WorldWideScience

Sample records for geothermal hydraulics nuclear

  1. Hydraulic fracturing in granite under geothermal conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solberg, P.; Lockner, D.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental hydraulic fracturing of granite under geothermal conditions produces tensile fracture at rapid fluid injection rates and shear fracture at slow injection rates and elevated differential stress levels. A sudden burst of acoustic emission activity accompanies tensile fracture formation whereas the acoustic emission rate increases exponentially prior to shear fracture. Temperature does not significantly affect the failure mechanism, and the experimental results have not demonstrated the occurrence of thermal fracturing. A critical result of these experiments is that fluid injection at intermediate rates and elevated differential stress levels increases permeability by more than an order of magnitude without producing macroscopic fractures, and low-level acoustic emission activity occurs simultaneously near the borehole and propagates outward into the specimen with time. Permeability measurements conducted at atmospheric pressure both before and after these experiments show that increased permeability is produced by permanent structural changes in the rock. Although results of this study have not demonstrated the occurrence of thermal fracturing, they suggest that fluid injection at certain rates in situ may markedly increase local permeability. This could prove critical to increasing the efficiency of heat exchange for geothermal energy extraction from hot dry rock. ?? 1980.

  2. Extended geothermal potential of clastic aquifers by hydraulic stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldkamp, J.G.; Pluymaekers, M.P.D.; Wees, J.D.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the implications of hydraulic stimulation in a Dutch context for low permeability clastic aquifers at a depth of 2000 to 4000 m, whose transmissivity has been mapped in the framework of the Dutch subsurface information system on geothermal energy in the Netherlands. For the simulation

  3. Hydraulic Shearing and Hydraulic Jacking Observed during Hydraulic Stimulations in Fractured Geothermal Reservoir in Pohang, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, K. B.; Park, S.; Xie, L.; Kim, K. I.; Yoo, H.; Kim, K. Y.; Choi, J.; Yoon, K. S.; Yoon, W. S.; Lee, T. J.; Song, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) relies on sufficient and irreversible enhancement of reservoir permeability through hydraulic stimulation and possibility of such desirable change of permeability is an open question that can undermine the universality of EGS concept. We report results of first hydraulic stimulation campaign conducted in two deep boreholes in fractured granodiorite geothermal reservoir in Pohang, Korea. Borehole PX-1, located at 4.22 km, was subjected to the injection of 3,907 m3 with flow rate of up to 18 kg/s followed by bleeding off of 1,207 m3. The borehole PX-2, located at 4.35 km, was subjected to the injection of 1,970 m3 with flow rate of up to 46 kg/sIn PX-1, a sharp distinct decline of wellhead pressure was observed at around 16 MPa of wellhead pressure which was similar to the predicted injection pressure to induce hydraulic shearing. Injectivity interpretation before and after the hydraulic shearing indicates that permanent increase of permeability was achieved by a factor of a few. In PX-2, however, injectivity was very small and hydraulic shearing was not observed due possibly to the near wellbore damage made by the remedying process of lost circulation such as using lost circulation material during drilling. Flow rate of larger than 40 kg/s was achieved at very high well head pressure of nearly 90 MPa. Hydraulic jacking, that is reversible opening and closure of fracture with change of injection pressure, was clearly observed. Although sharp increase of permeability due to fracture opening was achieved with elevated injection pressure, the increased permeability was reversed with decreased injection pressure.Two contrasting response observed in the same reservoir at two different boreholes which is apart only 600 m apart provide important implication that can be used for the stimulation strategy for EGS.This work was supported by the New and Renewable Energy Technology Development Program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology

  4. A Thermoelastic Hydraulic Fracture Design Tool for Geothermal Reservoir Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad Ghassemi

    2003-06-30

    Geothermal energy is recovered by circulating water through heat exchange areas within a hot rock mass. Geothermal reservoir rock masses generally consist of igneous and metamorphic rocks that have low matrix permeability. Therefore, cracks and fractures play a significant role in extraction of geothermal energy by providing the major pathways for fluid flow and heat exchange. Thus, knowledge of conditions leading to formation of fractures and fracture networks is of paramount importance. Furthermore, in the absence of natural fractures or adequate connectivity, artificial fracture are created in the reservoir using hydraulic fracturing. At times, the practice aims to create a number of parallel fractures connecting a pair of wells. Multiple fractures are preferred because of the large size necessary when using only a single fracture. Although the basic idea is rather simple, hydraulic fracturing is a complex process involving interactions of high pressure fluid injections with a stressed hot rock mass, mechanical interaction of induced fractures with existing natural fractures, and the spatial and temporal variations of in-situ stress. As a result it is necessary to develop tools that can be used to study these interactions as an integral part of a comprehensive approach to geothermal reservoir development, particularly enhanced geothermal systems. In response to this need we have set out to develop advanced thermo-mechanical models for design of artificial fractures and rock fracture research in geothermal reservoirs. These models consider the significant hydraulic and thermo-mechanical processes and their interaction with the in-situ stress state. Wellbore failure and fracture initiation is studied using a model that fully couples poro-mechanical and thermo-mechanical effects. The fracture propagation model is based on a complex variable and regular displacement discontinuity formulations. In the complex variable approach the displacement discontinuities are

  5. A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE OF NUCLEAR THERMAL HYDRAULICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D’Auria, F; Rohatgi, Upendra S.

    2017-01-12

    The nuclear thermal-hydraulics discipline was developed following the needs for nuclear power plants (NPPs) and, to a more limited extent, research reactors (RR) design and safety. As in all other fields where analytical methods are involved, nuclear thermal-hydraulics took benefit of the development of computers. Thermodynamics, rather than fluid dynamics, is at the basis of the development of nuclear thermal-hydraulics together with the experiments in complex two-phase situations, namely, geometry, high thermal density, and pressure.

  6. Modeling thermal stress propagation during hydraulic stimulation of geothermal wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Gunnar; Miller, Stephen A.

    2017-04-01

    A large fraction of the world's water and energy resources are located in naturally fractured reservoirs within the earth's crust. Depending on the lithology and tectonic history of a formation, fracture networks can range from dense and homogeneous highly fractured networks to single large scale fractures dominating the flow behavior. Understanding the dynamics of such reservoirs in terms of flow and transport is crucial to successful application of engineered geothermal systems (also known as enhanced geothermal systems or EGS) for geothermal energy production in the future. Fractured reservoirs are considered to consist of two distinct separate media, namely the fracture and matrix space respectively. Fractures are generally thin, highly conductive containing only small amounts of fluid, whereas the matrix rock provides high fluid storage but typically has much smaller permeability. Simulation of flow and transport through fractured porous media is challenging due to the high permeability contrast between the fractures and the surrounding rock matrix. However, accurate and efficient simulation of flow through a fracture network is crucial in order to understand, optimize and engineer reservoirs. It has been a research topic for several decades and is still under active research. Accurate fluid flow simulations through field-scale fractured reservoirs are still limited by the power of current computer processing units (CPU). We present an efficient implementation of the embedded discrete fracture model, which is a promising new technique in modeling the behavior of enhanced geothermal systems. An efficient coupling strategy is determined for numerical performance of the model. We provide new insight into the coupled modeling of fluid flow, heat transport of engineered geothermal reservoirs with focus on the thermal stress changes during the stimulation process. We further investigate the interplay of thermal and poro-elastic stress changes in the reservoir

  7. Thermal hydraulics in undergraduate nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theofanous, T.G.

    1986-01-01

    The intense safety-related research efforts of the seventies in reactor thermal hydraulics have brought about the recognition of the subject as one of the cornerstones of nuclear engineering. Many nuclear engineering departments responded by building up research programs in this area, and mostly as a consequence, educational programs, too. Whether thermal hydraulics has fully permeated the conscience of nuclear engineering, however, remains yet to be seen. The lean years that lie immediately ahead will provide the test. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the author's own educational activity in undergraduate nuclear engineering education over the past 10 yr or so. All this activity took place at Purdue's School of Nuclear Engineering. He was well satisfied with the results and expects to implement something similar at the University of California in Santa Barbara in the near future

  8. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Zohuri, Bahman

    2015-01-01

    This text covers the fundamentals of thermodynamics required to understand electrical power generation systems and the application of these principles to nuclear reactor power plant systems. It is not a traditional general thermodynamics text, per se, but a practical thermodynamics volume intended to explain the fundamentals and apply them to the challenges facing actual nuclear power plants systems, where thermal hydraulics comes to play.  Written in a lucid, straight-forward style while retaining scientific rigor, the content is accessible to upper division undergraduate students and aimed at practicing engineers in nuclear power facilities and engineering scientists and technicians in industry, academic research groups, and national laboratories. The book is also a valuable resource for students and faculty in various engineering programs concerned with nuclear reactors. This book also: Provides extensive coverage of thermal hydraulics with thermodynamics in nuclear reactors, beginning with fundamental ...

  9. Interwell tracer analyses of a hydraulically fractured granitic geothermal reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tester, J.W.; Potter, R.M.; Bivins, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Field experiments using fluorescent dye and radioactive tracers (Br 82 and I 131 ) have been employed to characterize a hot, low-matrix permeability, hydraulically-fractured granitic reservoir at depths of 2440 to 2960 m (8000 to 9700 ft). Tracer profiles and residence time distributions have been used to delineate changes in the fracture system, particularly in diagnosing pathological flow patterns and in identifying new injection and production zones. The effectiveness of one- and two-dimensional theoretical dispersion models utilizing single and multiple porous, fractured zones with velocity and formation dependent effects are discussed with respect to actual field data

  10. Nuclear-enhanced geothermal heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, W.H. II

    1995-01-01

    This report proposes the testing of an abandoned drill well for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel rods. The well need not be in a geothermal field, since the downhole assembly takes advantage of only the natural thermal gradient. The water in the immediate vicinity of the fuel will be chemically treated for corrosion resistance. Above this will be a long column of viscous fluid insoluble in water, to act as a fluid barrier. The remainder of the well bore, up to the surface, will be the working fluid for the power turbine at the surface. There will be a low-pressure region in the immediate vicinity of the fuel, encouraging the flashing of steam. Due to the low level of heat emitted by the fuel rods, the radioactive material will be surrounded by a secondary casing that will reduce the water it contacts directly, thus causing it to heat up quickly and to maximize the steam-generating process, and the formation of air nuclides. These will percolate upward through the viscous column where steadily decreasing pressure causes expansion. The nuclear fuel's thermal energy will have been transferred through the high radioactive zone as pressure, then it will flash to steam and heat the water in the top of the wellbore. The drill well, a minimum of 10,000 ft. in depth, will naturally heat any circulating fluid. The fuel is not used as a thermal source, but only to produce a few spontaneous bubbles, sufficient to increase the fluid pressure by expansion as it rises in the wellbore. The additional thermal energy from the nuclear source will superheat the water for use in the power-generation apparatus at the surface. This equipment, operating on very-low radioactive fluid, will be protected by a secondary containment. The typical drill well is ideally suited for the insertion of spent fuel rods, which are smaller than downhole tools and instrumentation regularly installed in production wells

  11. Creation of an Enhanced Geothermal System through Hydraulic and Thermal Stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Peter Eugene [Energy and Geoscience Institute at the University of Utah

    2013-04-15

    This report describes a 10-year DOE-funded project to design, characterize and create an Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) through a combination of hydraulic, thermal and chemical stimulation techniques. Volume 1 describes a four-year Phase 1 campaign, which focused on the east compartment of the Coso geothermal field. It includes a description of the geomechanical, geophysical, hydraulic, and geochemical studies that were conducted to characterize the reservoir in anticipation of the hydraulic stimulation experiment. Phase 1 ended prematurely when the drill bit intersected a very permeable fault zone during the redrilling of target stimulation well 34-9RD2. A hydraulic stimulation was inadvertently achieved, however, since the flow of drill mud from the well into the formation created an earthquake swarm near the wellbore that was recorded, located, analyzed and interpreted by project seismologists. Upon completion of Phase 1, the project shifted focus to a new target well, which was located within the southwest compartment of the Coso geothermal field. Volume 2 describes the Phase 2 studies on the geomechanical, geophysical, hydraulic, and geochemical aspects of the reservoir in and around target-stimulation well 46A-19RD, which is the deepest and hottest well ever drilled at Coso. Its total measured depth exceeding 12,000 ft. It spite of its great depth, this well is largely impermeable below a depth of about 9,000 ft, thus providing an excellent target for stimulation. In order to prepare 46A-19RD for stimulation, however, it was necessary to pull the slotted liner. This proved to be unachievable under the budget allocated by the Coso Operating Company partners, and this aspect of the project was abandoned, ending the program at Coso. The program then shifted to the EGS project at Desert Peak, which had a goal similar to the one at Coso of creating an EGS on the periphery of an existing geothermal reservoir. Volume 3 describes the activities that the Coso team

  12. Fully Coupled Geomechanics and Discrete Flow Network Modeling of Hydraulic Fracturing for Geothermal Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, P; Johnson, S M; Hao, Y; Carrigan, C R

    2011-01-18

    The primary objective of our current research is to develop a computational test bed for evaluating borehole techniques to enhance fluid flow and heat transfer in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). Simulating processes resulting in hydraulic fracturing and/or the remobilization of existing fractures, especially the interaction between propagating fractures and existing fractures, represents a critical goal of our project. To this end, we are continuing to develop a hydraulic fracturing simulation capability within the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC), a combined FEM/DEM analysis code with explicit solid-fluid mechanics coupling. LDEC simulations start from an initial fracture distribution which can be stochastically generated or upscaled from the statistics of an actual fracture distribution. During the hydraulic stimulation process, LDEC tracks the propagation of fractures and other modifications to the fracture system. The output is transferred to the Non-isothermal Unsaturated Flow and Transport (NUFT) code to capture heat transfer and flow at the reservoir scale. This approach is intended to offer flexibility in the types of analyses we can perform, including evaluating the effects of different system heterogeneities on the heat extraction rate as well as seismicity associated with geothermal operations. This paper details the basic methodology of our approach. Two numerical examples showing the capability and effectiveness of our simulator are also presented.

  13. Geothermal heat from solid rock - increased energy extraction through hydraulic pressurizing of drill wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramstad, Randi Kalskin; Hilmo, Bernt Olav; Skarphagen, Helge

    2005-01-01

    New equipment for hydraulic pressurizing, a double collar of the type FrakPak - AIP 410-550, is developed by the Broennteknologi AS. The equipment is tested in the laboratory and in the field at Lade in Trondheim. By the construction of two pilot plants for geothermal heat at Bryn and on the previous grounds of the energy company in Asker and Baerum (EAB) extensive studies connected to hydraulic pressurizing are carried out both with water and sand injection. The geothermal heat plants at Bryn and AEB were supposed to be based on pumped ground water from rock wells where increased effect was obtained through pumping up, returning and circulating the water. The aim of the study was to test and develop the methods for hydraulic pressurizing both with water and sand injection, document the effect of the various types of pressurizing as well as mapping the hydro- and rock geological conditions for this type of geothermal heat plants. In addition to stimulating 10 drill holes with hydraulic pressurizing with water and sand injection, the studies have carried out test pumping, water sampling, geophysical logging, measurements of alterations in the terrain, current and rock strain measurements and geothermal response tests. Furthermore an efficacy test and a theoretical model of the energy potential of the plants are carried out. The results from the pilot plant at Bryn show that the drill hole capacities are significantly increased both through hydraulic pressurizing with water and sand injection. There seems to be a greater need for sand as ''prepping agent'' or distance maker in cracks with high pressure resistance than in cracks with lower resistance. The grain size of the sand should be adapted to the resistance pressure and injection of coarser sand is recommended in cracks with lower resistance pressure. The rock strength and strain conditions determine the successes of hydraulic pressurizing at the reopening of existing or opening of new faults. Test pumping was

  14. Proceedings of the third nuclear thermal hydraulics meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the Thermal Hydraulics Division of the American Nuclear Society. The papers presented include: Simulator qualification using engineering codes and Development of thermal hydraulic analysis capabilities for Oyster Creek

  15. Multiphase Flow Dynamics 5 Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics

    CERN Document Server

    Kolev, Nikolay Ivanov

    2012-01-01

    The present Volume 5 of the successful book package "Multiphase Flow Dynamics" is devoted to nuclear thermal hydraulics which is a substantial part of nuclear reactor safety. It provides knowledge and mathematical tools for adequate description of the process of transferring the fission heat released in materials due to nuclear reactions into its environment. It step by step introduces into the heat release inside the fuel, temperature fields in the fuels, the "simple" boiling flow in a pipe described using ideas of different complexity like equilibrium, non equilibrium, homogeneity, non homogeneity. Then the "simple" three-fluid boiling flow in a pipe is described by gradually involving the mechanisms like entrainment and deposition, dynamic fragmentation, collisions, coalescence, turbulence. All heat transfer mechanisms are introduced gradually discussing their uncertainty. Different techniques are introduced like boundary layer treatments or integral methods. Comparisons with experimental data at each step...

  16. Multiphase flow dynamics 5 nuclear thermal hydraulics

    CERN Document Server

    Kolev, Nikolay Ivanov

    2015-01-01

    This Volume 5 of the successful book package "Multiphase Flow Dynamics" is devoted to nuclear thermal hydraulics which is a substantial part of nuclear reactor safety. It provides knowledge and mathematical tools for adequate description of the process of transferring the fission heat released in materials due to nuclear reactions into its environment. It step by step introduces into the heat release inside the fuel, temperature fields in the fuels, the "simple" boiling flow in a pipe described using ideas of different complexity like equilibrium, non equilibrium, homogeneity, non homogeneity. Then the "simple" three-fluid boiling flow in a pipe is described by gradually involving the mechanisms like entrainment and deposition, dynamic fragmentation, collisions, coalescence, turbulence. All heat transfer mechanisms are introduced gradually discussing their uncertainty. Different techniques are introduced like boundary layer treatments or integral methods. Comparisons with experimental data at each step demons...

  17. Applied mathematical methods in nuclear thermal hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ransom, V.H.; Trapp, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Applied mathematical methods are used extensively in modeling of nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulic behavior. This application has required significant extension to the state-of-the-art. The problems encountered in modeling of two-phase fluid transients and the development of associated numerical solution methods are reviewed and quantified using results from a numerical study of an analogous linear system of differential equations. In particular, some possible approaches for formulating a well-posed numerical problem for an ill-posed differential model are investigated and discussed. The need for closer attention to numerical fidelity is indicated

  18. Stimuli Responsive/Rheoreversible Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids for Enhanced Geothermal Energy Production (Part I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, C. A.; Jung, H. B.; Shao, H.; Bonneville, A.; Heldebrant, D.; Hoyt, D.; Zhong, L.; Holladay, J.

    2014-12-01

    Cost-effective yet safe creation of high-permeability reservoirs inside deep crystalline bedrock is the primary challenge for the viability of enhanced geothermal systems and unconventional oil/gas recovery. Current reservoir stimulation processes utilize brute force (hydraulic pressures in the order of hundreds of bar) to create/propagate fractures in the bedrock. Such stimulation processes entail substantial economic costs ($3.3 million per reservoir as of 2011). Furthermore, the environmental impacts of reservoir stimulation are only recently being determined. Widespread concerns about the environmental contamination have resulted in a number of regulations for fracturing fluids advocating for greener fracturing processes. To reduce the costs and environmental impact of reservoir stimulation, we developed an environmentally friendly and recyclable hydraulic fracturing fluid that undergoes a controlled and large volume expansion with a simultaneous increase in viscosity triggered by CO2 at temperatures relevant for reservoir stimulation in Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). The volume expansion, which will specifically occurs at EGS depths of interest, generates an exceptionally large mechanical stress in fracture networks of highly impermeable rock propagating fractures at effective stress an order of magnitude lower than current technology. This paper will concentrate on the presentation of this CO2-triggered expanding hydrogel formed from diluted aqueous solutions of polyallylamine (PAA). Aqueous PAA-CO2 mixtures also show significantly higher viscosities than conventional rheology modifiers at similar pressures and temperatures due to the cross-linking reaction of PAA with CO2, which was demonstrated by chemical speciation studies using in situ HP-HT 13C MAS-NMR. In addtion, PAA shows shear-thinning behavior, a critical advantage for the use of this fluid system in EGS reservoir stimulation. The high pressure/temperature experiments and their results as well

  19. Stream hydraulics and temperature determine the metabolism of geothermal Icelandic streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demars B. O.L.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Stream ecosystem metabolism plays a critical role in planetary biogeochemical cycling. Stream benthic habitat complexity and the available surface area for microbes relative to the free-flowing water volume are thought to be important determinants of ecosystem metabolism. Unfortunately, the engineered deepening and straightening of streams for drainage purposes could compromise stream natural services. Stream channel complexity may be quantitatively expressed with hydraulic parameters such as water transient storage, storage residence time, and water spiralling length. The temperature dependence of whole stream ecosystem respiration (ER, gross primary productivity (GPP and net ecosystem production (NEP = GPP − ER has recently been evaluated with a “natural experiment” in Icelandic geothermal streams along a 5–25 °C temperature gradient. There remained, however, a substantial amount of unexplained variability in the statistical models, which may be explained by hydraulic parameters found to be unrelated to temperature. We also specifically tested the additional and predicted synergistic effects of water transient storage and temperature on ER, using novel, more accurate, methods. Both ER and GPP were highly related to water transient storage (or water spiralling length but not to the storage residence time. While there was an additional effect of water transient storage and temperature on ER (r2 = 0.57; P = 0.015, GPP was more related to water transient storage than temperature. The predicted synergistic effect could not be confirmed, most likely due to data limitation. Our interpretation, based on causal statistical modelling, is that the metabolic balance of streams (NEP was primarily determined by the temperature dependence of respiration. Further field and experimental work is required to test the predicted synergistic effect on ER. Meanwhile, since higher metabolic activities allow for higher pollutant degradation or uptake

  20. Hydraulic modelling of the geothermal wells at Kreuzlingen and Konstanz; Hydraulische Modellierung der Geothermiebohrungen Kreuzlingen und Konstanz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megel, T [Inst. fuer Geophysik, Gruppe fuer Geothermik und Radiometrie, ETH Hoenggerberg, Zuerich (Switzerland); Wyss, R [Ingenieurgelogie, ETH Hoenggerberg, Zuerich (Switzerland); Greber, E; Leu, W [Geoform, Geologische Beratungen und Studien AG, Winterthur (Switzerland)

    1997-12-01

    Aussuming an aquifer of minimum 30 km extension, modelling and interpretation of the hydraulic situation at the geothermal wells Konstanz and Kreuzlingen have shown, that there is neither a significant hydraulic nor a thermal interrelation between the two wells (assumed production rate: Konstanz 6.6 l/s, Kreuzlingen 3 l/s). Every hydraulic behaviour of supposed fracture zones between the two wells reduces the interrelated influence. (orig.) [Deutsch] Modellierungen und Interpretationen haben gezeigt, dass unter der Annahme eines mindestens 30 km ausgedehnten Aquifers die Geothermiebohrungen Konstanz und Kreuzlingen auch laengerfristig (30 Jahre) sich gegenseitig weder hydraulisch noch thermisch nennenswert beeinflussen (Konstanz 6.6 l/s, Kreuzlingen 3 l/s). Die Existenz von hydraulisch signifikanten Bruchzonen zwischen den beiden Bohrungen wuerde die gegenseitige Beeinflussung vermindern. (orig.)

  1. Numerical simulations of heat transfer considering hydraulic discontinuity for an enhanced geothermal system development in Seokmo Island, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, J.; Kim, K.; Hyun, Y.; Lee, K.; Lee, T.

    2011-12-01

    The construction of the first geothermal plant in Korea is under planning in Seokmo Island, where a few artesian wells showing relatively high water temperature of around 70 degrees were discovered lately. Geologic structure in this region is characterized by the fractured granite. Numerical simulations for the temperature evolution in a fractured geothermal reservoir in Seokmo Island under the supposed injection-extraction operating conditions were carried out using TOUGH2. A MINC model including a hydraulic discontinuity in Seokmo Island region, which reflected the analysis from several geophysical explorations and drilled rock core, was generated. Supposing the N05°E, NW83° fracture zone containing the pumping range, the numerical simulation results show that temperature of the extracted geothermal water decreases after 15 years of operation, which decreases the overall efficiency of the expected geothermal plant. This is because the colder water from the injection well, which is 400 m apart, begins to flow into the more permeable fracture zone from the 15th year, resulting in a decrease in temperature near the pumping well. Temperature distribution calculated from the simulation also shows a rise of relatively hot geothermal water along the fracture plane. All of the results are different from the non-fracture MINC model, which shows a low temperature contour in concentric circle shape around the injection well and relatively consistent extracting temperature. This demonstrates that the distribution and the structure of fracture system influence the major mass and heat flow mechanisms in geologic medium. Therefore, an intensive geologic investigation for the fractures including their structure, permeability and connecting relation is important. Acknowledgement This study was financially supported by KIGAM, KETEP and BK21.

  2. Nonlinear Control of Hydraulic Manipulator for Decommissioning Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myoung-Ho; Lee, Sung-Uk; Kim, Chang-Hoi; Choi, Byung-Seon; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Robot technique is need to decommission nuclear reactor because of high radiation environment. Especially, Manipulator systems are useful for dismantling complex structure in a nuclear facility. In addition, Hydraulic system is applied to handle heavy duty object. Since hydraulic system can demonstrate high power. The manipulator with hydraulic power is already developed. To solve this problem, various nonlinear control method includes acceleration control. But, it is difficult because acceleration value is highly noisy. In this paper, the nonlinear control algorithm without acceleration control is studied. To verify, the hydraulic manipulator model had been developed. Furthermore, the numerical simulation is carried out. The nonlinear control without acceleration parameter method is developed for hydraulic manipulator. To verify control algorithm, the manipulator is modeled by MBD and the hydraulic servo system is also derived. In addition, the numerical simulation is also carried out. Especially, PID gain is determined though TDC algorithm. In the result of numerical simulation, tracking performance is good without acceleration control. Thus, the PID though TDC with SMC is good for hydraulic manipulator control

  3. Nonlinear Control of Hydraulic Manipulator for Decommissioning Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myoung-Ho; Lee, Sung-Uk; Kim, Chang-Hoi; Choi, Byung-Seon; Moon, Jei-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Robot technique is need to decommission nuclear reactor because of high radiation environment. Especially, Manipulator systems are useful for dismantling complex structure in a nuclear facility. In addition, Hydraulic system is applied to handle heavy duty object. Since hydraulic system can demonstrate high power. The manipulator with hydraulic power is already developed. To solve this problem, various nonlinear control method includes acceleration control. But, it is difficult because acceleration value is highly noisy. In this paper, the nonlinear control algorithm without acceleration control is studied. To verify, the hydraulic manipulator model had been developed. Furthermore, the numerical simulation is carried out. The nonlinear control without acceleration parameter method is developed for hydraulic manipulator. To verify control algorithm, the manipulator is modeled by MBD and the hydraulic servo system is also derived. In addition, the numerical simulation is also carried out. Especially, PID gain is determined though TDC algorithm. In the result of numerical simulation, tracking performance is good without acceleration control. Thus, the PID though TDC with SMC is good for hydraulic manipulator control.

  4. Thermal hydraulic feasibility assessment of the spent nuclear fuel project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heard, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    A series of analyses have been completed investigating the thermal-hydraulic performance and feasibility of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) Integrated Process Strategy (IPS). The goal was to develop a series of thermal-hydraulic models that could respond to all process and safety related issues that may arise pertaining to the SNFP, as well as provide a basis for validation of the results. Results show that there is a reasonable envelope for process conditions and requirements that are thermally and hydraulically acceptable

  5. Application of thermal-hydraulic codes in the nuclear sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queral, C.; Coriso, M.; Garcia Sedano, P. J.; Ruiz, J. A.; Posada, J. M.; Jimenez Varas, G.; Sol, I.; Herranz, L. E.

    2011-01-01

    Use of thermal-hydraulic codes is extended all over many different aspects of nuclear engineering. This article groups and briefly describes the main features of some of the well known codes as an introduction to their recent applications in the Spain nuclear sector. the broad range and quality of applications highlight the maturity achieved both in industry and research organizations and universities within the Spanish nuclear sector. (Author)

  6. Thermal-hydraulics associated with nuclear education and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokobori, Seiichi

    2011-01-01

    This article was the rerecording of the author's lecture at the fourth 'Future Energy Forum' (aiming at improving nuclear safety and economics) held in December 2010. The lecture focused on (1) importance of thermal hydraulics associated with nuclear education and research (critical heat flux, two-phase flow and multiphase flow), (2) emerging trend of maintenance engineering (fluid induced vibration, flow accelerated corrosion and stress corrosion cracks), (3) fostering sensible nuclear engineer with common engineering sense, (4) balanced curriculum of basics and advanced research, (5) computerized simulation and fluid mechanics, (6) crucial point of thermo hydraulics education (viscosity, flux, steam and power generation), (7) safety education and human resources development (indispensable technologies such as defence in depth) and (8) topics of thermo hydraulics research (vortices of curbed pipes and visualization of two-phase flow). (T. Tanaka)

  7. Hydraulic fracturing to enhance geothermal energy recovery in deep and tight formations. Modell approach in petrothermy research project OPTIRISS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafiee, M.M.; Schmitz, S.; Barsch, M. [DBI - Gastechnologisches Institut gGmbH, Freiberg (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    In Germany numerous projects were successfully conducted in developments of geothermal energy which applied so far mostly for the hydrothermal deposit type. In Thuringia and Saxony there are currently project developments of geothermal resource taking into account for deep, tight formations in petrothermy and Enhanced geothermal system, (EGS). One of the potential tasks in generating these petrothermal producers and in the design of the underground power plant appears to be hydraulic fracturing with multi frac method. This is to create the heat exchanger surfaces in the rock and ensure maximum volumetric flow through it. Therefore it is very important for a sustainable heat production. However the promise of its adequate conductivity in the deep formation is one of the dominant contests in geothermal energy industry. In a multi frac method, two wells (normally horizontal wellbores at different depths) are drilled in direction of minimum horizontal stress of the formation rock. By multiple frac operation in separate sections, flow paths are generated between the wells through which it is possible to extract the heat from the rock. The numerical simulation of hydraulic fracture propagation processes in the rock is mainly from the research in the area of oil and gas industry. These techniques are mainly used for very low permeable formations in petroleum engineering (e.g. Shale gas). The development is at the beginning for EGS (e.g. granites). In this work single and multi fracking propagation processes in a synthetic example of deep hard formation are investigated. The numerical simulation is carried out to design and characterize frac processes and frac dimensions. Sensitivities to various rock parameters and different process designs are examined and optimum criteria are concluded. This shows that the minimum stress profile has the most effective role and should be modelled properly. The analysis indicates the optimum fracture length and height for adequate thermal

  8. Hydraulic shock damper for fuel assemblies of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabson, F.S.

    1978-01-01

    A typical embodiment of this invention provides a hydraulic mechanism for alleviating the effect of seismic forces and other stresses that are applied to a fuel assembly in a nuclear reactor. Illustratively, hollow guide posts potrude into a fuel assembly end fitting grid from biased spring pads. Plungers that move with the spring pads plug one end of each of the respective guide posts. Plates on the end fitting grid that have individual holes for fluid discharge partially plug the other ends of the respective guide posts, thereby providing a hydraulic means for absorbing the longitudinal component of seismic shocks and other anticipated forces. (Auth.)

  9. Nuclear power plant thermal-hydraulic performance research program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    The purpose of this program plan is to present a more detailed description of the thermal-hydraulic research program than that provided in the NRC Five-Year Plan so that the research plan and objectives can be better understood and evaluated by the offices concerned. The plan is prepared by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) with input from the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) and updated periodically. The plan covers the research sponsored by the Reactor and Plant Systems Branch and defines the major issues (related to thermal-hydraulic behavior in nuclear power plants) the NRC is seeking to resolve and provides plans for their resolution; relates the proposed research to these issues; defines the products needed to resolve these issues; provides a context that shows both the historical perspective and the relationship of individual projects to the overall objectives; and defines major interfaces with other disciplines (e.g., structural, risk, human factors, accident management, severe accident) needed for total resolution of some issues. This plan addresses the types of thermal-hydraulic transients that are normally considered in the regulatory process of licensing the current generation of light water reactors. This process is influenced by the regulatory requirements imposed by NRC and the consequent need for technical information that is supplied by RES through its contractors. Thus, most contractor programmatic work is administered by RES. Regulatory requirements involve the normal review of industry analyses of design basis accidents, as well as the understanding of abnormal occurrences in operating reactors. Since such transients often involve complex thermal-hydraulic interactions, a well-planned thermal-hydraulic research plan is needed

  10. Thermal hydraulic tests for reactor safety system -Research on the improvement of nuclear safety-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Moon Ki; Park, Chun Kyeong; Yang, Seon Kyu; Chung, Chang Hwan; Chun, Shee Yeong; Song, Cheol Hwa; Chun, Hyeong Gil; Chang, Seok Kyu; Chung, Heung Joon; Won, Soon Yeon; Cho, Yeong Ro; Kim, Bok Deuk; Min, Kyeong Ho

    1994-07-01

    The present research aims at the development of the thermal hydraulic verification test technology for the reactor safety system of the conventional and advanced nuclear power plant and the development of the advanced thermal hydraulic measuring techniques. (Author)

  11. Thermal hydraulic feasibility assessment for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heard, F.J.; Cramer, E.R.; Beaver, T.R.; Thurgood, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    A series of scoping analyses have been completed investigating the thermal-hydraulic performance and feasibility of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) Integrated Process Strategy (IPS). The SNFP was established to develop engineered solutions for the expedited removal, stabilization, and storage of spent nuclear fuel from the K Basins at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The subject efforts focused on independently investigating, quantifying, and establishing the governing heat production and removal mechanisms for each of the IPS operations and configurations, obtaining preliminary results for comparison with and verification of other analyses, and providing technology-based recommendations for consideration and incorporation into the design bases for the SNFP. The goal was to develop a series fo thermal-hydraulic models that could respond to all process and safety-related issues that may arise pertaining to the SNFP. A series of sensitivity analyses were also performed to help identify those parameters that have the greatest impact on energy transfer and hence, temperature control. It is anticipated that the subject thermal-hydraulic models will form the basis for a series of advanced and more detailed models that will more accurately reflect the thermal performance of the IPS and alleviate the necessity for some of the more conservative assumptions and oversimplifications, as well as form the basis for the final process and safety analyses

  12. Calculation of dynamic hydraulic forces in nuclear plant piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, D.K.

    1982-01-01

    A computer code was developed as one of the tools needed for analysis of piping dynamic loading on nuclear power plant high energy piping systems, including reactor safety and relief value upstream and discharge piping systems. The code calculates the transient hydraulic data and dynamic forces within the one-dimensional system, caused by a pipe rupture or sudden value motion, using a fixed space and varying time grid-method of characteristics. Subcooled, superheated, homogeneous two-phase and transition flow regimes are considered. A non-equilibrium effect is also considered in computing the fluid specific volume and fluid local sonic velocity in the two-phase mixture. Various hydraulic components such as a spring loaded or power operated value, enlarger, orifice, pressurized tank, multiple pipe junction (tee), etc. are considered as boundary conditions. Comparisons of calculated results with available experimental data shows a good agreement. (Author)

  13. Spent nuclear fuel storage pool thermal-hydraulic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    Storage methods and requirements for spent nuclear fuel at U.S. commercial light water reactors are reviewed in Section 1. Methods of increasing current at-reactor storage capabilities are also outlined. In Section 2 the development of analytical methods for the thermal-hydraulic analysis of spent fuel pools is chronicled, leading up to a discussion of the GFLOW code which is described in Section 3. In Section 4 the verification of GFLOW by comparisons of the code's predictions to experimental data taken inside the fuel storage pool at the Maine Yankee nuclear power plant is presented. The predictions of GFLOW using 72, 224, and 1584 node models of the storage pool are compared to each other and to the experimental data. An example of thermal licensing analysis for Maine Yankee using the GFLOW code is given in Section 5. The GFLOW licensing analysis is compared to previous licensing analysis performed by Yankee Atomic using the RELAP-4 computer code

  14. Advanced modelling and numerical strategies in nuclear thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staedtke, H.

    2001-01-01

    The first part of the lecture gives a brief review of the current status of nuclear thermal hydraulics as it forms the basis of established system codes like TRAC, RELAP5, CATHARE or ATHLET. Specific emphasis is given to the capabilities and limitations of the underlying physical modelling and numerical solution strategies with regard to the description of complex transient two-phase flow and heat transfer conditions as expected to occur in PWR reactors during off-normal and accident conditions. The second part of the lecture focuses on new challenges and future needs in nuclear thermal-hydraulics which might arise with regard to re-licensing of old plants using bestestimate methodologies or the design and safety analysis of Advanced Light Water Reactors relying largely on passive safety systems. In order to meet these new requirements various advanced modelling and numerical techniques will be discussed including extended wellposed (hyperbolic) two-fluid models, explicit modelling of interfacial area transport or higher order numerical schemes allowing a high resolution of local multi-dimensional flow processes.(author)

  15. Scaling in nuclear reactor system thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, F.; Galassi, G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Scaling is a reference 'key-word' in engineering and in physics. The relevance of scaling in the water cooled nuclear reactor technology constitutes the motivation for the present paper. The origin of the scaling-issue, i.e. the impossibility to get access to measured data in case of accident in nuclear reactors, is discussed at first. The so-called 'scaling-controversy' constitutes an outcome. Then, a critical survey (or 'scaling state-of-art';) is given of the attempts and of the approaches to provide a solution to the scaling-issue in the area of Nuclear Reactor System Thermal-Hydraulics (NRSTH): dimensionless design factors for Integral Test Facilities (ITF) are distinguished from scaling factors. The last part of the paper has a two-fold nature: (a) classifying the information about achievements in the area of thermal-hydraulics which are relevant to scaling: the concepts of 'scaling-pyramid' and the related 'scaling bridges' are introduced; (b) establishing a logical path across the scaling achievements (represented as a 'scaling puzzle'). In this context, the 'roadmap for scaling' is proposed: the objective is addressing the scaling issue when demonstrating the applicability of system codes in the licensing process of nuclear power plants. The code itself is referred hereafter as the 'key-to-scaling'. The database from the operation of properly scaled ITF and the availability of qualified system codes are identified as main achievements in NRSTH connected with scaling. The 'roadmap to scaling' constitutes a unified approach to scaling which aims at solving the 'scaling puzzle' created by researches performed during a half-a-century period.

  16. Scaling in nuclear reactor system thermal-hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Auria, F., E-mail: dauria@ing.unipi.i [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, University of Pisa, Via Diotisalvi 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Galassi, G.M. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, University of Pisa, Via Diotisalvi 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2010-10-15

    Scaling is a reference 'key-word' in engineering and in physics. The relevance of scaling in the water cooled nuclear reactor technology constitutes the motivation for the present paper. The origin of the scaling-issue, i.e. the impossibility to get access to measured data in case of accident in nuclear reactors, is discussed at first. The so-called 'scaling-controversy' constitutes an outcome. Then, a critical survey (or 'scaling state-of-art';) is given of the attempts and of the approaches to provide a solution to the scaling-issue in the area of Nuclear Reactor System Thermal-Hydraulics (NRSTH): dimensionless design factors for Integral Test Facilities (ITF) are distinguished from scaling factors. The last part of the paper has a two-fold nature: (a) classifying the information about achievements in the area of thermal-hydraulics which are relevant to scaling: the concepts of 'scaling-pyramid' and the related 'scaling bridges' are introduced; (b) establishing a logical path across the scaling achievements (represented as a 'scaling puzzle'). In this context, the 'roadmap for scaling' is proposed: the objective is addressing the scaling issue when demonstrating the applicability of system codes in the licensing process of nuclear power plants. The code itself is referred hereafter as the 'key-to-scaling'. The database from the operation of properly scaled ITF and the availability of qualified system codes are identified as main achievements in NRSTH connected with scaling. The 'roadmap to scaling' constitutes a unified approach to scaling which aims at solving the 'scaling puzzle' created by researches performed during a half-a-century period.

  17. Thermal-Hydraulic Experiments and Modelling for Advanced Nuclear Reactor Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, C. H.; Baek, W. P.; Chung, M. K.

    2007-06-01

    The objectives of the project are to study thermal hydraulic characteristics of advanced nuclear reactor system for evaluating key thermal-hydraulic phenomena relevant to new safety concepts. To meet the research goal, several thermal hydraulic experiments were performed and related thermal hydraulic models were developed with the experimental data which were produced through the thermal hydraulic experiments. The Followings are main research topics: - Multi-dimensional Phenomena in a Reactor Vessel Downcomer - Condensation-induced Thermal Mixing in a Pool - Development of Thermal-Hydraulic Models for Two-Phase Flow - Construction of T-H Data Base

  18. Cross-cutting european thermal-hydraulics research for innovative nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelofs, F.; Class, A.; Cheng, X.; Meloni, P.; Van Tichelen, K.; Boudier, P.; Prasser, M.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulics is recognized as a key scientific subject in the development of different innovative nuclear reactor systems. From the thermal-hydraulic point of view, different innovative reactors are mainly characterized by their coolants (gas, water, liquid metals and molten salt). This results in different micro- and macroscopic behavior of flow and heat transfer and requires specific models and advanced analysis tools. However, many common thermal-hydraulic issues are identified among various innovative nuclear systems. In Europe, such cross-cutting thermal-hydraulic issues are the subject of the 7. framework programme THINS (Thermal-Hydraulics of Innovative Nuclear Systems) project which runs from 2010 until 2014. This paper will describe the activities in this project which address the main identified thermal hydraulics issues for innovative nuclear systems. (authors)

  19. Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2002-01-01

    Numerical simulation of geothermal reservoirs is useful and necessary in understanding and evaluating reservoir structure and behavior, designing field development, and predicting performance. Models vary in complexity depending on processes considered, heterogeneity, data availability, and study objectives. They are evaluated using computer codes written and tested to study single and multiphase flow and transport under nonisothermal conditions. Many flow and heat transfer processes modeled in geothermal reservoirs are expected to occur in anthropogenic thermal (AT) systems created by geologic disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste. We examine and compare geothermal systems and the AT system expected at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and their modeling. Time frames and spatial scales are similar in both systems, but increased precision is necessary for modeling the AT system, because flow through specific repository locations will affect long-term ability radionuclide retention. Geothermal modeling experience has generated a methodology, used in the AT modeling for Yucca Mountain, yielding good predictive results if sufficient reliable data are available and an experienced modeler is involved. Codes used in geothermal and AT modeling have been tested extensively and successfully on a variety of analytical and laboratory problems

  20. Nuclear and geothermal energy as a direct heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    After some remarks on economic aspects, the swimming pool reactor simplified for the purpose of heat generation is described, the core of which supplies heat of 100-120 0 C for district heating. In this context, ways of storing waste heat are discussed. The alternative is pointed out that energy may be transferred by means of hydrogen. In conclusion, it is demonstrated on a French plant how geothermal water can be used directly via heat exchangers for district heating. (UA/LN) [de

  1. Thermal hydraulic analysis of the encapsulated nuclear heat source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Wade, D.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    2001-07-01

    An analysis has been carried out of the steady state thermal hydraulic performance of the Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) 125 MWt, heavy liquid metal coolant (HLMC) reactor concept at nominal operating power and shutdown decay heat levels. The analysis includes the development and application of correlation-type analytical solutions based upon first principles modeling of the ENHS concept that encompass both pure as well as gas injection augmented natural circulation conditions, and primary-to-intermediate coolant heat transfer. The results indicate that natural circulation of the primary coolant is effective in removing heat from the core and transferring it to the intermediate coolant without the attainment of excessive coolant temperatures. (authors)

  2. FONESYS: The FOrum and NEtwork of SYStem Thermal-Hydraulic Codes in Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, S.H., E-mail: k175ash@kins.re.kr [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) (Korea, Republic of); Aksan, N., E-mail: nusr.aksan@gmail.com [University of Pisa San Piero a Grado Nuclear Research Group (GRNSPG) (Italy); Austregesilo, H., E-mail: henrique.austregesilo@grs.de [Gesellschaft für Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) (Germany); Bestion, D., E-mail: dominique.bestion@cea.fr [Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives (CEA) (France); Chung, B.D., E-mail: bdchung@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) (Korea, Republic of); D’Auria, F., E-mail: f.dauria@ing.unipi.it [University of Pisa San Piero a Grado Nuclear Research Group (GRNSPG) (Italy); Emonot, P., E-mail: philippe.emonot@cea.fr [Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives (CEA) (France); Gandrille, J.L., E-mail: jeanluc.gandrille@areva.com [AREVA NP (France); Hanninen, M., E-mail: markku.hanninen@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) (Finland); Horvatović, I., E-mail: i.horvatovic@ing.unipi.it [University of Pisa San Piero a Grado Nuclear Research Group (GRNSPG) (Italy); Kim, K.D., E-mail: kdkim@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) (Korea, Republic of); Kovtonyuk, A., E-mail: a.kovtonyuk@ing.unipi.it [University of Pisa San Piero a Grado Nuclear Research Group (GRNSPG) (Italy); Petruzzi, A., E-mail: a.petruzzi@ing.unipi.it [University of Pisa San Piero a Grado Nuclear Research Group (GRNSPG) (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • We briefly presented the project called Forum and Network of System Thermal-Hydraulics Codes in Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics (FONESYS). • We presented FONESYS participants and their codes. • We explained FONESYS projects motivation, its main targets and working modalities. • We presented FONESYS position about projects topics and subtopics. - Abstract: The purpose of this article is to present briefly the project called Forum and Network of System Thermal-Hydraulics Codes in Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics (FONESYS), its participants, the motivation for the project, its main targets and working modalities. System Thermal-Hydraulics (SYS-TH) codes, also as part of the Best Estimate Plus Uncertainty (BEPU) approaches, are expected to achieve a more-and-more relevant role in nuclear reactor technology, safety and design. Namely, the number of code-users can easily be predicted to increase in the countries where nuclear technology is exploited. Thus, the idea of establishing a forum and a network among the code developers and with possible extension to code users has started to have major importance and value. In this framework the FONESYS initiative has been created. The main targets of FONESYS are: • To promote the use of SYS-TH Codes and the application of the BEPU approaches. • To establish acceptable and recognized procedures and thresholds for Verification and Validation (V and V). • To create a common ground for discussing envisaged improvements in various areas, including user-interface, and the connection with other numerical tools, including Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Codes.

  3. Hydraulic Design Criteria for Spacer Grids of Nuclear Fuel Element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juanico, Luis; Brasnarof, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    In this paper a hydraulic model for calculating the pressure drop on the CARA spacer grids is extended.This model is validated and feedback from experimental hydraulic test performed in a low pressure loop.The importance of the spacer grid geometric parameter (that is, its thickness and length, the number and kind of their fix spacer), developing hydraulic design criteria for spacer grid on fuel element

  4. Nuclear reactor thermal hydraulics safety analysis and thoughts on FUKUSHIMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninokata, Hisashi

    2012-01-01

    The first part of this article is to show my thoughts on the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. It is cited from a summary of my lecture talk in Indonesia, in the beginning of the last December, 2011. This talk was based on my previous lecture and seminar talks including those delivered at MIT, June 16, at the ANS Annual Meeting in Hollywood, Florida, June 28 at NURETH-13 in Toronto, September 27, and others. The content is based on the open and latest information available to date in Japan. It may contain some erroneous or uncertain information. I tried to minimize it to my best capability. Also I tried to eliminate any critical issues or opinions that may jeopardize some people who were involved in. The latter half of this article will be excerpts of my recent R and D activities related to the safety-by-design for sodium cooled fast reactors and light water reactors, thermal hydraulics analysis focusing on the simulation-based technology, in particular subchannel analysis and computational fluid dynamics. (J.P.N.)

  5. Geothermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappelmeyer, O.

    1991-01-01

    Geothermal energy is the natural heat of the earth. It represents an inexhaustible source of energy. In many countries, which are mostly located within the geothermal belts of the world, geothermal energy is being used since many decades for electricity generation and direct heating applications comprising municipal, industrial and agricultural heating. Outside the geothermal anomalous volcanic regions, hot ground water from deep rock formations at temperatures above 70 o C is used for process heat and space heating. Low prices for gas and oil hinder the development of geothermal plants in areas outside positive geothermal anomalies; the cost of drilling to reach depths, where temperatures are above 50 o C to 70 o C, is high. The necessary total investment per MW th installed capacity is in the order of 5 Mio- DM/MW th (3 Mio $/MW th ). Experience shows, that an economic break even with oil is reached at an oil price of 30$ per barrel or if an adequate bonus for the clean, environmentally compatible production of geothermal heat is granted. Worldwide the installed electric capacity of geothermal power plants is approximately 6 000 MW e . About 15 000 MW th of thermal capacity is being extracted for process heat and space heat. The importance of the terrestrial heat as an energy resource would be substantially increased, if the heat, stored in the hot crystalline basement could be extracted at economical production costs. Geothermal energy is a competitive energy source in areas with high geothermal gradients (relative low cost for drilling) and would be competitive in areas with normal geothermal gradients, if a fair compensation for environmental implications from fossil and nuclear power production would be granted. (author) 2 figs., 1 tab., 6 refs

  6. Japanese geothermics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laplaige, P.

    1995-01-01

    At the end of the seventies, the NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organisation) and the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry have started two independent projects of deep geothermics research in Honshu island (Japan). The two sites are 50 km apart of each other and the boreholes have been drilled up to 2300 and 1100 m of depth, respectively, in hot-dry moderately fractured volcanic rocks. These sites are characterized by high geothermal gradients with a rock temperature reaching 250 C at the bottom of the wells. Hydraulic circulation tests are still in progress to evaluate the profitability of these sites. (J.S.). 1 fig., 1 photo

  7. Hydraulic simulation of the systems of a nuclear power plant for charges calculation in piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masriera, N.

    1990-01-01

    This work presents a general description of the methodology used by the ENACE S.A. Fluids Working Group for hydraulics simulation of a nuclear power plant system for the calculation charges in piping. (Author) [es

  8. Research on the improvement of nuclear safety -Thermal hydraulic tests for reactor safety system-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Moon Kee; Park, Choon Kyung; Yang, Sun Kyoo; Chun, Se Yung; Song, Chul Hwa; Jun, Hyung Kil; Jung, Heung Joon; Won, Soon Yun; Cho, Yung Roh; Min, Kyung Hoh; Jung, Jang Hwan; Jang, Suk Kyoo; Kim, Bok Deuk; Kim, Wooi Kyung; Huh, Jin; Kim, Sook Kwan; Moon, Sang Kee; Lee, Sang Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-01

    The present research aims at the development of the thermal hydraulic verification test technology for the safety system of the conventional and advanced nuclear power plant and the development of the advanced thermal hydraulic measuring techniques. In this research, test facilities simulating the primary coolant system and safety system are being constructed for the design verification tests of the existing and advanced nuclear power plant. 97 figs, 14 tabs, 65 refs. (Author).

  9. A case history of the Marysville geothermal anomaly from a nuclear waste disposal perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tammemagi, H.Y.; Grisak, G.E.; Parrish, D.K.

    1983-03-01

    A case history of a mild geothermal area near Marysville, Montana has been compiled in order to learn about the effects that long-term heat generated by an irradiated fuel repository might have on the surrounding rock mass. The results of geological and geophysical surveys are summarized and the hydrogeological conditions in the granite mass, as measured in a 2 km deep borehole, are described. A model is proposed which accounts for the hydrothermal circulation and explains some of the geophysical observations. The implications to deep burial of nuclear wastes are discussed

  10. NEPTUNE: A new software platform for advanced nuclear thermal hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guelfi, A.; Boucker, M.; Herard, J.M.; Peturaud, P.; Bestion, D.; Boudier, P.; Hervieu, E.; Fillion, P.; Grandotto, M.

    2007-01-01

    The NEPTUNE project constitutes the thermal-hydraulic part of the long-term Electricite de France and Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique joint research and development program for the next generation of nuclear reactor simulation tools. This program is also financially supported by the Institut de Radioprotection et Surete Nucleaire and AREVA NP. The project aims at developing a new software platform for advanced two-phase flow thermal hydraulics covering the whole range of modeling scales and allowing easy multi-scale and multidisciplinary calculations. NEPTUNE is a fully integrated project that covers the following fields: software development, research in physical modeling and numerical methods, development of advanced instrumentation techniques, and performance of new experimental programs. The analysis of the industrial needs points out that three main simulation scales are involved. The system scale is dedicated to the overall description of the reactor. The component or subchannel scale allows three-dimensional computations of the main components of the reactors: cores, steam generators, condensers, and heat exchangers. The current generation of system and component codes has reached a very high level of maturity for industrial applications. The third scale, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in open medium, allows one to go beyond the limits of the component scale for a finer description of the flows. This scale opens promising perspectives for industrial simulations, and the development and validation of the NEPTUNE CFD module have been a priority since the beginning of the project. It is based on advanced physical models (two-fluid or multi field model combined with interfacial area transport and two-phase turbulence) and modern numerical methods (fully unstructured finite volume solvers). For the system and component scales, prototype developments have also started, including new physical models and numerical methods. In addition to scale

  11. Icelandic basaltic geothermal field: A natural analog for nuclear waste isolation in basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulmer, G.C.; Grandstaff, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    Analog studies of Icelandic geothermal fields have shown that the design of nuclear waste repositories in basalt can benefit by comparison to the data base already available from the development of these geothermal fields. A high degree of similarity exists between these two systems: their petrology, groundwater geochemistry, mineral solubilities, hydrologic parameters, temperature ranges, water-rock redox equilibria, hydrothermal pH values, and secondary mineralogies all show considerable overlap in the range of values. The experimentally-simulated hydrothermal studies of the basaltic nuclear waste repository rocks have, at this time, produced a data base that receives a strong confirmation from the Icelandic analog. Furthermore, the Icelandic analog should eventually be employed to extrapolate into higher and lower temperatures, into longer time-base chemical comparisons, and into more realistic mineral deposition studies, than have been possible in the laboratory evaluations of the nuclear waste repository designs. This eventual use of the Icelandic analog will require cooperative work with the Icelandic Geological Survey. 46 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Proceedings of the fourth international topical meeting on nuclear thermal hydraulics, operations and safety. Vol. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    More than 100 papers were presented. The meeting was divided in 56 sessions and covered the following topics: Plant Operation, Retrofitting and Maintenance Experience; Steam Generator Operation and Maintenance; Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems; Seismic Technologies for Plant Design and Operations; Aging Management and Life Extension; Two-Phase Flow Modeling and Applications; Severe Accidents and Degraded Core Thermal Hydraulics; Plant Simulators, Analyzers, and Workstations; Advanced Nuclear Fuel Challenges; Recent Nuclear Power Station Decommissioning Experiences in the USA; Application of Probabilistic risk assessment/Probabilistic safety assessment (PRA/PSA) in Design and Modification; Numerical Modeling in Thermal Hydraulics; General Thermal Hydraulics; Severe Accident Management; Licensing and Regulatory Requirements; Advanced Light Water Reactor Designs to Support Reduced Emergency Planning; Best Estimate loss-of-coolant (LOCA) Methodologies; Plant Instrumentation and Control; LWR Fuel Designs for Improved Thermal Hydraulic Performance; Performance Assessment of Radioactive Waste Disposal; Thermal Hydraulics in Passive Reactor Systems; Advances in Man-Machine Interface Design and the Related Human Factors Engineering; Advances in Measurements and Instrumentation; Computer Aided Technology for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and Plant Maintenance Plant Uprating; Flow-Accelerated Corrosion in Nuclear Power Plants; Advances in Radiological Measurement and Analysis Risk Management and Assessment; Stability in Thermal Hydraulic Systems; Critical heat flux (CHF) and Post Dryout Heat Transfer; Plant Transient and Accident Modeling.

  13. Proceedings of the fourth international topical meeting on nuclear thermal hydraulics, operations and safety. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    More than 100 papers were presented. The meeting was divided in 56 sessions and covered the following topics: Plant Operation, Retrofitting and Maintenance Experience; Steam Generator Operation and Maintenance; Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems; Seismic Technologies for Plant Design and Operations; Aging Management and Life Extension; Two-Phase Flow Modeling and Applications; Severe Accidents and Degraded Core Thermal Hydraulics; Plant Simulators, Analyzers, and Workstations; Advanced Nuclear Fuel Challenges; Recent Nuclear Power Station Decommissioning Experiences in the USA; Application of Probabilistic risk assessment/Probabilistic safety assessment (PRA/PSA) in Design and Modification; Numerical Modeling in Thermal Hydraulics; General Thermal Hydraulics; Severe Accident Management; Licensing and Regulatory Requirements; Advanced Light Water Reactor Designs to Support Reduced Emergency Planning; Best Estimate loss-of-coolant (LOCA) Methodologies; Plant Instrumentation and Control; LWR Fuel Designs for Improved Thermal Hydraulic Performance; Performance Assessment of Radioactive Waste Disposal; Thermal Hydraulics in Passive Reactor Systems; Advances in Man-Machine Interface Design and the Related Human Factors Engineering; Advances in Measurements and Instrumentation; Computer Aided Technology for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and Plant Maintenance Plant Uprating; Flow-Accelerated Corrosion in Nuclear Power Plants; Advances in Radiological Measurement and Analysis Risk Management and Assessment; Stability in Thermal Hydraulic Systems; Critical heat flux (CHF) and Post Dryout Heat Transfer; Plant Transient and Accident Modeling

  14. Proceedings of the fourth international topical meeting on nuclear thermal hydraulics, operations and safety. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    More than 100 papers presented at the meeting were divided in 56 sessions and covered the following topics: Plant Operation, Retrofitting and Maintenance Experience; Steam Generator Operation and Maintenance; Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems; Seismic Technologies for Plant Design and Operations; Aging Management and Life Extension; Two-Phase Flow Modeling and Applications; Severe Accidents and Degraded Core Thermal Hydraulics; Plant Simulators, Analyzers, and Workstations; Advanced Nuclear Fuel Challenges; Recent Nuclear Power Station Decommissioning Experiences in the USA; Application of Probabilistic risk assessment/Probabilistic safety assessment (PRA/PSA) in Design and Modification; Numerical Modeling in Thermal Hydraulics; General Thermal Hydraulics; Severe Accident Management; Licensing and Regulatory Requirements; Advanced Light Water Reactor Designs to Support Reduced Emergency Planning; Best Estimate loss-of-coolant (LOCA) Methodologies; Plant Instrumentation and Control; LWR Fuel Designs for Improved Thermal Hydraulic Performance; Performance Assessment of Radioactive Waste Disposal; Thermal Hydraulics in Passive Reactor Systems; Advances in Man-Machine Interface Design and the Related Human Factors Engineering; Advances in Measurements and Instrumentation; Computer Aided Technology for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and Plant Maintenance Plant Uprating; Flow-Accelerated Corrosion in Nuclear Power Plants; Advances in Radiological Measurement and Analysis Risk Management and Assessment; Stability in Thermal Hydraulic Systems; Critical heat flux (CHF) and Post Dryout Heat Transfer; Plant Transient and Accident Modeling.

  15. Proceedings of the fourth international topical meeting on nuclear thermal hydraulics, operations and safety. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    More than 100 papers presented at the meeting were divided in 56 sessions and covered the following topics: Plant Operation, Retrofitting and Maintenance Experience; Steam Generator Operation and Maintenance; Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems; Seismic Technologies for Plant Design and Operations; Aging Management and Life Extension; Two-Phase Flow Modeling and Applications; Severe Accidents and Degraded Core Thermal Hydraulics; Plant Simulators, Analyzers, and Workstations; Advanced Nuclear Fuel Challenges; Recent Nuclear Power Station Decommissioning Experiences in the USA; Application of Probabilistic risk assessment/Probabilistic safety assessment (PRA/PSA) in Design and Modification; Numerical Modeling in Thermal Hydraulics; General Thermal Hydraulics; Severe Accident Management; Licensing and Regulatory Requirements; Advanced Light Water Reactor Designs to Support Reduced Emergency Planning; Best Estimate loss-of-coolant (LOCA) Methodologies; Plant Instrumentation and Control; LWR Fuel Designs for Improved Thermal Hydraulic Performance; Performance Assessment of Radioactive Waste Disposal; Thermal Hydraulics in Passive Reactor Systems; Advances in Man-Machine Interface Design and the Related Human Factors Engineering; Advances in Measurements and Instrumentation; Computer Aided Technology for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and Plant Maintenance Plant Uprating; Flow-Accelerated Corrosion in Nuclear Power Plants; Advances in Radiological Measurement and Analysis Risk Management and Assessment; Stability in Thermal Hydraulic Systems; Critical heat flux (CHF) and Post Dryout Heat Transfer; Plant Transient and Accident Modeling

  16. BEPU-FSAR: establishing a background for extension of nuclear thermal hydraulic principles to non thermal-hydraulic codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, Francine; Sabundjian, Gaianê, E-mail: franmenzel@gmail.com, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); D’Auria, Francesco, E-mail: f.dauria@ing.unipi.it [University of Pisa, San Piero a Grado Nuclear Research Group (Italy)

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear thermal hydraulic and accident analysis are based in three pillar activities, which consists in: Scaling, Coupling and V and V. Each of them are established technology, with key documents to describe and widely used. The final goal of this work is to apply the BEPU methodology in all parts of FSAR where analytical techniques are needed (BEPU-FSAR) and for that the crucial step is the transfer of the BEPU concepts into the other areas. In this sense, the issue is how to adapt to other disciplines the pillar activities presented in the thermal hydraulic area. For that we need to identify which elements can be applied in the other areas, to show that the proposed methodology is feasible. This work aims to discuss the first steps towards a BEPU-FSAR methodology and to show that the Scaling, Coupling and V and V elements, currently done for thermal-hydraulic codes, can be also done for different codes, which are used to perform different analysis included on a FSAR of a generic plant. (author)

  17. Thermal hydraulic simulation of the CANDU nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Athos M.S.S. de; Ramos, Mario C.; Costa, Antonella L.; Fernandes, Gustavo H.N., E-mail: athos1495@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores (INCT/CNPq), Rio de janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) is a Canadian-designed power reactor of PHWR type (Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor) that uses heavy water (deuterium oxide) for moderator and coolant, and natural uranium for fuel. There are about 47 reactors of this type in operation around the world generating more than 23 GWe, highlighting the importance of this kind of device. In this way, the main purpose of this study is to develop a thermal hydraulic model for a CANDU reactor to aggregate knowledge in this line of research. In this way, a core modeling was performed using RELAP5-3D code. Results were compared with reference data to verify the model behavior in steady state operation. Thermal hydraulic parameters as temperature, pressure and mass flow rate were verified and the results are in good agreement with reference data, as it is being presented in this work. (author)

  18. Deep geothermics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The hot-dry-rocks located at 3-4 km of depth correspond to low permeable rocks carrying a large amount of heat. The extraction of this heat usually requires artificial hydraulic fracturing of the rock to increase its permeability before water injection. Hot-dry-rocks geothermics or deep geothermics is not today a commercial channel but only a scientific and technological research field. The Soultz-sous-Forets site (Northern Alsace, France) is characterized by a 6 degrees per meter geothermal gradient and is used as a natural laboratory for deep geothermal and geological studies in the framework of a European research program. Two boreholes have been drilled up to 3600 m of depth in the highly-fractured granite massif beneath the site. The aim is to create a deep heat exchanger using only the natural fracturing for water transfer. A consortium of german, french and italian industrial companies (Pfalzwerke, Badenwerk, EdF and Enel) has been created for a more active participation to the pilot phase. (J.S.). 1 fig., 2 photos

  19. European activities on crosscutting thermal-hydraulic phenomena for innovative nuclear systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, X., E-mail: xu.cheng@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Batta, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Bandini, G. [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA) (Italy); Roelofs, F. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG) (Netherlands); Van Tichelen, K. [Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie – Centre d’étude de l’Energie Nucléaire (SCK-CEN) (Belgium); Gerschenfeld, A. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA) (France); Prasser, M. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) (Switzerland); Papukchiev, A. [Gesellschaft für Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS) (Germany); Hampel, U. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. (HZDR) (Germany); Ma, W.M. [Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan (KTH) (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • This paper serves as a guidance of the special issue. • The technical tasks and methodologies applied to achieve the objectives have been described. • Main results achieved so far are summarized. - Abstract: Thermal-hydraulics is recognized as a key scientific subject in the development of innovative reactor systems. In Europe, a consortium is established consisting of 24 institutions of universities, research centers and nuclear industries with the main objectives to identify and to perform research activities on important crosscutting thermal-hydraulic issues encountered in various innovative nuclear systems. For this purpose the large-scale integrated research project THINS (Thermal-Hydraulics of Innovative Nuclear Systems) is launched in the 7th Framework Programme FP7 of European Union. The main topics considered in the THINS project are (a) advanced reactor core thermal-hydraulics, (b) single phase mixed convection, (c) single phase turbulence, (d) multiphase flow, and (e) numerical code coupling and qualification. The main objectives of the project are: • Generation of a data base for the development and validation of new models and codes describing the selected crosscutting thermal-hydraulic phenomena. • Development of new physical models and modeling approaches for more accurate description of the crosscutting thermal-hydraulic phenomena. • Improvement of the numerical engineering tools for the design analysis of the innovative nuclear systems. This paper describes the technical tasks and methodologies applied to achieve the objectives. Main results achieved so far are summarized. This paper serves also as a guidance of this special issue.

  20. Trend analysis of troubles caused by thermal-hydraulic phenomena at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Teruo

    2010-01-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Safety System (INSS) is promoting researches to improve the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants. In the present study, our attention was focused on troubles attributed to thermal-hydraulic phenomena in particular, trend analysis were carried out to learn lessons from these troubles and to prevent their recurrence. Through our survey, we found the following two points. First, many thermal-hydraulics related troubles can be attributed to design faults, since we found some events in foreign countries took place after inadequate facility renovation. To ensure appropriate design verification, it is important to take account of state-of-the-art science and technology and at the same time to pay attention to the compatibility with the initial design concept. Second point, thermal-hydraulic related troubles are common and recurrent to nuclear power plants worldwide. Japanese utilities are planning to introduce some of overseas experiences to their plants, such as power uprate and renovations of aged facilities. It is important to learn lessons from experiences paying close attention continuously to overseas trouble events, including thermal-hydraulics related events, and to use them to improve safety and reliability of nuclear power plants. (author)

  1. Survey of thermal-hydraulic models of commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determan, J.C.; Hendrix, C.E.

    1992-12-01

    A survey of the thermal-hydraulic models of nuclear power plants has been performed to identify the NRC's current analytical capabilities for critical event response. The survey also supports ongoing research for accident management. The results of the survey are presented here. The PC database which records detailed data on each model is described

  2. Thermal-hydraulic calculation and analysis for QNPP (Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant) containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Hui; Zhou Jie; He Yingchao

    1993-01-01

    Three containment thermal-hydraulic codes CONTEMPT-LT/028, CONTEMPT-4/MOD3 and COMPARE are used to compute and analyse the Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant (QNPP) containment response under LOCA or MSLB conditions. An evaluation of the capability of containment of QNPP is given

  3. Crack Features and Shear-Wave Splitting Associated with Fracture Extension during Hydraulic Stimulation of the Geothermal Reservoir in Soultz-sous-Forêts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelinet M.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The recent tomography results obtained within the scope of the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS European Soultz project led us to revisit the meso-fracturing properties of Soultz test site. In this paper, we develop a novel approach coupling effective medium modeling and shear-wave splitting to characterize the evolution of crack properties throughout the hydraulic stimulation process. The stimulation experiment performed in 2000 consisted of 3 successive injection steps spanning over 6 days. An accurate 4-D tomographic image was first carried out based upon the travel-times measured for the induced seismicity [Calò M., Dorbath C., Cornet F.H., Cuenot N. (2011 Large-scale aseismic motion identified through 4-D P-wave tomography, Geophys. J. Int. 186, 1295-1314]. The current study shows how to take advantage of the resulting compressional wave (Calò et al., 2011 and shear-wave velocity models. These are given as input data to an anisotropic effective medium model and converted into crack properties. In short, the effective medium model aims to estimate the impact of cracks on velocities. It refers to a crack-free matrix and 2 families of penny-shaped cracks with orientations in agreement with the main observed geological features: North-South strike and dip of 65°East and 65°West [Genter A., Traineau H. (1996 Analysis of macroscopic fractures in granite in the HDR geothermal well EPS-1, Soultz-sous-Forêts, France, J. Vol. Geoth. Res. 72, 121-141], respectively. The resulting output data are the spatial distributions of crack features (lengths and apertures within the 3-D geological formation. We point out that a flow rate increase results in a crack shortening in the area imaged by both compressional and shear waves, especially in the upper part of the reservoir. Conversely, the crack length, estimated during continuous injection rate phases, is higher than during the increasing injection rate phases. A possible explanation for this is that

  4. Response time verification of in situ hydraulic pressure sensors in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, C.G.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus for verifying response time in situ of hydraulic pressure and pressure differential sensing instrumentation in a nuclear circuit is disclosed. Hydraulic pressure at a reference sensor and at an in situ process sensor under test is varied according to a linear ramp. Sensor response time is then determined by comparison of the sensor electrical analog output signals. The process sensor is subjected to a relatively slowly changing and a relatively rapidly changing hydraulic pressure ramp signal to determine an upper bound for process sensor response time over the range of all pressure transients to which the sensor is required to respond. Signal linearity is independent of the volumetric displacement of the process sensor. The hydraulic signal generator includes a first pressurizable gas reservoir, a second pressurizable liquid and gas reservoir, a gate for rapidly opening a gas communication path between the two reservoirs, a throttle valve for regulating rate of gas pressure equalization between the two reservoirs, and hydraulic conduit means for simultaneously communicating a ramp of hydraulic pressure change between the liquid/gas reservoir and both a reference and a process sensor. By maintaining a sufficient pressure differential between the reservoirs and by maintaining a sufficient ratio of gas to liquid in the liquid/gas reservoir, excellent linearity and minimal transient effects can be achieved for all pressure ranges, magnitudes, and rates of change of interest

  5. Thermal hydraulic stability in a pressure tube nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villani, A.; Ravetta, R.; Mansani, L.

    1986-01-01

    The CIRENE plant which will undergo preoperational tests in the near future is equipped with a 40 MW(e) Heavy Water moderated Boiling Light Water cooled Reactor (HWBLWR); at the start-up and up to about 30 % of nominal power, the necessary low coolant density is obtained injecting into the core a mixture of liquid and steam. To verify the thermal-hydraulic stability of the plant in this situation, tests have been carried out in a facility simulating two full scale power channels; the system stability has been confirmed in the reference conditions, and is not reduced by even a significant reduction of the liquid flowrate, where a decrease in liquid temperature has some negative effect and steam flowrate has a small influence. (author)

  6. Digital electro-hydraulic control system for nuclear turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Yutaka; Tone, Youichi; Ozono, Jiro

    1985-01-01

    The unit capacity of steam turbines for nuclear power generation is very large, accordingly their unexpected stop disturbs power system, and the lowering of their capacity ratio exerts large influence on power generation cost. Therefore, very high reliability is required for turbine EHC controllers which directly control the turbines for nuclear power generation. In order to meet such requirement, Toshiba Corp. has developed high reliability type analog tripled turbine EHC controllers, and delivered them to No. 3 plant in the Fukushima No. 2 Nuclear Power Station and No. 1 plant in the Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. At present, the trial operation is under way. The development of digital EHC controllers was begun in 1976, and through the digital EHC for a test turbine and that for a small turbine, the digital EHC controllers for the turbines for nuclear power generation were developed. In this paper, the function, constitution, features and maintenance of the digital tripled EHC controllers for the turbines for nuclear power generation, the application of new technology to them, and the confirmation of the control function by simulation are reported. (Kako, I.)

  7. Model and simulation of the hydraulic turbine speed regulator of the Atucha I nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copparoni, G.; Etchepareborda, A.; Urrutia, G.

    1992-01-01

    The hydraulics turbines of Atucha I Nuclear Power Plant takes advantage of condenser cooling water level difference between the plant and the river to recover about 2,5 MW e. It also supplies emergency power until diesel generators start up. Speed regulation is needed due to the transients that during this process occur. The purpose is to minimize the diesels start up time, and to avoid overshoots on the internal grid frequency. The hydraulic turbine, its speed regulator and the electric system associated with this transient have been modeled. The models and some simulation results are presented in this work. (author)

  8. 11. international topical meeting on nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics (NURETH-11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemonnier, H.

    2005-01-01

    The main topics covered by the NURETH 11 meeting are the thermal-hydraulics of existing and future nuclear power plants as foreseen by the Generation IV worldwide initiative. Normal operation and accidental situations are also relevant topics of the Conference. The topics cover modeling, experiments, instrumentation and numerical simulations related to flow and heat transfer in nuclear reactors with a special emphasis on the advances of multiphase CFD methods. The first part of this Book of Abstracts enumerates the Organizing Scientific Societies, the Sponsors of the Conference, the Conference Chairs, and the members of the Steering Committee and of the Technical Program Committee. The second part of this Book of Abstracts contains the list of the titles of the contributed papers. Each item includes the log number of the paper, the abstract of which can therefore be easily located in the next section of this book. The titles of the papers have been sorted out by topics to provide a synthetic view of the contributions in a selected domain. The last section of this Book includes an index of authors and co-authors with a reference to the log number(s) of their contributed paper(s). Finally, the CD-Rom of the Conference Proceedings containing the full-length papers is inserted at the inside back cover. Sessions content: A - two-phase flow and heat transfer fundamentals: computational and mathematical techniques (numerical schemes, LBM, BEM, mesh-less, etc.); contact angle and wettability phenomena; experiments and data bases for the assessment and the verification of 3D models; flow regime identification and modelling; heat transfer near critical pressure and supercritical water reactors; interfacial area (data base, modeling, measurement techniques); instrumentation techniques; micro-scale basic phenomena, fluid flow and heat transfer; scaling methods; counter current flow; B - code developments: containment analysis; core thermal-hydraulics and subchannel analysis

  9. FX2-TH: a two-dimensional nuclear reactor kinetics code with thermal-hydraulic feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shober, R.A.; Daly, T.A.; Ferguson, D.R.

    1978-10-01

    FX2-TH is a two-dimensional, time-dependent nuclear reactor kinetics program with thermal and hydraulic feedback. The neutronics model used is multigroup neutron diffusion theory. The following geometry options are available: x, r, x-y, r-z, theta-r, and triangular. FX2-TH contains two basic thermal and hydraulic models: a simple adiabatic fuel temperature calculation, and a more detailed model consisting of an explicit representation of a fuel pin, gap, clad, and coolant. FX2-TH allows feedback effects from both fuel temperature (Doppler) and coolant temperature (density) changes. FX2-TH will calculate a consistent set of steady state conditions by iterating between the neutronics and thermal-hydraulics until convergence is reached. The time-dependent calculation is performed by the use of the improved quasistatic method. A disk editing capability is available. FX2-TH is operational on IBM system 360 or 370 computers and on the CDC 7600

  10. Hydraulic experiment for pollutant discharge characteristics in a Wolseong Nuclear Power Plant Port

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Byung Mo; Min, Byung Li; Park, Ki Hyun; Kim, Sora; Suh, Kyung Suk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Lyul [Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    In this study, the dispersion process of pollutant substances in a port under wave and current environments was evaluated by a hydraulic experiment. Once the contaminants washed ashore into the port of Wolseong nuclear power plant, transport processes of pollutants were investigated by tracking the tracer according to the variations of experimental condition through a hydraulic experiment. Several hydraulic experiments were performed to analyze the pollutant discharge rate of the surface coming from the different coastal environments. From the hydraulic experiment results, the tracer concentration decreased exponentially. These results suggested that, after the tracer was transported to the open sea, a different gradient was shown under different conditions. For the case of a diluted condition, the half-life of flow rate was 2.70, 10.40, and 26.39 days for 30, 20 and 10 rpm in the left-side, respectively. The decrease of the tracer concentration under conditions of 30 rpm was much faster than that under conditions of 10 rpm. For the wave condition, the half-life of flow rate was 4.59 and 15.35 days for the right and left side of the port in a hydraulic scale prototype, respectively.

  11. Proceedings of the 10th international topical meeting on nuclear thermal hydraulics, operation and safety (NUTHOS-10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The 10th International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics, Operations and Safety (NUTHOS-10) in Okinawa, Japan is sponsored by Atomic Energy Society of Japan, in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, and co-sponsored by American Nuclear Society Thermal Hydraulics Division among others. Enhanced safety and reducing cost are going together, which can be achieved through continued research and development efforts. NUTHOS keeps you abreast of the most updated information in the advancement of science and technology in nuclear thermal hydraulics, operations and safety, and provides you insights into the future. (J.P.N.)

  12. Geothermal Modesty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    This publication of the Areva Group, a world nuclear industry leader, provides information on the energy in many domains. This issue deals with the uses for radioactivity, the future of the green electricity, the energy policy of Rhone-alps region, the end of the nuclear in Belgium, the nuclear propulsion to explore the solar system, the involvement of the Unites States in the hydrogen development, the gas exportation of China. A special part is devoted to the possibility of the geothermal energy. (A.L.B.)

  13. Complementary factors of nuclear and hydraulic energy in western Europe: the role of pumping stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabert, L [Universite Lyon II (FR)

    1981-12-01

    The nuclear choice results from the determination to be politically independent and a calculation of competitivity, which in France's case are emphasized by the chronological concord between the 1973-74 oil crisis and the Messmer Plan. Hydraulic equipment is not the result of an authentic choice, it is linked to the existence of the availability of water power. Our article deals with the role of pumping stations, the evolution of the role of pumping and its geography.

  14. Establishment of International Cooperative Network and Cooperative Research Strategy Between Korea and USA on Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Won Pil; Song, Chul Hwa; Jeong, Jae Jun; Choi, Ki Yong; Kang, Kyoung Ho

    2004-07-01

    1. Scope and Objectives of the Project - Successful holding of the NURETH-10 - Analysis of the international trends in technology development and applications for nuclear thermal-hydraulics - Establishment of the international cooperative network and cooperative research strategy between Korea and USA on nuclear thermal-hydraulics 2. Research Results - Successful holding of the NURETH-10 - Analysis of the international trends in technology development and applications for nuclear thermal-hydraulics: - Establishment of international cooperative network and cooperative research strategy focused between Korea and USA on nuclear thermal-hydraulics: 3. Application Plan of the Research Results - Utilization as the basic data/information in establishing the domestic R and D directions and the international cooperative research strategy, - Application of the relevant experiences and data bases of NURETH-10 for holding future international conferences, - Promote more effective and productive research cooperation between Korea and USA

  15. Mechanisms of mineral scaling in oil and geothermal wells studied in laboratory experiments by nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoernstad, T.; Stamatakis, E.

    2006-01-01

    Two independent nuclear methods have been developed and tested for studies of mineral scaling mechanisms and kinetics related to the oil and geothermal industry. The first is a gamma transmission method to measure mass increase with a 30 MBq source of 133 Ba. The other method applies radioactive tracers of one or more of the scaling components. CaCO 3 -precipitation has been used as an example here where the main tracer has been 47 Ca 2+ . While the transmission method is an indirect method, the latter is a direct method where the reactions of specific components may be studied. Both methods are on-line, continuous and non-destructive, and capable to study scaling of liquids with saturation ratios approaching the solubility product. A lower limit for detection of CaCO 3 with the transmission method in sand-packed columns with otherwise reasonable experimental parameters is estimated to be < 1 mg in a 1 cm section of the tube packed with silica sand while the lower limit of detection for the tracer method with reasonable experimental parameters is estimated to < 1 μg in the same tube section. (author)

  16. A device for the hydraulic control of nuclear reactor control rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, Erling; Frisch, D.R.; Andrews, H.N.

    1974-01-01

    A device for driving and locking the control rods of a nuclear reactor. This device comprises a hydraulic driving piston mounted in a cylinder provided with a construction for absorbing shocks. The piston is provided, at is extremity, with a locking device adapted to engage a stationary lock, it being possible to control the latter for freeing said piston locking device; with such an arrangement, the control rod is normally maintained in position, and it can be freed only by a positive signal. Moreover, the control rod movements are slowed down, so as to prevent the gripping device from being damaged. This device can be used in the nuclear industry [fr

  17. The safety feature of hydraulic driving system of control rod for 200 MW nuclear heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi Zongbo; Wu Yuanqiang

    1997-01-01

    The hydraulic driving system of control rod is used as control rod drive mechanism in 200 MW nuclear heating reactor. Design of this system is based on passive system, integrating drive and guide of control rod. The author analyzes the inherent safety and the design safety of this system, with mechanism of control rod not ejecting when the pressure of pressure vessel is lost, and calculating result of core not exposing when the amount of coolant is drained by broken pipe. The results indicate that this system has good safety feature, and assures reactor safety under any accident conditions, providing important technology support for 200 MW nuclear heating reactor with inherent safety feature

  18. Review of turbulence modelling for numerical simulation of nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.P.; Haapalehto, T.

    1996-01-01

    The report deals with the modelling of turbulent flows in nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulic applications. The goal is to give tools and knowledge about turbulent flows and their modelling in practical applications for engineers, and especially nuclear engineers. The emphasize is on the theory of turbulence, the existing different turbulence models, the state-of-art of turbulence in research centres, the available models in the commercial code CFD-FLOW3D, and the latest applications of turbulence modelling in nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics. It turns out that it is difficult to elaborate an universal turbulence model and each model has its advantages and drawbacks in each application. However, the increasing power of computers can permit the emergence of new methods of turbulence modelling such as Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) which open new horizons in this field. These latter methods are beginning to be available in commercial codes and are used in different nuclear applications such as 3-D modelling of the nuclear reactor cores and the steam generators. (orig.) (22 refs.)

  19. THR-TH: a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor core thermal hydraulics code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vondy, D.R.

    1984-07-01

    The ORNL version of PEBBLE, the (RZ) pebble bed thermal hydraulics code, has been extended for application to a prismatic gas cooled reactor core. The supplemental treatment is of one-dimensional coolant flow in up to a three-dimensional core description. Power density data from a neutronics and exposure calculation are used as the basic information for the thermal hydraulics calculation of heat removal. Two-dimensional neutronics results may be expanded for a three-dimensional hydraulics calculation. The geometric description for the hydraulics problem is the same as used by the neutronics code. A two-dimensional thermal cell model is used to predict temperatures in the fuel channel. The capability is available in the local BOLD VENTURE computation system for reactor core analysis with capability to account for the effect of temperature feedback by nuclear cross section correlation. Some enhancements have also been added to the original code to add pebble bed modeling flexibility and to generate useful auxiliary results. For example, an estimate is made of the distribution of fuel temperatures based on average and extreme conditions regularly calculated at a number of locations.

  20. Hydraulic properties of buffer and backfill materials for high-level nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komine, Hideo; Ogata, Nobuhide

    2001-01-01

    The design and development of buffer and backfill materials, which fill up the disposal facility, are important for developing the technology of high-level nuclear wastes disposal. The compacted bentonite and sand-bentonite mixture are attracting greater attention as buffer and backfill materials because they have impermeable and swelling properties. This study investigated the hydraulic-conductivities at the different sand-bentonite mass ratio and dry density, which are the specifications of material, by the experimental works. This study also obtained the experimental data of hydraulic conductivities of the materials for 120 days at the farthest, and the permeability changes before and after swelling. Furthermore, this study proposed the evaluation method for hydraulic conductivity using the parameter 'Swelling volumetric strain of montmorillonite', which was proposed by the author. The evaluation method can obtain the hydraulic conductivity of buffer and backfill materials at various dry densities and bentonite contents. Therefore, the evaluation method can be used for designing the bentonite content and compaction density from the viewpoint of 'impermeability'. (author)

  1. THR-TH: a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor core thermal hydraulics code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vondy, D.R.

    1984-07-01

    The ORNL version of PEBBLE, the (RZ) pebble bed thermal hydraulics code, has been extended for application to a prismatic gas cooled reactor core. The supplemental treatment is of one-dimensional coolant flow in up to a three-dimensional core description. Power density data from a neutronics and exposure calculation are used as the basic information for the thermal hydraulics calculation of heat removal. Two-dimensional neutronics results may be expanded for a three-dimensional hydraulics calculation. The geometric description for the hydraulics problem is the same as used by the neutronics code. A two-dimensional thermal cell model is used to predict temperatures in the fuel channel. The capability is available in the local BOLD VENTURE computation system for reactor core analysis with capability to account for the effect of temperature feedback by nuclear cross section correlation. Some enhancements have also been added to the original code to add pebble bed modeling flexibility and to generate useful auxiliary results. For example, an estimate is made of the distribution of fuel temperatures based on average and extreme conditions regularly calculated at a number of locations

  2. Application of hydraulic network analysis to motor operated butterfly valves in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldiwany, B.H.; Kalsi, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the application of hydraulic network analysis to evaluate the performance of butterfly valves in nuclear power plant applications. Required actuation torque for butterfly valves in high-flow applications is often dictated by peak dynamic torque. The peak dynamic torque, which occurs at some intermediate disc position, requires accurate evaluation of valve flow rate and pressure drop throughout the valve stroke. Valve flow rate and pressure drop are significantly affected by the valve flow characteristics and the hydraulic system characteristics, such as pumping capability, piping resistances, single and parallel flow paths, system hydrostatic pressure, and the location of the motor-operated valve (MOV) within the system. A hydraulic network analysis methodology that addresses the effect of these parameters on the MOV performance is presented. The methodology is based on well-established engineering principles. The application of this methodology requires detailed characteristics of both the MOV and the hydraulic system in which it is installed. The valve characteristics for this analysis can be obtained by flow testing or from the valve manufacturer. Even though many valve users, valve manufacturers, and engineering standards have recognized the importance of performing these analyses, none has provided a detailed procedure for doing so

  3. The analysis of thermal-hydraulic performances of nuclear ship reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, Shinshichi; Hamada, Masao

    1975-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic performances in the core of nuclear ship reactor was analysed by thermal-hydraulic analyser codes, AMRTC and COBRA-11+DNBCAL. This reactor is of a pressurized water type and incorporates the steam generator within the reactor vessel with the rated power of 330 MWt, which is developed by Nuclear Ship Research Panel Seven (NSR-7) in The Shipbuilding Research Association of Japan. Fuel temperature distributions, coolant temperature distributions, void fractions in coolant and minimum burn out ratio etc. were calculated. Results are as follows; a) The maximum temperature of fuel center is 1,472 0 C that corresponds to 53% as small as the melting point (2,800 0 C). b) Subcooled boiling exists in the core and the maximum void fraction is less than 4%. c) The minimum burn out ratio is not less than the minimum allowable limit of 1.25. It was found from the results of analysis that this reactor was able to be operated wide margin with respect to thermal-hydraulic design limits at the rated power. (auth.)

  4. Review of the nuclear reactor thermal hydraulic research in ocean motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, B.H.

    2017-01-01

    The research and development of small modular reactor in floating platform has been strongly supported by Chinese government and enterprises. Due to the effect of ocean waves, the thermal hydraulic behavior and safety characteristics of floating reactor are different from that of land-based reactor. Many scholars including the author have published their research and results in open literatures. Much of these literatures are valuable but there are also some contradictory conclusions. In this wok, the nuclear reactor thermal hydraulic research in ocean motions was systematically summarized. Valuable results and experimental data were analyzed and classified. Inherent mechanism for controversial issues in different experiments was explained. Necessary work needed in the future was suggested. Through this work, we attempt to find as many valuable results as possible for the designing and subsequent research.

  5. Review of the nuclear reactor thermal hydraulic research in ocean motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, B.H., E-mail: yanbh3@mail.sysu.edu.cn

    2017-03-15

    The research and development of small modular reactor in floating platform has been strongly supported by Chinese government and enterprises. Due to the effect of ocean waves, the thermal hydraulic behavior and safety characteristics of floating reactor are different from that of land-based reactor. Many scholars including the author have published their research and results in open literatures. Much of these literatures are valuable but there are also some contradictory conclusions. In this wok, the nuclear reactor thermal hydraulic research in ocean motions was systematically summarized. Valuable results and experimental data were analyzed and classified. Inherent mechanism for controversial issues in different experiments was explained. Necessary work needed in the future was suggested. Through this work, we attempt to find as many valuable results as possible for the designing and subsequent research.

  6. Thermal Hydraulic Characteristics of Fuel Defects in Plate Type Nuclear Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodey, Isaac T [ORNL

    2014-05-01

    Turbulent flow coupled with heat transfer is investigated for a High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel plate. The Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes Models are used for fluid dynamics and the transfer of heat from a thermal nuclear fuel plate using the Multi-physics code COMSOL. Simulation outcomes are compared with experimental data from the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor Thermal Hydraulic Test Loop. The computational results for the High Flux Isotope Reactor core system provide a more physically accurate simulation of this system by modeling the turbulent flow field in conjunction with the diffusion of thermal energy within the solid and fluid phases of the model domain. Recommendations are made regarding Nusselt number correlations and material properties for future thermal hydraulic modeling efforts

  7. Thermal-hydraulic software development for nuclear waste transportation cask design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, N.N.; Burns, S.P.; Gianoulakis, S.E.; Klein, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a state-of-the-art thermal-hydraulic software package intended for spent fuel and high-level nuclear waste transportation cask design and analysis. The objectives of this software development effort are threefold: (1) to take advantage of advancements in computer hardware and software to provide a more efficient user interface, (2) to provide a tool for reducing inefficient conservatism in spent fuel and high-level waste shipping cask design by including convection as well as conduction and radiation heat transfer modeling capabilities, and (3) to provide a thermal-hydraulic analysis package which is developed under a rigorous quality assurance program established at Sandia National Laboratories. 20 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Thermal-hydraulic code for estimating safety limits of nuclear reactors with plate type fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellanos, Duvan A.; Moreira, João L.; Maiorino, Jose R.; Rossi, Pedro R.; Carajilescov, Pedro, E-mail: duvan.castellanos@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: joao.moreira@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: joserubens.maiorino@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: pedro.rossi@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: pedro.carajilescov10@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo André, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharias, Modelagem e Ciências Sociais Aplicadas

    2017-07-01

    To ensure the normal and safe operation of PWR type nuclear reactors is necessary the knowledge of nuclear and heat transfer properties of the fuel, coolant and structural materials. The thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactors yields parameters such as the distribution of fuel and coolant temperatures, and the departure from nucleated boiling ratio. Usually computational codes are used to analyze the safety performance of the core. This research work presents a computer code for performing thermal-hydraulic analyses of nuclear reactors with plate-type fuel elements operating at low pressure and temperature (research reactors) or high temperature and pressure (naval propulsion or small power reactors). The code uses the sub-channel method based on geometric and thermal-hydraulic conditions. In order to solve the conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy, each sub-channel is divided into control volumes in the axial direction. The mass flow distribution for each fuel element of core is obtained. Analysis of critical heat flux is performed in the hottest channel. The code considers the radial symmetry and the chain or cascade method for two steps in order to facilitate the whole analysis. In the first step, we divide the core into channels with size equivalent to a fuel assembly. >From this analysis, the channel with the largest enthalpy is identified as the hot assembly. In the second step, we divide the hottest fuel assembly into sub-channels with size equivalent to one actual coolant channel. As in the previous step, the sub-channel with largest final enthalpy is identified as the hottest sub-channel. For the code validation, we considered results from the chinese CARR research reactor. The code reproduced well the CARR reactor results, yielding detailed information such as static pressure in the channel, mass flow rate distribution among the fuel channels, coolant, clad and centerline fuel temperatures, quality and local heat and critical heat

  9. Thermal-hydraulic code for estimating safety limits of nuclear reactors with plate type fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellanos, Duvan A.; Moreira, João L.; Maiorino, Jose R.; Rossi, Pedro R.; Carajilescov, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    To ensure the normal and safe operation of PWR type nuclear reactors is necessary the knowledge of nuclear and heat transfer properties of the fuel, coolant and structural materials. The thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactors yields parameters such as the distribution of fuel and coolant temperatures, and the departure from nucleated boiling ratio. Usually computational codes are used to analyze the safety performance of the core. This research work presents a computer code for performing thermal-hydraulic analyses of nuclear reactors with plate-type fuel elements operating at low pressure and temperature (research reactors) or high temperature and pressure (naval propulsion or small power reactors). The code uses the sub-channel method based on geometric and thermal-hydraulic conditions. In order to solve the conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy, each sub-channel is divided into control volumes in the axial direction. The mass flow distribution for each fuel element of core is obtained. Analysis of critical heat flux is performed in the hottest channel. The code considers the radial symmetry and the chain or cascade method for two steps in order to facilitate the whole analysis. In the first step, we divide the core into channels with size equivalent to a fuel assembly. >From this analysis, the channel with the largest enthalpy is identified as the hot assembly. In the second step, we divide the hottest fuel assembly into sub-channels with size equivalent to one actual coolant channel. As in the previous step, the sub-channel with largest final enthalpy is identified as the hottest sub-channel. For the code validation, we considered results from the chinese CARR research reactor. The code reproduced well the CARR reactor results, yielding detailed information such as static pressure in the channel, mass flow rate distribution among the fuel channels, coolant, clad and centerline fuel temperatures, quality and local heat and critical heat

  10. Geothermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rummel, F.; Kappelmeyer, O.; Herde, O.A.

    1992-01-01

    Objective of this brochure is to present the subject Geothermics and the possible use of geothermal energy to the public. The following aspects will be refered to: -present energy situation -geothermal potential -use of geothermal energy -environemental aspects -economics. In addition, it presents an up-dated overview of geothermal projects funded by the German government, and a list of institutions and companies active in geothermal research and developments. (orig./HP) [de

  11. An analytical study on excitation of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability due to seismically induced resonance in BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Masashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a scoping study on seismically induced resonance of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability in BWRs, which was conducted by using TRAC-BF1 within a framework of a point kinetics model. As a result of the analysis, it is shown that a reactivity insertion could occur accompanied by in-surge of coolant into the core resulted from the excitation of the nuclear-coupled instability by the external acceleration. In order to analyze this phenomenon more in detail, it is necessary to couple a thermal-hydraulic code with a three-dimensional nuclear kinetics code.

  12. Validation studies of thermal-hydraulic code for safety analysis of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haapalehto, T.

    1995-01-01

    The thesis gives an overview of the validation process for thermal-hydraulic system codes and it presents in more detail the assessment and validation of the French code CATHARE for VVER calculations. Three assessment cases are presented: loop seal clearing, core reflooding and flow in a horizontal steam generator. The experience gained during these assessment and validation calculations has been used to analyze the behavior of the horizontal steam generator and the natural circulation in the geometry of the Loviisa nuclear power plant. Large part of the work has been performed in cooperation with the CATHARE-team in Grenoble, France. (41 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.)

  13. Rock mechanical, thermomechanical and hydraulic behaviour of the near field for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, E.; Hakala, M.; Lorig, L.J.

    1991-10-01

    Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) is investigating the feasibility of disposing high level nuclear waste in crystalline rock at depths of 400 to 600 meters below the ground surface. Two explicit distinct element computer codes UDEC and 3DEC were used to simulate the mechanical response associated with excavation and the thermomechanical response associated with waste emplacement. Model input data are mostly based on preliminary design of the repository and on field data from on-going site investigations in Finland. The results showed that the overall stability of the repository near-field appears to be good during the studied time period 0 - 900 years. The maximum displacements after excavation are about 2 mm on the walls of the disposal tunnel. Joint openings are only a few micrometers. The hydraulic conductivity increases by 4 to 6 times within the zone of 0,3 m around the tunnel and emplacement hole, and farther away the average increase in conductivity is 1,2 to 1,7 times. After 60 years the heating increases the stresses in the vicinity of the excavated rooms, and closes the joints decreasing the hydraulic conductivity by 93 - 99 % when assuming 10 μm in-situ hydraulic aperture. However, when assuming 50 μm in-situ hydraulic aperture the hydraulic conductivity increases 10 - 40 % because the change in dynamic viscosity of water has a larger effect than the joint aperture change. After 900 years in the cooling stage the stresses and displacements come back almost to the same level as after the excavation. Some permanent displacements remain in the joints due to the shearing. The hydraulic conductivity at 900 years is 10 - 70 % of the conductivity after the excavation. The comparisons between the 2-D and 3-D results show that the two-dimensional modeling, if sufficient cross-sections have been analyzed, is enough to describe mechanical behaviour of the near-field, whereas the three-dimensional modeling is needed in some cases to assess the thermomechanical behaviour

  14. Nuclear fuel element design and thermal-hydraulic analysis of Wolsung-1, 600 MWe CANDU-PHWR (Part II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suk, H.C; Lee, J.C.; Suh, K.S.; Yuk, K.E.; Whang, W.; Park, J.S.; Eim, J.S.; Bang, K.H.; Eim, M.S.; Rim, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    The main objective of the present thermal hydraulic analysis is to determine the thermal hydraulic characteristics of Wolsung-1 600 MWe CANDU-PHW reactor under normal operation. This is to verify and expedite the development of the nuclear fuel design and fabrication as well as the management. The computer program package developed for the stated objective are DOD81, CANREPP, PLOC81 and COBRA-CANDU. (Author)

  15. Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. Volume 1. Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, A.V. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    This report presents an overview of a project on the health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. In addition to presenting an executive summary of the project, it sets forth the main results of the four tasks of the project: to review the health impacts (and related standards) of these forms of power generation, to review the status of standards related to plant safety (with an emphasis on nuclear power), to consider the role of the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission in selection of standards, and to set forth methodologies whereby that Commission may review the health and safety aspects of proposed sites and facilities

  16. Proceedings of the ANS/ASME/NRC international topical meeting on nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics: LMFBR and HTGR advanced reactor concepts and analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning the thermal-hydraulics of LMFBR type reactors; mathematical methods in nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics; heat transfer in gas-cooled reactors; and thermal-hydraulics of pebble-bed reactors. Two papers have been previously abstracted and input to the data base

  17. Recent advances in modeling and validation of nuclear thermal-hydraulics applications with NEPTUNE CFD - 15471

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guingo, M.; Baudry, C.; Hassanaly, M.; Lavieville, J.; Mechitouna, N.; Merigoux, N.; Mimouni, S.; Bestion, D.; Coste, P.; Morel, C.

    2015-01-01

    NEPTUNE CFD is a Computational Multi-(Fluid) Dynamics code dedicated to the simulation of multiphase flows, primarily targeting nuclear thermo-hydraulics applications, such as the departure from nuclear boiling (DNB) or the two-phase Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS). It is co-developed within the joint research/development project NEPTUNE (AREVA, CEA, EDF, IRSN) since 2001. Over the years, to address the aforementioned applications, dedicated physical models and numerical methods have been developed and implemented in the code, including specific sets of models for turbulent boiling flows and two-phase non-adiabatic stratified flows. This paper aims at summarizing the current main modeling capabilities of the code, and gives an overview of the associated validation database. A brief summary of emerging applications of the code, such as containment simulation during a potential severe accident or in-vessel retention, is also provided. (authors)

  18. A model selection support system for numerical simulations of nuclear thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gofuku, Akio; Shimizu, Kenji; Sugano, Keiji; Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Wakabayashi, Jiro

    1990-01-01

    In order to execute efficiently a dynamic simulation of a large-scaled engineering system such as a nuclear power plant, it is necessary to develop intelligent simulation support system for all phases of the simulation. This study is concerned with the intelligent support for the program development phase and is engaged in the adequate model selection support method by applying AI (Artificial Intelligence) techniques to execute a simulation consistent with its purpose and conditions. A proto-type expert system to support the model selection for numerical simulations of nuclear thermal-hydraulics in the case of cold leg small break loss-of-coolant accident of PWR plant is now under development on a personal computer. The steps to support the selection of both fluid model and constitutive equations for the drift flux model have been developed. Several cases of model selection were carried out and reasonable model selection results were obtained. (author)

  19. Development of Heavy-Duty and High-Precision Hydraulic Manipulator for Inspection, Maintenance and Decommission of Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Seo, Yong-chil; Jung, Kyung Min; Kim, Chang-hoi; Choi, Byung-seon; Moon, Jei-kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Robotic manipulators have been used for inspection, maintenance and decommission of nuclear power plants because nuclear power plants have high radiation and human workers cannot easily access the plants. And also, to inspecting, maintaining and decommissioning nuclear power plants require various manipulators. Only one manipulator cannot response to many required tasks. The existing manipulators that was used at nuclear power plants can only operate only focused specific task and cannot be used at several tasks. The actuators used at manipulators are varied and many companies sell actuators depending on power, torque and speed. However, the commercial product is not standardized. Therefore, the development of manipulator is time consuming and expensive. The essential item of a manipulator is an actuator module. If actuator module is standardized, it’s easier to develop a manipulator and also maintain a manipulator. Recently, manipulator having high-radiation, high-duty and high-precision is necessary to inspection, maintain and decommissioning of nuclear power plants. Hydraulic actuator has been used to development high-duty manipulator. But control performance of a hydraulic actuator is not better than that of an electric actuator so that hydraulic manipulator cannot easily satisfy the required precision. In this paper, we developed high-duty and high-precision actuator modules and hydraulic manipulator using the developed actuator modules. The developed hydraulic manipulator have a payload of 250kg and a precision of ±1mm. Four modularized hydraulic actuator modules were developed for inspection, maintenance and decommission. Using the developed actuator modules, the manipulator for decommissioning is easily developed. And also, various manipulators having different kinematic structure for specific tasks will be easily developed by using hydraulic modules.

  20. Development of Heavy-Duty and High-Precision Hydraulic Manipulator for Inspection, Maintenance and Decommission of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Seo, Yong-chil; Jung, Kyung Min; Kim, Chang-hoi; Choi, Byung-seon; Moon, Jei-kwon

    2016-01-01

    Robotic manipulators have been used for inspection, maintenance and decommission of nuclear power plants because nuclear power plants have high radiation and human workers cannot easily access the plants. And also, to inspecting, maintaining and decommissioning nuclear power plants require various manipulators. Only one manipulator cannot response to many required tasks. The existing manipulators that was used at nuclear power plants can only operate only focused specific task and cannot be used at several tasks. The actuators used at manipulators are varied and many companies sell actuators depending on power, torque and speed. However, the commercial product is not standardized. Therefore, the development of manipulator is time consuming and expensive. The essential item of a manipulator is an actuator module. If actuator module is standardized, it’s easier to develop a manipulator and also maintain a manipulator. Recently, manipulator having high-radiation, high-duty and high-precision is necessary to inspection, maintain and decommissioning of nuclear power plants. Hydraulic actuator has been used to development high-duty manipulator. But control performance of a hydraulic actuator is not better than that of an electric actuator so that hydraulic manipulator cannot easily satisfy the required precision. In this paper, we developed high-duty and high-precision actuator modules and hydraulic manipulator using the developed actuator modules. The developed hydraulic manipulator have a payload of 250kg and a precision of ±1mm. Four modularized hydraulic actuator modules were developed for inspection, maintenance and decommission. Using the developed actuator modules, the manipulator for decommissioning is easily developed. And also, various manipulators having different kinematic structure for specific tasks will be easily developed by using hydraulic modules

  1. Thermal-Hydraulic Sensitivity Study of Intermediate Loop Parameters for Nuclear Hydrogen Production System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jong Hwa; Lee, Heung Nae; Park, Jea Ho [KONES Corp., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won Jae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Il; Yoo, Yeon Jae [Hyundai Engineering Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The heat generated from the VHTR is transferred to the intermediate loop through Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX). It is further passed on to the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) hydrogen production system (HPS) through Process Heat Exchanger (PHX). The IL provides the safety distance between the VHTR and HPS. Since the IL performance affects the overall nuclear HPS efficiency, it is required to optimize its design and operation parameters. In this study, the thermal-hydraulic sensitivity of IL parameters with various coolant options has been examined by using MARS-GCR code, which was already applied for the case of steam generator. Sensitivity study of the IL and PHX parameters has been carried out based on their thermal-hydraulic performance. Several parameters for design and operation, such as the pipe diameter, safety distance and surface area, are considered for different coolant options, He, CO{sub 2} and He-CO{sub 2} (2:8). It was found that the circulator work is the major factor affecting on the overall nuclear hydrogen production system efficiency. Circulator work increases with the safety distance, and decreases with the operation pressure and loop pipe diameter. Sensitivity results obtained from this study will contribute to the optimization of the IL design and operation parameters and the optimal coolant selection.

  2. Development of RETRAN-03/MOV code for thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactor under moving conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hak Jae; Park, Goon Cherl

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear ship reactors have several; features different from land-based PWR's. Especially, effects of ship motions on reactor thermal-hydraulics and good load following capability for abrupt load changes are essential characteristics of nuclear ship reactors. This study modified the RETRAN-03 to analyze the thermal-hydraulic transients under three-dimensional ship motions, named RETRAN-03/MOV in order to apply to future marine reactors. First Japanese nuclear ship MUTSU reactor have been analyzed under various ship motions to verify this code. Calculations have been performed under rolling,heaving and stationary inclination conditions during normal operation. Also, the natural circulation has been analyzed, which can provide the decay heat removed to ensure the passive safety of marine reactors. As results, typical thermal-hydraulic characteristics of marine reactors such as flow rate oscillations and S/G water level oscillations have been successfully simulated at various conditions. 7 refs., 11 figs. (author)

  3. Geothermal Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haluska, Oscar P.; Tangir, Daniel; Perri, Matias S.

    2002-01-01

    A general overview of geothermal energy is given that includes a short description of the active and stable areas in the world. The possibilities of geothermal development in Argentina are analyzed taking into account the geothermal fields of the country. The environmental benefits of geothermal energy are outlined

  4. Geothermal System Extensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunnerson, Jon [Boise City Corporation, ID (United States); Pardy, James J. [Boise City Corporation, ID (United States)

    2017-09-30

    This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-EE0000318. The City of Boise operates and maintains the nation’s largest geothermal heating district. Today, 91 buildings are connected, providing space heating to over 5.5 million square feet, domestic water heating, laundry and pool heating, sidewalk snowmelt and other related uses. Approximately 300 million gallons of 177°F geothermal water is pumped annually to buildings and institutions located in downtown Boise. The closed loop system returns all used geothermal water back into the aquifer after heat has been removed via an Injection Well. Water injected back into the aquifer has an average temperature of 115°F. This project expanded the Boise Geothermal Heating District (Geothermal System) to bring geothermal energy to the campus of Boise State University and to the Central Addition Eco-District. In addition, this project also improved the overall system’s reliability and increased the hydraulic capacity.

  5. Design of a hydraulic loop for characterization of nuclear fuels for the Rech-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz Reveco, David Hernan

    2016-01-01

    The Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN), in particular the Fuels Elements Plant (PEC), wants to increase its capacity of design of nuclear fuel elements (ECN). The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) stipulates that in order to develop new ECN designs must be met with neutron, structural, thermal and hydraulics. The CCHEN in the first instance, wishes to implement the hydraulic tests with a test bench which is called 'Hydraulic Loop (LH)'. The general objective of the project is to design a LH at the level of detailed engineering, with the purpose to characterize ECN hydraulically of the RECH-1 reactor. The specific objectives are: (i) Carry out the conceptual design and control philosophy applicable to the LH, ii) Develop the design LH baseline including layout, equipment, instrumentation and assembly; and iii) Carry out the detailed design for LH construction and assembly including technical specifications for the acquisition, construction and assembly of LH, and estimated investments to materialize the project. To carry out the conceptual design of the LH proceed to review piping projects provided by specialists, fluid pressure drop analysis is carried out in pipelines and papers are reviewed on existing LHs (Petten and IPEN). The basic design is developed by setting the conditions system, taking as a design criterion the operating the RECH-2 reactor. For the design of the test zone, the ASME code VIII division 1 section 13-7. The pond develops according to the capacity of fluid contained in the system. The pump is selected by system losses, overestimating the load of the pump. In addition, the characteristic curves of the pump are compared with the curve feature of the system. Detail planes are generated with Autodesk Inventor software Professional 2014-student version. The instrumentation selection is carried out with the advice of a company dedicated to the measurement and control of industrial activities (VETO). The main results of the project

  6. Contribution to the study of thermal-hydraulic problems in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cognet, G.

    1998-01-01

    In nuclear reactors, whatever the type considered, Pressurized Water Water Reactors (PWRs), Fast Breeder reactors (FBRs)..., thermal-hydraulics, the science of fluid mechanics and thermal behaviour, plays an essential role, both in nominal operating and accidental conditions. Fluid can either be the primary fluid (liquid or gas) or a very specific fluid called corium, which, in case of severe accident, could result from core and environning structure melting. The work reported here represents a 20-year contribution to thermal-hydraulic issues which could occur in FBRs and PWRs. Working on these two types of reactors, both in nominal and severe accident situations, has allowed me to compare the problems and to realize the importance of communication between research teams. The evolution in the complexity of studied problems, unavoidable in order to reduce costs and significantly improve safety, has led me from numerical modelling of single-phase flow turbulence to high temperature real melt experiments. The difficulties encountered in understanding the observed phenomena and in increasing experimental databases for computer code qualification have often entailed my participation in specific measurement device developments or adaptations, in particular non-intrusive devices generally based on optical techniques. Being concerned about the end-use of this research work, I actively participated in 'in-situ' thermalhydraulic experiments in the FBRs: Phenix and Super-Phenix, of which I appreciated their undeniable scientific contribution. In my opinion, the thermal-hydraulic questions related to severe accidents are the most complex as they are at the cross-roads of several scientific specialities. Consequently, they require a multi-disciplinary approach and a continuous see-saw motion between experimentalists and modelling teams. After a brief description of the various problems encountered, the main ones are reported. Finally, the importance for research teams to

  7. On three-dimensional nuclear thermo-hydraulic computation techniques for ATR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    The three-dimensional computation code for nuclear thermo-hydraulic combination core LAYMON-2A is used for the calculation of the power distribution and the control rod reactivity value of the ATR. This code possesses various functions which are required for planning the core operation such as the search function for critical boric acid concentration, and can do various simulation calculations such as core burning calculation. Further, the three-dimensional analysis code for xenon dynamic characteristics in the core LAYMON-2C, in which the dynamic characteristic equation of xenon-samarium was incorporated into the LAYMON-2A code can take the change with time lapse of xenon-samarium concentration accompanying the change of power level and power distribution into account, and it is used for the analysis of the spatial vibration characteristics of power and the regional power control characteristics due to xenon in the core. As to the LAYMON-2A, the computation flow, power distribution and thermo-hydraulic computation models, and critical search function are explained. As to the LAYMON-2C, the computation flow is described. The comparison of the calculated values by using the LAYMON-2A code and the operation data of the Fugen is reported. (K.I.)

  8. The Thermal Hydraulics of Tube Support Fouling in Nuclear Steam Generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rummens, Helena E.C.; Rogers, J.T.; Turner, C.W.

    2004-01-01

    It is hypothesized that the thermal-hydraulic environment plays a role in the fouling of tube supports in nuclear steam generators. Experiments were performed to simulate the thermal-hydraulic environment near various designs of supports. Pressure loss, local velocity, turbulence intensity, and local void fraction were measured to characterize the effect of the support. Fouling mechanisms specific to supports were inferred from these experimental data and from actual steam generator inspection results. An analytical model was developed to predict the rate of particulate deposition on the supports, to better understand the complex processes involved.This paper presents the following set of tools for assessing the fouling propensity of a given support design: (1) proposed fouling mechanisms, (2) criteria for support fouling propensity, (3) correlation of fouling with parameters such as mass flux and quality, (4) descriptions of experimental tools such as flow visualization and measurement of pressure-loss profiles, and (5) analytical tools.An important conclusion from this and our previous work is that the fouling propensity is greater with broached support plates, both trefoil and quatrefoil, than with lattice bar supports and formed bar supports, in which significant cross flows occur

  9. 3D thermal-hydraulic analysis on core of PWR nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Zhaohui; Wang Xuefang; Shen Mengyu

    1997-01-01

    Thermal hydraulic analysis of core is of great importance in reactor safety analysis. A computer code, thermal hydraulic analysis porous medium analysis (THAPMA), has been developed to simulate the flow and heat transfer characteristics of reactor components. It has been proved reliable by several numerical tests. In the THAPMA code, a new difference scheme and solution method have been studied in developing the computer software. For the difference scheme, a second order accurate, high resolution scheme, called WSUC scheme, has been proposed. This scheme is total variation bounded and unconditionally stable in convective numeral stability. Numerical tests show that the WSUC is better in accuracy and resolution than the 1-st order upwind, 2-nd order upwind, SOUCUP by Zhu and Rodi. In solution method, a modified PISO algorithm is used, which is not only simpler but also more accurate and more rapid in convergence than the original PISO algorithm. Moreover, the modified PISO algorithm can effectively solve steady and transient state problem. Besides, with the THAPMA code, the flow and heat transfer phenomena in reactor core have been numerically simulated in the light of the design condition of Qinshan PWR nuclear power station (the second-term project). The simulation results supply a theoretical basis for the core design

  10. Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. Volume 9. Methodologies for review of the health and safety aspects of proposed nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel sites and facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, A.V.; Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

    1977-01-01

    This report sets forth methodologies for review of the health and safety aspects of proposed nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel sites and facilities for electric power generation. The review is divided into a Notice of Intention process and an Application for Certification process, in accordance with the structure to be used by the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission, the first emphasizing site-specific considerations, the second examining the detailed facility design as well. The Notice of Intention review is divided into three possible stages: an examination of emissions and site characteristics, a basic impact analysis, and an assessment of public impacts. The Application for Certification review is divided into five possible stages: a review of the Notice of Intention treatment, review of the emission control equipment, review of the safety design, review of the general facility design, and an overall assessment of site and facility acceptability

  11. Thermal-hydraulic analysis techniques for axisymmetric pebble bed nuclear reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroh, K.R.

    1979-03-01

    The pebble bed reactor's cylindrical core volume contains a random bed of small, spherical fuel-moderator elements. These graphite spheres, containing a central region of dispersed coated-particle fissile and fertile material, are cooled by high pressure helium flowing through the connected interstitial voids. A mathematical model and numerical solution technique have been developed which allow calculation of macroscopic values of thermal-hydraulic variables in an axisymmetric pebble bed nuclear reactor core. The computer program PEBBLE is based on a mathematical model which treats the bed macroscopically as a generating, conducting porous medium. The steady-state model uses a nonlinear Forchheimer-type relation between the coolant pressure gradient and mass flux, with newly derived coefficients for the linear and quadratic resistance terms. The remaining equations in the model make use of mass continuity, and thermal energy balances for the solid and fluid phases

  12. The delay function in finite difference models for nuclear channels thermo-hydraulic transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agazzi, A.

    1977-01-01

    The study of the thermo-hydraulic transients in a nuclear reactor core often requires a bi- or tri-dimensional mathematical simulation of a reactor channel. The equations involved are generally solved by means of finite-difference methods. The determination of the spatial mesh-width and the time interval is strongly conditioned by the necessity of a good accuracy in the description of the delay function which defines the transfer of thermal perturbations along the cooling channel. In this paper the effects of both space and time discretization on the delay function are considered and for the classical cases of inlet temperature step and ramp universal functions and diagrams are given in order to make possible the determination of optimal spatial mesh-width and time interval, once the requested accuracy of the model is fixed in advance

  13. Development of CFD software for the simulation of thermal hydraulics in advanced nuclear reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachar, Abdelaziz; Haslinger, Wolfgang; Scheuerer, Georg; Theodoridis, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of the project were: Improvement of the simulation accuracy for nuclear reactor thermo-hydraulics by coupling system codes with three-dimensional CFD software; Extension of CFD software to predict thermo-hydraulics in advanced reactor concepts; Validation of the CFD software by simulation different UPTF TRAM-C test cases and development of best practice guidelines. The CFD module was based on the ANSYS CFD software and the system code ATHLET of GRS. All three objectives were met: The coupled ATHLET-ANSYS CFD software is in use at GRS and TU Muenchen. Besides the test cases described in the report, it has been used for other applications, for instance the TALL-3D experiment of KTH Stockholm. The CFD software was extended with material properties for liquid metals, and validated using existing data. Several new concepts were tested when applying the CFD software to the UPTF test cases: Simulations with Conjugate Heat Transfer (CHT) were performed for the first time. This led to better agreement between predictions and data and reduced uncertainties when applying temperature boundary conditions. The meshes for the CHT simulation were also used for a coupled fluid-structure-thermal analysis which was another novelty. The results of the multi-physics analysis showed plausible results for the mechanical and thermal stresses. The workflow developed as part of the current project can be directly used for industrial nuclear reactor simulations. Finally, simulations for two-phase flows with and without interfacial mass transfer were performed. These showed good agreement with data. However, a persisting problem for the simulation of multi-phase flows are the long simulation times which make use for industrial applications difficult.

  14. Proceedings of the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics NURETH-7. Sessions 17-24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, R.C.; Feiner, F. [American Nuclear Society, La Grange Park, IL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Technical papers accepted for presentation at the Seventh International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics are included in the present Proceedings. Except for the invited papers in the plenary session, all other papers are contributed papers. The topics of the meeting encompass all major areas of nuclear thermal-hydraulics, including analytical and experimental works on the fundamental mechanisms of fluid flow and heat transfer, the development of advanced mathematical and numerical methods, and the application of advancements in the field in the development of novel reactor concepts. Because of the complex nature of nuclear reactors and power plants, several papers deal with the combined issues of thermal-hydraulics and reactor/power-plant safety, core neutronics and/or radiation. The participation in the conference by the authors from several countries and four continents makes the Proceedings a comprehensive review of the recent progress in the field of nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics worldwide. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  15. Proceedings of the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics NURETH-7. Sessions 17-24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, R.C.; Feiner, F.

    1995-09-01

    Technical papers accepted for presentation at the Seventh International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics are included in the present Proceedings. Except for the invited papers in the plenary session, all other papers are contributed papers. The topics of the meeting encompass all major areas of nuclear thermal-hydraulics, including analytical and experimental works on the fundamental mechanisms of fluid flow and heat transfer, the development of advanced mathematical and numerical methods, and the application of advancements in the field in the development of novel reactor concepts. Because of the complex nature of nuclear reactors and power plants, several papers deal with the combined issues of thermal-hydraulics and reactor/power-plant safety, core neutronics and/or radiation. The participation in the conference by the authors from several countries and four continents makes the Proceedings a comprehensive review of the recent progress in the field of nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics worldwide. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  16. Geothermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter discusses the role of geothermal energy may have on the energy future of the US. The topics discussed in the chapter include historical aspects of geothermal energy, the geothermal resource, hydrothermal fluids, electricity production, district heating, process heating, geopressured brines, technology and costs, hot dry rock, magma, and environmental and siting issues

  17. The development of radiation hardened robot for nuclear facility - Development of embedded controller for hydraulic robot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byung Kook; Kim, Jae Kwon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    We designed and implemented a reliable hierarchical control system for hydraulic robots for nuclear power plant maintenance. In hazardous environments such as nuclear power plants, robot systems or automated equipment should be used instead of human being for maintenance and repair. Such robot should guarantee high reliability in hazardous environments such as high radiation or high temperature. The overall system is composed of three hierarchical subsystems: i) supervisory controller in safe zone for operator interaction with monitoring and commanding and graphic user interface, ii) master controller in semi-hazardous zone for control function, and iii) slave controller in hazardous zone for sensing and actuation. These subsystems are connected with suitable communication channels: a) master-slave communication channel implemented with CAN (Control Area Network) and b) supervisory-master communication with Ethernet. The master and the slave controllers construct a feedback closed-loop control system. In order to improve reliability, the slave controller is duplicated using cold-standby scheme, and master-slave communication channel is also duplicated. The overall system is implemented harmonically, and we obtained fast control interval of 1msec, which is sufficient for high-performance real-time control. 12 refs., 58 figs., 13 tabs. (Author)

  18. On the Versatility of Rheoreversible, Stimuli-responsive Hydraulic-Fracturing Fluids for Enhanced Geothermal Systems: Effect of Reservoir pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Carlos A.; Shao, Hongbo; Bonneville, Alain; Varga, Tamas; Zhong, Lirong

    2016-04-25

    Abstract The primary challenge for the feasibility of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) is to cost-effectively create high-permeability reservoirs inside deep crystalline bedrock. Although fracturing fluids are commonly used for oil/gas, standard fracturing methods are not developed or proven for EGS temperatures and pressures. Furthermore, the environmental impacts of currently used fracturing methods are only recently being determined. These authors recently reported an environmentally benign, CO2-activated, rheoreversible fracturing fluid that enhances permeability through fracturing due to in situ volume expansion and gel formation. The potential of this novel fracturing fluid is evaluated in this work towards its application at geothermal sites under different pH conditions. Laboratory-scale fracturing experiments using Coso Geothermal rock cores under different pH environments were performed followed by X-ray microtomography characterization. The results demonstrate that CO2-reactive aqueous solutions of environmentally amenable polyallylamine (PAA) consistently and reproducibly creates/propagates fracture networks through highly impermeable crystalline rock from Coso EGS sites at considerably lower effective stress as compared to conventional fracturing fluids. In addition, permeability was significantly enhanced in a wide range of formation-water pH values. This effective, and environmentally-friendly fracturing fluid technology represents a potential alternative to conventional fracturing fluids.

  19. Nuclear future: thinking for building. Proceedings of the 12. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics; 8. General congress on nuclear energy; 5. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    These proceedings, for the first time, present jointly the 12. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics (12 ENFIR), 8. General congress on nuclear energy (8. CGEN), and 5. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications (5. ENAN). The main theme of discussion was: 'Nuclear Future: thinking for building'. The papers have analysed the progresses of peaceful utilization of nuclear technology and its forecasting for the beginning of the new millennium. The construction of Angra-3 nuclear power plant have been discussed

  20. Thermal-hydraulics analysis for advanced fuel to be used in Candu 600 nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catana, Alexandru [RAAN, Institute for Nuclear Research, Str. Campului Nr. 1, Pitesti, Arges (Romania); Danila, Nicolae; Prisecaru, Ilie; Dupleac, Daniel [University POLITEHNICA of Bucharest (Romania)

    2008-07-01

    Two Candu 600 pressure tube nuclear reactors cover about 17% of Romania's electricity demand. These nuclear reactors are moderated/cooled with D{sub 2}O, fuelled on-power with Natural Uranium (NU) dioxide encapsulated in a standard (STD37) fuel bundle. High neutron economy is achieved using D{sub 2}O as moderator and coolant in separated systems. To reduce fuel cycle costs, programs were initiated in Canada, S.Korea, Argentina and Romania for the design and build new fuel bundles able to accommodate different fuel compositions. Candu core structure and modular fuel bundles, permits flexible fuel cycles. The main expected achievements are: reduced fuel cycle costs, increased discharge burn-up, plutonium and minor actinides management, thorium cycle, use of recycled PWR and in the same time waste minimization and operating cost reduction. These new fuel bundles are to be used in already operated Candu reactors. Advanced fuel bundle were proposed: CANFLEX bundle (Canada, S-Korea); the Romanian 'SEU43' bundle (Fig 1). In this paper thermal-hydraulic analysis in sub-channel approach is presented for SEU43. Comparisons with standard (STD37) fuel bundles are made using SEU-NU for NU fuel composition and SEU-0.96, for recycled uranium (RU) fuel with 0.96% U-235. Extended and comprehensive analysis must be made in order to assess the TH behaviour of SEU43. In this paper, considering STD37, SEU43-NU and SEU43-0.96 fuel bundles, main TH parameters were analysed: pressure drop, fuel highest temperatures, coolant density, critical heat flux. Differences between these fuel types are outlined. Benefits are: fuel costs reduction, spent fuel waste minimization, increase in competitiveness of nuclear power. Safety margins must be, at least, conserved. (authors)

  1. Thermal-hydraulics analysis for advanced fuel to be used in Candu 600 nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catana, Alexandru; Danila, Nicolae; Prisecaru, Ilie; Dupleac, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Two Candu 600 pressure tube nuclear reactors cover about 17% of Romania's electricity demand. These nuclear reactors are moderated/cooled with D 2 O, fuelled on-power with Natural Uranium (NU) dioxide encapsulated in a standard (STD37) fuel bundle. High neutron economy is achieved using D 2 O as moderator and coolant in separated systems. To reduce fuel cycle costs, programs were initiated in Canada, S.Korea, Argentina and Romania for the design and build new fuel bundles able to accommodate different fuel compositions. Candu core structure and modular fuel bundles, permits flexible fuel cycles. The main expected achievements are: reduced fuel cycle costs, increased discharge burn-up, plutonium and minor actinides management, thorium cycle, use of recycled PWR and in the same time waste minimization and operating cost reduction. These new fuel bundles are to be used in already operated Candu reactors. Advanced fuel bundle were proposed: CANFLEX bundle (Canada, S-Korea); the Romanian 'SEU43' bundle (Fig 1). In this paper thermal-hydraulic analysis in sub-channel approach is presented for SEU43. Comparisons with standard (STD37) fuel bundles are made using SEU-NU for NU fuel composition and SEU-0.96, for recycled uranium (RU) fuel with 0.96% U-235. Extended and comprehensive analysis must be made in order to assess the TH behaviour of SEU43. In this paper, considering STD37, SEU43-NU and SEU43-0.96 fuel bundles, main TH parameters were analysed: pressure drop, fuel highest temperatures, coolant density, critical heat flux. Differences between these fuel types are outlined. Benefits are: fuel costs reduction, spent fuel waste minimization, increase in competitiveness of nuclear power. Safety margins must be, at least, conserved. (authors)

  2. Porosity and hydraulic conductivity estimation of the basaltic aquifer in Southern Syria by using nuclear and electrical well logging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfahani, Jamal

    2017-08-01

    An alternative approach using nuclear neutron-porosity and electrical resistivity well logging of long (64 inch) and short (16 inch) normal techniques is proposed to estimate the porosity and the hydraulic conductivity ( K) of the basaltic aquifers in Southern Syria. This method is applied on the available logs of Kodana well in Southern Syria. It has been found that the obtained K value by applying this technique seems to be reasonable and comparable with the hydraulic conductivity value of 3.09 m/day obtained by the pumping test carried out at Kodana well. The proposed alternative well logging methodology seems as promising and could be practiced in the basaltic environments for the estimation of hydraulic conductivity parameter. However, more detailed researches are still required to make this proposed technique very performed in basaltic environments.

  3. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Thermal-Hydraulic Research Program: Maintaining expertise in a changing environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheron, B.W.; Shotkin, L.M.; Baratta, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    Throughout the 1970s and early 1980s, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) thermal-hydraulic research program enjoyed ample funding, sponsored extensive experimental and analytical development programs, and attracted worldwide expertise. With the completion of the major experimental programs and with the promulgation of the revised emergency core-cooling system rule, both the funding and prominence of thermal-hydraulic research at the NRC have declined in recent years. This has led justifiably to the concern by some that the program may no longer have the minimal elements needed to maintain both expertise and world-class status. The purpose of this article is to describe the NRC's current thermal-hydraulic research program and to show how this program ensures maintenance of a viable, robust research effort and retention of needed expertise and international leadership

  4. Geothermal spas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, J.L.; Takahashi, P.K.

    1990-01-01

    The spa business, part of the health and fitness industry that has sprung up in recent years, is highly successful world-wide. The most traditional type of spa is the geothermal spa, found in geothermal areas around the world. In Japan, for example, some 2,000 geothermal spas and resorts generate $6 billion annually. Hawaii has an ideal environment for geothermal spas, and several locations in the islands could supply warm mineral water for spa development. Hawaii receives about 6 million visitors annually, a high percentage of whom are familiar with the relaxing and therapeutic value of geothermal spas, virtually guaranteeing the success of this industry in Hawaii. Presently, Hawaii does not have a single geothermal spa. This paper reports that the geothermal spa business is an industry whose time has come, an industry that offers very promising investment opportunities, and one that would improve the economy while expanding the diversity of pleasurable vacation options in Hawaii

  5. Modelling and thermal hydraulic analysis of the Angra-2 nuclear reactor using RELAP5-3D code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González Mantecón, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) performance during steady-state and accident conditions has been one of the main research subjects in the nuclear field. In order to simulate the behavior of water-cooled reactors, several complex thermal-hydraulic codes systems have been developed. Particularly, the RELAP5 code, developed by the Idaho National Laboratory, is a best-estimate thermal-hydraulic analysis tool and one of the most used in nuclear industry. The RELAP5-3D 3.0.0 code was used to develop a detailed model of Angra 2 nuclear reactor using reference data from the Final Safety Analysis Report. Angra 2 is the second Brazilian NPP, which began commercial operation in 2001. The plant is equipped with a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) type with 3771.0 MWt. Simulations of the reactor behavior during normal operation conditions and postulated accident conditions were performed. Results achieved in the reactor steady-state simulation were compared with nominal parameters of the NPP. These results proved to be in good agreement, with relative errors less than 1%. In the transient simulation, the obtained results were coherent and satisfactory. This study demonstrates that the RELAP5-3D model is capable to reproduce the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the Angra-2 PWR during diverse operation conditions and it can contribute for the process of the plant safety analysis. (author)

  6. 1D Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical (THC) Reactive transport modeling for deep geothermal systems: A case study of Groß Schönebeck reservoir, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driba, D. L.; De Lucia, M.; Peiffer, S.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid-rock interactions in geothermal reservoirs are driven by the state of disequilibrium that persists among solid and solutes due to changing temperature and pressure. During operation of enhanced geothermal systems, injection of cooled water back into the reservoir disturbs the initial thermodynamic equilibrium between the reservoir and its geothermal fluid, which may induce modifications in permeability through changes in porosity and pore space geometry, consequently bringing about several impairments to the overall system.Modeling of fluid-rock interactions induced by injection of cold brine into Groß Schönebeck geothermal reservoir system situated in the Rotliegend sandstone at 4200m depth have been done by coupling geochemical modeling Code Phreeqc with OpenGeoSys. Through batch modeling the re-evaluation of the measured hydrochemical composition of the brine has been done using Quintessa databases, the results from the calculation indicate that a mineral phases comprising of K-feldspar, hematite, Barite, Calcite and Dolomite was found to match the hypothesis of equilibrium with the formation fluid, Reducing conditions are presumed in the model (pe = -3.5) in order to match the amount of observed dissolved Fe and thus considered as initial state for the reactive transport modeling. based on a measured composition of formation fluids and the predominant mineralogical assemblage of the host rock, a preliminary 1D Reactive transport modeling (RTM) was run with total time set to 30 years; results obtained for the initial simulation revealed that during this period, no significant change is evident for K-feldspar. Furthermore, the precipitation of calcite along the flow path in the brine results in a drop of pH from 6.2 to a value of 5.2 noticed over the simulated period. The circulation of cooled fluid in the reservoir is predicted to affect the temperature of the reservoir within the first 100 -150m from the injection well. Examination of porosity change in

  7. Thermal-hydraulic studies on the safety of VVER-440 type nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuunanen, J.

    1994-01-01

    The thesis includes several thermal-hydraulic analyses related to the Loviisa VVER-440 nuclear power plant units. The work consists of experimental studies, analysis of the experiments, analysis of some plant transients and development of a calculational model for calculation of boric concentrations in the reactor. In the first part of thesis, in the case of simulation of boric acid solution behaviour during long-term cooling period of LOCAs, experiments were performed in scaled-down test facilities. The experimental data together with the results of RELAP5/MOD3 simulations were used to develop a model for calculations of boric acid concentrations in the reactor during LOCAs. In the second part, in the case of simulation of horizontal generators, experiments were performed with PACTEL integral test loop to simulate loss of feedwater transients. The PACTEL experiments as well as earlier REWETT-III natural circulation tests, were analyzed with RELAP5/MOD3 Version 5m5 code. The third part of the work consists of simulations of Loviisa VVER reactor pump trip transients with RELAP5/MOD1-Eur, RELAP5/MOD3 and CATHARE codes. (56 refs., 9 figs.)

  8. How to effectively compute the reliability of a thermal-hydraulic nuclear passive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zio, E.; Pedroni, N.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Optimized LS is the preferred choice for failure probability estimation. → Two alternative options are suggested for uncertainty and sensitivity analyses. → SS for simulation codes requiring seconds or minutes to run. → Regression models (e.g., ANNs) for simulation codes requiring hours or days to run. - Abstract: The computation of the reliability of a thermal-hydraulic (T-H) passive system of a nuclear power plant can be obtained by (i) Monte Carlo (MC) sampling the uncertainties of the system model and parameters, (ii) computing, for each sample, the system response by a mechanistic T-H code and (iii) comparing the system response with pre-established safety thresholds, which define the success or failure of the safety function. The computational effort involved can be prohibitive because of the large number of (typically long) T-H code simulations that must be performed (one for each sample) for the statistical estimation of the probability of success or failure. The objective of this work is to provide operative guidelines to effectively handle the computation of the reliability of a nuclear passive system. Two directions of computation efficiency are considered: from one side, efficient Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) techniques are indicated as a means to performing robust estimations with a limited number of samples: in particular, the Subset Simulation (SS) and Line Sampling (LS) methods are identified as most valuable; from the other side, fast-running, surrogate regression models (also called response surfaces or meta-models) are indicated as a valid replacement of the long-running T-H model codes: in particular, the use of bootstrapped Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) is shown to have interesting potentials, including for uncertainty propagation. The recommendations drawn are supported by the results obtained in an illustrative application of literature.

  9. Multi-scale analysis of nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics-first applications using the NEPTUNE platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guelfi, A.; Boucker, M.; Mimouni, S.; Bestion, D.; Boudier, P.

    2005-01-01

    The NEPTUNE project aims at building a new two-phase flow thermal-hydraulics platform for nuclear reactor simulation. EDF (Electricite de France) and CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) with the co-sponsorship of IRSN (Institut de Radioprotection et Surete Nucleaire) and FRAMATOME-ANP, are jointly developing the NEPTUNE multi-scale platform that includes new physical models and numerical methods for each of the computing scales. One usually distinguishes three different scales for industrial simulations: the 'system' scale, the 'component' scale (subchannel analysis) and CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics). In addition DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation) can provide information at a smaller scale that can be useful for the development of the averaged scales. The NEPTUNE project also includes work on software architecture and research on new numerical methods for coupling codes since both are required to improve industrial calculations. All these R and D challenges have been defined in order to meet industrial needs and the underlying stakes (mainly the competitiveness and the safety of Nuclear Power Plants). This paper focuses on three high priority needs: DNB (Departure from Nucleate Boiling) prediction, directly linked to fuel performance; PTS (Pressurized Thermal Shock), a key issue when studying the lifespan of critical components and LBLOCA (Large Break Loss of Coolant Accident), a reference accident for safety studies. For each of these industrial applications, we provide a review of the last developments within the NEPTUNE platform and we present the first results. A particular attention is also given to physical validation and the needs for further experimental data. (authors)

  10. Preprocessor for RELAP5 code, nuclear reactor thermal hydraulics accident analysis program, using Microsoft MS-EXCEL tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biaty, Patricia Andrea Paladino; Sabundjian, Gaiane

    2005-01-01

    The thermal hydraulic study in accidents and transients analyses in nuclear power plants is realized with some special tools. These programs use the best estimate analyses and have been developed to simulate accidents and transients in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and auxiliary systems. The RELAP5 code has been used as tool to licensing the nuclear facilities in our country, which is the objective of this study. The main problem when RELAP5 code is used is a lot of information necessary to simulate thermal hydraulic accidents. Moreover, there is the necessity of a reasonable amount of mathematical operations to calculation of the geometry of the components existents. Therefore, in order to facilitate the manipulation of this information, it is necessary the developing a friendly preprocessor for attainment of the mathematical calculations for RELAP5 code. One of the tools used for some of these calculations is the MS-EXCEL, which will be used in this work. (author)

  11. Program ELM: A tool for rapid thermal-hydraulic analysis of solid-core nuclear rocket fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, J.T.

    1992-11-01

    This report reviews the state of the art of thermal-hydraulic analysis codes and presents a new code, Program ELM, for analysis of fuel elements. ELM is a concise computational tool for modeling the steady-state thermal-hydraulics of propellant flow through fuel element coolant channels in a nuclear thermal rocket reactor with axial coolant passages. The program was developed as a tool to swiftly evaluate various heat transfer coefficient and friction factor correlations generated for turbulent pipe flow with heat addition which have been used in previous programs. Thus, a consistent comparison of these correlations was performed, as well as a comparison with data from the NRX reactor experiments from the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications (NERVA) project. This report describes the ELM Program algorithm, input/output, and validation efforts and provides a listing of the code

  12. Application of flow network models of SINDA/FLUINT{sup TM} to a nuclear power plant system thermal hydraulic code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Ji Bum [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Woon [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    In order to enhance the dynamic and interactive simulation capability of a system thermal hydraulic code for nuclear power plant, applicability of flow network models in SINDA/FLUINT{sup TM} has been tested by modeling feedwater system and coupling to DSNP which is one of a system thermal hydraulic simulation code for a pressurized heavy water reactor. The feedwater system is selected since it is one of the most important balance of plant systems with a potential to greatly affect the behavior of nuclear steam supply system. The flow network model of this feedwater system consists of condenser, condensate pumps, low and high pressure heaters, deaerator, feedwater pumps, and control valves. This complicated flow network is modeled and coupled to DSNP and it is tested for several normal and abnormal transient conditions such turbine load maneuvering, turbine trip, and loss of class IV power. The results show reasonable behavior of the coupled code and also gives a good dynamic and interactive simulation capabilities for the several mild transient conditions. It has been found that coupling system thermal hydraulic code with a flow network code is a proper way of upgrading simulation capability of DSNP to mature nuclear plant analyzer (NPA). 5 refs., 10 figs. (Author)

  13. Geothermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laplaige, Ph.; Lemale, J.

    2008-01-01

    Geothermal energy is a renewable energy source which consists in exploiting the heat coming from the Earth. It covers a wide range of techniques and applications which are presented in this article: 1 - the Earth, source of heat: structure of the Earth, geodynamic model and plate tectonics, origin of heat, geothermal gradient and terrestrial heat flux; 2 - geothermal fields and resources; 3 - implementation of geothermal resources: exploration, main characteristic parameters, resource exploitation; 4 - uses of geothermal resources: power generation, thermal uses, space heating and air conditioning heat pumps, district heating, addition of heat pumps; 5 - economical aspects: power generation, heat generation for district heating; 6 - environmental aspects: conditions of implementation, impacts as substitute to fossil fuels; 7 - geothermal energy in France: resources, organisation; 8 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  14. Geothermal energy

    OpenAIRE

    Manzella A.

    2017-01-01

    Geothermal technologies use renewable energy resources to generate electricity and direct use of heat while producing very low levels of greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions. Geothermal energy is the thermal energy stored in the underground, including any contained fluid, which is available for extraction and conversion into energy products. Electricity generation, which nowadays produces 73.7 TWh (12.7 GW of capacity) worldwide, usually requires geothermal resources temperatures of over 100 °C. Fo...

  15. Thermal-Hydraulic Experiments and Modelling for Advanced Nuclear Reactor Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, C. H.; Chung, M. K.; Park, C. K. and others

    2005-04-01

    The objectives of the project are to study thermal hydraulic characteristics of reactor primary system for the verification of the reactor safety and to evaluate new safety concepts of new safety design features. To meet the research goal, several thermal hydraulic experiments were performed and related thermal hydraulic models were developed with the experimental data which were produced through the thermal hydraulic experiments. Followings are main research topics; - Multi-dimensional Phenomena in a Reactor Vessel Downcomer - Condensation Load and Thermal Mixing in the IRWST - Development of Thermal-Hydraulic Models for Two-Phase Flow - Development of Measurement Techniques for Two-Phase Flow - Supercritical Reactor T/H Characteristics Analysis From the above experimental and analytical studies, new safety design features of the advanced power reactors were verified and lots of the safety issues were also resolved

  16. Thermal-Hydraulic Experiments and Modelling for Advanced Nuclear Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, C. H.; Chung, M. K.; Park, C. K. and others

    2005-04-15

    The objectives of the project are to study thermal hydraulic characteristics of reactor primary system for the verification of the reactor safety and to evaluate new safety concepts of new safety design features. To meet the research goal, several thermal hydraulic experiments were performed and related thermal hydraulic models were developed with the experimental data which were produced through the thermal hydraulic experiments. Followings are main research topics; - Multi-dimensional Phenomena in a Reactor Vessel Downcomer - Condensation Load and Thermal Mixing in the IRWST - Development of Thermal-Hydraulic Models for Two-Phase Flow - Development of Measurement Techniques for Two-Phase Flow - Supercritical Reactor T/H Characteristics Analysis From the above experimental and analytical studies, new safety design features of the advanced power reactors were verified and lots of the safety issues were also resolved.

  17. Geothermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Du, H.; Bouchot, V.; Lopez, S.; Bialkowski, A.; Colnot, A.; Rigollet, C.; Sanjuan, B.; Millot, R.; Brach, M.; Asmundsson, R.; Giroud, N.

    2010-01-01

    Geothermal energy has shown a revival for several years and should strongly develop in a near future. Its potentiality is virtually unexhaustible. Its uses are multiple and various: individual and collective space heating, heat networks, power generation, heat storage, heat exchanges etc.. Re-launched by the demand of renewable energy sources, geothermal energy has become credible thanks to the scientific works published recently which have demonstrated its economical and technical relevance. Its image to the public is changing as well. However, lot of work remains to do to make geothermal energy a real industry in France. Several brakes have to be removed rapidly which concern the noise pollution of geothermal facilities, the risk of bad results of drillings, the electricity costs etc. This dossier gives an overview of today's main research paths in the domain of geothermal energy: 1 - geothermal energy in France: historical development, surface and deep resources, ambitions of the French national energy plan (pluri-annual investment plan for heat generation, incentives, regional 'climate-air-energy' schemes), specific regulations; 2 - geothermal energy at the city scale - sedimentary basins: Ile-de-France 40 years of Dogger reservoir exploitation, potentialities of clastic reservoirs - the Chaunoy sandstones example; 3 - geothermal power generation: conventional reservoirs - the Bouillante model (Guadeloupe, French Indies); the Soultz-sous-Forets pilot plant (Bas-Rhin, France); the supercritical reservoirs - the Krafla geothermal area (Iceland). (J.S.)

  18. Thermal-hydraulic experiment and analysis for interim dry storage of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Seung Hun

    2011-02-01

    The experimental and numerical studies of interim storages for nuclear spent fuels have been performed to investigate thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the dry storage systems and to propose new methodologies for the analysis and the design. Three separate researches have been performed in the present study: (a) Development of a scaling methodology and thermal-hydraulic experiment of a single spent fuel assembly simulating a dry storage cask: (b) Full-scope simulation of a dry storage cask by the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code: (c) Thermal-hydraulic design of a tunnel-type interim storage facility. In the first study, a scaling methodology has been developed to design a scaled-down canister. The scaling was performed in two steps. For the first step, the height of a spent fuel assembly was reduced from full height to half height. In order to consider the effect of height reduction on the natural convection, the scaling law of Ishii and Kataoka (1984) was employed. For the second step, the quantity of spent fuel assemblies was reduced from multiple assemblies to a single assembly. The scaling methodology was validated through the comparison with the experiment of the TN24P cask. The Peak Cladding Temperature (PCT), temperature gradients, and the axial and radial temperature distribution in the nondimensional forms were in good agreement with the experimental data. Based on the developed methodology, we have performed a single assembly experiment which was designed to simulate the full scale of the TN24P cask. The experimental data was compared with the CFD calculations. It turns out that their PCTs were less than the maximum allowable temperature for the fuel cladding and that the differences of their PCTs were agreed within 3 .deg. C, which was less than measurement uncertainty. In the second study, the full-scope simulations of the TN24P cask were performed by FLUENT. In order to investigate the sensitivity of the numerical and physical

  19. Analysis of hydraulic gradients across the host rock at the proposed Texas Panhandle nuclear-waste repository site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bair, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis of the direction of ground-water flow across the host rock at the proposed high-level nuclear-waste repository site in Deaf Smith County, Texas, is complicated by vertical and lateral changes in the density of formation fluids in the various hydrogeologic units that overlie and underlie the proposed host rock. Because the concept of hydraulic head is not valid when evaluating vertical hydraulic gradients in a variably-density flow system, other methods were used to determine the direction and magnitude of vertical hydraulic gradients at the proposed site where the specific gravity of formation fluids varies between 1.00 and 1.28. The direction of ground-water flow across the proposed host rock, an 80-foot-thick salt bed in the Lower San Andres Formation, was determined by calculating vertical hydraulic gradients based on formation pressure and fluid density data, and by analysis of pressure-depth diagrams. Based on data from the vicinity of the proposed site, both methods indicate the potential for downflow across the host rock. Downflow or predominantly horizontal flow is considered a favorable prewaste emplacement condition because it prolongs the travel time to the biosphere of any naturally or accidentally released radionuclides

  20. Proceedings of the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics NURETH-7. Volume 3, Sessions 12-16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, R.C.; Feiner, F. [comps.] [American Nuclear Society, La Grange Park, IL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This document, Volume 3, includes papers presented at the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics (NURETH-7) September 10--15, 1995 at Saratoga Springs, N.Y. The following subjects are discussed: Progress in analytical and experimental work on the fundamentals of nuclear thermal-hydraulics, the development of advanced mathematical and numerical methods, ad the application of advancements in the field in the development of novel reactor concepts. Also combined issues of thermal-hydraulics and reactor/power-plant safety, core neutronics and/or radiation. Selected abstracts have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  1. Proceedings of the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics NURETH-7. Volume 2, Sessions 6-11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, R.C.; Feiner, F. [comps.] [American Nuclear Society, La Grange Park, IL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This document, Volume 2, includes papers presented at the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics (NURETH-7) September 10--15, 1995 at Saratoga Springs, N.Y. The following subjects are discussed: Progress in analytical and experimental work on the fundamentals of nuclear thermal-hydraulics, the development of advanced mathematical and numerical methods, and the application of advancements in the field in the development of novel reactor concepts. Also combined issues of thermal-hydraulics and reactor/power-plant safety, core neutronics and/or radiation. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  2. Proceedings of the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics NURETH-7. Volume 1, Sessions 1-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, R.C.; Feiner, F.

    1995-09-01

    This document, Volume 1, includes papers presented at the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics (NURETH-7) September 10--15, 1995 at Saratoga Springs, N.Y. The following subjects are discussed: Progress in analytical and experimental work on the fundamentals of nuclear thermal-hydraulics, the development of advanced mathematical and numerical methods, and the application of advancements in the field in the development of novel reactor concepts. Also combined issues of thermal-hydraulics and reactor/power-plant safety, core neutronics and/or radiation. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  3. Proceedings of the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics NURETH-7. Volume 1, Sessions 1-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, R.C.; Feiner, F. [comps.] [American Nuclear Society, La Grange Park, IL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This document, Volume 1, includes papers presented at the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics (NURETH-7) September 10--15, 1995 at Saratoga Springs, N.Y. The following subjects are discussed: Progress in analytical and experimental work on the fundamentals of nuclear thermal-hydraulics, the development of advanced mathematical and numerical methods, and the application of advancements in the field in the development of novel reactor concepts. Also combined issues of thermal-hydraulics and reactor/power-plant safety, core neutronics and/or radiation. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation Containment Experiments with GOTHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiles, Lawrence E.; George, Thomas L.

    2003-01-01

    GOTHIC version 7.0 was used to model five tests that were conducted in the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation facility in Japan. The tests involved steam and helium injection into a preheated, spray-moderated, 1/4-scale model of a pressurized water reactor dry containment. Comparison of GOTHIC predictions to measured data for pressure, vapor temperatures, structure surface temperatures, and helium concentrations provided the opportunity to evaluate methods for modeling gas dispersion, drop heat and mass transfer, and surface heat transfer.The test facility includes three floors. The lower two floors are partitioned into a variety of rooms that simulate the lower regions of the modeled containment. On the upper floor, rooms that simulate the steam generator enclosures and the pressurizer enclosure extend into the dome, which represents about two-thirds of the total volume of the containment.The GOTHIC model was defined with 30 control volumes using a mix of lumped parameter volumes and subdivided volumes that employ a three-dimensional mesh. Each volume included several thermal conductors to model the various structures. More than 100 flow paths were used to model the hydraulic connections.Comparison of predictions to data showed that enhanced grid resolution in the vicinity of the steam-helium release point served to limit dispersion of the steam-helium plume. The data comparisons also suggested that spray effectiveness was reduced by drop impact with the containment wall and by the high drop concentration. The data comparisons further suggested that the presence of condensation, sprays, splashing, and other wetting mechanisms should be considered to obtain a reasonable estimate of the effect of liquid films on the structure surfaces

  5. Proceedings of fifth international topical meeting on nuclear thermal hydraulics, operations and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The fifth international topical meeting on nuclear thermohydraulics, operations and safety was convened in Beijing in April 14-18, 1997. The topical meeting was sponsored by the Chinese Nuclear Society and cosponsored by American Nuclear Society, Atomic Energy Society of Japan, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Canada Nuclear Society, Korean Nuclear Society, Mexican Nuclear Society, Nuclear Society of Slovenia and Spanish Nuclear Society. There were 262 articles were published in the meeting. They are related nuclear power thermohydraulics, operations and safety

  6. The geo-reactor. A link between nuclear fission and geothermal energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, Claude; Fiorina, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Recent high-precision isotope analysis data suggests the potential occurrence of a geo-reactor. Specific gas isotopes that could have been generated by binary and ternary fissions were identified in volcano emanations or as soluble/associated species in crystalline rocks and semi-quantitatively evaluated as isotopic ratio or estimated amounts. Presently if it is evident that according to the actinide inventory on the Earth, local potential criticality of the geo-system may have been reached, several questions remain such as why, where and when did a geo-reactor be operational? Even if the hypothesis of a geo-reactor operation in the proto-Earth period should be acceptable, it could be difficult to anticipate that a geo-reactor is still operating today. This could be tested in the future by assessing and reconstructing the system by antineutrino detection and tomography through the Earth. The present paper focuses on the geo-reactor conditions including history, spatial extension and regimes. The discussion based on recent calculations involves investigations on the limits in term of fissile inventory, size and power, based on stratification through the gravitational field and the various features through the inner mantel, the boundary with the core, the external part and the inner-core. the reconstruction allows to formulating that from the history point of view there are possibilities that the geo-reactor reached criticality in a proto-Earth period as a thorium/uranium reactor triggered by an under-layer with heavier actinides. The geo-reactor should be a key component of geothermal energy sources. (author)

  7. Hydraulic characterisation of iron-oxide-coated sand and gravel based on nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation mode analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Costabel

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The capability of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR relaxometry to characterise hydraulic properties of iron-oxide-coated sand and gravel was evaluated in a laboratory study. Past studies have shown that the presence of paramagnetic iron oxides and large pores in coarse sand and gravel disturbs the otherwise linear relationship between relaxation time and pore size. Consequently, the commonly applied empirical approaches fail when deriving hydraulic quantities from NMR parameters. Recent research demonstrates that higher relaxation modes must be taken into account to relate the size of a large pore to its NMR relaxation behaviour in the presence of significant paramagnetic impurities at its pore wall. We performed NMR relaxation experiments with water-saturated natural and reworked sands and gravels, coated with natural and synthetic ferric oxides (goethite, ferrihydrite, and show that the impact of the higher relaxation modes increases significantly with increasing iron content. Since the investigated materials exhibit narrow pore size distributions, and can thus be described by a virtual bundle of capillaries with identical apparent pore radius, recently presented inversion approaches allow for estimation of a unique solution yielding the apparent capillary radius from the NMR data. We found the NMR-based apparent radii to correspond well to the effective hydraulic radii estimated from the grain size distributions of the samples for the entire range of observed iron contents. Consequently, they can be used to estimate the hydraulic conductivity using the well-known Kozeny–Carman equation without any calibration that is otherwise necessary when predicting hydraulic conductivities from NMR data. Our future research will focus on the development of relaxation time models that consider pore size distributions. Furthermore, we plan to establish a measurement system based on borehole NMR for localising iron clogging and controlling its remediation

  8. Hydraulic characterisation of iron-oxide-coated sand and gravel based on nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation mode analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costabel, Stephan; Weidner, Christoph; Müller-Petke, Mike; Houben, Georg

    2018-03-01

    The capability of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry to characterise hydraulic properties of iron-oxide-coated sand and gravel was evaluated in a laboratory study. Past studies have shown that the presence of paramagnetic iron oxides and large pores in coarse sand and gravel disturbs the otherwise linear relationship between relaxation time and pore size. Consequently, the commonly applied empirical approaches fail when deriving hydraulic quantities from NMR parameters. Recent research demonstrates that higher relaxation modes must be taken into account to relate the size of a large pore to its NMR relaxation behaviour in the presence of significant paramagnetic impurities at its pore wall. We performed NMR relaxation experiments with water-saturated natural and reworked sands and gravels, coated with natural and synthetic ferric oxides (goethite, ferrihydrite), and show that the impact of the higher relaxation modes increases significantly with increasing iron content. Since the investigated materials exhibit narrow pore size distributions, and can thus be described by a virtual bundle of capillaries with identical apparent pore radius, recently presented inversion approaches allow for estimation of a unique solution yielding the apparent capillary radius from the NMR data. We found the NMR-based apparent radii to correspond well to the effective hydraulic radii estimated from the grain size distributions of the samples for the entire range of observed iron contents. Consequently, they can be used to estimate the hydraulic conductivity using the well-known Kozeny-Carman equation without any calibration that is otherwise necessary when predicting hydraulic conductivities from NMR data. Our future research will focus on the development of relaxation time models that consider pore size distributions. Furthermore, we plan to establish a measurement system based on borehole NMR for localising iron clogging and controlling its remediation in the gravel pack of

  9. Characteristics of geothermal structures of Poprad basin in terms of numerical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagelova, A.; Fendek, M.

    2011-01-01

    Poprad basin is one of the promising areas in terms of geothermal resources. In terms of impact on the environment and the exploitation of geothermal waters it is important to quantify the natural geothermal water quantity. One of the most progressive methods of their evaluation is a method of numerical modelling. Before model creation it is necessary to characterize the geothermal structure. Character of hydro-geothermal structure consists of an analysis of Spatial distribution of collectors, hydraulic properties of collectors of geothermal water, pressure and temperature conditions and boundary conditions. Basic characteristics of geothermal energy transfer in the Poprad basin are described. (authors)

  10. Geothermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuataz, F.-D.

    2005-01-01

    This article gives a general overview of the past and present development of geothermal energy worldwide and a more detailed one in Switzerland. Worldwide installed electrical power using geothermal energy sources amounts to 8900 MW el . Worldwide utilization of geothermal energy for thermal applications amounts to 28,000 MW th . The main application (56.5%) is ground-coupled heat pumps, others are thermal spas and swimming pools (17.7%), space heating (14.9%), heating of greenhouses (4.8%), fish farming (2.2%), industrial uses (1,8%), cooling and melting of snow (1.2%), drying of agricultural products (0.6 %). Switzerland has become an important user of geothermal energy only in the past 25 years. Earlier, only the exploitation of geothermal springs (deep aquifers) in Swiss thermal baths had a long tradition, since the time of the Romans. Today, the main use of geothermal energy is as a heat source for heat pumps utilizing vertical borehole heat exchangers of 50 to 350 meters length. 35,000 installations of this type with heating powers ranging from a few kW to 1000 kW already exist, representing the highest density of such installations worldwide. Other developments are geostructures and energy piles, the use of groundwater for heating and cooling, geothermal district heating, the utilization of draining water from tunnels and the project 'Deep Heat Mining' allowing the combined production of heat and electric power

  11. A comprehensive review on the methodologies to simulate the nuclear fuel bundle for the thermal hydraulic experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishnoi, A.K.; Chandraker, D.K.; Pal, A.K.; Vijayan, P.K.; Saha, D.

    2011-01-01

    The designer of a nuclear reactor system has to ensure its safety during normal operation as well as accidental conditions. This requires, among other things, a proper understanding of the various thermal hydraulic phenomena occurring in the reactor core. In a nuclear reactor core the fuel elements are the heat source and highly loaded components of the reactor system. Therefore their behaviour under normal and accidental conditions must be extensively investigated. Data generation for Critical heat flux (CHF) in full scale bundle and parallel channel instability studies with at least two full size channels are required in order to evaluate the thermal margin and stability margin of the reactor. The complex nature of these phenomena calls for exhaustive experimental investigations. Fuel Rod Cluster Simulator (FRCS) is a very important component required for the experimental investigation of the thermal hydraulic behaviour of reactor fuel elements under normal and accidental conditions. This paper brings out a comprehensive review of the FRCS elaborating the challenges and important design aspects of the FRCS. Some of the main features and analysis results on the performance of the developed FRCS with respect to the actual nuclear fuel bundle will be presented in the paper. (author)

  12. Nuclear future: thinking for building. Proceedings of the 5. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications; 8. General congress on nuclear energy; 12. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    These proceedings, for the first time, present jointly the 12. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics (12. ENFIR), the 8. General congress on nuclear energy (8. CGEN), and the 5. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications (5. ENAN). The main theme of discussion was: 'Nuclear Future: thinking for building'. The papers have analysed the progresses of peaceful utilization of nuclear technology and its forecasting for the beginning of the new millennium. The construction of Angra-3 nuclear power plant have been discussed

  13. Geothermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemale, J.

    2009-01-01

    The geothermal energy, listed among the new and renewable energy sources, is characterized by a huge variety of techniques and applications. This book deals with the access to underground geothermal resources and with their energy valorization as well. After a presentation of the main geological, hydrogeological and thermal exploitation aspects of this resource, the book presents the different geothermal-related industries in detail, in particular the district heating systems, the aquifer-based heat pumps, the utilizations in the agriculture, fishery and balneology sectors, and the power generation. (J.S.)

  14. 77 FR 40354 - Permitting Guidance for Oil and Gas Hydraulic Fracturing Activities Using Diesel Fuels-Draft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... through the UIC Class II Program, the well class for oil and gas activities. Geothermal activities are not... inject diesel fuels during hydraulic fracturing related to oil, gas, or geothermal operations must obtain... geothermal activities, the draft guidance only covers hydraulic fracturing using diesel fuels related to oil...

  15. Numerical and experimental study of hydraulic dashpot used in the shut-off rod drive mechanism of a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Narendra K., E-mail: nksingh_chikki@yahoo.com [Division of Remote Handling and Robotics, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Badodkar, Deepak N. [Division of Remote Handling and Robotics, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Singh, Manjit [Division of Remote Handling and Robotics, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Hydraulic dashpot performance is studied numerically as well as experimentally. • Instantaneous pressure built-up in the dashpot is mainly contributing for damping of freely falling shut-off rod at the end of its travel. • At elevated temperature, dashpot pressure does not reduce in proportion to the reduction in viscosity. • ‘C’ grove in the dashpot shaft flattens the pressure peak and shifts it toward the end of operation. - Abstract: Hydraulic dashpot design for shut-off rod drive mechanism application in a nuclear reactor has been analyzed both numerically and experimentally in this paper. Finite element commercial code COMSOL Multiphysics 4.3 has been used for numerical analysis. Experimental validation has been done at two different cases. Experimental test set-ups and hydraulic dashpot constructions have been described in detail. Various combinations of dashpot oil viscosity and clearance thickness have been analyzed. Important experimental results are also presented and discussed. Pressure distributions in the dashpot chambers obtained from COMSOL are given for both the set-ups. Numerical and experimental results are compared. Dashpot designs have been qualified after detailed analysis and testing on full-scale test stations simulating actual reactor conditions (except radiation)

  16. Numerical and experimental study of hydraulic dashpot used in the shut-off rod drive mechanism of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Narendra K.; Badodkar, Deepak N.; Singh, Manjit

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Hydraulic dashpot performance is studied numerically as well as experimentally. • Instantaneous pressure built-up in the dashpot is mainly contributing for damping of freely falling shut-off rod at the end of its travel. • At elevated temperature, dashpot pressure does not reduce in proportion to the reduction in viscosity. • ‘C’ grove in the dashpot shaft flattens the pressure peak and shifts it toward the end of operation. - Abstract: Hydraulic dashpot design for shut-off rod drive mechanism application in a nuclear reactor has been analyzed both numerically and experimentally in this paper. Finite element commercial code COMSOL Multiphysics 4.3 has been used for numerical analysis. Experimental validation has been done at two different cases. Experimental test set-ups and hydraulic dashpot constructions have been described in detail. Various combinations of dashpot oil viscosity and clearance thickness have been analyzed. Important experimental results are also presented and discussed. Pressure distributions in the dashpot chambers obtained from COMSOL are given for both the set-ups. Numerical and experimental results are compared. Dashpot designs have been qualified after detailed analysis and testing on full-scale test stations simulating actual reactor conditions (except radiation)

  17. Geothermal energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzella A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Geothermal technologies use renewable energy resources to generate electricity and direct use of heat while producing very low levels of greenhouse-gas (GHG emissions. Geothermal energy is the thermal energy stored in the underground, including any contained fluid, which is available for extraction and conversion into energy products. Electricity generation, which nowadays produces 73.7 TWh (12.7 GW of capacity worldwide, usually requires geothermal resources temperatures of over 100 °C. For heating, geothermal resources spanning a wider range of temperatures can be used in applications such as space and district heating (and cooling, with proper technology, spa and swimming pool heating, greenhouse and soil heating, aquaculture pond heating, industrial process heating and snow melting. Produced geothermal heat in the world accounts to 164.6 TWh, with a capacity of 70.9 GW. Geothermal technology, which has focused for decades on extracting naturally heated steam or hot water from natural hydrothermal reservoirs, is developing to more advanced techniques to exploit the heat also where underground fluids are scarce and to use the Earth as a potential energy battery, by storing heat. The success of the research will enable energy recovery and utilization from a much larger fraction of the accessible thermal energy in the Earth’s crust.

  18. Geothermal energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzella, A.

    2017-07-01

    Geothermal technologies use renewable energy resources to generate electricity and direct use of heat while producing very low levels of greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions. Geothermal energy is the thermal energy stored in the underground, including any contained fluid, which is available for extraction and conversion into energy products. Electricity generation, which nowadays produces 73.7 TWh (12.7 GW of capacity) worldwide, usually requires geothermal resources temperatures of over 100 °C. For heating, geothermal resources spanning a wider range of temperatures can be used in applications such as space and district heating (and cooling, with proper technology), spa and swimming pool heating, greenhouse and soil heating, aquaculture pond heating, industrial process heating and snow melting. Produced geothermal heat in the world accounts to 164.6 TWh, with a capacity of 70.9 GW. Geothermal technology, which has focused for decades on extracting naturally heated steam or hot water from natural hydrothermal reservoirs, is developing to more advanced techniques to exploit the heat also where underground fluids are scarce and to use the Earth as a potential energy battery, by storing heat. The success of the research will enable energy recovery and utilization from a much larger fraction of the accessible thermal energy in the Earth's crust.

  19. Geothermal studies in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ji-Yang; Chen Mo-Xiang; Wang Ji-An; Deng Xiao; Wang Jun; Shen Hsien-Chieh; Hsiung Liang-Ping; Yan Shu-Zhen; Fan Zhi-Cheng; Liu Xiu-Wen

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal studies have been conducted in China continuosly since the end of the 1950's with renewed activity since 1970. Three areas of research are defined: (1) fundamental theoretical research of geothermics, including subsurface temperatures, terrestrial heat flow and geothermal modeling; (2) exploration for geothermal resources and exploitation of geothermal energy; (3) geothermal studies in mines. (orig./ME)

  20. Experimental simulation study on hydraulic behavior of the main heat exchanger of Daqing 200 MW nuclear heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Shengyao; Zhang Youjie; Jia Haijun; Bo Jinhai; Hong Liuming; Bo Hanliang; Liu Zhiyong

    1997-07-01

    The hydraulic behavior of the main heat exchanger of Daqing 200 MW nuclear heating reactor is studied through a 1:2.33 test model. The design and other feature of the test model is described. The experimental results show that the flow resistance coefficient of the heat exchanger becomes self-simulation when Reynolds number is greater than 5000. The value of flow resistance coefficient at self-simulation condition and the distribution of pressure drop in the heat exchanger are given through experiment. The option design to reduce flow resistance is proposed. The designed and experimental value for the flow resistance coefficient are in good agreement. The variation of system parameters during flow excursion was described. The experimental results are of great significant for the final design of the main heat exchanger of Daqing 200 MW nuclear heating reactor. (2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.)

  1. STEADY-SHIP: a computer code for three-dimensional nuclear and thermal-hydraulic analyses of marine reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itagaki, Masafumi; Naito, Yoshitaka; Tokuno, Yukio; Matsui, Yasushi.

    1988-01-01

    A code STEADY-SHIP has been developed to calculate three-dimensional distributions of neutron flux, power and coolant temperature in the reactor core of the nuclear ship MUTSU. The code consists of two parts, that is, a few-group three-dimensional neutron diffusion module DIFFUSION-SHIP and a thermal-hydraulic module HYDRO-SHIP: In the DIFFUSION-SHIP the leakage iteration method is used for solving the three-dimensional neutron diffusion equation with small computer core memory and short computing time; The HYDRO-SHIP performs the general thermal-hydraulic calculation for evaluating feedbacks required in the neutronic calculation by the DIFFUSION-SHIP. The macroscopic nuclear constants are generated by a module CROSS-SHIP as functions of xenon poison, fuel temperature, moderator temperature and moderator density. A module LOCAL-FINE has the capability of computing a detailed rod power distribution for each local node in the core, using the boundary conditions on the surface of the node which were supplied by the STEADY-SHIP whole-core calculation. The applicability of this code to marine reactors has been demonstrated by comparing the computed results with the data measured during the MUTSU land-loaded core critical experiments and with the data obtained during the hot-zero-power tests performed for the actual MUTSU plant. (author)

  2. Thermal-hydraulic R and D infrastructure for water cooled reactors of the Indian nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayan, P.K.; Jain, V.; Saha, D.; Sinha, R.K.

    2009-01-01

    R and D has been the critical ingredient of Indian Nuclear Power Program from the very inception. Approach to R and D infrastructure has been closely associated with the three-stage nuclear power program that was crafted on the basis of available resources and technology in the short-term and energy security in the long-term. Early R and D efforts were directed at technologies relevant to Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) which are currently the mainstay of Indian nuclear power program. Lately, the R and D program has been steered towards the design and development of advanced and innovative reactors with the twin objective of utilization of abundant thorium and to meet the future challenges to nuclear power such as enhanced safety and reliability, better economy, proliferation resistance etc. Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is an Indian innovative reactor currently being developed to realize the above objectives. Extensive R and D infrastructure has been created to validate the system design and various passive concepts being incorporated in the AHWR. This paper provides a brief review of R and D infrastructure that has been developed at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre for thermal-hydraulic investigations for water-cooled reactors of Indian nuclear power program. (author)

  3. Thermal-Hydraulic Aspects of Changing the Nuclear Fuel-Cladding Materials from Zircaloy to Silicon Carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niceno, Bojan; Pouchon, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The accident in Fukushima has drastically shown the drawbacks of Zircaloy claddings despite their beneficial properties in normal use. The effect of the lack of cooling and the production of hydrogen would not have been so strong if the fuel cladding had not consisted of a zirconium (or metal) alloy. International activities have been started to search for an alternative to Zircaloy, however, still on a limited basis. A project sponsored by Swissnuclear has been conducted at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) with the aim to close the gap in knowledge on application of silicon carbides (SiC) as potential replacement for Zircaloys as material for nuclear fuel cladding. The work was interdisciplinary, result of collaboration between different laboratories at PSI, and has focused on SiC cladding material properties, implication of its usage on neutronics and on thermal-hydraulics. This paper summarizes thermal-hydraulic aspects of changing Zircaloy for SiC as the cladding material. The change of cladding material inevitably changes the surface properties thus making a significant impact on boiling curve, and critical heat flux (CHF). Low chemical reactivity of SiC means fewer particles in the flow (less crud), which leads to fewer failures, but also decreases the CHF. Due to differences in physical properties between SiC and Zircaloys, higher brittleness of SiC in particular, might have impact on fuel-rod assembly design, which has direct influence on flow patterns and heat transfer in the fuel assembly. Higher melting (i.e. decomposition) point for SiC means that severe accident management guidelines (SAMG) should have to be re-assessed. Not only would the core degrade later than in the case of conventional fuels, but the production of hydrogen would be quite different as well. All these issues are explored in this work in two steps; first the SiC properties which may have influence on thermal-hydraulics are outlined, then each thermal-hydraulic issues is explained from

  4. Preliminary Thermo-hydraulic Core Design Analysis of Korea Advanced Nuclear Thermal Engine Rocket for Space Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Lee, Jeong Ik; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Nclear rockets improve the propellant efficiency more than twice compared to CRs and thus significantly reduce the propellant requirement. The superior efficiency of nuclear rockets is due to the combination of the huge energy density and a single low molecular weight propellant utilization. Nuclear Thermal Rockets (NTRs) are particularly suitable for manned missions to Mars because it satisfies a relatively high thrust as well as a high propellant efficiency. NTRs use thermal energy released from a nuclear fission reactor to heat a single low molecular weight propellant, i. e., Hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and then exhausted the extremely heated propellant through a thermodynamic nozzle to produce thrust. A propellant efficiency parameter of rocket engines is specific impulse (I{sub sp}) which represents the ratio of the thrust over the rate of propellant consumption. The difference of I{sub sp} makes over three times propellant savings of NTRs for a manned Mars mission compared to CRs. NTRs can also be configured to operate bimodally by converting the surplus nuclear energy to auxiliary electric power required for the operation of a spacecraft. Moreover, the concept and technology of NTRs are very simple, already proven, and safe. Thus, NTRs can be applied to various space missions such as solar system exploration, International Space Station (ISS) transport support, Near Earth Objects (NEOs) interception, etc. Nuclear propulsion is the most promising and viable option to achieve challenging deep space missions. Particularly, the attractions of a NTR include excellent thrust and propellant efficiency, bimodal capability, proven technology, and safe and reliable performance. The ROK has also begun the research for space nuclear systems as a volunteer of the international space race and a major world nuclear energy country. KANUTER is one of the advanced NTR engines currently under development at KAIST. This bimodal engine is operated in two modes of propulsion with 100 MW

  5. Single-channel model for steady thermal-hydraulic analysis in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiaoying; Huang Yuanyuan

    2010-01-01

    This article established a single-channel model for steady analysis in the reactor and an example of thermal-hydraulic analysis was made by using this model, including the Maximum heat flux density of fuel element, enthalpy, Coolant flow, various kinds of pressure drop, enthalpy increase in average tube and thermal tube. I also got the Coolant temperature distribution and the fuel element temperature distribution and analysis of the final result. The results show that some relevant parameters which we got in this paper are well coincide with the actual operating parameters. It is also show that the single-channel model can be used to the steady thermal-hydraulic analysis. (authors)

  6. Fiscal 1997 report on the survey of verification of geothermal exploration technology, etc. 1. Development of the reservoir variation exploration method (development of the fracture hydraulic exploration method); 1997 nendo chinetsu tansa gijutsu nado kensho chosa. Choryuso hendo tansaho kaihatsu (danretsu suiri tansaho kaihatsu) hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The paper described the fiscal 1997 result of the fracture hydraulic exploration method as the variation exploration method of geothermal reservoirs. By elucidating hydraulic characteristics of the fracture system forming reservoir, technologies are established which are effective for the reservoir evaluation in early stages of development, maintenance of stable power after operational start-up, and extraction of peripheral reservoirs. As for the pressure transient test method, a test supporting system was basically designed to obtain high accuracy hydraulic parameters. As to the tiltmeter fracture monitoring method, a simulation was made for distribution of active fractures and evaluation of hydraulic constants without drilling wells. In relation to the two-phase flow measuring method, for stable steam production, the use of the orifice plate, the existing flow measuring method, etc. was forecast as a simple measuring method of the two-phase state of reservoir. Concerning the hydrophone VSP method, a feasibility study was made of the practical VSP for high temperature which can analyze hydraulic characteristics and geological structures around the well at the same time which the existing methods were unable to grasp, and brought the results. Moreover, to make high accuracy reservoir modeling possible, Doppler borehole televiewer was made in each reservoir. 80 refs., 147 figs., 22 tabs.

  7. Geothermal handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The Bureau of Land Management offered over 400,000 hectares (one million acres) for geothermal exploration and development in 1975, and figure is expected to double this year. The Energy Research and Development Administration hopes for 10-15,000 megawatts of geothermal energy by 1985, which would require, leasing over 16.3 million hectares (37 million acres) of land, at least half of which is federal land. Since there is an 8 to 8-1/2 year time laf between initial exploration and full field development, there would have to be a ten-fold increase in the amount of federal land leased within the next three years. Seventy percent of geothermal potential, 22.3 million hectares (55 million acres), is on federal lands in the west. The implication for the Service are enormous and the problems immediate. Geothermal resource are so widespread they are found to some extent in most biomes and ecosystems in the western United States. In most cases exploitation and production of geothermal resources can be made compatible with fish and wildlife management without damage, if probable impacts are clearly understood and provided for before damage has unwittingly been allowed to occur. Planning for site suitability and concern with specific operating techniques are crucial factors. There will be opportunities for enhancement: during exploration and testing many shallow groundwater bodies may be penetrated which might be developed for wildlife use. Construction equipment and materials needed for enhancement projects will be available in areas heretofore considered remote projects will be available in areas heretofore considered remote by land managers. A comprehensive knowledge of geothermal development is necessary to avoid dangers and seize opportunities. This handbook is intended to serve as a working tool in the field. It anticipated where geothermal resource development will occur in the western United States in the near future. A set of environmental assessment procedures are

  8. Geothermal energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzella A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Geothermal technologies use renewable energy resources to generate electricity and direct use of heat while producing very low levels of greenhouse-gas (GHG emissions. Geothermal energy is stored in rocks and in fluids circulating in the underground. Electricity generation usually requires geothermal resources temperatures of over 100°C. For heating, geothermal resources spanning a wider range of temperatures can be used in applications such as space and district heating (and cooling, with proper technology, spa and swimming pool heating, greenhouse and soil heating, aquaculture pond heating, industrial process heating and snow melting. Geothermal technology, which has focused so far on extracting naturally heated steam or hot water from natural hydrothermal reservoirs, is developing to more advanced techniques to exploit the heat also where underground fluids are scarce and to use the Earth as a potential energy battery, by storing heat. The success of the research will enable energy recovery and utilization from a much larger fraction of the accessible thermal energy in the Earth’s crust.

  9. Nuclear future: thinking for building. Proceedings of the 5. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications; 8. General congress on nuclear energy; 12. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics; Futuro nuclear: refletindo para construir. Anais do 5. Encontro nacional de aplicacoes nucleares; 8. Congresso geral de energia nuclear; 12. Encontro nacional de fisica de reatores e termo-hidraulica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    These proceedings, for the first time, present jointly the 12. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics (12. ENFIR), the 8. General congress on nuclear energy (8. CGEN), and the 5. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications (5. ENAN). The main theme of discussion was: 'Nuclear Future: thinking for building'. The papers have analysed the progresses of peaceful utilization of nuclear technology and its forecasting for the beginning of the new millennium. The construction of Angra-3 nuclear power plant have been discussed.

  10. Nuclear future: thinking for building. Proceedings of the 12. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics; 8. General congress on nuclear energy; 5. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications; Futuro nuclear: refletindo para construir. Anais do 12. Encontro nacional de fisica de reatores e termo-hidraulica; 8. Congresso geral de energia nuclear; 5. Encontro nacional de aplicacoes nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    These proceedings, for the first time, present jointly the 12. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics (12 ENFIR), 8. General congress on nuclear energy (8. CGEN), and 5. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications (5. ENAN). The main theme of discussion was: 'Nuclear Future: thinking for building'. The papers have analysed the progresses of peaceful utilization of nuclear technology and its forecasting for the beginning of the new millennium. The construction of Angra-3 nuclear power plant have been discussed.

  11. Development of new NSSS thermal-hydraulic model for Korean standard nuclear power plant(UCN-3/4) simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Doo; Jeong, Jae Jun

    2001-09-01

    The NSSS thermal-hydraulic programs installed in the domestic full-scope power plant simulators were provided in early 1980s by foreign vendors. Because of limited computational capability at that time, they usually adopt very simplified physical models for a real-time simulation of NSSS thermal-hydraulic phenomena, which entails inaccurate results and the possibility of so-called 'negative training', especially for complicated two-phase flows in the reactor coolant system. To resolve the problem, we developed a realistic NSSS T/H program (named 'ARTS-UCN' code) for the improvement of the Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant full-scope simulator. ARTS Code, developed as an NSSS T/H model for the KNPEC no. 2 simulator using the RETRAN03 code, was selected as a reference code for ARTS-UCN code development. For the development of ARTS, the followings have been performed: - Improvement of the robustness of RETRAN - Improvement of the real-time simulation capability of RETRAN - Optimum input data generation for the NSSS simulation - New model development that cannot be efficiently modeled by RETRAN - Assessment of the ARTS code. The systematic assessment of ARTS has been conducted in both personal computers (Windows 98, Visual fortran) and the simulator development environment (Windows NT, GSE simulator development tool). The results were resonable in terms of accuracy, real-time simulation and robustness

  12. A new multi-scale platform for advanced nuclear thermal-hydraulics status and prospects of the Neptune project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bestion, D.; Boudier, P.; Hervieu, E.; Boucker, M.; Peturaud, P.; Guelfi, A.; Fillion, P.; Grandotto, M.; Herard, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Further to a thorough analysis of the industrial needs and of the limitations of current simulation tools, EDF (Electricite de France) and CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) launched in 2001 a new long-term joint development program for the next generation of nuclear reactors simulation tools. The NEPTUNE Project, which constitutes the Thermal-Hydraulics part of this comprehensive program, aims at building a new software platform for advanced two-phase flow thermal-hydraulics allowing easy multi-scale and multi-disciplinary calculations meeting the industrial needs. The NEPTUNE activities include software development, research in physical modeling and numerical methods, the development of advanced instrumentation techniques and performance of new experimental programs. The work focuses on the four different simulation scales: DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation), local CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics), component (subchannel-type analysis) and system scales. New physical models and numerical methods are being developed for each scale as well as for their coupling. This paper gives an overview of the NEPTUNE activities. It presents the main scientific and technical achievements obtained during Phase 1 (2002-2003) and at the beginning of Phase 2 (2004- 2006). Planned work for the future is also presented. (authors)

  13. Basic researches on thermo-hydraulic non-equilibrium phenomena related to nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Akira; Kataoka, Isao; Aritomi, Masanori.

    1989-01-01

    A review was made of recent developments of fundamental researches on thermo-hydraulic non-equilibrium phenomena related to light water reactor safety, in relation to problems to be solved for the improvement of safety analysis codes. As for the problems related to flow con ditions, fundamental researches on basic conservation equations and constitutive equations for transient two-phase flow were reviewed. Regarding to the problems related to thermal non-equilibrium phenomena, fundamental researches on film boiling in pool and forced convection, transient boiling heat transfer and flow behavior caused by pressure transients were reviewed. (author)

  14. Coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic code benchmark activities at the International Nuclear Safety Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlazov, L. N.

    1998-01-01

    Two realistic benchmark problems are defined and used to assess the performance of coupled thermal-hydraulic and neutronic codes used in simulating dynamic processes in VVER-1000 and RBMK reactor systems. One of the problems simulates a design basis accident involving the ejection of three control and protection system rods from a VVER-1000 reactor. The other is based on a postulated rod withdrawal from an operating RBMK reactor. Preliminary results calculated by various codes are compared. While these results show significant differences, the intercomparisons performed so far provide a basis for further evaluation of code limitations and modeling assumptions

  15. Nuclear Energy, Geothermal Energy and the Environment. Reports to the Energy Commission's Expertgroup for Safety and Environment. Kaernenergi, geotermisk energi och miljoe. Underlagsrapporter till rapport om miljoeeffekter och risker vid utnyttjandet av energi fraan Expertgruppen foer saekerhet och miljoe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    This volume contains reports on uranium mining, working conditions in the different stages of the nuclear fuel cycle, risks at storage of spent fuel elements, environmental impact of future reactor technology, effects of waste heat disposal and risks at geothermal energy extraction in Sweden. These reports have been use by the expert group to produce their final paper.

  16. Hydraulic manipulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, A.K.; Srikrishnamurty, G.

    1990-01-01

    Successful operation of nuclear plant is largely dependent on safe handling of radio-active material. In order to reduce this handling problem and minimise the exposure of radiation, various handling equipment and manipulators have been developed according to the requirements. Manufacture of nuclear fuel, which is the most important part of the nuclear industry, involves handling of uranium ingots weighing approximately 250 kg. This paper describes a specially designed hydraulic manipulator for handling of the ingots in a limited space. It was designed to grab and handle the ingots in any position. This has following drive motions: (1)gripping and releasing, (2)lifting and lowering (z-motion), (3)rotation about the horizontal axis (azimuth drive), (4)rotation about the job axis, and (5)rotation about the vertical axis. For horizontal motion (X and Y axis motion) this equipment is mounted on a motorised trolley, so that it can move inside the workshop. For all drives except the rotation about the job axis, hydraulic cylinders have been used with a battery operated power pack. Trolley drive is also given power from same battery. This paper describes the design aspects of this manipulator. (author). 4 figs

  17. Single failure effects of reactor coolant system large bore hydraulic snubbers for Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, T.S.; Park, S.H.; Sung, K.K.; Kim, T.W.; Jheon, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    A potential snubber single failure is one of the safety significances identified in General Safety Issue 113 for Large Bore Hydraulic Snubber (LBHS) dynamic qualification. This paper investigates dynamic structural effects of single failures of the steam generator and reactor coolant pump snubbers in Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant by performing the time history dynamic analyses for the reactor coolant system under seismic and postulated pipe break events. The seismic input motions considered are the synthesized ground time histories conforming to SRP 3.7.1, and he postulated pipe break input loadings result from steam generator main seam line and feedwater line pipe breaks which govern pipe breaks remaining after applying LBB to the main coolant line and primary side ranch lines equal to and greater than 12 inch nominal pipe size

  18. Neutronics and Thermal Hydraulics Analysis of a Conceptual Ultra-High Temperature MHD Cermet Fuel Core for Nuclear Electric Propulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Song

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear electric propulsion (NEP offers unique advantages for the interplanetary exploration. The extremely high conversion efficiency of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD conversion nuclear reactor makes it a highly potential space power source in the future, especially for NEP systems. Research on ultra-high temperature reactor suitable for MHD power conversion is performed in this paper. Cermet is chosen as the reactor fuel after a detailed comparison with the (U,ZrC graphite-based fuel and mixed carbide fuel. A reactor design is carried out as well as the analysis of the reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics. The specific design involves fuel element, reactor core, and radiation shield. Two coolant channel configurations of fuel elements are considered and both of them can meet the demands. The 91 channel configuration is chosen due to its greater heat transfer performance. Besides, preliminary calculation of nuclear criticality safety during launch crash accident is also presented. The calculation results show that the current design can meet the safety requirements well.

  19. A review of modern advances in analyses and applications of single-phase natural circulation loop in nuclear thermal hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, Dipankar N.; Bhattacharyya, Souvik; Das, P.K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Comprehensive review of state-of-the-art on single-phase natural circulation loops. • Detailed discussion on growth in solar thermal system and nuclear thermal hydraulics. • Systematic development in scaling methodologies for fabrication of test facilities. • Importance of numerical modeling schemes for stability assessment using 1-D codes. • Appraisal of current trend of research and possible future directions. - Abstract: A comprehensive review of single-phase natural circulation loop (NCL) is presented here. Relevant literature reported since the later part of 1980s has been meticulously surveyed, with occasional obligatory reference to a few pioneering studies originating prior to that period, summarizing the key observations and the present trend of research. Development in the concept of buoyancy-induced flow is discussed, with introduction to flow initiation in an NCL due to instability. Detailed discussion on modern advancement in important application areas like solar thermal systems and nuclear thermal hydraulics are presented, with separate analysis for various reactor designs working on natural circulation. Identification of scaling criteria for designing lab-scale experimental facilities has gone through a series of modification. A systematic analysis of the same is presented, considering the state-of-the-art knowledge base. Different approaches have been followed for modeling single-phase NCLs, including simplified Lorenz system mostly for toroidal loops, 1-D computational modeling for both steady-state and stability characterization and 3-D commercial system codes to have a better flow visualization. Methodical review of the relevant studies is presented following a systematic approach, to assess the gradual progression in understanding of the practical system. Brief appraisal of current research interest is reported, including the use of nanofluids for fluid property augmentation, marine reactors subjected to rolling waves

  20. A review of modern advances in analyses and applications of single-phase natural circulation loop in nuclear thermal hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Dipankar N., E-mail: dipankar.n.basu@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India); Bhattacharyya, Souvik; Das, P.K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Comprehensive review of state-of-the-art on single-phase natural circulation loops. • Detailed discussion on growth in solar thermal system and nuclear thermal hydraulics. • Systematic development in scaling methodologies for fabrication of test facilities. • Importance of numerical modeling schemes for stability assessment using 1-D codes. • Appraisal of current trend of research and possible future directions. - Abstract: A comprehensive review of single-phase natural circulation loop (NCL) is presented here. Relevant literature reported since the later part of 1980s has been meticulously surveyed, with occasional obligatory reference to a few pioneering studies originating prior to that period, summarizing the key observations and the present trend of research. Development in the concept of buoyancy-induced flow is discussed, with introduction to flow initiation in an NCL due to instability. Detailed discussion on modern advancement in important application areas like solar thermal systems and nuclear thermal hydraulics are presented, with separate analysis for various reactor designs working on natural circulation. Identification of scaling criteria for designing lab-scale experimental facilities has gone through a series of modification. A systematic analysis of the same is presented, considering the state-of-the-art knowledge base. Different approaches have been followed for modeling single-phase NCLs, including simplified Lorenz system mostly for toroidal loops, 1-D computational modeling for both steady-state and stability characterization and 3-D commercial system codes to have a better flow visualization. Methodical review of the relevant studies is presented following a systematic approach, to assess the gradual progression in understanding of the practical system. Brief appraisal of current research interest is reported, including the use of nanofluids for fluid property augmentation, marine reactors subjected to rolling waves

  1. Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-01

    Each of the following types of well stimulation techniques are summarized and explained: hydraulic fracturing; thermal; mechanical, jetting, and drainhole drilling; explosive and implosive; and injection methods. Current stimulation techniques, stimulation techniques for geothermal wells, areas of needed investigation, and engineering calculations for various techniques. (MHR)

  2. 3D Geological Model for "LUSI" - a Deep Geothermal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Reza; Jansen, Gunnar; Mazzini, Adriano; Galvan, Boris; Miller, Stephen A.

    2016-04-01

    Geothermal applications require the correct simulation of flow and heat transport processes in porous media, and many of these media, like deep volcanic hydrothermal systems, host a certain degree of fracturing. This work aims to understand the heat and fluid transport within a new-born sedimentary hosted geothermal system, termed Lusi, that began erupting in 2006 in East Java, Indonesia. Our goal is to develop conceptual and numerical models capable of simulating multiphase flow within large-scale fractured reservoirs such as the Lusi region, with fractures of arbitrary size, orientation and shape. Additionally, these models can also address a number of other applications, including Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), CO2 sequestration (Carbon Capture and Storage CCS), and nuclear waste isolation. Fractured systems are ubiquitous, with a wide-range of lengths and scales, making difficult the development of a general model that can easily handle this complexity. We are developing a flexible continuum approach with an efficient, accurate numerical simulator based on an appropriate 3D geological model representing the structure of the deep geothermal reservoir. Using previous studies, borehole information and seismic data obtained in the framework of the Lusi Lab project (ERC grant n°308126), we present here the first 3D geological model of Lusi. This model is calculated using implicit 3D potential field or multi-potential fields, depending on the geological context and complexity. This method is based on geological pile containing the geological history of the area and relationship between geological bodies allowing automatic computation of intersections and volume reconstruction. Based on the 3D geological model, we developed a new mesh algorithm to create hexahedral octree meshes to transfer the structural geological information for 3D numerical simulations to quantify Thermal-Hydraulic-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) physical processes.

  3. Transient thermal-hydraulic characteristics analysis software for PWR nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yingwei; Zhuang Chengjun; Su Guanghui; Qiu Suizheng

    2010-01-01

    A point reactor neutron kinetics model, a two-phase drift-flow U-tube steam generator model, an advanced non-equilibrium three regions pressurizer model, and a passive emergency core decay heat-removed system model are adopted in the paper to develop the computerized analysis code for PWR transient thermal-hydraulic characteristics, by Compaq Visual Fortran 6.0 language. Visual input, real-time processing and dynamic visualization output are achieved by Microsoft Visual Studio. NET language. The reliability verification of the soft has been conducted by RELAP 5, and the verification results show that the software is with high calculation precision, high calculation speed, modern interface, luxuriant functions and strong operability. The software was applied to calculate the transient accident conditions for QSNP, and the analysis results are significant to the practical engineering applications. (authors)

  4. Hydraulic noise in reactor circuits and loops, and its effect on nuclear fuel vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Card, D.C.

    This paper reports the results of an investigation at WNRE to monitor noise levels in reactor circuits and loops, so as to characterize the systems and establish the importance of this noise on fuel and pressure tube vibration. Some of the techniques necessary for in-reactor installations of pressure transducers have been developed and measurements have been obtained in the vertical fuel channels of a very noisy out-reactor loop as well as in the WR-1 reactor circuits. A very quiet out-reactor loop has been constructed to study the vibration behaviour of 37-element fuel bundles in the horizontal CANDU pressurized-heavy water reactor systems. In this facility various types and levels of hydraulic noise are being generated to study their effect on the fuel bundles and flow tube at flow velocities up to approximately 13 m/s. (author)

  5. Geothermal tomorrow 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    Contributors from the Geothermal Technologies Program and the geothermal community highlight the current status and activities of the Program and the development of the global resource of geothermal energy.

  6. Geothermal probabilistic cost study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orren, L.H.; Ziman, G.M.; Jones, S.C.; Lee, T.K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

    1981-08-01

    A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model is used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents are analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance are examined. (MHR)

  7. Deep Geothermal Energy Production in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Agemar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Germany uses its low enthalpy hydrothermal resources predominantly for balneological applications, space and district heating, but also for power production. The German Federal government supports the development of geothermal energy in terms of project funding, market incentives and credit offers, as well as a feed-in tariff for geothermal electricity. Although new projects for district heating take on average six years, geothermal energy utilisation is growing rapidly, especially in southern Germany. From 2003 to 2013, the annual production of geothermal district heating stations increased from 60 GWh to 530 GWh. In the same time, the annual power production increased from 0 GWh to 36 GWh. Currently, almost 200 geothermal facilities are in operation or under construction in Germany. A feasibility study including detailed geological site assessment is still essential when planning a new geothermal facility. As part of this assessment, a lot of geological data, hydraulic data, and subsurface temperatures can be retrieved from the geothermal information system GeotIS, which can be accessed online [1].

  8. Rock quality designation of the hydraulic properties in the near field of a final repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, Hans; Carlsson, Leif; Pusch, Roland

    1989-06-01

    Quality assurance of a final repository for spent nuclear fuel requires detailed information on the characteristics of the rock, backfill, canisters and the waste itself. Furthermore, and of fundamental importance, is the knowledge of the behaviour of the integrated system of the waste and the different barriers. The in-situ characteristics of the rock must therefore be assessed and their influence on and interactions with the remaining barriers must be predicted and verified. A rock quality designation process of the hydraulic properties in the near-field is out-lined both for the KBS-3 system as well as for the WP-cave system. The process, once updated and approved, will be included in a Quality Assurance Program for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel. Some of the available methods for the near-field designation process are presented as well as techniques that need further development or are not developed at all. Finally, a presentation is given of a generic designation process of the KBS-3 and WP-cave repository systems in the previously investigated area in Central Sweden, where the final repository for reactor waste, SFR, is located. Geological and hydrogeological data are here at hand and it is therefore possible to carry out a simulation of how the designation process would be accomplished. (authors) (72 figs., 12 tabs., 43 refs.)

  9. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of graphite tubes for the non-aqueous system of accelerator transmutation of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, R.C.; Venneri, F.; Trujillo, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    Accelerator transmutation of nuclear waste offers exciting possibilities for the disposal of nuclear waste by converting it into more benign Species. The non-aqueous system discussed here contains the materials to be transmuted within a lithium-fluoride salt. The system consists of bundles of graphite tubes containing the salt Solution. The tubes are cooled as lithium flows across their exterior. These circular graphite tubes have an inner circular passage and an outer annulus. Natural convection within the tubes causes the salt to circulate. This paper deals with the thermal-hydraulics of the system; it does not consider the neutronics in detail. Heat transfer and fluid flow were modeled using a custom computer program the system behavior of an graphite tube. Different geometries were tried, while keeping the system volume the same, to determine an optimize graphite tube geometry. I considered both the parallel flow and the counterflow of the lithium coolant, and allowed limited boiling to occur to facilitate circulation. I achieved power densities as high as 200 W/cm 3 for the overall blanket

  10. TITAN: an advanced three-dimensional coupled neutronic/thermal-hydraulics code for light water nuclear reactor core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griggs, D.P.; Kazimi, M.S.; Henry, A.F.

    1984-06-01

    The three-dimensional nodal neutronics code QUANDRY and the three-dimensional two-fluid thermal-hydraulics code THERMIT are combined into TITAN. Steady-state and transient coupling methodologies based upon a tandem structure were devised and implemented. Additional models for nuclear feedback, equilibrium xenon and direct moderator heating were added. TITAN was tested using a boiling water two channel problem and the coupling methodologies were shown to be effective. Simulated turbine trip transients and several control rod withdrawal transients were analyzed with good results. Sensitivity studies indicated that the time-step size can affect transient results significantly. TITAN was also applied to a quarter core PWR problem based on a real reactor geometry. The steady-state results were compared to a solution produced by MEKIN-B and poor agreement between the horizontal power shapes was found. Calculations with various mesh spacings showed that the mesh spacings in the MEKIN-B analysis were too large to produce accurate results with a finite difference method. The TITAN results were shown to be reasonable. A pair of control rod ejection accidents were also analyzed with TITAN. A comparison of the TITAN PWR control rod ejection results with results from coupled point kinetics/thermal-hydraulics analyses showed that the point kinetics method used (adiabatic method for control rod reactivities, steady-state flux shape for core-averaged reactivity feedback) underpredicted the power excursion in one case and overpredicted it in the other. It was therefore concluded that point kinetics methods should be used with caution and that three-dimensional codes like TITAN are superior for analyzing PWR control rod ejection transients

  11. Feedback from uncertainties propagation research projects conducted in different hydraulic fields: outcomes for engineering projects and nuclear safety assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Vito; Duluc, Claire-Marie; Bertrand, Nathalie; Bardet, Lise

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, in the context of hydraulic risk assessment, much effort has been put into the development of sophisticated numerical model systems able reproducing surface flow field. These numerical models are based on a deterministic approach and the results are presented in terms of measurable quantities (water depths, flow velocities, etc…). However, the modelling of surface flows involves numerous uncertainties associated both to the numerical structure of the model, to the knowledge of the physical parameters which force the system and to the randomness inherent to natural phenomena. As a consequence, dealing with uncertainties can be a difficult task for both modelers and decision-makers [Ioss, 2011]. In the context of nuclear safety, IRSN assesses studies conducted by operators for different reference flood situations (local rain, small or large watershed flooding, sea levels, etc…), that are defined in the guide ASN N°13 [ASN, 2013]. The guide provides some recommendations to deal with uncertainties, by proposing a specific conservative approach to cover hydraulic modelling uncertainties. Depending of the situation, the influencing parameter might be the Strickler coefficient, levee behavior, simplified topographic assumptions, etc. Obviously, identifying the most influencing parameter and giving it a penalizing value is challenging and usually questionable. In this context, IRSN conducted cooperative (Compagnie Nationale du Rhone, I-CiTy laboratory of Polytech'Nice, Atomic Energy Commission, Bureau de Recherches Géologiques et Minières) research activities since 2011 in order to investigate feasibility and benefits of Uncertainties Analysis (UA) and Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) when applied to hydraulic modelling. A specific methodology was tested by using the computational environment Promethee, developed by IRSN, which allows carrying out uncertainties propagation study. This methodology was applied with various numerical models and in

  12. Geothermal GW cogeneration system GEOCOGEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grob, Gustav R

    2010-09-15

    GEOCOGEN is the GW zero pollution, no risk solution to replace nuclear and fossil fuelled power plants. It can be built near the energy consumption centers, is invisible and produces electricity and heat at a fraction of the cost of any other the energy mix options. It is a break through deep well geothermal energy technology lasting forever driving also millions of electric vehicles.

  13. Inconsistency in the average hydraulic models used in nuclear reactor design and safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jee Won; Roh, Gyu Hong; Choi, Hang Bok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    One of important inconsistencies in the six-equation model predictions has been found to be the force experienced by a single bubble placed in a convergent stream of liquid. Various sets of governing equations yield different amount of forces to hold the bubble stationary in a convergent nozzle. By using the first order potential flow theory, it is found that the six-equation model can not be used to estimate the force experienced by a deformed bubble. The theoretical value of the particle stress of a bubble in a convergent nozzle flow has been found to be a function of the Weber number when bubble distortion is allowed. This force has been calculated by using different sets of governing equations and compared with the theoretical value. It is suggested in this study that the bubble size distribution function can be used to remove the presented inconsistency by relating the interfacial variables with different moments of the bubble size distribution function. This study also shows that the inconsistencies in the thermal-hydraulic governing equation can be removed by mechanistic modeling of the phasic interface. 11 refs., 3 figs. (Author)

  14. Blowdown hydraulic influence on core thermal response in LOFT nuclear experiment L2-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeder, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental research into pressurized water reactor (PWR) loss-of-coolant phenomena conducted in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility has given results indicating that for very large pipe breaks the core thermal response is tightly coupled to the fluid hydraulic phenomena during the blowdown phase of the loss-of-coolant transient. This summary presents and discusses data supporting this conclusion. LOFT Loss-of-Coolant Experiment (LOCE) L2-3 simulated a complete double-ended offset shear break of a primary coolant reactor vessel inlet pipe in a commercial PWR. The LOFT system conditions at experiment initiation were: fuel rod maximum linear heat generation rate (MLHGR) of 39.4 +- 3 kW/m, hot leg temperature of 593 +- 3 K, core ΔT of 32.2 +- 4 K, system pressure of 15.06 +- 0.03 MPa, and flow rate/system volume of 25.6 +- 0.8 kg/m 3 . These conditions are typical of those in commercial PWR systems at normal operating conditions

  15. Inconsistency in the average hydraulic models used in nuclear reactor design and safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jee Won; Roh, Gyu Hong; Choi, Hang Bok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    One of important inconsistencies in the six-equation model predictions has been found to be the force experienced by a single bubble placed in a convergent stream of liquid. Various sets of governing equations yield different amount of forces to hold the bubble stationary in a convergent nozzle. By using the first order potential flow theory, it is found that the six-equation model can not be used to estimate the force experienced by a deformed bubble. The theoretical value of the particle stress of a bubble in a convergent nozzle flow has been found to be a function of the Weber number when bubble distortion is allowed. This force has been calculated by using different sets of governing equations and compared with the theoretical value. It is suggested in this study that the bubble size distribution function can be used to remove the presented inconsistency by relating the interfacial variables with different moments of the bubble size distribution function. This study also shows that the inconsistencies in the thermal-hydraulic governing equation can be removed by mechanistic modeling of the phasic interface. 11 refs., 3 figs. (Author)

  16. PANDA a multi-purpose thermal-hydraulics facility devoted to nuclear reactor containment safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paladino, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the multi purpose facility PANDA devised for the safety analysis of nuclear reactor containment. The passive safety systems for LWRs have been explained with details about the PAssive Nachzerfallswärmeabfuhr und Druck-Abbau Testanlage (PANDA)

  17. A friend man-machine interface for thermo-hydraulic simulation codes of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo Filho, F. de; Belchior Junior, A.; Barroso, A.C.O.; Gebrim, A.

    1994-01-01

    This work presents the development of a Man-Machine Interface to the TRAC-PF1 code, a computer program to perform best estimate analysis of transients and accidents at nuclear power plants. The results were considered satisfactory and a considerable productivity gain was achieved in the activity of preparing and analyzing simulations. (author)

  18. Geothermal energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparovic, N

    1962-07-01

    Live steam, transformed steam, and steam produced by expansion flashing are outlined with respect to their use in the production of electricity. The capacity, pressure, and temperature of a steam must be determined empirically by exploratory drilling. These factors are dependent on time and on the extent of nearby drilling-activity. Particulars of geothermal-steam power-plants such as steam dryness, hot-water flashing, condensation, gas extraction, and corrosion are discussed in detail. All available data (as per 1962) concerning the costs of operation and construction of geothermal power plants are tabulated. For space-heating purposes, two basic systems are utilized. When little corrosion or precipitation is expected, an open system is used, otherwise, closed systems are necessary. The space-heating system of Reykjavik, Iceland is cited as an example. A brief description of industrial applications of geothermal energy, such as the extraction of NaCl, D/sub 2/O, or boric acid, is provided. Thirty-two references are given.

  19. In vitro nuclear receptor inhibition and cytotoxicity of hydraulic fracturing chemicals and their binary mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Peter A; Kumar, Anu

    2018-05-01

    The widespread use of hydraulic fracturing (HF) in oil and gas extraction operations has led to concern over environmental risks posed by chemicals used in HF fluids. Here we employed a suite of stable luciferase reporter gene assays to investigate the potential for selected HF chemicals or geogenics to activate or antagonise nuclear receptor signalling. We screened three biocides (bronopol [BP], glutaraldehyde [GA], and tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium sulfate [THPS]), a surfactant (2-butoxyethanol), a friction reducer (polyacrylamide), and a coal seam geogenic (o-cresol) for their potential to act as agonists or antagonists of the estrogen receptor, androgen receptor, progesterone receptor (PR), glucocorticoid receptor or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). None of the chemicals induced luciferase activity in any of assays used in the study. In antagonistic mode, BP, GA and THPS caused reductions in luciferase activity in the reporter assays at higher concentrations (50-100 μM), while at low concentrations (2-10 μM) GA and THPS enhanced luciferase activity in some assays relative to controls. None of the other tested chemicals exhibited antagonism in the selected assays. In most cases, altered receptor signalling only occurred at concentrations exhibiting cytotoxicity. However, PPARγ activity, and to a lesser extent PR activity, were inhibited by THPS at sub-cytotoxic concentrations. The majority of binary combinations tested exhibited significantly less-than-additive cytotoxicity, and none of the combinations exhibited synergistic cytotoxicity. In summary, the results of the present study indicate that the selected chemicals are not likely to function as direct agonists of the nuclear receptors tested, and only one chemical, THPS was an apparent partial antagonist of two nuclear receptors. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Development of a Nuclear Steam Supply System Thermal-Hydraulic Module for the Nuclear Power Plant Simulator Using a Best-Estimate Code, RETRAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Jae Seung

    2004-08-01

    The NSSS (Nuclear Steam Supply System) thermal-hydraulic programs adopted in the domestic full-scope power plant simulators were provided in early 1980s by foreign vendors. Because of limited computational capability at that time, they usually used very simplified physical models for the real-time simulation of Ness thermal-hydraulic transients, which entails inaccurate results and, thus, the possibility of so-called 'negative training', especially for complicated two-phase flows in the reactor coolant system. To resolve the problem, a realistic NSSS thermal-hydraulic program ARTS has been developed, it was based on the RETRAN code for the improvement of the Nuclear Power Plant full-scope simulator. Since ARTS is a generalized code to solve a simultaneous equation system, the smaller time-step size should be used if converged solution could not obtain even in a single volume. Therefore, dedicated models which do not force to reduce the time-step size are sometimes more suitable in terms of a real-time calculation and robustness. The PRT(Pressurizer Relief Tank) is a good example, which requires a dedicated model. The PRT consists of subcooled water in bottom and non-condensable gas in top. The sparger merged under subcooled water enhances condensation. The complicated thermal-hydraulic phenomena such as condensation, phase separation with existence of non-condensable gas makes difficult to simulate. Therefore, the PRT volume may limit the time-step size if it is modeled with a general control volume. To mitigate the time-step size reduction due to convergence failure at this component using RETRAN, the PRT model was developed as a dedicated model. The dedicated model was expected to provide reasonable results without convergence problem in the analysis of the system transients. The ARTS code guarantees the real-time calculations of almost all transients and ensures the robustness of simulations. However, there are some possibilities of calculation failure in the

  1. Annual report 2015 of the Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulenberg, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The annual report of the Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies of KIT summarizes its research activities and provides some highlights of each working group, like thermal-hydraulic analyses for nuclear fusion reactors, accident analyses for light water reactors, and research on innovative energy technologies: liquid metal technologies for energy conversion, hydrogen technologies and geothermal power plants. The institute has been engaged in education and training in energy technologies.

  2. Supercritical Water Nuclear Steam Supply System: Innovations In Materials, Neutronics and Thermal-Hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Mark; Corradini, M.L.; Sridharan, K.; Wilson, P.; Cho, D.; Kim, T.K.; Lomperski, S.

    2004-01-01

    In the 1990's supercritical light-water reactors were considered in conceptual designs. A nuclear reactor cooled by supercritical waster would have a much higher thermal efficiency with a once-through direct power cycle, and could be based on standardized water reactor components (light water or heavy water). The theoretical efficiency could be improved by more than 33% over that of other water reactors and could be simplified with higher reliability; e.g., a boiling water reactor without steam separators or dryers

  3. Considering environmental health risks of energy options. Hydraulic fracturing and nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonell, Margaret; Raymond, Michelle; Burganowski, Rachael; Vetrone, Andrea; Alonzo, Sydney [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States). Environmental Science Div.

    2014-07-01

    Growing public concerns about climate change and environmental health impacts related to energy production have led to increased consideration of alternate sources. Nuclear power and unconventional oil and shale gas development are among the options least favored by the public, with pollutant releases resulting from routine operations as well as accidents being among the key concerns. Advances in ICT approaches and the increasingly widespread accessibility of information resources and tools have facilitated community-based initiatives and broader data sharing that can directly contribute to more informed evaluations of energy options, toward more sustainable programs from the local to the global scale.

  4. Geothermal in transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    This article examines the current market for geothermal projects in the US and overseas. The topics of the article include future capacity needs, upgrading the Coso Geothermal project, the productivity of the Geysers area of Northern California, the future of geothermal, and new projects at Soda Lake, Carson Basin, Unalaska Island, and the Puna Geothermal Venture in Hilo, Hawaii

  5. FY 1998 report on the verification survey of geothermal survey technology, etc./Development of the reservoir fluctuation survey method (Summary). Theme 1. Development of the fracture hydraulic survey method; 1998 nendo chinetsu tansa gijutsu nado kensho chosa choryuso hendo tansaho kaihatsu hokokusho (Yoyaku). 1. Danretsu suiri tansaho kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The paper reported the results of the development of the fracture hydraulic method. As to the geothermal well hydraulic test method, the following were studied. Relating to the pressure transient test method, the detailed design of a system was conducted on a prototype hydraulic test system through the manufacture of element parts and feed back control mechanism and experiments to evaluate performance/operation characteristics of fields. Concerning the tiltmeter use measurement method, the field experiment by tiltmeter measurement was carried out in the Hijiori area where existing data and the wells used exist. With respect to the two-phase flow rate measuring method, by a combination of the existing vortex flow meter, vapor quality meter and tracer method, conducted were a field experiment on comparison/calibration of the existing flow meter and tracer method and a numerical simulation of change in vapor liquid in association with temperature/pressure changes in two-phase flow pipe, and the semi-quantitative calibration method was studied. About the water permeable logging method, study was made on the following items. In regard to the hydrophone VSP method, data analysis of the method was conducted. As to the development of individual feed zone flow meter measuring device, the evaluation was conducted of accuracy of Doppler shift rates for flow rate, pressure, flow velocity, well diameter and change in concentration and characteristics of acoustic unit. As a result, the flow rate was unable to be detected with satisfactory accuracy. (NEDO)

  6. Hydraulic model of the steam-lines network of the Cerro Prieto, B.C., geothermal field; Modelo hidraulico de la red de vaporductos del campo geotermico de Cerro Prieto, B.C.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salaices, E; Garcia, A; Martinez J I; Ovando, R; Cecenas, M; Hernandez A F [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. E-mail: salaices@iie.org.mx; Canchola, I; Mora, O; Miranda, C; Herandez, M; Lopez, S; Murillo, I [Comision Federal de Electricidad, B.C (Mexico)

    2007-01-15

    The steam-line network of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field is composed of 184 wells, and 162 of the wells are integrated and connected by pipes. Thirteen power units, with an installed electrical capacity of 720 MW, are fed by that network. The network length is 120 km, including pipes of several diameters with branches and interconnections. The extension and complexity of the steam-line system make it difficult to analyze the transport and supply of steam to the power plants. For that it was necessary to have a tool capable of analyzing the system and the performance of the network as a whole, as well as the direction and flow volumes in each part of the system. In this paper, a hydraulic model of the Cerro Prieto steam-line network is presented. The model can determine the performance of the whole network by quantifying the pressure drops, flows and heat losses of the components. The model analyses the consequences of changes in operating conditions, steam production, maintenance activities and design (such as the integration of new wells). The model was developed using PIPEPHASE 9.0, a numeric simulator of multi-phase flow in steady state with heat transfer. It is used to model systems and pipe networks for steam- and condensate-transport. [Spanish] La red de vaporductos del campo geotermico de Cerro Prieto esta compuesta por un conjunto de 184 pozos, de los cuales 162 son pozos integrados, interconectados entre si a traves de una red de tuberias. Por medio de esta red se alimentan 13 unidades generadoras de electricidad con una capacidad total instalada de 720 MWe. La red tiene una longitud aproximada de 120 kilometros y esta compuesta por tuberias de diferentes diametros, ramales, interconexiones, etc. La complejidad y extension del sistema de vaporductos hace muy dificil el analisis del transporte y suministro de vapor a las plantas generadoras. Lo anterior creo la necesidad de contar con una herramienta que ayudara en el analisis del sistema con el fin de

  7. Adaptive fuzzy control for a simulation of hydraulic analogy of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan, D.; Li, X.; Eynde, G. van den

    2000-01-01

    In the framework of the on-going R and D project on fuzzy control applications to the Belgian Reactor 1 (BR1) at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), we have constructed a real fuzzy-logic-control demo model. The demo model is suitable for us to test and compare some new algorithms of fuzzy control and intelligent systems, which is advantageous because it is always difficult and time consuming, due to safety aspects, to do all experiments in a real nuclear environment. In this chapter, we first report briefly on the construction of the demo model, and then introduce the results of a fuzzy control, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control and an advanced fuzzy control, in which the advanced fuzzy control is a fuzzy control with an adaptive function that can self-regulate the fuzzy control rules. Afterwards, we present a comparative study of those three methods. The results have shown that fuzzy control has more advantages in terms of flexibility, robustness, and easily updated facilities with respect to the PID control of the demo model, but that PID control has much higher regulation resolution due to its integration terms. The adaptive fuzzy control can dynamically adjust the rule base, therefore it is more robust and suitable to those very uncertain occasions. (orig.)

  8. Detailed channel thermal-hydraulic calculation of nuclear reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukov, A.V.; Sorokin, A.P.; Ushakov, P.A.; Yur'ev, Yu.S.

    1981-01-01

    The system of equations of mass balance, quantity of motion and energy used in calculation of nuclear reactor fuel assemblies is obtained. The equation system is obtained on the base of integral equations of hydrodynamics interaction in assemblies of smooth fuel elements and fuel elements with wire packing. The calculation results of coolant heating distributions by the fast reactor assembly channels are presented. The analysis of the results obtained shows that interchannel exchange essentially uniforms the coolant heating distribution in the peripheral range of the assembly but it does not remove non-uniformity caused by power distribution non-uniformity in the cross section. Geometry of the peripheral assembly range plays an essential role in the heating distribution. Change of the calculation gap between the peripheral fuel elements and assembly shells can result either in superheating or in subcooling in the peripheral channels relatively to joint internal channels of the assembly. Heat supply to the coolant passing through interassembly gaps decreases temperature in the assembly periphery and results in the increase of temperature non-uniformity by the perimeter of peripheral fuel elements. It is concluded that the applied method of the channel-by-channel calculation is ef-- fective in thermal-physical calculation of nuclear reactor fuel assemblies and it permits to solve a wide range of problems [ru

  9. State policies for geothermal development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacarto, D.M.

    1976-01-01

    The most prominent geothermal resources in the USA occur in fifteen Gulf and Western states including Alaska and Hawaii. In each state, authority and guidelines have been established for administration of geothermal leasing and for regulation of development. Important matters addressed by these policies include resource definition, leasing provisions, development regulations, water appropriation, and environmental standards. Some other policies that need attention include taxation, securities regulations, and utility regulations. It is concluded that conditions needed for the geothermal industry to pursue large-scale development are consumer (utility) confidence in the resource; equitable tax treatment; prompt exploration of extensive land areas; long and secure tenure for productive properties; prompt facility siting and development; and competitive access to various consumers. With these conditions, the industry should be competitive with other energy sectors and win its share of investment capital. This publication reviews for the states various technical, economic, and institutional aspects of geothermal development. The report summarizes research results from numerous specialists and outlines present state and Federal policies. The report concludes generally that if public policies are made favorable to their development, geothermal resources offer an important energy resource that could supply all new electric capacity for the fifteen states for the next two decades. This energy--100,000 MW--could be generated at prices competitive with electricity from fossil and nuclear power plants. An extensive bibliography is included. (MCW)

  10. The Numerical Nuclear Reactor for High-Fidelity Integrated Simulation of Neutronic, Thermal-Hydraulic, and Thermo-Mechanical Phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K. S.; Ju, H. G.; Jeon, T. H. and others

    2005-03-15

    A comprehensive high fidelity reactor core modeling capability has been developed for detailed analysis of current and advanced reactor designs as part of a US-ROK collaborative I-NERI project. High fidelity was accomplished by integrating highly refined solution modules for the coupled neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and thermo-mechanical phenomena. Each solution module employs methods and models that are formulated faithfully to the first-principles governing the physics, real geometry, and constituents. Specifically, the critical analysis elements that are incorporated in the coupled code capability are whole-core neutron transport solution, ultra-fine-mesh computational fluid dynamics/heat transfer solution, and finite-element-based thermo-mechanics solution, all obtained with explicit (fuel pin cell level) heterogeneous representations of the components of the core. The vast computational problem resulting from such highly refined modeling is solved on massively parallel computers, and serves as the 'numerical nuclear reactor'. Relaxation of modeling parameters were also pursued to make problems run on clusters of workstations and PCs for smaller scale applications as well.

  11. Steady-state thermal-hydraulic analysis of the pellet-bed reactor for nuclear thermal propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Morley, N.J.; Yang, J.Y.

    1992-01-01

    The pellet-bed reactor (PBR) for nuclear thermal propulsion is a hydrogen-cooled, BeO-reflected, fast reactor, consisting of an annular core region filled with randomly packed, spherical fuel pellets. The fuel pellets in the PBR are self-supported, eliminating the need for internal core structure, which simplifies the core design and reduces the size and mass of the reactor. Each spherical fuel pellet is composed of hundreds of fuel microspheres embedded in a zirconium carbide (ZrC) matrix. Each fuel microsphere is composed of a UC-NbC fuel kernel surrounded by two consecutive layers of the NbC and ZrC. Gaseous hydrogen serves both as core coolant and as the propellant for the PBR rocket engine. The cold hydrogen flows axially down the inlet channel situated between the core and the external BeO reflector and radially through the orifices in the cold frit, the core, and the orifices in the hot frit. Finally, the hot hydrogen flows axially out the central channel and exits through converging-diverging nozzle. A thermal-hydraulic analysis of the PBR core was performed with an emphasis on optimizing the size and axial distribution of the orifices in the hot and cold frits to ensure that hot spots would not develop in the core during full-power operation. Also investigated was the validity of the assumptions of neglecting the axial conduction and axial cross flow in the core

  12. The Numerical Nuclear Reactor for High-Fidelity Integrated Simulation of Neutronic, Thermal-Hydraulic, and Thermo-Mechanical Phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. S.; Ju, H. G.; Jeon, T. H. and others

    2005-03-01

    A comprehensive high fidelity reactor core modeling capability has been developed for detailed analysis of current and advanced reactor designs as part of a US-ROK collaborative I-NERI project. High fidelity was accomplished by integrating highly refined solution modules for the coupled neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and thermo-mechanical phenomena. Each solution module employs methods and models that are formulated faithfully to the first-principles governing the physics, real geometry, and constituents. Specifically, the critical analysis elements that are incorporated in the coupled code capability are whole-core neutron transport solution, ultra-fine-mesh computational fluid dynamics/heat transfer solution, and finite-element-based thermo-mechanics solution, all obtained with explicit (fuel pin cell level) heterogeneous representations of the components of the core. The vast computational problem resulting from such highly refined modeling is solved on massively parallel computers, and serves as the 'numerical nuclear reactor'. Relaxation of modeling parameters were also pursued to make problems run on clusters of workstations and PCs for smaller scale applications as well

  13. ELM - A SIMPLE TOOL FOR THERMAL-HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS OF SOLID-CORE NUCLEAR ROCKET FUEL ELEMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    ELM is a simple computational tool for modeling the steady-state thermal-hydraulics of propellant flow through fuel element coolant channels in nuclear thermal rockets. Written for the nuclear propulsion project of the Space Exploration Initiative, ELM evaluates the various heat transfer coefficient and friction factor correlations available for turbulent pipe flow with heat addition. In the past, these correlations were found in different reactor analysis codes, but now comparisons are possible within one program. The logic of ELM is based on the one-dimensional conservation of energy in combination with Newton's Law of Cooling to determine the bulk flow temperature and the wall temperature across a control volume. Since the control volume is an incremental length of tube, the corresponding pressure drop is determined by application of the Law of Conservation of Momentum. The size, speed, and accuracy of ELM make it a simple tool for use in fuel element parametric studies. ELM is a machine independent program written in FORTRAN 77. It has been successfully compiled on an IBM PC compatible running MS-DOS using Lahey FORTRAN 77, a DEC VAX series computer running VMS, and a Sun4 series computer running SunOS UNIX. ELM requires 565K of RAM under SunOS 4.1, 360K of RAM under VMS 5.4, and 406K of RAM under MS-DOS. Because this program is machine independent, no executable is provided on the distribution media. The standard distribution medium for ELM is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. ELM was developed in 1991. DEC, VAX, and VMS are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation. Sun4 and SunOS are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. IBM PC is a registered trademark of International Business Machines. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

  14. Deep Seawater Intrusion Enhanced by Geothermal Through Deep Faults in Xinzhou Geothermal Field in Guangdong, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, G.; Ou, H.; Hu, B. X.; Wang, X.

    2017-12-01

    This study investigates abnormal sea water intrusion from deep depth, riding an inland-ward deep groundwater flow, which is enhanced by deep faults and geothermal processes. The study site Xinzhou geothermal field is 20 km from the coast line. It is in southern China's Guangdong coast, a part of China's long coastal geothermal belt. The geothermal water is salty, having fueled an speculation that it was ancient sea water retained. However, the perpetual "pumping" of the self-flowing outflow of geothermal waters might alter the deep underground flow to favor large-scale or long distant sea water intrusion. We studied geochemical characteristics of the geothermal water and found it as a mixture of the sea water with rain water or pore water, with no indication of dilution involved. And we conducted numerical studies of the buoyancy-driven geothermal flow in the deep ground and find that deep down in thousand meters there is favorable hydraulic gradient favoring inland-ward groundwater flow, allowing seawater intrude inland for an unusually long tens of kilometers in a granitic groundwater flow system. This work formed the first in understanding geo-environment for deep ground water flow.

  15. Proceedings of the INAC 2007 International nuclear atlantic conference. Nuclear energy and energetic challenges for 21st. century. 15. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics; 8. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Following the success of INAC 2002 and 2005, INAC 2007 has been held with the 15th Meeting on Reactor Physics and Thermal Hydraulics (XV ENFIR) and the 8th Meeting on Nuclear Applications (VIII ENAN). A key goal of these joint meetings is to bring together scientists to exchange the latest research and development (R and D) information in nuclear science and technology. In the INAC 2007 technical program, plenary sessions, such as round table discussions and keynote lectures, has held to present to the general public the recent advances of peaceful nuclear energy usage, reducing the global warming. Besides, INAC 2007 has offered a poster technical session on Management Systems for Nuclear Organizations. The XV ENFIR has covered all aspects of interdisciplinary R and D related to nuclear reactors, and the VIII ENAN has offered a forum for discussion on nuclear applications in industry, geology, agriculture, medicine, biology, environmental sciences always highlighting the social, economical and environmental improvements generated by nuclear techniques. Both ENFIR and ENAN have also organized oral and poster technical sessions

  16. Proceedings of the INAC 2007 International nuclear atlantic conference. Nuclear energy and energetic challenges for 21st. century. 15. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics; 8. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    Following the success of INAC 2002 and 2005, INAC 2007 has been held with the 15th Meeting on Reactor Physics and Thermal Hydraulics (XV ENFIR) and the 8th Meeting on Nuclear Applications (VIII ENAN). A key goal of these joint meetings is to bring together scientists to exchange the latest research and development (R and D) information in nuclear science and technology. In the INAC 2007 technical program, plenary sessions, such as round table discussions and keynote lectures, has held to present to the general public the recent advances of peaceful nuclear energy usage, reducing the global warming. Besides, INAC 2007 has offered a poster technical session on Management Systems for Nuclear Organizations. The XV ENFIR has covered all aspects of interdisciplinary R and D related to nuclear reactors, and the VIII ENAN has offered a forum for discussion on nuclear applications in industry, geology, agriculture, medicine, biology, environmental sciences always highlighting the social, economical and environmental improvements generated by nuclear techniques. Both ENFIR and ENAN have also organized oral and poster technical sessions.

  17. Experimental Study of Hydraulic Control Rod Drive Mechanism for Passive IN-core Cooling System of Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Guk; Kim, Kyung Mo; Jeong, Yeong Shin; Bang, In Cheol [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    CAREM 25 (27 MWe safety systems using hydraulic control rod drives (CRD) studied critical issues that were rod drops with interrupted flow [3]. Hydraulic control rod drive suggested fast shutdown condition using a large gap between piston and cylinder in order to fast drop of neutron absorbing rods. A Passive IN-core Cooling system (PINCs) was suggested for safety enhancement of pressurized water reactors (PWR), small modular reactor (SMR), sodium fast reactor (SFR) in UNIST. PINCs consist of hydraulic control rod drive mechanism (Hydraulic CRDM) and hybrid control rod assembly with heat pipe combined with control rod. The schematic diagram of the hydraulic CRDM for PINCs is shown in Fig. 1. The experimental results show the steady state and transient behavior of the upper cylinder at a low pressure and low temperature. The influence of the working fluid temperature and cylinder mass are investigated. Finally, the heat removal between evaporator section and condenser section is compared with or without the hybrid control rod. Heat removal test of the hybrid heat pipe with hydraulic CRDM system showed the heat transfer coefficient of the bundle hybrid control rod and its effect on evaporator pool. The preliminary test both hydraulic CRDM and heat removal system was conducted, which showed the possibility of the in-core hydraulic drive system for application of PINCs.

  18. Nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic nonlinear stability analysis using a novel BWR reduced order model. Pt. 1. The effects of using drift flux versus homogeneous equilibrium models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dokhane, A.; Henning, D.; Chawla, R.; Rizwan-Uddin

    2003-01-01

    BWR stability analysis at PSI, as at other research centres, is usually carried out employing complex system codes. However, these do not allow a detailed investigation of the complete manifold of all possible solutions of the associated nonlinear differential equation set. A novel analytical, reduced order model for BWR stability has been developed at PSI, in several successive steps. In the first step, the thermal-hydraulic model was used for studying the thermal-hydraulic instabilities. A study was then conducted of the one-channel nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic dynamics in a BWR by adding a simple point kinetic model for neutron kinetics and a model for the fuel heat conduction dynamics. In this paper, a two-channel nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic model is introduced to simulate the out-of phase oscillations in a BWR. This model comprises three parts: spatial mode neutron kinetics with the fundamental and fist azimuthal modes; fuel heat conduction dynamics; and thermal-hydraulics model. This present model is an extension of the Karve et al. model i.e., a drift flux model is used instead of the homogeneous equilibrium model for two-phase flow, and lambda modes are used instead of the omega modes for the neutron kinetics. This two-channel model is employed in stability and bifurcation analyses, carried out using the bifurcation code BIFDD. The stability boundary (SB) and the nature of the Poincare-Andronov-Hopf bifurcation (PAF-B) are determined and visualized in a suitable two-dimensional parameter/state space. A comparative study of the homogeneous equilibrium model (HEM) and the drift flux model (DFM) is carried out to investigate the effects of the DFM parameters the void distribution parameter C 0 and the drift velocity V gi -on the SB, the nature of PAH bifurcation, and on the type of oscillation mode (in-phase or out-of-phase). (author)

  19. Thermal hydraulic aspects of uncertainty in power measurement of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.K.; Kumar, Rajesh; Gaikwad, A.J.; Majumdar, P.; Agrawal, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    Power measurement in Nuclear Reactors is carried out through in-core and ex-core neutron monitors which are continuously calibrated against thermal power. In Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (220 MWe) the temperature difference across steam generator hot and cold legs is taken to be a measure of thermal power as the flow through the primary heat transport system is assumed to be constant through out is operation. Gross flow is not measured directly. However, the flow depends on the characteristics of the primary heat transport pumps, which are centrifugal type and are affected by the grid frequency. The paper quantifies the percentage increase in the reactor power for the sustained allowable frequency. The paper quantifies the percentage increase in the reactor power for the sustained allowable high grid frequency. This uncertainty is in addition to instrument inaccuracy and should be accounted for in safety analysis. In some reactors thermal power is calculated from stem flow rate and pressure, here the location of steam flow measurement is important to avoid leakage related error in thermal power. Neutron absorption cross section in the power measurement instruments and the power production in the fuel varies with neutron energy levels, these aspects are also discussed in the paper. (author)

  20. Neutron and thermo - hydraulic model of a reactivity transient in a nuclear power plant fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva, Jose de Jesus Rivero

    2012-01-01

    A reactivity transient without reactor scram was modeled and calculated using analytical expressions for the space distributions of the temperature fields, combined with discrete numerical calculations for the time dependences of thermal power and temperatures. The transient analysis covered the time dependencies of reactivity, global thermal power, fuel heat flux and temperatures in fuel, cladding and cooling water. The model was implemented in Microsoft Office Excel, dividing the Excel file in several separated worksheets for input data, initial steady-state calculations, calculation of parameters non-depending on eigenvalues, eigenvalues determination, calculation of parameters depending on eigenvalues, transient calculation and graphical representation of intermediate and final results. The results show how the thermal power reaches a new equilibrium state due to the negative reactivity feedback derived from the fuel temperature increment. Nevertheless, the reactor mean power increases 40% during the first second and, in the hottest channel, the maximum fuel temperature goes to a significantly high value, slightly above 2100 deg C, after 8 seconds of transient. Consequently, the results confirm that certain degree of fuel damage could be expected in case of a reactor scram failure. Once the basic model has being established the scope of accidents for future analyses can be extended, modifying the nuclear power behavior (reactivity) during transient and the boundary conditions for coolant temperature. A more complex model is underway for an annular fuel element. (author)

  1. Qualification of code-Saturne for thermal-hydraulics single phase nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archambeau, F.; Bechaud, C.; Gest, B.; Martin, A.; Sakiz, M.

    2003-01-01

    Code-Saturne is a general finite volume CFD (computational fluid dynamics) code developed by Electricite de France (EDF) under quality assurance for 2- and 3-dimensional simulations, laminar and turbulent flows, conjugate heat transfer (coupling with thermal code SYRTHES), including combustion modelling and a Lagrangian module. A very large range of meshes can be used. The solver relies on a finite volume method on arbitrary meshes (hybrid, with hanging nodes, any type of element). All variables are located at the cell centres. The solver is time marching, with a predictor-corrector scheme for Navier-Stokes equations. Standard Reynolds Average Navier-Stokes modelling (RANS) is included (k-epsilon, RSM). Code-Saturne is used by EDF in various industrial fields such as process engineering, aeraulics, combustion and nuclear applications. The present paper describes the qualification phase carried out during 2001 for single-phase nuclear applications. Indeed, once an industrial product has been released and validated, it is of major importance, especially in this particular field related to safety matters, to demonstrate the ability of the code to help engineers produce satisfactory conclusions to industrial problems. In coherence with analyses and best practice guidelines such as those published by the ERCOFTAC Special Interest Group, it seemed important to base the qualification phase on well defined and documented experimental facilities, sufficiently complex to be representative of industrial studies. Much attention has been devoted to evaluating sensitivity to numerical parameters such as grid refinement, time step... Moreover, the qualification studies have been carried out in real-life conditions, that is in limited time, with industrial limitations on the number of grid cells, and by the teams usually producing such studies, so as to integrate a real industrial process in the qualification phase. Two test cases chosen to assess certain types of flows in PWR

  2. Multi scale analysis of thermal-hydraulics of nuclear reactors - the neptune project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bestion, D.

    2004-01-01

    Full text of publication follows:The NEPTUNE project aims at building a new two-phase thermalhydraulic platform for nuclear reactor simulation. It is jointly developed by CEA-DEN and EDF-DRD and also supported by IRSN and FRAMATOME-ANP. NEPTUNE is a new generation multi-scale platform. The system scale models the whole reactor circuit with 0D, 1D and 3D modules and is generally applied with a coarse meshing including about a thousand meshes. The component scale models components like the reactor Core or Steam Generators with a finer nodalization and is generally applied with 10 4 to 10 5 meshes. Since these components contain rod bundles or tube bundles the physical modelling uses a homogenization technique with a porosity. For some specific applications it was found necessary to add a two-phase CFD tool able to zoom on a portion of the circuit where small scale phenomena are of importance for design purpose or safety issues. Here the basic equations are still averaged like in RANS approach for single phase, but the space resolution is finer than in component codes and typical application may require 10 5 to 10 7 meshes. These three scales have to be coupled in order to simulate many reactor transients where both local effects and system effects play a role. In addition, two-phase Direct Numerical Simulation Tools with Interface Tracking Techniques can be used for even smaller scale investigations for a better understanding of basic physical processes and for developing closure relations for averaged models. The main challenges of this project are here presented and some first results are presented. (authors)

  3. Consideration of a design optimization method for advanced nuclear power plant thermal-hydraulic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridluan, Artit; Tokuhiro, Akira; Manic, Milos; Patterson, Michael; Danchus, William

    2009-01-01

    In order to meet the global energy demand and also mitigate climate change, we anticipate a significant resurgence of nuclear power in the next 50 years. Globally, Generation III plants (ABWR) have been built; Gen' III+ plants (EPR, AP1000 others) are anticipated in the near term. The U.S. DOE and Japan are respectively pursuing the NGNP and MSFR. There is renewed interest in closing the fuel cycle and gradually introducing the fast reactor into the LWR-dominated global fleet. In order to meet Generation IV criteria, i.e. thermal efficiency, inherent safety, proliferation resistance and economic competitiveness, plant and energy conversion system engineering design have to increasingly meet strict design criteria with reduced margin for reliable safety and uncertainties. Here, we considered a design optimization approach using an anticipated NGNP thermal system component as a Case Study. A systematic, efficient methodology is needed to reduce time consuming trial-and-error and computationally-intensive analyses. We thus developed a design optimization method linking three elements; that is, benchmarked CFD used as a 'design tool', artificial neural networks (ANN) to accommodate non-linear system behavior and enhancement of the 'design space', and finally, response surface methodology (RSM) to optimize the design solution with targeted constraints. The paper presents the methodology including guiding principles, an integration of CFD into design theory and practice, consideration of system non-linearities (such as fluctuating operating conditions) and systematic enhancement of the design space via application of ANN, and a stochastic optimization approach (RSM) with targeted constraints. Results from a Case Study optimizing the printed circuit heat exchanger for the NGNP energy conversion system will be presented. (author)

  4. Numerical modeling of shear stimulation in naturally fractured geothermal reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Ucar, Eren

    2018-01-01

    Shear-dilation-based hydraulic stimulations are conducted to create enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) from low permeable geothermal reservoirs, which are initially not amenable to energy production. Reservoir stimulations are done by injecting low-pressurized fluid into the naturally fractured formations. The injection aims to activate critically stressed fractures by decreasing frictional strength and ultimately cause a shear failure. The shear failure leads to a permanent ...

  5. Health effects and related standards for fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants. Volume 6 of health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. [In California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Case, G.D.; Bertolli, T.A.; Bodington, J.C.; Choy, T.A.; Nero, A.V.

    1977-01-01

    This report reviews health effects and related standards for fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants, emphasizing impacts which may occur through emissions into the atmosphere, and treating other impacts briefly. Federal regulations as well as California state and local regulations are reviewed. Emissions are characterized by power plant type, including: coal-fired, oil-fired, gas-fired, combined cycle and advanced fossil-fuel plants; and liquid and vapor geothermal systems. Dispersion and transformation of emissions are treated. The state of knowledge of health effects, based on epidemiological, physiological, and biomedical studies, is reviewed.

  6. Understanding the circulation of geothermal waters in the Tibetan Plateau using oxygen and hydrogen stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Hongbing; Zhang, Yanfei; Zhang, Wenjie; Kong, Na; Zhang, Qing; Huang, Jingzhong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Unique geothermal resources in Tibetan Plateau were discussed. • Isotopes were used to trace circulation of geothermal water. • Magmatic water mixing dominates geothermal water evolution. - Abstract: With the uplift of the Tibetan Plateau, many of the world’s rarest and most unique geothermal fields have been developed. This study aims to systematically analyze the characteristics of the hydrogen and oxygen isotopic data of geothermal, river, and lake waters to understand the circulation of groundwater and to uncover the mechanism of geothermal formation in the Tibetan Plateau. Field observations and isotopic data show that geothermal water has higher temperatures and hydraulic pressures, as well as more depleted D and 18 O isotopic compositions than river and lake waters. Thus, neither lakes nor those larger river waters are the recharge source of geothermal water. Snow-melt water in high mountains can vertically infiltrate and deeply circulate along some stretching tensile active tectonic belts or sutures and recharge geothermal water. After deep circulation, cold surface water evolves into high-temperature thermal water and is then discharged as springs at the surface again in a low area, under high water-head difference and cold–hot water density difference. Therefore, the large-scale, high-temperature, high-hydraulic-pressure geothermal systems in the Tibetan Plateau are developed and maintained by rapid groundwater circulation and the heat source of upwelled residual magmatic water. Inevitably, the amount of geothermal water will increase if global warming accelerates the melting of glaciers in high mountains

  7. Defining the research and development needs for the next generation nuclear plant: Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, R. R.; Nigg, D. W.; Ougouag, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    In May, 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) released a 'Request for Information and Expressions of Interest' (EOI) on the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The DOE objective 'is to conduct research, development, and demonstration of a next-generation nuclear power reactor in order to establish advanced technology for the future production of safe, efficient, and environmentally-acceptable power and to demonstrate the economic and technical feasibility of such facilities to the U.S. electric power industry.' The process of demonstrating the NGNP will require rigorous analysis of the plant's projected behavior under all postulated operational and accident conditions such that the operational and accident envelopes for the NGNP are fully defined and understood. Thus, the analytical tools must be demonstrated to be capable of analyzing the plant's behavior in the plant's operational and accident envelopes. Research and development (R and D) specific to the NGNP and conducted to date is based on the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) concept promulgated in the Generation IV technology roadmap. Although the NGNP may or may not resemble this concept, early thinking on the most likely candidates for the NGNP has led researchers to consider the prismatic and pebble bed variants of the very high temperature gas cooled thermal reactor. These designs have been demonstrated and have been studied extensively. Because some of their operational and accident characteristics have been identified in past studies, these characteristics are a good starting point for research and development planning and studies. This paper only addresses R and D needs regarding neutronics and thermal-hydraulics specific to very high temperature gas-cooled thermal reactors. The process of identifying R and D needs and then formulating plans is straightforward, although there are many unknowns and the process itself is iterative. The process is shown in flow chart form. In essence it is a

  8. Proceedings of the INAC 2005: International nuclear atlantic conference. Nuclear energy reducing global warming; 14. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics; 7. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Following the success of INAC 2002 which was inaugurated in Rio de Janeiro, INAC 2005 has been held with the 14th Meeting on Reactor Physics and Thermal Hydraulics (XIV ENFIR) and the 7th Meeting on Nuclear Applications (VII ENAN). A key goal of these joint meetings is to bring together scientists to exchange the latest research and development (R and D) information in nuclear science and technology. In the INAC 2005 technical program, plenary sessions, such as round table discussions and keynote lectures, has held to present to the general public the recent advances of peaceful nuclear energy usage, reducing the global warming. Besides, INAC 2005 has offered a poster technical session on Management Systems for Nuclear Organizations. The XIV ENFIR has covered all aspects of interdisciplinary R and D related to nuclear reactors, and the VII ENAN has offered a forum for discussion on nuclear applications in industry, geology, agriculture, medicine, biology and environmental sciences. Both ENFIR and ENAN have also organized oral and poster technical sessions

  9. Guidebook to Geothermal Finance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmon, J. P.; Meurice, J.; Wobus, N.; Stern, F.; Duaime, M.

    2011-03-01

    This guidebook is intended to facilitate further investment in conventional geothermal projects in the United States. It includes a brief primer on geothermal technology and the most relevant policies related to geothermal project development. The trends in geothermal project finance are the focus of this tool, relying heavily on interviews with leaders in the field of geothermal project finance. Using the information provided, developers and investors may innovate in new ways, developing partnerships that match investors' risk tolerance with the capital requirements of geothermal projects in this dynamic and evolving marketplace.

  10. Environment - Geothermal, the energy to wake up - Stimulation rather than fracturing - Iceland, the Texas of geothermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandes, Camille; Moragues, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    A first article comments the current efforts for the development of geothermal in France after a period during which it has been given up. It evokes the project of a geothermal plant near Paris (to supply Arcueil and Gentilly with energy), the increasing number of projects in different countries. It outlines the French delay in this sector, and that geothermal energy is as difficult to find as oil. It evokes the new actors of the sector and outlines the fierce competition in front of Icelander, Italian, US and Japanese actors, and the opportunities for the French ones. A second article comments the use of the hydraulic stimulation in geothermal energy exploration rather than hydraulic fracturing as in shale gas exploration, and outlines that according to geothermal energy actors this technique avoids the risk of micro-earthquake. A last article describes the activity of the geothermal sector in Iceland: geothermal energy supplies two thirds of primary energy consumption in this country. It exploits the Icelander volcanism. This development has been particularly noticeable since 2000, but some questions are raised regarding the production potential

  11. A THERMAL-HYDRAULIC SYSTEM FOR THE CONVERSION AND THE STORAGE OF ENERGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MITRAN Tudor

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes the concept design of a thermal-hydraulic system that converts the thermal energy (from the geothermal water, from the cooling water of power equipment, from exhaust gasses, and so. in hydrostatic energy, that is stored in a hydraulic accumulator. The hydraulic energy can be converted into electrical energy when needed.

  12. Geothermal Resource Utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, Paul J.

    1998-01-03

    Man has utilized the natural heat of the earth for centuries. Worldwide direct use of geothermal currently amounts to about 7,000 MWt, as compared to 1,500 MWe, now being used for the generation of electricity. Since the early 1970s, dwindling domestic reservoirs of oil and gas, continued price escalation of oil on the world market and environmental concerns associated with coal and nuclear energy have created a growing interest in the use of geothermal energy in the United States. The Department of Energy goals for hydrothermal resources utilization in the United States, expressed in barrels of oil equivalent, is 50 to 90 million bbl/yr by 1985 and 350 to 900 million bbl/yr by the year 2000. This relatively clean and highly versatile resource is now being used in a multitude of diverse applications (e.g., space heating and cooling, vegetable dehydration, agriculture, aquaculture, light manufacturing), and other applications requiring a reliable and economic source of heat.

  13. Geothermal Technologies Program: Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-02-01

    This fact sheets provides a summary of geothermal potential, issues, and current development in Alaska. This fact sheet was developed as part of DOE's GeoPowering the West initiative, part of the Geothermal Technologies Program.

  14. South Dakota geothermal handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The sources of geothermal fluids in South Dakota are described and some of the problems that exist in utilization and materials selection are described. Methods of heat extraction and the environmental concerns that accompany geothermal fluid development are briefly described. Governmental rules, regulations and legislation are explained. The time and steps necessary to bring about the development of the geothermal resource are explained in detail. Some of the federal incentives that encourage the use of geothermal energy are summarized. (MHR)

  15. An efficient approach to imaging underground hydraulic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2012-07-01

    To better locate natural resources, treat pollution, and monitor underground networks associated with geothermal plants, nuclear waste repositories, and carbon dioxide sequestration sites, scientists need to be able to accurately characterize and image fluid seepage pathways below ground. With these images, scientists can gain knowledge of soil moisture content, the porosity of geologic formations, concentrations and locations of dissolved pollutants, and the locations of oil fields or buried liquid contaminants. Creating images of the unknown hydraulic environments underfoot is a difficult task that has typically relied on broad extrapolations from characteristics and tests of rock units penetrated by sparsely positioned boreholes. Such methods, however, cannot identify small-scale features and are very expensive to reproduce over a broad area. Further, the techniques through which information is extrapolated rely on clunky and mathematically complex statistical approaches requiring large amounts of computational power.

  16. Passive temperature compensation in hydraulic dashpot used for the shut-off rod drive mechanism of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Narendra K.; Badodkar, Deepak N.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Passive temperature compensation in hydraulic dashpot has been studied numerically as well as experimentally. • Temperature compensation is achieved by reducing the clearances in the hydraulic dashpot at elevated temperature to compensate for the viscosity reduction. • Temperature compensation effects due to difference in thermal expansion of common engineering materials and use of bimetallic strips have been analyzed. • Design of a novel passive temperature compensating hydraulic dashpot is presented, which can be used for wide range of temperature variations. - Abstract: Passive temperature compensating hydraulic dashpot has been studied numerically as well as experimentally in this paper. Study is focused on reducing the clearances of the hydraulic dashpot at elevated temperature which intern compensates for the reduction in viscosity of damping oil and the dashpot gives uniform performance for wide range of temperature variation. Temperature compensation effects are mainly due to difference in the thermal expansion of materials. Different combinations of materials are used to reduce the dashpot clearances at elevated temperature. Finite element commercial code COMSOL Multiphysics 5.1 has been used for numerical analysis. Fluid-structure analysis has been carried-out to study the thermal expansion and pressure generated in the hydraulic dashpot. Multiphysics study with solid mechanics, laminar flow and moving mesh interfaces has been carried-out. Thermal expansion results of study-1 (solid mechanics) are further extended in to study-2 (laminar flow and moving mesh) and dashpot pressure is estimated. These results show that bimetallic strip improves the dashpot performance at 55 °C but do not fully compensate beyond that and less severe impacts occurs. Specific combinations of design and materials have been presented in this paper for obtaining maximum temperature compensation. A novel passive temperature compensating hydraulic dashpot

  17. Passive temperature compensation in hydraulic dashpot used for the shut-off rod drive mechanism of a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Narendra K., E-mail: nksingh_chikki@yahoo.com [Division of Remote Handling and Robotics, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, 400085 (India); Badodkar, Deepak N. [Division of Remote Handling and Robotics, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, 400085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai, 400094 (India)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Passive temperature compensation in hydraulic dashpot has been studied numerically as well as experimentally. • Temperature compensation is achieved by reducing the clearances in the hydraulic dashpot at elevated temperature to compensate for the viscosity reduction. • Temperature compensation effects due to difference in thermal expansion of common engineering materials and use of bimetallic strips have been analyzed. • Design of a novel passive temperature compensating hydraulic dashpot is presented, which can be used for wide range of temperature variations. - Abstract: Passive temperature compensating hydraulic dashpot has been studied numerically as well as experimentally in this paper. Study is focused on reducing the clearances of the hydraulic dashpot at elevated temperature which intern compensates for the reduction in viscosity of damping oil and the dashpot gives uniform performance for wide range of temperature variation. Temperature compensation effects are mainly due to difference in the thermal expansion of materials. Different combinations of materials are used to reduce the dashpot clearances at elevated temperature. Finite element commercial code COMSOL Multiphysics 5.1 has been used for numerical analysis. Fluid-structure analysis has been carried-out to study the thermal expansion and pressure generated in the hydraulic dashpot. Multiphysics study with solid mechanics, laminar flow and moving mesh interfaces has been carried-out. Thermal expansion results of study-1 (solid mechanics) are further extended in to study-2 (laminar flow and moving mesh) and dashpot pressure is estimated. These results show that bimetallic strip improves the dashpot performance at 55 °C but do not fully compensate beyond that and less severe impacts occurs. Specific combinations of design and materials have been presented in this paper for obtaining maximum temperature compensation. A novel passive temperature compensating hydraulic dashpot

  18. Hydraulic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Sheng-Hong

    2015-01-01

    This book discusses in detail the planning, design, construction and management of hydraulic structures, covering dams, spillways, tunnels, cut slopes, sluices, water intake and measuring works, ship locks and lifts, as well as fish ways. Particular attention is paid to considerations concerning the environment, hydrology, geology and materials etc. in the planning and design of hydraulic projects. It also considers the type selection, profile configuration, stress/stability calibration and engineering countermeasures, flood releasing arrangements and scouring protection, operation and maintenance etc. for a variety of specific hydraulic structures. The book is primarily intended for engineers, undergraduate and graduate students in the field of civil and hydraulic engineering who are faced with the challenges of extending our understanding of hydraulic structures ranging from traditional to groundbreaking, as well as designing, constructing and managing safe, durable hydraulic structures that are economical ...

  19. RELAP4/MOD5: a computer program for transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactors and related systems. User's manual. Volume II. Program implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    A discussion is presented of the use of the RELAP4/MOD5 computer program in simulating the thermal-hydraulic behavior of light-water reactor systems when subjected to postulated transients such as a LOCA, pump failure, or nuclear excursion. The volume is divided into main sections which cover: (1) program description, (2) input data, (3) problem initialization, (4) user guidelines, (5) output discussion, (6) source program description, (7) implementation requirements, (8) data files, (9) description of PLOTR4M, (10) description of STH20, (11) summary flowchart, (12) sample problems, (13) problem definition, and (14) problem input

  20. Geothermal fields of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearey, P.; HongBing, Wei

    1993-08-01

    There are over 2500 known occurrences of geothermal phenomena in China. These lie mainly in four major geothermal zones: Xizang (Tibet)-Yunnan, Taiwan, East Coast and North-South. Hot water has also been found in boreholes in major Mesozoic-Cenozoic sedimentary basins. This paper presents a summary of present knowledge of these geothermal zones. The geological settings of geothermal occurrences are associated mainly with magmatic activity, fault uplift and depressional basins and these are described by examples of each type. Increased multipurpose utilisation of geothermal resources is planned and examples are given of current usages.

  1. World geothermal congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povarov, O.A.; Tomarov, G.V.

    2001-01-01

    The World geothermal congress took place in the period from 28 May up to 10 June 2000 in Japan. About 2000 men from 43 countries, including specialists in the area of developing geothermal fields, creating and operating geothermal electrical and thermal plants and various systems for the earth heat application, participated in the work of the Congress. It was noted at the Congress, that development of the geothermal power engineering in the world is characterized by the large-scale application of geothermal resources for the electrical energy generation [ru

  2. Hawaii geothermal project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamins, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Hawaii's Geothermal Project is investigating the occurrence of geothermal resources in the archipelago, initially on the Island of Hawaii. The state's interest in geothermal development is keen, since it is almost totally dependent on imported oil for energy. Geothermal development in Hawaii may require greater participation by the public sector than has been true in California. The initial exploration has been financed by the national, state, and county governments. Maximization of net benefits may call for multiple use of geothermal resources; the extraction of by-products and the application of treated effluents to agricultural and aquacultural uses.

  3. Potential for enhanced geothermal systems in Alberta, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, Hannes; Weides, Simon; Babadagli, Tayfun; Zimmermann, Günter; Moeck, Inga; Majorowicz, Jacek; Unsworth, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    The province of Alberta has a high demand of thermal energy for both industrial and residential applications. Currently, the vast majority of the heat used in these applications is obtained by burning natural gas. Geothermal energy production from deep aquifer systems in the sedimentary basin could provide an alternative sustainable source of heat that would significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To date there has been no geothermal field development in Alberta because the average geothermal gradient was considered to be too low for economic geothermal energy generation. However, with new technologies for Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), it may be possible to develop geothermal resources from the sedimentary rocks in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin (WCSB). A numerical feasibility study based on a regional geological model and existing and newly gained data was conducted to identify scenarios for geothermal energy production in the region. In central Alberta, three Devonian carbonate formations (Cooking Lake, Nisku, Wabamun) and the Cambrian Basal Sandstone Unit were identified as the highest geothermal potential zones. Thermal-hydraulic reservoir simulations for a 5 km × 5 km site in the city of Edmonton were performed to evaluate reservoir development concepts for these four potential target formations; therefore, hydraulic fracturing treatments were also simulated. Different utilization concepts are presented for possible applications of geothermal energy generation in residential, industrial and agricultural areas. The Cooking Lake formation and the Basal Sandstone Unit are potentially the most promising reservoirs because the most heat can be extracted and the applications for the heat are widespread although the costs are higher than utilizing the shallower formations. Reservoir stimulation considerably improves the economics in all formations

  4. Hydraulic shock absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thatcher, G.; Davidson, D. F.

    1984-01-01

    A hydraulic shock absorber of the dash pot kind for use with electrically conducting liquid such as sodium, has magnet means for electro magnetically braking a stream of liquid discharged from the cylinder. The shock absorber finds use in a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor for arresting control rods

  5. Geothermal for kids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemzer, M.; Condy, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that educating children about geothermal energy is crucial to the future growth of the geothermal industry. The Geothermal Education Office (GEO) was founded in 1989 to provide materials and support to teachers and the geothermal community in educating grades K-12 about geothermal energy. GEO's goals are to: provide easy access to or referral to appropriate sources of geothermal information; foster teacher interest; create posters, booklets, lesson plans and other educational materials; monitor and review textbooks, encyclopedias and other educational materials distributed by educational groups to ensure inclusion of appropriate, accurate information and to encourage fair treatment of alternative energy resources; contribute articles to industry, science and educational publications; and foster communication and cooperation among GEO, the geothermal industry, government agencies, and educational and environmental groups

  6. Geothermal energy in Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Dabbas, Moh'd A. F.

    1993-11-01

    The potential of geothermal energy utilization in Jordan was discussed. The report gave a summary of the location of geothermal anomalies in Jordan, and of ongoing projects that utilize geothermal energy for greenhouse heating, fish farming, refrigeration by absorption, and water desalination of deep aquifers. The problems facing the utilization of geothermal energy in Jordan were identified to be financial (i.e. insufficient allocation of local funding, and difficulty in getting foreign financing), and inadequate expertise in the field of geothermal energy applications. The report gave a historical account of geothermal energy utilization activities in Jordan, including cooperation activities with international organizations and foreign countries. A total of 19 reports already prepared in the areas of geochemical and hydrological studies were identified. The report concluded that the utilization of geothermal energy offers some interesting economic possibilities. (A.M.H.). 4 refs. 1 map

  7. Behavior of nuclear waste elements during hydrothermal alteration of glassy rhyolite in an active geothermal system: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Seitz, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    The behavior of a group of nuclear waste elements (U, Th, Sr, Zr, Sb, Cs, Ba, and Sm) during hydrothermal alteration of glassy rhyolite is investigated through detailed geochemical analyses of whole rocks, glass and mineral separates, and thermal waters. Significant mobility of U, Sr, Sb, Cs, and Ba is found, and the role of sorption processes in their observed behavior is identified. Th, Zr, and Sm are relatively immobile, except on a microscopic scale. 9 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  8. Geothermal conditions in Northern Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybach, L.; Eugster, W.; Griesser, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    The geothermal field in northern Switzerland, derived from a great number of borehole temperature measurements, is characterized by a strongly positive temperature gradient and heat flow anomaly (>150 mW/m 2 ) in the lower Aare valley. The anomaly is centered above the recently discovered Permocarboniferous trough. Several possibilities to explain the anomaly (thermal disturbance in the mantle, cooling shallow intrusion, locally strong uplift/erosion, local contrasts in petrophysical properties) can be ruled out on the basis of model calculations. Uprising deep groundwater is favoured as the mechanism creating the observed anomaly. Deep groundwater circulation was investigated in detail, especially to clarify the hydraulic role of the Permocarboniferous trough, by coupled thermo-hydraulic modelling, using the integrated finite difference technique. The model was carefully validated by field data. The results reveal the draining effect of the Permocarboniferous trough and indicate that vertical permeability is present in the vicinity of the trough even at depths of several kilometers. They further imply that large parts of the crystalline basement in northern Switzerland have average hydraulic conductivities >10 -9 m/sec and that Darcy velocities in the order of 10 mm/year must be expected. (author) 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  9. Salton Sea geothermal field as a natural analog for the near-field in a salt high-level nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elders, W.A.; Moody, J.B.; Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH)

    1984-01-01

    The Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF), on the delta of the Colorado River in southern California, is being studied as a natural analog for the near-field environment of proposed nuclear waste repositories in salt. A combination of mineralogical and geochemical methods is being employed to develop a three-dimenisonal picture of temperature, salinity, lithology, mineralogy, and chemistry of reactions between the reservoir rocks and the hot brines. Our aim is to obtain quantitative data on mineral stabilities and on mobilities of the naturally occurring radionuclides of concern in Commercial High-Level Waste (CHLW). These data will be used to validate the EQ3/6 geochemical code under development to model the salt near-field repository behavior. Maximum temperatures encountered in wells in the SSGF equal or exceed peak temperatures expected in a salt repository. Brines produced from these wells have major element chemistry similar to brines from candidate salt sites. Relative to the rocks, these brines are enriched in Na, Mn, Sr, Ra, and Po, depleted in Ba, Si, Mg, Ti, and Al, and strongly depleted in U and Th. However, the unaltered rocks contain only about 2 to 3 ppm of U and 4 to 12 ppm of Th, largely in detrital epidotes and zircons. Samples of hydrothermally altered rocks from a wide range of temperature and salinity show rather similar uniform low concentrations of these elements, even when authigenic illite, chlorite, ipidote and feldspar are present. These observations suggest that U and Th are relatively immobile in these hot brines. However, Ra, Po, Cs, and Sr are relatively mobile. Work is continuing to document naturally occurring radionuclide partitioning between SSGF minears and brine over a range of temperature, salinity, and lithology. 8 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Hydraulic turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meluk O, G.

    1998-01-01

    The hydraulic turbines are defined according to the specific speed, in impulse turbines and in reaction turbines. Currently, the Pelton turbines (of impulse) and the Francis and Kaplan turbines (of reaction), they are the most important machines in the hydroelectric generation. The hydraulic turbines are capable of generating in short times, large powers, from its loads zero until the total load and reject the load instantly without producing damages in the operation. When the hydraulic resources are important, the hydraulic turbines are converted in the axle of the electric system. Its combination with thermoelectric generation systems, it allow the continuing supply of the variations in demand of energy system. The available hydraulic resource in Colombia is of 93085 MW, of which solely 9% is exploited, become 79% of all the electrical country generation, 21% remaining is provided by means of the thermoelectric generation

  11. Thermal-hydraulic behavior of physical quantities at critical velocities in a nuclear research reactor core channel using plate type fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidi Ali Kamel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal-hydraulic study presented here relates to a channel of a nuclear reactor core. This channel is defined as being the space between two fuel plates where a coolant fluid flows. The flow velocity of this coolant should not generate vibrations in fuel plates. The aim of this study is to know the distribution of the temperature in the fuel plates, in the cladding and in the coolant fluid at the critical velocities of Miller, of Wambsganss, and of Cekirge and Ural. The velocity expressions given by these authors are function of the geometry of the fuel plate, the mechanical characteristics of the fuel plate’s material and the thermal characteristics of the coolant fluid. The thermal-hydraulic study is made under steady-state; the equation set-up of the thermal problem is made according to El Wakil and to Delhaye. Once the equation set-up is validated, the three critical velocities are calculated and then used in the calculations of the different temperature profiles. The average heat flux and the critical heat flux are evaluated for each critical velocity and their ratio reported. The recommended critical velocity to be used in nuclear channel calculations is that of Wambsganss. The mathematical model used is more precise and all the physical quantities, when using this critical velocity, stay in safe margins.

  12. Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. Volume 4. Radiological emergency response planning for nuclear power plants in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, W.W.S.

    1977-01-01

    This report reviews the state of emergency response planning for nuclear power plants in California. Attention is given to the role of Federal agencies, particularly the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, in planning for both on and off site emergency measures and to the role of State and local agencies for off site planning. The relationship between these various authorities is considered. Existing emergency plans for nuclear power plants operating or being constructed in California are summarized. The developing role of the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission is examined

  13. HYDRAULIC SERVO CONTROL MECHANISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, R.B.; Gottsche, M.J. Jr.

    1963-09-17

    A hydraulic servo control mechanism of compact construction and low fluid requirements is described. The mechanism consists of a main hydraulic piston, comprising the drive output, which is connected mechanically for feedback purposes to a servo control piston. A control sleeve having control slots for the system encloses the servo piston, which acts to cover or uncover the slots as a means of controlling the operation of the system. This operation permits only a small amount of fluid to regulate the operation of the mechanism, which, as a result, is compact and relatively light. This mechanism is particuiarly adaptable to the drive and control of control rods in nuclear reactors. (auth)

  14. Deep geothermal energy: the Soultz-sous-Forets experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genter, A.; Guenot, N.; Graff, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the mining exploitation project of the geothermal heat at Soultz-sous-Forets, located 50 km NE of Strasbourg (Bas Rhin, France). A geothermal power plant, inaugurated mid-2008, will commercialize its own power generation soon. This power plant is owned by a consortium of French-German industrialists through the European economical interest group for the mining exploitation of heat. The paper presents the geological characteristics of the hot dry rock geothermal reservoir, the deep geothermal wells, the hydraulic stimulation of the reservoir rock, the surface equipments of the power plants and the production pumps, the activities of the site in 2008 and 2009 and the perspectives of development of this energy source in France in the light of the Soultz-sous-Forets site experience. (J.S.)

  15. Basic hydraulics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, P D

    1982-01-01

    BASIC Hydraulics aims to help students both to become proficient in the BASIC programming language by actually using the language in an important field of engineering and to use computing as a means of mastering the subject of hydraulics. The book begins with a summary of the technique of computing in BASIC together with comments and listing of the main commands and statements. Subsequent chapters introduce the fundamental concepts and appropriate governing equations. Topics covered include principles of fluid mechanics; flow in pipes, pipe networks and open channels; hydraulic machinery;

  16. Transient three-dimensional thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactor fuel rod arrays: general equations and numerical scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wnek, W.J.; Ramshaw, J.D.; Trapp, J.A.; Hughes, E.D.; Solbrig, C.W.

    1975-11-01

    A mathematical model and a numerical solution scheme for thermal-hydraulic analysis of fuel rod arrays are given. The model alleviates the two major deficiencies associated with existing rod array analysis models, that of a correct transverse momentum equation and the capability of handling reversing and circulatory flows. Possible applications of the model include steady state and transient subchannel calculations as well as analysis of flows in heat exchangers, other engineering equipment, and porous media

  17. Simplified model for the thermo-hydraulic simulation of the hot channel of a PWR type nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belem, J.A.T.

    1993-09-01

    The present work deals with the thermal-hydraulic analysis of the hot channel of a standard PWR type reactor utilizing a simplified mathematical model that considers constant the water mass flux during single-phase flow and reduction of the flow when the steam quality is increasing in the channel (two-phase flow). The model has been applied to the Angra-1 reactor and it has proved satisfactory when compared to other ones. (author). 25 refs, 15 figs, 3 tabs

  18. Geothermal energy worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbier, Enriko

    1997-01-01

    Geothermal energy, as a natural steam and hot water, has been exploited for decades in order to generate electricity as well as district heating and industrial processes. The present geothermal electrical installed capacity in the world is about 10.000 MWe and the thermal capacity in non-electrical uses is about 8.200 MWt. Electricity is produced with an efficiency of 10-17%, and the cost of the kWh is competitive with conventional energy sources. In the developing countries, where a total installed electrical power is still low, geothermal energy can play a significant role: in El Salvador, for example, 25% of electricity comes from geothermal spring, 20% in the Philippines and 8% in Kenya. Present technology makes it possible to control the environmental impact of geothermal exploitation. Geothermal energy could also be extracted from deep geopressured reservoirs in large sedimentary basins, hot dry rock systems and magma bodies. (author)

  19. GEOTHERMAL GREENHOUSING IN TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat Karaman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Use of renewable energy resources should be brought forward to reduce heating costs of greenhouses and to minimize the use of ever-depleting fossil fuels. Geothermal energy not only provides the heat required throughout plant growth, but also allow a year-long production. Geothermal resources with several other benefits therefore play significant role in agricultural activities. With regard to geothermal potential and implementation, Turkey has the 7th place in the world and the 1st place in Europe. Majority of country geothermal resources is used in greenhouse heating. The size of geothermal greenhouses increased 5 folds during the last decade and reached to 2500 decare. In this study, current status of geothermal greenhousing of Turkey was presented; problems and possible solutions were discussed.

  20. Coordination of geothermal research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jessop, A.M.; Drury, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    Visits were made in 1983 to various investigators and institutions in Canada to examine developments in geothermal research. Proposals for drilling geothermal wells to provide hot water for heating at a college in Prince Edward Island were made. In Alberta, the first phase of a program examining the feasibility of mapping sedimentary geothermal reservoirs was discussed. Some sites for possible geothermal demonstration projects were identified. In British Columbia, discussions were held between BC Hydro and Energy, Mines and Resources Canada on the drilling of a research hole into the peak of a temperature anomaly in the Meager Creek Valley. The British Columbia government has offered blocks of land in the Mount Cayley volcanic complex for lease to develop geothermal resources. A list of papers of interest to the Canadian geothermal energy program is appended.

  1. The geothermal power organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholl, K.L. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Geothermal Power Organization is an industry-led advisory group organized to advance the state-of-the-art in geothermal energy conversion technologies. Its goal is to generate electricity from geothermal fluids in the most cost-effective, safe, and environmentally benign manner possible. The group achieves this goal by determining the Member`s interest in potential solutions to technological problems, advising the research and development community of the needs of the geothermal energy conversion industry, and communicating research and development results among its Members. With the creation and adoption of a new charter, the Geothermal Power Organization will now assist the industry in pursuing cost-shared research and development projects with the DOE`s Office of Geothermal Technologies.

  2. Development of nuclear transmutation technology - A study on the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of Pb-Bi coolant material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Chang Hyun; You, Young Woo; Cho, Jae Seon; Kim, Ju Youl; Yang, Hui Chang; Huh, Byung Gil [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The objective of this study is to provide the direction of HYPER design in terms of thermal hydraulics especially through the analysis of thermal hydraulic characteristics of lead-bismuth material as a HYPER coolant and of proton accelerator target system. In this study, in order to evaluate the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of HYPER system, the FLUENT calculation is performed with liquid metal lead-bismuth(43%) and the turbulent Prandtl number model is developed. Also, the heat transfer analyses including temperature rising are performed for accelerator beam window, solid tungsten target and liquid target which is composed of liquid lead and lead-bismuth, respectively and the thermal stress analyses are performed for accelerator beam window. Through this study, the BASECASE whose parameter is HYPER system design specification is calculated by FLUENT. It is shown that the coolant velocity must exceeds 1.6 m/s for supporting the core coolant temperature in operating temperature range. The suggested turbulent Prandtl number model is applicable to liquid metal. And in order to maintain the integrity of proton beam target system, it is necessary to investigate the target structure associated with smoothing the flow path and beam window cooling. 43 refs., 67 figs., 27 tabs. (Author)

  3. Creys-Malville nuclear plant. Simulation of the cold plenum thermal-hydraulics. 12 zone model presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulot, J.P.

    1990-05-01

    The CRUSIFI code has been developed by SEPTEN (Engineering and Construction Division) with SICLE software during 1983-1985 in order to study the CREYS-MALVILLE dynamic behavior. At the time, the version was based on project data (version 2.3). It includes a 2 zones model for the cold plenum thermal-hydraulics, modelling which does not allow to reproduce accurately dissymetries apt to occur as well in usual operating (hydraulic dissymetries bound to one or many systems out of order), as during incidentally operating (hydraulic dissymetries bound to primary pump working back or thermal dissymetries after a transient on one or many secondary loops). Moreover, a 2 zones model cannot simulate axial temperature gradients which appear during double stratification phenomenon (upper and lower part of the plenum) produced by alternating thermal shock. A 12 zones model (4 sectors with 3 axial zones each) such as model developed by R$DD (Research and Development Division) allows to satisfy correctly these problems. This report is a specification of the chosen modelling. This model is now operational after qualifying with experimental transients on mockup and reactor. It is to-day connected with the EDF general operating code CRUSIFI (calibrating version 3.0). It could be easily integrated in a four loops plant modelling such as the CREYS-MALVILLE simulator in a four loops plant modelling such as the CREYS-MALVILLE simulator under construction at the present time by THOMSON

  4. Hydraulic Structures

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This table is required whenever hydraulic structures are shown in the flood profile. It is also required if levees are shown on the FIRM, channels containing the...

  5. Geothermal Today - 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-05-01

    U.S. Department of Energy 1999 Geothermal Energy Program Highlights The Hot Facts Getting into Hot Water Turning Waste water into Clean Energy Producing Even Cleaner Power Drilling Faster and Cheaper Program in Review 1999: The Year in Review JanuaryCal Energy announced sale of Coso geothermal power plants at China Lake, California, to Caithness Energy, for $277 million. U.S. Export-Import Bank completed a $50 million refinancing of the Leyte Geothermal Optimization Project in the Philippines. F

  6. Success in geothermal development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefansson, V.

    1992-01-01

    Success in geothermal development can be defined as the ability to produce geothermal energy at compatible energy prices to other energy sources. Drilling comprises usually the largest cost in geothermal development, and the results of drilling is largely influencing the final price of geothermal energy. For 20 geothermal fields with operating power plants, the ratio between installed capacity and the total number of well in the field is 1.9 MWe/well. The drilling history in 30 geothermal fields are analyzed by plotting the average cumulative well outputs as function of the number of wells drilled in the field. The range of the average well output is 1-10 MWe/well with the mean value 4.2 MWe/well for the 30 geothermal fields studied. A leaning curve is defined as the number of wells drilled in each field before the average output per well reaches a fairly constant value, which is characteristic for the geothermal reservoir. The range for this learning time is 4-36 wells and the average is 13 wells. In general, the average well output in a given field is fairly constant after some 10-20 wells has been drilled in the field. The asymptotic average well output is considered to be a reservoir parameter when it is normalized to the average drilling depth. In average, this reservoir parameter can be expressed as 3.3 MWe per drilled km for the 30 geothermal fields studied. The lifetime of the resource or the depletion time of the geothermal reservoir should also be considered as a parameter influencing the success of geothermal development. Stepwise development, where the reservoir response to the utilization for the first step is used to determine the timing of the installment of the next step, is considered to be an appropriate method to minimize the risk for over investment in a geothermal field

  7. Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. Volume 2. Radiological health and related standards for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, A.V.; Wong, Y.C.

    1977-01-01

    This report summarizes the status and basis of radiation protection standards, with a view to identifying how they particularly apply to nuclear power plants. The national and international organizations involved in the setting of standards are discussed, paying explicit attention to their jurisdictions and to the considerations they use in setting standards. The routine and accidental radioactive emissions from nuclear power plants are characterized, and the effect of these emissions on ambient radiation levels is discussed. The state of information on the relationship between radiation exposures and health effects is summarized

  8. Geothermal Power Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montagud, Maria E. Mondejar; Chamorro, C.R.

    2017-01-01

    Although geothermal energy has been widely deployed for direct use in locations with especial geologic manifestations, its potential for power generation has been traditionally underestimated. Recent technology developments in drilling techniques and power conversion technologies from low......-temperature heat resources are bringing geothermal energy to the spotlight as a renewable baseload energy option for a sustainable energy mix. Although the environmental impact and economic viability of geothermal exploitation must be carefully evaluated for each case, the use of deep low-temperature geothermal...... reservoirs could soon become an important contributor to the energy generation around the world....

  9. Geothermal reservoir engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Grant, Malcolm Alister

    2011-01-01

    As nations alike struggle to diversify and secure their power portfolios, geothermal energy, the essentially limitless heat emanating from the earth itself, is being harnessed at an unprecedented rate.  For the last 25 years, engineers around the world tasked with taming this raw power have used Geothermal Reservoir Engineering as both a training manual and a professional reference.  This long-awaited second edition of Geothermal Reservoir Engineering is a practical guide to the issues and tasks geothermal engineers encounter in the course of their daily jobs. The bo

  10. Geothermal Energy Program overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    The mission of the Geothermal Energy Program is to develop the science and technology necessary for tapping our nation's tremendous heat energy sources contained with the Earth. Geothermal energy is a domestic energy source that can produce clean, reliable, cost- effective heat and electricity for our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy -- the heat of the Earth -- is one of our nation's most abundant energy resources. In fact, geothermal energy represents nearly 40% of the total US energy resource base and already provides an important contribution to our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy systems can provide clean, reliable, cost-effective energy for our nation's industries, businesses, and homes in the form of heat and electricity. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Energy Program sponsors research aimed at developing the science and technology necessary for utilizing this resource more fully. Geothermal energy originates from the Earth's interior. The hottest fluids and rocks at accessible depths are associated with recent volcanic activity in the western states. In some places, heat comes to the surface as natural hot water or steam, which have been used since prehistoric times for cooking and bathing. Today, wells convey the heat from deep in the Earth to electric generators, factories, farms, and homes. The competitiveness of power generation with lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma ( the four types of geothermal energy) still depends on the technical advancements sought by DOE's Geothermal Energy Program

  11. Contribution to the study of thermal-hydraulic problems in nuclear reactors; Contribution a l`etude de problemes de thermohydraulique dans les reacteurs nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cognet, G

    1998-07-07

    In nuclear reactors, whatever the type considered, Pressurized Water Water Reactors (PWRs), Fast Breeder reactors (FBRs)..., thermal-hydraulics, the science of fluid mechanics and thermal behaviour, plays an essential role, both in nominal operating and accidental conditions. Fluid can either be the primary fluid (liquid or gas) or a very specific fluid called corium, which, in case of severe accident, could result from core and environning structure melting. The work reported here represents a 20-year contribution to thermal-hydraulic issues which could occur in FBRs and PWRs. Working on these two types of reactors, both in nominal and severe accident situations, has allowed me to compare the problems and to realize the importance of communication between research teams. The evolution in the complexity of studied problems, unavoidable in order to reduce costs and significantly improve safety, has led me from numerical modelling of single-phase flow turbulence to high temperature real melt experiments. The difficulties encountered in understanding the observed phenomena and in increasing experimental databases for computer code qualification have often entailed my participation in specific measurement device developments or adaptations, in particular non-intrusive devices generally based on optical techniques. Being concerned about the end-use of this research work, I actively participated in `in-situ` thermalhydraulic experiments in the FBRs: Phenix and Super-Phenix, of which I appreciated their undeniable scientific contribution. In my opinion, the thermal-hydraulic questions related to severe accidents are the most complex as they are at the cross-roads of several scientific specialities. Consequently, they require a multi-disciplinary approach and a continuous see-saw motion between experimentalists and modelling teams. After a brief description of the various problems encountered, the main ones are reported. Finally, the importance for research teams to

  12. INL Experimental Program Roadmap for Thermal Hydraulic Code Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn McCreery; Hugh McIlroy

    2007-09-01

    Advanced computer modeling and simulation tools and protocols will be heavily relied on for a wide variety of system studies, engineering design activities, and other aspects of the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), the DOE Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), and light-water reactors. The goal is for all modeling and simulation tools to be demonstrated accurate and reliable through a formal Verification and Validation (V&V) process, especially where such tools are to be used to establish safety margins and support regulatory compliance, or to design a system in a manner that reduces the role of expensive mockups and prototypes. Recent literature identifies specific experimental principles that must be followed in order to insure that experimental data meet the standards required for a “benchmark” database. Even for well conducted experiments, missing experimental details, such as geometrical definition, data reduction procedures, and manufacturing tolerances have led to poor Benchmark calculations. The INL has a long and deep history of research in thermal hydraulics, especially in the 1960s through 1980s when many programs such as LOFT and Semiscle were devoted to light-water reactor safety research, the EBRII fast reactor was in operation, and a strong geothermal energy program was established. The past can serve as a partial guide for reinvigorating thermal hydraulic research at the laboratory. However, new research programs need to fully incorporate modern experimental methods such as measurement techniques using the latest instrumentation, computerized data reduction, and scaling methodology. The path forward for establishing experimental research for code model validation will require benchmark experiments conducted in suitable facilities located at the INL. This document describes thermal hydraulic facility requirements and candidate buildings and presents examples of suitable validation experiments related

  13. Assessment of the impact of neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupling on the design and performance of nuclear reactors for space propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aithal, S.M.; Aldemir, T.; Vafai, K.

    1994-01-01

    A series of studies has been performed to investigate the potential impact of the coupling between neutronics and thermal hydraulics on the design and performance assessment of solid core reactors for nuclear thermal space propulsion, using the particle bed reactor (PBR) concept as an example system. For a given temperature distribution in the reactor, the k eff and steady-state core power distribution are obtained from three-dimensional, continuous energy Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNP code. For a given core power distribution, determination of the temperature distribution in the core and hydrogen-filled annulus between the reflector and pressure vessel is based on a nonthermal equilibrium analysis. The results show that a realistic estimation of fuel, core size, and control requirements for PBRs using hydrogenous moderators, as well as optimization of the overall engine design, may require coupled neutronic/thermal-hydraulic studies. However, it may be possible to estimate the thermal safety margins and propellant exit temperatures based on power distributions obtained from neutronic calculations at room temperature. The results also show that, while variation of the hydrogen flow rate in the annulus has been proposed as a partial control mechanism for PBRs, such control mechanism may not be feasible for PBRs with high moderator-to-fuel ratios and hence soft core neutron spectra

  14. Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. Volume 5. Control of population densities surrounding nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, A.V.; Schroeder, C.H.; Yen, W.W.S.

    1977-01-01

    In view of the requirement that the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission must specify land-use/population-density control measures to be used in the vicinity of nuclear power plants being granted land use, the possible forms of such measures are examined. Since these measures must maintain population densities below Nuclear Regulatory Commission criteria, if appropriate, NRC criteria for land use and population densities are given particular attention. In addition, a preliminary comparison of the cost of possible control measures with the reduced potential for damage to the public health and safety is made, yielding the result that control measures within approximately one mile of the plant site may be justified, in certain cases, on a strictly cost-benefit basis. However, it is not clear whether controls over such a limited region would satisfy the legal mandate

  15. Geothermal Today: 2003 Geothermal Technologies Program Highlights (Revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-05-01

    This outreach publication highlights milestones and accomplishments of the DOE Geothermal Technologies Program for 2003. Included in this publication are discussions of geothermal fundamentals, enhanced geothermal systems, direct-use applications, geothermal potential in Idaho, coating technology, energy conversion R&D, and the GeoPowering the West initiative.

  16. Geological model of supercritical geothermal reservoir related to subduction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2017-04-01

    Following the Great East Japan Earthquake and the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear power station on 3.11 (11th March) 2011, geothermal energy came to be considered one of the most promising sources of renewable energy for the future in Japan. The temperatures of geothermal fields operating in Japan range from 200 to 300 °C (average 250 °C), and the depths range from 1000 to 2000 m (average 1500 m). In conventional geothermal reservoirs, the mechanical behavior of the rocks is presumed to be brittle, and convection of the hydrothermal fluid through existing network is the main method of circulation in the reservoir. In order to minimize induced seismicity, a rock mass that is "beyond brittle" is one possible candidate, because the rock mechanics of "beyond brittle" material is one of plastic deformation rather than brittle failure. Supercritical geothermal resources could be evaluated in terms of present volcanic activities, thermal structure, dimension of hydrothermal circulation, properties of fracture system, depth of heat source, depth of brittle factures zone, dimension of geothermal reservoir. On the basis of the GIS, potential of supercritical geothermal resources could be characterized into the following four categories. 1. Promising: surface manifestation d shallow high temperature, 2 Probability: high geothermal gradient, 3 Possibility: Aseismic zone which indicates an existence of melt, 4 Potential : low velocity zone which indicates magma input. Base on geophysical data for geothermal reservoirs, we have propose adequate tectonic model of development of the supercritical geothermal reservoirs. To understand the geological model of a supercritical geothermal reservoir, granite-porphyry system, which had been formed in subduction zone, was investigated as a natural analog of the supercritical geothermal energy system. Quartz veins, hydrothermal breccia veins, and glassy veins are observed in a granitic body. The glassy veins formed at 500-550

  17. Experience with a servo-hydraulic mechanical testing machine installed in a new shielded active facility at Windscale Nuclear Power Development Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garlick, A.; Hindmarch, P.; Gravenor, J.G.; Rhodes, D.

    1982-03-01

    An Instron model 1273 servo-hydraulic machine has been installed within a lead-shielded cell at Windscale in order to provide a facility capable of performing a wide range of mechanical tests on nuclear reactor structural materials and fuel assembly components. This particular type of machine was chosen because it has design features associated with the load frame, location of the actuator and adjustment and clamping of the cross-head that are especially well suited to remote operation within a shielded cell. The design of the testing facility is described and the programmes of work that have been completed over the past 11/2 years of operation are reviewed. (author)

  18. Geothermal Financing Workbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battocletti, E.C.

    1998-02-01

    This report was prepared to help small firm search for financing for geothermal energy projects. There are various financial and economics formulas. Costs of some small overseas geothermal power projects are shown. There is much discussion of possible sources of financing, especially for overseas projects. (DJE-2005)

  19. Geothermal energy for greenhouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacky Friedman

    2009-01-01

    Geothermal energy is heat (thermal) derived from the earth (geo). The heat flows along a geothermal gradient from the center of the earth to the surface. Most of the heat arrives at the surface of the earth at temperatures too low for much use. However, plate tectonics ensure that some of the heat is concentrated at temperatures and depths favorable for its commercial...

  20. Prospects of geothermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzella, A.; Bianchi, A.

    2008-01-01

    Geothermal energy has great potential as a renewable energy with low environmental impact, the use of heat pumps is becoming established in Italy but the national contributions are still modest when compared to other nations. Mature technologies could double the installed geothermal power in Italy at 2020. [it

  1. The economics of Plowshare geothermal power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, J B; Stewart, D H [Battelle-Northwest (United States)

    1970-05-15

    Geothermal energy is not a new concept. Naturally occurring hot water has been used for centuries in Iceland for heating purposes. About 20% of Klamath Falls, Oregon is today heated by hot water from geothermal wells. The generation of electricity is a relatively new use for geothermal energy which has developed over the last half century. There are plants in operation in Italy, New Zealand and the U. S.; these have a total capacity of more than 700 MWe. Geothermal generation is being explored and developed today in Japan, USSR, Mexico, Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Guatemala. Whenever a favorable combination of recent magmatic intrusion and favorable groundwater conditions occurs to create the necessary steam conditions it is usually economic to build a generating plant. With fuel essentially free the plants are usually economically competitive even in small sizes. Naturally occurring geothermal steam sites are rather limited. Witness to this statement can be found in the small number of plants (less than a dozen) in operation or under construction. On the other hand, geothermal anomalies are prevalent in every one of the world's continents. The possible coupling of Plowshare with geothermal power tp produce electricity is based on the idea to use rock crushing power of nuclear device to produce large cavity filled with broken rock from which the sensible heat can be removed. This paper is based on preliminary analysis of the concept. It is recognized that a more in-depth feasibility study is required before firm conclusions can be drawn. Also, a demonstration experiment is required to prove the concept in practical application.

  2. The economics of Plowshare geothermal power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnham, J.B.; Stewart, D.H.

    1970-01-01

    Geothermal energy is not a new concept. Naturally occurring hot water has been used for centuries in Iceland for heating purposes. About 20% of Klamath Falls, Oregon is today heated by hot water from geothermal wells. The generation of electricity is a relatively new use for geothermal energy which has developed over the last half century. There are plants in operation in Italy, New Zealand and the U. S.; these have a total capacity of more than 700 MWe. Geothermal generation is being explored and developed today in Japan, USSR, Mexico, Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Guatemala. Whenever a favorable combination of recent magmatic intrusion and favorable groundwater conditions occurs to create the necessary steam conditions it is usually economic to build a generating plant. With fuel essentially free the plants are usually economically competitive even in small sizes. Naturally occurring geothermal steam sites are rather limited. Witness to this statement can be found in the small number of plants (less than a dozen) in operation or under construction. On the other hand, geothermal anomalies are prevalent in every one of the world's continents. The possible coupling of Plowshare with geothermal power tp produce electricity is based on the idea to use rock crushing power of nuclear device to produce large cavity filled with broken rock from which the sensible heat can be removed. This paper is based on preliminary analysis of the concept. It is recognized that a more in-depth feasibility study is required before firm conclusions can be drawn. Also, a demonstration experiment is required to prove the concept in practical application

  3. Renewability of geothermal resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Sullivan, Michael; Yeh, Angus [Department of Engineering Science, University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand); Mannington, Warren [Contact Energy Limited, Taupo (New Zealand)

    2010-12-15

    In almost all geothermal projects worldwide, the rate of extraction of heat energy exceeds the pre-exploitation rate of heat flow from depth. For example, current production of geothermal heat from the Wairakei-Tauhara system exceeds the natural recharge of heat by a factor of 4.75. Thus, the current rate of heat extraction from Wairakei-Tauhara is not sustainable on a continuous basis, and the same statement applies to most other geothermal projects. Nevertheless, geothermal energy resources are renewable in the long-term because they would fully recover to their pre-exploitation state after an extended shut-down period. The present paper considers the general issue of the renewability of geothermal resources and uses computer modeling to investigate the renewability of the Wairakei-Tauhara system. In particular, modeling is used to simulate the recovery of Wairakei-Tauhara after it is shut down in 2053 after a hundred years of production. (author)

  4. Geothermal country update of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higo, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the status of geothermal energy in Japan. Topics covered include: present and planned production of electricity, present utilization of geothermal energy for direct heat, information about geothermal localities, and wells drilled for electrical utilization of geothermal resources to January 1, 1990

  5. Geothermal energy: a brief assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunis, B.C.; Blackett, R.; Foley, D. (eds.)

    1982-07-01

    This document includes discussions about geothermal energy, its applications, and how it is found and developed. It identifies known geothermal resources located in Western's power marketing area, and covers the use of geothermal energy for both electric power generation and direct applications. Economic, institutional, environmental, and other factors are discussed, and the benefits of the geothermal energy resource are described.

  6. Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. C. Maurer

    2000-05-01

    Approximately 50% of the cost of a new geothermal power plant is in the wells that must be drilled. Compared to the majority of oil and gas wells, geothermal wells are more difficult and costly to drill for several reasons. First, most U.S. geothermal resources consist of hot, hard crystalline rock formations which drill much slower than the relatively soft sedimentary formations associated with most oil and gas production. Second, high downhole temperatures can greatly shorten equipment life or preclude the use of some technologies altogether. Third, producing viable levels of electricity from geothermal fields requires the use of large diameter bores and a high degree of fluid communication, both of which increase drilling and completion costs. Optimizing fluid communication often requires creation of a directional well to intersect the best and largest number of fracture capable of producing hot geothermal fluids. Moineau motor stators made with elastomers cannot operate at geothermal temperatures, so they are limited to the upper portion of the hole. To overcome these limitations, Maurer Engineering Inc. (MEI) has developed a turbodrill that does not use elastomers and therefore can operate at geothermal temperatures. This new turbodrill uses a special gear assembly to reduce the output speed, thus allowing a larger range of bit types, especially tri-cone roller bits, which are the bits of choice for drilling hard crystalline formations. The Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) represents a significant improvement for drilling geothermal wells and has the potential to significantly reduce drilling costs while increasing production, thereby making geothermal energy less expensive and better able to compete with fossil fuels. The final field test of the AGT will prepare the tool for successful commercialization.

  7. Proceedings of the INAC 2002: International nuclear atlantic conference; 13. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics; 6. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In order to promote a deep and sound reflection on key issues of the nuclear technology development, INAC 2002 has held three International Seminars: CGEN, ENFIR and ENAN approaching the themes 'Personnel Qualifying and Training', 'Nuclear Energy and Sustainable Development' and 'Nuclear Energy and Climatic Changes'

  8. A Hydraulic Stress Measurement System for Deep Borehole Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ask, Maria; Ask, Daniel; Cornet, Francois; Nilsson, Tommy

    2017-04-01

    Luleå University of Technology (LTU) is developing and building a wire-line system for hydraulic rock stress measurements, with funding from the Swedish Research Council and Luleå University of Technology. In this project, LTU is collaborating with University of Strasbourg and Geosigma AB. The stress state influences drilling and drillability, as well as rock mass stability and permeability. Therefore, knowledge about the state of in-situ stress (stress magnitudes, and orientations) and its spatial variation with depth is essential for many underground rock engineering projects, for example for underground storage of hazardous material (e.g. nuclear waste, carbon dioxide), deep geothermal exploration, and underground infrastructure (e.g. tunneling, hydropower dams). The system is designed to conduct hydraulic stress testing in slim boreholes. There are three types of test methods: (1) hydraulic fracturing, (2) sleeve fracturing and (3) hydraulic testing of pre-existing fractures. These are robust methods for determining in situ stresses from boreholes. Integration of the three methods allows determination of the three-dimensional stress tensor and its spatial variation with depth in a scientific unambiguously way. The stress system is composed of a downhole and a surface unit. The downhole unit consists of hydraulic fracturing equipment (straddle packers and downhole imaging tool) and their associated data acquisition systems. The testing system is state of the art in several aspects including: (1) Large depth range (3 km), (2) Ability to test three borehole dimensions (N=76 mm, H=96 mm, and P=122 mm), (3) Resistivity imager maps the orientation of tested fracture; (4) Highly stiff and resistive to corrosion downhole testing equipment; and (5) Very detailed control on the injection flow rate and cumulative volume is obtained by a hydraulic injection pump with variable piston rate, and a highly sensitive flow-meter. At EGU General Assembly 2017, we would like to

  9. System code assessment with thermal-hydraulic experiment to develop helium cooled breeding blanket for nuclear fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yum, S. B.; Park, I. W.; Park, G. C.; Lee, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    By considering the requirements for a DEMO-relevant blanket concept, Korea (KO) has proposed a He Cooled Molten Lithium (HCML) Test Blanket Module (TBM) for testing in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). A performance analysis for the thermal-hydraulics and a safety analysis for an accident caused by a loss of coolant for the KO TBM have been carried out using a commercial CFD code, ANSYS-CFX, and a system code, GAMMA (GAs Multicomponent Mixture Analysis), which was developed by the Gas Cooled Reactor in Korea. To verify the codes, a preliminary study was performed by Lee using a single TBM First Wall (FW) mock-up made from the same material as tho KO TBM, ferritic martensitic steel, using a 6 MPa nitrogen gas loop. The test was performed at pressures of 11, 19, and 29 bar, and under various ranges of flow rate from 0.63 to 2.44kg/min with a constant wall temperature condition. In the present study, a thermal-hydraulic test was performed with the newly constructed helium supplying system, In which the design pressure and temperature were 9 MPa and 500 .deg. C, respectively. In the experiment, the same mock-up was used, and the test was performed under the conditions of 8 MPa pressure, 0.2 kg/s flow rate, which are almost same conditions of the KO TBM FW. One-side of the mock-up was heated with a constant heat flux of 0.5 MW/m 2 using a graphite heating system, KoHLT-2 (Korea Heat Load Test Facility-2). The wall temperatures were measured using installed thermocouples, and they show a strong parity with the code results simulated under the same test conditions

  10. Global geothermal energy scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.K.; Singh, A.; Pandey, G.N.

    1993-01-01

    To resolve the energy crisis efforts have been made in exploring and utilizing nonconventional energy resources since last few decades. Geothermal energy is one such energy resource. Fossil fuels are the earth's energy capital like money deposited in bank years ago. The energy to build this energy came mainly from the sun. Steam geysers and hot water springs are other manifestations of geothermal energy. Most of the 17 countries that today harness geothermal energy have simply tapped such resources where they occur. (author). 8 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig

  11. Geothermal survey handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-01-01

    The objective of this handbook is to publicize widely the nature of geothermal surveys. It covers geothermal survey planning and measurement as well as measurement of thermal conductivity. Methods for the detection of eruptive areas, the measurement of radiative heat using snowfall, the measurement of surface temperature using infrared radiation and the measurement of thermal flow are described. The book also contains information on physical detection of geothermal reservoirs, the measurement of spring wells, thermographic measurement of surface heat, irregular layer surveying, air thermographics and aerial photography. Isotope measurement techniques are included.

  12. Worldwide installed geothermal power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laplaige, P.

    1995-01-01

    Worldwide electric energy production data are easy to compile, according to the informations given by individual countries. On the contrary, thermal applications of geothermics are difficult to quantify due to the variety of applications and the number of countries concerned. Exhaustive informations sometimes cannot be obtained from huge countries (China, Russia..) because of data centralization problems or not exploitable data transmission. Therefore, installed power data for geothermal heat production are given for 26 countries over the 57 that have answered the International Geothermal Association questionnaire. (J.S.). 1 fig., 2 tabs., 1 photo

  13. Geothermal electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliasson, E.T.

    1991-01-01

    Geothermal conversion, as discussed here, is the conversion of the heat bound within the topmost three kilometres of the upper crust of the earth into useful energy, principally electricity. The characteristics of a geothermal reservoir and its individual technical features are highly site-specific. Applications therefore must be designed to match the specific geothermal reservoir. An estimate of the electric energy potential world-wide made by the Electric Power Research Institute (United States) in 1978 and based on sustaining a continuous 30-year operation is given in the box at the right for comparison purposes only. 8 refs, 5 figs

  14. Navy Geothermal Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-12-01

    Domestic geothermal resources with the potential for decreasing fossil fuel use and energy cost exist at a significant number of Navy facilities. The Geothermal Plan is part of the Navy Energy R and D Program that will evaluate Navy sites and provide a technical, economic, and environmental base for subsequent resource use. One purpose of the program will be to provide for the transition of R and D funded exploratory efforts into the resource development phase. Individual Navy geothermal site projects are described as well as the organizational structure and Navy decision network. 2 figs.

  15. Aging and service wear of hydraulic and mechanical snubbers used on safety-related piping and components of nuclear power plants. Phase I study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, S H; Heasler, P G; Dodge, R E

    1986-02-01

    This report presents an overview of hydraulic and mechanical snubbers used on nuclear piping systems and components, based on information from the literature and other sources. The functions and functional requirements of snubbers are discussed. The real versus perceived need for snubbers is reviewed, based primarily on studies conducted by a Pressure Vessel Research Committee. Tests conducted to qualify snubbers, to accept them on a case-by-case basis, and to establish their fitness for continued operation are reviewed. This report had two primary purposes. The first was to assess the effects of various aging mechanisms on snubber operation. The second was to determine the efficacy of existing tests in determining the effects of aging and degradation mechanisms. These tests include breakaway force, drag force, velocity/ acceleration range for activation in tension or compression, release rates within specified tension/compression limits, and restricted thermal movement. The snubber operating experience was reviewed using licensee event reports and other historical data for a period of more than 10 years. Data were statistically analyzed using arbitrary snubber populations. Value-impact was considered in terms of exposure to a radioactive environment for examination/ testing and the influence of lost snubber function and subsequent testing program expansion on the costs and operation of a nuclear power plant. The implications of the observed trends were assessed; recommendations include modifying or improving examination and testing procedures to enhance snubber reliability. Optimization of snubber populations by selective removal of unnecessary snubbers was also considered. (author)

  16. Characterisation of hydraulically-active fractures in a fractured ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in the initial stage of a site investigation to select the optimal site location or to evaluate the hydrogeological properties of fractures in underground exploration studies, such as those related geothermal reservoir evaluation and radioactive waste disposal. Keywords: self-potential method, hydraulically-conductive fractures, ...

  17. 77 FR 27451 - Permitting Guidance for Oil and Gas Hydraulic Fracturing Activities Using Diesel Fuels-Draft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... (other than diesel fuels) pursuant to hydraulic fracturing operations related to oil, gas, or geothermal... during HF related to oil, gas, or geothermal operations must obtain a UIC permit before injection begins... diesel fuels are available through the UIC Class II Program, the well class for oil and gas activities.\\1...

  18. Geothermal Energy: Current abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringe, A.C. (ed.)

    1988-02-01

    This bulletin announces the current worldwide information available on the technologies required for economic recovery of geothermal energy and its use as direct heat or for electric power production. (ACR)

  19. Effective geothermal heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abelsen, Atle

    2006-01-01

    Scandinavia's currently largest geothermal heating project: the New Ahus hospital, is briefly presented. 300-400 wells on a field outside the hospital are constructed to store energy for both heating and cooling purposes

  20. NGDC Geothermal Data Bases

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Geothermics is the study of heat generated in Earth's interior and its manifestation at the surface. The National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) has a variety of...

  1. Geothermics in Aquitaine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dane, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    The geothermal exploitation of the Aquitanian Basin (S W France) started 15 years ago and has extended today to 12 different places. Three main aquifers of different depth are exploited in Bordeaux region: the old alluvial deposits of Garonne river (20-30 m), the Middle Eocene aquifer (300-400 m), and the Cenomanian-Turonian aquifer (900-1100 m) which is the deepest and most exploited for geothermal purposes. The drinkable quality of the water and the use of single-well technique are important factors that reduce the operating costs. Geothermics remains competitive with other energy sources due to the long-term stability of geothermal energy costs. (J.S.). 2 figs., 1 tab., 5 photos

  2. Geothermal studies in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji-Yang, Wang; Mo-Xiang, Chen; Ji-An, Wang; Xiao, Deng; Jun, Wang; Hsien-Chieh, Shen; Liang-Ping, Hsiung; Shu-Zhen, Yan; Zhi-Cheng, Fan; Xiu-Wen, Liu; Ge-Shan, Huang; Wen-Ren, Zhang; Hai-Hui, Shao; Rong-Yan, Zhang

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal studies have been conducted in China continuously since the end of the 1950's with renewed activity since 1970. Three areas of research are defined: (1) fundamental theoretical research on geothermics, including subsurface temperatures, terrestrial heat flow and geothermal modeling; (2) exploration for geothermal resources and exploitation of geothermal energy; and (3) geothermal studies in mines. Regional geothermal studies have been conducted recently in North China and more than 2000 values of subsurface temperature have been obtained. Temperatures at a depth of 300 m generally range from 20 to 25°C with geothermal gradients from 20 to 40°C/km. These values are regarded as an average for the region with anomalies related to geological factors. To date, 22 reliable heat flow data from 17 sites have been obtained in North China and the data have been categorized according to fault block tectonics. The average heat flow value at 16 sites in the north is 1.3 HFU, varying from 0.7 to 1.8 HFU. It is apparent that the North China fault block is characterized by a relatively high heat flow with wide variations in magnitude compared to the mean value for similar tectonic units in other parts of the world. It is suggested that although the North China fault block can be traced back to the Archaean, the tectonic activity has been strengthening since the Mesozoic resulting in so-called "reactivation of platform" with large-scale faulting and magmatism. Geothermal resources in China are extensive; more than 2000 hot springs have been found and there are other manifestations including geysers, hydrothermal explosions, hydrothermal steam, fumaroles, high-temperature fountains, boiling springs, pools of boiling mud, etc. In addition, there are many Meso-Cenozoic sedimentary basins with widespread aquifers containing geothermal water resources in abundance. The extensive exploration and exploitation of these geothermal resources began early in the 1970's. Since then

  3. Development of an Internet based geothermal information system for Germany; Aufbau eines geothermischen Informationssystems fuer Deutschland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, R.; Agemar, T.; Alten, J.A.; Kuehne, K.; Maul, A.A.; Pester, S.; Wirth, W. [Inst. fuer Geowissenschaftliche Gemeinschaftsaufgaben (GGA), Hannover (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    The Leibniz Institute for Applied Geosciences (GGA-Institut) is setting up an internet based information system on geothermal resources in close collaboration with partners. For a start, the geothermal information system will contain data about hydrogeothermal resources only. The project aims at an improvement of quality in the planning of geothermal plants and at a minimization of exploration risks. The key parameters for this purpose are production rate (Q) and temperature (T). The basis for the estimation of subsurface hydraulic properties comes from the information system on hydrocarbons. This information system provides permeability and porosity values derived from the analyses of drilling cores. The IT targets will be realised by a relational database providing all data relevant to the project. A 3D model of the ground provides the basis for visualisation and calculation of geothermal resources. As a prototype, a data-recall facility of geothermal sites in Germany is available online. (orig.)

  4. A reservoir engineering assessment of the San Jacinto-Tizate Geothermal Field, Nicaragua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostapenko, S.; Spektor, S.; Davila, H.; Porras, E.; Perez, M.

    1996-01-24

    More than twenty yews have passed since geothermal research and drilling took place at the geothermal fields in Nicaragua- Tbe well horn Momotombo Geothermal Field (70 We) has been generating electricity since 1983, and now a new geothermal field is under exploration. the San Jacinto-Tizate. Two reservoirs hydraulic connected were found. The shallow reservoir (270°C) at the depth of 550 - 1200 meters, and the deep one at > 1600 meters. Both of theme are water dominated reservoirs, although a two phase condition exist in the upper part of the shallow one. Different transient tests and a multi-well interference test have been carried out, very high transmissivity value were estimated around the well SJ-4 and average values for the others. A preliminar conceptual model of the geothermal system is given in this paper, as the result of the geology, geophysics, hydrology studies, drilling and reservoir evaluation.

  5. Renewable Energy Essentials: Geothermal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    Geothermal energy is energy available as heat contained in or discharged from the earth's crust that can be used for generating electricity and providing direct heat for numerous applications such as: space and district heating; water heating; aquaculture; horticulture; and industrial processes. In addition, the use of energy extracted from the constant temperatures of the earth at shallow depth by means of ground source heat pumps (GSHP) is also generally referred to as geothermal energy.

  6. Geothermal environmental impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armannsson, H.; Kristmannsdottir, H.

    1992-01-01

    Geothermal utilization can cause surface disturbances, physical effects due to fluid withdrawal noise, thermal effects and emission of chemicals as well as affect the communities concerned socially and economically. The environmental impact can be minimized by multiple use of the energy source and the reinjection of spent fluids. The emission of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere can be substantially reduced by substituting geothermal energy for fossil fuels as an industrial energy source wherever possible

  7. A complementary geothermal application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedard, R.

    1998-01-01

    A geothermal project for air conditioning and heating at four health centres in Quebec was presented. The four health centres are: le centre Dominique-Tremblay, le centre Cardinal-Villeneuve, le centre Louis-Hebert, et le centre Francois-Charon. The investment made to install the geothermal heating and cooling system, the cost of operating the system, and energy savings resulting from the investment were discussed

  8. The missing link between submarine volcano and promising geothermal potential in Jinshan, Northern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. C.; Hutchings, L.; Chang, C. C.; Lee, C. S.

    2017-12-01

    The Tatun volcanic group (TVG) and the Keelung submarine volcano (KSV) are active volcanoes and surrounding three nuclear plant sites in north Taiwan. The famous Jinshan-Wanli hot springs locates between TVG and KSV, moreover, the geochemical anomalies of acidic boiling springs on the seacoast infer that the origin is from magmatic fluids, sea water and meteoric water mixture, strongly implying that mantle fluids ascends into the shallow crust. The evidence for a magma chamber, submarine volcano, and boiling springs have a close spatial relationship. Based on UNECE specifications to Geothermal Energy Resources (2016), the Jinshan-Wanli geothermal area could be classified as Known Geothermal Energy Source for geothermal direct use and Potential Geothermal Energy Source for conventional geothermal system. High resolution reservoir exploration and modeling in Jinshan-Wanli geothermal area is developing for drilling risk mitigation. The geothermal team of National Taiwan Ocean University and local experts are cooperating for further exploration drilling and geothermal source evaluation. Keywords: geothermal resource evaluation, Jinshan-Wanli geothermal area, submarine volcano

  9. Geothermal energy in the western United States and Hawaii: Resources and projected electricity generation supplies. [Contains glossary and address list of geothermal project developers and owners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    Geothermal energy comes from the internal heat of the Earth, and has been continuously exploited for the production of electricity in the United States since 1960. Currently, geothermal power is one of the ready-to-use baseload electricity generating technologies that is competing in the western United States with fossil fuel, nuclear and hydroelectric generation technologies to provide utilities and their customers with a reliable and economic source of electric power. Furthermore, the development of domestic geothermal resources, as an alternative to fossil fuel combustion technologies, has a number of associated environmental benefits. This report serves two functions. First, it provides a description of geothermal technology and a progress report on the commercial status of geothermal electric power generation. Second, it addresses the question of how much electricity might be competitively produced from the geothermal resource base. 19 figs., 15 tabs.

  10. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geothermal Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghassemi, Ahmad [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2017-08-11

    The objective of this is to develop a 3-D numerical model for simulating mode I, II, and III (tensile, shear, and out-of-plane) propagation of multiple fractures and fracture clusters to accurately predict geothermal reservoir stimulation using the virtual multi-dimensional internal bond (VMIB). Effective development of enhanced geothermal systems can significantly benefit from improved modeling of hydraulic fracturing. In geothermal reservoirs, where the temperature can reach or exceed 350oC, thermal and poro-mechanical processes play an important role in fracture initiation and propagation. In this project hydraulic fracturing of hot subsurface rock mass will be numerically modeled by extending the virtual multiple internal bond theory and implementing it in a finite element code, WARP3D, a three-dimensional finite element code for solid mechanics. The new constitutive model along with the poro-thermoelastic computational algorithms will allow modeling the initiation and propagation of clusters of fractures, and extension of pre-existing fractures. The work will enable the industry to realistically model stimulation of geothermal reservoirs. The project addresses the Geothermal Technologies Office objective of accurately predicting geothermal reservoir stimulation (GTO technology priority item). The project goal will be attained by: (i) development of the VMIB method for application to 3D analysis of fracture clusters; (ii) development of poro- and thermoelastic material sub-routines for use in 3D finite element code WARP3D; (iii) implementation of VMIB and the new material routines in WARP3D to enable simulation of clusters of fractures while accounting for the effects of the pore pressure, thermal stress and inelastic deformation; (iv) simulation of 3D fracture propagation and coalescence and formation of clusters, and comparison with laboratory compression tests; and (v) application of the model to interpretation of injection experiments (planned by our

  11. Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission twentieth water reactor safety information meeting; Volume 2, Severe accident research, Thermal hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, A.J. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-03-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twentieth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 21--23, 1992. The papers describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included 10 different papers presented by researchersfrom CEC, China, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Spain and Taiwan. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  12. Geothermal energy developments in the district heating of Szeged

    OpenAIRE

    Osvald, Máté; Szanyi, János; Medgyes, Tamás; Kóbor, Balázs; Csanádi, Attila

    2017-01-01

    The District Heating Company of Szeged supplies heat and domestic hot water to 27,000 households and 500 public buildings in Szeged. In 2015, the company decided to introduce geothermal sources into 4 of its 23 heating circuits and started the preparation activities of the development. Preliminary investigations revealed that injection into the sandstone reservoir and the hydraulic connection with already existing wells pose the greatest hydrogeological risks, while placement and operation of...

  13. Geothermal energy in the world energy scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbier, E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the world energy consumption between 1960 and 1984 from primary energy sources (coal, natural gas, oil, hydropower, nuclear energy) and the same in percentages from 1925. This highlights the diminishing role of coal and the increased consumption of gas and oil. The latter has stabilized around 42% of the total after the drop in demand resulting from the oil crisis of 1973. The world energy consumption has then been divided into industrialized and developing countries. It appears that the latter, with a population equal to 68% of the total world population, consumed 23% of the world energy in 1982. Furthermore, the consumption figures show that the demand for domestic energy is much smaller in developing countries, and it is well-known that domestic energy consumed is one of the parameters used to assess standard of living. The total installed electric capacity throughout the world is then reported, divided between developed and developing countries, showing that the latter consumed 11% of all the electricity generated in the world in 1981. The world installed electric power of geothermal origin at the end of 1985 is shown, along with estimates for 1990. Geothermal energy represents 0.2% of the world electric power. This is obviously a small figure and indicates that geothermal energy plays a minor role on the world energy scene. However, if we distinguish between industrialized and developing countries, we can observe that, with their currently limited electrical consumption but good geothermal prospects, the developing countries could achieve quite a significant contribution to their total electric energy from that of geothermal origin, increasing at the moment from 3 to 19%. Finally, a comparison is made between electricity generating costs of different sources, showing that geothermal energy is competitive. A table illustrates the world evolution in installed geothermal capacity from 1950 to 1985. The non-electric uses of geothermal energy

  14. Utilising geothermal energy in Victoria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driscoll, Jim

    2006-01-01

    Geothermal energy is generated from the radioactive decay of naturally occurring isotopes and about 20% is generated from primordial heat associated with the formation of the earth. Geothermal project reduce energy and water cost and reduces greenhouse gas emissions

  15. Thermal-hydraulic study of fixed bed nuclear reactor (FBNR), in FCC, BCC and pseudo-random configurations of the core through CFD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, M.; Chavez, I.; Cajas, D.; Santos, R.

    2015-01-01

    The study of thermal-hydraulic performance of a fixed bed nuclear reactor (FBNR) core and the effect of the porosity was studied by the CFD method with 'SolidWorks' software. The representative sections of three different packed beds arrangements were analyzed: face-centered cubic (FCC), body-centered cubic (BCC), and a pseudo-random, with values of porosity of 0.28, 0.33 and 0.53 respectively. The minimum coolant flow required to avoid the phase change for each one of the configurations was determined. The results show that the heat transfer rate increases when the porosity value decreases, and consequently the minimum coolant flow in each configuration. The results of minimum coolant flow were: 728.51 kg/s for the FCC structure, 372.72 kg/s for the BCC, and 304.96 kg/s for the pseudo-random. Meanwhile, the heat transfer coefficients in each packed bed were 6480 W/m 2 *K, 3718 W/m 2 *K and 3042 W/m 2 *K respectively. Finally the pressure drop was calculated, and the results were 0.588 MPa for FCC configuration, 0.033 MPa for BCC and 0.017 MPa for the pseudo-random one. This means that with a higher porosity, the fluid can circulate easier because there are fewer obstacles to cross, so there are fewer energy losses. (authors)

  16. Determination and maintenance of DE minimis risk for migration of residual tritium (3H) from the 1969 Project Rulison nuclear test to nearby hydraulically fractured natural gas wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Jeffrey I; Chapman, Jenny B

    2013-05-01

    The Project Rulison underground nuclear test was a proof-of-concept experiment that was conducted under the Plowshare Program in 1969 in the Williams Fork Formation of the Piceance Basin in west-central Colorado. Today, commercial production of natural gas is possible from low permeability, natural gas bearing formations like that of the Williams Fork Formation using modern hydraulic fracturing techniques. With natural gas exploration and production active in the Project Rulison area, this human health risk assessment was performed in order to add a human health perspective for site stewardship. Tritium (H) is the radionuclide of concern with respect to potential induced migration from the test cavity leading to subsequent exposure during gas-flaring activities. This analysis assumes gas flaring would occur for up to 30 d and produce atmospheric H activity concentrations either as low as 2.2 × 10 Bq m (6 × 10 pCi m) from the minimum detectable activity concentration in produced water or as high as 20.7 Bq m (560 pCi m), which equals the highest atmospheric measurement reported during gas-flaring operations conducted at the time of Project Rulison. The lifetime morbidity (fatal and nonfatal) cancer risks calculated for adults (residents and workers) and children (residents) from inhalation and dermal exposures to such activity concentrations are all below 1 × 10 and considered de minimis. The implications for monitoring production water for conforming health-protective, risk-based action levels also are examined.

  17. Accelerating Geothermal Research (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-05-01

    Geothermal research at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is advancing geothermal technologies to increase renewable power production. Continuous and not dependent on weather, the geothermal resource has the potential to jump to more than 500 gigawatts in electricity production, which is equivalent to roughly half of the current U.S. capacity. Enhanced geothermal systems have a broad regional distribution in the United States, allowing the potential for development in many locations across the country.

  18. Thermal-hydraulic analyses of the TN-24P cask loaded with consolidated and unconsolidated spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michener, T.E.; McKinnon, M.A.; Rector, D.R.; Creer, J.M.

    1989-06-01

    This paper presents the results of comparisons of COBRA-SFS (spent fuel storage) temperature predictions with experimental data from the TN-24P (Transnuclear) spent fuel storage cask loaded with unconsolidated and consolidated spent PWR fuel. Peak cladding temperature predictions using the COBRA-SFS code are compared with test data and predicted axial and radial temperature distributions are compared with measured temperature profiles. The pre-test accuracy of the COBRA-SFS code in predicting temperature distributions is discussed, along with the effect of post-test model improvements on temperature predictions. This paper also briefly describes the COBRA-SFS code, which is designed to accurately predict flow and temperature distributions in spent nuclear fuel storage and transportation systems. 6 refs., 14 figs

  19. BEACON/MOD: a computer program for thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactor containments - user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadus, C.R.; Doyle, R.J.; James, S.W.; Lime, J.F.; Mings, W.J.

    1980-04-01

    The BEACON code is a best-estimate, advanced containment code designed to perform a best-estimate analysis of the flow of a mixture of air, water, and steam in a nuclear reactor containment system under loss-of-coolant accident conditions. The code can simulate two-component, two-phase fluid flow in complex geometries using a combination of two-dimensional, one-dimensional, and lumped-parameter representations for the various parts of the system. The current version of BEACON, which is designated BEACON/MOD3, contains mass and heat transfer models for wall film and wall conduction. It is suitable for the evaluation of short-term transients in dry-containment systems. This manual describes the models employed in BEACON/MOD3 and specifies code implementation requirements. It provides application information for input data preparation and for output data interpretation

  20. SCORE-EVET: a computer code for the multidimensional transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear fuel rod arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedetti, R.L.; Lords, L.V.; Kiser, D.M.

    1978-02-01

    The SCORE-EVET code was developed to study multidimensional transient fluid flow in nuclear reactor fuel rod arrays. The conservation equations used were derived by volume averaging the transient compressible three-dimensional local continuum equations in Cartesian coordinates. No assumptions associated with subchannel flow have been incorporated into the derivation of the conservation equations. In addition to the three-dimensional fluid flow equations, the SCORE-EVET code ocntains: (a) a one-dimensional steady state solution scheme to initialize the flow field, (b) steady state and transient fuel rod conduction models, and (c) comprehensive correlation packages to describe fluid-to-fuel rod interfacial energy and momentum exchange. Velocity and pressure boundary conditions can be specified as a function of time and space to model reactor transient conditions such as a hypothesized loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) or flow blockage

  1. Development of geothermal resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the geothermal development promotion survey project. NEDO is taking the lead in investigation and development to reduce risks for private business entities and promote their development. The program is being moved forward by dividing the surveys into three ranks of A, B and C from prospects of geothermal resource availability and the state of data accumulation. The survey A lacks number of data, but covers areas as wide as 100 to 300 km{sup 2}, and studies possible existence of high-temperature geothermal energy. The survey B covers areas of 50 to 70 km{sup 2}, investigates availability of geothermal resources, and assesses environmental impacts. The survey C covers areas of 5 to 10 km{sup 2}, and includes production well drilling and long-term discharge tests, other than those carried out by the surveys A and B. Results derived in each fiscal year are evaluated and judged to establish development plans for the subsequent fiscal year. This paper summarizes development results on 38 areas from among 45 areas surveyed since fiscal 1980. Development promotion surveys were carried out over seven areas in fiscal 1994. Development is in progress not only on utilization of high-temperature steam, but also on binary cycle geothermal power generation utilizing hot waters of 80 to 150{degree}C. Fiscal 1994 has carried out discussions for spread and practical use of the systems (particularly on economic effects), and development of small-to-medium scale binary systems. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Numerical investigation on the implications of spring temperature and discharge rate with respect to the geothermal background in a fault zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhenjiao; Xu, Tianfu; Mariethoz, Gregoire

    2018-04-01

    Geothermal springs are some of the most obvious indicators of the existence of high-temperature geothermal resources in the subsurface. However, geothermal springs can also occur in areas of low average subsurface temperatures, which makes it difficult to assess exploitable zones. To address this problem, this study quantitatively analyzes the conditions associated with the formation of geothermal springs in fault zones, and numerically investigates the implications that outflow temperature and discharge rate from geothermal springs have on the geothermal background in the subsurface. It is concluded that the temperature of geothermal springs in fault zones is mainly controlled by the recharge rate from the country rock and the hydraulic conductivity in the fault damage zone. Importantly, the topography of the fault trace on the land surface plays an important role in determining the thermal temperature. In fault zones with a permeability higher than 1 mD and a lateral recharge rate from the country rock higher than 1 m3/day, convection plays a dominant role in the heat transport rather than thermal conduction. The geothermal springs do not necessarily occur in the place having an abnormal geothermal background (with the temperature at certain depth exceeding the temperature inferred by the global average continental geothermal gradient of 30 °C/km). Assuming a constant temperature (90 °C here, to represent a normal geothermal background in the subsurface at a depth of 3,000 m), the conditions required for the occurrence of geothermal springs were quantitatively determined.

  3. Radiator Enhanced Geothermal System - A Revolutionary Method for Extracting Geothermal Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, S.; Marsh, B. D.; Hilpert, M.

    2017-12-01

    A new method of extracting geothermal energy, the Radiator Enhanced Geothermal System (RAD-EGS) has been developed. RAD-EGS attempts to mimic natural hydrothermal systems by 1) generating a vertical vane of artificially produced high porosity/permeability material deep in a hot sedimentary aquifer, 2) injecting water at surface temperatures to the bottom of the vane, where the rock is the hottest, 3) extracting super-heated water at the top of the vane. The novel RAD-EGS differs greatly from the currently available Enhanced Geothermal Systems in vane orientation, determined in the governing local crustal stress field by Shmax and Sl (meaning it is vertical), and in the vane location in a hot sedimentary aquifer, which naturally increases the longevity of the system. In this study, we explore several parameters regimes affecting the water temperature in the extraction well, keeping in mind that the minimum temperature of the extracted water has to be 150 °C in order for a geothermal system to be commercially viable. We used the COMSOL finite element package to simulate coupled heat and fluid transfer within the RAD-EGS model. The following geologic layers from top to bottom are accounted for in the model: i) confining upper layer, ii) hot sedimentary aquifer, and iii) underlying basement rock. The vane is placed vertically within the sedimentary aquifer. An injection well and an extraction well are also included in the simulation. We tested the model for a wide range of various parameters including background heat flux, thickness of geologic layers, geometric properties of the vane, diameter and location of the wells, fluid flow within the wells, regional hydraulic gradient, and permeability and porosity of the layers. The results show that among the aforementioned parameters, background heat flux and the depth of vane emplacement are highly significant in determining the level of commercial viability of the geothermal system. These results indicate that for the

  4. Geothermal heat pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, R.; Tinti, F.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, for several types of buildings and users, the choice of conditioning by heat pump and low enthalpy geothermal reservoir has been increasing in the Italian market. In fact, such systems are efficient in terms of energy and consumption, they can perform, even at the same time, both functions, heating and cooling and they are environmentally friendly, because they do not produce local emissions. This article will introduce the technology and will focus on critical points of a geothermal field design, from actual practice, to future perspectives for the geo exchanger improvement. Finally, the article presents a best practice case in Bologna district, with an economic analysis showing the convenience of a geothermal heat pump. Conclusions of the real benefits of these plants can be drawn: compared to a non-negligible initial cost, the investment has a pay-back period almost always acceptable, usually less than 10 years. [it

  5. Geothermal energy technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Geothermal energy research and development by the Sunshine Project is subdivided into five major categories: exploration and exploitation technology, hot-water power generation technology, volcanic power generation technology, environmental conservation and multi-use technology, and equipment materials research. The programs are being carried out by various National Research Institutes, universities, and private industry. During 1976 and 1977, studies were made of the extent of resources, reservoir structure, ground water movement, and neotectonics at the Onikobe and Hachimantai geothermal fields. Studies to be performed in the near future include the use of new prospecting methods, including artificial magnetotellurics, heat balance calculation, brightspot techniques, and remote sensing, as well as laboratory studies of the physical, mechanical, and chemical properties of rock. Studies are continuing in the areas of ore formation in geothermal environments, hot-dry-rock drilling and fracturing, large scale prospecting technology, high temperature-pressure drilling muds and well cements, and arsenic removal techniques.

  6. Geophysical considerations of geothermics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, M

    1967-01-01

    The development and utilization of geothermal energy is described from the standpoint of geophysics. The internal temperature of the Earth and the history and composition of magmas are described. Methods of exploration such as gravity, magnetic, thermal and electrical surveys are discussed, as are geochemical and infrared photogrammetric techniques. Examples are provided of how these techniques have been used in Italy and at the Matsukawa geothermal field in Japan. Drilling considerations such as muds, casings and cementing materials are discussed. Solutions are proposed for problems of environmental pollution and plant expansion.

  7. Victorian first for geothermal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, Paula

    2014-01-01

    AGL Limited (AGL) will assist Maroondah Sports Club to save hundreds of thousands of dollars on its energy bills over the next decade by commencing work to install Victoria's first GeoAir geothermal cooling and heating system. Utilising the earth's constant temperature, the new GeoAir geothermal system provides a renewable source of energy that will save the club up to $12,000 in the first year and up to $150,000 over the next 10 years

  8. Geothermal and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The production of geothermal-electric energy, presents relatively few contamination problems. The two bigger problems associated to the geothermal production are the disposition of waste fluids and the discharges to the atmosphere of non-condensable gases as CO 2 , H 2 O and NH 3 . For both problems the procedures and production technologies exist, like it is the integral use of brines and gases cleaning systems. Other problems consist on the local impact to forest areas for the effect of the vapor discharge, the contamination for noise, the contamination of aquifer shallow and the contamination related with the construction and termination of wells

  9. Geothermal energy in the western United States and Hawaii: Resources and projected electricity generation supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    Geothermal energy comes from the internal heat of the Earth, and has been continuously exploited for the production of electricity in the United States since 1960. Currently, geothermal power is one of the ready-to-use baseload electricity generating technologies that is competing in the western United States with fossil fuel, nuclear and hydroelectric generation technologies to provide utilities and their customers with a reliable and economic source of electric power. Furthermore, the development of domestic geothermal resources, as an alternative to fossil fuel combustion technologies, has a number of associated environmental benefits. This report serves two functions. First, it provides a description of geothermal technology and a progress report on the commercial status of geothermal electric power generation. Second, it addresses the question of how much electricity might be competitively produced from the geothermal resource base. 19 figs., 15 tabs

  10. 2008 Geothermal Technologies Market Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, J.; Freeman, J.

    2009-07-01

    This report describes market-wide trends for the geothermal industry throughout 2008 and the beginning of 2009. It begins with an overview of the U.S. DOE's Geothermal Technology Program's (GTP's) involvement with the geothermal industry and recent investment trends for electric generation technologies. The report next describes the current state of geothermal power generation and activity within the United States, costs associated with development, financing trends, an analysis of the levelized cost of energy (LCOE), and a look at the current policy environment. The report also highlights trends regarding direct use of geothermal energy, including geothermal heat pumps (GHPs). The final sections of the report focus on international perspectives, employment and economic benefits from geothermal energy development, and potential incentives in pending national legislation.

  11. Human Resources in Geothermal Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fridleifsson, I.B.

    1995-01-01

    Some 80 countries are potentially interested in geothermal energy development, and about 50 have quantifiable geothermal utilization at present. Electricity is produced from geothermal in 21 countries (total 38 TWh/a) and direct application is recorded in 35 countries (34 TWh/a). Geothermal electricity production is equally common in industrialized and developing countries, but plays a more important role in the developing countries. Apart from China, direct use is mainly in the industrialized countries and Central and East Europe. There is a surplus of trained geothermal manpower in many industrialized countries. Most of the developing countries as well as Central and East Europe countries still lack trained manpower. The Philippines (PNOC) have demonstrated how a nation can build up a strong geothermal workforce in an exemplary way. Data from Iceland shows how the geothermal manpower needs of a country gradually change from the exploration and field development to monitoring and operations.

  12. Geothermal industry assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-07-01

    An assessment of the geothermal industry is presented, focusing on industry structure, corporate activities and strategies, and detailed analysis of the technological, economic, financial, and institutional issues important to government policy formulation. The study is based principally on confidential interviews with executives of 75 companies active in the field. (MHR)

  13. Geothermal Greenhouse Information Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafferty, K. [P.E.; Boyd, T. [ed.

    1997-01-01

    This package of information is intended to provide a foundation of background information for developers of geothermal greenhouses. The material is divided into seven sections covering such issues as crop culture and prices, operating costs for greenhouses, heating system design, vendors and a list of other sources of information.

  14. Geothermal energy. Program summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    Brief descriptions of geothermal projects funded through the Department of Energy during FY 1978 are presented. Each summary gives the project title, contractor name, contract number, funding level, dates, location, and name of the principal investigator, together with project highlights, which provide informaion such as objectives, strategies, and a brief project description. (MHR)

  15. Geothermal investigations in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Ravnik

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the methodology and the results of geothermal investigations, based on seventy-two boreholes in the territory of the Republic of Slovenia.The data of fundamental geothermal quantities: formation temperature, thermal conductivity, and radiogenic heat production of rocks as well as surface heat flow density are stored in a computerized data base. Their synthesis is given in the map of formation temperatures at 1000 m depth and in the map of surface heat flow density. In both maps the thermal difference between the Pannonian basin in theeastern and the Dinarides in the western part of Slovenia is clearly expressed.However, in the boundary area between these two tectonic units, for a distance of about 100 km in SW-NE direction, elevated horizontal gradients of formation temperature as well as heat flow density are evident. A small positive thermal anomaly in the Ljubljana depression is conspicuous.The low-temperature geothermal resources in Slovenia such as thermalsprings and thermal water from boreholes, are estimated to have a flow rate of 1120 kg/s, corresponding to the ideal total heat production of 144 MWt. In the geothermally promising areas amounting to 3200 km2 the rate of accessible resource base (ARB down to the depth of 3 km has been assessed to about 8.5 x lO 20» J.

  16. Very low energy geothermics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Very low energy geothermics correspond to temperatures below 30 C and has been developed to cover heating and cooling needs of recent individual houses or tertiary industries using heat pumps and low depth aquifers (<100 m). Geothermal heat pumps industry has made great strides in European Northern countries, China, Japan and the United States of America. Geothermal heat pumps are less energy consuming than air heat pumps and require less cooling fluid and maintenance. The Aquapac procedure has been developed in France in 1983 by the AFME (French Energy Control Agency), EdF and the BRGM (Geologic and Mining Research Office) to encourage the use of geothermal heat pump for domestic and sanitary water heating and to make a survey of low-depth aquifers in the whole french territory. The decay of energy costs that started in 1986 has led to a loss of interest for the Aquapac procedure, even in the tertiary industries for which the air-conditioning demand is growing up. (J.S.). 1 tab

  17. Geothermal Grows Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William C.; Kraemer, Steven; Ormond, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Self-declared energy and carbon reduction goals on the part of progressive colleges and universities have driven ground source geothermal space heating and cooling systems into rapid evolution, as part of long-term climate action planning efforts. The period of single-building or single-well solutions is quickly being eclipsed by highly engineered…

  18. Geothermal energy conversion facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutscher, C.F.

    1997-12-31

    With the termination of favorable electricity generation pricing policies, the geothermal industry is exploring ways to improve the efficiency of existing plants and make them more cost-competitive with natural gas. The Geothermal Energy Conversion Facility (GECF) at NREL will allow researchers to study various means for increasing the thermodynamic efficiency of binary cycle geothermal plants. This work has received considerable support from the US geothermal industry and will be done in collaboration with industry members and utilities. The GECF is being constructed on NREL property at the top of South Table Mountain in Golden, Colorado. As shown in Figure 1, it consists of an electrically heated hot water loop that provides heating to a heater/vaporizer in which the working fluid vaporizes at supercritical or subcritical pressures as high as 700 psia. Both an air-cooled and water-cooled condenser will be available for condensing the working fluid. In order to minimize construction costs, available equipment from the similar INEL Heat Cycle Research Facility is being utilized.

  19. Critical review of hydraulic modeling on atmospheric heat dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Y.; Brown, S.M.

    1977-01-01

    Objectives of this study were: to define the useful roles of hydraulic modeling in understanding the predicting atmospheric effects of heat dissipation systems; to assess the state-of-the-art of hydraulic modeling of atmospheric phenomena; to inventory potentially useful existing hydraulic modeling facilities both in the United States and abroad; and to scope hydraulic model studies to assist the assessment of atmospheric effects of nuclear energy centers

  20. A three-dimensional coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical model for deformable fractured geothermal systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salimzadeh, Saeed; Paluszny, Adriana; Nick, Hamidreza M.

    2018-01-01

    A fully coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (THM) finite element model is presented for fractured geothermal reservoirs. Fractures are modelled as surface discontinuities within a three-dimensional matrix. Non-isothermal flow through the rock matrix and fractures are defined and coupled to a mec......A fully coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (THM) finite element model is presented for fractured geothermal reservoirs. Fractures are modelled as surface discontinuities within a three-dimensional matrix. Non-isothermal flow through the rock matrix and fractures are defined and coupled....... The model has been validated against several analytical solutions, and applied to study the effects of the deformable fractures on the injection of cold water in fractured geothermal systems. Results show that the creation of flow channelling due to the thermal volumetric contraction of the rock matrix...

  1. Characteristic Length Scales in Fracture Networks: Hydraulic Connectivity through Periodic Hydraulic Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, M.; Bour, O.; Le Borgne, T.; Longuevergne, L.; Lavenant, N.; Cole, M. C.; Guiheneuf, N.

    2017-12-01

    Determining hydraulic and transport connectivity in fractured bedrock has long been an important objective in contaminant hydrogeology, petroleum engineering, and geothermal operations. A persistent obstacle to making this determination is that the characteristic length scale is nearly impossible to determine in sparsely fractured networks. Both flow and transport occur through an unknown structure of interconnected fracture and/or fracture zones making the actual length that water or solutes travel undetermined. This poses difficulties for flow and transport models. For, example, hydraulic equations require a separation distance between pumping and observation well to determine hydraulic parameters. When wells pairs are close, the structure of the network can influence the interpretation of well separation and the flow dimension of the tested system. This issue is explored using hydraulic tests conducted in a shallow fractured crystalline rock. Periodic (oscillatory) slug tests were performed at the Ploemeur fractured rock test site located in Brittany, France. Hydraulic connectivity was examined between three zones in one well and four zones in another, located 6 m apart in map view. The wells are sufficiently close, however, that the tangential distance between the tested zones ranges between 6 and 30 m. Using standard periodic formulations of radial flow, estimates of storativity scale inversely with the square of the separation distance and hydraulic diffusivity directly with the square of the separation distance. Uncertainty in the connection paths between the two wells leads to an order of magnitude uncertainty in estimates of storativity and hydraulic diffusivity, although estimates of transmissivity are unaffected. The assumed flow dimension results in alternative estimates of hydraulic parameters. In general, one is faced with the prospect of assuming the hydraulic parameter and inverting the separation distance, or vice versa. Similar uncertainties exist

  2. Sensitivity study on hydraulic well testing inversion using simulated annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Shinsuke; Najita, J.; Karasaki, Kenzi

    1997-11-01

    For environmental remediation, management of nuclear waste disposal, or geothermal reservoir engineering, it is very important to evaluate the permeabilities, spacing, and sizes of the subsurface fractures which control ground water flow. Cluster variable aperture (CVA) simulated annealing has been used as an inversion technique to construct fluid flow models of fractured formations based on transient pressure data from hydraulic tests. A two-dimensional fracture network system is represented as a filled regular lattice of fracture elements. The algorithm iteratively changes an aperture of cluster of fracture elements, which are chosen randomly from a list of discrete apertures, to improve the match to observed pressure transients. The size of the clusters is held constant throughout the iterations. Sensitivity studies using simple fracture models with eight wells show that, in general, it is necessary to conduct interference tests using at least three different wells as pumping well in order to reconstruct the fracture network with a transmissivity contrast of one order of magnitude, particularly when the cluster size is not known a priori. Because hydraulic inversion is inherently non-unique, it is important to utilize additional information. The authors investigated the relationship between the scale of heterogeneity and the optimum cluster size (and its shape) to enhance the reliability and convergence of the inversion. It appears that the cluster size corresponding to about 20--40 % of the practical range of the spatial correlation is optimal. Inversion results of the Raymond test site data are also presented and the practical range of spatial correlation is evaluated to be about 5--10 m from the optimal cluster size in the inversion

  3. Sensitivity study on hydraulic well testing inversion using simulated annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakao, Shinsuke; Najita, J.; Karasaki, Kenzi

    1997-11-01

    For environmental remediation, management of nuclear waste disposal, or geothermal reservoir engineering, it is very important to evaluate the permeabilities, spacing, and sizes of the subsurface fractures which control ground water flow. Cluster variable aperture (CVA) simulated annealing has been used as an inversion technique to construct fluid flow models of fractured formations based on transient pressure data from hydraulic tests. A two-dimensional fracture network system is represented as a filled regular lattice of fracture elements. The algorithm iteratively changes an aperture of cluster of fracture elements, which are chosen randomly from a list of discrete apertures, to improve the match to observed pressure transients. The size of the clusters is held constant throughout the iterations. Sensitivity studies using simple fracture models with eight wells show that, in general, it is necessary to conduct interference tests using at least three different wells as pumping well in order to reconstruct the fracture network with a transmissivity contrast of one order of magnitude, particularly when the cluster size is not known a priori. Because hydraulic inversion is inherently non-unique, it is important to utilize additional information. The authors investigated the relationship between the scale of heterogeneity and the optimum cluster size (and its shape) to enhance the reliability and convergence of the inversion. It appears that the cluster size corresponding to about 20--40 % of the practical range of the spatial correlation is optimal. Inversion results of the Raymond test site data are also presented and the practical range of spatial correlation is evaluated to be about 5--10 m from the optimal cluster size in the inversion.

  4. Health impacts of geothermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1982-01-01

    Geothermal resources are used to produce electrical energy and to supply heat for non-electric applications like residential heating and crop drying. The utilization of geothermal energy consists of the extraction of hot water or steam from an underground reservoir followed by different methods of surface processing along with the disposal of liquid, gaseous, and even solid wastes. The focus of this paper is on electric power production using geothermal resources greater than 150 0 C because this form of geothermal energy utilization has the most serious health-related consequences. Based on measurements and experience at existing geothermal power plants, atmospheric emissions of non-condensing gases such as hydrogen sulphide and benzene pose the greatest hazards to public health. Surface and ground waters contaminated by discharges of spent geothermal fluids constitute another health hazard. In this paper it is shown that hydrogen sulphide emissions from most geothermal power plants are apt to cause odour annoyances among members of the exposed public -some of whom can detect this gas at concentrations as low as 0.002 ppmv. A risk-assessment model is used to estimate the lifetime risk of incurring leukaemia from atmospheric benzene caused by 2000 MW(e) of geothermal development in California's Imperial Valley. Also assessed is the risk of skin cancer due to the ingestion of river water in New Zealand that is contaminated by waste geothermal fluids containing arsenic. Finally, data on the occurrence of occupational disease in the geothermal industry is briefly summarized. (author)

  5. Geothermal energy program summary: Volume 1: Overview Fiscal Year 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    Geothermal energy is a here-and-now technology for use with dry steam resources and high-quality hydrothermal liquids. These resources are supplying about 6 percent of all electricity used in California. However, the competitiveness of power generation using lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma still depends on the technology improvements sought by the DOE Geothermal Energy R and D Program. The successful outcome of the R and D initiatives will serve to benefit the U.S. public in a number of ways. First, if a substantial portion of our geothermal resources can be used economically, they will add a very large source of secure, indigenous energy to the nation's energy supply. In addition, geothermal plants can be brought on line quickly in case of a national energy emergency. Geothermal energy is also a highly reliable resource, with very high plant availability. For example, new dry steam plants at The Geysers are operable over 99 percent of the time, and the small flash plant in Hawaii, only the second in the United States, has an availability factor of 98 percent. Geothermal plants also offer a viable baseload alternative to fossil and nuclear plants -- they are on line 24 hours a day, unaffected by diurnal or seasonal variations. The hydrothermal power plants with modern emission control technology have proved to have minimal environmental impact. The results to date with geopressured and hot dry rock resources suggest that they, too, can be operated so as to reduce environmental effects to well within the limits of acceptability. Preliminary studies on magma are also encouraging. In summary, the character and potential of geothermal energy, together with the accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal R and D Program, ensure that this huge energy resource will play a major role in future U.S. energy markets.

  6. Development of nuclear thermal hydraulic verification tests and evaluation technology - Development of the ultrasonic method for two-phase mixture level measurement in nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    No, Hee Cheon; Kim, Sang Jae; Kim, Hyung Tae; Moon, Young Min [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    An ultrasonic method is developed for the measurement of the two-phase mixture level in the reactor vessel or steam generator. The ultrasonic method is selected among the several non-nuclear two-phase mixture level measurement methods through two steps of selection procedure. A commercial ultrasonic level measurement method is modified for application into the high temperature, pressure, and other conditions. The calculation method of the ultrasonic velocity is modified to consider the medium as the homogeneous mixture of air and steam, and to be applied into the high temperature and pressure conditions. The cross-correlation technique is adopted as a detection method to reduced the effects of the attenuation and the diffused reflection caused by surface fluctuation. The waveguides are developed to reduce the loss of echo and to remove the effects of obstructs. The present experimental study shows that the developed ultrasonic method measures the two-phase mixture level more accurately than the conventional methods do. 21 refs., 60 figs., 13 tabs. (Author)

  7. Several new thermo-hydraulic test facilities in NPIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Shurong; Sun Yufa; Ji Fuyun; Zong Guifang; Guo Zhongchuan

    1997-01-01

    Several new thermo-hydraulic test facilities are under construction in Nuclear Power Institute of Chinese (NPIC) at Chengdu. These facilities include: 1. Nuclear Power Component Comprehensive Test Facility. 2. Reactor Hydraulic Modeling Test Facility. 3. Control Rod Drive Line Hydraulic Test Facility. 4. Large Scale Thermo-Hydraulic Test Facility. The construction of these facilities will make huge progress in the research and development capability of nuclear power technology in CHINA. The author will present a brief description of the design parameters flowchart and test program of these facilities

  8. Geothermal heat can cool, too

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellstein, J.

    2008-01-01

    This article takes a look at how geothermal energy can not only be used to supply heating energy, but also be used to provide cooling too. The article reports on a conference on heating and cooling with geothermal energy that was held in Duebendorf, Switzerland, in March 2008. The influence of climate change on needs for heating and cooling and the need for additional knowledge and data on deeper rock layers is noted. The seasonal use of geothermal systems to provide heating in winter and cooling in summer is discussed. The planning of geothermal probe fields and their simulation is addressed. As an example, the geothermal installations under the recently renewed and extended 'Dolder Grand' luxury hotel in Zurich are quoted. The new SIA 384/6 norm on geothermal probes issued by the Swiss Association of Architects SIA is briefly reviewed.

  9. Geothermal energy utilization in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svalova, V. [Institute of Environmental Geoscience, RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-01

    Geothermal energy use is the way to clean, sustainable energy development for the world. Russia has rich high and low temperature geothermal resources and is making progress using them - mostly with low-temperature geothermal resources and heat pumps This is optimal for many regions of Russia -in the European part, in the Urals and others. Electricity is generated by some geothermal power plants (GeoPP) only in the Kamchatka Peninsula and Kuril Islands There are two possible ways of using geothermal resources, depending on the properties of thermal waters heat/power and mineral extraction. The mineral-extraction direction is basic for geothermal waters, which contain valuable components in industrial quantities The most significant deposits of thermal waters represent the brines containing from 35 up to 400 and more g/l of salts. These are the minerals of many chemical dements. (author)

  10. Geothermal development plan: Maricopa county

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    Maricopa county is the area of Arizona receiving top priority since it contains over half of the state's population. The county is located entirely within the Basin and Range physiographic region in which geothermal resources are known to occur. Several approaches were taken to match potential users to geothermal resources. One approach involved matching some of the largest facilities in the county to nearby geothermal resources. Other approaches involved identifying industrial processes whose heat requirements are less than the average assessed geothermal reservoir temperature of 110/sup 0/C (230/sup 0/F). Since many of the industries are located on or near geothermal resources, geothermal energy potentially could be adapted to many industrial processes.

  11. BWR 9 X 9 Fuel Assembly Thermal-Hydraulic Tests (2): Hydraulic Vibration Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiaki Tsukuda; Katsuichiro Kamimura; Toshiitsu Hattori; Akira Tanabe; Noboru Saito; Masahiko Warashina; Yuji Nishino

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) conducted thermal-hydraulic projects for verification of thermal-hydraulic design reliability for BWR high-burnup 8 x 8 and 9 x 9 fuel assemblies, entrusted by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI). As a part of the NUPEC thermal-hydraulic projects, hydraulic vibration tests using full-scale test assemblies simulating 9 x 9 fuel assemblies were carried out to evaluate BWR fuel integrity. The test data were applied to development of a new correlation for the estimation of fuel rod vibration amplitude. (authors)

  12. Chemical logging of geothermal wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, C.A.; McAtee, R.E.

    The presence of geothermal aquifers can be detected while drilling in geothermal formations by maintaining a chemical log of the ratio of the concentrations of calcium to carbonate and bicarbonate ions in the return drilling fluid. A continuous increase in the ratio of the concentrations of calcium to carbonate and bicarbonate ions is indicative of the existence of a warm or hot geothermal aquifer at some increased depth.

  13. Review of light--water reactor safety studies. Volume 3 of health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, A.V.; Farnaam, M.R.K.

    1977-01-01

    This report summarizes and compares important studies of light-water nuclear reactor safety, emphasizing the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Safety Study, work on risk assessment funded by the Electric Power Research Institute, and the Report of the American Physical Society study group on light-water reactor safety. These reports treat risk assessment for nuclear power plants and provide an introduction to the basic issues in reactor safety and the needs of the reactor safety research program. Earlier studies are treated more briefly. The report includes comments on the Reactor Safety Study. The manner in which these studies may be used and alterations which would increase their utility are discussed

  14. Direct application of geothermal energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reistad, G.M.

    1980-01-01

    An overall treatment of direct geothermal applications is presented with an emphasis on the above-ground engineering. The types of geothermal resources and their general extent in the US are described. The potential market that may be served with geothermal energy is considered briefly. The evaluation considerations, special design aspects, and application approaches for geothermal energy use in each of the applications are considered. The present applications in the US are summarized and a bibliography of recent studies and applications is provided. (MHR)

  15. Water Desalination using geothermal energy

    KAUST Repository

    Goosen, M.

    2010-08-03

    The paper provides a critical overview of water desalination using geothermal resources. Specific case studies are presented, as well as an assessment of environmental risks and market potential and barriers to growth. The availability and suitability of low and high temperature geothermal energy in comparison to other renewable energy resources for desalination is also discussed. Analysis will show, for example, that the use of geothermal energy for thermal desalination can be justified only in the presence of cheap geothermal reservoirs or in decentralized applications focusing on small-scale water supplies in coastal regions, provided that society is able and willing to pay for desalting. 2010 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  16. The geothermal KWh cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Numerous factors can influence the cost of geothermal electricity production: the size and power of production units, the conversion technology used (Rankine cycle or water steam), the resource quality (dry vapor or water-vapor mixing), the resource depth, the drilling activity in the country and the work people costs. In the United States of America the geothermal kWh cost ranges from 2.5 to 8.5 US cents, while in Italy and Nicaragua it ranges from 3 and 10 cents and from 5.7 to 6 cents, respectively. Results of a comparative study of the kWh production cost from different energy sources is also summarized. (J.S.). 1 tab

  17. Thermal-hydraulic-geochemical coupled processes around disposed high level nuclear waste in deep granite hosted geological repositories: frontier areas of advanced groundwater research in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajpai, R.K.

    2012-01-01

    Indian policy for permanent disposal of high level nuclear wastes with radionuclide having very long half lives include their immobilization in a stable matrix i.e. glasses of suitable composition, its storage in high integrity steel canisters and subsequent disposal in suitable host rock like granites at a depth of 400-500m in stable geological set up. The site for such disposal facilities are selected after vigorous assessment of their stability implying an exhaustive site selection methodology based on a large number of criteria and attributes. In India, an area of about 70000 square kilometers occupied by granites has been subjected to such evaluation for generating comprehensive database on host rock parameters. The sites selected after such intensive analysis are expected to remain immune to processes like seismicity, volcanism, faulting, uplift, erosion, flooding etc. even in distant future spanning over tens of thousands of years. Nevertheless, groundwater has emerged as the only credible pathway through which disposed waste can eventually find its way to accessible biosphere. Hence groundwater research constitutes one of the most important aspects in demonstration of safety of such disposal. The disposed waste due to continuous emission of decay heat creates high temperature field around them with resultant increase in groundwater temperature in the vicinity. Hot groundwater on reacting with steel canisters, backfill clays and cement used around the disposed canister, produces geochemical environment characterized by altered Ph, Eh and groundwater compositions. Acceleration in geochemical interaction among waste-groundwater-clay-cement-granite often results in dissolution or precipitation reactions along the groundwater flow paths i.e. fractures with resultant increase or decrease in their permeability. Thus thermal, hydraulic and geochemical processes work interdependently around the disposed waste. These coupled processes also control the release and

  18. Lunar nuclear power plant design for thermal-hydraulic cooling in nano-scale environment: Nuclear engineering-based interdisciplinary nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Tae Ho

    2015-01-01

    The environment of the Moon is nearly vacant, which has very low density of several kinds of gases. It has the molecular level contents of the lunar atmosphere in Table 1, which is recognized that radiation heat transfer is a major cooling method. The coolant of the nuclear power plant (NPP) in the lunar base is the Moon surface soil , which is known as the regolith. The regolith is the layer of loose and heterogeneous material covering the solid rock. For finding the optimized length of the radiator of the coolant in the lunar NPP, the produced power and Moon environmental temperature are needed. This makes the particular heat transfer characteristics in heat transfer in the Moon surface. The radiation is the only heat transfer way due to very weak atmosphere. It is very cold in the night time and very hot in the daytime on the surface of the ground. There are comparisons between lunar high land soil and Earth averages in Table 2. In the historical consideration, Konstantin Tsiolkovsky made a suggestion for the colony on the Moon.. There are a number of ideas for the conceptual design which have been proposed by several scientists. In 1954, Arthur C. Clarke mentioned a lunar base of inflatable modules covered in lunar dust for insulation. John S. Rinehart suggested the structure of the stationary ocean of dust, because there could be a mile-deep dust ocean on the Moon, which gives a safer design. In 1959, the project horizon was launched regarding the U.S. Army's plan to establish a fort on the Moon by 1967. H. H. Koelle, a German rocket engineer of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency, leaded the project (ABMA). There was the first landing in 1965 and 245 tons of cargos were transported to the outpost by 1966. The coolant material of regolith in the Moon is optimized for the NPP. By the simulation, there are some results. The temperature is calculated as the 9 nodals by radiation heat transfer from the potassium coolant to the regolith flow. The high efficiency

  19. Lunar nuclear power plant design for thermal-hydraulic cooling in nano-scale environment: Nuclear engineering-based interdisciplinary nanotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Tae Ho [Systemix Global Co. Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The environment of the Moon is nearly vacant, which has very low density of several kinds of gases. It has the molecular level contents of the lunar atmosphere in Table 1, which is recognized that radiation heat transfer is a major cooling method. The coolant of the nuclear power plant (NPP) in the lunar base is the Moon surface soil , which is known as the regolith. The regolith is the layer of loose and heterogeneous material covering the solid rock. For finding the optimized length of the radiator of the coolant in the lunar NPP, the produced power and Moon environmental temperature are needed. This makes the particular heat transfer characteristics in heat transfer in the Moon surface. The radiation is the only heat transfer way due to very weak atmosphere. It is very cold in the night time and very hot in the daytime on the surface of the ground. There are comparisons between lunar high land soil and Earth averages in Table 2. In the historical consideration, Konstantin Tsiolkovsky made a suggestion for the colony on the Moon.. There are a number of ideas for the conceptual design which have been proposed by several scientists. In 1954, Arthur C. Clarke mentioned a lunar base of inflatable modules covered in lunar dust for insulation. John S. Rinehart suggested the structure of the stationary ocean of dust, because there could be a mile-deep dust ocean on the Moon, which gives a safer design. In 1959, the project horizon was launched regarding the U.S. Army's plan to establish a fort on the Moon by 1967. H. H. Koelle, a German rocket engineer of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency, leaded the project (ABMA). There was the first landing in 1965 and 245 tons of cargos were transported to the outpost by 1966. The coolant material of regolith in the Moon is optimized for the NPP. By the simulation, there are some results. The temperature is calculated as the 9 nodals by radiation heat transfer from the potassium coolant to the regolith flow. The high efficiency

  20. Federal Interagency Geothermal Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Arlene [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States); Prencipe, Loretta [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States); Todaro, Richard M. [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States); Cuyler, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Eide, Elizabeth [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-06-01

    This collaborative document describes the roles and responsibilities of key Federal agencies in the development of geothermal technologies including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), including the U.S. Forest Service; the U.S. Department of Interior (DOI), including the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and Bureau of Land Management (BLM); the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); and the Department of Defense (DOD).

  1. Geothermal training at Auckland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochstein, M.P.

    1990-01-01

    A total of 297 candidates from developing countries have attended the annual Geothermal Diploma Course at the University of Auckland between 1979 and 1989. Additional training in the form of post-graduate studies and short-term specialized courses has been given to 69 candidates from these countries between 1989 and 1989. In this paper performance indicators for the training are discussed, namely: demand, job retention rate, regional intake in relation to demand, and publication record of fellows

  2. NATIONAL GEOTHERMAL DATA SYSTEM (NGDS) GEOTHERMAL DATA DOMAIN: ASSESSMENT OF GEOTHERMAL COMMUNITY DATA NEEDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Arlene [United States Department of Energy; Blackwell, David [Southern Methodist University; Chickering, Cathy [Southern Methodist University; Boyd, Toni [Oregon Institute of Technology; Horne, Roland [Stanford University; MacKenzie, Matthew [Uberity Technology Corporation; Moore, Joseph [University of Utah; Nickull, Duane [Uberity Technology Corporation; Richard, Stephen [Arizona Geological survey; Shevenell, Lisa A. [University of Nevada, Reno

    2013-01-01

    To satisfy the critical need for geothermal data to ad- vance geothermal energy as a viable renewable ener- gy contender, the U.S. Department of Energy is in- vesting in the development of the National Geother- mal Data System (NGDS). This paper outlines efforts among geothermal data providers nationwide to sup- ply cutting edge geo-informatics. NGDS geothermal data acquisition, delivery, and methodology are dis- cussed. In particular, this paper addresses the various types of data required to effectively assess geother- mal energy potential and why simple links to existing data are insufficient. To create a platform for ready access by all geothermal stakeholders, the NGDS in- cludes a work plan that addresses data assets and re- sources of interest to users, a survey of data provid- ers, data content models, and how data will be ex- changed and promoted, as well as lessons learned within the geothermal community.

  3. Geothermal Power Generation Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Tonya [Oregon Inst. of Technology, Klamath Falls, OR (United States). Geo-Heat Center

    2013-12-01

    Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196°F resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OIT’s Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the “waste” water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the “waste” water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

  4. Geothermal long-term modelling of a solar coupled geothermal probe heat storage in Crailsheim; Geothermische Langzeitmodellierung eines solargekoppelten Erdsonden-Waermespeichers in Crailsheim

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homuth, Sebastian; Mikisek, Philipp; Goetz, Annette E.; Sass, Ingo [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Fachgebiet Angewandte Geothermie

    2011-10-24

    The thermal variations of the subsurface in the vicinity of a seasonal solar coupled geothermal probe heat storage were modeled using FEFLOW {sup registered} over a period of thirty years. The geothermal probe heat storage consists of eighty boreholes in an area of 85 square meters. The geothermal probes have a depth of 55 m and are mainly located in limestones of the Upper Muschelkalk (Triassic). The geothermal probe heat storage is thermally loaded from April to September. The thermal discharge takes place from October to March. The thermal and hydraulic input data of the model are based on three 80 meter deep geothermal probes (GWM 1-3) in the vicinity of the storage. The cores were completely lithologically, facially and finely stratigraphically affiliated. Measurements of thermal conductivity, permeability, porosity and density of 76 representative samples from the geothermal probe GWM 3 and measurements of the main fracture directions in two reference digestions at Crailsheim enabled a most realistic modeling of the storage. The results of the long-term modeling can be used for a detailed forecasting of the thermal alterations in the subsurface.

  5. Hydraulically centered control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horlacher, W.R.; Sampson, W.T.; Schukei, G.E.

    1981-01-01

    A control rod suspended to reciprocate in a guide tube of a nuclear fuel assembly has a hydraulic bearing formed at its lower tip. The bearing includes a plurality of discrete pockets on its outer surface into which a flow of liquid is continuously provided. In one embodiment the flow is induced by the pressure head in a downward facing chamber at the end of the bearing. In another embodiment the flow originates outside the guide tube. In both embodiments the flow into the pockets produces pressure differences across the bearing which counteract forces tending to drive the rod against the guide tube wall. Thus contact of the rod against the guide tube is avoided

  6. Technical-evaluation report on the proposed technical-specification changes for the inservice surveillance of safety-related hydraulic and mechanical snubbers at the Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-336)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selan, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    This report documents the technical evaluation of the proposed Technical Specification changes to Limiting Conditions for Operation, Surveillance Requirements and Bases for safety-related hydraulic and mechanical snubbers at the Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit 2. The evaluation is to determine whether the proposed Technical Specifications are in conformance with the model Standard Technical Specification set forth by the NRC. A check list, Appendix A of this report, compares the licensee's submittal with the NRC requirements and includes Proposed Resolution of the Deviations

  7. Technical-evaluation report on the proposed technical-specification changes for the inservice surveillance of safety-related hydraulic and mechanical snubbers at the Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 3 (Docket No. 50-286)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selan, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    This report documents the technical evaluation of the proposed Technical Specification changes to Limiting Conditions for Operation, Surveillance Requirements and Bases for safety-related hydraulic and mechanical snubbers at the Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 3. The evaluation is to determine whether the proposed Technical Specifications are in conformance with the model Standard Technical Specification set forth by the NRC. A check list, Appendix A of this report, compares the licensee's submittal with the NRC requirements and includes Proposed Resolution of the Deviations

  8. Technical-evaluation report on the proposed technical-specification changes for the inservice surveillance of safety-related hydraulic and mechanical snubbers at the James A. Fitzpatrick Nuclear Power Plant (Docket No. 50-333)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selan, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    This report documents the technical evaluation of the proposed Technical Specification changes to Limiting Conditions for Operation, Surveillance Requirements and Bases for safety-related hydraulic and mechanical snubbers at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Plant. The evaluation is to determine whether the proposed Technical Specifications are in conformance with the model Standard Technical Specification set forth by the NRC. A check list, Appendix A of this report, compares the licensee's submittal with the NRC requirements and includes Proposed Resolution of the Deviations

  9. Massive hydraulic fracturing gas stimulation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appledorn, C.R.; Mann, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The Rio Blanco Massive Hydraulic Fracturing Project was fielded in 1974 as a joint Industry/ERDA demonstration to test the relative formations that were stimulated by the Rio Blanco Nuclear fracturing experiment. The project is a companion effort to and a continuation of the preceding nuclear stimulation project, which took place in May 1973. 8 figures

  10. Geothermal energy. A national proposal for geothermal resources research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denton, J.C. (ed.)

    1972-01-01

    Discussions are given for each of the following topics: (1) importance to the Nation of geothermal resources, (2) budget recommendations, (3) overview of geothermal resources, (4) resource exploration, (5) resource assessment, (6) resource development and production, (7) utilization technology and economics, (8) environmental effects, (9) institutional considerations, and (10) summary of research needs.

  11. Geotherm: the U.S. geological survey geothermal information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, J.D.; Rapport, A.

    1983-01-01

    GEOTHERM is a comprehensive system of public databases and software used to store, locate, and evaluate information on the geology, geochemistry, and hydrology of geothermal systems. Three main databases address the general characteristics of geothermal wells and fields, and the chemical properties of geothermal fluids; the last database is currently the most active. System tasks are divided into four areas: (1) data acquisition and entry, involving data entry via word processors and magnetic tape; (2) quality assurance, including the criteria and standards handbook and front-end data-screening programs; (3) operation, involving database backups and information extraction; and (4) user assistance, preparation of such items as application programs, and a quarterly newsletter. The principal task of GEOTHERM is to provide information and research support for the conduct of national geothermal-resource assessments. The principal users of GEOTHERM are those involved with the Geothermal Research Program of the U.S. Geological Survey. Information in the system is available to the public on request. ?? 1983.

  12. Recent developments in the hot dry rock geothermal energy program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, P.R.; Nunz, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, most of the Hot Dry Rock Programs effort has been focused on the extraction technology development effort at the Fenton Hill test site. The pair of approximately 4000 m wells for the Phase II Engineering System of the Fenton Hill Project have been completed. During the past two years, hydraulic fracture operations have been carried out to develop the geothermal reservoir. Impressive advances have been made in fracture identification techniques and instrumentation. To develop a satisfactory interwellbore flow connection the next step is to redrill the lower section of one of the wells into the fractured region. Chemically reactive tracer techniques are being developed to determine the effective size of the reservoir area. A new estimate has been made of the US hot dry rock resource, based upon the latest geothermal gradiant data. 3 figs.

  13. Fiscal 1999 geothermal energy development promotion survey. Report on resource assessment for Shiramizugoe area; 1999 nendo chinetsu kaihatsu sokushin chosa hokokusho. Shiramizugoe chiiki shigen hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Under an assumed plan of building a geothermal power station in the Shiramizugoe area of Makizono-cho, Aira-gun, Kagoshima Prefecture, investigations will be conducted under a 4-year program into the amount of geothermal resources, the dimensions and cost performance of a geothermal power station under consideration, and the environmental impact that the locating of such will incur, through for example identifying areas containing geothermal reservoirs suitable for geothermal power generation. In fiscal 1999, activities were conducted in the three fields of (1) survey plan preparation, (2) comprehensive analysis, and (3) environmental assessment. Under item (1), a survey and coordination implementation plan was prepared, existing data were analyzed for the construction of geothermal models out of which a suitable geothermal structure was specified for digging, and a list was drafted of locations for borehole digging for fiscal 2000. Under item (2), it was found that most of the past surveys covered the Ogiri area and that the Shiramizugoe area was but poorly covered. Discussion was made on the geological structure, geothermal structure, geothermal water hydraulic structure, and the geothermal water system. Under item (3), the plan was summarily explained to the local administration, associations of hot spring hotels, and inhabitants in the vicinity, and their consent was obtained. (NEDO)

  14. Geothermal Energy: Tapping the Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bill

    2008-01-01

    Ground source geothermal energy enables one to tap into the earth's stored renewable energy for heating and cooling facilities. Proper application of ground-source geothermal technology can have a dramatic impact on the efficiency and financial performance of building energy utilization (30%+). At the same time, using this alternative energy…

  15. Geothermal Energy: Prospects and Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, William W.

    1973-01-01

    An examination of geothermal energy as a means of increasing the United States power resources with minimal pollution problems. Developed and planned geothermal-electric power installations around the world, capacities, installation dates, etc., are reviewed. Environmental impact, problems, etc. are discussed. (LK)

  16. The Future of Geothermal Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubik, Michelle [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of enhanced, or engineered, geothermal systems was carried out by an 18-member panel assembled by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to evaluate the potential of geothermal energy becoming a major energy source for the United States.

  17. Geothermal engineering fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    This book explains the engineering required to bring geothermal resources into use. The book covers specifically engineering aspects that are unique to geothermal engineering, such as measurements in wells and their interpretation, transport of near-boiling water through long pipelines, turbines driven by fluids other than steam, and project economics. The explanations are reinforced by drawing comparisons with other energy industries.

  18. Multipurpose Use of Geothermal Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, Paul J.; Lund, John W. (eds.)

    1974-10-09

    The conference was organized to review the non-electric, multipurpose uses of geothermal energy in Hungary, Iceland, New Zealand, United States and the USSR. The international viewpoint was presented to provide an interchange of information from countries where non-electric use of geothermal energy has reached practical importance.

  19. Uranium-thorium series radionuclides in brines and reservoir rocks from two deep geothermal boreholes in the Salton Sea geothermal field, southeastern California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zukin, J.G.; Hammond, D.E.; Ku, Tehlung; Elders, W.A.

    1987-01-01

    Naturally occurring U and Th series radionuclides have been analyzed in high temperature brines (∼ 300 degree C, 25 wt% dissolved solids) and associated rocks from two deep geothermal wells located on the northeastern margin of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). These data are part of a study of the SSGF as a natural analog of possible radionuclide behavior near a nuclear waste repository constructed in salt beds, and permit evaluation of some characteristics of water-rock interaction in the SSGF

  20. Geothermal Field Investigations of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayın, N.; Özer, N.

    2017-12-01

    Geothermal energy is a type of energy that are found in the accessible depth of the crust, in the reservoirs by way of the permeable rocks, specially in heated fluid. Geothermal system is made of 3 main components; heat source, reservoir, and fluid bearing heat. Geothermal system mechanism is comprise of fluid transmission. Convection current (heat transmission) is caused by heating and causes the fluid in the system to expand. Heated fluid with low density show tendency to rise in system. Geothermal system occurs with variable geophysics and geochemical properties. Geophysical methods can determine structural properties of shallow and deep reservoirs with temperature, mineralization, gas amount, fluid movement, faulting, and sudden change in lithostratigraphic strata. This study revealed possible reservoir structures and showed examples of geophysics and gas measuring results in Turkey which is wealthy in regard to Geothermal sources.

  1. 2008 Geothermal Technologies Market Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonathan Cross

    2009-07-01

    This report describes market-wide trends for the geothermal industry throughout 2008 and the beginning of 2009. It begins with an overview of the GTP’s involvement with the geothermal industry and recent investment trends for electric generation technologies. The report next describes the current state of geothermal power generation and activity within the United States, costs associated with development, financing trends, an analysis of the levelized cost of energy (LCOE), and a look at the current policy environment. The report also highlights trends regarding direct use of geothermal energy, including GHPs.† The final sections of the report focus on international perspectives, employment and economic benefits from geothermal energy development, and potential incentives in pending national legislation.

  2. Environmental Assessment Lakeview Geothermal Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treis, Tania [Southern Oregon Economic Development Department, Medford, OR (United States)

    2012-04-30

    The Town of Lakeview is proposing to construct and operate a geothermal direct use district heating system in Lakeview, Oregon. The proposed project would be in Lake County, Oregon, within the Lakeview Known Geothermal Resources Area (KGRA). The proposed project includes the following elements: Drilling, testing, and completion of a new production well and geothermal water injection well; construction and operation of a geothermal production fluid pipeline from the well pad to various Town buildings (i.e., local schools, hospital, and Lake County Industrial Park) and back to a geothermal water injection well. This EA describes the proposed project, the alternatives considered, and presents the environmental analysis pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act. The project would not result in adverse effects to the environment with the implementation of environmental protection measures.

  3. Hydraulic Hybrid Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA and the United Parcel Service (UPS) have developed a hydraulic hybrid delivery vehicle to explore and demonstrate the environmental benefits of the hydraulic hybrid for urban pick-up and delivery fleets.

  4. Geothermal Small Business Workbook [Geothermal Outreach and Project Financing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elizabeth Battocletti

    2003-05-01

    Small businesses are the cornerstone of the American economy. Over 22 million small businesses account for approximately 99% of employers, employ about half of the private sector workforce, and are responsible for about two-thirds of net new jobs. Many small businesses fared better than the Fortune 500 in 2001. Non-farm proprietors income rose 2.4% in 2001 while corporate profits declined 7.2%. Yet not all is rosy for small businesses, particularly new ones. One-third close within two years of opening. From 1989 to 1992, almost half closed within four years; only 39.5% were still open after six years. Why do some new businesses thrive and some fail? What helps a new business succeed? Industry knowledge, business and financial planning, and good management. Small geothermal businesses are no different. Low- and medium-temperature geothermal resources exist throughout the western United States, the majority not yet tapped. A recent survey of ten western states identified more than 9,000 thermal wells and springs, over 900 low- to moderate-temperature geothermal resource areas, and hundreds of direct-use sites. Many opportunities exist for geothermal entrepreneurs to develop many of these sites into thriving small businesses. The ''Geothermal Small Business Workbook'' (''Workbook'') was written to give geothermal entrepreneurs, small businesses, and developers the tools they need to understand geothermal applications--both direct use and small-scale power generation--and to write a business and financing plan. The Workbook will: Provide background, market, and regulatory data for direct use and small-scale (< 1 megawatt) power generation geothermal projects; Refer you to several sources of useful information including owners of existing geothermal businesses, trade associations, and other organizations; Break down the complicated and sometimes tedious process of writing a business plan into five easy steps; Lead you

  5. Status of geothermal energy in Ethiopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endeshaw, A.; Belaineh, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that there are several identified geothermal localities in Ethiopia. Ten geothermal localities have been studied with regional assessments, while three localities have had pre-feasibility studies. In one area, the Aluto-Langano geothermal field, the feasibility studies have been completed. However, the geothermal resources have not been utilized yet except in the traditional baths

  6. INTEGRATED EXPLORATION OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Alkhasov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim. The aim is to develop the energy efficient technologies to explore hydro geothermal resources of different energy potential.Methods. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the proposed technologies has been carried out with the use of physical and mathematical, thermodynamic and optimization methods of calculation and the physical and chemical experimental research.Results. We propose the technology of integrated exploration of low-grade geothermal resources with the application of heat and water resource potential on various purposes. We also argue for the possibility of effective exploration of geothermal resources by building a binary geothermal power plant using idle oil and gas wells. We prove the prospect of geothermal steam and gas technologies enabling highly efficient use of thermal water of low energy potential (80 - 100 ° C degrees to generate electricity; the prospects of complex processing of high-temperature geothermal brine of Tarumovsky field. Thermal energy is utilized in a binary geothermal power plant in the supercritical Rankine cycle operating with a low-boiling agent. The low temperature spent brine from the geothermal power plant with is supplied to the chemical plant, where the main chemical components are extracted - lithium carbonate, magnesium burning, calcium carbonate and sodium chloride. Next, the waste water is used for various water management objectives. Electricity generated in the binary geothermal power plant is used for the extraction of chemical components.Conclusions. Implementation of the proposed technologies will facilitate the most efficient development of hydro geothermal resources of the North Caucasus region. Integrated exploration of the Tarumovsky field resources will fully meet Russian demand for lithium carbonate and sodium chloride.

  7. Geothermal energy. Pt.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Geothermal energy has certain features that make it highly recommendable as a source of power production. It is noted by its high load factor; it may be used as a basic or peak source; its versatility and high availability among others. In spite of these advantages, geothermal energy has not attained a significant development up to now. There are several reasons for this to happen, while the main one is that it requires an important initial investment. Assessing if an area is potentially profitable for the obtention of a given type of energy implies performing a complex set of analyses and prospective work, but it is not so significant as that associated with petroleum. The strategy for the exploration of geothermal resources is based on the execution of consecutive stages ranging from a surveillance at a regional scale to a project feasibility study, with growing investments and using more and more complex techniques. Many Latin American countries are located in areas considered as promisory concerning the development of this type of exploitation. Another factor supporting this view is a special demographic feature, showing a very irregular distribution of the population, with extense isolated areas with a minimun number of inhabitants that does not justify the extension of the electric power network. There are plants operating in four countries producing, as a whole, 881 MW. In Argentina the activities are aimed to intensifying the knowledge about the availability of this resource within the local territory and to estimating the feasibility of its usage in areas where exploration is more advanced [es

  8. Utilization of surface-near geothermal energy by means of energy piles and geothermal probes; Nutzung der oberflaechennahen Geothermie mittels Energiepfaehlen und Erdwaermesonden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xiaolong

    2013-05-01

    In collaboration with the Institute of Thermo-Fluid Dynamics (Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany), a pilot plant for geothermal and sorption supported air-conditioning was built in the dockside area of Hamburg. The author of the book under consideration investigates a geothermal power plant with five energy poles and three boreholes. The economic and environmental benefits of this pilot plant were detected. The thermodynamic behavior of these energy piles was numerically simulated very well. The complex processes in the energy pile and in the soil could be mapped By means of a thermal-hydraulic-mechanical coupled simulation. The extraction capacity of a geothermal probe could be significantly increased by means of a combination of a groundwater circulation method with borehole heat exchangers.

  9. Geothermal Information Dissemination and Outreach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clutter, Ted J. [Geothermal Resources Council (United States)

    2005-02-18

    Project Purpose. To enhance technological and topical information transfer in support of industry and government efforts to increase geothermal energy use in the United States (power production, direct use, and geothermal groundsource heat pumps). Project Work. GRC 2003 Annual Meeting. The GRC convened the meeting on Oct. 12-15, 2003, at Morelia's Centro de Convenciones y ExpoCentro in Mexico under the theme, International Collaboration for Geothermal Energy in the Americas. The event was also sponsored by the Comision Federal de Electricidad. ~600 participants from more than 20 countries attended the event. The GRC convened a Development of Geothermal Projects Workshop and Geothermal Exploration Techniques Workshop. GRC Field Trips included Los Azufres and Paricutin Volcano on Oct. 11. The Geothermal Energy Association (Washington, DC) staged its Geothermal Energy Trade Show. The Annual Meeting Opening Session was convened on Oct. 13, and included the governor of Michoacan, the Mexico Assistant Secretary of Energy, CFE Geothermal Division Director, DOE Geothermal Program Manager, and private sector representatives. The 2003 Annual Meeting attracted 160 papers for oral and poster presentations. GRC 2004. Under the theme, Geothermal - The Reliable Renewable, the GRC 2004 Annual Meeting convened on Aug. 29-Sept. 1, 2004, at the Hyatt Grand Champions Resort at Indian Wells, CA. Estimated total attendance (including Trade Show personnel, guests and accompanying persons) was ~700. The event included a workshop, Geothermal Production Well Pump Installation, Operation and Maintenance. Field trips went to Coso/Mammoth and Imperial Valley/Salton Sea geothermal fields. The event Opening Session featured speakers from the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the private sector. The Geothermal Energy Association staged its Geothermal Energy Trade Show. The Geothermal Education Office staged its Geothermal Energy Workshop. Several local radio and

  10. Geothermal heat pump performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Tonya L.; Lienau, Paul J.

    1995-01-01

    Geothermal heat pump systems are a promising new energy technology that has shown rapid increase in usage over the past ten years in the United States. These systems offer substantial benefits to customers and utilities in energy (kWh) and demand (kW) savings. The purpose of this study was to determine what existing monitored data was available mainly from electric utilities on heat pump performance, energy savings and demand reduction for residential, school, and commercial building applications. Information was developed on the status of electric utility marketing programs, barriers to market penetration, incentive programs, and benefits.

  11. Geothermal Heat Pump Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Tonya L.; Lienau, Paul J.

    1995-01-01

    Geothermal heat pump systems are a promising new energy technology that has shown rapid increase in usage over the past ten years in the United States. These systems offer substantial benefits to customers and utilities in energy (kWh) and demand (kW) savings. The purpose of this study was to determine what existing monitored data was available mainly from electric utilities on heat pump performance, energy savings and demand reduction for residential, school, and commercial building applications. Information was developed on the status of electric utility marketing programs, barriers to market penetration, incentive programs, and benefits.

  12. Geothermal heating saves energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romsaas, Tor

    2003-01-01

    The article reviews briefly a pioneer project for a construction area of 200000 m''2 with residences, business complexes, a hotel and conference centre and a commercial college in Oslo. The energy conservation potential is estimated to be about 60-70 % compared to direct heating with oil, gas or electricity as sources. There will also be substantial reduction in environmentally damaging emissions. The proposed energy central combines geothermal energy sources with heat pump technology, utilises water as energy carrier and uses terrestrial wells for energy storage. A cost approximation is presented

  13. Method of extracting heat from dry geothermal reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, R.M.; Robinson, E.S.; Smith, M.C.

    1974-01-22

    Hydraulic fracturing is used to interconnect two or more holes that penetrate a previously dry geothermal reservoir, and to produce within the reservoir a sufficiently large heat-transfer surface so that heat can be extracted from the reservoir at a usefully high rate by a fluid entering it through one hole and leaving it through another. Introduction of a fluid into the reservoir to remove heat from it and establishment of natural (unpumped) convective circulation through the reservoir to accomplish continuous heat removal are important and novel features of the method. (auth)

  14. Scale Model Simulation of Enhanced Geothermal Reservoir Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, M.; Frash, L.; Hampton, J.

    2012-12-01

    Geothermal energy technology has successfully provided a means of generating stable base load electricity for many years. However, implementation has been spatially limited to limited availability of high quality traditional hydro-thermal resources possessing the combination of a shallow high heat flow anomaly and an aquifer with sufficient permeability and continuous fluid recharge. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) has been proposed as a potential solution to enable additional energy production from the non-conventional hydro-thermal resources. Hydraulic fracturing is considered the primary means of creating functional EGS reservoirs at sites where the permeability of the rock is too limited to allow cost effective heat recovery. EGS reservoir creation requires improved fracturing methodology, rheologically controllable fracturing fluids, and temperature hardened proppants. Although large fracture volumes (several cubic km) have been created in the field, circulating fluid through these full volumes and maintaining fracture volumes have proven difficult. Stimulation technology and methodology as used in the oil and gas industry for sedimentary formations are well developed; however, they have not sufficiently been demonstrated for EGS reservoir creation. Insufficient data and measurements under geothermal conditions make it difficult to directly translate experience from the oil and gas industries to EGS applications. To demonstrate the feasibility of EGS reservoir creation and subsequent geothermal energy production, and to improve the understanding of hydraulic and propping in EGS reservoirs, a heated true-triaxial load cell with a high pressure fluid injection system was developed to simulate an EGS system from stimulation to production. This apparatus is capable of loading a 30x30x30 cubic cm rock sample with independent principal stresses up to 13 MPa while simultaneously providing heating up to 180 degree C. Multiple orientated boreholes of 5 to 10 mm

  15. Geothermal Technologies Program Blue Ribbon Panel Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-06-17

    The Geothermal Technologies Program assembled a geothermal Blue Ribbon Panel on March 22-23, 2011 in Albuquerque, New Mexico for a guided discussion on the future of geothermal energy in the United States and the role of the DOE Program. The Geothermal Blue Ribbon Panel Report captures the discussions and recommendations of the experts. An addendum is available here: http://www.eere.energy.gov/geothermal/pdfs/gtp_blue_ribbon_panel_report_addendum10-2011.pdf

  16. Geothermal Energy and its Prospects in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radeckas, B.

    1995-01-01

    Data on the geothermal resources in lithuania and on their prospective usage are presented. The analysis covers water horizons of the geothermal anomaly in West Lithuania and their hydrogeology. The energy of the 3 km thick geothermal source was evaluated. Technical and economical possibilities of using geothermal energy in West Lithuania are described. Some aspects of the investment and of the project of a geothermal power plant in Klaipeda are considered. (author). 6 refs., 6 tabs., 2 figs

  17. Outline of geothermal activity in Czechoslovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franko, O.; Bodis, D.; Dendek, M.; Remsik, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that in respect of different geothermal conditions in the Bohemian Massif (unfavorable) and in the West Carpathians (favorable), the development and utilization of geothermal energy are concentrated in Slovakia. THe utilization of geothermal energy for the heating of buildings in spas commenced in 1958. Thermal energy of geothermal waters was used for direct heating through heat exchangers, and in one case by a heat pump. Concentrated continuous development and utilization of geothermal energy started in 1971

  18. Potential of geothermal systems in Picardy

    OpenAIRE

    Dourlat, Estelle

    2017-01-01

    Geothermal systems are not only about electrical plants or urban heating networks, but also concerned with geothermal energy assisted with a heat pump. In the former region of Picardy (North of France), 97% of the territory is suitable for very low temperature geothermal power. The French Agency for the Environment and Energy Management and the Picardy Region decided in 2016 to finance a facilitator to encourage geothermal use. To carry out this aim, it is important to consider the geothermal...

  19. 78 FR 8202 - Meeting of the Joint ACRS Subcommittees on Thermal Hydraulic Phenomena and Materials, Metallurgy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the Joint ACRS Subcommittees on Thermal Hydraulic Phenomena and Materials, Metallurgy and Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The Joint ACRS Subcommittees on Thermal Hydraulic Phenomena and Materials, Metallurgy and...

  20. Coupling geophysical investigation with hydrothermal modeling to constrain the enthalpy classification of a potential geothermal resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jeremy T.; Karakhanian, Arkadi; Connor, Chuck; Connor, Laura; Hughes, Joseph D.; Malservisi, Rocco; Wetmore, Paul

    2015-01-01

    An appreciable challenge in volcanology and geothermal resource development is to understand the relationships between volcanic systems and low-enthalpy geothermal resources. The enthalpy of an undeveloped geothermal resource in the Karckar region of Armenia is investigated by coupling geophysical and hydrothermal modeling. The results of 3-dimensional inversion of gravity data provide key inputs into a hydrothermal circulation model of the system and associated hot springs, which is used to evaluate possible geothermal system configurations. Hydraulic and thermal properties are specified using maximum a priori estimates. Limited constraints provided by temperature data collected from an existing down-gradient borehole indicate that the geothermal system can most likely be classified as low-enthalpy and liquid dominated. We find the heat source for the system is likely cooling quartz monzonite intrusions in the shallow subsurface and that meteoric recharge in the pull-apart basin circulates to depth, rises along basin-bounding faults and discharges at the hot springs. While other combinations of subsurface properties and geothermal system configurations may fit the temperature distribution equally well, we demonstrate that the low-enthalpy system is reasonably explained based largely on interpretation of surface geophysical data and relatively simple models.

  1. Boron isotopes in geothermal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, J.

    1997-01-01

    Boron is a highly mobile element and during water-rock reactions, boron is leached out of rocks with no apparent fractionation. In geothermal systems where the water recharging the systems are meteoric in origin, the B isotope ratio of the geothermal fluid reflects the B isotope ratio of the rocks. Seawater has a distinctive B isotope ratio and where seawater recharges the geothermal system, the B isotope ratio of the geothermal system reflects the mixing of rock derived B and seawater derived B. Any deviations of the actual B isotope ratio of a mixture reflects subtle differences in the water-rock ratios in the cold downwelling limb of the hydrothermal system. This paper will present data from a variety of different geothermal systems, including New Zealand; Iceland; Yellowston, USA; Ibusuki, Japan to show the range in B isotope ratios in active geothermal systems. Some of these systems show well defined mixing trends between seawater and the host rocks, whilst others show the boron isotope ratios of the host rock only. In geothermal systems containing high amounts of CO 2 boron isotope ratios from a volatile B source can also be inferred. (auth)

  2. Policy for geothermal energy development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiuchi, S [Public Utilities Bureau, Ministry of International Trade and Industry, Japan

    1973-01-01

    Government actions related to Japanese geothermal energy development in the past include: a mining and industrial research subsidy of 27 million yen granted to Kyushu Electric Power Co. in 1952, a mining and industrial research subsidy of 13 million yen granted to Japan Metals and Chemicals Co. in 1960, a study on steam production technology for geothermal power generation by Japan Metals and Chemicals Co. funded at 3.5 hundred million yen from the Research Development Corporation of Japan, and a study on steam production technology for large scale geothermal power generation by Japan Metals and Chemicals Co. funded at 7.6 hundred million yen by the Research Development Corporation of Japan. The following projects are planned by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry for 1973: a two-year geothermal power promotion including investigations into the utilization of hot water, new methods for geothermal reservoir detection and steam well drilling, and environmental effects, studies on hydrothermal systems, basic investigations for geothermal indicators in 30 areas, and a means to finance the construction of geothermal power plants in Kakkonda (Iwate Prefecture) and Hatchobara (Oita Prefecture).

  3. Geothermal energy. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    As most of the alternative power sources, geothermal energy started being considered as a tentative one during the early 1970s. At that time the world's demand for energy was mostly fed by means of petroleum, coal, gas and other primary materials. The low prices of these raw materials at that time and the lack of general consciousness on the environmental contamination problems caused by the combustion processes did not forecast any significant changes for the coming years. However, as from 1973, a constant raise in prices, specially for liquid fuels, started to take place. A few years later, in the early 1980s, a growing interest for nature and for the delicate equilibrium of the ecological and for systems started to awaken. These facts led several countries to re-evaluate their power resources and to reconsider those showing less negative incidence upon the environment. Among such alternatives, geothermal energy introduces certain features that make it highly advisable for developing countries, in addition to the fact that the mean heat reservoirs are located within this group of nations [es

  4. Tracing Geothermal Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael C. Adams; Greg Nash

    2004-03-01

    Geothermal water must be injected back into the reservoir after it has been used for power production. Injection is critical in maximizing the power production and lifetime of the reservoir. To use injectate effectively the direction and velocity of the injected water must be known or inferred. This information can be obtained by using chemical tracers to track the subsurface flow paths of the injected fluid. Tracers are chemical compounds that are added to the water as it is injected back into the reservoir. The hot production water is monitored for the presence of this tracer using the most sensitive analytic methods that are economically feasible. The amount and concentration pattern of the tracer revealed by this monitoring can be used to evaluate how effective the injection strategy is. However, the tracers must have properties that suite the environment that they will be used in. This requires careful consideration and testing of the tracer properties. In previous and parallel investigations we have developed tracers that are suitable from tracing liquid water. In this investigation, we developed tracers that can be used for steam and mixed water/steam environments. This work will improve the efficiency of injection management in geothermal fields, lowering the cost of energy production and increasing the power output of these systems.

  5. Geothermal Energy in Ecuador

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilera, Eduardo; Villalba, Fabio

    1999-11-01

    Energy represents an essential element for economy, and for any sustainable development strategy, assuming it is a basic input for all production activities. It is a fundamental contra int for country's competitivity and also a main component of population's standard of life. The Agenda 21 and the General Agreement on Climatic Changes emphasize that the development and sustainable use of energy should promote economy, but taking care of the environment. Under these basic concepts, for the particular case of energy, the sustain ability of development requires the adoption of a strategy which guarantee an energy supply in terms of quality, opportunity, continuity and afford ability and, in addition, without production of negative environmental impacts. Geothermal energy is a serious energetic option for sustainable development, since presents technical and economic advantages for production of electricity at medium and large scale. Furthermore, geothermal energy allows a wide spectrum of direct applications of heat in profitable projects of high social impact as green houses, drying of seeds and wood products, fish farming, recreation and others. All of them can help the increase of communal production activities in rural areas affected by poverty

  6. Efficiency for C-14 measurement in the simulated hydraulic oil waste from a CANDU nuclear power plant as measured on a packard counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dianu, Magdalena; Podina, Corneliu; Nita, Valentina

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The paper mainly contains; - composition and data on liquid scintillation cocktail used; - characterization of radioactive waste - hydraulic oil waste contaminated with C-14; - detection limits; - sample loading; - the values of calculated and measured activities; - efficiency vs sample loading. Samples were counted in a Model 2100 TR Packard TRI-CARB liquid scintillation analyser. Sample preparation is a critical step in obtaining accurate results in scintillation counting. Standard (22 ml) plastic vials were used in these experiments. These vials have the advantage to reduce backgrounds and improve the counting rate. Hydraulic oil sample volumes were added to the vials in 0.5 ml increments from 1 ml to 2 ml. Then the liquid scintillation cocktail was added so that the sample - cocktail volume was 20 ml. Each vial was shaken vigorously for several seconds after each addition to ensure homogeneity and counting. Blank vials were prepared using C-14 - free hydraulic oil samples in the same sample-cocktail proportions. After at least two hours, the samples and blank vials were counted for ten minutes. (authors)

  7. Environmental impact in geothermal fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkle, P.; Torres R, V.; Gonzalez P, E.; Guevara G, M.

    1996-01-01

    Generally, water exploitation and deep steam of geothermal fields may be cause of a pollution potential on the surface, specially by the chemical composition of geothermal water which has a high concentration of minerals, salts and heavy metals. The utilization of stable isotopes as deuterium and oxygen 18 as radioactive tracers and water origin indicators allow to know the trajectories and sources of background waters as well as possible moistures between geothermal waters and meteoric waters. Some ions such as chlorides and fluorides present solubilities that allow their register as yet long distances of their source. (Author)

  8. Experimental Investigation of Crack Extension Patterns in Hydraulic Fracturing with Shale, Sandstone and Granite Cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming He

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracturing is an important method of reservoir stimulation in the exploitation of geothermal resources, and conventional and unconventional oil and gas resources. In this article, hydraulic fracturing experiments with shale, sandstone cores (from southern Sichuan Basin, and granite cores (from Inner Mongolia were conducted to investigate the different hydraulic fracture extension patterns in these three reservoir rocks. The different reactions between reservoir lithology and pump pressure can be reflected by the pump pressure monitoring curves of hydraulic fracture experiments. An X-ray computer tomography (CT scanner was employed to obtain the spatial distribution of hydraulic fractures in fractured shale, sandstone, and granite cores. From the microscopic and macroscopic observation of hydraulic fractures, different extension patterns of the hydraulic fracture can be analyzed. In fractured sandstone, symmetrical hydraulic fracture morphology could be formed, while some micro cracks were also induced near the injection hole. Although the macroscopic cracks in fractured granite cores are barely observed by naked eye, the results of X-ray CT scanning obviously show the morphology of hydraulic fractures. It is indicated that the typical bedding planes well developed in shale formation play an important role in the propagation of hydraulic fractures in shale cores. The results also demonstrated that heterogeneity influenced the pathway of the hydraulic fracture in granite cores.

  9. Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Creation in Engineered Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Peter [Energy & Geoscience Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Harris, Joel [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2014-05-08

    The aim of this proposal is to develop, through novel high-temperature-tracing approaches, three technologies for characterizing fracture creation within Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS). The objective of a first task is to identify, develop and demonstrate adsorbing tracers for characterizing interwell reservoir-rock surface areas and fracture spacing. The objective of a second task is to develop and demonstrate a methodology for measuring fracture surface areas adjacent to single wells. The objective of a third task is to design, fabricate and test an instrument that makes use of tracers for measuring fluid flow between newly created fractures and wellbores. In one method of deployment, it will be used to identify qualitatively which fractures were activated during a hydraulic stimulation experiment. In a second method of deployment, it will serve to measure quantitatively the rate of fluid flowing from one or more activated fracture during a production test following a hydraulic stimulation.

  10. 2012 geothermal energy congress. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Within the Geothermal Energy Congress 2012 from 13th to 16th November 2012, in Karlsruhe (Federal Republic of Germany), the following lectures were held: (1) Comparison of different methods for the design of geothermal probes on the example of the thermal utilization of smouldering fires at heaps (Sylvia Kuerten); (2) Determination of the thermo-physical features of loose rocks (Johannes Stegner); (3) Tools for the planning and operation of district heating grids (Werner Seichter); (4) geo:build - System optimisation of the cooling mode of the ground-source heat and cooling supply (Franziska Bockelmann); (5) Successful and economic conception, planning and optimization of district heating grids (Werner Seichter); (6) Treacer / Heat transfer decoupling in a heterogeneous hydrothermal reservoir characterized by geological faults in the Upper Rhine Graben (I. Ghergut); (7) Determination of the porosity, thermal conductivity and particle size distribution in selected sections of the Meisenheim-1 drilling core (Saar-Nahe basin, Rheinland-Palatinate) under consideration of geothermally relevant formulation of questions (Gillian Inderwies); (8) Innovative technologies of exploration in the Jemez Geothermal project, New Mexico, USA (Michael Albrecht); (9) Geothermal energy, heat pump and TABS - optimization of planning, operational control and control (Franziska Bockelmann); (10) The impact of large-scale geothermal probes (storage probes) on the heat transfer and heat loss (Christopher Steins); (11) Numeric modelling of the permocarbon in the northern Upper Rhine Graben (L. Dohrer); (12) Engineering measurement solutions on quality assurance in the exploitation of geothermal fields (C. Lehr); (13) Evaluation and optimization of official buildings with the near-surface geothermal energy for heating and cooling (Franziska Bockelmann); (14) On-site filtration for a rapid and cost-effective quantification of the particle loading in the thermal water stream (Johannes Birner

  11. Project GeoPower: Basic subsurface information for the utilization of geothermal energy in the Danish-German border region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirsch, Reinhard; Balling, Niels; Fuchs, Sven

    and require reliable cross-border management and planning tools. In the framework of the Interreg4a GeoPower project, fundamental geological and geophysical information of importance for the planning of geothermal energy utilization in the Danish-German border region was compiled and analyzed. A 3D geological......Information on both hydraulic and thermal conditions of the subsurface is fundamental for the planning and use of hydrothermal energy. This is paramount in particular for densely populated international border regions, where different subsurface applications may introduce conflicts of use...... on potential geothermal reservoirs, and a new 3D structural geological model was developed. The interpretation of petrophysical data (core data and well logs) allows to evaluate the hydraulic and thermal rock properties of geothermal formations and to develop a parameterized 3D thermal conductive subsurface...

  12. Use of environmental radioactive isotopes in geothermal prospecting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balcazar, M.; Lopez M, A.; Huerta, M.; Flores R, J. H.; Pena, P.

    2010-10-01

    Oil resources decrease and environmental impact of burning fossil fuels support the use of alternative energies around the world. By far nuclear energy is the alternative which can supply huge amount of clean energy. Mexico has two nuclear units and has also explored and exploited the use of other complementary renewal energies, as wind and geothermal. Mexico is the third geothermal-energy producer in the world with an installed capacity of 960 MW and is planning the installation of 146 MW for the period 2010-2011, according to information of the Mexican Federal Electricity Board. This paper presents a study case, whose goal is to look for areas where the heat source can be located in geothermal energy fields under prospecting. The method consist in detecting a natural radioactive tracer, which is transported to the earth surface by geo-gases, generated close to the heat source, revealing areas of high permeability properties and open active fractures. Those areas are cross correlated to other resistivity, gravimetric and magnetic geophysical parameters in the geothermal filed to better define the heat source in the field. (Author)

  13. National Laboratory of Hydraulics. 1996 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This progress report of the National Laboratory of Hydraulics (LNH) of Electricite de France (EdF) summarizes, first, the research and development studies carried out in 1996 for the development of research tools for industrial fluid mechanics and environmental hydraulics and for the development of computer tools (computer codes and softwares for fluid mechanics modeling, modeling of reactive, compressible, two-phase and turbulent flows and of complex chemical kinetics using finite elements and finite volume methods). A second parts describes the research studies performed for other services of EdF, concerning: the functioning of nuclear reactors (thermohydraulic studies of the reactor vessel and of the primary coolant circuit, gas flows following severe accidents, fluid-structure thermal coupling etc...), fossil fuel power plants, the equipment and operation of thermal power plants and hydraulic power plants, the use of electric power. A third part summarizes the river and marine hydraulic studies carried out for other companies. (J.S.)

  14. Geothermal Permeability Enhancement - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe Beall; Mark Walters

    2009-06-30

    The overall objective is to apply known permeability enhancement techniques to reduce the number of wells needed and demonstrate the applicability of the techniques to other undeveloped or under-developed fields. The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) concept presented in this project enhances energy extraction from reduced permeability zones in the super-heated, vapor-dominated Aidlin Field of the The Geysers geothermal reservoir. Numerous geothermal reservoirs worldwide, over a wide temperature range, contain zones of low permeability which limit the development potential and the efficient recovery of heat from these reservoirs. Low permeability results from poorly connected fractures or the lack of fractures. The Enhanced Geothermal System concept presented here expands these technologies by applying and evaluating them in a systematic, integrated program.

  15. Geothermal energy utilization and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Dickson, Mary H; Fanelli, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Geothermal energy refers to the heat contained within the Earth that generates geological phenomena on a planetary scale. Today, this term is often associated with man's efforts to tap into this vast energy source. Geothermal Energy: utilization and technology is a detailed reference text, describing the various methods and technologies used to exploit the earth's heat. Beginning with an overview of geothermal energy and the state of the art, leading international experts in the field cover the main applications of geothermal energy, including: electricity generation space and district heating space cooling greenhouse heating aquaculture industrial applications The final third of the book focuses upon environmental impact and economic, financial and legal considerations, providing a comprehensive review of these topics. Each chapter is written by a different author, but to a set style, beginning with aims and objectives and ending with references, self-assessment questions and answers. Case studies are includ...

  16. Geothermal Technologies Program: Direct Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-08-01

    This general publication describes geothermal direct use systems, and how they have been effectively used throughout the country. It also describes the DOE program R&D efforts in this area, and summarizes several projects using direct use technology.

  17. Water Desalination using geothermal energy

    KAUST Repository

    Goosen, M.; Mahmoudi, H.; Ghaffour, NorEddine

    2010-01-01

    The paper provides a critical overview of water desalination using geothermal resources. Specific case studies are presented, as well as an assessment of environmental risks and market potential and barriers to growth. The availability

  18. Geothermal energy - availability - economy - prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappelmeyer, O.

    1992-01-01

    The heat contained in the earth's crust represents an inexhaustible reservoir of energy on the technical scale, which is available at all times of day and at all seasons. In the volcanically active zones, the earth's heat is used industrially: Worldwide, the electrical power of geothermal powerstations is about 5000 MW; in addition, about 10,000 MW are used for direct thermal applications (heating) in regions with normal geothermal conditions. The geothermal power plants have been expanded at an annual rate of 12.2% since 1970. In many developing countries, the geothermal energy is the most important home source of energy for electricity generation. In Europe, in the Paris Basin, hot groundwater is pumped from a depth of about 2 km and is used for heating blocks of flats. In France as a whole, about 170,000 flats have been supplied with heat and hot water from underground for more than a decade. (orig./DG) [de

  19. Geothermics of the Apenninic subduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zito

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The subduction of the Adriatic microplate is analysed from a geothermal point of view. In particular four main geodynamic units are distinguished: foreland, foredeep and slab, accretionary prism, and back-arc basin. Each of them is examined from a geothermal point of view and the related open question are discussed. The most relevant results are the determination of the undisturbed geothermal gradient in the aquifer of the foreland; the discovery of a « hot » accretionary prism; and a new model of instantaneous extension of the back-arc basins. The main conclusion is that geothermal data are consistent with a westward dipping subduction that migrated eastward producing a sequence of several episodes at the surface.

  20. Geothermal energy for American Samoa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-01

    The geothermal commercialization potential in American Samoa was investigated. With geothermal energy harnessed in American Samoa, a myriad of possibilities would arise. Existing residential and business consumers would benefit from reduced electricity costs. The tuna canneries, demanding about 76% of the island's process heat requirements, may be able to use process heat from a geothermal source. Potential new industries include health spas, aquaculture, wood products, large domestic and transhipment refrigerated warehouses, electric cars, ocean nodule processing, and a hydrogen economy. There are no territorial statutory laws of American Samoa claiming or reserving any special rights (including mineral rights) to the territorial government, or other interests adverse to a land owner, for subsurface content of real property. Technically, an investigation has revealed that American Samoa does possess a geological environment conducive to geothermal energy development. Further studies and test holes are warranted.

  1. Geothermal Program Review IV: proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    The research and development program of DOE's Geothermal Technology Division is reviewed in separate presentations according to program area. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers. (ACR)

  2. Issues related to geothermal development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesperance, G.O.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on a number of potential barriers to geothermal development in Hawaii which have been overcome but some remain. Efforts continue to address issues relating to transmission, project economics, the regulatory process, resource verification, and public acceptance

  3. Engineered Geothermal System Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petty, Susan

    2014-06-19

    In June 2009, AltaRock Energy began field work on a project supported by the U.S. Department of Energy entitled “Use of Multiple Stimulations to Improve Economics of Engineered Geothermal Systems in Shallow High Temperature Intrusives.” The goal of the project was to develop an Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) in the portion of The Geysers geothermal field operated by the Northern California Power Agency (NCPA). The project encountered several problems while deepening Well E-7 which culminated in the suspension of field activities in September 2009. Some of the problems encountered are particular to The Geysers area, while others might be encountered in any geothermal field, and they might be avoided in future operations.

  4. World status of geothermal energy use: past and potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, John

    2000-01-01

    The past and potential development of geothermal energy is reviewed, and the use of geothermal energy for power generation and direct heat utilisation is examined. The energy savings that geothermal energy provides in terms of fuel oil and carbon savings are discussed. Worldwide development of geothermal electric power (1940-2000) and direct heat utilisation (1960 to 2000), regional geothermal use in 2000, the national geothermal contributions of geothermal energy, and the installed geothermal electric generating capacities in 2000 are tabulated

  5. Applications of stable isotopes and radioisotopes in the exploration and reservoir management of Philippine geothermal fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, H.P.; Alvis-Isidro, R.R.

    1996-01-01

    The development of indigenous geothermal energy resources is currently one of the primary thrusts of the country's energy program. Presently, the Philippines has a total of geothermal generating capacity of about 1400 MWe. This comprises about 20% of the total energy mix and electricity requirements of the country. By 1998, an additional capacity of about 500 MWe will be commissioned, and the PHilippines would be generating 1900 MWe of electricity from geothermal energy resources. From 1990 to 1993, PNOC EDC (Philippine National Oil Company, Energy Development Corporation) has been granted a research contract by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The Company has also been a recipient since 1991 of an IAEA Technical Assistance on the use of stable isotope techniques in geothermal hydrology. Stable isotopes, particularly 18 O and 2 H, in conjunction with other geochemical parameters and geological and geophysical data, have been used to: a) establish the local meteoric water line; b) determine the origin of geothermal fluids; c) delineate the elevation of recharge of geothermal and ground water systems; d) confirm pre-exploitation hydrochemical models; e) identify physical and chemical processes due to exploitation of the geothermal resource (i.e. reinjection fluid returns, incursion of cold meteoric water, boiling due to pressure drawdown and mixing with acidic steam condensates); and, f) estimate reservoir temperatures. Techniques using radioisotopes, such as 14 C, have also been used for the age-dating of charred wood samples collected from some of our geothermal exploration areas. The detection of 3 H has also been used as an indicator for the incursion of recent cold meteoric water into the geothermal system. Tracer studies using 131 I, have also been previously carried out, in coordination with the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, to determine local hydrology and flow paths of reinjected water in some of our geothermal fields

  6. Fiscal 1996 verification and survey of geothermal prospecting technology etc. 2/2. Survey report on deep-seated geothermal resources; 1996 nendo chinetsu tansa gijutsu nado kensho chosa hokokusho. 2/2. Shinbu chinetsu shigen chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    For the purpose of reducing the risk to accompany the exploitation of deep-seated geothermal resources, investigations are conducted into the three factors that govern the formation of geothermal resources at deep levels, that is, the supply of heat from heat sources, the supply of geothermal fluids, and the development of fracture systems contributing to the constitution of reservoir structures. In the study of deep-seated geothermal models for the Kakkonda area, a reservoir structure model, a thermal structure model, and a geothermal fluid/hydraulic structure model are deliberated. Then, after studying the relations of the said three structure models to fracture systems, the boundary between the geothermal fluid convection region and the thermal conduction region near the 3,100m-deep level, the existence of high-salinity fluids and the depth of gas inflow, the ranges of shallow-seated reservoirs and deep-seated reservoirs, the trend of reduction in reservoir pressure and the anisotropy in water permeability in shallow-seated reservoirs, etc., a latest reservoir model is constructed into which all the findings obtained so far are incorporated. As for guidelines for deep-seated thermal resources survey and development, it is so decided that deep-seated geothermal survey guidelines, deep-seated fluid production guidelines, and deep-seated well drilling guidelines be prepared and that assessment be made of their economic effectiveness. (NEDO)

  7. Geothermal energy geopressure subprogram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-02-01

    The proposed action will consist of drilling one geopressured-geothermal resource fluid well for intermittent production testing over the first year of the test. During the next two years, long-term testing of 40,000 BPD will be flowed. A number of scenarios may be implemented, but it is felt that the total fluid production will approximate 50 million barrels. The test well will be drilled with a 22 cm (8.75 in.) borehole to a total depth of approximately 5185 m (17,000 ft). Up to four disposal wells will provide disposal of the fluid from the designated 40,000 BPD test rate. The following are included in this assessment: the existing environment; probable environmental impacts-direct and indirect; probable cumulative and long-term environmental impacts; accidents; coordination with federal, state, regional, and local agencies; and alternative actions. (MHR)

  8. Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeanloz, R. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (United States); Stone, H. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (United States); et al.

    2013-12-31

    DOE, through the Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, requested this study, identifying a focus on: i) assessment of technologies and approaches for subsurface imaging and characterization so as to be able to validate EGS opportunities, and ii) assessment of approaches toward creating sites for EGS, including science and engineering to enhance permeability and increase the recovery factor. Two days of briefings provided in-depth discussion of a wide range of themes and challenges in EGS, and represented perspectives from industry, government laboratories and university researchers. JASON also contacted colleagues from universities, government labs and industry in further conversations to learn the state of the field and potential technologies relevant to EGS.

  9. INTEGRATED EXPLORATION OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES

    OpenAIRE

    A. B. Alkhasov; D. A. Аlkhasova; R. M. Aliyev; A. Sh. Ramazanov

    2016-01-01

    The aim. The aim is to develop the energy efficient technologies to explore hydro geothermal resources of different energy potential.Methods. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the proposed technologies has been carried out with the use of physical and mathematical, thermodynamic and optimization methods of calculation and the physical and chemical experimental research.Results. We propose the technology of integrated exploration of low-grade geothermal resources with the application of heat ...

  10. Geothermal energy development in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simsek, S.; Okandan, E.

    1990-01-01

    Geothermal fields in Turkey are related to rather complex zones of collision between the Eurasian and African continents, and penetration of the Arabian plate into the Anatolian continental mass. These processes gave rise to fracturing of the lithosphere and eruption of magmas. Geothermal regional assessment studies have proven several low enthalpy sources and some high enthalpy fields suitable for electricity generation. This paper summarizes developments in exploration-drilling and give examples of direct utilization implemented in recent years

  11. The Oregon Geothermal Planning Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-10-02

    Oregon's geothermal resources represent a large portion of the nation's total geothermal potential. The State's resources are substantial in size, widespread in location, and presently in various stages of discovery and utilization. The exploration for, and development of, geothermal is presently dependent upon a mixture of engineering, economic, environmental, and legal factors. In response to the State's significant geothermal energy potential, and the emerging impediments and incentives for its development, the State of Oregon has begun a planning program intended to accelerate the environmentally prudent utilization of geothermal, while conserving the resource's long-term productivity. The program, which is based upon preliminary work performed by the Oregon Institute of Technology's Geo-Heat Center, will be managed by the Oregon Department of Energy, with the assistance of the Departments of Economic Development, Geology and Mineral Industries, and Water Resources. Funding support for the program is being provided by the US Department of Energy. The first six-month phase of the program, beginning in July 1980, will include the following five primary tasks: (1) coordination of state and local agency projects and information, in order to keep geothermal personnel abreast of the rapidly expanding resource literature, resource discoveries, technological advances, and each agency's projects. (2) Analysis of resource commercialization impediments and recommendations of incentives for accelerating resource utilization. (3) Compilation and dissemination of Oregon geothermal information, in order to create public and potential user awareness, and to publicize technical assistance programs and financial incentives. (4) Resource planning assistance for local governments in order to create local expertise and action; including a statewide workshop for local officials, and the formulation of two specific community resource development

  12. Geothermal energy applications in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, X.; Tang, N.; Zhang, Z.; Wang, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper updates geothermal energy applications in China. To total energy consumption for electricity is 20.38 MWe, and for direct use is 41,222 TJ/yr, even though the beneficial heat was estimated to be 7,198 TJ/yr. The attached tables are the basic geothermal information mainly the years 1985-1989. Some of the tables are additions to the report or preceeding years

  13. Geothermal Money Book [Geothermal Outreach and Project Financing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elizabeth Battocletti

    2004-02-01

    Small business lending is big business and growing. Loans under $1 million totaled $460 billion in June 2001, up $23 billion from 2000. The number of loans under $100,000 continued to grow at a rapid rate, growing by 10.1%. The dollar value of loans under $100,000 increased 4.4%; those of $100,000-$250,000 by 4.1%; and those between $250,000 and $1 million by 6.4%. But getting a loan can be difficult if a business owner does not know how to find small business-friendly lenders, how to best approach them, and the specific criteria they use to evaluate a loan application. This is where the Geothermal Money Book comes in. Once a business and financing plan and financial proposal are written, the Geothermal Money Book takes the next step, helping small geothermal businesses locate and obtain financing. The Geothermal Money Book will: Explain the specific criteria potential financing sources use to evaluate a proposal for debt financing; Describe the Small Business Administration's (SBA) programs to promote lending to small businesses; List specific small-business friendly lenders for small geothermal businesses, including those which participate in SBA programs; Identify federal and state incentives which are relevant to direct use and small-scale (< 1 megawatt) power generation geothermal projects; and Provide an extensive state directory of financing sources and state financial incentives for the 19 states involved in the GeoPowering the West (GPW). GPW is a U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored activity to dramatically increase the use of geothermal energy in the western United States by promoting environmentally compatible heat and power, along with industrial growth and economic development. The Geothermal Money Book will not: Substitute for financial advice; Overcome the high exploration, development, and financing costs associated with smaller geothermal projects; Remedy the lack of financing for the exploration stage of a geothermal project; or Solve

  14. Periodic Hydraulic Testing for Discerning Fracture Network Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, M.; Le Borgne, T.; Bour, O.; Guihéneuf, N.; Cole, M.

    2015-12-01

    Discrete fracture network (DFN) models often predict highly variable hydraulic connections between injection and pumping wells used for enhanced oil recovery, geothermal energy extraction, and groundwater remediation. Such connections can be difficult to verify in fractured rock systems because standard pumping or pulse interference tests interrogate too large a volume to pinpoint specific connections. Three field examples are presented in which periodic hydraulic tests were used to obtain information about hydraulic connectivity in fractured bedrock. The first site, a sandstone in New York State, involves only a single fracture at a scale of about 10 m. The second site, a granite in Brittany, France, involves a fracture network at about the same scale. The third site, a granite/schist in the U.S. State of New Hampshire, involves a complex network at scale of 30-60 m. In each case periodic testing provided an enhanced view of hydraulic connectivity over previous constant rate tests. Periodic testing is particularly adept at measuring hydraulic diffusivity, which is a more effective parameter than permeability for identify the complexity of flow pathways between measurement locations. Periodic tests were also conducted at multiple frequencies which provides a range in the radius of hydraulic penetration away from the oscillating well. By varying the radius of penetration, we attempt to interrogate the structure of the fracture network. Periodic tests, therefore, may be uniquely suited for verifying and/or calibrating DFN models.

  15. Final Report to DOE EERE – Geothermal Technologies Program Project Title: Monitoring and modeling of fluid flow in a developing enhanced geothermal system (EGS) reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehler, Michael [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-04-19

    The primary objective of this project was to improve our ability to predict performance of an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) reservoir over time by relating, in a quantitative manner, microseismic imaging with fluid and temperature changes within the reservoir. Historically, microseismic data have been used qualitatively to place bounds on the growth of EGS reservoirs created by large hydraulic fracturing experiments. Previous investigators used an experimentally based fracture opening relationship (fracture aperture as a function of pressure), the spatial extent of microseismic events, and some assumptions about fracture frequency to determine the size of an EGS reservoir created during large pumping tests. We addressed a number of issues (1) locating microearthquakes that occur during hydraulic fracturing, (2) obtaining more information about a reservoir than the microearthquake locations from the microearthquake data, for example, information about the seismic velocity structure of the reservoir or the scattering of seismic waves within the reservoir, (3) developing an improved methodology for estimating properties of fractures that intersect wellbores in a reservoir, and (4) developing a conceptual model for explaining the downward growth of observed seismicity that accompanies some hydraulic injections into geothermal reservoirs. We used two primary microseismic datasets for our work. The work was motivated by a dataset from the Salak Geothermal Field in Indonesia where seismicity accompanying a hydraulic injection was observed to migrate downward. We also used data from the Soultz EGS site in France. We also used Vertical Seismic Profiling data from a well in the United States. The work conducted is of benefit for characterizing reservoirs that are created by hydraulic fracturing for both EGS and for petroleum recovery.

  16. Geothermal development plan: Maricopa County

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

    1982-08-01

    The Maricopa County Geothermal Development Plan evaluated the market potential for utilizing geothermal energy. The study identified six potential geothermal resource areas with temperatures less than 100{sup 0}C (212{sup 0}F) and in addition, four suspected intermediate temperature areas (90{sup 0} to 150{sup 0}C, 194{sup 0} to 300{sup 0}F). Geothermal resources are found to occur in and near the Phoenix metropolitan area where average population growth rates of two to three percent per year are expected over the next 40 years. Rapid growth in the manufacturing, trade and service sectors of the regional economy provides opportunities for the direct utilization of geothermal energy. A regional energy use analysis is included containing energy use and price projections. Water supplies are found to be adequate to support this growth, though agricultural water use is expected to diminish. The study also contains a detailed section matching geothermal resources to potential users. Two comparative analyses providing economic details for space heating projects are incorporated.

  17. Geothermal energy abstract sets. Special report No. 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, C. (comp.)

    1985-01-01

    This bibliography contains annotated citations in the following areas: (1) case histories; (2) drilling; (3) reservoir engineering; (4) injection; (5) geothermal well logging; (6) environmental considerations in geothermal development; (7) geothermal well production; (8) geothermal materials; (9) electric power production; (10) direct utilization of geothermal energy; (11) economics of geothermal energy; and (12) legal, regulatory and institutional aspects. (ACR)

  18. Study on safety of a nuclear ship having an integral marine water reactor. Intelligent information database program concerned with thermal-hydraulic characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inasaka, Fujio; Nariai, Hideki; Kobayashi, Michiyuki; Murata, Hiroyuki; Aya, Izuo

    2001-01-01

    As a high economical marine reactor with sufficient safety functions, an integrated type marine water reactor has been considered most promising. At the National Maritime Research Institute, a series of the experimental studies on the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of an integrated/passive-safety type marine water reactor such as the flow boiling of a helical-coil type steam generator, natural circulation of primary water under a ship rolling motion and flashing-condensation oscillation phenomena in pool water has been conducted. This current study aims at making use of the safety analysis or evaluation of a future marine water reactor by developing an intelligent information database program concerned with the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of an integral/passive-safety reactor on the basis of the above-mentioned valuable experimental knowledge. Since the program was created as a Windows application using the Visual Basic, it is available to the public and can be easily installed in the operating system. Main functions of the program are as follows: (1) steady state flow boiling analysis and determination of stability limit for any helical-coil type once-through steam generator design. (2) analysis and comparison with the flow boiling data, (3) reference and graphic display of the experimental data, (4) indication of the knowledge information such as analysis method and results of the study. The program will be useful for the design of not only the future integrated type marine water reactor but also the small sized water reactor. (author)

  19. Geothermal systems: Principles and case histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybach, L.; Muffler, L. J. P.

    The classification of geothermal systems is considered along with the geophysical and geochemical signatures of geothermal systems, aspects of conductive heat transfer and regional heat flow, and geothermal anomalies and their plate tectonic framework. An investigation of convective heat and mass transfer in hydrothermal systems is conducted, taking into account the mathematical modelling of hydrothermal systems, aspects of idealized convective heat and mass transport, plausible models of geothermal reservoirs, and preproduction models of hydrothermal systems. Attention is given to the prospecting for geothermal resources, the application of water geochemistry to geothermal exploration and reservoir engineering, heat extraction from geothermal reservoirs, questions of geothermal resource assessment, and environmental aspects of geothermal energy development. A description is presented of a number of case histories, taking into account the low enthalpy geothermal resource of the Pannonian Basin in Hungary, the Krafla geothermal field in Northeast Iceland, the geothermal system of the Jemez Mountains in New Mexico, and extraction-reinjection at the Ahuachapan geothermal field in El Salvador.

  20. Thermally Actuated Hydraulic Pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack; Ross, Ronald; Chao, Yi

    2008-01-01

    Thermally actuated hydraulic pumps have been proposed for diverse applications in which direct electrical or mechanical actuation is undesirable and the relative slowness of thermal actuation can be tolerated. The proposed pumps would not contain any sliding (wearing) parts in their compressors and, hence, could have long operational lifetimes. The basic principle of a pump according to the proposal is to utilize the thermal expansion and contraction of a wax or other phase-change material in contact with a hydraulic fluid in a rigid chamber. Heating the chamber and its contents from below to above the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to expand significantly, thus causing a substantial increase in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid out of the chamber. Similarly, cooling the chamber and its contents from above to below the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to contract significantly, thus causing a substantial decrease in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid into the chamber. The displacement of the hydraulic fluid could be used to drive a piston. The figure illustrates a simple example of a hydraulic jack driven by a thermally actuated hydraulic pump. The pump chamber would be a cylinder containing encapsulated wax pellets and containing radial fins to facilitate transfer of heat to and from the wax. The plastic encapsulation would serve as an oil/wax barrier and the remaining interior space could be filled with hydraulic oil. A filter would retain the encapsulated wax particles in the pump chamber while allowing the hydraulic oil to flow into and out of the chamber. In one important class of potential applications, thermally actuated hydraulic pumps, exploiting vertical ocean temperature gradients for heating and cooling as needed, would be used to vary hydraulic pressures to control buoyancy in undersea research

  1. On calculation of a steam-water flow in a geothermal well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulyupin, A. N.; Chermoshentseva, A. A.

    2013-08-01

    Approaches to calculation of a steam-water flow in a geothermal well are considered. For hydraulic applications, a WELL-4 model of a steam-water well is developed. Data obtained using this model are compared with experimental data and also with calculations by similar models including the well-known HOLA model. The capacity of the A-2 well in the Mutnovskoe flash-steam field (Kamchatka half-island, Russia) after planned reconstruction is predicted.

  2. DMRC studies geothermal energy options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-03-01

    The Deep Mining Research Consortium (DMRC) is an industry-led research consortium that includes Vale Inco, Xstrata, Rio Tinto, Goldcorp, Agnico-Eagle, Barrick Gold, CANMET and the City of Sudbury. This article reported on the application of geothermal energy technologies to cool deep mine workings and use the heat from underground to produce energy to heat surface buildings. Researchers at the University of British Columbia's Centre for Environmental Research in Minerals, Metals and Materials have proposed the use of heat pumps and water-to-air heat exchangers at depth to chill mine workings. The heat pumps would act as refrigerators, taking heat from one area and moving it elsewhere. The purpose would be to extract heat from naturally occurring ground water and pass the chilled water through a heat exchanger to cool the air. The heated water would then be pumped to surface and used to heat surface facilities. The technology is well suited for using geothermal energy from decommissioned mines for district heating. The technology has been successfully used in Spring Hill, Nova Scotia, where geothermal energy from a decommissioned coal mine is used to heat an industrial park. A feasibility study is also underway for the city of Yellowknife in the Northwest Territories to produce up to 10 megawatts of heat from the Con Gold Mine, enough energy to heat half of Yellowknife. Geothermal energy can also be used to generate electricity, particularly in the Pacific Rim where underground temperatures are higher and closer to surface. In Sudbury Ontario, the enhanced geothermal systems technology would require two holes drilled to a depth of four kilometers. The ground between the two holes should be fractured to create an underground geothermal circuit. Geothermal energy does not produce any greenhouse gases or chemical wastes. 1 fig.

  3. Hydraulic braking system for loads subjected to impacts and vibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This invention concerns a hydraulic braking system for loads subjected to impacts and vibrations. These double acting telescopic type hydraulic braking systems possess significant drawbacks linked to possibly important hydraulic leaks due to (a) the use of many dynamic seals in such appliances and (b) the effects of the environment of the system on these seals, particularly when employed in nuclear power stations where the seals reach significant temperatures and are subjected to radiation. Under this invention a remedy is suggested to such drawbacks by integrating means to offset automatically the leaks and the accumulation of hydraulic fluid expansions, as well as facilities to show if such leaks have occurred [fr

  4. Geothermal Energy: Evaluation of a Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockemuehl, H. W.

    1976-01-01

    This article suggests the use of geothermal energy for producing electricity, using as an example the development at Wairakei, New Zealand. Other geothermal areas are identified, and economic and environmental co sts of additional development are explored. (Author/AV)

  5. Imperial County geothermal development annual meeting: summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    All phases of current geothermal development in Imperial County are discussed and future plans for development are reviewed. Topics covered include: Heber status update, Heber binary project, direct geothermal use for high-fructose corn sweetener production, update on county planning activities, Brawley and Salton Sea facility status, status of Imperial County projects, status of South Brawley Prospect 1983, Niland geothermal energy program, recent and pending changes in federal procedures/organizations, plant indicators of geothermal fluid on East Mesa, state lands activities in Imperial County, environmental interests in Imperial County, offshore exploration, strategic metals in geothermal fluids rebuilding of East Mesa Power Plant, direct use geothermal potential for Calipatria industrial Park, the Audubon Society case, status report of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, East Brawley Prospect, and precision gravity survey at Heber and Cerro Prieto geothermal fields. (MHR)

  6. Choosing a Geothermal as an HVAC System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lensenbigler, John D.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the process of selecting and installing geothermal water source heat pumps for new residence halls at Johnson Bible College in Knoxville, Tennessee, including choosing the type of geothermal design, contractors, and interior equipment, and cost and payback. (EV)

  7. Thermal-hydraulic design of the 200 MW NHR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jincai; Gao Zuying; Xu Baocheng; He Junxiao

    1997-01-01

    The thermal hydraulic design of the 200-MW Nuclear Heating Reactor (NHR), design criteria, design methods, important characteristics and some development results are presented in this paper. (author). 5 refs, 8 figs, 2 tabs

  8. Thermal-hydraulic design of the 200 MW NHR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jincai, Li; Zuying, Gao; Baocheng, Xu; Junxiao, He [Institute of Nuclear Energy and Technology, Tsingua Univ., Beijing (China)

    1997-09-01

    The thermal hydraulic design of the 200-MW Nuclear Heating Reactor (NHR), design criteria, design methods, important characteristics and some development results are presented in this paper. (author). 5 refs, 8 figs, 2 tabs.

  9. Soft energy vs nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Yoshio

    1981-01-01

    During the early 1960s, a plentiful, inexpensive supply of petroleum enabled Japanese industry to progress rapidly; however, almost all of this petroleum was imported. Even after the first oil crisis of 1973, the recent annual energy consumption of Japan is calculated to be about 360 million tons in terms of petroleum, and actual petroleum forms 73% of total energy. It is necessary for Japan to reduce reliance on petroleum and to diversify energy resources. The use of other fossil fuels, such as coal, LNG and LPG, and hydraulic energy, is considered as an established alternative. In this presentation, the author deals with new energy, namely soft energy and nuclear energy, and discusses their characteristics and problems. The following kinds of energy are dealt with: a) Solar energy, b) Geothermal energy, c) Ocean energy (tidal, thermal, wave), d) Wind energy, e) Biomass energy, f) Hydrogen, g) Nuclear (thermal, fast, fusion). To solve the energy problem in future, assiduous efforts should be made to develop new energy systems. Among them, the most promising alternative energy is nuclear energy, and various kinds of thermal reactor systems have been developed for practical application. As a solution to the long-term future energy problem, research on and development of fast breeder reactors and fusion reactors are going on. (author)

  10. Geothermal surveys in the oceanic volcanic island of Mauritius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdoya, Massimo; Chiozzi, Paolo; Pasqua, Claudio

    2017-04-01

    Oceanic island chains are generally characterised by young volcanic systems that are predominately composed of basaltic lavas and related magmatic products. Although hot springs are occasionally present, the pervasive, massive, recent outpourings of basaltic lavas are the primary manifestation of the existence of geothermal resources. These islands may have, in principle, significant potential for the exploitation of geothermal energy. In this paper, we present results of recent investigations aimed at the evaluation of geothermal resources of the island of Mauritius, that is the emerging portion of a huge submarine, aseismic, volcanic plateau extending in the SW part of the Indian Ocean. The plateau is related to a long-lived hotspot track, whose present-day expression is the active volcano of La Réunion Island, located about 200 km SW of Mauritius. The island does not show at present any volcanic activity, but magmatism is quite recent as it dates from 7.8 to 0.03 Myr. Geochemical data from water samples collected from boreholes do not indicate the presence of mature water, i.e. circulating in high-temperature geothermal reservoirs, and argue for short-term water-rock interaction in shallow hydrogeological circuits. However, this cannot rule out that a deep magmatic heat source, hydraulically insulated from shallow aquifers, may occur. To evaluate the geothermal gradient, a 270-m-deep hole was thus drilled in the island central portion, in which the most recent volcanic activity (0.03 Myr) took place. Temperature-depth profiles, recorded after complete thermal equilibration, revealed a thermal gradient of 40 mK/m. Attempts of extracting additional thermal information were also made by measuring the temperature in a 170-m-deep deep water hole, no longer used. The results were consistent with the gradient hole, i.e. pointing to a weak or null deep-seated thermal anomaly beneath Mauritius and low geothermal potential. The deep thermal process (mantle plume) invoked

  11. Managing Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Risks Drilling Geothermal Exploration and Delineation Wells with Small-Footprint Highly Portable Diamond Core Drills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, J.; Listi, R.; Combs, J.; Welch, V.; Reilly, S.

    2012-12-01

    Small hydraulic core rigs are highly portable (truck or scow-mounted), and have recently been used for geothermal exploration in areas such as Nevada, California, the Caribbean Islands, Central and South America and elsewhere. Drilling with slim diameter core rod below 7,000' is common, with continuous core recovery providing native-state geological information to aid in identifying the resource characteristics and boundaries; this is a highly cost-effective process. Benefits associated with this innovative exploration and delineation technology includes the following: Low initial Capital Equipment Cost and consumables costs Small Footprint, reducing location and road construction, and cleanup costs Supporting drill rod (10'/3meter) and tools are relatively low weight and easily shipped Speed of Mobilization and rig up Reduced requirements for support equipment (cranes, backhoes, personnel, etc) Small mud systems and cementing requirements Continuous, simplified coring capability Depth ratings comparable to that of large rotary rigs (up to ~10,000'+) Remote/small-location accessible (flown into remote areas or shipped in overseas containers) Can be scow or truck-mounted This technical presentation's primary goal is to share the technology of utilizing small, highly portable hydraulic coring rigs to provide exploratory drilling (and in some cases, production drilling) for geothermal projects. Significant cost and operational benefits are possible for the Geothermal Operator, especially for those who are pursuing projects in remote locations or countries, or in areas that are either inaccessible or in which a small footprint is required. John D. Tuttle Sinclair Well Products jtuttle@sinclairwp.com

  12. Digital switched hydraulics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Min; Plummer, Andrew

    2018-06-01

    This paper reviews recent developments in digital switched hydraulics particularly the switched inertance hydraulic systems (SIHSs). The performance of SIHSs is presented in brief with a discussion of several possible configurations and control strategies. The soft switching technology and high-speed switching valve design techniques are discussed. Challenges and recommendations are given based on the current research achievements.

  13. Hydraulic Structures : Caissons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorendt, M.Z.; Molenaar, W.F.; Bezuyen, K.G.

    These lecture notes on caissons are part of the study material belonging to the course 'Hydraulic Structures 1' (code CTB3355), part of the Bachelor of Science education and the Hydraulic Engineering track of the Master of Science education for civil engineering students at Delft University of

  14. Mutnovo geothermal power complex at Kamchatka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britvin, O.V.; Povarov, O.A.; Klochkov, E.F.; Tomarov, G.V.; Koshkin, N.L.; Luzin, V.E.

    2001-01-01

    The data on geothermal resources at Kamchatka and experience in their application are presented. The description of the geothermal power complex objects at the Mutnovo deposit is given. The basic trends and stages of the prospective geothermal power development in this region are indicated. It is specified for unique huge geothermal heat reserves, which by different estimates may provide for the total electrical and thermal capacity, exceeding 2000 MW [ru

  15. Proceedings of the 8. Brazilian Meeting on Reactor Physics and Thermal Hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Some papers about pressurized light water reactors, fast reactors, accident analysis, transients, research reactors, nuclear data collection, thermal hydraulics, reactor monitoring, neutronics are presented. (E.G.)

  16. Hydraulic accumulator-compressor for geopressured enhanced oil recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsberry, Fred L.

    1988-01-01

    A hydraulic accumulator-compressor vessel using geothermal brine under pressure as a piston to compress waste (CO.sub.2 rich) gas is used in a system having a plurality of gas separators in tandem to recover pipeline quality gas from geothermal brine. A first high pressure separator feeds gas to a membrance separator which separates low pressure waste gas from high pressure quality gas. A second separator produces low pressure waste gas. Waste gas from both separators is combined and fed into the vessel through a port at the top as the vessel is drained for another compression cycle. High pressure brine is then admitted into the vessel through a port at the bottom of the vessel. Check valves control the flow of low pressure waste gas into the vessel and high pressure waste gas out of the vessel.

  17. Design of a partial inter-tube lancing system actuated by hydraulic power for type F model steam generator in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. T.; Jeong, W. T.

    2008-01-01

    The sludge grown up in steam generators of nuclear power plants shortens the life-cycle of steam generators and reduces the output of power plants. So KHNP(Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power), the only nuclear power utility in Korea, removes it periodically using a steam generator lancing system during the outage of plants for an overhaul. KEPRI(Korea Electric Power Research Institute) has developed lancing systems with high pressured water nozzle for steam generators of nuclear power plants since 2001. In this paper, the design of a partial inter-tube lancing system for model F type steam generators will be described. The system is actuated without a DC motor inner steam generators because the motors in a steam generator make a trouble from high intensity of radioactivity as a break down

  18. Seismic velocity uncertainties and their effect on geothermal predictions: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbel, Wolfgang; Köhn, Daniel; Bahadur Motra, Hem; Niederau, Jan; Thorwart, Martin; Wuttke, Frank; Descramble Working Group

    2017-04-01

    Geothermal exploration relies in large parts on geophysical subsurface models derived from seismic reflection profiling. These models are the framework of hydro-geothermal modeling, which further requires estimating thermal and hydraulic parameters to be attributed to the seismic strata. All petrophysical and structural properties involved in this process can be determined only with limited accuracy and thus impose uncertainties onto the resulting model predictions of temperature-depth profiles and hydraulic flow, too. In the present study we analyze sources and effects of uncertainties of the seismic velocity field, which translate directly into depth uncertainties of the hydraulically and thermally relevant horizons. Geological sources of these uncertainties are subsurface heterogeneity and seismic anisotropy, methodical sources are limitations in spread length and physical resolution. We demonstrate these effects using data of the EU-Horizon 2020 project DESCRAMBLE investigating a shallow super-critical geothermal reservoir in the Larderello area. The study is based on 2D- and 3D seismic reflection data and laboratory measurements on representative rock samples under simulated in-situ conditions. The rock samples consistently show P-wave anisotropy values of 10-20% order of magnitude. However, the uncertainty of layer depths induced by anisotropy is likely to be lower depending on the accuracy, with which the spatial orientation of bedding planes can be determined from the seismic reflection images.

  19. Permeability in fractured rocks from deep geothermal boreholes in the Upper Rhine Graben

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Jeanne; Whitechurch, Hubert; Genter, Albert; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Baujard, Clément

    2015-04-01

    Permeability in fractured rocks from deep geothermal boreholes in the Upper Rhine Graben Vidal J.1, Whitechurch H.1, Genter A.2, Schmittbuhl J.1, Baujard C.2 1 EOST, Université de Strasbourg 2 ES-Géothermie, Strasbourg The thermal regime of the Upper Rhine Graben (URG) is characterized by a series of geothermal anomalies on its French part near Soultz-sous-Forêts, Rittershoffen and in the surrounding area of Strasbourg. Sedimentary formations of these areas host oil field widely exploited in the past which exhibit exceptionally high temperature gradients. Thus, geothermal anomalies are superimposed to the oil fields which are interpreted as natural brine advection occurring inside a nearly vertical multi-scale fracture system cross-cutting both deep-seated Triassic sediments and Paleozoic crystalline basement. The sediments-basement interface is therefore very challenging for geothermal industry because most of the geothermal resource is trapped there within natural fractures. Several deep geothermal projects exploit local geothermal energy to use the heat or produce electricity and thus target permeable fractured rocks at this interface. In 1980, a geothermal exploration well was drilled close to Strasbourg down to the Permian sediments at 3220 m depth. Bottom hole temperature was estimated to 148°C but the natural flow rate was too low for an economic profitability (geothermal site by drilling five boreholes, three of which extend to 5 km depth. They identified a temperature of 200° C at 5 km depth in the granitic basement but with a variable flow rate. Hydraulic and chemical stimulation operations were applied in order to increase the initial low permeability by reactivating and dissolving sealed fractures in basement. The productivity was considerably improved and allows geothermal exploitation at 165° C and 20 L/s. Recent studies revealed the occurrences of permeable fractures in the limestones of Muschelkalk and the sandstones of Buntsandstein also. For

  20. Vibration of hydraulic machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yulin; Liu, Shuhong; Dou, Hua-Shu; Qian, Zhongdong

    2013-01-01

    Vibration of Hydraulic Machinery deals with the vibration problem which has significant influence on the safety and reliable operation of hydraulic machinery. It provides new achievements and the latest developments in these areas, even in the basic areas of this subject. The present book covers the fundamentals of mechanical vibration and rotordynamics as well as their main numerical models and analysis methods for the vibration prediction. The mechanical and hydraulic excitations to the vibration are analyzed, and the pressure fluctuations induced by the unsteady turbulent flow is predicted in order to obtain the unsteady loads. This book also discusses the loads, constraint conditions and the elastic and damping characters of the mechanical system, the structure dynamic analysis, the rotor dynamic analysis and the system instability of hydraulic machines, including the illustration of monitoring system for the instability and the vibration in hydraulic units. All the problems are necessary for vibration pr...

  1. Trial approach to the function of the volcanoes, geothermal sources, and spa from a standpoint of radioactivity (part 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Yukio

    1987-11-30

    General aspects of solar energy generation, composition of the earth's crust, and geothermal energy utilization, etc. are described. 1) Formation of the elements and explosion of the supernovas: Discussion is made on the solar energy generation from the existence probability of elenents in the universe. 2) Chemical composition of the earth's crust, and uranium and sodium: Chemical composition is estimated from the amount of radioactive elements in the crust. 3) Generation of magma. 4) Geothermal energy and fossile nuclear reactor: Analysis of nuclear physical data in the thermal history of the earth indicates that a nuclear reactor was naturally generated. 5) Heat escaping from the earth's surface: Flow rate of the earth's crust heat is estimated. 6) Geothermal reservoir and the formation of hot springs: Relation between the geothermal flow and the site of hot springs is estimated. 7) Utilization of thermal energy endowed by the earth: This is a natural benefit and should be wisely utilized. (11 figs, 16 tabs, 95 refs)

  2. Microbiological monitoring in geothermal plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alawi, M.; Lerm, S.; Vetter, A.; Vieth, A.; Seibt, A.; Wolfgramm, M.; Würdemann, H.

    2009-12-01

    In times of increasing relevance of alternative energy resources the utilization of geothermal energy and subsurface energy storage gains importance and arouses increasing interest of scientists. The research project “AquiScreen” investigates the operational reliability of geothermally used groundwater systems under microbial, geochemical, mineralogical and petrological aspects. Microbiological analyses based on fluid and solid phases of geothermal systems are conducted to evaluate the impact of microbial populations on these systems. The presentation focuses on first results obtained from microbiological monitoring of geothermal plants located in two different regions of Germany: the North German Basin and the Molasse Basin in the southern part characterized by different salinities and temperatures. Fluid and filter samples taken during regular plant operation were investigated using genetic fingerprinting based on PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes to characterize the microbial biocenosis of the geothermal aquifer. Sequencing of dominant bands of the fingerprints and the subsequent comparison to 16S rRNA genes from public databases enables a correlation to metabolic classes and provides information about the biochemical processes in the deep biosphere. The genetic profiles revealed significant differences in microbiological community structures of geothermal aquifers investigated. Phylogenetic analyses indicate broad metabolical diversity adapted to the specific conditions in the aquifers. Additionally a high amount of so far uncultivated microorganisms was detected indicating very specific indigenous biocenosis. However, in all geothermal plants bacteria were detected despite of fluid temperatures from 45° to 120°C. The identified microorganisms are closely related to thermophilic and hyperthermophilic species detectable in hot wells and hot springs, like Thermus scotoductus and Thermodesulfovibrio yellowstonii, respectively. Halophilic species were detected in

  3. China starts tapping rich geothermal resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guang, D.

    1980-09-01

    Attention is given to the electric and power installation running on geothermal energy at Yangbajain, Tibet. Other geothermal projects in Tibet, the Yunnan Province and the North China Plain are also outlined. Applications of geothermal energy are described, including the heating of homes and factories, spinning, weaving, paper-making and the making of wine.

  4. Research status of geothermal resources in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lincheng; Li, Guang

    2017-08-01

    As the representative of the new green energy, geothermal resources are characterized by large reserve, wide distribution, cleanness and environmental protection, good stability, high utilization factor and other advantages. According to the characteristics of exploitation and utilization, they can be divided into high-temperature, medium-temperature and low-temperature geothermal resources. The abundant and widely distributed geothermal resources in China have a broad prospect for development. The medium and low temperature geothermal resources are broadly distributed in the continental crustal uplift and subsidence areas inside the plate, represented by the geothermal belt on the southeast coast, while the high temperature geothermal resources concentrate on Southern Tibet-Western Sichuan-Western Yunnan Geothermal Belt and Taiwan Geothermal Belt. Currently, the geothermal resources in China are mainly used for bathing, recuperation, heating and power generation. It is a country that directly makes maximum use of geothermal energy in the world. However, China’s geothermal power generation, including installed generating capacity and power generation capacity, are far behind those of Western European countries and the USA. Studies on exploitation and development of geothermal resources are still weak.

  5. Advanced seismic imaging for geothermal development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louie, John [UNR; Pullammanappallil, Satish [Optim; Honjas, Bill [Optim

    2016-08-01

    J. N. Louie, Pullammanappallil, S., and Honjas, W., 2011, Advanced seismic imaging for geothermal development: Proceedings of the New Zealand Geothermal Workshop 2011, Nov. 21-23, Auckland, paper 32, 7 pp. Preprint available at http://crack.seismo.unr.edu/geothermal/Louie-NZGW11.pdf

  6. Geothermal Energy Development annual report 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    This report is an exerpt from Earth Sciences Division Annual Report 1979 (LBL-10686). Progress in thirty-four research projects is reported including the following area: geothermal exploration technology, geothermal energy conversion technology, reservoir engineering, and geothermal environmental research. Separate entries were prepared for each project. (MHR)

  7. Prospects of geothermal resource exploitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourrelier, P.H.; Cornet, F.; Fouillac, C.

    1994-01-01

    The use of geothermal energy to generate electricity has only occurred during the past 50 years by drilling wells in aquifers close to magmas and producing either dry steam or hot water. The world's production of electricity from geothermal energy is over 6000 MWe and is still growing. The direct use of geothermal energy for major urban communities has been developed recently by exploitation of aquifers in sedimentary basins under large towns. Scaling up the extraction of heat implies the exploitation of larger and better located fields requiring an appropriate method of extraction; the objective of present attempts in USA, Japan and Europe is to create heat exchangers by the circulation of water between several deep wells. Two field categories are considered: the extension of classical geothermal fields beyond the aquifer areas, and areas favoured by both a high geothermal gradient, fractures inducing a natural permeability at large scale, and good commercial prospects (such as in the Rhenan Graben). Hot dry rocks concept has gained a large interest. 1 fig., 5 tabs., 11 refs

  8. Thermodynamics of geothermal fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, P.S.Z.

    1981-03-01

    A model to predict the thermodynamic properties of geothermal brines, based on a minimum amount of experimental data on a few key systems, is tested. Volumetric properties of aqueous sodium chloride, taken from the literature, are represented by a parametric equation over the range 0 to 300{sup 0}C and 1 bar to 1 kbar. Density measurements at 20 bar needed to complete the volumetric description also are presented. The pressure dependence of activity and thermal properties, derived from the volumetric equation, can be used to complete an equation of state for sodium chloride solutions. A flow calorimeter, used to obtain heat capacity data at high temperatures and pressures, is described. Heat capacity measurements, from 30 to 200{sup 0}C and 1 bar to 200 bar, are used to derive values for the activity coefficient and other thermodynamic properties of sodium sulfate solutions as a function of temperature. Literature data on the solubility of gypsum in mixed electrolyte solutions have been used to evaluate model parameters for calculating gypsum solubility in seawater and natural brines. Predictions of strontium and barium sulfate solubility in seawater also are given.

  9. Electricity from geothermal steam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheatcroft, E L.E.

    1959-01-01

    The development of the power station at Wairakei geothermal field is described. Wairakei is located at the center of New Zealand's volcanic belt, which lies within a major graben which is still undergoing some degree of downfaulting. A considerable number of wells, some exceeding 610 m, have been drilled. Steam and hot water are produced from both deep and shallow wells, which produce at gauge pressures of 1.5 MPa and 0.6 MPa, respectively. The turbines are fed by low, intermediate, and high pressure mains. The intermediate pressure turbine bank was installed as a replacement for a heavy water production facility which had originally been planned for the development. Stage 1 includes a 69 MW plant, and stage 2 will bring the capacity to 150 MW. A third stage, which would bring the output up to 250 MW had been proposed. The second stage involves the installation of more high pressure steam turbines, while the third stage would be powered primarily by hot water flashing. Generation is at 11 kV fed to a two-section 500 MVA board. Each section of the board feeds through a 40 MVA transformer to a pair of 220 V transmission lines which splice into the North Island grid. Other transformers feed 400 V auxiliaries and provide local supply.

  10. Handbook of hydraulic fluid technology

    CERN Document Server

    Totten, George E

    2011-01-01

    ""The Handbook of Hydraulic Fluid Technology"" serves as the foremost resource for designing hydraulic systems and for selecting hydraulic fluids used in engineering applications. Featuring new illustrations, data tables, as well as practical examples, this second edition is updated with essential information on the latest hydraulic fluids and testing methods. The detailed text facilitates unparalleled understanding of the total hydraulic system, including important hardware, fluid properties, and hydraulic lubricants. Written by worldwide experts, the book also offers a rigorous overview of h

  11. Geothermal resource assessment of the Yucca Mountain Area, Nye County, Nevada. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.; Trexler, D. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Harry Reid Center for Environmental Studies, Division of Earth Sciences; Shevenell, L., Garside, L. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Mackay School of Mines, Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology

    1995-12-01

    An assessment of the geothermal resources within a fifty-mile radius of the Yucca Mountain Project area was conducted to determine the potential for commercial development. The assessment includes collection, evaluation, and quantification of existing geological, geochemical, hydrological, and geophysical data within the Yucca Mountain area as they pertain to geothermal phenomena. Selected geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data were reduced to a set of common-scale digital maps using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for systematic analysis and evaluation. Available data from the Yucca Mountain area were compared to similar data from developed and undeveloped geothermal areas in other parts of the Great Basin to assess the resource potential for future geothermal development at Yucca Mountain. This information will be used in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project to determine the potential suitability of the site as a permanent underground repository for high-level nuclear waste.

  12. Geothermal resource assessment of the Yucca Mountain Area, Nye County, Nevada. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.; Trexler, D.

    1995-12-01

    An assessment of the geothermal resources within a fifty-mile radius of the Yucca Mountain Project area was conducted to determine the potential for commercial development. The assessment includes collection, evaluation, and quantification of existing geological, geochemical, hydrological, and geophysical data within the Yucca Mountain area as they pertain to geothermal phenomena. Selected geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data were reduced to a set of common-scale digital maps using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for systematic analysis and evaluation. Available data from the Yucca Mountain area were compared to similar data from developed and undeveloped geothermal areas in other parts of the Great Basin to assess the resource potential for future geothermal development at Yucca Mountain. This information will be used in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project to determine the potential suitability of the site as a permanent underground repository for high-level nuclear waste

  13. Potential effects of the Hawaii geothermal project on ground-water resources on the Island of Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorey, M.L.; Colvard, E.M.

    1994-07-01

    This report provides data and information on the quantity and quality of ground-water resources in and adjacent to proposed geothermal development areas on the Island of Hawaii Geothermal project for the development of as much as 500 MW of electric power from the geothermal system in the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano. Data presented for about 31 wells and 8 springs describe the chemical, thermal, and hydraulic properties of the ground-water system in and adjacent to the East Rift Zone. On the basis of this information, potential effects of this geothermal development on drawdown of ground-water levels and contamination of ground-water resources are discussed. Significant differences in ground-water levels and in the salinity and temperature of ground water within the study area appear to be related to mixing of waters from different sources and varying degrees of ground-water impoundment by volcanic dikes. Near Pahoa and to the east, the ground-water system within the rift is highly transmissive and receives abundant recharge from precipitation; therefore, the relatively modest requirements for fresh water to support geothermal development in that part of the east rift zone would result in minimal effects on ground-water levels in and adjacent to the rift. To the southwest of Pahoa, dike impoundment reduces the transmissivity of the ground-water system to such an extent that wells might not be capable of supplying fresh water at rates sufficient to support geothermal operations. Water would have to be transported to such developments from supply systems located outside the rift or farther downrift. Contaminant migration resulting from well accidents could be rapid because of relatively high ground-water velocities in parts of the region. Hydrologic monitoring of observation wells needs to be continued throughout development of geothermal resources for the Hawaii Geothermal Project to enable the early detection of leakage and migration of geothermal fluids.

  14. Hydraulic Fracturing and the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayatollahy Tafti, T.; Aminzadeh, F.; Jafarpour, B.; de Barros, F.

    2013-12-01

    In this presentation, we highlight two key environmental concerns of hydraulic fracturing (HF), namely induced seismicity and groundwater contamination (GC). We examine the induced seismicity (IS) associated with different subsurface fluid injection and production (SFIP) operations and the key operational parameters of SFIP impacting it. In addition we review the key potential sources for possible water contamination. Both in the case of IS and GC we propose modeling and data analysis methods to quantify the risk factors to be used for monitoring and risk reduction. SFIP include presents a risk in hydraulic fracturing, waste water injection, enhanced oil recovery as well as geothermal energy operations. Although a recent report (NRC 2012) documents that HF is not responsible for most of the induced seismicities, we primarily focus on HF here. We look into vaious operational parameters such as volume and rate of water injection, the direction of the well versus the natural fracture network, the depth of the target and the local stress field and fault system, as well as other geological features. The latter would determine the potential for triggering tectonic related events by small induced seismicity events. We provide the building blocks for IS risk assessment and monitoring. The system we propose will involve adequate layers of complexity based on mapped seismic attributes as well as results from ANN and probabilistic predictive modeling workflows. This leads to a set of guidelines which further defines 'safe operating conditions' and 'safe operating zones' which will be a valuable reference for future SFIP operations. We also illustrate how HF can lead to groundwater aquifer contamination. The source of aquifer contamination can be the hydrocarbon gas or the chemicals used in the injected liquid in the formation. We explore possible pathways of contamination within and discuss the likelihood of contamination from each source. Many of the chemical compounds used

  15. Development of a thermal hydraulic modelling of ground water of the Malm in the Munich metropolitan area; Entwicklung einer thermisch-hydraulischen Grundwassermodellierung des Malm im Grossraum Muenchen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dussel, M.; Lueschen, E.; Thomas, R. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Angewandte Geophysik, Hannover (DE)] (and others)

    2011-10-24

    The mutual potential influence of geothermal duplicates and the scientific investigation of the relationship between seismic and hydraulic parameters are investigated in the joint research project 'Geothermal characterization of fractured karst limestone aquifers in the Munich metropolitan area'. Thirteen doublets and triplets being in production or sunk illustrate the great geothermal potential and provide important data on the development of a thermal-hydraulic modeling of the reservoir. 3D seismic Unterhaching, 3D structural model, hydrogeological model and a high-resolution 3D temperature model form the basis of the numerical modeling. Different seismic signatures, seismic attributes and variations in the interval velocities characterize the ground geophysically, and were interpreted under consideration of geological and hydrogeological background information as well as borehole measurements in terms of hydraulically conductive homogeneous areas. For the Munich metropolitan area, the numerical modeling is a decision aid for the future optimized and sustainable hydrothermal utilization of the Malm aquifer.

  16. Greece, Milos Island Geothermal Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delliou, E.E.

    1990-01-01

    On Milos island (Aegean Sea) a high enthalpy, water dominated geothermal field of high salinity exists. At 1985, a 2MW geothermoelectric pilot plant was installed on the island. This plant has been provided by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries of Japan under a contract with Public Power Corporation of Greece. Due to high salinity of the geothermal fluid, unforeseen problems (scaling mainly) arisen in both steam and brine cycles. As a consequence, the operation (trial mainly) of the power plant have been interrupted several times for long periods, in order to identify the arisen, each time, problems and find the most appropriate technical solution. The above fact, as well as, some unfortunate coincidences described in this paper, led Milos people to react against geothermal development in their island. The sequence of the events, technical and non-technical, their approach and the relevant conclusions are reported in this presentation

  17. Geothermal resources of the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, A.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that geothermal energy applications and research are being actively pursued in the United Kingdom despite the relatively normal heat flow regime. The cumulative expenditure on geothermal activity from 1975 to 1989 has been approximately Brit-pounds 46 million of 32% of the Renewable Energy Research Budget to date. The first practical application is a 2 MWt scheme at Southampton as part of a district heating scheme. Commercial operation started in February 1988 and further expansion is planned. The UK's enthusiasm for Hot Dry Rock has dimmed slightly as the entire program is reappraised and the long heralded deep exploration hole has yet to materialize. Future activity looks likely to focus on geothermal opportunities that have multiple uses or applications for the fluids in small scale schemes and Hot Dry Rock research will probably be linked to a pan-European program based in France

  18. Geothermal hydrogen - a vision? Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zittel, W.; Weindorf, W.; Wurster, R.; Bussmann, W.

    2001-07-01

    With the progresses in geothermal electricity production by means of the hot-dry-rock (HDR) method electricity might be produced at cost of between 0.07 - 0.09 ECU/kWh, depending on systems sizes of between 5 - 20 MW{sub e}. The electricity can be used to produce hydrogen from electrolysis and water. This method of electricity production offers high availability with operating hour of between 7,600 - 8,000 hours per year. The 40 GWh electricity production per year from one 5 MW{sub e} geothermal plant are sufficient to produce enough hydrogen for the operation of an average fueling station with about 400 refuelings per day at cost of about 20 - 30 percent higher than today's gasoline (including taxes). In this contribution some details of the analysis are presented as well as a general discussion of geothermal hydrogen production as a future energy vector. (orig.)

  19. Acquired experience on organizing 3D S.UN.COP: international course to support nuclear license by user training in the areas of scaling, uncertainty, and 3D thermal-hydraulics/neutron-kinetics coupled codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petruzzi, Alessandro; D' Auria, Francesco [University of Pisa, San Piero a Grado (Italy). Nuclear Research Group San Piero a Grado (GRNSPG); Galetti, Regina, E-mail: regina@cnen.gov.b [National Commission for Nuclear Energy (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bajs, Tomislav [University of Zagreb (Croatia). Fac. of Electrical Engineering and Computing. Dept. of Power Systems; Reventos, Francesc [Technical University of Catalonia, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Physics and Nuclear Engineering

    2011-07-01

    Thermal-hydraulic system computer codes are extensively used worldwide for analysis of nuclear facilities by utilities, regulatory bodies, nuclear power plant designers, vendors, and research organizations. Computer code user represents a source of uncertainty that may significantly affect the results of system code calculations. Code user training and qualification represent an effective means for reducing the variation of results caused by the application of the codes by different users. This paper describes the experience in applying a systematic approach to training code users who, upon completion of the training, should be able to perform calculations making the best possible use of the capabilities of best estimate codes. In addition, this paper presents the organization and the main features of the 3D S.UN.COP (scaling, uncertainty, and 3D coupled code calculations) seminars during which particular emphasis is given to practical applications in connection with the licensing process of best estimate plus uncertainty methodologies, showing the designer, utility and regulatory approaches. (author)

  20. Acquired experience on organizing 3D S.UN.COP: international course to support nuclear license by user training in the areas of scaling, uncertainty, and 3D thermal-hydraulics/neutron-kinetics coupled codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petruzzi, Alessandro; D'Auria, Francesco; Galetti, Regina; Bajs, Tomislav; Reventos, Francesc

    2011-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic system computer codes are extensively used worldwide for analysis of nuclear facilities by utilities, regulatory bodies, nuclear power plant designers, vendors, and research organizations. Computer code user represents a source of uncertainty that may significantly affect the results of system code calculations. Code user training and qualification represent an effective means for reducing the variation of results caused by the application of the codes by different users. This paper describes the experience in applying a systematic approach to training code users who, upon completion of the training, should be able to perform calculations making the best possible use of the capabilities of best estimate codes. In addition, this paper presents the organization and the main features of the 3D S.UN.COP (scaling, uncertainty, and 3D coupled code calculations) seminars during which particular emphasis is given to practical applications in connection with the licensing process of best estimate plus uncertainty methodologies, showing the designer, utility and regulatory approaches. (author)

  1. Highly reliable electro-hydraulic control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mande, Morima; Hiyama, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Makoto

    1984-01-01

    The unscheduled shutdown of nuclear power stations disturbs power system, and exerts large influence on power generation cost due to the lowering of capacity ratio; therefore, high reliability is required for the control system of nuclear power stations. Toshiba Corp. has exerted effort to improve the reliability of the control system of power stations, and in this report, the electro-hydraulic control system for the turbines of nuclear power stations is described. The main functions of the electro-hydraulic control system are the control of main steam pressure with steam regulation valves and turbine bypass valves, the control of turbine speed and load, the prevention of turbine overspeed, the protection of turbines and so on. The system is composed of pressure sensors and a speed sensor, the control board containing the electronic circuits for control computation and protective sequence, the oil cylinders, servo valves and opening detectors of the valves for control, a high pressure oil hydraulic machine and piping, the operating panel and so on. The main features are the adoption of tripling intermediate value selection method, the multiplying of protection sensors and the adoption of 2 out of 3 trip logic, the multiplying of power sources, the improvement of the reliability of electronic circuit hardware and oil hydraulic system. (Kako, I.)

  2. Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1990-01-01

    The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic

  3. Geothermal resource assessment in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youngmin; Kim, Hyoung Chan [Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (Korea); Park, Sungho; Kim, Jongchan; Koo, Min-Ho [Kongju National University (Korea)

    2010-10-15

    To estimate available geothermal energy and to construct temperature at depth maps in Korea, various geothermal data have been used. Those include 1560 thermal property data such as thermal conductivity, specific heat and density, 353 heat flow data, 54 surface temperature data, and 180 heat production data. In Korea, subsurface temperature ranges from 23.9 C to 47.9 C at a depth of 1 km, from 34.2 C to 79.7 C at 2 km, from 44.2 C to 110.9 C at 3 km, from 53.8 C to 141.5 C at 4 km, and from 63.1 C to 171.6 C at 5 km. The total available subsurface geothermal energy in Korea is 4.25 x 10{sup 21} J from surface to a depth of 1 km, 1.67 x 10{sup 22} J to 2 km, 3.72 x 10{sup 22} J to 3 km, 6.52 x 10{sup 22} J to 4 km, and 1.01 x 10{sup 23} J to 5 km. In particular, the southeastern part of Korea shows high temperatures at depths and so does high geothermal energy. If only 2% of geothermal resource from surface to a depth of 5 km is developed in Korea, energy from geothermal resources would be equivalent to about 200 times annual consumption of primary energy ({proportional_to}2.33 x 10{sup 8} TOE) in Korea in 2006. (author)

  4. Geothermal Progress Monitor: Report No. 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    This issue of the Geothermal Progress Monitor, the 14th since its inception in 1980, highlights the anticipated rapid growth in the use of geothermal heat pumps and documents the continued growth in the use of geothermal energy for power generation, both in this country and abroad. In countries with a relatively large demand for new generation capacity, geothermal, if available, is being called on as a preferable alternative to the use of domestic or imported oil. On the other hand, in this country where current demand for new capacity is less, geothermal energy is commonly being put to use in small power generation units operating on the hot water resource.

  5. Geothermal progress monitor report No. 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-06-01

    Geothermal Progress Monitor Report No. 6 presents a state-by-state summary of the status of geothermal leasing, exploration, and development in major physiographic regions where geothermal resource potential has been identified. Recent state-specific activities are reported at the end of each state status report, while recent activities of a more general nature are summarized briefly in Part II of the report. A list of recent publications of potential interest to the geothermal community and a directory of contributors to the geothermal progress monitoring system are also included.

  6. "Assistance to States on Geothermal Energy"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linda Sikkema; Jennifer DeCesaro

    2006-07-10

    This final report summarizes work carried out under agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy, related to geothermal energy policy issues. This project has involved a combination of outreach and publications on geothermal energy—Contract Number DE-FG03-01SF22367—with a specific focus on educating state-level policymakers. Education of state policymakers is vitally important because state policy (in the form of incentives or regulation) is a crucial part of the success of geothermal energy. State policymakers wield a significant influence over all of these policies. They are also in need of high quality, non-biased educational resources which this project provided. This project provided outreach to legislatures, in the form of responses to information requests on geothermal energy and publications. The publications addressed: geothermal leasing, geothermal policy, constitutional and statutory authority for the development of geothermal district energy systems, and state regulation of geothermal district energy systems. These publications were distributed to legislative energy committee members, and chairs, legislative staff, legislative libraries, and other related state officials. The effect of this effort has been to provide an extensive resource of information about geothermal energy for state policymakers in a form that is useful to them. This non-partisan information has been used as state policymakers attempt to develop their own policy proposals related to geothermal energy in the states. Coordination with the National Geothermal Collaborative: NCSL worked and coordinated with the National Geothermal Collaborative (NGC) to ensure that state legislatures were represented in all aspects of the NGC's efforts. NCSL participated in NGC steering committee conference calls, attended and participated in NGC business meetings and reviewed publications for the NGC. Additionally, NCSL and WSUEP staff drafted a series of eight issue briefs published by the

  7. Using Geothermal Electric Power to Reduce Carbon Footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombie, George W.

    Human activities, including the burning of fossil fuels, increase carbon dioxide levels, which contributes to global warming. The research problem of the current study examined if geothermal electric power could adequately replace fossil fuel by 2050, thus reducing the emissions of carbon dioxide while avoiding potential problems with expanding nuclear generation. The purpose of this experimental research was to explore under what funding and business conditions geothermal power could be exploited to replace fossil fuels, chiefly coal. Complex systems theory, along with network theory, provided the theoretical foundation for the study. Research hypotheses focused on parameters, such as funding level, exploration type, and interfaces with the existing power grid that will bring the United States closest to the goal of phasing out fossil based power by 2050. The research was conducted by means of computer simulations, using agent-based modeling, wherein data were generated and analyzed. The simulations incorporated key information about the location of geothermal resources, exploitation methods, transmission grid limits and enhancements, and demand centers and growth. The simulation suggested that rapid and aggressive deployment of geothermal power plants in high potential areas, combined with a phase out of coal and nuclear plants, would produce minimal disruptions in the supply of electrical power in the United States. The implications for social change include reduced risk of global warming for all humans on the planet, reduced pollution due to reduction or elimination of coal and nuclear power, increased stability in energy supply and prices in the United States, and increased employment of United States citizens in jobs related to domestic energy production.

  8. Simplified model for the thermo-hydraulic simulation of the hot channel of a PWR type nuclear reactor; Modelo simplificado para simulacao do comportamento termohidraulico do canal quente de reator nuclear do tipo PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belem, J A.T.

    1993-09-01

    The present work deals with the thermal-hydraulic analysis of the hot channel of a standard PWR type reactor utilizing a simplified mathematical model that considers constant the water mass flux during single-phase flow and reduction of the flow when the steam quality is increasing in the channel (two-phase flow). The model has been applied to the Angra-1 reactor and it has proved satisfactory when compared to other ones. (author). 25 refs, 15 figs, 3 tabs.

  9. Geothermal country report of Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottlik, P.

    1990-01-01

    There is a slow but steady increase in the number of geothermal wells in Hungary. The rate of increase is 3-5 new wells/year. In the last years technical development and the raising of efficiency came to the front in utilization of geothermal energy. Technical development is supported by the state. This paper reports that the main directions were: developing a pump suitable for Hungarian conditions, working out the model of sandy and karstic aquifers for simulation and prediction, and developing new chemicals and methods for treating thermal water

  10. New Mexico Geothermal Data Base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witcher, J.C.; Whittier, J.; Morgan, R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the New Mexico Geothermal Data Base (NMGDB) which is a comprehensive public-domain data base of low-temperature geothermal resource information for New Mexico that is designed to assist researchers and developers. A broad range of geoscience, engineering, climatic, economic, and land status information are complied in the dBASE III PLUS data base management system for use on an IBM or IBM-compatible personal computer. A user friendly menu format with on-screen prompts allows easy and convenient use

  11. Submarine geothermal resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    Approximately 20% of the earth's heat loss (or 2 ?? 1012 cal/s) is released through 1% of the earth's surface area and takes the form of hydrothermal discharge from young (Pleistocene or younger) rocks adjacent to active seafloor-spreading centers and submarine volcanic areas. This amount is roughly equivalent to man's present gross energy consumption rate. A sub-seafloor geothermal reservoir, to be exploitable under future economic conditions, will have to be hot, porous, permeable, large, shallow, and near an energy-deficient, populated land mass. Furthermore, the energy must be recoverable using technology achievable at a competitive cost and numerous environmental, legal and institutional problems will have to be overcome. The highest-temperature reservoirs should be found adjacent to the zones of the seafloor extension or volcanism that are subject to high sedimentation rates. The relatively impermeable sediments reduce hydrothermal-discharge flow rates, forcing the heat to be either conducted away or released by high-temperature fluids, both of which lead to reservoir temperatures that can exceed 300??C. There is evidence that the oceanic crust is quite permeable and porous and that it was amenable to deep (3-5 km) penetration by seawater at least some time in the early stages of its evolution. Most of the heat escapes far from land, but there are notable exceptions. For example, in parts of the Gulf of California, thermal gradients in the bottom sediments exceed 1??C/m. In the coastal areas of the Gulf of California, where electricity and fresh water are at a premium, this potential resource lies in shallow water (characteristics of these systems before they can be considered a viable resource. Until several of the most promising areas are carefully defined and drilled, the problem will remain unresolved. ?? 1976.

  12. PMK-2, the First Integral Thermal-Hydraulics Tests for the Safety Evaluation of VVER-440/213 Nuclear Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gy. Ézsöl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The PMK-2 facility is a full-pressure thermal-hydraulic model of the primary and partly the secondary circuit of the VVER-type units of Paks NPP. The facility was the first integral-type facility for VVERs. The PMK-2 was followed later by the PACTEL (for VVER-440, the ISB, and PSB for VVER-1000. Since the startup of the facility in 1985, 55 experiments have been performed primarily in international frameworks with the participation of experts from 29 European and overseas countries forming a scientific school to better understand VVER system behaviour and reach a high level of modelling of accident sequences. The ATHLET, CATHARE, and RELAP5 codes have been validated including both qualitative and quantitative assessments. The former was almost exclusively applied to the early phase of validation by integral experiments, while the quantitative assessments have been performed by the Fast Fourier Transform Based Method. Paper gives comprehensive information on the design features of PMK-2 facility with a special respect to the representativeness of phenomena, the experiments performed, and the results of the validation of ATHLET, CATHARE, and RELAP5 codes. Safety significance of the PMK-2 projects is also discussed.

  13. PMK-2, the First Integral Thermal-Hydraulics Tests for the Safety Evaluation of VVER-440/213 Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezsol, G.; Perneczky, L.; Szabados, L.; Toth, I.

    2012-01-01

    The PMK-2 facility is a full-pressure thermal-hydraulic model of the primary and partly the secondary circuit of the VVER-type units of Paks NPP. The facility was the first integral-type facility for VVERs. The PMK-2 was followed later by the PACTEL (for VVER-440), the ISB, and PSB for VVER-1000. Since the startup of the facility in 1985, 55 experiments have been performed primarily in international frameworks with the participation of experts from 29 European and overseas countries forming a scientific school to better understand VVER system behaviour and reach a high level of modelling of accident sequences. The ATHLET, CATHARE, and RELAP5 codes have been validated including both qualitative and quantitative assessments. The former was almost exclusively applied to the early phase of validation by integral experiments, while the quantitative assessments have been performed by the Fast Fourier Transform Based Method. Paper gives comprehensive information on the design features of PMK-2 facility with a special respect to the representativeness of phenomena, the experiments performed, and the results of the validation of ATHLET, CATHARE, and RELAP5 codes. Safety significance of the PMK-2 projects is also discussed

  14. Nuclear energy and renewable energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The nuclear energy and the renewable energies namely: solar energy, wind energy, geothermal energy and biomass are complementary. They are not polluting and they are expected to develop in the future to replace the fossil fuels

  15. Mexican geothermal development and the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, J.M.E.V.

    1998-01-01

    Geothermics in Mexico started in 1954, by drilling the first geothermal well in Pathe, State of Hidalgo, which reached a depth of 237 meters. In 1959 electrical generation from geothermal origin began, with an installed capacity of 3.5 MW. From 1959 to 1994 Mexico increased its installed capacity to 753 MW, by developing three geothermal fields: Cerro Prieto, Los Azufres, and Los Humeros. Currently, 177 wells produce steam at a rate of 36 tons per hour (t/h) each. Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE, Federal Commission of Electricity) has planned to increase the geothermal-electric installed capacity through construction and installation of several projects. Repowering of operating units and development of new geothermal zones will also allow Mexican geothermal growth

  16. Integrated Modeling and Experiments to Characterize Coupled Thermo-hydro-geomechanical-chemical processes in Hydraulic Fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, H. S.; Carey, J. W.; Karra, S.; Porter, M. L.; Rougier, E.; Kang, Q.; Makedonska, N.; Hyman, J.; Jimenez Martinez, J.; Frash, L.; Chen, L.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing phenomena involve fluid-solid interactions embedded within coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes over scales from microns to tens of meters. Feedbacks between processes result in complex dynamics that must be unraveled if one is to predict and, in the case of unconventional resources, facilitate fracture propagation, fluid flow, and interfacial transport processes. The proposed work is part of a broader class of complex systems involving coupled fluid flow and fractures that are critical to subsurface energy issues, such as shale oil, geothermal, carbon sequestration, and nuclear waste disposal. We use unique LANL microfluidic and triaxial core flood experiments integrated with state-of-the-art numerical simulation to reveal the fundamental dynamics of fracture-fluid interactions to characterize the key coupled processes that impact hydrocarbon production. We are also comparing CO2-based fracturing and aqueous fluids to enhance production, greatly reduce waste water, while simultaneously sequestering CO2. We will show pore, core and reservoir scale simulations/experiments that investigate the contolling mechanisms that control hydrocarbon production.

  17. Hydraulic Yaw System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubkier, Søren; Pedersen, Henrik C.; Mørkholt, M.

    a hydraulic soft yaw system, which is able to reduce the loads on the wind turbine significantly. A full scale hydraulic yaw test rig is available for experiments and tests. The test rig is presented as well as the system schematics of the hydraulic yaw system....... the HAWC2 aeroelastic code and an extended model of the NREL 5MW turbine combined with a simplified linear model of the turbine, the parameters of the soft yaw system are optimized to reduce loading in critical components. Results shows that a significant reduction in fatigue and extreme loads to the yaw...... system and rotor shaft when utilizing the soft yaw drive concept compared to the original stiff yaw system. The physical demands of the hydraulic yaw system are furthermore examined for a life time of 20 years. Based on the extrapolated loads, the duty cycles show that it is possible to construct...

  18. Water Hydraulic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conrad, Finn

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents research results using IT-Tools for CAD and dynamic modelling, simulation, analysis, and design of water hydraulic actuators for motion control of machines, lifts, cranes and robots. Matlab/Simulink and CATIA are used as IT-Tools. The contributions include results from on......-going research projects on fluid power and mechatronics based on tap water hydraulic servovalves and linear servo actuators and rotary vane actuators for motion control and power transmission. Development and design a novel water hydraulic rotary vane actuator for robot manipulators. Proposed mathematical...... modelling, control and simulation of a water hydraulic rotary vane actuator applied to power and control a two-links manipulator and evaluate performance. The results include engineering design and test of the proposed simulation models compared with IHA Tampere University’s presentation of research...

  19. Hydraulic hoisting and backfilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauermann, H. B.

    In a country such as South Africa, with its large deep level mining industry, improvements in mining and hoisting techniques could result in substantial savings. Hoisting techniques, for example, may be improved by the introduction of hydraulic hoisting. The following are some of the advantages of hydraulic hoisting as against conventional skip hoisting: (1) smaller shafts are required because the pipes to hoist the same quantity of ore hydraulically require less space in the shaft than does skip hoisting equipment; (2) the hoisting capacity of a mine can easily be increased without the necessity of sinking new shafts. Large savings in capital costs can thus be made; (3) fully automatic control is possible with hydraulic hoisting and therefore less manpower is required; and (4) health and safety conditions will be improved.

  20. Horizontal steam generator thermal-hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubra, O. [SKODA Praha Company, Prague (Czechoslovakia); Doubek, M. [Czech Technical Univ., Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-09-01

    Horizontal steam generators are typical components of nuclear power plants with pressure water reactor type VVER. Thermal-hydraulic behavior of horizontal steam generators is very different from the vertical U-tube steam generator, which has been extensively studied for several years. To contribute to the understanding of the horizontal steam generator thermal-hydraulics a computer program for 3-D steady state analysis of the PGV-1000 steam generator has been developed. By means of this computer program, a detailed thermal-hydraulic and thermodynamic study of the horizontal steam generator PGV-1000 has been carried out and a set of important steam generator characteristics has been obtained. The 3-D distribution of the void fraction and 3-D level profile as functions of load and secondary side pressure have been investigated and secondary side volumes and masses as functions of load and pressure have been evaluated. Some of the interesting results of calculations are presented in the paper.