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Sample records for georgia

  1. Georgia - Energy Rehabilitation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — Gustavson Associates was retained by Millennium Challenge Georgia (MCG) to prepare a model to calculate the economic rate of return (ERR) for rehabilitation work...

  2. Banking Reform in Georgia

    OpenAIRE

    Mercan, Metin

    2006-01-01

    Georgia's banking system restructure began in 1991 when Soviet Union collopsed.This paper tries to compare and constract the performance of banks and banking system between 1999 and 2004 with banks in other transition countries. Although Georgia banking system showed a long processing in banking sector, it is still lags behind other transition countries Central and Eastern Europe. Neverthless.An efficient financial institution and performance will not come without further economic development...

  3. Wind Power in Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-11-01

    Georgia has good wind power potential. Preliminary analyses show that the technical wind power potential in Georgia is good. Meteorological data shows that Georgia has four main areas in Georgia with annual average wind speeds of over 6 m/s and two main areas with 5-6 m/s at 80m. The most promising areas are the high mountain zone of the Great Caucasus, The Kura river valley, The South-Georgian highland and the Southern part of the Georgian Black Sea coast. Czech company Wind Energy Invest has recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Georgian authorities for development of the first wind farm in Georgia, a 50MW wind park in Paravani, Southern Georgia, to be completed in 2014. Annual generation is estimated to 170.00 GWh and the investment estimated to 101 million US$. Wind power is suited to balance hydropower in the Georgian electricity sector Electricity generation in Georgia is dominated by hydro power, constituting 88% of total generation in 2009. Limited storage capacity and significant spring and summer peaks in river flows result in an uneven annual generation profile and winter time shortages that are covered by three gas power plants. Wind power is a carbon-free energy source well suited to balance hydropower, as it is available (often strongest) in the winter and can be exported when there is a surplus. Another advantage with wind power is the lead time for the projects; the time from site selection to operation for a wind power park (approximately 2.5 years) is much shorter than for hydro power (often 6-8 years). There is no support system or scheme for renewable sources in Georgia, so wind power has to compete directly with other energy sources and is in most cases more expensive to build than hydro power. In a country and region with rapidly increasing energy demands, the factors described above nevertheless indicate that there is a commercial niche and a role to play for Georgian wind power. Skra: An example of a wind power development

  4. Georgia : Accounting and Auditing

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of accounting, financial reporting and auditing requirements and practices within the enterprise and financial sectors in Georgia. The report uses International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), International Standards on Auditing (ISA) and draws on international experience and good practices in the field of accounting and audit regulation, including in ...

  5. Georgia's Unusual "Electoral College"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Andrea L.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports a unique partnership between Kennesaw State University and the Georgia state government involving the participation of computer experts in the deployment or electronic voting machines. The effort has received attention in Washington as scientists and government officials search for ways to reform election procedures across the…

  6. My Classroom: Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    Khatuna Kharkheli is an English language teacher in the Faculty of Education, Exact, and Natural Sciences at Gori State Teaching University (GSTU) in Gori, Georgia. With her passion for developing innovative and creative lessons and with her commitment to professional development, Ms. Kharkheli works to inspire her students to achieve success both…

  7. Libraries in Georgia: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Library → Libraries in Georgia URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/georgia.html Libraries in Georgia ... PRINCE AVENUE ATHENS, GA 30606 706-475-3416 http://www.armc.org/mdx.shtml Atlanta Atlanta Medical ...

  8. Anthropogenization in Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana M. Berdzenishvili

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of towns and natural environment interection shows that creating the most convenient living conditions for the public depends on correct and systematic actions, concerning protection and restoration of all natural components, including clean air preservation, cities planting, water and land resources protection. It should be noted that recultivation activities are unsatisfactory and are held on small scale. Despite there is little farmland per head in Georgia, 3000 hectares of agricultural land, more than half of which is allocated for plough lands and perennial trees is lost due to urbanization and industrialization.

  9. 2009 Chatham County Georgia Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LiDAR generated point cloud acquired in spring 2009 for Chatham County, Georgia for the Metropolitan Planning Commission. The data are classified as follows: Class 1...

  10. 2009 Chatham County Georgia Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LiDAR generated point cloud acquired in spring 2009 for Chatham County, Georgia for the Metropolitan Planning Commission. The data are classified as follows: Class...

  11. Distribution of Georgia Oyster Reefs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The feature class in this ESRI Geodatabase contains polygons representing oyster reefs along the Georgia coastal waterways from Chatham County south to Glynn County....

  12. 2010 Coastal Georgia Elevation Project Lidar Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Between January and March 2010, lidar data was collected in southeast/coastal Georgia under a multi-agency partnership between the Coastal Georgia Regional...

  13. Various aspects of sustainability analysis in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. J. Cieszewski; M. Zasada; B. E. Borders; R. Lowe; M. L. Clutter; R. F. Daniels; R. Izlar

    2002-01-01

    In 2001 the Georgia Traditional Industries Program (TIP) sponsored a cooperative study at the D.B. Warnell School of Forest Resources, University of Georgia, to analyze the long-term sustainability of the fiber supply in Georgia. The subject of this study is relevant to a diverse array of disciplines, and it offers the opportunity to explore various aspects of...

  14. Legal abortion in Georgia, 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, A M; Oberle, M; Zaro, S M

    1984-02-01

    According to data reported to the Georgia Department of Human Resources (DHR), the number of induced abortions performedin Georgia in 1980 decreased for the 1st time since 1968 when the state legalized abortion. To verify this reported decrease, the DHR data were compared with statistics obtained by the Alan Guttmacher Institute in a 1980 survey of abortion providers in Georgia. Since the AGI contacts providers directly, its statistics are considered a more accurate reflection of abortions performed. According to the DHR, the number of abortions dropped from 36,579 in 1979 to 33,288 in 1980, a 9% decrease, and the abortion rate fell from 26.6/1000 women ages 15-44 years to 23.9/1000. AGI data indicated a drop from 38,760 abortions in 1979 to 37,890 in 1980, a 2% decrease. Since both sources noted a similar trend despite differences in data collection methods, the 1980 decline in abortion procedures in Georgia is considered to represent a true decline rather than s statistical artifact. The sociodemographic characteristics of women obtaining abortions in Georgia in 1980 were also analyzed on the basis of DHR data. Although the number of abortions in Georgia performed on Georgia residents increased 2.5% from 1979-80 to 90.7%, the abortion ratio for residents decreased from 367.7 to 327.4 abortions/1000 live births. There was little change in the age, race, or marital status distribution of women receiving abortions. The ratio for white women was 317 abortions/1000 live births and that for blacks was 342/1000. The abortion ratio for unmarried women (1166/1000) was 13 times that for married women (88/1000). The number of repeat abortions decreased form 34% in 1979 to 29% in 1980. Moreover, 93% of women obtaining abortions did so in the 1st 12 weeks of gestation compared with 89% in 1979. The percentage of abortions performed in clinics increased from 66.5% in 1979 to 75.3% in 1980, with suction curettage accounting for 85% of all abortions in the 1st 12 weeks of

  15. The Perception of National Security in Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merabishvili Gela

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines how the on-going confrontation between Russia and the West affects perceptions of security in Georgia. Our angle is twofold: in addition to comparing previous National Security Concepts of Georgia we examine both governmental and public perceptions of security in the light of Georgia’s foreign policy priorities, its relationship with neighbouring countries and conflict resolution policy. Since Georgia declares 20 per cent of its territory to be occupied, the article focuses particularly on the crisis in Ukraine and its effect on security debates in Georgia. As the upcoming parliamentary elections in Georgia in autumn 2016 are highly important to maintain the current foreign policy course and secure achievements, the paper also tries to answer how these global and regional developments may be interpreted and reflected in the next National Security Concept of Georgia (whenever it might be published.

  16. 76 FR 59177 - Georgia Disaster #GA-00036

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ... ADMINISTRATION Georgia Disaster GA-00036 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of GEORGIA dated 09/13..., Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street, SW., Suite...

  17. The University System of Georgia's GALILEO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penson, Merryll

    1998-01-01

    The University System of Georgia and the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) built the innovative electronic library GALILEO (GeorgiA LIbrary LEarning Online system). This article describes the cooperation, leadership, and technology that made GALILEO possible; the proposal; planning and implementation; governance; current status; and future…

  18. National Seismic Network of Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumanova, N.; Kakhoberashvili, S.; Omarashvili, V.; Tserodze, M.; Akubardia, D.

    2016-12-01

    Georgia, as a part of the Southern Caucasus, is tectonically active and structurally complex region. It is one of the most active segments of the Alpine-Himalayan collision belt. The deformation and the associated seismicity are due to the continent-continent collision between the Arabian and Eurasian plates. Seismic Monitoring of country and the quality of seismic data is the major tool for the rapid response policy, population safety, basic scientific research and in the end for the sustainable development of the country. National Seismic Network of Georgia has been developing since the end of 19th century. Digital era of the network started from 2003. Recently continuous data streams from 25 stations acquired and analyzed in the real time. Data is combined to calculate rapid location and magnitude for the earthquake. Information for the bigger events (Ml>=3.5) is simultaneously transferred to the website of the monitoring center and to the related governmental agencies. To improve rapid earthquake location and magnitude estimation the seismic network was enhanced by installing additional 7 new stations. Each new station is equipped with coupled Broadband and Strong Motion seismometers and permanent GPS system as well. To select the sites for the 7 new base stations, we used standard network optimization techniques. To choose the optimal sites for new stations we've taken into account geometry of the existed seismic network, topographic conditions of the site. For each site we studied local geology (Vs30 was mandatory for each site), local noise level and seismic vault construction parameters. Due to the country elevation, stations were installed in the high mountains, no accessible in winter due to the heavy snow conditions. To secure online data transmission we used satellite data transmission as well as cell data network coverage from the different local companies. As a result we've already have the improved earthquake location and event magnitudes. We

  19. 2012 Oconee County, Georgia ADS80 Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — All imagery was collected during the 2012 Spring flying season during leaf-off conditions for deciduous vegetation in the State of Georgia. The sun angle was at...

  20. 2013 Athens-Clarke County, Georgia Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of 0.5 foot pixel resolution, four band (RGB, Near IR) orthoimages covering Athens-Clarke Georgia. An orthoimage is remotely sensed image data...

  1. "Explaining the Gender Wage Gap in Georgia"

    OpenAIRE

    Khitarishvili, Tamar

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates gender wage differentials in Georgia between 2000 and 2004. Using ordinary least squares, we find that the gender wage gap in Georgia is substantially higher than in other transition countries. Correcting for sample selection bias using the Heckman approach further increases the gender wage gap. The Blinder Oaxaca decomposition results suggest that most of the wage gap remains unexplained. The explained portion of the gap is almost entirely attributed to industrial variab...

  2. The effects of Georgia's Choice curricular reform model on third grade science scores on the Georgia Criterion Referenced Competency Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phemister, Art W.

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Georgia's Choice reading curriculum on third grade science scores on the Georgia Criterion Referenced Competency Test from 2002 to 2008. In assessing the effectiveness of the Georgia's Choice curriculum model this causal comparative study examined the 105 elementary schools that implemented Georgia's Choice and 105 randomly selected elementary schools that did not elect to use Georgia's Choice. The Georgia's Choice reading program used intensified instruction in an effort to increase reading levels for all students. The study used a non-equivalent control group with a pretest and posttest design to determine the effectiveness of the Georgia's Choice curriculum model. Findings indicated that third grade students in Non-Georgia's Choice schools outscored third grade students in Georgia's Choice schools across the span of the study.

  3. Detailed Performance Calculations: Georgia Institute of Technology Group, Appendix E

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Conditions for system intercomparison; signal strength evaluation; background total source strength; signal-to-noise ratio; performance of present Georgia Tech system; and special comments on current Georgia Tech system are discussed.

  4. Georgia Black Bear Project Report and Status Update

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A 2009 synopsis of black bear populations throughout Georgia (including the south Georgia population) for the purposes of determining distribution and population...

  5. Grapevine phytoplasma disease in Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.M. Chkhaidze

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Results of grapevine yellows disease (GY studies in 2005–2015 are reported. Based on symptoms and Dienes' staining method the disease was detected in Kartli, Kakheti and Guria regions on Vitis vinifera (L. Rkatsiteli, Saperavi, Shavkapito, Tavkveri, Aladasturi, Kachichi, Ganjuri, Chardonnay, Vitis labrusca (L. cultivar Isabella, species hybrid cultivar Noah. The phytoplasmas were also visualized by using electron microscopy. The disease seriously modifies the structure of leaf the grapevine phloem, the chlorophyll content and the functioning of sink–source system. According to anatomical characters the studied cultivars showed a decreasing resistance from Noah, to Aladasturi, Rkatsiteli, Kachichi and Saperavi. In the areas of disease epidemic 12 leafhopper species were identified: Agalmatium grylloides (Fabricius, 1794, Cicadella viridis (Linnaeus, 1758, Dictyophara europaea (Linnaeus, 1767, Empoasca vitis (Gothe, 1875, Erythroneura imeretina Dekanoidze, 1962, Hyalesthes mlokosieviczi Signoret, 1879, Hyalesthes obsoletus Signoret, 1865, Lepironia coleoptrata (Linnaeus, 1758, Pentastiridius leporinus (Linnaeus, 1761, Philaenus spumarius (Linnaeus, 1758, Metcalfa pruinosa (Say, 1830, Ricania japonica (Melichar, 1898, which may be possible vectors of grapevine phytoplasmas in Georgia.

  6. Exploring Homophobia in Tbilisi, Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestvirishvili, Maia; Zurabishvili, Tinatin; Iakobidze, Tamar; Mestvirishvili, Natia

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine statistical predictors of homophobic attitudes among the residents of Tbilisi, Georgia. We analyze 2013 survey data from a representative sample of the Tbilisi adult population. Residents were asked about their attitudes, beliefs, and political and social values in the context of the May 17, 2013 attack on LGBT activists on the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia (IDAHOT). Findings show that homophobia is significantly predicted by male gender, lower levels of education, acceptance of social inequality, nonliberal attitudes, and perceiving homosexuals as a "threat to national security." However, psychological perceptions and personal experiences also indirectly influence homophobic attitudes: the findings suggest that males report homophobic attitudes more often than females do and tend to be even more homophobic when they believe that homosexuality is inborn rather than acquired. The study also found that people without liberal attitudes tend to be more homophobic when they have personal contacts with homosexuals. This article highlights the need for a more comprehensive approach to education and the promotion of liberal values as well as legal equality for LGBTQ individuals to decrease the level of homophobia in Georgian society and, specifically, in Tbilisi.

  7. 30 CFR 910.700 - Georgia Federal program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Enviromental Protection Division, pertaining to solid waste management. (5) Georgia Seed Laws and Rules and....700 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA § 910.700 Georgia Federal...

  8. DVD Database Astronomical Manuscripts in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonia, I.; Simonia, Ts.; Abuladze, T.; Chkhikvadze, N.; Samkurashvili, L.; Pataridze, K.

    2016-06-01

    Little known and unknown Georgian, Persian, and Arabic astronomical manuscripts of IX-XIX centuries are kept in the centers, archives, and libraries of Georgia. These manuscripts has a form of treaties, handbooks, texts, tables, fragments, and comprises various theories, cosmological models, star catalogs, calendars, methods of observations. We investigated this large material and published DVD database Astronomical Manuscripts in Georgia. This unique database contains information about astronomical manuscripts as original works. It contains also descriptions of Georgian translations of Byzantine, Arabic and other sources. The present paper is dedicated to description of obtained results and DVD database. Copies of published DVD database are kept in collections of the libraries of: Ilia State University, Georgia; Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, UK; Congress of the USA, and in other centers.

  9. Historical Earthquakes and Active Structure for Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsereteli, Nino; Varazanashivli, Otar

    2014-05-01

    Long-term seismic history is an important foundation for reliable assessment of seismic hazard and risk. Therefore, completeness of earthquake catalogues in the longest historical part is very important. Survived historical sources, as well as special researches from the institutes, museums, libraries and archives in Georgia, the Caucasus and the Middle East indicate to high level of seismicity which entailed numerous human casualties and destruction on the territory of Georgia during the historical period. The study and detailed analysis of these original documents and researches have allowed us to create a new catalogue of historical earthquakes of Georgia from 1250 BC to 1900 AD. The method of the study is based on a multidisciplinary approach, i.e. on the joint use of methods of history and paleoseismology, archeoseismology, seismotectonics, geomorphology, etc. We present here a new parametric catalogue of 44 historic earthquakes of Georgia and a full "descriptor" of all the phenomena described in it. Constructed on its basis, the summarized map of the distribution of maximum damage in the historical period (before 1900) on the territory of Georgia clearly shows the main features of the seismic field during this period. In particular, in the axial part and the southern slope of the Greater Caucasus there is a seismic gap, which was filled in 1991 by the strongest earthquake and its aftershocks in Racha. In addition, it is also obvious that very high seismic activity in the central and eastern parts of the Javakheti highland is not described in historical materials and this fact requires further searches of various kinds of sources that contain data about historical earthquakes. We hope that this catalogue will enable to create a new joint (instrumental and historical) parametric earthquake catalogue of Georgia and will serve to assess the real seismic hazard and risk in the country.

  10. Georgia's Surface-Water Resources and Streamflow Monitoring Network, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2008-01-01

    Surface water provides 5 billion gallons per day, or 78 percent, of the total freshwater used (including thermoelectric) in Georgia (Fanning, 2003). Climate, geology, and landforms control the natural distribution of Georgia's water resources. Georgia is a 'headwaters' State, with most of the rivers beginning in northern Georgia and increasing in size downstream (see map at right for major watersheds). Surface water is the primary source of water in the northern one-half of the State, including the Atlanta metropolitan area, where limited ground-water resources are difficult to obtain. In Georgia, periodic droughts exacerbate competition for surface-water supplies. Many areas of Georgia also face a threat of flooding because of spring frontal thunderstorms and the potential for hurricanes from both the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. As the population of Georgia increases, these flood risks will increase with development in flood-risk zones, particularly in the coastal region.

  11. Geological hazard monitoring system in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaprindashvili, George

    2017-04-01

    Georgia belongs to one of world's most complex mountainous regions according to the scale and frequency of Geological processes and damage caused to population, farmlands, and Infrastructure facilities. Geological hazards (landslide, debrisflow/mudflow, rockfall, erosion and etc.) are affecting many populated areas, agricultural fields, roads, oil and gas pipes, high-voltage electric power transmission towers, hydraulic structures, and tourist complexes. Landslides occur almost in all geomorphological zones, resulting in wide differentiation in the failure types and mechanisms and in the size-frequency distribution. In Georgia, geological hazards triggered by: 1. Activation of highly intense earthquakes; 2. Meteorological events provoking the disaster processes on the background of global climatic change; 3. Large-scale Human impact on the environment. The prediction and monitoring of Geological Hazards is a very wide theme, which involves different researchers from different spheres. Geological hazard monitoring is essential to prevent and mitigate these hazards. In past years in Georgia several monitoring system, such as Ground-based geodetic techniques, Debrisflow Early Warning System (EWS) were installed on high sensitive landslide and debrisflow areas. This work presents description of Geological hazard monitoring system in Georgia.

  12. Human cutaneous anthrax, Georgia 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracalik, Ian; Malania, Lile; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Manvelyan, Julietta; Bakanidze, Lela; Imnadze, Paata; Tsanava, Shota; Blackburn, Jason K

    2014-02-01

    We assessed the occurrence of human cutaneous anthrax in Georgia during 2010--2012 by examining demographic and spatial characteristics of reported cases. Reporting increased substantially, as did clustering of cases near urban centers. Control efforts, including education about anthrax and livestock vaccination, can be directed at areas of high risk.

  13. Ibsen in Georgia: milestones in the reception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakhaber Loria

    2015-02-01

    Ibsen was and is constantly referred to in Georgian literary studies, not least in connection with Georgian writers. In post-Soviet Georgia, Ibsen is very much on the agenda, and his plays are produced and discussed as they always have been.

  14. Climate change vulnerability assessment in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binita KC; J. Marshall Shepherd; Cassandra Johnson Gaither

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is occurring in the Southeastern United States, and one manifestation is changes in frequency and intensity of extreme events. A vulnerability assessment is performed in the state of Georgia (United States) at the county level from 1975 to 2012 in decadal increments. Climate change vulnerability is typically measured as a function of exposure to physical...

  15. Human Cutaneous Anthrax, Georgia 2010–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracalik, Ian; Malania, Lile; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Manvelyan, Julietta; Bakanidze, Lela; Imnadze, Paata; Tsanava, Shota

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the occurrence of human cutaneous anthrax in Georgia during 2010–-2012 by examining demographic and spatial characteristics of reported cases. Reporting increased substantially, as did clustering of cases near urban centers. Control efforts, including education about anthrax and livestock vaccination, can be directed at areas of high risk. PMID:24447721

  16. 77 FR 51099 - Georgia Disaster #GA-00046

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-23

    ... ADMINISTRATION Georgia Disaster GA-00046 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY...: 05/14/2013. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration... CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street...

  17. Progressive Education in Georgia: Tradition or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopaliani, Bella; Harnisch, Delwyn L.; Doliashvili, Nana; Guetterman, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Despite differences among progressive educators, they share the conviction that democracy means active participation by all citizens in the social, political, and economic decisions of their countries. The aim of this paper is to explore how Georgia is meeting goals and perspectives of progressive education by widely implementing civic education…

  18. Jazz in Georgia Schools: Twin Residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Mark; Blackman, Gary

    1984-01-01

    A very successful artist-in-education program in which jazz musicians introduced elementary students in Augusta (Georgia) to jazz music is described. Students were involved in many activities, including instrumental improvisation, singing, reading staff notation, choreography, and composing jazz. (RM)

  19. Sixty Years of Creationism in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladin, Kenneth S.

    1983-01-01

    Examines sociopolitical conditions that allowed pro-creationist and anti-evolutionist movements to thrive in Georgia and other southern States. Describes efforts by leading citizens to influence legislation toward propagation of the creationist philosophy, especially in education. Stresses the need for scientists and educators to oppose…

  20. MODELING MERCURY FATE IN SEVEN GEORGIA WATERSHEDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field and modeling studies were conducted in support of total maximum daily loads (TMDLs)for mercury in six south Georgia rivers and the Savannah River. Mercury is introduced to these rivers primarily by atmospheric deposition, with minor point source loadings. To produce mercu...

  1. Sixty Years of Creationism in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladin, Kenneth S.

    1983-01-01

    Examines sociopolitical conditions that allowed pro-creationist and anti-evolutionist movements to thrive in Georgia and other southern States. Describes efforts by leading citizens to influence legislation toward propagation of the creationist philosophy, especially in education. Stresses the need for scientists and educators to oppose…

  2. Milkweed, stink bugs, and Georgia cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    In peanut-cotton farmscapes in Georgia, stink bugs, i.e., Nezara viridula (L.)(Say) and Chinavia hilaris (Say), develop in peanut and then disperse at the crop-to-crop interface to feed on fruit in cotton. The main objective of this study was to examine the influence of a habitat of tropical milkwe...

  3. Competition on the Georgia Education Marketplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnidze, Archil; Maglakelidze, Shorena

    2017-01-01

    Georgia implemented a nationwide, full scale school voucher program in 2005. The new voucher plan was designed with the intent to provide equitable distribution and efficient utilization of financial and human resources. By introducing the voucher scheme, the government hoped to promote competition among public as well as private schools to push…

  4. Obstetric Provider Maldistribution: Georgia, USA, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spelke, Bridget; Zertuche, Adrienne D; Rochat, Roger

    2016-07-01

    Objectives In 2010, Georgia had the nation's highest maternal mortality rate, sixteenth highest infant mortality rate, and a waning obstetrician/gynecologist (ob/gyn) workforce. Statewide ob/gyn workforce data, however, masked obstetric-specific care shortages and regional variation in obstetric services. The Georgia Maternal and Infant Health Research Group thereby assessed each Georgia region's obstetric provider workforce to identify service-deficient areas. Methods We identified 63 birthing facilities in the 82 Primary Care Service Areas (PCSAs) outside metropolitan Atlanta and interviewed nurse managers and others to assess the age, sex, and expected departure year of each delivering professional. Using accepted annual delivery rates of 155 per obstetrician (OB), 100 per certified nurse midwife (CNM), and 70 per family medicine physician (FP) we converted obstetric providers into "OB equivalents" to standardize obstetric services available in any given area. Using facility births and computed OB equivalents (contemporary and 2020 estimates), we calculated current and projected average annual births per provider (AABP) for each PCSA, categorizing its obstetric provider workforce as "adequate" (AABP  166). We mapped results using ArcGIS. Results Of 82 surveyed PCSAs, 52 % (43) were deficient in obstetric care; 16 % (13) had a shortage and 37 % (30) lacked obstetric providers entirely. There were no delivering FPs in 89 % (73) of PCSAs and no CNMs in 70 % (56). If Georgia fails to recruit delivering providers, 72 % (58/77) of PCSAs will have deficient or no obstetric care by 2020. Conclusions Obstetric provider shortages in Georgia hinder access to prenatal and delivery services. Care-deficient areas will expand if recruitment and retention of delivering professionals does not improve.

  5. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Georgia. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2011 Georgia State Code base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Georgia.

  6. Astronomy in Georgia - Present Status and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todua, M.

    2016-09-01

    Astronomy in Georgia is generally represented in Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory found in 1932. It is one of the leading scientific institutes in the country. Main fields of research are solar system bodies (including near-Earth asteroids), various aspects of solar physics, stellar astronomy (including binary stars and open clusters), extragalactic objects (AGNs), theoretical astrophysics, cosmology, atmospheric and solar-terrestrial physics. Several telescopes are operational today, as well as the instruments for atmospheric studies. In 2007 the Observatory was integrated with Ilia State University, merging scientific research and education which facilitated the growth of a new generation of researchers. There are groups of astronomers and astrophysicists in other Georgian universities and institutions as well. Georgian scientists collaborate with research centers and universities worldwide. Research groups participate in various international scientific projects. The interest in astronomy in Georgia has been growing, which increases future perspectives of its development in the country.

  7. Russia-Georgia Conflict and Beyond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Yujun; Ma Zongshi

    2008-01-01

    Yet another Post 9/11 historical event indicating a significant turning point in the Post-Cold War era, Russia-Georgia conflict represents a remarkable change in the international strategy of a resurgent Russia. It also signifies that former Soviet republics are still groping for a new identity and that a new round of realignment will persist in the vast Eurasia region. The conflict reveals declining U.S. global control, flawed European integration, and NATO embarrassment. To a certain extent, it exposes chaos brought about by international nonpolarity and world governance vacuum. It also highlights what serious consequences can a double standard inflict on the principles of international law. A reasonable arrangement for global security and economic growth is therefore challenging the resolve and wisdom of international strategists. Actually fierce geopolitical rivalry for energy resources is at work behind the Russia-Georgia conflict. This will further compound the international energy strategic environment.

  8. Development of the banking system in Georgia

    OpenAIRE

    Kbiltsetskhlashvili, Tea

    2008-01-01

    Over fifteen years have passed since the beginning of the reconstruction of the transition countries' banking systems. The analysis of the development of commercial banking in Georgia and other transition countries points out several features, which are typical for the starting period of financial sector reforms. It turns out from this article that the success of the reconstruction of banking sector in certain countries differs substantially. Since the starting of reforms the Georgian banking...

  9. Water resources activities, Georgia District, 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casteel, Carolyn A.; Ballew, Mary D.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, through its Water Resources Division , investigates the occurrence, quantity, quality, distribution, and movement of the surface and underground water that composes the Nation 's water resources. Much of the work is a cooperative effort in which planning and financial support are shared by state and local governments and other federal agencies. This report contains a brief description of the water-resources investigations in Georgia in which the Geological Survey participates, and a list of selected references. Water-resources data for the 1985 water year for Georgia consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and groundwater levels. These data include discharge records for 108 gaging stations; water quality for 43 continuous stations, 109 periodic stations, and miscellaneous sites; peak stage and discharge only for 130 crest-stage partial-record stations and 44 miscellaneous sites; and water levels of 27 observation wells. Nineteen Georgia District projects are summarized. (Lantz-PTT)

  10. European Integration and Business Enviroment in Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nestan Abramishvili

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPaper analyzes the impact that the process of Georgia’s European integration have had on country’s business environment. A significant changes have occurred in Georgia in the last decade, which had an influence on the status of the current business environment. Especially, it is worth to mention the aspiration of the country for European Integration. Georgia has carried out a number of recommendations and requirements set by the European Union, on the way to this goal, which has changed the country's business environment.The negotiations between the EU and Georgia about the “Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Area (DCFTA”  was officially opened on 28th February, 2012. Prior to the opening discussions about “DCFTA”, the European Commission singled out four main areas of country’s economy, where conducted fundamental reforms became precondition to open diplomacy. These sectors were: technical barriers related to the EU trade regulations, sanitary and phytosanitary measures, intellectual property rights and competition policy. In addition, the European Commission together with the International Labour Organization asked for changing of the Labour Code and directly linked implemented reforms to progress, which should be reached during the talks with Europe about “DCFTA”. Key words: Business environment, European integration, DCFTA, reforms. 

  11. Corruption Risks of Private Tutoring: Case of Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobakhidze, Magda Nutsa

    2014-01-01

    The paper focuses on teacher-supplied private tutoring in the context of post-Soviet Georgia, and elucidates the ways in which teacher-supplied private tutoring can be related to educational corruption. The paper draws on data from in-depth interviews of 18 school teachers in different parts of Georgia in 2013. The findings of the qualitative…

  12. Corruption Risks of Private Tutoring: Case of Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobakhidze, Magda Nutsa

    2014-01-01

    The paper focuses on teacher-supplied private tutoring in the context of post-Soviet Georgia, and elucidates the ways in which teacher-supplied private tutoring can be related to educational corruption. The paper draws on data from in-depth interviews of 18 school teachers in different parts of Georgia in 2013. The findings of the qualitative…

  13. Physical activity in Georgia state parks: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln R. Larson; Jason W. Whiting; Gary T. Green

    2012-01-01

    This pilot study assessed the role of Georgia State Parks in the promotion of physical activity among different racial/ethnic and age groups. Data were collected at three state parks in north Georgia during the summer of 2009 using two research methods: behavior observations (N=2281) and intercept surveys (N=473).

  14. Integrating Engineering Design into Technology Education: Georgia's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denson, Cameron D.; Kelley, Todd R.; Wicklein, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    This descriptive research study reported on Georgia's secondary level (grades 6-12) technology education programs capability to incorporate engineering concepts and/or engineering design into their curriculum. Participants were middle school and high school teachers in the state of Georgia who currently teach technology education. Participants…

  15. Perceived Effectiveness of Clinical E-Learning for Georgia Midwives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Adrienne

    2014-01-01

    In the state of Georgia, approximately nine out of every 1,000 babies die during birth and approximately 18.6 out of every 1,000 women die from a pregnancy-related cause (Georgia Department of Public Health, 2011). Continuing to build capacities for the continuing education of midwives--specifically Certified Nurse Midwives (CNMs)--can ensure they…

  16. 77 FR 64946 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Maysville, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-24

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Maysville, Georgia AGENCY: Federal Communications... filed by Appalachian Broadcasting Company, Inc., proposing the allotment of Channel 265A at Maysville... Broadcasting Company, Post Office Drawer E, 233 Big A Road, Toccoa, Georgia 30577. FOR FURTHER...

  17. Health Reforms and Public Health in Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raminashvili, D.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Starting from 90‘th, the Government of Georgia (GoG made several attempts to transform Georgian health care system into one with improved efficiency, accessibility, and quality services. Mandatory social health insurance which was introduced in the 1990s was abolished and private health insurance has been promoted as its replacement. The main principle of health care reform since 2006 was the transition towards complete marketization of the health care sector: private provision, private purchasing, liberal regulation, and minimum supervision.This paper aims to analyze an impact of ongoing reforms on public health and population health status.MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic review of the available literature was conducted through national and international organization reports; key informant interviews were conducted with major stakeholders. RESULTS: The country has attained critical achievements in relation to improved maternal and child health, national responses to HIV, TB and Malaria. Life expectancy has increased from 70.3 years in 1995 to 75.1 years in 2010. Under-5 mortality indicator has improved from 45.3 to 16.4 per 1000 live birth in 2005-2010 meaning a 64% decrease. However, Georgia is still facing a number of critical challenges securing better health for the population. Cardiovascular diseases are by far the largest cause of mortality, respiratory diseases are the leading cause of morbidity and have doubled during last decade. Georgia has one of the highest rates of male smoking in the world (over 50%.CONCLUSION: Governmental efforts in health promotion and disease prevention can have significant impact on health status by preventing chronic diseases and detecting health problems at a treatable stage. Government should consider increasing funding for public health and prevention programmes with the focus on prevention of the main risk factors affecting the population’s health: tobacco and drug use and unsafe

  18. The Crusades and the Kingdom of Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roin Metreveli

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Crusades had a significant impact upon the fate of the Georgian state. The Georgian royal court used the Europeans’ undertakings to its own advantage. The Georgian king David IV the Builder (ruled from 1089 to 1125 was well-aware of objectives pursued by the Crusade wars. The ruler’s clever approach to laying out the nation’s policy, predicated upon the relevant characteristics of the then-existing international situation, resulted in the Crusades overpowering the might of the Seljuq Turks, which successfully facilitated the stepping-up of efforts to wage a war of liberation on the part of the Georgians. In the East, David IV the Builder was viewed as a protector of Christianity. He, concurrently, was seen as a ruler with a tolerant policy toward Moslems and firm ties with the Moslem world, which was due to a special state of affairs inside and outside Georgia. Thus, the link between the Kingdom of Georgia and the Crusades hinged on certain political circumstances. Among the rulers known to have had dealings with the Crusaders are George III (1156–1187, Tamar the Great (1181–1213, George IV Lasha (1213–1222, Rusudan (1223–1245, and some others. Some of the original sources, like letters from foreign kings, mention with great regard the name of George V the Brilliant (1314–1346, considered a eulogist of Jerusalem’s holy places and a mainstay of Christianity. His activities did not have a direct linkage with the Crusades but, nonetheless, were a continuation of the struggle of their ideology. The solicitude of the Kingdom of Georgia toward Christianity would, eventually, pay off by helping boost its prestige and ensure its high standing internationally.

  19. Astronomical Beliefs in Medieval Georgia: Innovative Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Jefferson; Orchiston, W.; Stephenson, F.

    2014-01-01

    Written sources from medieval Georgia show, among other things, how astronomical ideas were adapted on the periphery of the Byzantine and Islamic worlds. In this paper, we investigate a number of Georgian beliefs about the heavens from a calendrical work and a celestial prognostication text, but also from less expected sources including the medieval life of a saint and an epic poem. For the most part, these sources were derived from Byzantine or Persian models. We show the extent to which the sources nevertheless conform to a specifically Georgian view of the cosmos. We argue that, in so doing, medieval Georgian authors employed several innovative approaches hitherto unnoticed by modern scholars.

  20. Geodiversity of Georgia: valorization of geotouristic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowicz, Anna

    2017-04-01

    Georgia, as a country with a high geodiversity, boasts an infinite variety of landscapes, wealth of geological formations and surface water systems. These attributes have a significant influence on the development of geo-touristic potential. The prevalence of geotourism can positively improve the situation in the country. Unfortunately, many interesting places are not sufficiently well utilized, which makes them difficult to access. There is also a failure to provide or disseminate information about these places to visitors. Various sources describe numerous locations, but none of them carry a full inventory or database of categorized objects. Inventory based on studies and field work helped to create categorized geosites in Georgia (including the occupied territories). Evidential cards with detailed descriptions were prepared for every cataloged object. Categorized geosites were used to carry out a valorisation of geotouristic objects and geodiversity evaluation by QGIS and ArcGIS. Valorization of geotouristic potential determined two regions with an exceptionally huge attractiveness and geodiversity on a national scale. Results of the evaluation and valorisation were visualised and presented as an application in ArcGIS Online platform.

  1. Georgia tech catalog of gravitational waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Karan; Healy, James; Clark, James A.; London, Lionel; Laguna, Pablo; Shoemaker, Deirdre

    2016-10-01

    This paper introduces a catalog of gravitational waveforms from the bank of simulations by the numerical relativity effort at Georgia Tech. Currently, the catalog consists of 452 distinct waveforms from more than 600 binary black hole simulations: 128 of the waveforms are from binaries with black hole spins aligned with the orbital angular momentum, and 324 are from precessing binary black hole systems. The waveforms from binaries with non-spinning black holes have mass-ratios q = m 1/m 2 ≤ 15, and those with precessing, spinning black holes have q ≤ 8. The waveforms expand a moderate number of orbits in the late inspiral, the burst during coalescence, and the ring-down of the final black hole. Examples of waveforms in the catalog matched against the widely used approximate models are presented. In addition, predictions of the mass and spin of the final black hole by phenomenological fits are tested against the results from the simulation bank. The role of the catalog in interpreting the GW150914 event and future massive binary black-hole search in LIGO is discussed. The Georgia Tech catalog is publicly available at einstein.gatech.edu/catalog.

  2. COHUTTA WILDERNESS, GEORGIA AND TENNESSEE AND HEMP TOP ROADLESS AREA, GEORGIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gair, Jacob E.; Gazdik, Gertrude C.

    1984-01-01

    A survey has found little or no promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral-resources in the Cohutta Wilderness and the adjacent Hemp Top Roadless Area. The Cohutta Wilderness is located mainly in northern Georgia and extends a small distance into southeastern Tennessee; the Hemp Top Roadless Area borders part of the Cohutta Wilderness on the east and extends southward from the Georgia-Tennessee line. The study area is underlain by slightly metamorphosed folded and faulted sedimentary rocks of late Precambrian age. Detailed sampling in the vicinity of the known gold-bearing and tin-bearing samples might outline small areas of low-grade mineralization. The sedimentary rocks which are buried many thousands of feet beneath the surface of the Cohutta area have an unknown potential for oil and gas - probably gas at the inferred depth of burial and temperatures implicit at such depth. This potential could only be verified by a program of deep drilling.

  3. Conference Report: 5th Annual Georgia Conference on Information Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Ziegler

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The 5th annual Georgia Conference on Information Literacy took place in Savannah, Georgia on October 3-4, 2008. Since its inception, this conference has drawn participants from across the United States and even a few from abroad. Jointly sponsored by the Zach S. Henderson Library, the Department of Writing and Linguistics, the College of Education, and the Center for Continuing Education at Georgia Southern University, the conference offers both theoretical and practical discussions of the complex issues involved in teaching students how to find, interpret and use information in emerging electronic technologies against the backdrop of one of America’s loveliest cities.

  4. Simulation of flood hydrographs for Georgia streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Ernest J.

    1987-01-01

    Flood hydrographs are needed for the design of many highway drainage structures and embankments. A method for simulating these flood hydrographs at ungaged sites in Georgia is presented in this report. The O'Donnell method was used to compute unit hydrographs and lagtimes for 355 floods at 80 gaging stations. An average unit hydrograph and an average lagtime were computed for each station. These average unit hydrographs were transformed to unit hydrographs having durations of one-fourth, one-third, one-half, and three-fourths lagtime, then reduced to dimensionless terms by dividing the time by lagtime and the discharge by peak discharge. Hydrographs were simulated for these 355 floods and their widths were compared with the widths of the observed hydrographs at 50 and 75 percent of peak flow. The dimensionless hydrograph based on one-half lagtime duration provided the best fit of the observed data. Multiple regression analysis was then used to define relations between lagtime and certain physical basin characteristics; of these characteristics, drainage area and slope were found to be significant for the rural-stream equations and drainage area, slope, and impervious area were found to be significant for the Atlanta urban-stream equation. A hydrograph can be simulated from the dimensionless hydrograph, the peak discharge of a specific recurrence interval, and the lagtime obtained from regression equations for any site in Georgia having a drainage area of less than 500 square miles. For simulating hydrographs at sites having basins larger than 500 square miles, the U.S. Geological Survey computer model CONROUT can be used. This model routes streamflow from an upstream channel location to a user-defined location downstream. The product of CONROUT is a simulated discharge hydrograph for the downstream site that has a peak discharge of a specific recurrence interval.

  5. An Economic Valuation of Biotic Pollination Services in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, Ashley S; Bergstrom, John C; Ferreira, Susana; Covich, Alan P; Delaplane, Keith S

    2015-04-01

    As agriculture faces documented decline in bees and other insect pollinators, empirical assessments of potential economic losses are critical for contextualizing the impacts of this decline and for prioritizing research needs. For the state of Georgia, we show that the annual economic value of biotic pollinators is substantial--US$367 million, equivalent to 13 percent of the total production value of crops studied and 3 percent of the total production value of Georgia's agricultural sector. Our unique Geographic Information Systems analysis reveals an irregular pattern of vulnerability. While the Georgia counties displaying the highest economic values of pollination are clustered in southern Georgia, those with the highest dependency on pollinators in terms of their contribution to crop production value are more dispersed throughout the state.

  6. EAARL Topography--Potato Creek Watershed, Georgia, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the Potato Creek watershed in Georgia was produced from remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation...

  7. EAARL Topography--Potato Creek Watershed, Georgia, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the Potato Creek watershed in Georgia was produced from remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation...

  8. Savannah, Georgia Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Savannah, Georgia Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST...

  9. Population Parameters and Harvest Characteristics of Black Bears in Georgia

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes findings of black bear distribution and population trends throughout Georgia and evaluates black bear harvest trends from 1992 to 2002....

  10. CUSTOMS MODERNIZATION IN GEORGIA:CHANGES, OUTCOMES, AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES

    OpenAIRE

    Chikovani, Elene; Avaliani, Mariam

    2011-01-01

    Since 2004, Georgia has been carrying out systemic reform aimed at modernizing the old, corrupted, customs system. The country intends to bring current legislation into harmony with European legislative regulations, increase revenue mobilization through improved customs administration, simplify customs procedures, and refine the customer culture. Georgia has been applying numerous innovative approaches throughout this process. The article focuses on the important challenges in the customs sys...

  11. Archaeological Survey and Testing at Hunter Army Airfield, Savannah, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    1978; DePratter 1975; DePratter and Howard 1977). Apparently at least some of these materials were deposited as terrestial sites during a low stand...DePratter, Chester B. and J. D. Howard 1977 History of Shoreline Changes Determined by Archaeological Dating: Georgia Coast, U.S.A. Transactions of the Gulf...relationships. Des Barres, J-F. W. 1780 The Coast, Rivers and Inlets of the Province of Georgi -. Map Collection (#61), Georgia Historical Society

  12. Entrepreneur for Equality: Governor Rufus Brown Bullock and the Politics of Race and Commerce in Post-Civil War Georgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duncan, Russell

    Rufus Bullock, reconstruction, Georgia, United States history, African American, race relations, Gilded age......Rufus Bullock, reconstruction, Georgia, United States history, African American, race relations, Gilded age...

  13. Groundwater conditions in Georgia, 2012–14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Michael F.; Painter, Jaime A.

    2016-12-07

    The U.S. Geological Survey collects groundwater data and conducts studies to monitor hydrologic conditions, better define groundwater resources, and address problems related to water supply, water use, and water quality. In Georgia, water levels were monitored continuously at 181 wells during calendar year 2012, 185 wells during calendar year 2013, and at 171 wells during calendar year 2014. Because of missing data or short periods of record (less than 3 years) for several of these wells, a total of 164 wells are discussed in this report. These wells include 17 in the surficial aquifer system, 18 in the Brunswick aquifer system and equivalent sediments, 68 in the Upper Floridan aquifer, 15 in the Lower Floridan aquifer and underlying units, 10 in the Claiborne aquifer, 1 in the Gordon aquifer, 11 in the Clayton aquifer, 16 in the Cretaceous aquifer system, 2 in Paleozoic-rock aquifers, and 6 in crystalline-rock aquifers. Data from the well network indicate that water levels generally rose during the 2012 through 2014 calendar-year period, with water levels rising in 151 wells, declining in 12, and remained about the same in 1. Water levels declined over the long-term period of record at 94 wells, increased at 60 wells, and remained relatively constant at 10 wells.In addition to continuous water-level data, periodic water-level measurements were collected and used to construct potentiometric-surface maps for the Upper Floridan aquifer in the following areas in Georgia: the Brunswick-Glynn County area during August 2012 and October 2014 and in the Albany-Dougherty County area during November 2012 and November 2014. Periodic water-level measurements were also collected and used to construct potentiometric surface maps for the Cretaceous aquifer system in the Augusta-Richmond County area during August 2012 and July 2014. In general, water levels in these areas were higher during 2014 than during 2012; however, the configuration of the potetiometric surface in each of

  14. Tectonic architecture of central Georgia Eastern Piedmont

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maher, H.D. Jr.; Brueggemann, M.; Pospisil, M. (Univ. of Nebraska, Omaha, NE (United States). Dept. of Geography and Geology); Boland, I.; Pray, J.; Secor, D.T.; Steinke, T.; West, T. (Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences); Sacks, P. (Univ. of Minnesota, Duluth, MN (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Recent work suggests the following for the tectonic architecture of the central Georgia Eastern Piedmont. The Alleghenian-age, Modoc fault zone (MZ), first defined in S. Carolina, continues along strike (c. S60W) at least to the Ocmulgee R. (net length = 250 km), where it converges with the Ocmulgee (OF) and Goat Rock (GR) faults. Diverging to the S from the MZ is a sharp contact between migmatitic amphibolites and gneisses of the Sinclair Lake terrane (SLt) and lower grade metapelites and metapsammites of the Milledgeville terrane (Mt). Both are introduced by post-kinematic granites (likely Alleghanian). A previously undescribed, 10 km long ultramafite belt within SLt, the Shoulderbone zone (Sz), is concordantly foliated with respect to surrounding rocks--hence emplacement is considered as pre- or synkinematic. Numerous smaller ultramafite bodies exist within SLt, Metavolcanic rocks N of SLt and the intervening MZ are interpreted as Carolina slate belt (CSB) rocks extending farther SW than often depicted. Arc volcanism and plutonism, terrane amalgamation and subsequent Alleghanian plutonism, dextral shear zones (some with extensional components), and local tight folding contributed to the present architecture. Locally, accretionary wedge material may exist, but the authors find published views and maps describing the entire area as primarily an accretionary wedge thrust stack to be inappropriate.

  15. Georgia Tech Catalog of Gravitational Waveforms

    CERN Document Server

    Jani, Karan; Clark, James A; London, Lionel; Laguna, Pablo; Shoemaker, Deirdre

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a catalog of gravitational waveforms from the bank of simulations by the numerical relativity effort at Georgia Tech. Currently, the catalog consists of 452 distinct waveforms from more than 600 binary black hole simulations: 128 of the waveforms are from binaries with black hole spins aligned with the orbital angular momentum, and 324 are from precessing binary black hole systems. The waveforms from binaries with non-spinning black holes have mass-ratios $q = m_1/m_2 \\le 15$, and those with precessing, spinning black holes have $q \\le 8$. The waveforms expand a moderate number of orbits in the late inspiral, the burst during coalescence, and the ring-down of the final black hole. Examples of waveforms in the catalog matched against the widely used approximate models are presented. In addition, predictions of the mass and spin of the final black hole by phenomenological fits are tested against the results from the simulation bank. The role of the catalog in interpreting the GW150914 even...

  16. 78 FR 28633 - Georgia Pacific LLC, Also Doing Business as Duluth Hardboard Plant, Specialty Manufacturing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    ... Employment and Training Administration Georgia Pacific LLC, Also Doing Business as Duluth Hardboard Plant..., applicable to workers of Georgia Pacific, LLC, also doing business as Duluth Hardboard Plant, Specialty...-W-82,035 is hereby issued as follows: All workers of Georgia Pacific, LLC, also doing business...

  17. 40 CFR 81.114 - Augusta (Georgia)-Aiken (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Augusta (Georgia)-Aiken (South... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.114 Augusta (Georgia)-Aiken (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Augusta (Georgia)-Aiken (South Carolina) Interstate...

  18. Biomass for bioethanol production and technological process in Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadiradze, K.; Phirosmanashvili, N. [Association for Farmers Rights Defence, Tbilisi (Georgia)

    2010-07-01

    This study discussed the use of biomass for bioethanol production in Georgia and its potential impacts on the country's rural economy. Eighty-five per cent of the country's lands are forested or used for agricultural purposes, and more than 56 per cent of the adult population is involved in the agricultural sector. The privatization of land in post-Soviet Georgia has resulted in the creation of a new social class of land-owners. The use of biofuel in petroleum fuel has significantly lowered greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the country. The biofuel is produced using local agricultural and forest wastes. Use of the biofuel has lowered the country's reliance on imported oil and has increased its energy security. The production of ethanol in Georgia has resulted in significant socio-economic benefits in the country.

  19. Grapevine phenology and climate change in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cola, G.; Failla, O.; Maghradze, D.; Megrelidze, L.; Mariani, L.

    2016-10-01

    While the climate of Western Europe has been deeply affected by the abrupt climate change that took place in the late `1980s of the twentieth century, a similar signal is detected only few years later, in 1994, in Georgia. Grapevine phenology is deeply influenced by climate and this paper aimed to analyze how phenological timing changed before and after the climatic change of 1994. Availability of thermal resources in the two climatic phases for the five altitudinal belts in the 0-1250-m range was analyzed. A phenological dataset gathered in two experimental sites during the period 2012-2014, and a suitable thermal dataset was used to calibrate a phenological model based on the normal approach and able to describe BBCH phenological stages 61 (beginning of flowering), 71 (fruit set), and 81 (veraison). Calibration was performed for four relevant Georgian varieties (Mtsvane Kakhuri, Rkatsiteli, Ojaleshi, and Saperavi). The model validation was performed on an independent 3-year dataset gathered in Gorizia (Italy). Furthermore, in the case of variety Rkatsiteli, the model was applied to the 1974-2013 thermal time series in order to obtain phenological maps of the Georgian territory. Results show that after the climate change of 1994, Rkatsiteli showed an advance, more relevant at higher altitudes where the whole increase of thermal resource was effectively translated in phenological advance. For instance the average advance of veraison was 5.9 days for 250-500 m asl belt and 18.1 days for 750-1000 m asl). On the other hand, at lower altitudes, phenological advance was depleted by superoptimal temperatures. As a final result, some suggestions for the adaptation of viticultural practices to the current climatic phase are provided.

  20. Outcomes of Universal Access to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) in Georgia

    OpenAIRE

    Tengiz Tsertsvadze; Nikoloz Chkhartishvili; Lali Sharvadze; Natia Dvali; Otar Chokoshvili; Pati Gabunia; Akaki Abutidze; Kenrad Nelson; Jack DeHovitz; Carlos del Rio

    2011-01-01

    Since 2004, Georgia achieved universal access to free antiretroviral therapy (ART). A retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the outcomes of Georgia's ART program. The study included adult patients enrolled in the ART program from 2004 through 2009. Of 752 patients, 76% were men, 60% were injection drug users (IDU), 59% had a history of an AIDS-defining illness, and 53% were coinfected with hepatitis C. The median baseline CD4 cell count was 141 cells/mm3. During followup, 152 (...

  1. Perspective in supportive care--practical experiences in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukhadze, Tamari; Kordzaia, Dimitri

    2011-10-01

    Authors describe the first steps of Palliative Care development in Georgia, including policy, educational issues, drug availability and services. It is underlined the importance and effectiveness of collaboration of Governmental institutions, NGOs and international organizations and experts to create the basis for Palliative care system in the Country. Georgian experience on revealing of problems of adequate pain control gained by survey with participation of advanced patients and their family members is also discussed. All current activities in the sphere of Palliative Care as well as the future models of Palliative Care provision in the capital and regions of Georgia is shown.

  2. Epidemiology of visceral leishmaniasis in Georgia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgi Babuadze

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the transmission and prevalence of Leishmania parasite infection of humans in two foci of Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL in Georgia, the well known focus in Tbilisi in the East, and in Kutaisi, a new focus in the West of the country. The seroprevalence of canine leishmaniasis was investigated in order to understand the zoonotic transmission. Blood samples of 1575 dogs (stray and pet and 77 wild canids were tested for VL by Kalazar Detect rK39 rapid diagnostic tests. Three districts were investigated in Tbilisi and one in Kutaisi. The highest proportions of seropositive pet dogs were present in District #2 (28.1%, 82/292 and District #1 (26.9%, 24/89 in Tbilisi, compared to 17.3% (26/150 of pet dogs in Kutaisi. The percentage of seropositive stray dogs was also twice as high in Tbilisi (16.1%, n = 670 than in Kutaisi (8%, n = 50; only 2/58 wild animals screened were seropositive (2. 6%. A total of 873 Phlebotomine sand flies were collected, with 5 different species identified in Tbilisi and 3 species in Kutaisi; 2.3% of the females were positive for Leishmania parasites. The Leishmanin Skin Test (LST was performed on 981 human subjects in VL foci in urban areas in Tbilisi and Kutaisi. A particularly high prevalence of LST positives was observed in Tbilisi District #1 (22.2%, 37.5% and 19.5% for ages 5-9, 15-24 and 25-59, respectively; lower prevalence was observed in Kutaisi (0%, 3.2% and 5.2%, respectively; P<0.05. This study shows that Tbilisi is an active focus for leishmaniasis and that the infection prevalence is very high in dogs and in humans. Although exposure is as yet not as high in Kutaisi, this is a new VL focus. The overall situation in the country is alarming and new control measures are urgently needed.

  3. Human Lymphadenopathy Caused by Ratborne Bartonella, Tbilisi, Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandelaki, George; Malania, Lile; Bai, Ying; Chakvetadze, Neli; Katsitadze, Guram; Imnadze, Paata; Nelson, Christina; Harrus, Shimon; Kosoy, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Lymphadenopathy and fever that developed in a woman in Tbilisi, Georgia, most likely were caused by a ratborne Bartonella strain related B. tribocorum and B. elizabethae. The finding suggests that this Bartonella strain could be spread by infected rats and represents a potential human risk.

  4. Duck Hunters’ Perceptions of Risk for Avian Influenza, Georgia, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Dishman, Hope; Stallknecht, David; Cole, Dana

    2010-01-01

    To determine duck hunters’ risk for highly pathogenic avian influenza, we surveyed duck hunters in Georgia, USA, during 2007–2008, about their knowledge, attitudes, and practices. We found they engage in several practices that could expose them to the virus. Exposures and awareness were highest for those who had hunted >10 years.

  5. Duck hunters' perceptions of risk for avian influenza, Georgia, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishman, Hope; Stallknecht, David; Cole, Dana

    2010-08-01

    To determine duck hunters'risk for highly pathogenic avian influenza, we surveyed duck hunters in Georgia, USA, during 2007-2008, about their knowledge, attitudes, and practices. We found they engage in several practices that could expose them to the virus. Exposures and awareness were highest for those who had hunted >10 years.

  6. [AEROPOLINOLOGIC MONITORING AND DISTRIBUTION OF ALLERGOALLERGENS IN WESTERN GEORGIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepiashvili, R; Khachapuridze, D; Chikhladze, M; Gamkrelidze, S

    2015-06-01

    Climate and geographical conditions such as: air temperature, humidity and plant diversity represented in the region is of great importance for prevalence of allergic diseases. All these factors will maintain growing of allergization/sensitization of the body. It is known that allergic diseases (pollinosis, bronchial asthma), the highest percentage comes on the allergens- aeropolutants, that are represented in many plants and herbs in the form of dust (ragweed pollen, alder, birch, maple, walnut, mallow, cotton plant etc.). Thus, aeropolinologic study acquires special importance helping the clinicians to solve the following issues: which plant is common for the concrete region; what is the source of dust allergy; when are they particularly dangerous for the patient; when their dust is revealed and its concentrations in air pool or how they look. Georgia is the country with diverse flora and landscapes; the climate in Georgia varies across different parts of the country. Clinical and epidemiological studies have shown that the Western Georgia is characterized by the frequency of allergic diseases. The above raises the need to create a calendar of flowering plants in Imerety region of Georgia. 69 patients with allergic rhinitis and bronchial asthma from 7 to 60 years old (34 men and 35 women) were observed. The patients underwent allegro-diagnostic investigation. The results revealed high titers on weeds (WX2). On the basis of the conducted research annual calendar of aero-allergens spread in Imerety region was composed.

  7. Communicative language teaching in Georgia : from theory to practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edisherashvili, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    In a globalizing world, the majority of language learners need to study foreign languages for real-life purposes, in order to be able to communicate beyond the bounds of their own country. This is especially important for the populations of smaller countries such as Georgia, whose native language is

  8. Directory of Services for the Mentally Regarded in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia State Dept. of Public Health, Atlanta. Council on Mental Retardation.

    Services available from the following state agencies in Georgia are described: the Department of Public Health, including state hospitals and schools, public health and community services, and services for maternal and child health, crippled children, and school health; the Exceptional Child and Vocational Rehabilitation Divisions of the…

  9. University System of Georgia's eCore: Virtual General Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Libby V.; Finnegan, Catherine L.

    2009-01-01

    This case study reviews the emergence and evolution of eCore (the University System of Georgia's electronically delivered undergraduate core courses) over eight years and summarizes the issues, ongoing challenges, and lessons learned from interinstitutional collaboration in offering and administering a "virtual" shared core. The bulk of…

  10. Reading Motivation and Engagement at a Rural Georgia High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfree, Linda

    2013-01-01

    As college and workplace success becomes increasingly dependent on reading, parents and educators have become more interested in how to engage students in reading. Teachers at a rural Georgia high school have reported that students are reluctant to engage in academic reading. Guided by previous research on the factors that promote or discourage…

  11. Professional School Counselor Graduates in Georgia: Findings Regarding Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Brent M.; Boes, Susan R.; Chibbaro, Julia S.; Sebera, Kerry E.

    2008-01-01

    As key players in the school, professional school counselors have many roles and tasks however not all are trained with the same curriculum. In the state of Georgia, school counselor training is becoming more similar than different because all university system programs are mandated by the Board of Regents (BOR) to become accredited by the Council…

  12. Minority Education in Georgia: Is It Delivering What Is Expected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatadze, Shalva

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the issue of minority education in the nation of Georgia, and this research aims to identify the reasons for minority educational problems. The results of school exit exams, literacy research studies, and the 2009 Program for International Student Assessment were used to highlight the differences in educational achievements…

  13. EAARL topography-Potato Creek watershed, Georgia, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonisteel-Cormier, J.M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Fredericks, Xan; Jones, J.W.; Wright, C.W.; Brock, J.C.; Nagle, D.B.

    2011-01-01

    This DVD contains lidar-derived first-surface (FS) and bare-earth (BE) topography GIS datasets of a portion of the Potato Creek watershed in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River basin, Georgia. These datasets were acquired on February 27, 2010.

  14. Systemic Efforts in Georgia to Improve Education Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Deb

    2010-01-01

    Research points to links between school and school district leadership and student achievement. Local and national education reform has created rising expectations for student performance. Education leadership is both complex and high stakes. Key stakeholders in Georgia have developed a solution to improve factors in the work, workplace, and…

  15. 78 FR 45898 - Vidalia Onions Grown in Georgia; Continuance Referendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ...; Continuance Referendum AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Referendum order. SUMMARY: This document directs that a referendum be conducted among eligible producers of Vidalia onions grown in Georgia... Vidalia onions produced in the production area. DATES: The referendum will be conducted from September 9...

  16. Status of Clinical Supervision among School Counselors in Southeast Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Anna Lila; Bailey, Carrie Lynn; Bergin, James J.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated the role of clinical supervision in school counseling practice. This research explored the status and meaning of clinical supervision to school counselors employed in two southeastern Georgia counties. Results indicate that participants value clinical supervision even though their employers did not necessarily…

  17. Molecular patterns of multidrug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Shubladze

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: A great majority of the Georgian MDR MTB strains have a strong preference for the drug resistance mutations carrying no or low fitness cost. Thus, it can be suggested that MDR MTB strains with such mutations will continue to arise in Georgia at a high frequency even in the absence of antibiotic pressure.

  18. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Quota System in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatadze, Shalva; Gorgadze, Natia

    2013-01-01

    This document is the report on research which was undertaken by the Center of Civil Integration and Inter-Ethnic Relations and financed by the United Nations Association in Georgia within the project "Advanced National Integration" funded by United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The research aimed at the evaluation…

  19. Georgia-Based Avondale May Close All Mills

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Don; Theeuwes

    2006-01-01

    Georgia-based Avondale Mills said it is considering closing all its plants because of increased foreign competition and a train wreck more than a year ago that released a cloud of corrosive chlorine gas just outside the gates of its Graniteville plant, killing nine people.

  20. Communicative language teaching in Georgia : from theory to practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edisherashvili, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    In a globalizing world, the majority of language learners need to study foreign languages for real-life purposes, in order to be able to communicate beyond the bounds of their own country. This is especially important for the populations of smaller countries such as Georgia, whose native language is

  1. The Antebellum Georgia Publishing Industry: A Group Portrait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, Wallace B.

    Using census data from pre-Civil War Georgia at two points in time (1850 and 1860), this paper describes the Georgian publishing industry and profiles those involved in it. Microfilm editions of handwritten documents were scanned to find the names and other data (residence, job title, age, sex, place of birth, and value of property owned) of those…

  2. Reading Motivation and Engagement at a Rural Georgia High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfree, Linda

    2013-01-01

    As college and workplace success becomes increasingly dependent on reading, parents and educators have become more interested in how to engage students in reading. Teachers at a rural Georgia high school have reported that students are reluctant to engage in academic reading. Guided by previous research on the factors that promote or discourage…

  3. Quest for water in coastal Georgia: assessment of alternative water sources at Hunter Army Airfield, Chatham County, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, John S.

    2011-01-01

    To meet growing demands for water in the coastal Georgia area, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of the Army, conducted detailed site investigations and modeling studies at Hunter Army Airfield to assess the water-bearing potential of ponds and wells completed in the Lower Floridan aquifer.

  4. Translocation of reindeer from South Georgia to the Falkland Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron M. Bell

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the first translocation of reindeer Rangifer tarandus from South Georgia to the Falkland Islands, in the South Atlantic Ocean. Reindeer were introduced from Norway to the subantarctic island of South Georgia on three occasions in the early 1900s by Norwegian whalers, and today they exist as two discrete herds, numbering approximately 2600 individuals in total. Because of concerns over the impact on native vegetation, the long-term eradication of reindeer from South Georgia has recently been proposed. A translocation of reindeer to the Falkland Islands was undertaken in 2001 by the Falkland Island Government with two objectives: (1 to preserve the genetic resources of at least one of the South Georgia herds; and (2 to facilitate the diversification of the agricultural sector of the Falkland Islands by establishing a commercial reindeer herd. Techniques developed and used in North America for the successful relocation of large numbers of calves were adopted for the translocation. A total of 59 calves (26 females and 33 males were successfully translocated from South Georgia to the Falklands Islands in 2001, and subsequently produced their first offspring in 2003. Good husbandry practices and an understanding of biology and behaviour are essential for the successful translocation of reindeer.Flytting av rein fra Sør-Georgia til FalklandsøyeneAbstract in Norwegian / Sammendrag: Artikkelen beskriver den første overføring av rein Rangifer tarandus fra Sør-Georgia til Falklandsøyene i søratlanteren. Tamrein fra Norge ble flyttet til den subarktiske øya Sør-Georgia ved tre anledninger i perioden 1911 til 1925 i forbindelse med den norske hvalfangsten der. I dag består bestanden av rundt regnet 2600 dyr fordelt på to geografisk atskilte flokker. Av hensyn til den naturlige vegetasjonen på øya er det forslag om å på sikt utrydde reinbestanden på øya. Regjeringen på Falklandsøyene foretok en første overføring av

  5. Engaging the Demons. Report on a Collaboration between English Faculty of Baldwin High School and Georgia College & State University, Milledgeville, Georgia: 2001-02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriere, Peter M.; Smith, Melissa

    A collaborative project between Georgia College and State University (GC&SU) and Baldwin High School (BHS) in Milledgeville, Georgia, had as its initial goals: to provide an opportunity for two-way mentoring between the GC&SU's Arts and Sciences faculty and BHS's English faculty; to improve curriculum alignment; to establish realistic…

  6. Privatization and management development in the healthcare sector of Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Daniel J; Costello, Michael; Ramirez, Bernardo

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare reforms in Georgia parallel some of the major changes made by other Central and Eastern European countries. This is especially true of efforts to privatize the health sector and secure capital investments from Western Europe. Privatization of Georgian healthcare requires an understanding of the Soviet-era healthcare system and ideological orientation. Many of the issues and problems of privatization in Georgia require new knowledge to enhance equity outcomes, improve financial performance, increase access to care and encourage healthcare competition. Training existing and future healthcare leaders in modern management theory and practice is paramount. A university based health-management education partnership model was developed and implemented between several universities in the United States and Europe, along with two Georgian universities, to address workforce demands, changing market conditions, management knowledge and leadership competencies. Health-management education concentrations were developed and implemented along with several short courses to meet market demand for trained leaders and managers.

  7. Negotiating "The Social" and Managing Tuberculosis in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Erin

    2016-03-01

    In this paper I utilize anthropological insights to illuminate how health professionals and patients navigate and negotiate what for them is social about tuberculosis in order to improve treatment outcomes and support patients as human beings. I draw on ethnographic research about the implementation of the DOTS (Directly Observed Therapy, Short Course) approach in Georgia's National Tuberculosis Program in the wake of the Soviet healthcare system. Georgia is a particularly unique context for exploring these issues given the country's rich history of medical professionalism and the insistence that the practice of medicine is a moral commitment to society. I argue for critical attention to the ways in which treatment recipients and providers navigate what, for them, is "social" about therapeutic practices and their significance for avoiding biological and social reductionism.

  8. 86(th) Annual Georgia Public Health Association Meeting & Conference Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Selina A; Abbott, Regina; Sims, Christy

    2015-01-01

    The 86(th) annual meeting of the Georgia Public Health Association (GPHA) and joint conference with the Southern Health Association was held in Atlanta, Georgia, on April 13-14, 2015, with pre-conference (April 12(th)) and post-conference (April 14(th)) Executive Board meetings. As Georgia's leading forum for public health researchers, practitioners, and students, the annual meeting of the GPHA brings together participants from across the state to explore recent developments in the field and to exchange techniques, tools, and experiences. Historically, the GPHA conference has been held in Savannah (n=24); Jekyll Island (n=20); Atlanta (n=16); Augusta (n=4); and Gainesville (n=1). There was no annual meeting during the early years (1929-1936); during World War II (1941-1943 and 1945); and for four years during the 1980s. Between 2006 and 2010, GPHA held one-day annual meetings and business sessions with educational workshops. Several new initiatives were highlighted as part of this year's conference. These included a "move and groove" physical activity lounge, registration scholarships for students with a dedicated meet-and-greet reception, an expanded exhibit hall, presentation and approval of three resolutions (related to healthy foods at official activities and events; weapons at official activities and events; and memorials), and approval of the 2015 legislative policy positions and amended association bylaws. The theme for the conference was Advocacy in Action for Public Health. Specifically, the program addressed ensuring access to care; protecting funding for core programs, services, and infrastructure; eliminating health disparities; and addressing key public health issues important to the state of Georgia. One hundred and nine (109) abstracts were submitted for peer review; 36 were accepted for poster and 40 for workshop presentations. Four plenary sessions with keynote speakers covered the intersection between advocacy and policy, Georgia's response to the

  9. Prevalence and Diversity of Bartonella Species in Rodents from Georgia (Caucasus)

    OpenAIRE

    Malania, Lile; Bai, Ying; Osikowicz, Lynn M.; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Katsitadze, Guram; Imnadze, Paata; Kosoy, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Bartonella infections are widespread and highly prevalent in rodents. Several rodent-associated Bartonella species have been related to human diseases. Recently, Bartonella species was reported as the etiology of a human case in the country of Georgia (Caucasus). However, information on Bartonella in rodents in Georgia is absent. Rodent hearts were collected from Georgia to investigate the presence and diversity of Bartonella species. Bartonella bacteria were cultured from 37.2% (16/43) of ro...

  10. Georgia Teachers in Academic Laboratories: Research Experiences in the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, D.

    2005-12-01

    The Georgia Intern-Fellowships for Teachers (GIFT) is a collaborative effort designed to enhance mathematics and science experiences of Georgia teachers and their students through summer research internships for teachers. By offering business, industry, public science institute and research summer fellowships to teachers, GIFT provides educators with first-hand exposure to the skills and knowledge necessary for the preparation of our future workforce. Since 1991, GIFT has placed middle and high school mathematics, science and technology teachers in over 1000 positions throughout the state. In these fellowships, teachers are involved in cutting edge scientific and engineering research, data analysis, curriculum development and real-world inquiry and problem solving, and create Action Plans to assist them in translating the experience into changed classroom practice. Since 2004, an increasing number of high school students have worked with their teachers in research laboratories. The GIFT program places an average of 75 teachers per summer into internship positions. In the summer of 2005, 83 teachers worked in corporate and research environments throughout the state of Georgia and six of these positions involved authentic research in geoscience related departments at the Georgia Institute of Technology, including aerospace engineering and the earth and atmospheric sciences laboratories. This presentation will review the history and the structure of the program including the support system for teachers and mentors as well as the emphasis on inquiry based learning strategies. The focus of the presentation will be a comparison of two placement models of the teachers placed in geoscience research laboratories: middle school earth science teachers placed in a 6 week research experience and high school teachers placed in 7 week internships with teams of 3 high school students. The presentation will include interviews with faculty to determine the value of these experiences

  11. Human Anthrax Transmission at the Urban?Rural Interface, Georgia

    OpenAIRE

    Kracalik, Ian; Malania, Lile; Imnadze, Paata; Blackburn, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    Human anthrax has increased dramatically in Georgia and was recently linked to the sale of meat in an urban market. We assessed epidemiological trends and risk factors for human anthrax at the urban?rural interface. We reviewed epidemiologic records (2000?2012) that included the place of residence (classified as urban, peri-urban, or rural), age, gender, and self-reported source of infection (handling or processing animal by-products and slaughtering or butchering livestock). To estimate risk...

  12. Pierce - University of Georgia | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principal Investigator: J. Michael Pierce, PhDInstitution: University of Georgia, Athens, GA Our project, Discovery and Development of Cancer Glycomarkers, is a joint collaboration between our laboratories at the CCRC, which include Karen Abbott, Lance Wells, Kevin Dobbin, and Mike Tiemeyer, those at TGen, in Phoenix, AZ, Daniel Von Hoff, Haiyong Han, and Mike Demeure, and Caerus Discovery in Manassas, VA, which includes Cohava Gelber and S?ren Mogelsvang. |

  13. Updated Fiscal Impact Analysis, Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    It also uses the grade structure of the inmigrating Navy personnel to 4-3- calculate the salaries that will be brought to the area. The population and...of inmigrants who wish to work. The FIA model treats the labor market as a dynamic condition that varies with base load-up and multiplier changes...Florida and Georgia (see the map on Figure 1-1). The selection of these counties was based on preliminary information about where the inmigrating

  14. Network and computing infrastructure for scientific applications in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvatadze, R.; Modebadze, Z.

    2016-09-01

    Status of network and computing infrastructure and available services for research and education community of Georgia are presented. Research and Educational Networking Association - GRENA provides the following network services: Internet connectivity, network services, cyber security, technical support, etc. Computing resources used by the research teams are located at GRENA and at major state universities. GE-01-GRENA site is included in European Grid infrastructure. Paper also contains information about programs of Learning Center and research and development projects in which GRENA is participating.

  15. The Russian Military and the Georgia War: Lessons and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    sweeten this unsavory power pill. The respected Vedomosti newspaper reported that the Defense Ministry of Azerbaijan has contracted with... Alternative bypasses to the Russia-centered Northern Distribution Network (NDN) are thus of importance to U.S. strategists and logisticians... alternative to Pakistan involves Georgia and Central Asia. Supplies coming by ship can dock at ports in the Mediterranean (Turkey) and the Black Sea

  16. The borders between Azerbaijan, Georgia, and Russia: Soviet heritage

    OpenAIRE

    Arkhipova, Ekaterina

    2005-01-01

    The administrative-territorial reforms carried out under Soviet power in the Caucasus to delimitate Russia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia have always been and remain a bone of contention. So far their governments have not yet come to terms on several problems on certain border stretches. For fourteen years now, delimitation has been going on with varying intensity. Russia and Azerbaijan have come the closest to settling these disputes with respect to the Daghestanian stretch of their common border....

  17. PREVALENCE OF CLEFT LIP AND PALATE IN GEORGIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chincharadze, S; Vadachkoria, Z; Mchedlishvili, I

    2017-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate take significant place in congenital malformations. We aimed to study epidemiological peculiarities of these pathologies in Georgia for 2006-2015. We compared magnitude of its distribution with the data from 1981-1990. Prevalence of cleft lip and palate in Georgia in 2006-2015 was 0.95±0.04 per 1000 live births, while in 1981-1990- it was 1.05, i.e. in contrast to 1980's frequency of these pathological conditions decreased to some extent. Distribution of cleft lip and palate varies across the country regions. The most intensive spread has been observed in Mtskheta-Mtianeti region, where prevalence composed 2.28/1000. In the rest of the regions frequency of these pathologies is significantly lower. For instance, in Kakheti the rate is equal to 1,87/1000, in Kvemo Kartli - 1.56/1000, in Shida Kartli - 1.55/1000. In the rest of the regions prevalence rate is lower than the country average. It should be noted that in Tbilisi the rate is as low as 0.80/1000. The lowest level has been reported in Guria - 0.56/1000. Currently cleft lip with palate is the most frequently occurring anomaly in Georgia accounting for 39.8% of all congenital malformations. Cleft lip alone ranks the second - 36.1%, followed by cleft palate (24.1%). These pathologies are more frequent in boys than in girls. 60.3% of the cases are reported in males, in contrast to girls - 39.7% (pcleft palate is the most common among girls, but in our case, it had higher prevalence among boys, 53.6% vs. 46,4%. Thus cleft lip and palate distribution in Georgia is characterized by epidemiological peculiarities, which should be considered in implementation of preventive measures.

  18. 76 FR 28219 - Georgia Power Company; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-16

    .... Applicant: Georgia Power Company. e. Name of Project: Wallace Pumped Storage Project. f. Location: Lake... Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Protests Take notice that the following hydroelectric...

  19. Disease agents in Amblyomma americanum from northeastern Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, A S; Moore, V A; Little, S E

    2004-07-01

    Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) is known or suspected to vector several organisms that are implicated as human pathogens, including Ehrlichia chaffeensis, E. ewingii, and Borrelia lonestari. These three agents have also been detected in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Because northeastern Georgia has a high abundance of both lone star ticks and white-tailed deer, and one of these organisms, E. chaffeensis, is already known to be endemic in the area, we assayed individual adult A. americanum, collected during the spring of 2001, 2002, and 2003, for these three organisms. A total of 400 ticks were dissected and tissues assayed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using Ehrlichia species-specific and Borrelia genus-wide primers. Of ticks tested, 2.0% (8/398) had evidence of E. chaffeensis, 4.8% (19/398) had evidence of E. ewingii, and 1.0% (4/398) had evidence of B. lonestari. Borrelia sp. spirochetes were also visualized by an indirect fluorescent antibody test, using an anti-flagellin monoclonal antibody (H9724), in a total of 10.7% (32/300) of ticks tested in 2003. These results reconfirm the presence of E. chaffeensis and establish evidence of E. ewingii and B. lonestari in questing adult A. americanum ticks from northeastern Georgia. Detection of at least two of the three organisms in ticks collected each year suggests that people in northeastern Georgia are at risk of infection with these organisms.

  20. Effect of organic fertilizers on maize production in Eastern Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolokhava, Tamar; Kenchiashvili, Naira; Tarkhnishvili, Maia; Ghambashidze, Giorgi

    2016-04-01

    Maize remains to be the most important cereal crop in Georgia. Total area of arable land under cereal crops production equals to 184 thousands hectares (FAO statistical yearbook, 2014), from which maize takes the biggest share. Leading position of maize among other cereal crops is caused by its dual purpose as food and feed product. In Spite of a relatively high production of maize to other cereals there is still a high demand on it, especially as feed for animal husbandry. The same tendency is seen in organic production, where producers of livestock and poultry products require organically grown maize, the average yield of which is much less than those produced conventionally. Therefore, it is important to increase productivity of maize in organic farms. Current study aimed to improve maize yield using locally produced organic fertilizers and to compare them to the effect of mineral fertilizers. The study was carried out in Eastern Georgia under dry subtropical climate conditions on local hybrid of maize. This is the first attempt to use hybrid maize (developed with organic plant breeding method) in organic field trials in Georgia. The results shown, that grain yield from two different types of organic fertilizers reached 70% of the yields achieved with industrial mineral fertilizers. As on farm level differences between organic and conventional maize production are much severe, the results from the field trials seems to be promising for future improvement of organic cereal crop production.

  1. Hybrid-Empirical Ground Motion Estimations for Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsereteli Nino

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ground motion prediction equations are essential for several purposes ranging from seismic design and analysis to probabilistic seismic hazard assessment. In seismically active regions without sufficiently strong ground motion data to build empirical models, hybrid models become vital. Georgia does not have sufficiently strong ground motion data to build empirical models. In this study, we have applied the host-to-target method in two regions in Georgia with different source mechanisms. According to the tectonic regime of the target areas, two different regions are chosen as host regions. One of them is in Turkey with the dominant strike-slip source mechanism, while the other is in Iran with the prevalence of reverse-mechanism events. We performed stochastic finite-fault simulations in both host and target areas and employed the hybrid-empirical method as introduced in Campbell (2003. An initial set of hybrid empirical ground motion estimates is obtained for PGA and SA at selected periods for Georgia.

  2. 75 FR 5281 - Approval of Manufacturing Authority, Foreign-Trade Zone 26, Kia Motors Manufacturing Georgia, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-02

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Order No. 1648 Approval of Manufacturing Authority, Foreign-Trade Zone 26, Kia Motors Manufacturing Georgia, Inc. (Motor Vehicles), West Point, Georgia Pursuant to its authority under...., grantee of FTZ 26, has requested manufacturing authority on behalf of Kia Motors Manufacturing Georgia...

  3. 78 FR 28627 - Georgia Pacific LLC, Also Doing Business as Duluth Hardboard Plant, Specialty Manufacturing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    ... Employment and Training Administration Georgia Pacific LLC, Also Doing Business as Duluth Hardboard Plant..., also doing business as Duluth Hardboard Plant, Specialty Manufacturing Division, a subsidiary of Koch... workers of Georgia Pacific, LLC, also doing business as Duluth Hardboard Plant, Specialty...

  4. Seeking Better Lives by Becoming Teachers in Rural South Georgia: Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, David W.

    2011-01-01

    For four years the Investigator studied students in South Georgia attempting to become teachers. Three themes emerged impacting study subjects most. They are location, teacher education program, and the economy. South Georgia is one of the poorest rural regions in the United States. People are often place-bound and they endure chronic…

  5. Rapid assessment of wildfire damage using Forest Inventory data: A case in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard A. Harper; John W. Coulsten; Jeffery A. Turner

    2009-01-01

    The rapid assessment of damage caused by natural disasters is essential for planning the appropriate amount of disaster relief funds and public communication. Annual Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data provided initial estimates of damage to timberland in a timely manner to State leaders during the 2007 Georgia Bay Complex Wildfire in southeast Georgia. FIA plots...

  6. Understanding Georgia's National Board Certified Teachers: A Phenomenological Approach to a Teacher's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, Kimberly K.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to understand what it means to be a National Board Certified teacher (NBCT) in Georgia. Georgia teachers, distinguished with the NBCT title, participated in surveys and interviews which were analyzed qualitatively in order to understand the essence of being a National Board Certified teacher. Three…

  7. THE PROFESSIONAL TRAINING, SPECIFIC TEACHING ASSIGNMENTS, AND JOB SATISFACTIONS OF GEORGIA SOCIAL STUDIES TEACHERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MILLER, HENRY; SCOTT, OWEN

    TO SURVEY THE CERTIFICATION STATUS, TEACHING ASSIGNMENT, AND SELECTED JOB-RELATED OPINIONS OF GEORGIA SOCIAL STUDIES TEACHERS, DATA ON 115 SCHOOLS AND 403 TEACHERS WAS EXTRACTED FROM A RANDOM SAMPLING OF THE ANNUAL REPORTS OF SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENTS TO THE GEORGIA ACCREDITING COMMISSION. AN UNSTRUCTURED QUESTIONNAIRE ASKING WHICH ASPECTS OF…

  8. 77 FR 1894 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia; Rome; Fine Particulate Matter 2002...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia; Rome; Fine Particulate... October 27, 2009. The emissions inventory is part of the Rome, Georgia PM 2.5 attainment...

  9. State of Georgia AIP implementation report. Progress report, January--March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardeman, J.

    1996-06-01

    To ensure the citizens of the State of Georgia that health, safety and the environment are being protected through existing DOE programs at the Savannah River Site (SRS), through a vigorous program of independent monitoring and oversight by Georgia officials. This report summarizes implementation of this program from January to March 1996.

  10. "Making the Difficult Choice": Understanding Georgia's Test-Based Grade Retention Policy in Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    The author uses Bourdieu's concepts of field, capital, and habitus to analyze how students, parents, teachers, and administrators are responding to Georgia's test-based grade retention policy in reading at one Georgia elementary school. In this multiple case study, the author interviewed, observed, and collected documents regarding ten fifth…

  11. Understanding Georgia's National Board Certified Teachers: A Phenomenological Approach to a Teacher's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, Kimberly K.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to understand what it means to be a National Board Certified teacher (NBCT) in Georgia. Georgia teachers, distinguished with the NBCT title, participated in surveys and interviews which were analyzed qualitatively in order to understand the essence of being a National Board Certified teacher. Three…

  12. The Rise of Childhood Poverty in Georgia: Implications for Public School Planning and Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, Olivia M.

    2011-01-01

    The rapid and steady growth of poverty in Georgia's public schools is a clarion call to re-examine the extent to which educators are reaching and teaching all students, regardless of their economic standing. The traditional view of poverty as a marginal condition affecting a minority of students no longer holds as 56% of Georgia's 1.6-million…

  13. Road and Street Centerlines, Road centerlines for Newton County, Georgia, Published in 2007, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Northeast Georgia Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — , published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale as of 2007. It is described as 'Road centerlines for Newton County, Georgia'. Data by this publisher are often provided in...

  14. Road and Street Centerlines, Road centerlines for Madison County, Georgia, Published in 2000, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Northeast Georgia Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — , published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale as of 2000. It is described as 'Road centerlines for Madison County, Georgia'. Data by this publisher are often provided in...

  15. Airports and Airfields, Airports in 18 county region in South Georgia, Published in 1999, 1:7200 (1in=600ft) scale, Southern Georgia Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Airports and Airfields dataset, published at 1:7200 (1in=600ft) scale as of 1999. It is described as 'Airports in 18 county region in South Georgia'. Data by...

  16. Railroad Lines, Railroads in 18 county region in South Georgia, Published in 1999, 1:7200 (1in=600ft) scale, Southern Georgia Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Railroad Lines dataset, published at 1:7200 (1in=600ft) scale as of 1999. It is described as 'Railroads in 18 county region in South Georgia'. Data by this...

  17. GETTING CLOSER TO EU STANDARDS - GEORGIA FISCAL GOVERNANCE ADJUSTMENT AND ITS IMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David OBOLADZE

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on fiscal governance from the perspective of developing the public finance management of Georgia. The paper investigates the fiscal governance framework in European Union countries and examines the impact of fiscal rules and budget procedures in EU countries. Well-designed fiscal frameworks are generally associated with better budgetary outcomes in terms of deficit and debt control. Following a thorough investigation of the current stance of fiscal governance in Georgia, the paper analyses the main medium and long term perspectives for Georgia to approximate with EU fiscal governance. The main objective of this paper is to provide policy guidelines needed for the appropriate and necessary reforms to ensure comprehensive, coherent and consistent fiscal governance framework for Georgia, which will improve the performance of public finance management and national economy of Georgia.

  18. Inclusive Education in Georgia: Current Progress and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikoloz Kavelashvili

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and Originality: The paper provides a realistic picture about how the implementation process of inclusive education in Georgia is developing, about the problems that are encountered together with what needs are to be fulfilled for stimulating the process. Today’s challenge in the country is to make inclusive practices available to everybody, everywhere and all the time. This article discusses the status of the efforts being made to meet this challenge. In the course of that discussion, some comprehensive changes will be described that systemic efforts of school improvement must achieve to continue making progress towards fully inclusive learning. Method: The study was conducted in Georgia. A qualitative research design was employed along with closed-ended and open-ended questionnaires, which allowed participants to express their point of views, skills and knowledge. Data collection methods were applied: semi-structured interviews and observation on respondents. Results: The study uncovers those challenges that obstruct the implementation process: indifferent attitudes of teachers and parents towards inclusion, absence of self-awareness to the issue amongst educators, slightest involvement of parents and need to infrastructural development. Society: The results should raise the awareness of the population of Georgia as well as increase the understanding of the problem. Limitations / further research: There were quite enough informants on the school level (special teachers, principals, however, there are still many other possible respondents who could add something valuable to a better understanding of the process of inclusion at schools. The theoretical approach employed in the study and the empirical research could be validated.

  19. South Georgia glaciers through periods of fast and slow retreat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paasche, O.; Bakke, J.; Schaefer, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Along the Antarctic Peninsula and across the sub-Antarctic islands most glaciers, regardless of size and configuration, are in a state of demise and have been so for several decades. An emerging question is: how unique is this modern retreat when compared to glacier activity in this region during the last 10 000 years, if at all and to what extent? And also, how is this pattern different from the Northern Hemisphere where glaciers generally were small or even absent during the Holocene Optimum (9000-6000 years ago) and expanding after the onset of the Neoglacial (4000 years ago), with a typical late maximum around the Little Ice age (1400-1800 AD)? Here we address these questions in an effort to further our understanding of natural environmental variability in the Southern Hemisphere on time scales, and with a resolution, high enough to capture glacier trends on multi-decadal to centennial time scales. This is accomplished by acquiring and analyzing new terrestrial glacier records from the remote island South Georgia (54-55°S, 36-38°W) covering at least the last 13 000 years. Results from downstream lake sediment archives together with cosmogenic nuclide dating of a complete moraine sequence add new insight to the glacier history of South Georgia. The Hodges cirque glacier, which was mapped and investigated intermittently by the British Antarctic Survey between 1955-1982, was according to our observations present during the entire Holocene, but smaller advances were superimposed on a long-term pattern of retreat. The Hodges, as one of the first glaciers on South Georgia, had completely melted away by 2008, which indicate a retreat of circa 900 meter since early Holocene.

  20. InSAR observations of the 2009 Racha earthquake, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaeva, Elena; Walter, Thomas R.

    2016-09-01

    Central Georgia is an area strongly affected by earthquake and landslide hazards. On 29 April 1991 a major earthquake (Mw  =  7.0) struck the Racha region in Georgia, followed by aftershocks and significant afterslip. The same region was hit by another major event (Mw  =  6.0) on 7 September 2009. The aim of the study reported here was to utilize interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data to improve knowledge about the spatial pattern of deformation due to the 2009 earthquake. There were no actual earthquake observations by InSAR in Georgia. We considered all available SAR data images from different space agencies. However, due to the long wavelength and the frequent acquisitions, only the multi-temporal ALOS L-band SAR data allowed us to produce interferograms spanning the 2009 earthquake. We detected a local uplift around 10 cm (along the line-of-sight propagation) in the interferogram near the earthquake's epicenter, whereas evidence of surface ruptures could not be found in the field along the active thrust fault. We simulated a deformation signal which could be created by the 2009 Racha earthquake on the basis of local seismic records and by using an elastic dislocation model. We compared our modeled fault surface of the September 2009 with the April 1991 Racha earthquake fault surfaces and identify the same fault or a sub-parallel fault of the same system as the origin. The patch that was active in 2009 is just adjacent to the 1991 patch, indicating a possible mainly westward propagation direction, with important implications for future earthquake hazards.

  1. Obstetric Provider Trainees in Georgia: Characteristics and Attitudes About Practice in Obstetric Provider Shortage Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smulian, Elizabeth A; Zahedi, Leilah; Hurvitz, Julie; Talbot, Abigail; Williams, Audra; Julian, Zoë; Zertuche, Adrienne D; Rochat, Roger

    2016-07-01

    Objectives In Georgia, 52 % of the primary care service areas outside metropolitan Atlanta have a deficit of obstetric providers. This study was designed to identify factors associated with the likelihood of Georgia's obstetric trainees (obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) residents and certified nurse midwifery (CNM) students) to practice in areas of Georgia that lack obstetric providers and services, i.e. rural Georgia. Methods Pilot-tested electronic and paper surveys were distributed to all of Georgia's OB/GYN residents (N = 95) and CNM students (N = 28). Mixed-methods survey questions assessed characteristics, attitudes, and incentives that might be associated with trainee desire to practice in areas of Georgia that lack obstetric providers and services. Surveys also gathered information about concerns that may prevent trainees from practicing in shortage areas. Univariate and bivariate analyses were performed, and qualitative themes were abstracted from open-ended questions. Results The survey response rate was 87.8 % (108/123). Overall, 24.4 % (19/78) of residents and 53.6 % (15/28) of CNM students expressed interest in practicing in rural Georgia, and both residents and CNM students were more likely to desire to practice in rural Georgia with the offer of any of six financial incentives (P < 0.001). Qualitative themes highlighted trainees' strong concerns about Georgia's political environment as it relates to reproductive healthcare. Conclusions Increasing state-level, rurally-focused financial incentive programs and emphasizing the role of CNMs may alleviate obstetric provider shortages in Georgia.

  2. Mental illness in metropolitan, urban and rural Georgia populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, William C; Lin, Jin-Mann S; Nater, Urs M

    2013-04-30

    Mental illness represents an important public health problem. Local-level data concerning mental illness in different populations (e.g., socio-demographics and residence--metropolitan/urban/rural) provides the evidence-base for public health authorities to plan, implement and evaluate control programs. This paper describes prevalence and covariates of psychiatric conditions in Georgia populations in three defined geographic areas. Data came from the Georgia population-based random-digit-dialing study investigating unwellness and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in Georgia populations of three defined geographic areas (metropolitan, urban, and rural). Respondents were screened for symptoms of fatigue, sleep, cognition, and pain at household screening interviews, and a randomly selected sample completed detailed individual phone interviews. Based on the detailed phone interviews, we conducted one-day clinical evaluations of 292 detailed interview participants classified as unwell with a probable CFS (i.e. CFS-like; a functional somatic syndrome), 268 classified as other unwell, and 223 well (matched to CFS-like). Clinical evaluation included psychiatric classification by means of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM (SCID). To derive prevalence estimates we used sample weighting to account for the complexity of the multistage sampling design. We used 2- and 3-way table analyses to examine socio-demographic and urbanicity specific associations and multiple logistic regression to calculate adjusted odds ratios. Anxiety and mood disorders were the most common psychiatric conditions. Nineteen percent of participants suffered a current anxiety disorder, 18% a mood disorder and 10% had two or more conditions. There was a significant linear trend in occurrence of anxiety or mood disorders from well to CFS-like. The most common anxiety disorders were post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (6.6%) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) (5.8%). Logistic regression showed that

  3. Black Hole - Neutron Star Binary Simulations at Georgia Tech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Roland

    2009-05-01

    Mixed compact object binaries consisting of a black hole and a neutron star are expected to be not only one of the primary sources of gravitational radiation to be observed by interferometric detectors but also the central engine of short gamma-ray bursts. We report on the status of our effort at Georgia Tech to model these mixed binary systems using the moving puncture method. The results are obtained with an enhanced version our vacuum MayaKranc code coupled to the hydrodynamics Whisky code. We present preliminary results of gravitational waveforms and the disruption of the neutron star for simple polytropic equations of state.

  4. Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Swimming Pools, Atlanta, Georgia

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-05-29

    In this podcast, Dan Rutz speaks with Dr. Joan Shields, a guest researcher with the Healthy Swimming Program at CDC, about an article in June 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases reporting on the results of a test of swimming pools in the greater Atlanta, Georgia area. Dr. Shields tested 160 pools in metro Atlanta last year for Cryptosporidium and Giardia. These germs cause most recreational water associated outbreaks.  Created: 5/29/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 5/29/2008.

  5. Salmonella from gopher tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus) in south Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, J Mitchell; Lee, Gregory; Turco, Jenifer; Chamberlin, Linda

    2008-10-01

    From 2002 to 2006, gopher tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus) were collected at Moody Air Force Base, Lowndes/Lanier counties, Georgia, USA, and opportunistically surveyed for the presence of Salmonella species. Four of 155 (2.6%) cloacal swabs collected from 80 tortoises were positive for the presence of Salmonella enterica, and the following serovars were identified: Give, Hartford, Javiana, and Luciana. Female tortoises (5%) were infected at a rate similar to male tortoises (5%). All isolates were obtained from adult tortoises (n = 73); subadults (n = 7) were all negative. Each isolated serovar is a potential human pathogen, suggesting appropriate precautions should be emphasized when handling these animals.

  6. Recent changes in Georgia׳s temperature means and extremes: Annual and seasonal trends between 1961 and 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Keggenhoff

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sixteen temperature minimum and maximum series are used to quantify annual and seasonal changes in temperature means and extremes over Georgia (Southern Caucasus during the period 1961 and 2010. Along with trends in mean minimum and maximum temperature, eight indices are selected from the list of climate extreme indices as defined by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI of the Commission for Climatology of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO, for studying trends in temperature extremes. Between the analysis periods 1961–2010, 1971–2010 and 1981–2010 pronounced warming trends are determined for all Georgia-averaged trends in temperature means and extremes, while all magnitudes of trends increase towards the most recent period. During 1981 and 2010, significant warming trends for annual minimum and maximum temperature at a rate of 0.39 °C (0.47 °C days/decade and particularly for the warm temperature extremes, summer days, warm days and nights and the warm spell duration index are evident, whereas warm extremes show larger trends than cold extremes. The most pronounced trends are determined for summer days 6.2 days/decade, while the warm spell duration index indicates an increase in the occurrence of warm spells by 5.4 days/decade during 1981 and 2010. In the comparison of seasonal changes in temperature means and extremes, the largest magnitudes of warming trends can be observed for temperature maximum in summer and temperature minimum in fall. Between 1981 and 2010, summer maximum temperature shows a significant warming at a rate of 0.84 °C/decade, increasing almost twice as fast as its annual trend (0.47 °C/decade. The Georgia-averaged trends for temperature minimum in fall increase by 0.59 °C/decade. Strongest significant trends in temperature extremes are identified during 1981 and 2010 for warm nights (4.6 days/decade in summer and fall as well as for warm days (5.6 days/decade in summer

  7. A 3000 yr paleostorm record from St. Catherines Island, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Erick; Meyer, Brian; Deocampo, Daniel; Kiage, Lawrence M.

    2017-09-01

    Tropical cyclones (hurricanes in the northern hemisphere) are amongst the most devastating of the world's natural disasters and cause billions of dollars in damage every year. Data on the likelihood of a coastal site being struck by a major hurricane strike can potentially aid in planning and mitigation efforts that could save money and lives. However, forecasting requires data that are currently insufficient for the Georgia Bight. This study provides information to enhance the paleohurricane record by analysis of a 467 cm thick vibracore raised from St. Catherines Island, GA. Sediment geochemistry and foraminiferal assemblages indicate deposits attributable to seven paleohurricane events, five of which were likely major hurricanes when they made landfall on St. Catherines. Magnitudes were estimated by comparison to the overwash deposit left by ;The Sea Islands hurricane of 1893;, a major hurricane recorded by the recent sediment of St. Catherines Island. The St. Catherines record also shows a change in the activity levels on the Georgia coast with two distinct activity regimes over the past 3000 years.

  8. Women’s Role in Developing Economies: Case of Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nino Kharistvalashvili

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe paper deals with the most topical gender issues in economic point of view and explains women’s role in modern economy of developing country like Georgia.In spite of the powerful process of the globalization and dissemination of ideas of human rights and gender equality huge problems related with gender inequality still remains and hinders the social and economic development of the societies.The most prevalent issues regarding the abovementioned problem are the following: violence against women, pay gap between men and women workers, various stereotypes about the women existing in all over the world. All of these issues are dissected in an economic point of view.Georgia is a post-soviet country with its peculiarities that are also reflected with respect to the gender issues and the analysis given in the paper considers these important characteristics.In the modern world where women’s role in social and economic life is continuously increasing the issues of gender equality gains an utmost importance.Results of the study shows the ways for increasing women’s involvement in the economic processes in the country and using women’s skills and knowledge for the sake of the country. Key words: Gender, equality, economy, pay gap, migration, unemployment.

  9. [Analysis of spreading the sexually transmitted disorders in Georgia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiokadze, Sh; Galdava, G; Kvlividze, O; Durglishvili, G

    2014-03-01

    According statistical data in Georgia sexually transmitted disorders represent one of the most important medical and social problems. Main causes of this are hard social and economic condition of the country, changing sexual-behavioral stereotypes, drugs and alcohol abuse, political perturbation, as well as unprecedented decrease in financing prevention programs of STD by government. The purpose of given research is statistical analysis of spread of sexually transmitted disorders in Georgia, in particular, among the people included in risk group; finding trends and in accordance with this, working out recommendations for improvement of situation in given field of medicine. Essays showed that through 2000-2012 years among STD revealed in the group of increased risk chlamidiosis was the most common. There is an objective trend of increasing the level of morbidity with chlamidiosis and trichomoniasis, however the speed of increasing morbidity with trichomoniasis probably does not correspond the reality. In the same time morbidity with gonorrhea and syphilis is decreasing, however in the result of significant decrease in STD prevention program scale data validity concerning syphilis might be doubtful. Coming out of this in the field of health care related to STD optimization of laboratory diagnostics management is essential; perfection of methods of epidemiologic control; increasing the scales of prevention programs as well as initiation of researches related to antimicrobial resistance of gonococci. Authors consider essential taking steps for optimization of management of laboratory diagnostics and perfection of methods of epidemiologic control and increasing scales of preventive programs.

  10. Location of South Georgia and potential impact on early Pacific-Atlantic through flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, A.; Curtis, M.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most significant Cenozoic reconfigurations of global ocean circulation involved the initiation of Pacific to Atlantic exchange that led to the isolation of Antarctica by the Antarctica Circumpolar Current though the separation of South America and Antarctica and the opening of the Scotia Sea and Drake Passage. Whether significant Pacific to Atlantic through-flow was possible in the early Cenozoic has remained unclear because it is not certain where continental fragments such as South Georgia, a potential barrier, were located before seafloor spreading created the Scotia Sea. Establishing where South Georgia was located is also critical to reconstructing the Scotia arc and understanding its evolution. Detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology and apatite thermochronometry are used to constrain the pre-drift location of South Georgia. Data from Cretaceous turbidites exposed on South Georgia are consistent with a former connection to the Rocas Verdes back-arc basin giving support to models that have argued for a pre- tectonic translation location southeast of Tierra del Fuego. Following an early phase of rock uplift, thermal history models of the apatite chronometry data indicate that the South Georgia continental fragment underwent burial related heating and was therefore not a significant topographic feature until it emerged c. 10-7 Ma coeval with the cessation of spreading at the West Scotia Ridge and collision between the South Georgia continental block and the Northeast Georgia Rise.

  11. Historical Determinants of Regional Divisions of Georgia and their Implications for Territorial Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mądry Cezary

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Georgia can be characterised by its turbulent history, centuries-old traditions, and a great ethnic diversity. This makes it necessary to include historical determinants, in addition to geopolitical and economic factors, when making a regional analysis of its territory and contemporary governance issues. Five stages of the development of the present territorial division of Georgia are distinguished. They have been identified by means of an analysis of key events (critical junctures of significance in the formation of its historical regions. Additionally, their influence at each of the three levels of the current territorial division of independent Georgia is discussed, in particular in the context of territorial governance.

  12. Necessity of electromagnetic emission network arrangement in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turazashvili, Ioseb; Kachakhidze, Nino; Machavariani, Kakhaber; Kachakhidze, Manana; Gogoberidze, Vitali; Khazaradze, Giorgi

    2015-04-01

    The field of the tectonic stress has the hierarchical structure. The most characteristic features connected with the regional tectonic elements are determined by the geologic - tectonic data. It is established that in the young folded areas like the Caucasus the field of tectonic stress is characterized by the sharp anisotropy with the predominance of the compression perpendicular to the trend of folding. Spatial location of the main positive and negative geotectonic morphostructures of the Caucasus shows the existence of the wavy tectonic movements in the region. They are caused by the horizontal compression, provoked evidently by advancement of the Arabian lithosphere plate to the North and its re-approach with the Euro-Asian plate. All these cause considerable deformation of the lithosphere of the Caucasian region and its breaking up in separate blocks. This, in its turn, causes the concentration of stress along the boundaries of the blocks and rising of earthquakes focuses there. According to the instrumental data starting from 1899 at about 40 large earthquakes were fixed in the Caucasus. The rate of risks associated with these hazards increases every year in Georgia due to the appearance of new complicated technological construction: oil and gas pipelines large dams and hydropower plants and others. Modern ground-based and satellite methods of viewing enables to reveal those multiple anomalous geophysical phenomena which become evident in the period preceding earthquake and are directly connected with the process of its preparation. Lately special attention is attributed to the electromagnetic emission fixed during large earthquake and has already been successfully detected in Japan, America and Europe. Unfortunately there is no electromagnetic emission detection network in Georgia yet. The presented abstract concerns arrange of EM emission net and begin implementation of this vital task by arrangement of the one relevant station on the fault near Tbilisi

  13. Human anthrax outbreak associated with livestock exposure: Georgia, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navdarashvili, A; Doker, T J; Geleishvili, M; Haberling, D L; Kharod, G A; Rush, T H; Maes, E; Zakhashvili, K; Imnadze, P; Bower, W A; Walke, H T; Shadomy, S V

    2016-01-01

    Human anthrax cases reported in the country of Georgia increased 75% from 2011 (n = 81) to 2012 (n = 142). This increase prompted a case-control investigation using 67 culture- or PCR-confirmed cases and 134 controls matched by residence and gender to investigate risk factor(s) for infection during the month before case onset. Independent predictors most strongly associated with disease in the multivariable modelling were slaughtering animals [odds ratio (OR) 7·3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2·9-18·1, P 1 km; 15 (12%) of 125 had sick livestock; and 11 (9%) of 128 respondents reported finding dead livestock. We recommend joint public health and veterinary anthrax case investigations to identify areas of increased risk for livestock anthrax outbreaks, annual anthrax vaccination of livestock in those areas, and public awareness education.

  14. Grape and wine culture in Georgia, the South Caucasus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maghradze David

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2014, the National Wine Agency of the Republic of Georgia initiated a three-year “Research Project for the study of Georgian Grapes and Wine Culture. Through collaborative research by Georgian and foreign institutions and researchers, the project aims to: stimulate research of Georgian viticulture and viniculture, through the lens of the country with the earliest tradition of grape domestication and winemaking; and to reconstruct the continuous development of viticulture and wine culture through time. The project advances the study of grape and wine culture by utilizing a multidisciplinary approach, including: archaeology, history, ethnography, molecular genetics, biomolecular archaeology, palaeobotany, ampelography, enology, climatology and other scientific fields. These studies are diachronic in their approach, beginning with the oldest Neolithic civilizations, to present day, creating a holistic understanding of the continuity and complexity of Georgian Wine Culture to help popularize Georgian Wine throughout the global wine market.

  15. Surface complexation model of uranyl sorption on Georgia kaolinite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, T.E.; Davis, J.A.; Lumpkin, G.R.; Chisari, R.; Waite, T.D.

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption of uranyl on standard Georgia kaolinites (KGa-1 and KGa-1B) was studied as a function of pH (3-10), total U (1 and 10 ??mol/l), and mass loading of clay (4 and 40 g/l). The uptake of uranyl in air-equilibrated systems increased with pH and reached a maximum in the near-neutral pH range. At higher pH values, the sorption decreased due to the presence of aqueous uranyl carbonate complexes. One kaolinite sample was examined after the uranyl uptake experiments by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to determine the U content. It was found that uranium was preferentially adsorbed by Ti-rich impurity phases (predominantly anatase), which are present in the kaolinite samples. Uranyl sorption on the Georgia kaolinites was simulated with U sorption reactions on both titanol and aluminol sites, using a simple non-electrostatic surface complexation model (SCM). The relative amounts of U-binding >TiOH and >AlOH sites were estimated from the TEM/EDS results. A ternary uranyl carbonate complex on the titanol site improved the fit to the experimental data in the higher pH range. The final model contained only three optimised log K values, and was able to simulate adsorption data across a wide range of experimental conditions. The >TiOH (anatase) sites appear to play an important role in retaining U at low uranyl concentrations. As kaolinite often contains trace TiO2, its presence may need to be taken into account when modelling the results of sorption experiments with radionuclides or trace metals on kaolinite. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Fresh Groundwater Resources in Georgia and Management Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaprindashvili, George; Gaprindashvili, Merab

    2015-04-01

    Fresh water represents conditioned factor for human body's life. That's why the superiority of drinking water is recognized as human body's priority according to the international declarations. World is experiencing deficit of quality water. Natural Disasters caused by the pollution of the fresh groundwater is also very painful and acute, because it needed more time, more material and financial means for the liquidation of their results, and what the most important practically is, it is impossible to renew the initial natural conditions completely. All these conditions that the rational use of fresh groundwater passed by the interests of separate countries and became worldwide, international problem - fresh water became as considerable raw material for the worlds import and export. The fresh groundwater place the important role among the water recourses of Georgia. Their existing is considerably connected to the development of industry and agriculture, also with water supply issue of populated area. Groundwater management requires precise knowledge of sources (aquifers). Monitoring of Georgia's most important aquifers started many years ago and has provided large amount of data. This was interrupted at the beginning of the 1990s. It could be noted that fresh water existing in the country is distinguished with high quality. According to the mineralization and temperature parameters groundwater is generally divided into the following groups: 1) Fresh drinking waters (mineralization not exceeding 1.0 g/l); 2) Mineral waters (mineralization over 1.0 g/l); 3) Thermal waters -- healing (20˚C - 35˚C), Geothermal (40˚C - 108˚C). Below we present briefly review about the situation of fresh groundwater resources, started recovery of groundwater monitoring network and the analysis of the management problems.

  17. Importance of the Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries in Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezo Goradze

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The economic downturn in the 1990s and early 2000s associated with the break-up of the Soviet Union had a negative impact on Georgian fisheries. Both marine and freshwater fisheries and aquaculture suffered considerable decline. The Georgian fishing fleet deteriorated. The role of state institutions in fisheries management weakened and funding of scientific research diminished. Economic and institutional problems had a negative effect on the state of aquatic bio-resources. The excessive and relentless use of living resources, use of illegal fishing gear and degradation of coastal ecosystems led to a considerable reduction in fish stocks, while the number of vulnerable and endangered species increased. Starting from the new millennium the attitude has changed. In 2004-2005 the 15-year plan for the development of the ecosystem approach to fisheries in Georgia was initiated with support from the FAO. A Georgian law on fisheries and aquaculture has been introduced. Discussions on responsible fisheries and an aquaculture code have also started, but are still pending. On the other hand, the fisheries department of the Ministry of Agriculture was abolished and the single fisheries research institute met a similar fate. Fisheries regulation came under the authority of the ministry of environment. There is still a lot to be done in order to establish an ecosystem approach to fisheries in Georgia. First of all, the legislative base must be addressed, including the Georgian law on fisheries, which would consider such issues as long-term sustainable development of fisheries, a responsible code of conduct for fishermen, monitoring and management structures at the national level, allocation of resources and application of scientific approaches in development of fisheries, aquaculture and mariculture.

  18. Surface-Water Conditions in Georgia, Water Year 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Jaime A.; Landers, Mark N.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Georgia Water Science Center-in cooperation with Federal, State, and local agencies-collected surface-water streamflow, water-quality, and ecological data during the 2005 Water Year (October 1, 2004-September 30, 2005). These data were compiled into layers of an interactive ArcReaderTM published map document (pmf). ArcReaderTM is a product of Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc (ESRI?). Datasets represented on the interactive map are * continuous daily mean streamflow * continuous daily mean water levels * continuous daily total precipitation * continuous daily water quality (water temperature, specific conductance dissolved oxygen, pH, and turbidity) * noncontinuous peak streamflow * miscellaneous streamflow measurements * lake or reservoir elevation * periodic surface-water quality * periodic ecological data * historical continuous daily mean streamflow discontinued prior to the 2005 water year The map interface provides the ability to identify a station in spatial reference to the political boundaries of the State of Georgia and other features-such as major streams, major roads, and other collection stations. Each station is hyperlinked to a station summary showing seasonal and annual stream characteristics for the current year and for the period of record. For continuous discharge stations, the station summary includes a one page graphical summary page containing five graphs, a station map, and a photograph of the station. The graphs provide a quick overview of the current and period-of-record hydrologic conditions of the station by providing a daily mean discharge graph for the water year, monthly statistics graph for the water year and period of record, an annual mean streamflow graph for the period of record, an annual minimum 7-day average streamflow graph for the period of record, and an annual peak streamflow graph for the period of record. Additionally, data can be accessed through the layer's link

  19. White Paper: Estimating Salinity Effects Due to Climate Change on the Georgia and South Carolina Coasts

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This record is an unpublished white paper describing estimated effects of climate change of salinity on the coastal waterways of Georgia and South Carolina

  20. Do Local Sales Taxes for Education Increase Inequities? The Case of Georgia's ESPLOST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Ross; Freeman, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    Examines Georgia's use of the Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax for Education (ESPLOST). Finds that ESPLOST increases revenue disparities among districts. Discusses policy implications. (Contains 36 references.) (PKP)

  1. Pacific Hake - Growth and natal origin of Pacific hake from the Georgia Basin DPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pacific hake (Merluccius productus) is an abundant species residing along the Pacific coast from the Gulf of California to the Strait of Georgia. It is the most...

  2. FRIDAY: EPA Administrator Visiting Georgia Tech to Discuss Manufacturing Innovation and Environmental Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATLANTA - On Friday, EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy will visit Georgia Tech to speak about the connection between manufacturing innovation and environmental sustainability. McCarthy will meet with more than 50 high school students and faculty parti

  3. Variations in Language: Teaching within the Confines of Black English in Rural Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Amelia

    2014-01-01

    It is the purpose of this paper to describe how the identification of linguistic differences in Black English helped eradicate the language barrier in a rural Georgia classroom and enhanced the communication between the teacher and the students.

  4. Wind Powering America: A New Wind Economy for South Carolina and Georgia Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SC Energy Office: Southern Alliance for Clean Energy

    2013-02-12

    This report describes all activities undertaken by the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE) in cooperation with the states of Georgia and South Carolina to develop a public outreach program, including shared analytical and reference tools and other technical assistance.

  5. 78 FR 929 - Georgia Power Company; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-07

    .... Applicant Contact: George A. Martin, Hydro Relicensing Project Manager, Georgia Power Company, 241 Ralph Mc....com. i. FERC Contact: Allan Creamer, (202) 502-8365, or allan.creamer@ferc.gov . j. This...

  6. 78 FR 62357 - Georgia Power Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions To Intervene...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-21

    .... Martin, Hydro Relicensing Project Manager, Georgia Power Company, 241 Ralph McGill Blvd. NE., BIN 10221... Creamer; Telephone (202) 502-8365; email_ allan.creamer@ferc.gov. j. Deadline for filing motions...

  7. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Georgia, maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0013780)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) maps for the shoreline of Georgia. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  8. Amphibians and agrochemicals: Dermal contact and pesticide uptake from irrigated croplands in SW Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background/Question/Methods Although isolated wetlands comprise a significant portion of amphibian breeding habitats throughout the United States, they are not protected under the Clean Water Act. In SW Georgia where agriculture is dominant within the landscape, many isolated ...

  9. 2016 Newton County, Georgia ADS100 4-Band 8 Bit Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of 0.5-foot pixel resolution, natural color orthoimages covering Newton County, Georgia. An orthoimage is remotely sensed image data in which...

  10. 2016 Walton County, Georgia ADS100 4-Band 8 Bit Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of 0.5-foot pixel resolution, natural color orthoimages covering Walton County, Georgia. An orthoimage is remotely sensed image data in which...

  11. Colour Revolutions Revisited: Relative Deprivation – the Reason for the Rose Revolution in Georgia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nino Machurishvili

    2017-01-01

    ... – revolution period in Georgia, within the framework of Relative Deprivation theory. The linkage between relative deprivation and the Gini coefficient, as well type of existing political regime and Soviet past is considered...

  12. 75 FR 7471 - Chandra Coffee and Rabun Boatworks, Complainants v. Georgia Power Company, Respondent; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Chandra Coffee and Rabun Boatworks, Complainants v. Georgia Power Company... January 8, 2010, Chandra Coffee and Rabun Boatworks (Complainants) filed with the Federal...

  13. 2016 Oconee County, Georgia ADS100 4-Band 8 Bit Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of 0.5-foot pixel resolution, natural color orthoimages covering Oconee County, Georgia. An orthoimage is remotely sensed image data in which...

  14. Solar energy system installed at the North Georgia APDC office building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-01

    Information is provided on the solar energy system installed in the newly constructed office building of the North Georgia Area Planning and Development Commission near downtown Dalton, Georgia. This solar heating, cooling and hot water system supplies 65 to 70% of the cooling demand and 90 to 95% of the heating demand. There are 2,001 square feet of effective Revere collector area, and the absorption chiller is in Arkla model 300 and provides 16 tons of cooling.

  15. Mapping the spatio-temporal evolution of irrigation in the Coastal Plain of Georgia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus D. Williams; Christie M.S. Hawley; Marguerite Madden; J. Marshall Shepherd

    2017-01-01

    This study maps the spatial and temporal evolution of acres irrigated in the Coastal Plain of Georgia over a 38 year period. The goal of this analysis is to create a time-series of irrigated areas in the Coastal Plain of Georgia at a sub-county level. From 1976 through 2013, Landsat images were obtained and sampled at four year intervals to manually...

  16. Are Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) persons protected against discrimination and hate crime in Georgia?

    OpenAIRE

    Japaridze, Sophio

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses whether lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people are protected against discrimination and hate crime in Georgia. Georgia is dominated by deeply rooted traditions, history and religion which promote stigmatisation and enhance existing negative stereotypes of the LGBT community. This is aggravated by state practice and poor legislation which fail to ensure adequate protection of LGBT individuals against discrimination and hate crime. Even though homosexuality ...

  17. Testing models of ice cap extent, South Georgia, sub-Antarctic

    OpenAIRE

    Barlow, NLM; Bentley, MJ; G. Spada; Evans, DJA; Hansom, JD; Brader, MD; White, DA; Zander, A; Berg, S.

    2016-01-01

    The extent of Last Glacial Maximum ice in South Georgia is contested, with two alternative hypotheses: an extensive (maximum) model of ice reaching the edge of the continental shelf, or a restricted (minimum) model with ice constrained within the inner fjords. We present a new relative sea-level dataset for South Georgia, summarising published and new geomorphological evidence for the marine limit and elevations of former sea levels on the island. Using a glacial isostatic adjustment model (A...

  18. Testing models of ice cap extents, South Georgia, sub-Antarctic

    OpenAIRE

    N. L. M. Barlow; Bentley, M.J.; G. Spada; Evans, D.J.A.; Hansom, J.D.; Brader, M.D.; White, D. A.; Zander, A; Berg, S.

    2016-01-01

    The extent of Last Glacial Maximum ice in South Georgia is\\ud contested, with two alternative hypotheses: an extensive (maximum) model ofice reaching the edge of the continental shelf, or a restricted(minimum) model with ice constrained within the inner fjords. We present new relative sea-level dataset for South Georgia, summarising published\\ud and new geomorphological evidence for the marine limit and elevations offormer sea levels on the island. Using a glacial isostatic adjustmentmodel (A...

  19. U.S. Strategic Interests and Georgias Prospects for NATO Membership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    beverages, metals, machinery, and chemicals, as well as the mining of manganese, copper , and gold.53 However, according to the CIA, in 2006, 55.6 percent of...54 According to the National Statistics Office of Georgia, Georgia’s major exports include motor cars, Ferro-alloys, copper ores, nuts, and wine...151 In April 2012, President Obama signed an additional NDAA that stated that “there were two pillars of U.S.-Georgia defense cooperation: U.S

  20. Pelagic tar off Georgia and Florida in relation to physical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, C.; Atkinson, L.; Lee, R.; Blanton, J.

    1980-11-01

    It was hypothesized, following the Ixtoc oil rig blowout in Campeche Bay in August 1979, that resultant tarballs should eventually appear in the Gulf stream off Georgia and that little would reach nearshore areas. Surface tows to collect floating tar were conducted off the coasts of Georgia and Florida to test this hypothesis. No tar was found within 40 km of shore. All samples more than 40 km from shore contained some tar.

  1. Invasive Carassius Carp in Georgia: Current state of knowledge and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bella JAPOSHVILI, Levan MUMLADZE, Fahrettin KÜÇÜK

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In Georgia, crucian carp Carassius carassius (Linnaeus, 1758 was known from only one locality after Kesslers record (1877–1878 with no new findings until 1985. Since then C. carassius rapidly and simultaneously invaded almost all water bodies of Georgia. In 2004, it was for the first time noted that this invasive Carassius sp. could not be a C. Carassius, but was a form of Carassius gibelio (Bloch, 1792. However no further data is available about this invasive species in Georgia. The aim of the present study was to investigate taxonomic status of Carassius sp. in Georgia using mtDNA phylogenetic analyses and morphometric study of truss network system. Genetic analysis revealed that invasive Carassius sp. is closely related to the C. gibelio from Turkey and other countries. In contrast, morphometrically Carassius sp. from Georgia can be easily differentiated from those of Turkey indicating high intraspecific variability. This is the first time discussion on the current knowledge of the present distribution of invasive carp in Georgia with identifying current problems and future research directions needed [Current Zoology 59 (6: 732–739, 2013].

  2. Georgia Institute of Technology chilled water system evaluation and master plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-15

    As the host of the Olympic Village for the 1996 Atlanta Olympics, Georgia Tech has experienced a surge in construction activities over the last three years. Over 1.3 million square feet of new buildings have been constructed on the Georgia Tech campus. This growth has placed a strain on the Georgia Tech community and challenged the facilities support staff charged with planning and organizing utility services. In concert with Olympic construction, utility planners have worked to ensure long term benefits for Georgia Tech facilities while meeting the short term requirements of the Olympic Games. The concentration of building construction in the northwest quadrant of the campus allowed planners to construct a satellite chilled water plant to serve the needs of this area and provide the opportunity to integrate this section of the campus with the main campus chilled water system. This assessment and master plan, funded in part by the US Department of Energy, has evaluated the chilled water infrastructure at Georgia Tech, identified ongoing problems and made recommendations for long term chilled water infrastructure development and efficiency improvements. The Georgia Tech office of Facilities and RDA Engineering, Inc. have worked together to assemble relevant information and prepare the recommendations contained in this document.

  3. Report from the Country of Georgia: Protecting and Promoting Breastfeeding through Regulation of Artificial-Feeding Marketing Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Nemsadze, Ketevan

    2004-01-01

    This paper highlights the southwest Asian country of Georgia's experience in creating efforts to protect and promote breastfeeding and to implement the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes. Since 1994, the country of Georgia (of the former Soviet Union) has successfully implemented the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. In 1997–1998, Georgia conducted a study throughout the country's various regions to evaluate compliance with the International Code of Marketing of Breas...

  4. Ground-water conditions and studies in Georgia, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeth, David C.; Clarke, John S.; Craigg, Steven D.; Wipperfurth, Caryl J.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collects ground-water data and conducts studies to monitor hydrologic conditions, to better define ground-water resources, and address problems related to water supply and water quality. Data collected as part of ground-water studies include geologic, geophysical, hydraulic property, water level, and water quality. A ground-water-level network has been established throughout most of the State of Georgia, and ground-water-quality networks have been established in the cities of Albany, Savannah, and Brunswick and in Camden County, Georgia. Ground-water levels are monitored continuously in a network of wells completed in major aquifers of the State. This network includes 17 wells in the surficial aquifer, 12 wells in the upper and lower Brunswick aquifers, 73 wells in the Upper Floridan aquifer, 10 wells in the Lower Floridan aquifer and underlying units, 12 wells in the Claiborne aquifer, 1 well in the Gordon aquifer, 11 wells in the Clayton aquifer, 11 wells in the Cretaceous aquifer system, 2 wells in Paleozoic-rock aquifers, and 7 wells in crystalline-rock aquifers. In this report, data from these 156 wells were evaluated to determine whether mean-annual ground-water levels were within, below, or above the normal range during 2001, based on summary statistics for the period of record. Information from these summaries indicates that water levels during 2001 were below normal in almost all aquifers monitored, largely reflecting climatic effects from drought and pumping. In addition, water-level hydrographs for selected wells indicate that water levels have declined during the past 5 years (since 1997) in almost all aquifers monitored, with water levels in some wells falling below historical lows. In addition to continuous water-level data, periodic measurements taken in 52 wells in the Camden County-Charlton County area, and 65 wells in the city of Albany-Dougherty County area were used to construct potentiometric-surface maps for

  5. Vulnerability assessment at a national level in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsereteli, N.; Arabidze, V.; Varazanashvili, O.; Gugeshashvili, T.

    2012-04-01

    Vulnerability assessment at a national level in Georgia Nino Tsereteli, Vakhtang Arabidze, Otar Varazanashvili, Tengiz Gugeshashvili The risk always exists when cities are built on. Population growth in cities and urbanization in natural hazard-prone zones leads to infrastructure expansion. The goal of the society is to construct natural hazards resistant infrastructure and minimize the expected losses. This is a complicated task as there is always knowledge deficiency on real seismic hazard and vulnerability. Assessment of vulnerability is vital in risk analysis, as vulnerability is defined in many different ways. Work presented here mostly deals with assessment of infrastructure's and population vulnerability at national level in Georgia. This work was initiated by NATO SFP project "seismic Hazard and Risk Assessment for Southern Caucasus - Eastern Turkey Energy Corridors" and the two work packages WP4 (seismic risk) and WP5 (city scenarios) of risk module of EMME (Earthquake Model of the Middle East Region) project. First step was creation databases (inventory) of elements at risk in GIS. Element at risk were the buildings, population, pipelines. The inventories was studied and Created in GIS for the following categories: Building material, number of stories, number of entrances, condition of building, building period. For pipelines pipe tipe (continous or segmented), material, pipe diameter. Very important is to estimate the initial cost of building for assessment of economic losses. From this purpose the attempt was done and the algorithm of this estimation were prepared taking into account obtained the inventory. Build quality, reliability and durability are of special importance to corresponding state agencies and include different aesthetic, engineering, practical, social, technological and economical aspects. The necessity that all of these aspects satisfy existing normative requirements becomes evident as the building and structures come into exploitation

  6. A comparative study of selected Georgia elementary principals' perceptions of environmental knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joyce League

    This study sought to establish baseline data on environmental knowledge, opinions, and perceptions of elementary principals and to make comparisons based on academic success rankings of schools and to national results. The self-reported study looked at 200 elementary principals in the state of Georgia. The population selected for the study included principals from the 100 top and 100 bottom academically ranked elementary schools as reported in the Georgia Public Policy Foundation Report Card for Parents. Their scores on the NEETF/Roper Environmental Knowledge Survey were compared between these two Georgia groups and to a national sample. Georgia elementary principals' scores were compared to environmental programs evident in their schools. The two Georgia groups were also compared on environmental opinion and perception responses on mandates, programs in schools and time devoted to these, environmental education as a priority, and the impact of various factors on the strength of environmental studies in schools. Georgia elementary principals leading schools at the bottom of the academic performance scale achieved environmental knowledge scores comparable to the national sample. However, principals of academically successful schools scored significantly higher on environmental knowledge than their colleagues from low performing schools (p education curriculum for Georgia. The two groups were comparable on distributions of time devoted to environmental education across grade levels; however, principals from the more successful schools reported significantly (p education as an instructional priority in their schools; principals supervising successful school programs viewed environmental education as a higher priority. These successful principals also recognized the importance of both administrator and staff interest as influencing factors and ranked these two variables as strongly impacting the success or failure of environmental initiatives in schools. Comparison of

  7. Survey of intersex largemouth bass from impoundments in Georgia USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellock, Kristen A.; Trushel, Brittany E.; Ely, Patrick C.; Jennings, Cecil A.; Bringolf, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Intersex fish are increasingly being reported worldwide, primarily in rivers that receive treated wastewater, but few studies have investigated intersex in waters that do not receive wastewater. In a recent reconnaissance survey of intersex fish in North America, a high rate of intersex was reported for Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides in some southeastern U.S. rivers; however, the occurrence of intersex in impoundments has not been well described, especially on a statewide scale. Therefore, our objective for this project was to survey the occurrence of intersex Largemouth Bass in a variety of impoundment habitats across Georgia. Largemouth Bass were collected from 11 impoundments without direct municipal or agricultural wastewater inputs. Gonads from all male Largemouth Bass were evaluated for the incidence and severity of the intersex condition based on presence and arrangement of testicular oocytes. Overall 48% of male Largemouth Bass collected from impoundments were intersex, which was found in 9 of the 11 impoundments. Among impoundments, incidence of intersex ranged from 0 to 82% of the males sampled and surface area of the impoundment was a significant predictor of intersex incidence. Intersex fish were smaller than normal males, but population-level effects of intersex and causative factors of endocrine disruption in the impoundments remain unknown. The high incidence of intersex males in small impoundments demonstrates that the condition is not confined to rivers and suggests that factors other than those previously associated with intersex (i.e., municipal wastewater) may be involved.

  8. Human Anthrax Transmission at the Urban-Rural Interface, Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracalik, Ian; Malania, Lile; Imnadze, Paata; Blackburn, Jason K

    2015-12-01

    Human anthrax has increased dramatically in Georgia and was recently linked to the sale of meat in an urban market. We assessed epidemiological trends and risk factors for human anthrax at the urban-rural interface. We reviewed epidemiologic records (2000-2012) that included the place of residence (classified as urban, peri-urban, or rural), age, gender, and self-reported source of infection (handling or processing animal by-products and slaughtering or butchering livestock). To estimate risk, we used a negative binomial regression. The average incidence per 1 million population in peri-urban areas (24.5 cases) was > 2-fold higher compared with rural areas and > 3-fold higher compared with urban area. Risk from handling or purchasing meat was nearly 2-fold higher in urban areas and > 4-fold higher in peri-urban areas compared with rural area. Our findings suggest a high risk of anthrax in urban and peri-urban areas likely as a result of spillover from contaminated meat and animal by-products. Consumers should be warned to purchase meat only from licensed merchants.

  9. Human Anthrax Transmission at the Urban–Rural Interface, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracalik, Ian; Malania, Lile; Imnadze, Paata; Blackburn, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    Human anthrax has increased dramatically in Georgia and was recently linked to the sale of meat in an urban market. We assessed epidemiological trends and risk factors for human anthrax at the urban–rural interface. We reviewed epidemiologic records (2000–2012) that included the place of residence (classified as urban, peri-urban, or rural), age, gender, and self-reported source of infection (handling or processing animal by-products and slaughtering or butchering livestock). To estimate risk, we used a negative binomial regression. The average incidence per 1 million population in peri-urban areas (24.5 cases) was > 2-fold higher compared with rural areas and > 3-fold higher compared with urban area. Risk from handling or purchasing meat was nearly 2-fold higher in urban areas and > 4-fold higher in peri-urban areas compared with rural area. Our findings suggest a high risk of anthrax in urban and peri-urban areas likely as a result of spillover from contaminated meat and animal by-products. Consumers should be warned to purchase meat only from licensed merchants. PMID:26438026

  10. Mobile Operator Supports Refugees and Disabled in Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zviad KIRTAVA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Collapse of USSR and declaration of independence by Georgia was followed by ethnic conflicts provoked by Russia, and de-facto loosing of South Ossetia and Abkhazia, with about 300,000 internally displaced persons (IDPs. New wave of tens of thousands IDPs - mainly from South Ossetia and Shida Kartli - have emerged since recent Russian occupation of Georgian territories in August 2008. Refugees, considering their economical and psycho-social problems, are needy for communication as cell phones often remain a main hope for establishing contacts and new social networking. One of the major mobile operator (MO – Geocell introduced during 4 months special tariff for refugees - 0, 09 GEL (0,044€ per min –70% reduction of basic rate. Around 56% of refugees have used that emergency relief measure. MO also helps deaf-mute persons by providing special SMS rate - 0, 02 GEL (1/3 of usual and supporting computer center where it educates such disabled with future employment prospects (7 persons – at MO office.

  11. Aquatic dissipation of triclopyr in Lake Seminole, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodburn, K.B.; Green, W.R.; Westerdahl, H.E.

    1993-01-01

    A field study was conducted to evaluate the environmental dissipation of triclopyr herbicide under aquatic-use conditions. Three 4-h plots in Lake Seminole, Georgia, were selected for use: one control, one aerial plot, and one subsurface plot; both applications were at the maximum aquatic-use rate of 2.5 mg/L. Water, sediment, plants, fish, clams, and crayfish were all analyzed for residues, and water temperature, oxygen levels, pH, and conductivity were monitored. The half-life for aqueous-phase triclopyr ranged from 0.5 to 3.6 days, and the dissipation in surface and bottom waters was equivalent. The intermediate decay product of triclopyr, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP), had an observed aquatic half-life of less than 1 day. No accumulation of triclopyr or TCP on sediment was observed. The half-life of triclopyr metabolized by aquatic plants averaged 4 days. Fish species did not exhibit any bioconcentration of triclopyr or TCP, with only trace amounts of either compound found in fish tissue. Both clams and crayfish contained detectable residues of triclopyr. The elimination of triclopyr from clam tissue was more rapid, with an observed half-life of 1.5 days, vs 12 days for crayfish; retention of triclopyr in the crayfish carcass (carapace, chelopeds, and gills) may have been an important mechanism. There was no detectable decline in water quality in either treatment plot. ?? 1993 American Chemical Society.

  12. Energy conserving site design case study: Shenandoah, Georgia. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    The case study examines the means by which energy conservation can be achieved at an aggregate community level by using proper planning and analytical techniques for a new town, Shenandoah, Georgia, located twenty-five miles southwest of Atlanta's Hartsfield International Airport. A potentially implementable energy conservation community plan is achieved by a study team examining the land use options, siting characteristics of each building type, alternate infrastructure plans, possible decentralized energy options, and central utility schemes to determine how community energy conservation can be achieved by use of pre-construction planning. The concept for the development of mixed land uses as a passively sited, energy conserving community is based on a plan (Level 1 Plan) that uses the natural site characteristics, maximizes on passive energy siting requirement, and allows flexibility for the changing needs of the developers. The Level 2 Plan is identical with Level 1 plan plus a series of decentraized systems that have been added to the residential units: the single-family detached, the apartments, and the townhouses. Level 3 Plan is similar to the Level 1 Plan except that higher density dwellings have been moved to areas adjacent to central site. The total energy savings for each plan relative to the conventional plan are indicated. (MCW)

  13. Integrated mined-area reclamation and land-use planning. Volume 3C. A case study of surface mining and reclamation planning: Georgia Kaolin Company Clay Mines, Washington County, Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guernsey, J L; Brown, L A; Perry, A O

    1978-02-01

    This case study examines the reclamation practices of the Georgia Kaolin's American Industrial Clay Company Division, a kaolin producer centered in Twiggs, Washington, and Wilkinson Counties, Georgia. The State of Georgia accounts for more than one-fourth of the world's kaolin production and about three-fourths of U.S. kaolin output. The mining of kaolin in Georgia illustrates the effects of mining and reclaiming lands disturbed by area surface mining. The disturbed areas are reclaimed under the rules and regulations of the Georgia Surface Mining Act of 1968. The natural conditions influencing the reclamation methodologies and techniques are markedly unique from those of other mining operations. The environmental disturbances and procedures used in reclaiming the kaolin mined lands are reviewed and implications for planners are noted.

  14. 78 FR 54234 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, Georgia, Authorization of Production Activity PBR, Inc. d/b/a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 26--Atlanta, Georgia, Authorization of Production Activity PBR, Inc. d/b/a SKAPS Industries (Polypropylene Geotextiles), Athens, Georgia On April 8,...

  15. A value orientation approach to assess and compare climate change risk perception among trout anglers in Georgia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh Paudyal; Neelam C. Poudyal; J.M. Bowker; Adrienne M. Dorison; Stanley J. Zarnoch; Gary T. Green

    2015-01-01

    Trout in Georgia could experience early impacts from climate change as the streams in the region are located at the southern most edge of their North American home range. This study surveyed trout anglers in Georgia to understand how anglers perceive the potential impact of climate change on trout, and whether and how their perception and response to declines in trout...

  16. 75 FR 71487 - Norfolk Southern Railway Company-Abandonment Exemption-in Crawford County, GA; Georgia Midland...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-23

    ... TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Norfolk Southern Railway Company--Abandonment Exemption--in Crawford County, GA; Georgia Midland Railroad, Inc.\\1\\--Discontinuance of Service Exemption--in Crawford County... discontinuing railroad-- not Georgia Midland Railroad Company, as indicated in the notice. Norfolk Southern...

  17. The Role of Media Specialists with Respect to Instructional Technology in an Urban School District in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetzel, Warren Reid

    2011-01-01

    Due to the absence of a Georgia Educator Certificate in instructional technology, and the lack of state-wide staffing guidelines or requirements for instructional technology specialists, there is a lack of consistency in the qualifications and staffing of P-12 instructional technology specialists in Georgia public schools. The result is a lack of…

  18. Teachers' Attitudes toward Assessment of Student Learning and Teacher Assessment Practices in General Educational Institutions: The Case of Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitiashvili, Anastasia

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to study teachers' attitudes toward assessment of students' learning and their assessment practices in Georgia's general educational institutions. Georgia is a country in the South Caucasus with a population of 4.5 million people, with 2300 general educational institutions and about 559,400 students. The research…

  19. The Economic and Fiscal Costs of Failing to Reform K-12 Education in Georgia. School Choice Issues in the State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlob, Brian J.

    2009-01-01

    This study documents the public costs of high school dropouts in Georgia, and examines how policies that increase school choice, such as the recently-enacted tuition tax credit scholarship program will provide large public benefits by increasing public school graduation rates. The study calculates the annual cost of Georgia dropouts caused by…

  20. Return to normal streamflows and water levels: summary of hydrologic conditions in Georgia, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaak, Andrew E.; Caslow, Kerry; Peck, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) South Atlantic Water Science Center (SAWSC) Georgia office, in cooperation with local, State, and other Federal agencies, maintains a long-term hydrologic monitoring network of more than 340 real-time continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations (streamgages), including 10 real-time lake-level monitoring stations, 67 real-time surface-water-quality monitors, and several water-quality sampling programs. Additionally, the SAWSC Georgia office operates more than 180 groundwater monitoring wells, 39 of which are real-time. The wide-ranging coverage of streamflow, reservoir, and groundwater monitoring sites allows for a comprehensive view of hydrologic conditions across the State. One of the many benefits of this monitoring network is that the analyses of the data provide a spatially distributed overview of the hydrologic conditions of creeks, rivers, reservoirs, and aquifers in Georgia.

  1. [Technical assistance to Georgia industries]. Final CRADA report for CRADA Number Y-1293-0230

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, A.A.

    1997-03-14

    The purpose of this CRADA was to provide a mechanism whereby private sector companies within the State of Georgia could access the vast technological resources available at the Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., facilities in oak Ridge, Tennessee. This assistance was focused on assisting companies within the State to become more globally competitive. The Georgia Tech Research Corporation and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (LMES), provided companies within the state of Georgia up to four days of technical assistance at no charge. As a result of those interactions, there has been an economic impact of $5.1 million dollars reported over the life of the CRADA. This report contains a review of the objectives of this CRADA, and the status of each objective. It also contains information on how the work performed under this CRADA benefited the sponsor in pursuing its mission. Details of private sector impact and how it was measured and collected are discussed.

  2. EFFECT OF TURKISH PUBLIC DIPLOMACY ACTIVITIES ON RELATIONS BETWEEN TURKEY AND GEORGIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinem Celik

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to analyze the impact power of Turkish public diplomacy performed towards Georgia to empower the relation between both countries. Within the scope of this article, after public diplomacy term was discussed in many aspects, some of the important activities of the actors of Turkish public diplomacy have also been mentioned. When these activities are examined, it has been observed that non-governmental organizations failed to show the desired level of asset compared to government agencies in Georgia. Besides, when Turkish public diplomacy activities are examined as a whole, it has been remarked that these activities play an effective role to gain the sympathy of the Georgian. However, it has been concluded that the impacts of these activities on Turkey- Georgia relations are limited especially due to the Russian influence on relations with each of these two countries.

  3. Genomic analysis of highly virulent Georgia 2007/1 isolate of African swine fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, David A G; Darby, Alistair C; Da Silva, Melissa; Upton, Chris; Radford, Alan D; Dixon, Linda K

    2011-04-01

    African swine fever is widespread in Africa but has occasionally been introduced into other continents. In June 2007, African swine fever was isolated in the Caucasus Region of the Republic of Georgia and subsequently in neighboring countries (Armenia, Azerbaijan, and 9 states of the Russian Federation). Previous data for sequencing of 3 genes indicated that the Georgia 2007/1 isolate is closely related to isolates of genotype II, which has been identified in Mozambique, Madagascar, and Zambia. We report the complete genomic coding sequence of the Georgia 2007/1 isolate and comparison with other isolates. A genome sequence of 189,344 bp encoding 166 open reading frames (ORFs) was obtained. Phylogeny based on concatenated sequences of 125 conserved ORFs showed that this isolate clustered most closely with the Mkuzi 1979 isolate. Some ORFs clustered differently, suggesting that recombination may have occurred. Results provide a baseline for monitoring genomic changes in this virus.

  4. A consolidated list of Triticum species and varieties of Georgia to promote repatriation of local diversity from foreign genebanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mosulishvili

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Georgia is one of the most important centers of diversity of the domesticated wheat. Five out of the fourteen wheat species found in Georgia, originate from Georgia and are local endems. They represent transitional forms from wild to domesticated wheat. Their examination could contribute in evalutionary studies of wheat. Unfortunately, the Georgia wheats are often overlooked as are not accessible for researchers. To promote better understanding of the wheat diversity in Georgia and facilitate its acquisition and identification, the authors of the present paper developed a comprehensive list of the wheat taxa, which can be used as reference for search of wheat samples missing in the local collections. As many as 184 variations of wheat are present in the consolidated list.

  5. Periodontal status among adolescents in Georgia. A pathfinder study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liran Levin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the present pathfinder study was to screen and map the periodontal status of Georgian population in accordance with the guidelines of the World Health Organization for population based surveys. Methods. During 2012, a pathfinder study was conducted to collect this data. For the periodontal portion of the study, 15-year-old school children were examined in the capital city of Tbilisi as well as in two other large cities and 4 smaller villages. All participants were examined by a trained dental team in a classroom using a dental mirror and a periodontal probe. Periodontal examination included plaque scores, calculus scores, probing depth measurements and bleeding on probing. These measurements were recorded for the Ramfjord index teeth. Results. A total of 397 15-year-old participants were examined in this pathfinder study. There were 240 females (60.45% and 157 males (39.55%. Of the total participants 196 (49.37% were urban adolescents while 201 (50.63% were from rural communities. Mean probing depth was 3.34 ± 0.57 mm with a range of 1 to 10 mm; a relatively high proportion (34.26% of these subjects presented with at least one site with pockets of 5 mm or deeper. Males presented with greater plaque, calculus and probing depths than females. When urban and rural populations were compared, urban participants presented with more plaque, probing depths and bleeding on probing. Greater pocket depths were found to be related to the presence of plaque calculus and bleeding on probing. Conclusions. Overall, rather high incidences of periodontal pockets ≥ 5 mm were detected in this population. This data should serve to prepare further more detailed epidemiological studies that will serve to plan and implement prevent and treat strategies for periodontal diseases in Georgia and also help make manpower decisions.

  6. Attitudes towards smoking restrictions and tobacco advertisement bans in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhturidze, George D; Mittelmark, Maurice B; Aarø, Leif E; Peikrishvili, Nana T

    2013-11-25

    This study aims to provide data on a public level of support for restricting smoking in public places and banning tobacco advertisements. A nationally representative multistage sampling design, with sampling strata defined by region (sampling quotas proportional to size) and substrata defined by urban/rural and mountainous/lowland settlement, within which census enumeration districts were randomly sampled, within which households were randomly sampled, within which a randomly selected respondent was interviewed. The country of Georgia, population 4.7 million, located in the Caucasus region of Eurasia. One household member aged between 13 and 70 was selected as interviewee. In households with more than one age-eligible person, selection was carried out at random. Of 1588 persons selected, 14 refused to participate and interviews were conducted with 915 women and 659 men. Respondents were interviewed about their level of agreement with eight possible smoking restrictions/bans, used to calculate a single dichotomous (agree/do not agree) opinion indicator. The level of agreement with restrictions was analysed in bivariate and multivariate analyses by age, gender, education, income and tobacco use status. Overall, 84.9% of respondents indicated support for smoking restrictions and tobacco advertisement bans. In all demographic segments, including tobacco users, the majority of respondents indicated agreement with restrictions, ranging from a low of 51% in the 13-25 age group to a high of 98% in the 56-70 age group. Logistic regression with all demographic variables entered showed that agreement with restrictions was higher with age, and was significantly higher among never smokers as compared to daily smokers. Georgian public opinion is normatively supportive of more stringent tobacco-control measures in the form of smoking restrictions and tobacco advertisement bans.

  7. Ecological investigation of a hazardous waste site, Warner Robins, Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Billig, P. [Camp Dresser and McKee, Inc., Denver, CO (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Landfill No. 4 and the sludge lagoon at Robins Air Force Base, Warner Robins, Georgia, were added to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Priorities List in 1987 because of highpotential for contaminant migration. Warner Robins is located approximately 90 miles southeast of Atlanta. In 1990 CH2M HILL conducted a Remedial Investigation at the base that recommended that further ecological assessment investigations be conducted (CH2M HILL 1990). The subject paper is the result of this recommendation. The ecological study was carried out by the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP)Division of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., working jointly with its subcontractor CDM (CDM 1992a). The primary area of investigation (Zone 1) included the sludge lagoon, Landfill No. 4, the wetland area east of the landfill and west of Hannah Road (including two sewage treatment ponds), and the area between Hannah Road and Horse Creek (Fig. 1). The bottomland forest wetlands of Zone 1 extend from the landfill east to Horse Creek. Surface water and groundwater flow across Zone 1 is generally in an easterly direction toward Horse Creek. Horse Creek is a south-flowing tributary of the Ocmulgee River Floodplain. The objective of the study was to perform a quantitative analysis of ecological risk associated with the ecosystems present in Zone 1. This investigation was unique because the assessment was to be based upon many measurement endpoints resulting in both location-specific data and data that would assess the condition of the overall ecosystem. The study was segregated into five distinct field investigations: hydrology, surface water and sediment, aquatic biology, wetlands ecology, and wildlife biology.

  8. Factors of soil diversity in the Batumi delta (Georgia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Bülent; Ateş, Merve

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine certain basic properties of soils in the Batumi delta (southwestern Georgia) to determine the relationships of studied properties and to identify differences with regards to these properties between different sampling sites in the delta that were selected based on the delta morphology. In this context, a total of 125 soil samples were collected from five different sampling sites, and the clay, silt and sand content of the samples were determined along with their mean weight diameter (MWD) values, aggregate stability (AS) values, amount of water retained under -33 (FC) and -1500 kPa (WP) pressure and organic matter (OM) content. Correlation analysis indicated that clay content and OM were positively correlated with MWD, and OM was positively correlated with AS. However, the sand content was found to be negatively correlated with MWD. In addition, clay, silt and OM content were positive correlated with FC and WP. Variance analysis results determined statistically significant differences between the sampling sites with respect to all of the evaluated properties. The active delta section of the study area was characterized by high sand content, while the lower delta plain was characterized by high OM and AS values, and the upper delta plain was characterized by high MWD values, high FC and WP moisture content levels and high clay and silt content. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that the examined properties were significantly affected by the different morphological positions and usages of these different areas. These results may help with the management of agricultural lands in the Batumi delta, which has never been studied before.

  9. A decade of AMS at University of Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culp, Randy, E-mail: rculp@uga.edu [Center for Applied Isotope Studies, University of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Noakes, John; Cherkinsky, Alex; Ravi Prasad, G.V.; Dvoracek, Doug [Center for Applied Isotope Studies, University of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2013-01-15

    In a span of 10 years, University of Georgia's Center for Applied Isotope Studies (CAIS) has transformed itself from principally a liquid scintillation counting (LSC) laboratory to one conducting thousands of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and stable isotope ratio analysis (SIRA) annually. After receiving the first of the NEC compact AMS units in the United States, the CAIS began to meet the demand for {sup 14}C analysis outside the normal realm of most radiocarbon dating laboratories. With industry's support, isotope research continued on an already developing natural products program to authenticate materials origin and process of formation. The CAIS's AMS allowed for the detection of synthetic materials in milligram quantities rather than gram quantities required by LSC and allowed new compound specific SIRA techniques to be directed toward compound specific {sup 14}C measurement. By 2005 the CAIS was one of only a few laboratories accredited to determine bio-base content in industrial fuels and products by both AMS and LSC following ASTM D6866-10 [1]. Since 2001, when our first sample was analyzed by AMS method, both radiocarbon and natural products sample numbers have increased steadily. The advantages of AMS analysis in overall efficiency, cost savings, accuracy, and precision, are detailed here in a review of analytical precision for radiocarbon and natural products analyzed over 10 years of AMS operation. Comparisons are made between natural products and bio-based materials analyzed by both AMS and LSC. Although high precision is not required to authenticate natural products, for the purpose of product comparison with regard to degree of naturalness accurate and precise {sup 14}C measurement is shown to be achievable by both methods.

  10. Island effects on marine production and circulation around the island of South Georgia, Southern Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In high-nutrient low-chlorophyll waters of the south-western Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, an intense phytoplankton bloom is observed annually north of South Georgia (37°W, 55°S). South Georgia blooms have a vital role in the ecosystem surrounding the island, and have been linked to one of the strongest seasonal atmospheric-carbon uptake in the open Southern Ocean. Which environmental conditions drive such remarkable productivity are still under debate, and were investigated in the c...

  11. Comparative analysis of Multiple risks in the Western part of Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsereteli, N.; Chelidze, T.; Varazanashvili, O.; Amiranashvili, A.

    2009-04-01

    Georgia is prone to catastrophes. In the last two decades, there have occurred the following natural disasters: (a) Avalanches in Svaneti and Khevsureti, (b) landslides in the mountainous Achara, floods, (c) hurricane and drought in West and East Georgia, (d) Racha earthquake of 1991 and (e) the Tbilisi Earthquake of 2002. These phenomena are very special both from ecological and from social-economical points of view. By the disaster risk index obtained by the UNDP, Georgia is similar to countries with medium and high level risk. Therefore, natural disasters in Georgia are considered as a negative factor in the development process of the country. This implies the necessity of more active actions by all possible means to reduce the risk of natural disasters at each level and maintain the sustainable economic development of the country, including good education at the universities and schools for real understanding of natural hazards. The main goal of the work here is the assessment of 12 widespread natural disasters and multiple risks for political districts in West Georgia. These natural disasters include earthquakes, landslides, avalanches, floods, mudflows, droughts, hurricanes, lightning, hail, glaze, freezes, mists. The research was based on the following steps: (a) Creation of electronic detailed databases of natural disasters that occurred in Georgia. These databases consist of the parameters of such hazardous phenomena class that caused natural disasters. (b) Quantitative investigation of energetic and spatial-time regularities of 12 natural disasters for the territory of Georgia. Estimation of people and environment (technosphere) vulnerability. (c) Elaboration of mathematical models and algorithms of disasters multiple risks taking into account the concrete conditions: (i) Sharing and generalization of gathered experience in the world. This allows more proper and wide comparison of the multiple risks of Caucasus countries; (ii) Taking into account the

  12. Outcomes among Asylum Seekers in Atlanta, Georgia, 2003--2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Dabney P; Donato, Caitlin E; Malewezi, Bridget A; Li, Anyie J; Corea, Mario J; Mitchell, Andrew B

    2015-10-01

    INTRODUCTION Asylum seekers face a wide array of challenges, including the need for a fair and just adjudication process. In the state of Georgia, the Atlanta Asylum Network addresses the needs of such individuals by providing them physical, psychological and gynecological assessments, the results of which are presented to the courts in the asylum appeal process. OBJECTIVE As a component of the Network's program evaluation, assess outcomes among asylum seekers using its services, as well as relation of outcomes to type of service provided, the individual's geographic origin and English language proficiency. METHODS A retrospective examination was conducted of program data gathered by the Network between 2003 and 2012. Subjects included asylum seekers who received assessments by the Network during this period. The primary variable of interest was the final case outcome, defined as determination of asylum status: granted, withholding of removal, administrative closure and prosecutorial discretion, denied or voluntary departure. Outcomes were subsequently collapsed into a single positive or negative outcome variable. Positive outcomes included asylum granted, removal withheld, administrative closure and prosecutorial discretion. Negative outcomes included asylum denied and voluntary departure. We conducted bivariate and multivariate analyses, relating final case outcomes to Network services, geographic origin and English language proficiency, among the key variables. RESULTS A total of 69 of 120 asylum seekers in the study had a known final case outcome, and of those, 63.8% (44) had a positive outcome; or 37% of the total number of asylum seekers (n = 120). Among the 20 who received 2 of the 3 types of assessment (physical, psychological, gynecological), 16 (80%) received a positive case outcome. Most persons with a known final outcome came from Africa (41), where 78% (32) of cases resulted positive. Asylum seekers not proficient in English were 2.4 times more likely

  13. Beyond the "fit": introducing climate forecasts among organic farmers in Georgia (United States)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Furman, C.; Roncoli, C.; Crane, T.A.; Hoogenboom, G.

    2011-01-01

    Organic farmers are a prime clientele for climate services by virtue of their social profile and vulnerability of produce to climate extremes. The study draws on an online survey and in-depth interviews with organic farmers in Georgia (United States). It shows that organic farmers access and act on

  14. Trade Competition and Route Development in Georgia and the Carolinas, 1740-1900.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, David C.

    1998-01-01

    Employs a graphical analysis evaluating the evolution of the transportation network in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain sections of Georgia and the Carolinas. Concludes that transport expansion appears to support the general parameters of the ideal-typical sequence model and provides useful material for instruction related to the national standards…

  15. Red, White, and Black: The Meaning of Loyalty in Georgia Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Rhonda K.; Bohan, Chara Haeussler

    2014-01-01

    During the aftermath of the First Red Scare in the 1930s and during the early stages of the Cold War in the 1940s, the United States engaged in a great national effort to preserve and protect its capitalist system from international rival--the communist Soviet Union. In the American South, states such as Georgia, Mississippi, and Alabama faced a…

  16. Methyl Bromide alternatives for vegetable production in Georgia: Small-plot trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    In Georgia, the loss of MeBr directly impacts the production and profitability of several fruiting vegetables [specifically, pepper (Capsicum annuum L.), eggplant (Solanum melogena L.), and tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill)) and cucurbits (specifically, squash [yellow (Cucurbita pepo L.)], melon...

  17. 77 FR 58096 - Georgia Transmission Corporation: Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment and To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... decision-making in its Section 106 review process. Any party ] wishing to participate more directly with... Rural Utilities Service Georgia Transmission Corporation: Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment and To Hold Public Scoping Meetings AGENCY: Rural Utilities Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice...

  18. Cohort Comparisons in Resources and Functioning among Centenarians: Findings from the Georgia Centenarian Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jinmyoung; Martin, Peter; Margrett, Jennifer; MacDonald, Maurice; Poon, Leonard W.; Johnson, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine cohort comparisons in levels of resources (e.g., mental health, physical functioning, economic and social resources, and cognitive functioning) for 211 community-dwelling centenarians (whose Mini-Mental Status Examination score was 23 or higher) of phases I and III of the Georgia Centenarian Study. The…

  19. 33 CFR 165.751 - Security Zone: LNG mooring slip, Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone: LNG mooring slip... § 165.751 Security Zone: LNG mooring slip, Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia. (a) Security zone. The... security zone; or (4) Actively engaged in escort, maneuvering, or support duties for an LNG tankship....

  20. Trees and business district preferences: a case study of Athens, Georgia, U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen L. Wolf

    2004-01-01

    As a National Main Street program participant, Athens, Georgia, U.S., has included streetscape tree plantings in economic development efforts. The Main Street program assists downtown merchant groups with physical improvements planning in order to create vital retail environments. If comprehensively managed, the urban forest can be a...

  1. An Empirical Case Study of a Child Sexual Abuse Prevention Initiative in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Daniel J.; Fawcett, Stephen B.; Thigpen, Sally; Curtis, Anna; Wright, Renee

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This empirical case study describes Prevent Child Abuse Georgia's effort to prevent child sexual abuse (CSA) by educating communities throughout the state on supporting preventive behaviour. The initiative consisted of three major components: (1) dissemination of CSA prevention messages and materials; (2) a statewide helpline that…

  2. Higher Education in Transition: From Corruption to Freedom of Information in Post-Soviet Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostiashvili, Ketevan

    2012-01-01

    This article examines higher education reforms in the Republic of Georgia, tracing changes before and after the Rose Revolution. The transformation of this higher education system is one of gradual evolution, moving from a centrally controlled and corrupt system into a more transparent and organized system through a series of reforms, including…

  3. Genetic diversity, virulence, and Meloidogyne incognita interactions of Fusarium oxysporum isolates causing cotton wilt in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locally severe outbreaks of Fusarium wilt of cotton (Gossypium spp.) in South Georgia raised concerns about the genotypes of the causal pathogen, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum. Vegetative complementation tests and DNA sequence analysis were used to determine genetic diversity among 492 F. ox...

  4. Two Roadmaps, One Destination: The Economic Progress Paradigm in Teacher Education Accountability in Georgia and Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Joseph R., Jr.; Cuenca, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The current accountability conversation in teacher education is the direct result of the policy paradigms that shape our understandings of schooling and reform. The authors present cases from Georgia and Missouri illustrating how these policy paradigms have resulted in outcomes-based accountability initiatives for teacher education. Specifically,…

  5. 78 FR 43273 - Central of Georgia Railroad Company-Abandonment Exemption-in Newton County, Ga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Central of Georgia Railroad Company--Abandonment Exemption--in Newton County... the intersection of Washington Street SW., and Turner Lake Road SW., in Covington), in Newton...

  6. 78 FR 21065 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia: New Source Review-Prevention of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-09

    ..., 2013, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit issued an order vacating and... with respect to these provisions. Id. The D.C. Circuit Court's decision can be found in the docket for.... Circuit Court's decision, EPA is not taking action at this time on any portions of Georgia's PSD...

  7. Experience with LEDS and NAMA Low Carbon Strategies: The Case of Georgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mdivani, Kakhaberi; Hoppe, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS) and National Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) have the potential to support developing countries in attaining low carbon goals. In spite of the evident potential, there is a need to learn from practice. This paper explores the case of Georgia. The

  8. Building hierarchical models of avian distributions for the State of Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J.E.; Peterson, J.T.; Conroy, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    To predict the distributions of breeding birds in the state of Georgia, USA, we built hierarchical models consisting of 4 levels of nested mapping units of decreasing area: 90,000 ha, 3,600 ha, 144 ha, and 5.76 ha. We used the Partners in Flight database of point counts to generate presence and absence data at locations across the state of Georgia for 9 avian species: Acadian flycatcher (Empidonax virescens), brownheaded nuthatch (Sitta pusilla), Carolina wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus), indigo bunting (Passerina cyanea), northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis), prairie warbler (Dendroica discolor), yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyxus americanus), white-eyed vireo (Vireo griseus), and wood thrush (Hylocichla mustelina). At each location, we estimated hierarchical-level-specific habitat measurements using the Georgia GAP Analysis18 class land cover and other Geographic Information System sources. We created candidate, species-specific occupancy models based on previously reported relationships, and fit these using Markov chain Monte Carlo procedures implemented in OpenBugs. We then created a confidence model set for each species based on Akaike's Information Criterion. We found hierarchical habitat relationships for all species. Three-fold cross-validation estimates of model accuracy indicated an average overall correct classification rate of 60.5%. Comparisons with existing Georgia GAP Analysis models indicated that our models were more accurate overall. Our results provide guidance to wildlife scientists and managers seeking predict avian occurrence as a function of local and landscape-level habitat attributes.

  9. Higher Education in Transition: From Corruption to Freedom of Information in Post-Soviet Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostiashvili, Ketevan

    2012-01-01

    This article examines higher education reforms in the Republic of Georgia, tracing changes before and after the Rose Revolution. The transformation of this higher education system is one of gradual evolution, moving from a centrally controlled and corrupt system into a more transparent and organized system through a series of reforms, including…

  10. 78 FR 25579 - Georgia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    ...-.07(1). Treatment Exemptions for 10/04/05......... Hazardous Waste Mixtures (``Headworks exemptions... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Georgia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions... to EPA for final authorization of changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource...

  11. An Empirical Case Study of a Child Sexual Abuse Prevention Initiative in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Daniel J.; Fawcett, Stephen B.; Thigpen, Sally; Curtis, Anna; Wright, Renee

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This empirical case study describes Prevent Child Abuse Georgia's effort to prevent child sexual abuse (CSA) by educating communities throughout the state on supporting preventive behaviour. The initiative consisted of three major components: (1) dissemination of CSA prevention messages and materials; (2) a statewide helpline that…

  12. Military vehicle trafficking impacts on vegetation and soil bulk density at Fort Benning, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potential increases in wind erosion that might be brought about by military vehicles travelling on off-road sites during training are of concern to the Military establishment. Field studies were conducted in the summer of 2012 at Fort Benning, Georgia. The objective of the experiment was to assess t...

  13. Military vehicle trafficking impacts vegetation and soil bulk density at Fort Benning, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potential increases in wind erosion that might be brought about by military vehicles travelling off-road during training are of concern to the United States military. Field studies were conducted in the summer of 2012 at Fort Benning, Georgia. The objective of the experiment was to assess the traffi...

  14. 77 FR 1873 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia; Rome; Fine Particulate Matter 2002...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-12

    ... Submittal III. Final Action IV. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews I. Background On July 18, 1997 (62 FR... Area. Subsequently, on April 5, 2011 (76 FR 18650), EPA determined that the Rome Area attained the 1997... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia; Rome; Fine...

  15. 75 FR 10865 - Shoreline Management Initiative, Reservoirs in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... Environmental Policy Act. In 1999, TVA adopted its current Shoreline Management Policy (SMP) to implement the preferred alternative in the November 1998 environmental impact statement (EIS) for the Shoreline Management... Shoreline Management Initiative, Reservoirs in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina...

  16. The Struggle for Industrial Education in the "Lowell of the South," Columbus, Georgia, 1850-1930

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Lauren Yarnell; Bohan, Chara Haeussler

    2013-01-01

    The history of Columbus, Georgia, cannot be separated from that of the local textile mills; the mills were important in defining the economic success, the social struggles, and the enduring legacy of southern industrial tycoons. Evidence of this industrial past can be seen on almost every street, school, and business located in the city along the…

  17. Failing at College Football Reform: The Jan Kemp Trial at the University of Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulford, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Throughout the history of college football, there have been efforts to reform the system and stop improprieties, yet conflict between gaining academic and athletic prowess at colleges remained a central theme. In the 1980s, the Jan Kemp trial involving the University of Georgia demonstrated this clash between revenue-generating athletics and…

  18. Who Pays and Who Benefits: Examining the Distributional Consequences of the Georgia Lottery for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Ross; Scafidi, Benjamin

    2002-01-01

    The incidence of the implicit lottery tax and distribution of benefits from lottery-funded programs in Georgia were examined. Estimates suggest that lower-income and nonwhite households tend to have higher purchases of lottery products while receiving lower benefits. Hope Scholarship benefits especially accrue disproportionately to higher-income,…

  19. Economic Model Cost-Satisfaction in Inclusive Education. Based on Research Made in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantaluta, Ovidiu; Rukhadze, Nino

    2008-01-01

    This research comprises a brief analysis of the economic model design, projected for poor countries, where complex assessments of the health status, education outcomes and motivation for children with disabilities are impossible to be done; is possible to be applied on a national scale in Georgia, if the actual government has the necessary…

  20. Predictors of Students` Desire to be an Entrepreneur: Kyrgyzstan, Georgia, and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry A. FRIEDMAN

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurship is an important element of national economic growth, and college business students represent an important feeder pool for a nation’s supply of entrepreneurs. The purpose of this study is to identify and contrast predictors of students’ desire to be entrepreneurs in Kyrgyzstan, Georgia, and the United States. Three hundred and five undergraduate business students in Kyrgyzstan, Georgia, and the United States completed the Aspiring Entrepreneurial Motives Questionnaire (Aziz, Friedman & Sayfullin, 2012. While the recognition motive was important for all students, predictors of their desire to be entrepreneurs differed across the three countries. In contrast to Kyrgyzstan and the United States, students’ in Georgia overall desire to be entrepreneurs was more complex as finance, recognition, freedom, marketing opportunities and economic conditions reached significance. National initiatives that recognize entrepreneurial accomplishments may therefore encourage more individuals to start and manage businesses. A more complex strategy may be required in Georgia, as the decision to be an entrepreneur appeared to be more multidimensional.

  1. Salmonellosis in the Republic of Georgia: using molecular typing to identify the outbreak-causing strain.

    OpenAIRE

    Sulakvelidze, A; Kekelidze, M.; Turabelidze, D.; Tsanava, S.; Tevsadze, L.; Devdariani, L.; Gautom, R.; Myers, R.; Morris, J G; Imnadze, P.

    2000-01-01

    In May 1998, three large outbreaks of salmonellosis, affecting 91 persons, were identified in the Republic of Georgia. Eighteen Salmonella Typhimurium strains were characterized by arbitrary primed polymerase chain reaction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis; the results suggested that all cases were part of a single outbreak caused by a distinct clonal strain.

  2. 78 FR 2878 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia: New Source Review-Prevention of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    ... Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Greenhouse gases, Incorporation by reference, Intergovernmental..., Regulatory Development Section, Air Planning Branch, Air, Pesticides and Toxics Management Division, U.S... Deterioration'' to approve changes to Georgia's SIP-approved regulations entitled ``Air Quality Control Rule...

  3. Europeanization in the "Wild East"? Analyzing Higher Education Governance Reform in Georgia and Armenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbins, Michael; Khachatryan, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    The authors examine higher education developments in two peripheral post-communist countries--Georgia and Armenia, whose education systems have previously received little attention in the literature. They focus on how both countries' models of higher education governance have evolved through the phase of political transformation and recent period…

  4. Bank of Georgia jäi sõja jalgu / Romet Kreek

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kreek, Romet, 1972-

    2008-01-01

    Pinev olukord Gruusias ei ole Bank of Georgia tööd veel halvanud, kuid pikemas perspektiivis sõltub panga saatus sellest, kuidas läheb edasi Gruusia majandusel. Graafik: Aktsia oli langustrendis ammu enne Venemaa kallaletungi Gruusiale. Lisad

  5. Teacher's Perceptions regarding the Impact of Classroom Techniques on Negative Behavior in Northeast Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Elevating academic achievement and meeting the mandates of NCLB and state standards has continued to be critical challenges to educational leaders and teachers in our nation's schools ("U.S. Department of Education", 2002; "Georgia Department of Education", 2006). Classroom management and behavior problems are serious concern.…

  6. Audit and Evaluation of the Georgia Comprehensive Career Guidance Project, Grades 7-12. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, Garry R.; Benjamin, Libby

    An external evaluation was conducted to assess the training packages developed by the Georgia Comprehensive Career Guidance Project (see CE 018 130 for the final report of this project). Three secondary staff development training packages (Educational Environment, CE 018 154; Work and Leisure Environments, CE 018 161; and Human Relations, CE 018…

  7. Physical activity locations in Georgia: frequency of use by socio-demographic group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln R. Larson; Jason W. Whiting; Gary T. Green; J. M. Bowker

    2014-01-01

    Active outdoor recreation helps to mitigate health consequences associated with sedentary behavior. Enhanced understanding of socio-demographic differences in physical activity (PA) location preferences could therefore contribute to health promotion.This study examined frequency o fuse fo rvarious PA locations in Georgia,a state with historically high levels of...

  8. Workflow to study genetic biodiversity of aflatoxigenic Aspergillus spp. in Georgia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peanut seeds were sampled from the entire state of Georgia in 2014. More than 600 isolates of Aspergillus spp. were collected using modified-dichloran rose Bengal (MDRB) medium, 240 of those isolates were fingerprinted with 25 InDel markers within the aflatoxin-biosynthesis gene cluster (ABC). Clust...

  9. Violence Prevention in Georgia's Rural Public School Systems: Perceptions of School Superintendents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Chet

    1998-01-01

    Survey responses by superintendents in 81 of Georgia's 114 rural school districts covered violence prevention policies; use of searches, videocamera surveillance, metal detectors, security alarm systems, dress codes, and law enforcement officers on campus; incidence of removal of weapons and various forms of violence; student discipline programs;…

  10. An Exploratory Study of the Philosophy and Teaching Styles of Georgia Workforce Educators and Entrepreneurship Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Tuboise D.

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study examines the adult educational philosophies and teaching styles of workforce educators and entrepreneurship instructors within the State of Georgia. A workforce educator is an educator teaching workforce skills; an entrepreneurship instructor is an educator who teaches entrepreneurship skills. Conti's Principles of Adult…

  11. South West Georgia: an important bottleneck for raptor migration during autumn

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhelst, B.; Jansen, J.; Vansteelant, W.

    2011-01-01

    Counts of migrating raptors at Batumi, Georgia, revealed the eastern Black Sea coast to form one of the most important bottlenecks for raptor migration during autumn in the Eurasian-African migration system. Totals for 10 species (European Honey-buzzard Pernis apivorus, Steppe Buzzard Buteo buteo vu

  12. The Tagliavini Report Revisited: Jus ad Bellum and the Legality of the Russian Intervention in Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Lott

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this manuscript is to critically examine the legal findings of the Tagliavini Report in hope of contributing to the debate on its principal conclusions. The establishment of an independent fact-finding commission to explore the origins and course of the conflict marked the first time in its history that the EU, key mediator in concluding the Georgia-Russia conflict's ceasefire, intervened actively in an armed conflict. The author, disparate from the Fact-Finding Mission, does not find Georgia to have the right of self-defence in regard of attacks by Ossetian secessionist forces preceding the Russian invasion. The author argues, analogously to the Tagliavini Report, that Georgian offensive on Tskhinvali in South Ossetia represented an excessive use of force which violated Article 2(4 of the UN Charter. In regards to the central issue, the author contends that the Russian military intervention in Georgia on 8 August 2008 following Georgian offensive on Tskhinvali was not justified under the scope of reinforcing its peacekeeping force, or on the grounds of humanitarian intervention, intervention by invitation, or protection of citizens. Distinct from the Tagliavini Report, this manuscript reaches the conclusion that Russia was neither entitled to invade Georgia for protecting its peacekeeping contingent that comprised part of an international peacekeeping force. 

  13. Reported Motivations for and Locations of Healthy Eating among Georgia High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gayathri S.; Bryan, Michael; Bayakly, Rana; Drenzek, Cherie; Merlo, Caitlin; Perry, Geraldine S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Understanding how youth perceive eating healthy foods can inform programs and policies that aim to improve healthy eating. We assessed the reasons for and the most common locations of eating healthy foods among Georgia's (GA) high school (HS) students. Methods: Using the 2013 GA HS Youth Risk Behavior Survey, we examined motivations…

  14. Title I in Georgia: Annual Evaluation Report, FY 1972/73.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sarah H.; Weiss, Mark H.

    Title I programming emphasis in Georgia is increasingly oriented toward basic skills. Fifty-eight percent of the total "participation units" were engaged in English reading and mathematics activities. No other activity or service received as much as 8 percent of the participation total. English reading activities accounted for 56.5…

  15. Recovery of thermophilic Campylobacter by three sampling methods from classified river sites in Northeast Georgia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is not clear how best to sample streams for the detection of Campylobacter which may be introduced from agricultural or community land use. Fifteen sites in the watershed of the South Fork of the Broad River (SFBR) in Northeastern Georgia, USA, were sampled in three seasons. Seven sites were cl...

  16. Using DNA Technology to Explore Marine Bacterial Diversity in a Coastal Georgia Salt Marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yihe; Guerrero, Stella; Moran, Mary Ann

    2008-01-01

    An important aspect of teaching biology is to expose students to the concept of biodiversity. For this purpose, bacteria are excellent examples. The advanced placement (AP) biology class at Cedar Shoals High School in Athens, Georgia, learned how to explore bacterial biodiversity using molecular fingerprinting. They collected marine water samples,…

  17. China Xinjiang Children’s Art Troupe’s Performance Tour of Georgia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport of Adjara Autonomous Republic of Georgia, an 18-member Xinjiang Children’s Art Troupe sent by the Xinjiang People’s Association for Friendship with Foreign Countries,

  18. Newcastle disease B1 vaccine strain in wild rock pigeons in Atlanta, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    From June to October of 2012, samples were collected from wild Rock Pigeons (Columba livia) in urban neighborhoods of Atlanta, Georgia to ascertain the prevalence of pigeon paramyxovirus serotype-1 (PPMV-1). PPMV-1 strains are a subset of avian paramyxovirus serotype-1 (APMV-1) commonly isolated fro...

  19. A statewide Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) initiative: evolution of the Georgia CIT program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Janet R; Compton, Michael T

    2008-01-01

    In late 2004, Georgia began implementation of a statewide Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) program to train a portion of its law enforcement officers to respond safely and effectively to individuals with mental illnesses who are in crisis. This overview provides a description of the evolution of the Georgia CIT, including discussions of the historical context in which the program developed; the program's vision, mission, and objectives; the importance of the multidisciplinary Georgia CIT Advisory Board; the training curriculum; the role played by state and local coordinators; the value of stakeholders' meetings; practical operations of the program; the importance of considering the adequacy of community-based and hospital-based psychiatric services; costs and funding; the program's expansion plan; and evaluation, research, and academic collaborations. These detailed descriptions of the Georgia CIT program may be useful for professionals involved in local, regional, or state CIT program planning and may provide a practical synopsis of one example of this collaborative model that is being rapidly disseminated across the U.S.

  20. 77 FR 38796 - Georgia Power Company; Bartletts Ferry Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Revised Restricted...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Georgia Power Company; Bartletts Ferry Hydroelectric Project; Notice of... that could be affected by issuance of a new license for the Bartletts Ferry Hydroelectric Project No... list for the Bartletts Ferry Hydroelectric Project. On June 14, 2012, the Kialegee Tribal Town...

  1. Corruption, Collusion, and Nepotism in Higher Education and the Labor Market in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orkodashvili, Mariam

    2011-01-01

    This article offers a new approach to conceptualizing the limited affordability and access to higher education for socioeconomically disadvantaged students in Georgia. Unlike most traditional views, it associates the issue with corruption, collusion, and nepotism existent in the country's higher education, job market, and banking system. It argues…

  2. The Fiscal Impact of Tax-Credit Scholarships in Georgia. School Choice Issues in the State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlob, Brian

    2008-01-01

    This study seeks to inform the debate over a proposal in Georgia to give tax credits for contributions to organizations that provide scholarships to K-12 private schools. Such a program would extend to K-12 education the philosophy of choice that is inherent in the state's existing Hope Scholarships program for college students. This study…

  3. Education in Multicultural Environment--Teaching/Learning Support Activities (On the Example of Georgia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malazonia, David; Maglakelidze, Shorena; Chiabrishvili, Nino; Chiabrishvili, Maia

    2017-01-01

    The National Curricula of Georgia emphasises the importance of intercultural education only in a declarative way. This article investigates how specific activities can contribute to the development of intercultural competences in a diverse environment. We conclude that additional training resources are critical for the development of those…

  4. An Exploratory Study of the Philosophy and Teaching Styles of Georgia Workforce Educators and Entrepreneurship Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Tuboise D.

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study examines the adult educational philosophies and teaching styles of workforce educators and entrepreneurship instructors within the State of Georgia. A workforce educator is an educator teaching workforce skills; an entrepreneurship instructor is an educator who teaches entrepreneurship skills. Conti's Principles of Adult…

  5. Pabellón Ida Cason Gardens. Harris – County, Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial, Equipo

    1959-01-01

    Full Text Available En Callaway Gardens, Pine Mountain (Georgia, se ha construido, bajo la dirección de los arquitectos asociados AECK, el «Ida Cason Callaway Dining Pavilion», restaurante bar al aire libre, situado en la playa a orillas del lago Robin.

  6. Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia: Political Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    Reporters Without Borders and other NGOs raised concerns in September 2010 that the number of independent media had declined since the last legislative...Deterioration of Freedom of Expression Ahead of Elections, Reporters Without Borders , September 15, 2010. 56 EIU, Georgia Country Report, June 4, 2009

  7. Testing models of ice cap extent, South Georgia, sub-Antarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, N. L. M.; Bentley, M. J.; Spada, G.; Evans, D. J. A.; Hansom, J. D.; Brader, M. D.; White, D. A.; Zander, A.; Berg, S.

    2016-12-01

    The extent of Last Glacial Maximum ice in South Georgia is contested, with two alternative hypotheses: an extensive (maximum) model of ice reaching the edge of the continental shelf, or a restricted (minimum) model with ice constrained within the inner fjords. We present a new relative sea-level dataset for South Georgia, summarising published and new geomorphological evidence for the marine limit and elevations of former sea levels on the island. Using a glacial isostatic adjustment model (ALMA) specifically suited to regional modelling and working at high spatial resolutions, combined with a series of simulated ice-load histories, we use the relative sea-level data to test between the restricted and extensive ice extent scenarios. The model results suggest that there was most likely an extensive Last Glacial Maximum glaciation of South Georgia, implying that the island was covered by thick (>1000 m) ice, probably to the edge of the continental shelf, with deglaciation occurring relatively early (ca. 15 ka BP, though independent data suggest this may have been as early as 18 ka). The presence of an extensive ice cap extending to the shelf edge would imply that if there were any biological refugia around South Georgia, they must have been relatively localised and restricted to the outermost shelf.

  8. A hedonic analysis of big game hunting club dues in Georgia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    James C. Mingie; Neelam C. Poudyal; J. M.  Bowker; Michael T.  Mengak; Jacek P.  Siry

    2017-01-01

    Hunting lease revenue can be a reliable supplemental income for forest landowners. Although studies have examined factors influencing per acre lease rates, little is known about how various characteristics are capitalized in hunting club dues. The objective of this study was to conduct a hedonic analysis of big game hunting club dues in Georgia, USA using a variety of...

  9. 77 FR 11452 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; State of Georgia; Regional Haze...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... conditions of 10.78 deciviews, i.e., 19.47 deciviews. Over the 60-year period from 2004 to 2064, this would..., Environmental Protection Division (GA EPD), on February 11, 2010, as supplemented on November 19, 2010, that... a limited approval of Georgia's February 11, 2010, SIP revision and November 19, 2010,...

  10. 78 FR 52219 - State of Georgia Relinquishment of Sealed Source and Device Evaluation and Approval Authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-22

    ...-415- 7135; email: Stephen.Poy@nrc.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section 274b. of the Atomic Energy... and activities. On December 15, 1969, Georgia entered into a Section 274b. Agreement with the Atomic... special nuclear material in quantities not sufficient to form a critical mass. Currently, the State...

  11. A Decade of No-Fault Divorce Revisited: California, Georgia, and Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Charles E.; Price-Bonham, Sharon

    1983-01-01

    Surveyed divorce settlements in Georgia and Washington during 1970 and 1980 to replicate Seal's study of no-fault divorce in California. Findings indicate few substantive changes. With no-fault divorce, alimony was rare, child custody was awarded to mothers, assets tended to be shared, and child support had not decreased. (Author/JAC)

  12. Savannah, Georgia: The Lasting Legacy of Colonial City Planning. Teaching with Historic Places.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzer, Judson

    Strolling through the old city of Savannah, Georgia's rigid, grid pattern streets, down its linear brick walkways, past over 1,100 residential and public buildings of unparalleled architectural richness and diversity, visitors and residents come to appreciate the original plan that has existed intact since Savannah's founding in 1733. Twenty-four…

  13. Raw materials exploitation in Prehistory of Georgia: sourcing, processing and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tushabramishvili, Nikoloz; Oqrostsvaridze, Avthandil

    2016-04-01

    Study of raw materials has a big importance to understand the ecology, cognition, behavior, technology, culture of the Paleolithic human populations. Unfortunately, explorations of the sourcing, processing and distribution of stone raw materials had a less attention until the present days. The reasons of that were: incomplete knowledge of the archaeologists who are doing the late period archaeology (Bronze Age-Medieval) and who are little bit far from the Paleolithic technology and typology; Ignorance of the stone artifacts made on different kind of raw-materials, except flint and obsidians. Studies on the origin of the stone raw materials are becoming increasingly important since in our days. Interesting picture and situation have been detected on the different sites and in different regions of Georgia. In earlier stages of Middle Paleolithic of Djruchula Basin caves the number of basalt, andesite, argillite etc. raw materials are quite big. Since 130 000 a percent of the flint raw-material is increasing dramatically. Flint is an almost lonely dominated raw-material in Western Georgia during thousand years. Since approximately 50 000 ago the first obsidians brought from the South Georgia, appeared in Western Georgia. Similar situation has been detected by us in Eastern Georgia during our excavations of Ziari and Pkhoveli open-air sites. The early Lower Paleolithic layers are extremely rich by limestone artifacts while the flint raw-materials are dominated in the Middle Paleolithic layers. Study of these issues is possible to achieve across chronologies, the origins of the sources of raw-materials, the sites and regions. By merging archaeology with anthropology, geology and geography we are able to acquire outstanding insights about those populations. New approach to the Paleolithic stone materials, newly found Paleolithic quarries gave us an opportunities to try to achieve some results for understanding of the behavior of Paleolithic populations, geology and

  14. Sedimentary and atmospheric sources of iron around South Georgia, Southern Ocean: a modelling perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Borrione

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In high-nutrient low-chlorophyll waters of the western Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, an intense phytoplankton bloom is observed annually north of South Georgia, most likely due to an enhanced supply of the limiting micronutrient iron. Shallow sediments and atmospheric dust deposition are believed to be the main iron sources. However, their relative importance is still unclear and in the South Georgia region have yet not been ascertained because iron measurements are very few. In this study, we use austral summer dissolved iron (dFe data around South Georgia (January and February 2008 with a coupled regional hydrodynamic and biogeochemical model to investigate natural iron fertilization around the island. The biogeochemical component of the model includes an iron cycle, where sediments and dust deposition are the sources of iron to the ocean. The model captures the characteristic flow patterns around South Georgia, hence simulating a large phytoplankton bloom to the north, i.e., downstream, of the island. Modelled dFe concentrations agree well with observations (mean difference and root mean square errors of ~0.02 nM and ~0.81 nM and form a large plume to the north of the island that extends eastwards for more than 800 km. In agreement with observations, highest dFe concentrations are located along the coast and decrease with distance from the island. Sensitivity tests indicate that most of the iron measured in the main bloom area originates from the coast and the very shallow shelf-sediments (depths a concentrations. Iron sources such as run-off not represented explicitly in the model, but that likely contribute to the iron plumes observed around South Georgia, are also discussed together with the potential effects their temporal variability may have on the system.

  15. Magnitude and Frequency of Floods for Urban and Small Rural Streams in Georgia, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotvald, Anthony J.; Knaak, Andrew E.

    2011-01-01

    A study was conducted that updated methods for estimating the magnitude and frequency of floods in ungaged urban basins in Georgia that are not substantially affected by regulation or tidal fluctuations. Annual peak-flow data for urban streams from September 2008 were analyzed for 50 streamgaging stations (streamgages) in Georgia and 6 streamgages on adjacent urban streams in Florida and South Carolina having 10 or more years of data. Flood-frequency estimates were computed for the 56 urban streamgages by fitting logarithms of annual peak flows for each streamgage to a Pearson Type III distribution. Additionally, basin characteristics for the streamgages were computed by using a geographical information system and computer algorithms. Regional regression analysis, using generalized least-squares regression, was used to develop a set of equations for estimating flows with 50-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent annual exceedance probabilities for ungaged urban basins in Georgia. In addition to the 56 urban streamgages, 171 rural streamgages were included in the regression analysis to maintain continuity between flood estimates for urban and rural basins as the basin characteristics pertaining to urbanization approach zero. Because 21 of the rural streamgages have drainage areas less than 1 square mile, the set of equations developed for this study can also be used for estimating small ungaged rural streams in Georgia. Flood-frequency estimates and basin characteristics for 227 streamgages were combined to form the final database used in the regional regression analysis. Four hydrologic regions were developed for Georgia. The final equations are functions of drainage area and percentage of impervious area for three of the regions and drainage area, percentage of developed land, and mean basin slope for the fourth region. Average standard errors of prediction for these regression equations range from 20.0 to 74.5 percent.

  16. Report from the Country of Georgia: Protecting and Promoting Breastfeeding through Regulation of Artificial-Feeding Marketing Practices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nemsadze, Ketevan

    2004-01-01

    This paper highlights the southwest Asian country of Georgia's experience in creating efforts to protect and promote breastfeeding and to implement the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes...

  17. Summary of Needs and Opportunities from the 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting: Atlanta, Georgia -- March 16-18, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-05-01

    This summary report outlines needs and issues for increasing energy efficiency of new and existing U.S homes, as identified at the U.S Department of Energy Building America program Spring 2011 stakeholder meeting in Atlanta, Georgia.

  18. 2011 Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GADNR) Environmental Protection Division (EPD) Lidar: Four Counties (Burke, Columbia, Lincoln, and Richmond)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is the topographic elevation point data derived from multiple return light detection and ranging (LiDAR) measurements for four counties in Georgia....

  19. On-Demand Paging and Retrieval in a Semiautomated Environment at Georgia Southern University: The First Two Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Fred W.

    2010-01-01

    An automated retrieval system, adapted from a commercial warehouse application, has been installed at Georgia Southern University and has been well accepted by patrons and library personnel due to its reliability, efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and responsiveness. (Contains 1 figure.)

  20. Loss of traditional knowledge aggravates wolf–human conflict in Georgia (Caucasus) in the wake of socio-economic change

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kikvidze, Zaal; Tevzadze, Gigi

    ...–human conflicts in Georgia. Restoring traditional, simple but good practices—such as protecting herds using shepherd dogs and introducing bulls into the herds—can help one solve this problem.

  1. The results of the pilot project in Georgia to install a network of electromagnetic radiation before the earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machavariani, Kakhaber; Khazaradze, Giorgi; Turazashvili, Ioseb; Kachakhidze, Nino; Kachakhidze, Manana; Gogoberidze, Vitali

    2016-04-01

    The world's scientific literature recently published many very important and interesting works of VLF / LF electromagnetic emissions, which is observed in the process of earthquake preparation. This works reliable earthquake prediction in terms of trends. Because, Georgia is located in Trans Asian earthquake zone, VLF / LF electromagnetic emissions network are essential. In this regard, it was possible to take first steps. It is true that our university has Shota Rustaveli National Science Foundation № DI / 21 / 9-140 / 13 grant, which included the installation of a receiver in Georgia, but failed due to lack of funds to buy this device. However, European friends helped us (Prof. Dr. PF Biagi and Prof. Dr. Aydın BÜYÜKSARAÇ) and made possible the installation of a receiver. Turkish scientists expedition in Georgia was organized in August 2015. They brought with them VLF / LF electromagnetic emissions receiver and together with Georgian scientists install near Tbilisi. The station was named GEO-TUR. It should be noted that Georgia was involved in the work of the European network. It is possible to completely control the earthquake in Georgia in terms of electromagnetic radiation. This enables scientists to obtain the relevant information not only on the territory of our country, but also on seismically active European countries as well. In order to maintain and develop our country in this new direction, it is necessary to keep independent group of scientists who will learn electromagnetic radiation ahead of an earthquake in Georgia. At this stage, we need to remedy this shortcoming, it is necessary and appropriate specialists to Georgia to engage in a joint international research. The work is carried out in the frame of grant (DI/21/9-140/13 „Pilot project of before earthquake detected Very Low Frequency/Low Frequency electromagnetic emission network installation in Georgia") by financial support of Shota Rustaveli National Science Foundation.

  2. A comparative ethnobotany of Khevsureti, Samtskhe-Javakheti, Tusheti, Svaneti, and Racha-Lechkhumi, Republic of Georgia (Sakartvelo), Caucasus

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background The Republic of Georgia (Sakartvelo in Georgian language) is part of the Caucasus biodiversity hotspot, and human agricultural plant use dates bat at least 6000 years. However, little ethnobiological research has been published from the region since the 1940s. Given the lack of recent research in the region, the present study we report on plant uses in Skartvelo (Republic of Georgia), Caucasus. We hypothesized that, (1) given the long tradition of plant use, and the isolation under...

  3. Children's Growth and Classroom Experiences in Georgia's Pre-K Program: Findings from the 2011-2012 Evaluation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peisner-Feinberg, Ellen; Schaaf, Jennifer; LaForett, Dore

    2013-01-01

    Georgia has one of the few state-funded universal pre-kindergarten programs in the United States, with the aim of providing pre-k services to all 4-year-olds whose families want their children to participate in the program, regardless of family income level. In the 2011-2012 school year, Georgia's Pre-K Program served a total of over 94,000…

  4. Upper-crustal structure beneath the strait of Georgia, Southwest British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, R.K.; Spence, G.D.; Riedel, M.; Hyndman, R.D.; Brocher, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    We present a new three-dimensional (3-D) P-wave velocity model for the upper-crustal structure beneath the Strait of Georgia, southwestern British Columbia based on non-linear tomographic inversion of wide-angle seismic refraction data. Our study, part of the Georgia Basin Geohazards Initiative (GBGI) is primarily aimed at mapping the depth of the Cenozoic sedimentary basin and delineating the near-surface crustal faults associated with recent seismic activities (e.g. M = 4.6 in 1997 and M = 5.0 in 1975) in the region. Joint inversion of first-arrival traveltimes from the 1998 Seismic Hazards Investigation in Puget Sound (SHIPS) and the 2002 Georgia Basin experiment provides a high-resolution velocity model of the subsurface to a depth of ???7 km. In the southcentral Georgia Basin, sedimentary rocks of the Cretaceous Nanaimo Group and early Tertiary rocks have seismic velocities between 3.0 and 5.5 km s-1. The basin thickness increases from north to south with a maximum thickness of 7 (??1) km (depth to velocities of 5.5 km s-1) at the southeast end of the strait. The underlying basement rocks, probably representing the Wrangellia terrane, have velocities of 5.5-6.5 km-1 with considerable lateral variation. Our tomographic model reveals that the Strait of Georgia is underlain by a fault-bounded block within the central Georgia Basin. It also shows a correlation between microearthquakes and areas of rapid change in basin thickness. The 1997/1975 earthquakes are located near a northeast-trending hinge line where the thicknesses of sedimentary rocks increase rapidly to the southeast. Given its association with instrumentally recorded, moderate sized earthquakes, we infer that the hinge region is cored by an active fault that we informally name the Gabriola Island fault. A northwest-trending, southwest dipping velocity discontinuity along the eastern side of Vancouver Island correlates spatially with the surface expression of the Outer Island fault. The Outer Island

  5. Conspectus of trees and shrubs of Tbilisi environs (East Georgia, South Caucasus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.J. Lachashvili

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Floristic composition of Tbilisi environs trees and shrubs are studied. On the one hand, variety of physical-geographical conditions and ecosystem of Tbilisi, and on the other hand, its location conditioned either floristic or bioecological diversity of the trees and the shrubs. 177 species of trees and shrubs, belonging to 89 genera and 44 families, were recorded. 35 species of them are endemics of Caucasus and included in “Red List of the Endemic Plants of the Caucasus”. Among them 2 species are endemics of Georgia, which of them 1 is local endemic of Tbilisi environs. 18 species are plants of Red List of Georgia. Floristic composition is enriched with naturalized plants (28 species. Habitats and area of species in Tbilisi environs are established. The full list of the trees and shrubs of Tbilisi environs as a conspectus is given. The review of and vegetation of Tbilisi environs is attached to the article.

  6. Selected low-flow frequency statistics for continuous-record streamgages in Georgia, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotvald, Anthony J.

    2016-04-13

    This report presents the annual and monthly minimum 1- and 7-day average streamflows with the 10-year recurrence interval (1Q10 and 7Q10) for 197 continuous-record streamgages in Georgia. Streamgages used in the study included active and discontinued stations having a minimum of 10 complete climatic years of record as of September 30, 2013. The 1Q10 and 7Q10 flow statistics were computed for 85 streamgages on unregulated streams with minimal diversions upstream, 43 streamgages on regulated streams, and 69 streamgages known, or considered, to be affected by varying degrees of diversions upstream. Descriptive information for each of these streamgages, including the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) station number, station name, latitude, longitude, county, drainage area, and period of record analyzed also is presented.Kendall’s tau nonparametric test was used to determine the statistical significance of trends in annual and monthly minimum 1-day and 7-day average flows for the 197 streamgages. Significant negative trends in the minimum annual 1-day and 7-day average streamflow were indicated for 77 of the 197 streamgages. Many of these significant negative trends are due to the period of record ending during one of the recent droughts in Georgia, particularly those streamgages with record through the 2013 water year. Long-term unregulated streamgages with 70 or more years of record indicate significant negative trends in the annual minimum 7-day average flow for central and southern Georgia. Watersheds for some of these streamgages have experienced minimal human impact, thus indicating that the significant negative trends observed in flows at the long-term streamgages may be influenced by changing climatological conditions. A Kendall-tau trend analysis of the annual air temperature and precipitation totals for Georgia indicated no significant trends. A comprehensive analysis of causes of the trends in annual and monthly minimum 1-day and 7-day average flows in central

  7. Primary headache disorders in the Republic of Georgia: prevalence and risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katsarava, Z; Dzagnidze, A; Kukava, M;

    2009-01-01

    adult members (>/=16 years) of 500 adjacent households in Tbilisi, the capital city, and 300 in rural Kakheti in eastern Georgia, using a previously validated questionnaire based on International Headache Society diagnostic criteria. RESULTS: The target population included 1,145 respondents, 690 (60......OBJECTIVE: To estimate the 1-year prevalences of migraine and tension-type headache (TTH), and identify their principal risk factors, in the general population of the Republic of Georgia. METHODS: In a community-based door-to-door survey, 4 medical residents interviewed all biologically unrelated...... socioeconomic status were risk factors for migraine but not for TTH. Headache on >/=15 days/month was reported by 87 respondents, a prevalence of 7.6% (6.1-9.1). Female gender, low socioeconomic status, and frequent use (>/=10 days/month) of acute headache drugs were risk factors. The likely prevalence...

  8. Georgia's Cancer Awareness and Education Campaign: combining public health models and private sector communications strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Demetrius M

    2004-07-01

    The Georgia Cancer Awareness and Education Campaign was launched in September 2002 with the goals of supporting cancer prevention and early detection efforts, heightening awareness of and understanding about the five leading cancers among Georgia residents, and enhancing awareness and education about the importance of proper nutrition, exercise, and healthy lifestyles. The inaugural year of the campaign is outlined, beginning with adherence to the public health principles of surveillance, risk factor identification, intervention evaluation, and implementation. A strategic and integrated communications campaign, using tactics such as paid advertising, public service announcements, local community relations, media releases, a documentary film, special events, and other components, is described in detail with links to multimedia samples. With an estimated budget of 3.1 million dollars, the first year of the campaign focuses on breast and cervical cancer screening and early detection.

  9. The vulnerability of the Strait of Georgia (Canada) to future hypoxia and ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianson, Debby; Allen, Susan; Moore-Maley, Ben; Haigh, Rowan; Johannessen, Sophia; Macdonald, Robie; Krogh, Jeremy; Simpson, Eleanor; Kohfeld, Karen; Hamme, Roberta

    2016-04-01

    The Canadian Pacific coast is filled with fjords and islands. Circulation in the region is dynamic, so that large changes in acidity (pH) and oxygen may occur both in space and time. The Strait of Georgia (Canada) is a large (200 X 30 km) semi-enclosed basin, that has relatively low pH with respect to the adjacent outer coast and yet hosts a lucrative aquaculture industry. On the other hand this region is relatively well oxygenated due to gas exchange in the turbulent (tidal) flow in the narrow Straits with sills connecting it with the outer coast. We investigate the role that this intense gas exchange plays in protecting the Strait of Georgia from future hypoxia and ocean acidification. Finally, we contrast surface water properties (including dissolved inorganic carbon and total alkalinity) measured on large ships with those measured nearshore and at shore-based aquaculture sites within the Strait.

  10. Identity processes and statuses in post-Soviet Georgia: Exploration processes operate differently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skhirtladze, Nino; Javakhishvili, Nino; Schwartz, Seth J; Beyers, Wim; Luyckx, Koen

    2016-02-01

    Identity formation is one of the main developmental tasks of emerging adulthood. Based on quantitative data on a five-dimensional model of identity formation, we concluded that the identity formation process has some different features in the Republic of Georgia than it does in many Western countries. Results obtained from young Georgian adults (N = 295, 82.6% female) yielded four exploration processes instead of three, which is in line with the recent Swiss findings. A key difference between Georgia and the Western contexts, however, is that exploration in breadth is highly correlated with ruminative exploration. Cluster analysis, which produced six identity clusters, also supported this pattern. Achievement, the most adjusted cluster in Western contexts, was relatively low on exploration in breadth. We discuss ways in which the Georgian transition from Soviet communism to a more globalized society may contribute to limited opportunities for identity exploration and may add some tension to the identity development process.

  11. Experience with LEDS and NAMA Low Carbon Strategies: The Case of Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakhaberi Mdivani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS and National Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs have the potential to support developing countries in attaining low carbon goals. In spite of the evident potential, there is a need to learn from practice. This paper explores the case of Georgia. The main research question discussed is: What experience has been gained with the development of LEDS and NAMAs in Georgia? The study reveals that both LEDS and NAMAs are subject to barriers that considerably slow development processes: there is a lack of institutional capacity, little inter-governmental goal alignment and poor coordination of actions, a lack of experienced staff and insufficient, substantial, earmarked funding. Capacity building depends on support from organizations in donor countries. This paper contributes to a growing body of knowledge of the implementation of LEDS and NAMA.

  12. Pelagic tar off Georgia and Florida in relation to physical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, C.; Atkinson, L.; Lee, R.; Blanton, J.

    1980-01-01

    Following the Ixtoc I oil rig blowout in Campeche Bay we hypothesized that resulting tarballs should eventually appear in the Gulf Stream off Georgia and that because of dynamic barriers in the innershelf little would reach near-shore areas. To test these hypotheses, surface tows to collect floating tar were taken off the coasts of Georgia and Florida in October and December 1979. No tar was found within 40 km of the shore. All samples more than 40 km offshore contained some tar. The mean concentration was 0.82 mg m/sup -2/ with a range of 0.01 to 5.6 mg m/sup -2/. Closely spaced sampling showed extreme variation but trends were consistent. Perylene was the most abundant compound in the tarballs.

  13. An Evaluation of Three Driving-Under-the-Influence Courts in Georgia

    OpenAIRE

    Fell, James C.; Tippetts, A. Scott; Ciccel, J. DeCarlo

    2011-01-01

    Following the model of Drug Courts, three Georgia Driving-Under-the-Influence (DUI) Courts (established in Chatham, Clarke, and Hall Counties in 2003) were designed to address the underlying alcohol problems of repeat DUI offenders through continuous and frequent judicially supervised treatment, periodic alcohol and other drug testing, the use of graduated sanctions, and other appropriate rehabilitative services. A team comprised of a judge, court personnel, probation officials, and treatment...

  14. Magnitude and Frequency of Rural Floods in the Southeastern United States, 2006: Volume 1, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotvald, Anthony J.; Feaster, Toby D.; Weaver, J. Curtis

    2009-01-01

    A multistate approach was used to update methods for estimating the magnitude and frequency of floods in rural, ungaged basins in Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina that are not substantially affected by regulation, tidal fluctuations, or urban development. Annual peak-flow data through September 2006 were analyzed for 943 streamgaging stations having 10 or more years of data on rural streams in Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and adjacent parts of Alabama, Florida, Tennessee, and Virginia. Flood-frequency estimates were computed for the 943 stations by fitting the logarithms of annual peak flows for each station to a Pearson Type III distribution. As part of the computation of flood-frequency estimates for these streamgaging stations, a new value for the generalized-skew coefficient was developed by using a Bayesian generalized least-squares regression model. Additionally, basin characteristics for the streamgaging stations were computed by using a geographical information system and automated computer algorithms. Regional regression analysis, using generalized least-squares regression, was used to develop a set of predictive equations for estimating the 50-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent chance exceedance flows for rural ungaged basins in Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina. Flood-frequency estimates and basin characteristics for 828 stream-gaging stations were combined to form the final database used in the regional regression analysis. Five hydrologic regions were developed for Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina. The final predictive equations are all functions of drainage area and percentage of the drainage basin within each hydrologic region. Average standard errors of prediction for these regression equations range from 34.5 to 47.7 percent.

  15. Epidemiological and Clinical Features of Brucellosis in the Country of Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhvlediani, Tamar; Bautista, Christian T.; Garuchava, Natalia; Sanodze, Lia; Kokaia, Nora; Malania, Lile; Chitadze, Nazibrola; Sidamonidze, Ketevan; Rivard, Robert G.; Hepburn, Matthew J.; Nikolich, Mikeljon P.; Imnadze, Paata; Trapaidze, Nino

    2017-01-01

    Background Brucellosis is an endemic disease in the country of Georgia. According to the National Center for Disease Control and Public Health of Georgia (NCDC), the average annual number of brucellosis cases was 161 during 2008–2012. However, the true number of cases is thought to be higher due to underreporting. The aim of this study was to provide current epidemiological and clinical information and evaluate diagnostic methods used for brucellosis in Georgia. Methodology Adult patients were eligible for participation if they met the suspected or probable case definition for brucellosis. After consent participants were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire to collect information on socio-demographic characteristics, epidemiology, history of present illness, and clinical manifestation. For the diagnosis of brucellosis, culture and serological tests were used. Results A total of 81 participants were enrolled, of which 70 (86%) were from rural areas. Seventy-four percent of participants reported consuming unpasteurized milk products and 62% consuming undercooked meat products before symptom onset. Forty-one participants were positive by the Wright test and 33 (41%) were positive by blood culture. There was perfect agreement between the Huddelston and Wright tests (k = 1.0). Compared with blood culture (the diagnostic gold standard), ELISA IgG and total ELISA (IgG + IgM), the Wright test had fair (k = 0.12), fair (k = 0.24), and moderate (k = 0.52) agreement, respectively. Conclusions Consumption of unpasteurized milk products and undercooked meat were among the most common risk factors in brucellosis cases. We found poor agreement between ELISA tests and culture results. This report also serves as an initial indication that the suspected case definition for brucellosis surveillance purposes needs revision. Further research is needed to characterize the epidemiology and evaluate the performance of the diagnostic methods for brucellosis in Georgia. PMID

  16. The Successes and Failures of Military Occupation in Atlanta, Georgia, 1865-1871

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    a massive reduction in force, and mission creep, as it facilitated a volatile transition from a slave-based economy to a wage-based one. This paper...force, and mission creep, as it facilitated a volatile transition from a slave-based economy to a wage-based one. This paper examines reports from...Reconstruction in Georgia: Economic, Social , Political 1865-1872 (New York: The Columbia University Press, 1915), 23. 5 Arthur R. Taylor, “From the

  17. Georgia's timber industry - an assessment of timber product output and use, 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tony G. Johnson; Anne Jenkins; John L. Wells

    1997-01-01

    In 1995, roundwood output from Georgia’s forests totaled 1.3 billion cubic feet, 7 percent more than in 1992. Mill byproducts generated from primary manufacturers declined 10 percent to 474 million cubic feet. Almost all plant residues were used, primarily for fuel and fiber products. Pulpwood was the leading roundwood product at 617 million cubic feet; saw logs ranked...

  18. Severe summer heat waves over Georgia: trends, patterns and driving forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Keggenhoff

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last 50 years Georgia experienced a rising number of severe summer heat waves causing increasing heat-health impacts. In this study, the 10 most severe heat waves between 1961 and 2010 and recent changes in heat wave characteristics have been detected from 22 homogenized temperature minimum and maximum series using the Excess Heat Factor (EHF. A composite and Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA have been performed to study summer heat wave patterns and their relationships to the selected predictors: mean Sea Level Pressure (SLP, Geopotential Height at 500 mb (Z500, Sea Surface Temperature (SST, Zonal (u-wind500 and Meridional Wind at 500 mb (v-wind500, Vertical Velocity at 500 mb (O500, Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR, Relative Humidity (RH500, Precipitation (RR and Soil Moisture (SM. Most severe heat events during the last 50 years are identified in 2007, 2006 and 1998. Largest significant trend magnitudes for the number, intensity and duration of low and high-impact heat waves have been found during the last 30 years. Significant changes in the heat wave predictors reveal that all relevant surface and atmospheric patterns contributing to heat waves have been intensified between 1961 and 2010. Composite anomalies and CCA patterns provide evidence of a large anticyclonic blocking pattern over the southern Ural Mountains, which attracts warm air masses from the Southwest, enhances subsidence and surface heating, shifts the African Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ northwards, and causes a northward shift of the subtropical jet. Moreover, pronounced precipitation and soil moisture deficiency throughout Georgia contribute to the heat wave formation and persistence over Georgia. Due to different large- to mesoscale circulation patterns and the local terrain, heat wave effects over Eastern Georgia are dominated by subsidence and surface heating, while convective rainfall and cooling are observed in the West.

  19. International trade in Georgia: Review of state programs, policies, and recent trends.

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Robert E.

    2000-01-01

    This report surveys the major programs and formal policies of the state of Georgia that may affect or influence international trade, particularly exports from the state. This is of interest because it is expected that exports will have a positive effect on the job base by increasing the quantity and quality of jobs in the state, and on the general business climate by leading to a more diverse and extensive business environment. The report also presents recent trends in international trade in ...

  20. Theory and observations of Ekman flux in the chlorophyll distribution downstream of South Georgia.

    OpenAIRE

    Venables, Hugh; Meredith, Michael Paul

    2009-01-01

    A large phytoplankton bloom occurs downstream of South Georgia, an island on the northern edge of the Scotia Sea, Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. This is due to natural iron fertilisation being advected downstream in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Mapping of SeaWiFS chl-a in dynamic height/longitude space reveals the trajectory of surface water under the dual influences of geostrophic flow and Ekman flux. A theoretical estimate of the trajectory shows good agreement with observatio...

  1. Water use in Georgia by county for 2010 and water-use trends, 1985–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Stephen J.

    2015-12-16

    Water use and water withdrawals and returns in 2010 are estimated for each major river basin, principal aquifer, water-planning region, and county in Georgia using data obtained from various Federal and State agencies and local sources. Offstream water use in 2010 is estimated for the categories of public supply, domestic, commercial, industrial, mining, irrigation, livestock, aquaculture, and thermoelectric power. Water-use trends for 1985 to 2010 are also shown.

  2. Determinants analysis of outpatient service utilisation in Georgia: can the approach help inform benefit package design?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotsadze, George; Tang, Wenze; Shengelia, Natia; Zoidze, Akaki

    2017-05-02

    The healthcare financing reforms initiated by the Government of Georgia in 2007 have positively affected inpatient service utilisation and enhanced financial protection, especially for the poor, but they have failed to facilitate outpatient service use among chronic patients. Non-communicable diseases significantly affect Georgia's ageing population. Consequently, in this paper, we look at the evidence emerging from determinants analysis of outpatient service utilisation and if the finding can help identify possible policy choices in Georgia, especially regarding benefit package design for individuals with chronic conditions. We used Andersen's behavioural model of health service utilisation to identify the critical determinants that affect outpatient service use. A multinomial logistic regression was carried out with complex survey design using the data from two nationally representative cross-sectional population-based health utilisation and expenditure surveys conducted in Georgia in 2007 and 2010, which allowed us to assess the relationship between the determinants and outpatient service use. The study revealed the determinants that significantly impede outpatient service use. Low income, 45- to 64-year-old Georgian males with low educational attainment and suffering from a chronic health problem have the lowest odds for service use compared to the rest of the population. Using Andersen's behavioural model and assessing the determinants of outpatient service use has the potential to inform possible policy responses, especially those driving services use among chronic patients. The possible policy responses include reducing financial access barriers with the help of public subsidies for sub-groups of the population with the lowest access to care; focusing/expanding state-funded benefits for the most prevalent chronic conditions, which are responsible for the greatest disease burden; or supporting chronic disease management programs for the most prevalent chronic

  3. Russia-Georgia Conflict in August 2008: Context and Implications for U.S. Interests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-03

    proclaimed that “Putin is our president.” Many South Ossetians voted in the 2007 Russian Duma election and the 2008 Russian presidential election. CEDR...On August 25, Russia’s Federation Council (upper legislative chamber) and the Duma (lower chamber) met and recommended that the...August 15, 2008. See also News Conference with Legal Council for the Republic of Georgia Payam Akhavan, National Press Club , August 21, 2008

  4. Geochemistry, faunal composition and trophic structure in reducing sediments on the South West South Georgia margin

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, JB; Aquilina, A.; Woulds, C; Glover, AG; Little, CTS; Reid, WDK; Hepburn, LE; Newton, J; Mills, RA

    2016-01-01

    Despite a number of studies in areas of focused methane seepage, the extent of transitional sediments of more diffuse methane seepage, and their influence upon biological communities is poorly understood. We investigated an area of reducing sediments with elevated levels of methane on the South Georgia margin around 250 m depth and report data from a series of geochemical and biological analyses. Here, the geochemical signatures were consistent with weak methane seepage and the role of sub-su...

  5. Bio-ecological Peculiarities of Genus Pinus L. Species Under Conditions of Eastern Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Nadiradze

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses bio-ecological peculiarities of the following species of genus Pinus L. spread in eastern Georgia: Pinus eldarica Medw., P. griffithii McCleland., P. cembra L., P. pallasiana Lamb., P. pinea L., P. sabiniana Dougl., P. sylvestris L., P. sosnowskyi Nakai, P. strobus L., the perspectives of their usage in Green Building and contemporary problems. We have studied the periods of bud opening, vegetation ending, starting and finishing of cambium action, sprout woodening process, time and rate of growing in height, and regularities of accumulation-transformation of storage carbohydrates. The studies revealed that the annual development cycle of all these species includes all morphological -physiological periods: sprout growth, latent growth, organic and forced rest. They are characterized by the good growth-development; almost all of them are perspective for eastern Georgia, particularly, for all regions of inner Kakheti. However, in recent years, massive drying up of pine forests groves takes place in eastern Georgia. That is why it is necessary to conduct the fitopatologic research, identify the pest causing the damage and plan the measures against it.

  6. Historical Earthquake scenario and Seismic risk for Big Cities in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsereteli, Nino; Varazanashvili, Otar; Alania, Victor; Gventsadze, Aleksander; Kvavadze, Nino

    2016-04-01

    The study and detailed analysis of the original documents and researches have allowed us to create a new catalog of historical earthquakes of Georgia from 1250 BC to 1900 AD. Recalculation catalog of instrumental period from 1900 up to now together with new historical catalog allowed us to investigate completeness of earthquake catalog. Estimation fault plane solution, new data from seismic profiles for big cities of Georgia allowed to constrain new seismic sources in large scale. Investigation of seismic parameters for seismic hazard as depth distribution, seismic rate, Mmax and b value on one side and new detail data of active faults gave us possibility to run strong historical earthquake scenario and estimate of ground shaking map for these sites. For calculation of shaking map we used empirical ground motion model that was developed for PGA and SA at selected periods for Georgia. Some local investigation of site was done that allow to estimate such parameters as dominant frequency and amplification factor. Investigation of inventory map of element at risk allows us estimate social and economic losses for large cities.

  7. Utilizing NASA Earth Observations to Monitor Sinkhole Development and Identify Risk Areas in Dougherty County, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahalan, M. D.; Berry, K.; Amin, M.; Xu, W.; Hu, T.; Milewski, A.

    2015-12-01

    Located in southwest Georgia, Dougherty County has a growing populace in an agricultural region that relies heavily on groundwater resources. Partly due to escalated groundwater extraction, this area has experienced an increase in sinkhole development over the last decade. Sinkholes pose a threat to infrastructure development, groundwater pollution, and land use operations. The NASA DEVELOP Georgia Disasters and Water Resources team partnered with the City of Albany and Dougherty County Planning and Development Services (PDS) and the Southwest Georgia Water Resources Task Force (SGWRTF) to assess past sinkhole development and identify areas susceptible to future sinkhole formation. Sinkhole mapping was completed utilizing a time-series of elevation data (1999 - 2011) from NASA's SRTM and ASTER missions, as well as European Remote-Sensing (ERS-1 and 2) satellite-derived elevation data. The sinkhole inventory maps and spatial statistical techniques (i.e., geographically-weighted regression) were employed to quantify the factors most influential in sinkhole development. With those results, the susceptibility of every area within Dougherty County to future sinkhole formation was identified. The results of this applied science project will enable the PDS and SGWRTF to make informed decisions on current and future land use, safe infrastructure development, and sustainable water resource management.

  8. Normal streamflows and water levels continue—Summary of hydrologic conditions in Georgia, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaak, Andrew E.; Ankcorn, Paul D.; Peck, Michael F.

    2016-03-31

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) South Atlantic Water Science Center (SAWSC) Georgia office, in cooperation with local, State, and other Federal agencies, maintains a long-term hydrologic monitoring network of more than 350 real-time, continuous-record, streamflow-gaging stations (streamgages). The network includes 14 real-time lake-level monitoring stations, 72 real-time surface-water-quality monitors, and several water-quality sampling programs. Additionally, the SAWSC Georgia office operates more than 204 groundwater monitoring wells, 39 of which are real-time. The wide-ranging coverage of streamflow, reservoir, and groundwater monitoring sites allows for a comprehensive view of hydrologic conditions across the State. One of the many benefits this monitoring network provides is a spatially distributed overview of the hydrologic conditions of creeks, rivers, reservoirs, and aquifers in Georgia.Streamflow and groundwater data are verified throughout the year by USGS hydrographers and made available to water-resource managers, recreationists, and Federal, State, and local agencies. Hydrologic conditions are determined by comparing the statistical analyses of data collected during the current water year to historical data. Changing hydrologic conditions underscore the need for accurate, timely data to allow informed decisions about the management and conservation of Georgia’s water resources for agricultural, recreational, ecological, and water-supply needs and in protecting life and property.

  9. Georgia Maternal and Infant Health Research Group (GMIHRG): Mobilizing Allied Health Students and Community Partners to Put Data into Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zertuche, Adrienne D; Spelke, Bridget; Julian, Zoë; Pinto, Meredith; Rochat, Roger

    2016-07-01

    Purpose Despite having an obstetrician/gynecologist (ob/gyn) workforce comparable to the national average, Georgia is ranked 50th in maternal mortality and 40th in infant mortality. The Georgia Maternal and Infant Health Research Group (GMIHRG) was founded in 2010 to evaluate and address this paradox. Description In the several years since GMIHRG's inception, its graduate allied health student researchers and advisors have collaborated with community partners to complete several requisite research initiatives. Their initial work demonstrated that over half the Georgia areas outside metropolitan Atlanta lack adequate access to obstetric services, and their subsequent research evaluated the reasons for and the consequences of this maldistribution of obstetric providers. Assessment In order to translate their workforce and outcomes data for use in policymaking and programming, GMIHRG created reader-friendly reports for distribution to a wide variety of stakeholders and prepared concise, compelling presentations with targeted recommendations for change. This commitment to advocacy ultimately enabled them to: (a) inspire the Georgia Study Committees on Medicaid Reform and Medical Education, (b) influence Georgia General Assembly abortion bills, medical scholarship/loan legislation, and appropriations, and (c) motivate programming initiatives to improve midwifery education and perinatal regionalization in Georgia. Conclusion GMIHRG members have employed inventive research methods and maximized collaborative partnerships to enable their data on Georgia's maternal and infant outcomes and obstetric workforce to effectively inform state organizations and policymakers. With this unique approach, GMIHRG serves as a cost-efficient and valuable model for student engagement in the translation of research into advocacy efforts, policy change, and innovative programming.

  10. Reality of Risk of Natural Disasters in Georgia and a Management Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaprindashvili, George; Tsereteli, Emil; Gobejishvili, Ramin; King, Lorenz; Gaprindashvili, Merab

    2013-04-01

    In the last decades of the 20th century, the protection of the population from natural disasters, the preservation of land resources and the safe operation of a complex infrastructure and costly engineering facilities have become the primary socio-economic, demographic, political and environmental problems worldwide. This problem has become more acute in recent years when the natural cataclysms in terms of a population increase, progressive urbanization and use of vulnerable technologies have acquired even larger scales. This holds true especially for mountainous countries as Georgia, too. Natural-catastrophic processes as landslides, mudflows, rockfalls and erosion, and their frequent reoccurrence with harmful impacts to population, agricultural lands and engineering objects form a demanding challenge for the responsible authorities. Thousands of settlements, roads, oil and gas pipelines, high-voltage power transmission lines and other infrastructure may be severely damaged. Respective studies prove that the origin and activation of landslide-gravitational and mudflow processes increase year by year, and this holds true for almost all landscapes and geomorphological zones of Georgia. Catastrophic events may be triggered by (1) intense earthquakes, (2) extreme hydro-meteorological events, probably on the background of global climatic changes (3) large-scale human impacts on the environment. Societies with a low level of preparedness concerning these hazards are especially hit hard. In view of this urgent task, many departmental and research institutions have increased their efforts within the limits of their competence. First of all, it is the activity of the Geological Survey of Georgia (at present included in the National Environmental Agency of the Ministry of Environment Protection of Georgia) which mapped, identified and catalogued the hazardous processes on the territory of the country and identified the spatial limits and occurrences of hazardous processes

  11. 77 FR 29753 - CaterParrott Railnet, L.L.C.-Sublease and Operation Exemption-Georgia & Florida Railway, L.L.C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-18

    ...] CaterParrott Railnet, L.L.C.--Sublease and Operation Exemption-- Georgia & Florida Railway, L.L.C. CaterParrott Railnet, L.L.C. (CPR), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31 to sublease from Georgia & Florida Railway, L.L.C. (GRF) and operate approximately 43.2 miles of rail...

  12. A brief review of some pathology research supported by the Georgia Commodity Commission for Pecans at the USDA-ARS, Byron

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the changes currently taking place nationally in the pecan industry, and the production issues faced specifically by growers in Georgia and elsewhere in the southeastern region, the pathology research projects funded by the Georgia Commodity Commission for Pecans (CC) are reviewed. The results ...

  13. Replication of a Career Academy Model: The Georgia Central Educational Center and Four Replication Sites. Summary. Issues & Answers. REL 2011-No. 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detgen, Amy; Alfeld, Corinne

    2011-01-01

    The study surveyed four career academies in Georgia that replicated the model of the Georgia Central Educational Center, which integrates technical instruction and academics at the high school level. The four replication sites adhered to the major tenets of the model. The model's flexibility helped the new sites meet community needs. [For the main…

  14. Designing effective power sector reform: A road map for the republic of Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdgelashvili, Lado

    Around the world, network utilities (i.e., electricity, natural gas, railway, telecommunications, and water supply industries) are undergoing major structural transformation. A new wave of market liberalization, together with rapid technological changes, has challenged the previously dominant monopoly organization of these industries. A global trend toward deregulation and restructuring is evident in countries at different levels of social and economic development. The challenges of transition from a monopolistic to an open market competitive structure are numerous. Understanding these problems and finding solutions are essential to successful restructuring. In developing countries and economies in transition (i.e., the Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union), government-owned utilities are often considered to be highly inefficient. The dominant power sector restructuring strategies seek to promote economic efficiency through a gradual introduction of competition into the power sector. Five components of power sector reform are commonly proposed by the World Bank and others for these countries: commercialization, privatization, establishment of an independent regulatory agency, unbundling and gradual introduction of competition in generation and retail markets. The Republic of Georgia, like many economies in transition (e.g., Hungary, Ukraine, and Kazakhstan) has followed this reform model. However, outcomes of the reform have not been as promised. The acute economic problems facing Georgia after it regained independence have compounded problems in the power sector. A review of Georgia's utility reforms reveals that the country has undertaken electricity industry restructuring without giving substantial consideration to the problems that these reforms might have created within the industry or society. The main task of this dissertation is to find the restructuring model, which can best serve economic, social and environmental goals under circumstances similar

  15. West Nile virus antibodies in avian species of Georgia, USA: 2000-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Samantha E J; Allison, Andrew B; Yabsley, Michael J; Mead, Daniel G; Wilcox, Benjamin R; Stallknecht, David E

    2006-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) was first isolated in the state of Georgia in the summer of 2001. As amplifying hosts of WNV, avian species play an important role in the distribution and epidemiology of the virus. The objective of this study was to identify avian species that are locally involved as potential amplifying hosts of WNV and can serve as indicators of WNV transmission over the physiographic and land use variation present in the southeastern United States. Avian serum samples (n=14,077) from 83 species of birds captured throughout Georgia during the summers of 2000-2004 were tested by a plaque reduction neutralization test for antibodies to WNV and St. Louis encephalitis virus. Over the 5-year period, WNV-neutralizing antibodies were detected in 869 (6.2%) samples. The WNV seroprevalence increased significantly throughout the study and was species dependent. The highest antibody prevalence rates were detected in rock pigeons (Columba livia), northern cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis), common ground doves (Columbina passerina), grey catbirds (Deumetella carolinensis), and northern mockingbirds (Mimus polyglottos). Northern cardinals, in addition to having high geometric mean antibody titers and seroprevalence rates, were commonly found in all land use types and physiographic regions. Rock pigeons, common ground doves, grey catbirds, and northern mockingbirds, although also having high seroprevalence rates and high antibody titers against WNV, were more restricted in their distribution and therefore may be of more utility when attempting to assess exposure rates in specific habitat types. Of all species tested, northern cardinals represent the best potential avian indicator species for widespread serologic-based studies of WNV throughout Georgia due to their extensive range, ease of capture, and high antibody rates and titers. Due to the large geographic area covered by this species, their utility as a WNV sentinel species may include most of the eastern United

  16. The hydrochemistry of high-elevation lakes in the Georgia Basin, British Columbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick D. SHAW

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available High-elevation lakes are sensitive to acidification from atmospheric deposition owing to their generally small catchment areas, thin soils and low bedrock weathering rates. The Georgia Basin, southwest British Columbia, Canada, receives atmospheric inputs from emissions originating in Vancouver, Victoria, and from marine traffic in the Strait of Georgia. There is growing concern on the influence of this air pollution on high-elevation systems in the region. Water chemistry and catchment characteristics were used to assess the sensitivity of 72 lakes in the Georgia Basin to acidic deposition. Twenty percent of the study lakes had pH levels less than 6, and acid neutralising capacity (ANC concentrations below 20 μeq L–1, which are key thresholds for biological sustainability. Base cation and trace metal concentrations were low, typical of the dilute nature of high-elevation lakes (median conductivity = 7.0 μS cm–1. Nonetheless, concentrations of trace metals (such as lead decreased with distance from major cities. The primary factors influencing the pH and ANC of surface waters were investigated using multiple linear regression; both ANC and pH were related to longitude and the proportion of the catchment dominated by ice and glaciers. Increasing sulphur deposition resulted in decreasing pH. The median critical load of acidity (sulphur for the study lakes was approximately 70 meq m–2 y–1; 18% of the lakes received sulphur deposition (range: 6-81 meq m–2 y–1 for the period 2005-2006 in excess of their critical load.

  17. The economic impact of chronic fatigue syndrome in Georgia: direct and indirect costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brimmer Dana J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is a debilitating chronic illness affecting at least 4 million people in the United States. Understanding its cost improves decisions regarding resource allocation that may be directed towards treatment and cure, and guides the evaluation of clinical and community interventions designed to reduce the burden of disease. Methods This research estimated direct and indirect costs of CFS and the impact on educational attainment using a population-based, case-control study between September 2004 and July 2005, Georgia, USA. Participants completed a clinical evaluation to confirm CFS, identify other illnesses, and report on socioeconomic factors. We estimated the effect of CFS on direct medical costs (inpatient hospitalizations, provider visits, prescription medication spending, other medical supplies and services and loss in productivity (employment and earnings with a stratified sample (n = 500 from metropolitan, urban, and rural Georgia. We adjusted medical costs and earnings for confounders (age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, and geographic strata using econometric models and weighted estimates to reflect response-rate adjusted sampling rates. Results Individuals with CFS had mean annual direct medical costs of $5,683. After adjusting for confounding factors, CFS accounted for $3,286 of these costs (p Conclusions Study results indicate that chronic fatigue syndrome may lead to substantial increases in healthcare costs and decreases in individual earnings. Studies have estimated up to 2.5% of non-elderly adults may suffer from CFS. In Georgia, a state with roughly 5.5 million people age 18-59, illness could account for $452 million in total healthcare expenditures and $1.2 billion of lost productivity.

  18. Distribution and recurrence of phytoplankton blooms around South Georgia, Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Borrione

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available South Georgia phytoplankton blooms are amongst the largest of the Southern Ocean and are associated with a rich ecosystem and strong atmospheric carbon drawdown. Both aspects depend on the intensity of blooms, but also on their regularity. Here we use data from 12 yr of SeaWiFS (Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor ocean colour imagery and calculate the frequency of bloom occurrence (FBO to re-examine spatial and temporal bloom distributions. We find that upstream of the island and outside the borders of the Georgia Basin, blooms occurred in less than 4 out of the 12 yr (FBO < 4. In contrast, FBO was mostly greater than 8 downstream of the island, i.e., to the north and northwest, and in places equal to 12, indicating that blooms occurred every year. The typical bloom area, defined as the region where blooms occurred in at least 8 out of the 12 yr, covers the entire Georgia Basin and the northern shelf of the island. The time series of surface chlorophyll a (Chl a concentrations averaged over the typical bloom area shows that phytoplankton blooms occurred in every year between September 1997 and September 2010, and that Chl a values followed a clear seasonal cycle, with concentration peaks around December followed in many years by a second peak during late austral summer or early autumn, suggesting a bi-modal bloom pattern. The bloom regularity we describe here is in contrast with results of Park et al. (2010 who used a significantly different study area including regions that almost never exhibit bloom conditions.

  19. Tobacco Use and Nicotine Dependence among Conflict-Affected Men in the Republic of Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Patel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is very little evidence globally on tobacco use and nicotine dependence among civilian populations affected by armed conflict, despite key vulnerability factors related to elevated mental disorders and socio-economic stressors. The study aim was to describe patterns of smoking and nicotine dependence among conflict-affected civilian men in the Republic of Georgia and associations with mental disorders. Methods: A cross-sectional household survey using multistage random sampling was conducted in late 2011 among conflict-affected populations in Georgia. Respondents included in this paper were 1,248 men aged ≥18 years who were internally displaced persons (IDPs and former IDPs who had returned in their home areas. Outcomes of current tobacco use, heavy use (≥20 cigarettes per day, and nicotine dependence (using the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence were used. PTSD, depression, anxiety and hazardous alcohol use were also measured, along with exposure to traumatic events and a range of demographic and socio-economic characteristics. Results: Of 1,248 men, 592 (47.4% smoked and 70.9% of current smokers were heavy smokers. The mean nicotine dependence score was 5.0 and the proportion with high nicotine dependence (≥6 was 41.4%. In multivariate regression analyses, nicotine dependence was significantly associated with PTSD (β 0.74 and depression (β 0.85, along with older age (except 65+ years, and being a returnee (compared to IDPs. Conclusions: The study reveals very high levels of heavy smoking and nicotine dependence among conflict-affected persons in Georgia. The associations between nicotine dependence, PTSD and depression suggest interventions could yield synergistic benefits.

  20. Geochronologic evidence for a possible MIS-11 emergent barrier/beach-ridge in southeastern Georgia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markewich, H.W.; Pavich, M.J.; Schultz, A.P.; Mahan, S.A.; Aleman-Gonzalez, W. B.; Bierman, P.R.

    2013-01-01

    Predominantly clastic, off-lapping, transgressive, near-shore marine sediment packages that are morphologically expressed as subparallel NE-trending barriers, beach ridges, and associated back-barrier areas, characterize the near-surface stratigraphic section between the Savannah and the Ogeechee Rivers in Effingham County, southeastern Georgia. Each barrier/back-barrier (shoreline) complex is lower than and cut into a higher/older complex. Each barrier or shoreline complex overlies Miocene strata. No direct age data are available for these deposits. Previous researchers have disagreed on their age and provenance. Using luminescence and meteoric beryllium-10 (10Be) inventory analyses, we estimated a minimum age for the largest, westernmost, morphologically identifiable, and topographically-highest, barrier/beach-ridge (the Wicomico shoreline barrier) and constrained the age of a suite of younger barrier/beach-ridges that lie adjacent and seaward of the Wicomico shoreline barrier. At the study site, the near-shore marine/estuarine deposits underlying the Wicomico shoreline barrier are overlain by eolian sand and an intervening zone-of-mixing. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) data indicate ages of ≤43 ka for the eolian sand and 116 ka for the zone-of-mixing. Meteoric 10Be and pedostratigraphic data indicate minimum residence times of 33.4 ka for the eolian sand, 80.6 ka for the zone-of-mixing, and 247 ka for the paleosol. The combined OSL and 10Be age data indicate that, at this locality, the barrier/beach ridge has a minimum age of about 360 ka. This age for the Wicomico shoreline-barrier deposit is the first for any Pleistocene near-shore marine/estuarine deposit in southeast Georgia that is conclusively older than 80 ka. The 360-ka minimum age is in agreement with other geochronologic data for near-coastline deposits in Georgia and South Carolina. The geomorphic position of this barrier/beach-ridge is similar to deposits in South Carolina considered to be

  1. Prevalence of chronic fatigue syndrome in metropolitan, urban, and rural Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boneva Roumiana S

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is a debilitating illness with no known cause or effective therapy. Population-based epidemiologic data on CFS prevalence are critical to put CFS in a realistic context for public health officials and others responsible for allocating resources. Methods Based on a random-digit dialing survey we ascertained CFS cases and controls to estimate the prevalence of CFS in metropolitan, urban, and rural populations of Georgia. This report focuses on the 5,623 of 19,381 respondents ages 18 to 59 years old. Fatigued (2,438, randomly selected unwell not fatigued (1,429 and randomly selected well (1,756 respondents completed telephone questionnaires concerning fatigue, other symptoms, and medical history. Subsets of those identified by interview as having CFS-like illness (292, chronic unwellness which was not CFS-like (268 – randomly selected, and well subjects (223, matched to those with CFS-like illness on sex, race, and age completed a clinical evaluation. Results We estimated that 2.54% of persons 18 to 59 years of age suffered from CFS. There were no significant differences in prevalence of CFS between metropolitan, urban or rural populations or between white and black residents of the three regions. However, there were significant differences in female-to-male ratios of prevalence across the strata (metropolitan female: male 11.2 : 1, urban 1.7 : 1, rural 0.8 : 1. Conclusion We estimated that 2.54% of the Georgia population suffers from CFS, which is 6- to 10-fold higher than previous population-based estimates in other geographic areas. These differences may reflect broader screening criteria and differences in the application of the case definition. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that CFS prevalence may be higher in Georgia than other areas where it has been measured. Although the study did not identify differences in overall prevalence between metropolitan, urban, and rural Georgia

  2. Geochronologic evidence for a possible MIS-11 emergent barrier/beach-ridge in southeastern Georgia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markewich, H. W.; Pavich, M. J.; Schultz, A. P.; Mahan, S. A.; Aleman-Gonzalez, W. B.; Bierman, P. R.

    2013-01-01

    Predominantly clastic, off-lapping, transgressive, near-shore marine sediment packages that are morphologically expressed as subparallel NE-trending barriers, beach ridges, and associated back-barrier areas, characterize the near-surface stratigraphic section between the Savannah and the Ogeechee Rivers in Effingham County, southeastern Georgia. Each barrier/back-barrier (shoreline) complex is lower than and cut into a higher/older complex. Each barrier or shoreline complex overlies Miocene strata. No direct age data are available for these deposits. Previous researchers have disagreed on their age and provenance. Using luminescence and meteoric beryllium-10 (10Be) inventory analyses, we estimated a minimum age for the largest, westernmost, morphologically identifiable, and topographically-highest, barrier/beach-ridge (the Wicomico shoreline barrier) and constrained the age of a suite of younger barrier/beach-ridges that lie adjacent and seaward of the Wicomico shoreline barrier. At the study site, the near-shore marine/estuarine deposits underlying the Wicomico shoreline barrier are overlain by eolian sand and an intervening zone-of-mixing. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) data indicate ages of ≤43 ka for the eolian sand and 116 ka for the zone-of-mixing. Meteoric 10Be and pedostratigraphic data indicate minimum residence times of 33.4 ka for the eolian sand, 80.6 ka for the zone-of-mixing, and 247 ka for the paleosol. The combined OSL and 10Be age data indicate that, at this locality, the barrier/beach ridge has a minimum age of about 360 ka. This age for the Wicomico shoreline-barrier deposit is the first for any Pleistocene near-shore marine/estuarine deposit in southeast Georgia that is conclusively older than 80 ka. The 360-ka minimum age is in agreement with other geochronologic data for near-coastline deposits in Georgia and South Carolina. The geomorphic position of this barrier/beach-ridge is similar to deposits in South Carolina considered to be

  3. Geology and paleontology of five cores from Screven and Burke counties, eastern Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lucy E.

    2001-01-01

    Five deep stratigraphic test holes were drilled from 1991 to 1993 in support of multidisciplinary investigations to determine the stratigraphy of Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary sediments of the coastal plain in east-central Georgia. Cored sediment and geological logs from the Millhaven test hole in Screven County and the Girard and Millers Pond test holes in Burke County are the primary sources of lithologic and paleontologic information from this report. Lithologic and paleontologic information from the Thompson Oak and McBean test holes in Burke County supplements the discussion of stratigraphy and sedimentation in the updip part of the study area near the Millers Pond test hole.

  4. The Tagliavini Report Revisited: Jus ad Bellum and the Legality of the Russian Intervention in Georgia

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Lott

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to critically examine the legal findings of the Tagliavini Report in hope of contributing to the debate on its principal conclusions. The establishment of an independent fact-finding commission to explore the origins and course of the conflict marked the first time in its history that the EU, key mediator in concluding the Georgia-Russia conflict's ceasefire, intervened actively in an armed conflict. The author, disparate from the Fact-Finding Mission, does n...

  5. Hydrology of the Claiborne aquifer and interconnection with the Upper Floridan aquifer in southwest Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Debbie W.; Gonthier, Gerard

    2017-04-24

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study, in cooperation with the Georgia Environmental Protection Division, to define the hydrologic properties of the Claiborne aquifer and evaluate its connection with the Upper Floridan aquifer in southwest Georgia. The effort involved collecting and compiling hydrologic data from the aquifer in subarea 4 of southwestern Georgia. Data collected for this study include borehole geophysical logs in 7 wells, and two 72-hour aquifer tests to determine aquifer properties.The top of the Claiborne aquifer extends from an altitude of about 200 feet above the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88) in Terrell County to 402 feet below NAVD 88 in Decatur County, Georgia. The base of the aquifer extends from an altitude of about 60 feet above NAVD 88 in eastern Sumter County to about 750 feet below NAVD 88 in Decatur County. Aquifer thickness ranges from about 70 feet in eastern Early County to 400 feet in Decatur County.The transmissivity of the Claiborne aquifer, determined from two 72-hour aquifer tests, was estimated to be 1,500 and 700 feet squared per day in Mitchell and Early Counties, respectively. The storage coefficient was estimated to be 0.0006 and 0.0004 for the same sites, respectively. Aquifer test data from Mitchell County indicate a small amount of leakage occurred during the test. Groundwater-flow models suggest that the source of the leakage was the underlying Clayton aquifer, which produced about 2.5 feet of drawdown in response to pumping in the Claiborne aquifer. The vertical hydraulic conductivity of the confining unit between the Claiborne and Clayton aquifers was simulated to be about 0.02 foot per day.Results from the 72-hour aquifer tests run for this study indicated no interconnection between the Claiborne and overlying Upper Floridan aquifers at the two test sites. Additional data are needed to monitor the effects that increased withdrawals from the Claiborne aquifer may have on future water resources.

  6. Prevalence and histopathology of shell disease in turtles from Lake Blackshear, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovich, J.E.; Gotte, S.W.; Ernst, C.H.; Harshbarger, J.; Laemmerzahl, A.F.

    1996-01-01

    Turtles in Lake Blackshear, Crisp County, Georgia (USA) were evaluated for shell disease during intensive trapping efforts on 8 and 9 May 1990. The disease was most prevalent in Pseudemys concinna (74%) and Trachemys scripta (35%). The degree of necrosis on the carapace was significantly positively correlated with the degree of necrosis on the plastron in T. scripta (rs = 0.50), but not in P. concinna (rs=0.06). Female T. scripta with lesions were significantly larger than females without lesions. Lesions were not detected on six other species of turtles. Some areas contained multicarinate osteoclasts that were destroying bone. No tumors were detected in soft tissue samples.

  7. Georgia Pacific: Crossett Mill Identifies Heat Recovery Projects and Operational Improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-10-01

    An assessment team conducted a mill-wide energy survey at Georgia-Pacific's Crossett, Arkansas mill to update a previous pinch analysis. Three heat recovery projects were identified that could reduce annual costs by $4.8 million and reduce natural gas use by 1,845,000 x 106 Btu. The overall payback period for the heat recovery projects would be less than 1 year. Furthermore, by implementing operational improvements, the mill could save $4.8 million more annually and 1,500,000 x 106 Btu in natural gas.

  8. Las Relaciones Báltico-Cáucaso Sur: El Caso Lituania – Georgia

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael José R. de Estepona

    2009-01-01

    Las transformaciones acaecidas en el espacio ex-soviético encuentran en el Cáucaso Sur un escenario de especial complejidad y tensión, como se ha evidenciado en la guerra ruso-georgiana de Agosto de 2008. El panorama estratégico se explica en virtud de las aspiraciones atlantistas (especialmente hacia la OTAN) de Georgia en contraposición a los intereses de Rusia, y la importancia económica del corredor energético surcaucásico como vía alternativa de obtención de los recursos del Mar Caspio. ...

  9. ASFV in Tanzania: Asymptomatic pigs harbor virus of molecular similarity to Georgia 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uttenthal, Åse; Braae, Uffe Christian; Ngowi, H. A.

    2013-01-01

    -month-old pigs confirms the circulation of ASFV in Mbeya several months after our detection of ASFV in asymptomatic pigs. The initial blood samples were obtained on Whatman FTA filter papers as dried blood samples. The samples were stored under field conditions and ASFV could be sequenced in DNA eluted...... in the study area. ASFV genome was detected in serum from 10 out of 127 healthy European/crossbreed pigs. ASFV DNA was polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified and sequenced from sera with high viral loads using primers targeting p54 or p72. Both p54 and p72 had total identity to ASFV Genotype II (Georgia...

  10. A Survey of Georgia Adult Protective Service Staff: Implications for Older Adult Injury Prevention and Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strasser, Sheryl

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aging population is a rapidly growing demographic. Isolation and limited autonomy render many of the elderly vulnerable to abuse, neglect and exploitation. As the population grows, so does the need for Adult Protective Services (APS. This study was conducted to examine current knowledge of older adult protection laws in Georgia among APS staff and to identify training opportunities to better prepare the APS workforce in case detection and intervention.Methods: The Georgia State University Institute of Public Health faculty developed a primary survey in partnership with the Georgia Division of Aging Services’ leadership to identify key training priority issues for APS caseworkers and investigators. A 47-item electronic questionnaire was delivered to all APS employees via work-issued email accounts. We conducted descriptive analyses, t-tests and chi-square analyses to determine APS employees’ baseline knowledge of Georgia’s elder abuse policies, laws and practices, as well as examine associations of age, ethnicity, and educational attainment with knowledge. We used a p-value of 0.05 and 95% confidence intervals to determine statistical significance of analyses performed.Result: Ninety-two out of 175 APS staff responded to the survey (53% response rate. The majority of respondents were Caucasian (56% women (92%. For over half the survey items, paired sample t-tests revealed significant differences between what APS staff reported as known and what APS staff members indicated they needed to know more about in terms of elder abuse and current policies. Chi-square tests revealed that non-Caucasians significantly preferred video conferencing as a training format (44% compared to 18%, [χ2(1 = 7.102, p < .008], whereas Caucasians preferred asynchronous online learning formats (55% compared to 28% [χ2(1 =5.951, p < .015].Conclusion: Results from this study provide the Georgia Division of Aging with insight into specific policy areas

  11. Proposed Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina system power marketing policy and subsequent contracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-04

    This is an Environmental Assessment (Assessment) (DOE/EA-0935) evaluating the Power Marketing Policy and Subsequent Contracts between Southeastern and its customers. The Assessment evaluates two alternatives and the no action alternative. The proposed action is to market the power and energy available in the Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina System during the next ten years, with new power sales contracts of ten-year durations, to the customers set forth in Appendix A of the Assessment. In addition to the proposed alternative, the Assessment evaluates the alternative of extending existing contracts under the current marketing policy.

  12. Evaluation of Primary Safety Belt Laws in California, Louisiana, and Georgia

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    This study evaluated three states that changed to primary enforcement of safety belt laws, collecting statewide seat belt observation data for several years and conducting monthly seat belt observations for 6 months after passage of the primary law in 6 California cities, 5 Louisiana cities, and 5 Georgia cities (average 1,000–6,000 vehicles a month); monthly motorist surveys at DMVs for 6 months in these sites (n=7,061); focus groups with law enforcement officers and supervisors in each site...

  13. Human Contacts and Potential Pathways of Disease Introduction on Georgia Poultry Farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vieira, Antonio; Hofacre, C.L.; Smith, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    As highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus continues to circulate in the world, poultry farm biosecurity and timely reporting of morbidity and mortality among commercial poultry farms in the United States are major concerns. To assess the vulnerability of poultry farms to the introduction...... and spread of a highly infectious pathogen, such as the currently circulating H5N1 influenza virus, a survey was administered to growers in two counties in Georgia representing areas of low and high poultry densities. Survey questions regarding horizontal contacts and management were sent to commercial...

  14. Managing soil nutrients with compost in organic farms of East Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghambashidze, Giorgi

    2013-04-01

    Soil Fertility management in organic farming relies on a long-term integrated approach rather than the more short-term very targeted solutions common in conventional agriculture. Increasing soil organic matter content through the addition of organic amendments has proven to be a valuable practice for maintaining or restoring soil quality. Organic agriculture relies greatly on building soil organic matter with compost typically replacing inorganic fertilizers and animal manure as the fertility source of choice. In Georgia, more and more attention is paid to the development of organic farming, occupying less than 1% of total agricultural land of the country. Due to increased interest towards organic production the question about soil amendments is arising with special focus on organic fertilizers as basic nutrient supply sources under organic management practice. In the frame of current research two different types of compost was prepared and their nutritional value was studied. The one was prepared from organic fraction municipal solid waste and another one using fruit processing residues. In addition to main nutritional properties both composts were tested on heavy metals content, as one of the main quality parameter. The results have shown that concentration of main nutrient is higher in municipal solid waste compost, but it contains also more heavy metals, which is not allowed in organic farming system. Fruit processing residue compost also has lower pH value and is lower in total salt content being is more acceptable for soil in lowlands of East Georgia, mainly characterised by alkaline reaction. .

  15. Guided-Inquiry Lessons Raise Scores on the Sixth Grade Georgia Science Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Purlie M.

    At the local level, G Middle School has the highest district-wide percentage of 6th grade science students who are not meeting standards. It is imperative that G middle school take corrective action to reduce the number of students failing to meet state science standards. Dewey's theory of conceptual framework, which involves knowledge constructed on a person's personal experience and mind activity through active forms of learning, guided this study. The goal of the study was to determine whether inquiry-based science modules produce greater 6th grade science achievement, as measured by an equivalent instrument of the science section of the Georgia Criterion-Referenced Competency Test, when compared to traditional instruction among eastern Georgia 6th graders. The sample consisted of 230 students in the nonintervention group and 119 students in the intervention group. All students were from intact classes. At the end of the intervention, an independent t test was conducted to analyze the scores. According to the study t test, (t = 12.33, df = 304.56, p motivation towards, comprehension of, and interest in science concepts. At the local level, these inquiry lessons can be shared with science teachers across grade levels and within the district to improve county-wide science scores. An increase in student interest and comprehension of science concepts could ultimately lead to the United States producing more students in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education.

  16. An Evaluation of Three Driving-Under-the-Influence Courts in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fell, James C; Tippetts, A Scott; Ciccel, J Decarlo

    2011-01-01

    Following the model of Drug Courts, three Georgia Driving-Under-the-Influence (DUI) Courts (established in Chatham, Clarke, and Hall Counties in 2003) were designed to address the underlying alcohol problems of repeat DUI offenders through continuous and frequent judicially supervised treatment, periodic alcohol and other drug testing, the use of graduated sanctions, and other appropriate rehabilitative services. A team comprised of a judge, court personnel, probation officials, and treatment providers met regularly to assess offender progress, and offenders met biweekly with the judge to report their progress. An impact evaluation showed after 4 years of exposure that when the DUI Court graduates were combined with the DUI Court terminated offenders (Intent to Treat Group), the DUI Court offenders had significantly lower recidivism rates: 38 percent lower than a Contemporary Group of offenders and 65 percent lower than a Retrospective Group of offenders. The DUI Court Intent to Treat Group had a significantly lower recidivism rate: 15 percent compared to 24 percent for a group of matched offenders from three similar counties in Georgia (Contemporary Group) and a 35 percent rate for matched offenders from the same counties as the DUI Court who would have been eligible for the DUI Court had it been in existence (Retrospective Group). Offenders who were terminated from the DUI Courts for various reasons had a recidivism rate of 26 percent. It is estimated that the DUI Courts prevented between 47 and 112 repeat arrests during a four year period due to the reduced recidivism associated with them.

  17. Occurrence and diversity of clinically important Vibrio species in the aquatic environments of Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamari eKokashvili

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Among the more than 70 different Vibrio species inhabiting marine, estuarine, and freshwater ecosystems, 12 are recognized as human pathogens. The warm subtropical climate of the Black Sea coastal area and inland regions of Georgia likely provides a favorable environment for various Vibrio species. From 2006 to 2009, the abundance, ecology, and diversity of clinically important Vibrio species were studied in different locations in Georgia and across seasons. Over a 33-month period, 1,595 presumptive Vibrio isolates were collected from the Black Sea (n=657 and freshwater lakes around Tbilisi (n=938. Screening of a subset of 440 concentrated and enriched water samples by PCR-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (PCR-ESI/MS detected the presence of DNA from eight clinically important Vibrio species: V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, V. mimicus, V. alginolyticus, V. harveyi, V. metschnikovii, and V. cincinnatiensis. Almost ninety percent of PCR/ESI-MS samples positive for Vibrio species were collected from June through November. Three important human pathogenic Vibrio species (V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus were detected in 62.8%, 37.8%, and 21.4% of samples testing positive for vibrios, respectively. The results of these activities suggest that natural reservoirs for human-pathogenic Vibrios exist in Georgian aquatic environments. Water temperature at all sampling sites was positively correlated with the abundance of clinically important Vibrio spp. (except V. metschnikovii and salinity was correlated with species composition at particular Black Sea sites as well as inland reservoirs.

  18. Genetic HLA Study of Kurds in Iraq, Iran and Tbilisi (Caucasus, Georgia): Relatedness and Medical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñiz, Ester; Campos, Cristina; Alonso-Rubio, Javier; Gomez-Casado, Eduardo; Salih, Shadallah Fareq; Martin-Villa, Manuel; Al-Qadi, Rawand

    2017-01-01

    Kurds from Iraq (Dohuk and Erbil Area, North Iraq) have been analyzed for HLA genes. Their HLA genetic profile has been compared with that of other Kurd groups from Iran and Tbilisi (Georgia, Caucasus) and also Worldwide populations. A total of 7,746 HLA chromosomes have been used. Genetic distances, NJ dendrograms and correspondence analyses have been carried out. Haplotype HLA-B*52—DRB1*15 is present in all three analyzed Kurd populations. HLA-A*02-B*51-DRB1*11 is present in Iraq and Georgia Kurds. Haplotypes common to Iran and Iraq Kurds are HLA DRB1*11—DQB1*03, HLA DRB1*03—DQB1*02 and others in a lower frequency. Our HLA study conclusions are that Kurds most probably belong to an ancient Mediterranean / Middle East / Caucasian genetic substratum and that present results and those previously obtained by us in Kurds may be useful for Medicine in future Kurd transplantation programs, HLA Epidemiology (HLA linked diseases) and Pharmacogenomics (HLA-associated drug side effects) and also for Anthropology. It is discussed that one of the most ancient Kurd ancestor groups is in Hurrians (2,000 years BC). PMID:28114347

  19. Mental disorders and their association with disability among internally displaced persons and returnees in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhashvili, Nino; Chikovani, Ivdity; McKee, Martin; Bisson, Jonathan; Patel, Vikram; Roberts, Bayard

    2014-10-01

    There remains limited evidence on comorbidity of mental disorders among conflict-affected civilians, particularly internally displaced persons (IDPs) and former IDPs who have returned to their home areas (returnees). The study aim was to compare patterns of mental disorders and their influence on disability between IDPs and returnees in the Republic of Georgia. A cross-sectional household survey was conducted with adult IDPs from the conflicts in the 1990s, the 2008 conflict, and returnees. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety, and disability were measured using cut scores on Trauma Screening Questionnaire, Patient Health Questionnaire 9, Generalised Anxiety Disorder 7, and the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0. Among the 3,025 respondents, the probable prevalence of PTSD, depression, anxiety, and comorbidity (>1 condition) was 23.3%, 14.0%, 10.4%, 12.4%, respectively. Pearson correlation coefficients (p displacement (particularly longer-term), cumulative trauma exposure, female gender, older age, poor community conditions, and bad household economic situation; coefficients ranged from 1.50 to 3.79. PTSD, depression, anxiety, and comorbidity were associated with increases in disability of 6.4%, 9.7%, 6.3%, and 15.9%, respectively. A high burden of psychiatric symptoms and disability persist among conflict-affected persons in Georgia.

  20. Las Relaciones Báltico-Cáucaso Sur: El Caso Lituania – Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael José R. de Estepona

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Las transformaciones acaecidas en el espacio ex-soviético encuentran en el Cáucaso Sur un escenario de especial complejidad y tensión, como se ha evidenciado en la guerra ruso-georgiana de Agosto de 2008. El panorama estratégico se explica en virtud de las aspiraciones atlantistas (especialmente hacia la OTAN de Georgia en contraposición a los intereses de Rusia, y la importancia económica del corredor energético surcaucásico como vía alternativa de obtención de los recursos del Mar Caspio. Los países bálticos y los surcaucásicos han intensificado sus relaciones de cooperación desde 2004, habiéndose distinguido las relaciones bilaterales desarrolladas entre Lituania y Georgia, que suponen un caso representativo de promoción del vínculo euro-atlántico.

  1. Elimination of Iodine Deficiency in Georgia: Results of National Survey in 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sehniashvily

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In Georgia a law was passed in 2005 that banned the import and sale of non-iodized salt. To measure the impact of this legislation, a national survey was conducted in November 2005. A cross-sectional school-based 30 cluster survey of children aged 6—12 years measured urinary iodine excretion (UIE and the iodine content of household salt. Approximately 30 children from each school were requested to provide a urine sample and bring a household salt sample to school. Urine samples were sent for laboratory analysis to Brussels University (Belgium, and salt samples were analyzed onsite using rapid kits. Only 40 (4.4% of 900 urinary samples analyzed had a low UIE (below 100 @мg/L; the median UIE was 320.7 @мg/L. Of 957 salt samples analyzed with rapid salt testing kits, 867 (95.9% were adequately iodized (>15 mg/kg, and only 39 (4.1% had no iodine. Iodization of salt was validated in 136 random samples using iodometric titration; 128 (94.1% were adequately iodized. These results indicate dramatic improvements both in the prevalence of low UIE among Georgian children (80% in 1998 and in the percentage of Georgian households using salt with adequate iodine (8% in 1999 and 67% in 2003. These results show that, Georgia has achieved universal salt iodization (USI and now meets the primary WHO, UNICEF and ICCIDD criteria for elimination of iodine deficiency.

  2. Dental caries among children in Georgia by age, gender, residence location and ethnic group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgan-Cohen, H D; Margvelashvili, V; Bilder, L; Kalandadze, M; Gordon, M; Margvelashvili, M; Zini, A

    2014-09-01

    To provide prevalence data for dental caries in Georgia. This World Health Organization pathfinder survey was conducted among 1,351 (6, 12 and 15 year-old) Georgian children, representing the main ethnic groups in urban and rural locations. Caries was analysed at univariate and multivariate levels, according to age, gender, urban/rural locality and ethnic group. Caries experience levels among 6-year-olds were dmft = 4.57, sd 3.42 (14.8% caries-free); DMFT = 2.04 (sd 2.02) among 12-year-olds (31.1% caries-free); and DMFT = 3.51 (sd 3.14) for the 15-year-olds (17.7% caries-free). Urban children at ages 6 and 12 years were more likely to be caries-free and have both lower levels of caries-experience and higher levels of filled or restored teeth. In multivariate regression analyses, most age groups showed a significant contribution from residence location. No differences were found by age and no consistent differences were detected by ethnic group. These data should provide the baseline for formulating and conducting public oral health efforts in Georgia, with emphases on rural residence locations.

  3. Typologically-differentiated landslide susceptibility assessment for the territory of Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsamalashvili, Tamar; Chelidze, Tamaz; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Mathieu, Alexandre

    2014-05-01

    Mass movement is one of the major natural hazards affecting mountainous regions, which lead to the damage to infrastructure, economical harm and life loss. Georgia is highly affected by landslides because of the complex geological and geomorphological structure, the high geodynamic activity of the region and the possibility of important rainfall events. Up to now, most of the research has been carried out on landslide hazard assessment in Georgia consisted in landslide qualitative description, data collection and inventory mapping. The objective of this work is to propose a national scale and typologically-differentiated landslide susceptibility map based on a spatial database constructed in the framework of the "Pan-European and nation-wide landslide susceptibility assessment" project of Council of Europe. The development of such a map has a significant importance from the scientific view as well as from the practical vision for Georgian stakeholders. A database with more than 3300 mass movement events have been created during the project. The database contains information on the location, date, event type and intensity of the event. The database distinguishes slide, falls and flows processes. A first susceptibility map is created using three types predictors (lithology, slope, landuse) for different climatic and topographic regions of the country. Further, the dependence of the mass movements location to triggering factors such as GPA (ground peak acceleration) and precipitation is investigated. The results of the analysis are presented and discussed.

  4. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 83-335-1618, Kendall Company, Augusta, Georgia. [Ethylene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seligman, P.; Gorman, R.

    1985-08-01

    Environmental and breathing-zone samples were analyzed for ethylene oxide at the Kendall Company, Augusta, Georgia in August, 1983 and July and August, 1984. The evaluation was requested confidentially to investigate employee complaints of eye irritation and neurologic symptoms and concern over an excessive number of miscarriages. Physicians at the Medical College of Georgia had reported cases of peripheral neuropathy and cataracts related to ethylene-oxide exposure. Twenty-one employees were interviewed. Company medical records were reviewed. Ethylene-oxide concentrations ranged from nondetectable to 0.83 part per million (ppm). The OSHA standard for ethylene oxide is 1.00 ppm. Grab samples taken during sterilizer down/loading contained 0.3 to 25.0ppm ethylene oxide. Medical records confirmed three cases of neuropathy and four of cataracts. Headache, eye irritation, and fatigue were the most prominent symptoms reported. Many of these symptoms were resolved when ethylene oxide was removed from the alcohol wipes. Five of six miscarriages were not occupationally related. The authors conclude that cases of peripheral neuropathy and cataracts among ethylene-oxide sterilizer operators can be related to past exposures, which were higher. Recommendations include using engineering controls to reduce ethylene-oxide exposure further and complying with OSHA recommendations in monitoring employees exposed to action-level concentrations of 0.5ppm ethylene oxide.

  5. Georgia resource assessment project: Institutionalizing LANDSAT and geographic data base techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, R. R.; Rado, B. Q.; Faust, N.

    1981-01-01

    Digital data from LANDSAT for each 1.1-acre cell in Georgia were processed and the land cover conditions were categorized. Several test cases were completed and an operational hardware and software processing capability was established at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The operational capability was developed to process the entire state (60,000 sq. miles and 14 LANDSAT scenes) in a cooperative project between eleven divisions and agencies at the regional, state, and federal levels. Products were developed for State agencies such as in both mapped and statistical formats. A computerized geographical data base was developed for management programs. To a large extent the applications of the data base evolved as users of LANDSAT information requested that other data (i.e., soils, slope, land use, etc.) be made compatible with LANDSAT for management programs. To date, geographic data bases incorporating LANDSAT and other spatial data deal with elements of the municipal solid waste management program, and reservoir management for the Corps of Engineers. LANDSAT data are also being used for applications in wetland, wildlife, and forestry management.

  6. Shocking Behavior: Random Wealth in Antebellum Georgia and Human Capital Across Generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleakley, Hoyt; Ferrie, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Does the lack of wealth constrain parents' investments in the human capital of their descendants? We conduct a nearly fifty-year followup of an episode in which such constraints would have been plausibly relaxed by a random allocation of substantial wealth to families. We track descendants of participants in Georgia's Cherokee Land Lottery of 1832, in which nearly every adult white male in Georgia took part. Winners received close to the median level of wealth - a large financial windfall orthogonal to participants' underlying characteristics that might have also affected their children's human capital. Although winners had slightly more children than non-winners, they did not send them to school more. Sons of winners have no better adult outcomes (wealth, income, literacy) than the sons of non-winners, and winners' grandchildren do not have higher literacy or school attendance than non-winners' grandchildren. This suggests only a limited role for family financial resources in the formation of human capital in the next generations in this environment and a potentially more important role for other factors that persist through family lines.

  7. Georgia marble at the Minnesota State Capitol The Effects of Mineralogy and Climate on Durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitenack, Paul; Shotwell, L. Brad; Scheffler, Michael J.

    2016-11-01

    Based on visual observations and tests made of Georgia marble units that have been in service at the historic Minnesota State Capitol for 110 years, a fielddiscernible correlation exists between marble unit mineralogical composition and unit weathering performance. Field studies noted over the course of a five-year restoration project of the capitol exterior were used to categorize the original marble cladding into four perceptible types, which were evaluated by field testing that suggested a correlation between the textural and mineralogical differences within the marble and its long-term durability. To test this theory, field-issued repair assignments made during an exterior marble restoration project at the capitol were examined statistically. The nature and frequency of assigned repairs were compared to the type of marble from which they were originally fabricated to determine whether a correlation existed. The results of this comparison provided convincing statistical verification of the link between mineralogy and durability. This hypothesis was then verified through detailed petrographic analysis in a laboratory setting, which determined that marble consisting of a smaller, more interlocked grain configuration that was more dolomitic than calcitic in its basic chemistry consistently proved to be more durable in weathering performance over time. The paper describes the process followed by the authors to categorize and study the distinct varieties of Georgia marble present on the Minnesota State Capitol, and how this information was used to guide the restoration process with the intent of maximizing the anticipated service life of new marble replacements.

  8. Steady-state critical loads of acidity for forest soils in the Georgia Basin, British Columbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun A. WATMOUGH

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available There has been growing interest in acid rain research in western Canada where sulphur (S and nitrogen (N emissions are expected to increase during the next two decades. One region of concern is southern British Columbia, specifically the Georgia Basin, where emissions are expected to increase owing to the expansion of industry and urban centres (Vancouver and Victoria. In the current study, weathering rates and critical loads of acidity (S and N for forest soils were estimated at nineteen sites located within the Georgia Basin. A base cation to aluminium ratio of 10 was selected as the critical chemical criterion associated with ecosystem damage. The majority of the sites (58% had low base cation weathering rates (≤50 meq m–2 y–1 based on the PROFILE model. Accordingly, mean critical load for the study sites, estimated using the steady-state mass balance model, ranged between 129–168 meq m–2 y–1. Annual average total (wet and dry S and N deposition during the period 2005–2006 (estimated by the Community Multiscale Air Quality model, exceeded critical load at five–nine of the study sites (mean exceedance = 32–46 meq m–2 y–1. The high-elevation (>1000 m study sites had shallow, acid sensitive, soils with low weathering rates; however, critical loads were predominantly exceeded at sites close to Vancouver under higher modelled deposition loads. The extent of exceedance is similar to other industrial regions in western and eastern Canada.

  9. The Economic Impact of University System of Georgia Institutions on Their Regional Economies. A Needs Assessment Study Commissioned by Georgia's Intellectual Capital Partnership Program[R] (ICAPP[R]).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhart, Sharon R.

    Using data from the 2 most recent fiscal years, this report calculates the economic benefits that the University System of Georgia's 34 institutions bring to their home regions and communities. The benefits are estimated for these categories: (1) spending by institutions themselves for salary and fringe benefits, operating supplies, and expenses,…

  10. Alkaloid and phenolic compounds of Galanthus caucasicus, Magnolia obovata, Cocculus laurifolius, and Veratrum lobelianum grown in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakadze, Dali M; Samsoniya, Shota A; Ziaev, Richsivoi; Abdusamatov, Abdulatip

    2005-01-01

    A collection of plants from the country of Georgia (Galanthus caucasicus, Magnolia obovata, Cocculus laurifolius, and Veratrum lobelianum) has been studied for their alkaloid content. Our studies led to the isolation and identification of 24 alkaloids, three of which are being identified and reported for the first time.

  11. Rural Schooling in Georgia: The Experiences of a Minority Community Service Organization Involved in Local School Decision-Making Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Cynthia Louise Altman

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation study was a descriptive case study of a minority community service organization whose members were actively involved in local school decision-making and activities in a rural Northeast Georgia community. Rural schools face unique challenges in light of current educational trends. To address the challenges, rural schools must…

  12. 77 FR 20097 - Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Georgia Multi-Modal Passenger Terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-03

    ... surrounding destinations and districts from one another. The purpose of the Georgia Multi-modal Passenger... environment. 4. Alternatives FTA and GDOT will consider all reasonable alternatives to provide a multi-modal... horizon. The Build alternatives will involve construction of a new multi-modal transit terminal and...

  13. Rural Schooling in Georgia: The Experiences of a Minority Community Service Organization Involved in Local School Decision-Making Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Cynthia Louise Altman

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation study was a descriptive case study of a minority community service organization whose members were actively involved in local school decision-making and activities in a rural Northeast Georgia community. Rural schools face unique challenges in light of current educational trends. To address the challenges, rural schools must…

  14. 2012 Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GADNR) Topographic LiDAR: Floyd, Polk, Paulding and Oconee Counties

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME:FY 2012 GEORGIA DNR ELEVATION DATA NOAA Contract No. EA133C11CQ0010 Requisition No. NCNP0000-11-02615 Woolpert Order No. 71511 CONTRACTOR: Woolpert, Inc....

  15. Traits and Talents of Giftedness in Minority and Low Socioeconomic Fourth Grade Students in a Georgia School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrea Ragon

    2013-01-01

    The potential traits and talents of giftedness in students are multidimensional; yet, some school districts in Georgia perpetuate barriers for students from minority and low socioeconomic backgrounds by relying solely on standardized test scores for gifted identification. The purpose of this case study was to explore the multidimensionality of…

  16. Traits and Talents of Giftedness in Minority and Low Socioeconomic Fourth Grade Students in a Georgia School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrea Ragon

    2013-01-01

    The potential traits and talents of giftedness in students are multidimensional; yet, some school districts in Georgia perpetuate barriers for students from minority and low socioeconomic backgrounds by relying solely on standardized test scores for gifted identification. The purpose of this case study was to explore the multidimensionality of…

  17. Sight-Singing Assessment: A Study of Current Beliefs and Practices of Georgia Middle and High School Choral Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Douglass Anthony

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to ascertain the specific assessment strategies used by middle- and high-school choral directors in Georgia to evaluate sight-singing. Data was further gathered to determine which assessment practices choral directors considered to be the most effective. Although there had been previous studies that attempted to determine the…

  18. Parents, Homevoters, and Public School Employees: An Analysis of Voting Patterns in the 2012 Georgia Charter Schools Amendment Referendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaway, Brooke; Scafidi, Benjamin; Stephenson, E. F.

    2016-01-01

    Georgia's 2012 Charter Schools Amendment was the first successful statewide school choice referendum in the United States. This amendment permitted the state to authorize new charter schools, thereby creating a way for charter creators to bypass local school boards. This study analyzes voting on this state constitutional amendment and finds that…

  19. Experimental infection of pregnant sows with African swine fever (ASFV Georgia 2007): Clinical outcome, pathogenesis and vertical transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Louise; Strandbygaard, Bertel; Nielsen, Jens

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) causes a severe hemorrhagic fever in domestic pigs. The disease was introduced from the African continent to Georgia in 2007 and has since spread throughout the Caucasus and the Russian Federation. ASF is now established in Eastern Europe and outbreaks have occurred...

  20. The Feasibility of the Georgia Educational Model for Teacher Preparation--Elementary. Volume II A & B. Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Charles E., Ed.; And Others

    The two sections of volume 2 of the Georgia feasibility study on elementary teacher education are intended for readers who wish for a detailed analysis of the study's activities and findings. The first section contains detailed PERT charts for the 5-year development strategy, activity lists, and the time data and time reports. The second section…

  1. Incidence and Pathogenicity of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes Associated with Blueberry (Vaccinium spp.) Replant Disease in Georgia and North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagdale, Ganpati B.; Holladay, Ted; Brannen, P. M.; Cline, W. O.; Agudelo, P.; Nyczepir, A. P.; Noe, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Blueberry replant disease (BRD) is an emerging threat to continued blueberry (Vaccinium spp.) production in Georgia and North Carolina. Since high populations of ring nematode Mesocriconema ornatum were found to be associated with commercially grown blueberries in Georgia, we hypothesized that M. ornatum may be responsible for predisposing blueberry to BRD. We therefore tested the pathogenicity of M. ornatum on 10-wk-old Rabbiteye blueberries (Vaccinium virgatum) by inoculating with initial populations (Pi) of 0 (water control), 10, 100, 1,000. and 10,000 mixed stages of M. ornatum/pot under both greenhouse (25 ± 2°C) and field microplot conditions. Nematode soil population densities and reproduction rates were assessed 75, 150, 225, and 255, and 75, 150, 225, and 375 d after inoculation (DAI) in both the greenhouse and field experiments, respectively. Plant growth parameters were recorded in the greenhouse and field microplot experiments at 255 and 375 DAI, respectively. The highest M. ornatum population density occurred with the highest Pi level, at 75 and 150 DAI under both greenhouse (P Xiphinema spp. Paratrichodorus spp. was also found only in Georgia. In Georgia, our results indicate that blueberry is a host for M. ornatum and its relationship to BRD warrants further investigation. PMID:23833323

  2. pncA Gene Mutations Associated with Pyrazinamide Resistance in Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis, South Africa and Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allana, Salim; Shashkina, Elena; Mathema, Barun; Bablishvili, Nino; Tukvadze, Nestani; Shah, N Sarita; Kempker, Russell R; Blumberg, Henry M; Moodley, Pravi; Mlisana, Koleka; Brust, James C M; Gandhi, Neel R

    2017-03-01

    Although pyrazinamide is commonly used for tuberculosis treatment, drug-susceptibility testing is not routinely available. We found polymorphisms in the pncA gene for 70% of multidrug-resistant and 96% of extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from South Africa and Georgia. Assessment of pyrazinamide susceptibility may be prudent before using it in regimens for drug-resistant tuberculosis.

  3. Foreign Product Perceptions and Country of Origin Analysis across Black Sea:Studies on Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, Georgia, Russia and Turkey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ali R; za Apil

    2006-01-01

    ...) as the most important cue to assess the quality. This study analyses approaches toward foreign products, country of origin effect and the ethnocentric behavior of consumers of the selected countries. The study is a literature review of related studies in Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, Georgia, Russia and Turkey.

  4. The effect of fallow on Longidorus americanus, a nematode associated with stunting of loblolly pine seedlings in Georgia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen W. Fraedrich; Michelle M. Cram; Stanley J. Zarnoch

    2005-01-01

    Stunting of loblolly pine (Pinue taeda L.) seedlings, caused by Longidorus americanus, has been a problem at a Georgia (USA) nursery. Field and growth chamber studies were conducted to determine the survivability of the nematode in a fallow nursery soil. The population density of L. americanus decreased rapidly...

  5. The Relationship between Principal Leadership and Teacher Morale in the Elementary Schools in a Northwest Georgia School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Dan O.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the difference between 2012 CRCT math sores based on principal leadership styles and teacher morale, as well as the relationship between teacher morale and 2012 CRCT math scores at each of the 12 elementary schools within a Northwest Georgia county school district. There is a gap in current research regarding the importance of…

  6. Steep Houses in Basic Writing: Advocating for Latino Immigrants in a North Georgia Two-Year College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Spencer

    2012-01-01

    Recounting the controversy surrounding a town hall meeting on "illegal" Latino immigration at a two-year college in North Georgia, this ethnographic narrative details the aftermath that ensued and its consequences for an ESL basic writing instructor. Fallout included the potential loss of her job, the rumored reallocation of a $5 million…

  7. Statewide Evaluation of Local Wellness Policies in Georgia: An Examination of Policy Compliance, Policy Strength, and Associated Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyn, Rodney; O'Meara, Sandra; Hepburn, Valerie A.; Potter, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyze relationships between demographic characteristics of Georgia school systems and: (1) compliance with the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act (CNRA); and (2) strength of wellness policy goals in nutrition, physical activity, and other school-based activities. Design: Each local school district submitted their…

  8. First Report of Root Rot of Cowpea Caused by Fusarium equiseti in Georgia in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root rot was observed on cowpea in Tift County, Georgia, in May of 2015. The disease occurred on approximately 10% of cowpea plants in 2 fields (2 ha). Symptoms appeared as sunken reddish brown lesions on roots and stems under the soil line, secondary roots became dark brown and rotted, and infected...

  9. Phylogeography of Bacillus anthracis in the country of Georgia shows evidence of population structuring and is dissimilar to other regional genotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterine Khmaladze

    Full Text Available Sequence analyses and subtyping of Bacillus anthracis strains from Georgia reveal a single distinct lineage (Aust94 that is ecologically established. Phylogeographic analysis and comparisons to a global collection reveals a clade that is mostly restricted to Georgia. Within this clade, many groups are found around the country, however at least one subclade is only found in the eastern part. This pattern suggests that dispersal into and out of Georgia has been rare and despite historical dispersion within the country, for at least for one lineage, current spread is limited.

  10. New distributional records of the stygobitic crayfish Cambarus cryptodytes (Decapoda: Cambaridae) in the Floridan Aquifer System of southwestern Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenolio, Dante B.; Niemiller, Matthew L.; Gluesenkamp, Andrew G.; Mckee, Anna; Taylor, Steven J.

    2017-01-01

    Cambarus cryptodytes (Dougherty Plain Cave Crayfish) is an obligate inhabitant of groundwater habitats (i.e., a stygobiont) with troglomorphic adaptations in the Floridan aquifer system of southwestern Georgia and adjacent Florida panhandle, particularly in the Dougherty Plain and Marianna Lowlands. Documented occurrences of Dougherty Plain Cave Crayfish are spatially distributed as 2 primary clusters separated by a region where few caves and springs have been documented; however, the paucity of humanly accessible karst features in this intermediate region has inhibited investigation of the species' distribution. To work around this constraint, we employed bottle traps to sample for Dougherty Plain Cave Crayfish and other groundwater fauna in 18 groundwater-monitoring wells that access the Floridan aquifer system in 10 counties in southwestern Georgia. We captured 32 Dougherty Plain Cave Crayfish in 9 wells in 8 counties between September 2014 and August 2015. We detected crayfish at depths ranging from 17.9 m to 40.6 m, and established new county records for Early, Miller, Mitchell, and Seminole counties in Georgia, increasing the number of occurrences in Georgia from 8 to 17 sites. In addition, a new US Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Unit Code 8 (HUC8) watershed record was established for the Spring Creek watershed. These new records fill in the distribution gap between the 2 previously known clusters in Georgia and Jackson County, FL. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that deployment of bottle traps in groundwater-monitoring wells can be an effective approach to presence—absence surveys of stygobionts, especially in areas where surface access to groundwater is limited.

  11. The assessment of seismic hazard for Gori, (Georgia) and preliminary studies of seismic microzonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoladze, Z.; Moscatelli, M.; Giallini, S.; Avalle, A.; Gventsadze, A.; Kvavadze, N.; Tsereteli, N.

    2016-12-01

    Seismic risk is a crucial issue for South Caucasus, which is the main gateway between Asia and Europe. The goal of this work is to propose new methods and criteria for defining an overall approach aimed at assessing and mitigating seismic risk in Georgia. In this reguard seismic microzonation represents a highly useful tool for seismic risk assessmentin land management, for design of buildings or structures and for emergency planning.Seismic microzonation assessment of local seismic hazard,which is a component of seismicity resulting from specific local characteristics which cause local amplification and soil instability, through identification of zones with seismically homogeneous behavior. This paper presents the results of preliminary study of seismic microzonation of Gori, Georgia. Gori is and is located in the Shida Kartli region and on both sides of Liachvi and Mtkvari rivers, with area of about 135 km2around the Gori fortress. Gori is located in Achara-Trialeti fold-thrust belt, that is tectonically unstable. Half of all earthquakes in Gori area with magnitude M≥3.5 have happened along this fault zone and on basis of damage caused by previous earthquakes, this territory show the highest level of risk (the maximum value of direct losses) in central part of the town. The seismic microzonation map of level 1 for Gori was carried out using: 1) Already available data (i.e., topographic map and boreholes data), 2) Results of new geological surveys and 3) Geophysical measurements (i.e., MASW and noise measurements processed with HVSR technique). Our preliminary results highlight the presence of both stable zones susceptible to local amplifications and unstable zones susceptible to geological instability. Our results are directed to establish set of actions aimed at risk mitigation before initial onset of emergency, and to management of the emergency once the seismic event has occurred. The products obtained, will contain the basic elements of an integrated system

  12. Health research capacity building in Georgia: a case-based needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, A; Chitashvili, T; Djibuti, M; Ridge, L; Chyun, D

    2017-06-01

    Research capacity building in the health sciences in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) has typically focused on bench-science capacity, but research examining health service delivery and health workforce is equally necessary to determine the best ways to deliver care. The Republic of Georgia, formerly a part of the Soviet Union, has multiple issues within its healthcare system that would benefit from expended research capacity, but the current research environment needs to be explored prior to examining research-focused activities. The purpose of this project was to conduct a needs assessment focused on developing research capacity in the Republic of Georgia with an emphasis on workforce and network development. A case study approach guided by a needs assessment format. We conducted in-country, informal, semi-structured interviews in English with key informants and focus groups with faculty, students, and representatives of local non-governmental organizations. Purposive and snowball sampling approaches were used to recruit participants, with key informant interviews scheduled prior to arrival in country. Documents relevant to research capacity building were also included. Interview results were coded via content analysis. Final results were organized into a SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threat) analysis format, with the report shared with participants. There is widespread interest among students and faculty in Georgia around building research capacity. Lack of funding was identified by many informants as a barrier to research. Many critical research skills, such as proposal development, qualitative research skills, and statistical analysis, were reported as very limited. Participants expressed concerns about the ethics of research, with some suggesting that research is undertaken to punish or 'expose' subjects. However, students and faculty are highly motivated to improve their skills, are open to a variety of learning modalities, and have

  13. Saltwater intrusion in the Floridan aquifer system near downtown Brunswick, Georgia, 1957–2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Gregory S.; Peck, Michael

    2017-02-16

    IntroductionThe Floridan aquifer system (FAS) consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer (UFA), an intervening confining unit of highly variable properties, and the Lower Floridan aquifer (LFA). The UFA and LFA are primarily composed of Paleocene- to Oligocene-age carbonate rocks that include, locally, Upper Cretaceous rocks. The FAS extends from coastal areas in southeastern South Carolina and continues southward and westward across the coastal plain of Georgia and Alabama, and underlies all of Florida. The thickness of the FAS varies from less than 100 feet (ft) in aquifer outcrop areas of South Carolina to about 1,700 ft near the city of Brunswick, Georgia.Locally, in southeastern Georgia and the Brunswick– Glynn County area, the UFA consists of an upper water-bearing zone (UWBZ) and a lower water-bearing zone (LWBZ), as identified by Wait and Gregg (1973), with aquifer test data indicating the upper zone has higher productivity than the lower zone. Near the city of Brunswick, the LFA is composed of two permeable zones: an early middle Eocene-age upper permeable zone (UPZ) and a highly permeable lower zone of limestone (LPZ) of Paleocene and Late Cretaceous age that includes a deeply buried, cavernous, saline water-bearing unit known as the Fernandina permeable zone. Maslia and Prowell (1990) inferred the presence of major northeast–southwest trending faults through the downtown Brunswick area based on structural analysis of geophysical data, northeastward elongation of the potentiometric surface of the UFA, and breaches in the local confining unit that influence the area of chloride contamination. Pronounced horizontal and vertical hydraulic head gradients, caused by pumping in the UFA, allow saline water from the FPZ to migrate upward into the UFA through this system of faults and conduits.Saltwater was first detected in the FAS in wells completed in the UFA near the southern part of the city of Brunswick in late 1957. By the 1970s, a plume of groundwater

  14. Aflatoxin levels in corn available as wild turkey feed in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, S H; Ouist, C F; Grimes, G L; Forest, D L

    2001-07-01

    Samples of corn available as wildlife feed from retailers throughout Georgia (USA) were collected during April 1997 and analyzed for aflatoxin to determine if levels harmful to wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) were present. Three of 31 (10%) samples collected from a 40-country area were positive. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay qualitatively determined that two samples contained from 0 to 20 ppb aflatoxin. A chromatography analysis of a third sample measured 380 ppb total aflatoxin. A small percentage of our sample of wildlife feed collected during one season contained levels of aflatoxin that may cause harm to turkeys, especially poults. However, because aflatoxin levels ranging from 100 to 400 ppb may cause liver dysfunction and immunosuppression in turkey poults and other wildlife, grains known to be contaminated with aflatoxin at levels unacceptable for domestic animal feeds (> or =100 ppb) should not be sold as wildlife feed. Further analyses of grains sold as wildlife feed should be conducted to address this potential problem.

  15. Georgia prenatal care providers' perceptions of barriers to sexually transmitted disease screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Rheta S; Anderson, Lynda A; Weisbord, Joanna S; Koumans, Emilia; Toomey, Kathleen E

    2003-09-01

    Evidence suggests that sexually transmitted disease (STD) screening during pregnancy is not optimal. No published studies have systematically examined barriers that hinder routine STD screening. This study examines prenatal care providers' perceptions about barriers to routine STD screening of pregnant women. Using a conceptual framework, four a priori barrier categories were developed: provider, patient, organizational, and structural. Responses to a question on barriers to STD screening in a 1998 mail survey of Georgia prenatal care providers were qualitatively classified into one of these categories. Of the 293 providers who responded, 71% identified structural barriers, with 52% citing inadequate reimbursement. These respondents were most likely to name barriers categorized as structural, not patient, provider, or organization issues. Efforts to improve STD screening of pregnant women should include a focus on structural level interventions, such as instituting health care policies that provide adequate reimbursement for routine STD screening during pregnancy.

  16. Scenario Backcasting Exercises for Water Policy Development in the Republic of Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendzimir, J.

    2012-04-01

    Water policy development must provide the long-term potential to manage water resources under increasing uncertainty in the coming decades. Uncertainty can emerge from variability in climate, global markets, or evolving technologies. Decision-makers can develop policies that are robust to uncertainty as well as processes flexible enough to reform policies to adapt to changing conditions. The capacity to foresee and integrate different rates of development of policy, technology and infrastructure increases long-term management potential. This presentation outlines a combined foresight/backcasting exercise for the development of water policy over the next 50 years in a transitional economy that currently prioritizes privatization of water services: the Republic of Georgia.

  17. Groundwater conditions in the Brunswick-Glynn County area, Georgia, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Gregory S.; Peck, Michael F.; Painter, Jaime A.; Stayton, Welby L.

    2011-01-01

    The Upper Floridan aquifer is contaminated with saltwater in a 2-square-mile area of downtown Brunswick, Georgia. The presence of this saltwater has limited the development of the groundwater supply in the Glynn County area. Hydrologic, geologic, and water-quality data are needed to effectively manage water resources. Since 1959, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has conducted a cooperative water program with the City of Brunswick and Glynn County to monitor and assess the effect of groundwater development on saltwater intrusion within the Floridan aquifer system. The potential development of alternative sources of water in the Brunswick and surficial aquifer systems also is an important consideration in coastal areas.

  18. Effects of habitat on avian productivity in abandoned pecan orchards in southern Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnode, K.A.; White, D.H.

    1992-01-01

    Daily survival rates (DSRs) of nests, eggs and nestlings were determined for Mourning Doves (Zenaida macroura), Northern Cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis), Brown Thrashers (Toxostoma rufum) and Northern Mockingbirds (Mimus polyglottos) occupying abandoned pecan orchards in a highly fragmented and intensively farmed area of southern Georgia. The effects of nest placement parameters, seasonal factors and habitat disruptions on DSRs for all species combined were statistically analyzed. Egg and nestling DSRs varied significantly by month of nesting, percent cover, vegetative form and position of nest in substrate. Causes of nest failure (no fledglings produced) in order of decreasing importance were predation by small mammals/snakes, avian predation, predation by large mammals, and abandonment. Results provide further evidence that the importance of nest placement and habitat disruptions in nesting success is influenced by foraging strategies of the predator community. Site-specific predator/habitat complexes may be a more appropriate criterion than habitat conditions alone for evaluating avian nesting habitat

  19. A note on the Charleston Gyre. [Gulf Stream deflection off Georgia-South Carolina coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcclain, C. R.; Atkinson, L. P.

    1985-01-01

    The deflection of the Gulf Stream caused by a topographic feature - the Charleston Bump, located offshore of Savannah, Georgia - results in a quasi-stationary cyclonic eddy - the Charleston Gyre which is situated over the continental slope east of Charleston and Cape Romain. Occasionally, the upwelling associated with this eddy produces an enhancement in the surface layer primary production that is great enough to be detected by the Nimbus 7 coastal zone color scanner (CZCS). In this note a CZCS image with simultaneous hydrography, current, and wind observations is presented that documents an unusual manifestation of the gyre. In addition to the CZCS image a Seasat synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image is included that clearly indicates the presence of the eddy adjacent to the Gulf Stream front.

  20. Human-Environment Patterns of Metropolitan Spatial Restructuring: Atlanta, Georgia and Shanghai, PRC, 1950-2000

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper compares the spatial and environmental impacts of rapid growth through the five decades in Atlanta, Georgia and Shanghai, PRC. Both metropolitan areas represent the prime demographic and economic engines of their respective regions, and exhibit some of the worst environmental degradation problems, though from significantly different sources. Atlanta epitomizes spatial patterns of sprawl arising from an unfettered topographic and economic setting. Shanghai, in a political economy transitioning from decades of centralized constraint, seeks to spread out some of the world's densest core settlement population to its inner suburbs. Remotely sensed photographic images are utilized to classify land use changes, while census figures and environmental data are integrated in a Geographic Information System to correlate shifts through time.

  1. Effects of Medicaid disease management programs on medical expenditures: Evidence from a natural experiment in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranker, Keith

    2016-03-01

    In recent decades, most states' Medicaid programs have introduced disease management programs for chronically ill beneficiaries. Interventions assist beneficiaries and their health care providers to appropriately manage chronic health condition(s) according to established clinical guidelines. Cost containment has been a key justification for the creation of these programs despite mixed evidence they actually save money. This study evaluates the effects of a disease management program in Georgia by exploiting a natural experiment that delayed the introduction of high-intensity services for several thousand beneficiaries. Expenditures for medical claims decreased an average of $89 per person per month for the high- and moderate-risk groups, but those savings were not large enough to offset the total costs of the program. Impacts varied by the intensity of interventions, over time, and across disease groups. Heterogeneous treatment effect analysis indicates that decreases in medical expenditures were largest at the most expensive tail of the distribution.

  2. Ant community composition across a gradient of disturbed military landscapes at Fort Benning, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, J.H.; Krzysik, A.J.; Kovacic, D.A.; Duda, J.J.; Freeman, D.C.; Emlen, J.M.; Zak, J.C.; Long, W.R.; Wallace, M.P.; Chamberlin-Graham, C.; Nutter, J.P.; Balbach, H.E.

    2008-01-01

    Military training, soil texture, and ground cover influence ant communities at Fort Benning, a military installation in west-central Georgia. We sampled 81,237 ground-dwelling ants (47 species in 20 genera) with pitfall traps at 40 sites on a continuum from nearly pristine forest to highly disturbed training areas. We also measured 15 environmental variables related to vegetation and soil. Sites disturbed by military training had fewer trees, less canopy cover, more bare ground, and more compact soils with shallower A-horizons than comparable undisturbed sites. Pheidole bicarinata, Dorymyrmex smithi, and Pogonomyrmex badius dominated the most highly disturbed sites. Competitively submissive myrmicines, such as Aphaenogaster and Crematogaster, and formicines, such as Camponotus and Formica, were abundant in the undisturbed sites. Solenopsis invicta occurred in all but the least disturbed sites. Ant community composition was a useful indicator of disturbance at Fort Benning.

  3. Downsizing of Georgia Tech's Airborne Fluorescence Spectrometer (AFS) for the Measurement of Nitrogen Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandholm, Scott

    1998-01-01

    This report addresses the Tropospheric Trace Gas and Airborne Measurements (TTGAMG) endeavors to further downsize and stabilize the Georgia Institute of Technology's Airborne Laser Induced Fluorescence Experiment (GITALIFE). It will mainly address the TTGAMG successes and failures as participants in the summer 1998 Wallops Island test flights on board the P3-B. Due to the restructuring and reorganization of the TTGAMG since the original funding of this grant, some of the objectives and time lines of the deliverables have been changed. Most of these changes have been covered in the preceding annual report. We are anticipating getting back on track with the original proposal's downsizing effort this summer, culminating in the GITALIFE no longer occupying a high bay rack and the loss of several hundred pounds.

  4. Nutritional status of refugee children entering DeKalb County, Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ankoor Y; Suchdev, Parminder S; Mitchell, Tarissa; Shetty, Sharmila; Warner, Catherine; Oladele, Alawode; Reines, Susan

    2014-10-01

    This study determines the nutritional status among refugee children entering one of the largest resettlement counties in the United States and identifies differences between incoming populations. Medical records of all newly arriving pediatric refugees (0-18 years) entering DeKalb County, Georgia between October 2010 and July 2011 were reviewed. Refugee children were grouped as African, Bhutanese, or Burmese (resettling from either Thailand or Malaysia) for comparative analysis. Approximately one in five refugees were anemic or malnourished, while a quarter had stool parasites, and nearly half had dental caries. African refugees had the highest anemia but the lowest underweight prevalence (p Malaysia, Burmese children from Thailand had a higher prevalence of anemia, underweight, and stool parasites (p refugees, as well as ensure proper nutritional support and follow-up care.

  5. Industrial heritage sites in Spitsbergen (Svalbard), South Georgia and the Antarctic Peninsula: Sources of historical information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacquebord, Louwrens; Avango, Dag

    2016-09-01

    Industrial heritage sites in Polar Regions are very important as sources of historical information. Together with archival documents this information gives us the possibility to complete the picture of the exploitation of natural resources in those regions. Thirty years of historical-archaeological field research at whaling and mining sites in Spitsbergen (Svalbard), South Georgia and the Antarctic Peninsula has shown that these sites can provide unique evidence about the driving forces behind industrial development, the design of industrial technology, the structure of the settlements, strategies to control natural resources and achieve political influence, and the impact of resource extraction on the local environment. In this article we will give examples of the results of our research at these sites.

  6. Spatial and temporal variations of mercury levels in Okefenokee invertebrates: southeast Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Bagie M; Batzer, Darold

    2008-03-01

    Accumulation of mercury in wetland ecosystems has raised concerns about impacts on wetland food webs. This study measured concentrations of mercury in invertebrates of the Okefenokee Swamp in Georgia, focusing on levels in amphipods, odonates, and crayfish. We collected and analyzed total mercury levels in these invertebrates from 32 sampling stations across commonly occurring sub-habitats. Sampling was conducted in December, May, and August over a two-year period. The highest levels of mercury were detected in amphipods, with total mercury levels often in excess of 20 ppm. Bioaccumulation pathways of mercury in invertebrates of the Okefenokee are probably complex; despite being larger and higher in the food chain, levels in odonates and crayfish were much lower than in amphipods. Mercury levels in invertebrates varied temporally with the highest levels detected in May. There was a lack of spatial variation in mercury levels which is consistent with aerial deposition of mercury.

  7. Some morphological and anatomical descriptions of seed in Galanthus woronowii Losinsk. from Western Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nona Chkhaidze

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Morphology and anatomy of seeds of Galanthus woronowii Losinsk. from Ajara and Guria (Western Georgia regions were studied in laboratory conditions. It was found out that shape of fruits changed from round (big fruits to longish (small fruits. Weight of mature seed was 0,0075 g. By the end of June elaiosome disappears and green hollow develops on its place. Gas bubbles were emitted from green tissues; emission was intensive in August, when embryo was already well developed. Greenness was localized mainly on cell walls. It is permissible that on cells walls located aerobic oxygenic phototrophic bacteria. In early August an embryo in seeds was well developed, reserve fat transformed to starch around of embryo. Germination of seeds began by the end September very slowly. Results of the work will be important for ex situ conservation of G. woronowii, also for expedient to plant industrial plantations.

  8. Molecular Survey of Bacterial Zoonotic Agents in Bats from the Country of Georgia (Caucasus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osikowicz, Lynn; McKee, Clifton; Kuzmin, Ivan; Kandaurov, Andrei; Babuadze, Giorgi; Natradze, Ioseb; Imnadze, Paata; Kosoy, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Bats are important reservoirs for many zoonotic pathogens. However, no surveys of bacterial pathogens in bats have been performed in the Caucasus region. To understand the occurrence and distribution of bacterial infections in these mammals, 218 bats belonging to eight species collected from four regions of Georgia were examined for Bartonella, Brucella, Leptospira, and Yersinia using molecular approaches. Bartonella DNA was detected in 77 (35%) bats from all eight species and was distributed in all four regions. The prevalence ranged 6–50% per bat species. The Bartonella DNA represented 25 unique genetic variants that clustered into 21 lineages. Brucella DNA was detected in two Miniopterus schreibersii bats and in two Myotis blythii bats, all of which were from Imereti (west-central region). Leptospira DNA was detected in 25 (13%) bats that included four M. schreibersii bats and 21 M. blythii bats collected from two regions. The Leptospira sequences represented five genetic variants with one of them being closely related to the zoonotic pathogen L. interrogans (98.6% genetic identity). No Yersinia DNA was detected in the bats. Mixed infections were observed in several cases. One M. blythii bat and one M. schreibersii bat were co-infected with Bartonella, Brucella, and Leptospira; one M. blythii bat and one M. schreibersii bat were co-infected with Bartonella and Brucella; 15 M. blythii bats and three M. schreibersii bats were co-infected with Bartonella and Leptospira. Our results suggest that bats in Georgia are exposed to multiple bacterial infections. Further studies are needed to evaluate pathogenicity of these agents to bats and their zoonotic potential. PMID:28129398

  9. Business and public health collaboration for emergency preparedness in Georgia: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berkelman Ruth L

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Governments may be overwhelmed by a large-scale public health emergency, such as a massive bioterrorist attack or natural disaster, requiring collaboration with businesses and other community partners to respond effectively. In Georgia, public health officials and members of the Business Executives for National Security have successfully collaborated to develop and test procedures for dispensing medications from the Strategic National Stockpile. Lessons learned from this collaboration should be useful to other public health and business leaders interested in developing similar partnerships. Methods The authors conducted a case study based on interviews with 26 government, business, and academic participants in this collaboration. Results The partnership is based on shared objectives to protect public health and assure community cohesion in the wake of a large-scale disaster, on the recognition that acting alone neither public health agencies nor businesses are likely to manage such a response successfully, and on the realization that business and community continuity are intertwined. The partnership has required participants to acknowledge and address multiple challenges, including differences in business and government cultures and operational constraints, such as concerns about the confidentiality of shared information, liability, and the limits of volunteerism. The partnership has been facilitated by a business model based on defining shared objectives, identifying mutual needs and vulnerabilities, developing carefully-defined projects, and evaluating proposed project methods through exercise testing. Through collaborative engagement in progressively more complex projects, increasing trust and understanding have enabled the partners to make significant progress in addressing these challenges. Conclusion As a result of this partnership, essential relationships have been established, substantial private resources and

  10. Measures of student success with textbook transformations: the Affordable Learning Georgia Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Croteau

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In 2014, the state of Georgia’s budget supported a University System of Georgia (USG initiative: Affordable Learning Georgia (ALG. The initiative was implemented via Textbook Transformation Grants, which provided grants to USG faculty, libraries and librarians, and institutions to “transform their use of textbooks and other learning materials into using lower cost options”, in other words to use open educational resources (OER in lieu of a traditional bound textbook. The Round One Textbook Transformation Grants have already shown to be successful in that they saved students approximately $760,000.  What is not known, is the collective impact on student learning. This study examines the learning gains or losses pre- and post-transformation in ALG Round One courses where traditional resources were replaced with OER.  It estimates differences between pre- and post- textbook transformation across the following outcomes: 1 Drop Fail Withdraw (DFW rates, 2 rates of completion, 3 numbers of students receiving a final grade of A or B, C and D, 4 numerical final grades as a percent, 5 final exam grades as a percent, and, 6 course-specific assessment grades measured in percent. Twenty-four data sets were analyzed for DFW rate, eight data sets for completion rate, fourteen data sets for grade distribution, three data sets for final exam grades, three data sets for course specific assessment and one data set for final grades. The null hypothesis that there would be no differences between pre- and post-transformation rates in these learning outcomes was supported.  Thus, this study demonstrates that the USG’s ALG initiative helped students save money without negatively impacting learning outcomes. In addition, it is the first of its kind to measure some of these learning outcomes (e.g. final exam grade, assessment grade, and distribution of letter grades at this scale.

  11. The importance of climatic factors and outliers in predicting regional monthly campylobacteriosis risk in Georgia, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisent, J; Seaver, W; Odoi, A; Rohrbach, B

    2014-11-01

    Incidence of Campylobacter infection exhibits a strong seasonal component and regional variations in temperate climate zones. Forecasting the risk of infection regionally may provide clues to identify sources of transmission affected by temperature and precipitation. The objectives of this study were to (1) assess temporal patterns and differences in campylobacteriosis risk among nine climatic divisions of Georgia, USA, (2) compare univariate forecasting models that analyze campylobacteriosis risk over time with those that incorporate temperature and/or precipitation, and (3) investigate alternatives to supposedly random walk series and non-random occurrences that could be outliers. Temporal patterns of campylobacteriosis risk in Georgia were visually and statistically assessed. Univariate and multivariable forecasting models were used to predict the risk of campylobacteriosis and the coefficient of determination (R(2)) was used for evaluating training (1999-2007) and holdout (2008) samples. Statistical control charting and rolling holdout periods were investigated to better understand the effect of outliers and improve forecasts. State and division level campylobacteriosis risk exhibited seasonal patterns with peaks occurring between June and August, and there were significant associations between campylobacteriosis risk, precipitation, and temperature. State and combined division forecasts were better than divisions alone, and models that included climate variables were comparable to univariate models. While rolling holdout techniques did not improve predictive ability, control charting identified high-risk time periods that require further investigation. These findings are important in (1) determining how climatic factors affect environmental sources and reservoirs of Campylobacter spp. and (2) identifying regional spikes in the risk of human Campylobacter infection and their underlying causes.

  12. Modeling of road traffic noise and estimated human exposure in Fulton County, Georgia, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Jeong C; Park, Tae H; Ko, Joon H; Chang, Seo I; Kim, Minho; Holt, James B; Mehdi, Mohammed R

    2011-11-01

    Environmental noise is a major source of public complaints. Noise in the community causes physical and socio-economic effects and has been shown to be related to adverse health impacts. Noise, however, has not been actively researched in the United States compared with the European Union countries in recent years. In this research, we aimed at modeling road traffic noise and analyzing human exposure in Fulton County, Georgia, United States. We modeled road traffic noise levels using the United States Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration Traffic Noise Model implemented in SoundPLAN®. After analyzing noise levels with raster, vector and façade maps, we estimated human exposure to high noise levels. Accurate digital elevation models and building heights were derived from Light Detection And Ranging survey datasets and building footprint boundaries. Traffic datasets were collected from the Georgia Department of Transportation and the Atlanta Regional Commission. Noise level simulation was performed with 62 computers in a distributed computing environment. Finally, the noise-exposed population was calculated using geographic information system techniques. Results show that 48% of the total county population [N=870,166 residents] is potentially exposed to 55 dB(A) or higher noise levels during daytime. About 9% of the population is potentially exposed to 67 dB(A) or higher noises. At nighttime, 32% of the population is expected to be exposed to noise levels higher than 50 dB(A). This research shows that large-scale traffic noise estimation is possible with the help of various organizations. We believe that this research is a significant stepping stone for analyzing community health associated with noise exposures in the United States.

  13. Glacier changes on South Georgia since the late-19th century documented in historical photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John; Haynes, Valerie

    2014-05-01

    South Georgia is one of the few landmasses in the Southern Ocean. It provides a crucial geographical datapoint for glacier responses to climate change over different timescales. As part of an ongoing glacier inventory of the island, we are compiling a database of historical glacier photographs. Since the late 19th century, the island has been visited by numerous scientific and survey expeditions, as well as being the land-base for a major whaling industry. Historical photographs of the island are available from the late-19th century, beginning with the 1882-83 German International Polar Year Expedition. Many more exist from the 20th century, notably from the South Georgia Surveys in the 1950s. An assessment of the value of the photographs indicates that spatial coverage is variable, many lack reference features to pinpoint glacier positions and, in the case of smaller glaciers, the presence of snowcover makes it difficult to define the ice edge. Nevertheless, the photographs provide useful corroboration of more advanced glacier positions during the late-19th century and recession of smaller mountain and valley glaciers during the mid-20th century, while larger tidewater and sea-calving glaciers generally remained in relatively advanced positions until the 1980s. Since then, nearly all the glaciers have retreated; some of these retreats have been dramatic and a number of small mountain glaciers have fragmented or disappeared. The response of the glaciers can be related to synoptic-scale warming, particularly since the 1950s, moderated by individual glacier geometry and topography.

  14. Analysis of the effects of proposed pumping from the principal artesian aquifer, Savannah, Georgia area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, R.B.; Krause, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    A two-dimensional finite-difference model of the principal artesian aquifer in the Savannah, Georgia, area, originally developed by Counts and Krause (1976), has been expanded and refined. The model was updated and the grid redesigned to provide more current and accurate detail for ground-water resources management alternatives. Improvements in the definition of the flow system were made possible by the acquisition of additional data in the area and by recently completed regional models that include the area. The model was initially calibrated by using the estimated predevelopment potentiometric surface of 1880. The flow system under predevelopment conditions was sluggish and only 100 cubic feet per second (65 million gallons per day) flowed through the model area. It was then tested for acceptance by using the May 1980 potentiometric surface and corresponding pumping stress of approximately 85 million gallons per day in the Savannah, Georgia-Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, area. The flow through the system under 1980 conditions was about 390 cubic feet per second (250 million gallons per day) and the vertical inflow from the overlying surficial aquifer more than doubled due to formerly rejected recharge that now flows vertically into the aquifer. Calibration was accurate + or - 10 feet. The absolute error per node was 3.4 feet. A hypothetical 25-percent increase in pumpage over the entire area was used to represent a gradual growth in commercial and municipal pumpage over the next 20 to 30 years. The increase produced a maximum decline of 30 feet below the existing water level of 135 feet below sea level at the center of the cone of depression in Savannah, and a 5-foot decline at a radius of 20 miles from the center of the cone of depression. (USGS)

  15. [Fever of Unknown Origin in children and adolescents in Georgia: a review of 52 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakashvili, L Z; Makhviladze, M A; Pagava, E K; Pagava, K I

    2006-06-01

    The distribution of the disorders causing Fever of Unknown Origin (FUO) may differ according to the geographic area and the socioeconomic status of the country. FUO has not been appropriately investigated in children and adolescents in Georgia and therefore a study was undertaken to determine its causes and clinical characteristics. A total of 52 children fitting the classical FUO criteria seen in our clinic between 2003 and 2005 were investigated retrospectively. 27 (51,9 %) were boys and 25 (48,0%) were girls. 3 children (5,7 %) were less than 3 years old, 4 (7,6%) were 3-9 years old, 14 (26,9 %) were 10-14 years old and 32 (61,5%) were 15-18 years old. The mean age was 15,9 +/-4,8 years (range 1 year-18 years). 25 children (48,0 %) had a prolonged fever that had lasted for 15-30 days, 15 (28.8 %) for 31-60 days, and 12 (23.0 %) had fever lasting for more than 60 days. The most common causes of FUO were sepsis (10/52), tuberculosis (9/52), pneumonia (8/52), pyelonephritis (5/52), collagen tissue disorder (2/52), neoplasm (2/52), and miscellaneous (9/52). In 7 (13,4 %) of the cases the etiology could not be found. Some derivative hematological parameters--leukocytic index of intoxication, organism's allergisation index, ratios lymphocytes/neutrophils and eosinophils/lymphocytes and adaptation reactions can be helpful to distinguish severe infections. Precise evaluation of hematological changes can be useful for differential diagnosis of FUO. The most common cause of FUO in children and adolescents in Georgia remains infection.

  16. Occurrence and Diversity of Clinically Important Vibrio Species in the Aquatic Environment of Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokashvili, Tamar; Whitehouse, Chris A.; Tskhvediani, Ana; Grim, Christopher J.; Elbakidze, Tinatin; Mitaishvili, Nino; Janelidze, Nino; Jaiani, Ekaterine; Haley, Bradd J.; Lashkhi, Nino; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R.; Tediashvili, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Among the more than 70 different Vibrio species inhabiting marine, estuarine, and freshwater ecosystems, 12 are recognized as human pathogens. The warm subtropical climate of the Black Sea coastal area and inland regions of Georgia likely provides a favorable environment for various Vibrio species. From 2006 to 2009, the abundance, ecology, and diversity of clinically important Vibrio species were studied in different locations in Georgia and across seasons. Over a 33-month period, 1,595 presumptive Vibrio isolates were collected from the Black Sea (n = 657) and freshwater lakes around Tbilisi (n = 938). Screening of a subset of 440 concentrated and enriched water samples by PCR-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (PCR-ESI/MS) detected the presence of DNA from eight clinically important Vibrio species: V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, V. mimicus, V. alginolyticus, V. harveyi, V. metschnikovii, and V. cincinnatiensis. Almost 90% of PCR/ESI-MS samples positive for Vibrio species were collected from June through November. Three important human-pathogenic Vibrio species (V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus) were detected in 62.8, 37.8, and 21.4% of samples testing positive for Vibrios, respectively. The results of these activities suggest that natural reservoirs for human-pathogenic Vibrios exist in Georgian aquatic environments. Water temperature at all sampling sites was positively correlated with the abundance of clinically important Vibrio spp. (except V. metschnikovii), and salinity was correlated with species composition at particular Black Sea sites as well as inland reservoirs. PMID:26528464

  17. Albatross populations in peril: a population trajectory for black-browed albatrosses at south Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Jennifer M; Brault, Solange; Croxall, John P

    2006-02-01

    Simulation modeling was used to reconstruct Black-browed Albatross (Diomedea melanophris) population trends. Close approximations to observed data were accomplished by annually varying survival rates, reproductive success, and probabilities of returning to breed given success in previous years. The temporal shift in annual values coincided with the start of longline fishing at South Georgia and potential changes in krill abundance. We used 23 years of demographic data from long-term studies of a breeding colony of this species at Bird Island, South Georgia, to validate our model. When we used annual parameter estimates for survival, reproductive success, and probabilities of returning to breed given success in previous years, our model trajectory closely followed the observed changes in breeding population size over time. Population growth rate was below replacement (lambda < 1) in most years and was most sensitive to changes in adult survival. This supports the recent IUCN uplisting of this species from "Vulnerable" to "Endangered." Comparison of pre-1988 and post-1988 demography (before and after the inception of a longline fishery in the breeding area) reveals a decrease in lambda from 0.963 to 0.910. A life table response experiment (LTRE) showed that this decline in lambda was caused mostly by declines in survival of adults. If 1988-1998 demographic rates are maintained, the model predicts a 98% chance of a population of fewer than 25 pairs within 78 years. For this population to recover to a status under which it could be "delisted," a 10% increase in survival of all age classes would be needed.

  18. Tobacco smoking and tuberculosis treatment outcomes: a prospective cohort study in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegia, Medea; Magee, Matthew J; Kempker, Russell R; Kalandadze, Iagor; Chakhaia, Tsira; Golub, Jonathan E; Blumberg, Henry M

    2015-06-01

    To assess the effect of tobacco smoking on the outcome of tuberculosis treatment in Tbilisi, Georgia. We conducted a prospective cohort study of adults with laboratory-confirmed tuberculosis from May 2011 to November 2013. History of tobacco smoking was collected using a standardized questionnaire adapted from the global adult tobacco survey. We considered tuberculosis therapy to have a poor outcome if participants defaulted, failed treatment or died. We used multivariable regressions to estimate the risk of a poor treatment outcome. Of the 591 tuberculosis patients enrolled, 188 (31.8%) were past smokers and 271 (45.9%) were current smokers. Ninety (33.2%) of the current smokers and 24 (18.2%) of the participants who had never smoked had previously been treated for tuberculosis (P Treatment outcome data were available for 524 of the participants, of whom 128 (24.4%) - including 80 (32.9%) of the 243 current smokers and 21 (17.2%) of the 122 individuals who had never smoked - had a poor treatment outcome. Compared with those who had never smoked, current smokers had an increased risk of poor treatment outcome (adjusted relative risk, aRR: 1.70; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.00-2.90). Those who had ceased smoking more than two months before enrolment did not have such an increased risk (aRR: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.51-1.99). There is a high prevalence of smoking among patients with tuberculosis in Georgia and smoking increases the risk of a poor treatment outcome.

  19. Science Scores in Title I Elementary Schools in North Georgia: A Project Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frias, Ramon

    The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB)'s emphasis of reading, language arts, and mathematics (RLA&M) and its de-emphasis of science has been a source of great concern among educators. Through an objectivist and constructionist framework, this study explored the unforeseen effects of the NCLB on public science education among Title I (TI) and non-Title I (NTI) students. The research questions focused on the effects of NCLB on Criterion Referenced Competency Test (CRCT) scores in the high-stakes subjects of reading, language arts, mathematics and the low stakes subject of science among TI and NTI 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade students in a north Georgia County during the 2010/2011 school year. This study also compared instructional time TI and NTI teachers dedicated to science. A causal-comparative quantitative methodology was used to analyze Georgia's public domain CRCT scores. Three independent-samples t tests showed that TI schools exhibited significantly lower Science CRCT scores than did NTI students at all grade levels (p indicated no significant differences between TI and NTI teachers' instructional science time (t (107) = 1.49, p = 0.137). A teacher development project was designed to focus on improving teacher science content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge through a formal introduction to the nature of science. With increasing global science competition, science is more relevant than ever, and communities need students with strong science foundations. Further study is recommended to analyze the factors associated with this science gap between TI and NTI students.

  20. Efficacy of anthelmintics on South American camelid (llama and alpaca) farms in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Rose-Ann M; Williamson, Lisa H; Terrill, Thomas H; Kaplan, Ray M

    2010-08-27

    The number of South American camelid (SAC; llama and alpaca) farms is growing in the southeastern United States, and infection with gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) is a major health concern in this region. There is widespread resistance to anthelmintic remedies in small ruminants (sheep and goats), but a paucity of information on llamas and alpacas. Anthelmintic resistance was evaluated on three SAC farms (two llama; one alpaca) in Georgia in the southern United States using fecal egg count reduction (FECR) tests. For each farm, animals were randomly assigned to 1 of 5 treatment groups based on initial fecal egg count (FEC) and number of animals available (2-5 groups, n=9-11 per treatment). Ivermectin (IVM, subcutaneous injection; 0.3mg/kg body weight (BW)) and a control group were tested on an alpaca farm, and fenbendazole (FBZ, oral; 10mg/kg BW; two farms), moxidectin (MOX oral; 0.2mg/kg BW; two farms), and levamisole (LEV, oral; 8 mg/kg BW; one farm) were added for the llama farms. Anthelmintic efficacy was determined by comparing FEC of treatment and control animals 14 days post-treatment, with resistance evaluated using the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP) guidelines. Based upon these guidelines, there was GIN resistance to IVM in both llamas and alpacas in Georgia and to FBZ on both llama farms where this drug was tested. There was MOX resistance on one llama farm using the FECR test, while there was no resistance to LEV detected in this study. These data demonstrate a serious emerging problem in the United States of llama and alpaca GIN resistant to drugs from two of the three major anthelmintic classes.

  1. Trends in daily temperature and precipitation extremes over Georgia, 1971–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Keggenhoff

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Annual changes to climate extreme indices in Georgia (Southern Caucasus from 1971 to 2010 are studied using homogenized daily minimum and maximum temperature and precipitation series. Fourteen extreme temperature and 11 extreme precipitation indices are selected from the list of core climate extreme indices recommended by the World Meteorological Organization – Commission for Climatology (WMO-CCL and the research project on Climate Variability and Predictability (CLIVAR of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP. Trends in the extreme indices are studied for 10 minimum and 11 maximum temperature and 24 precipitation series for the period 1971–2010. Between 1971 and 2010 most of the temperature extremes show significant warming trends. In 2010 there are 13.3 fewer frost days than in 1971. Within the same time frame there are 13.6 more summer days and 7.0 more tropical nights. A large number of stations show significant warming trends for monthly minimum and maximum temperature as well as for cold and warm days and nights throughout the study area, whereas warm extremes and night-time based temperature indices show greater trends than cold extremes and daytime indices. Additionally, the warm spell duration indicator indicates a significant increase in the frequency of warm spells between 1971 and 2010. Cold spells show an insignificant increase with low spatial coherence. Maximum 1-day and 5-day precipitation, the number of very heavy precipitation days, very wet and extremely wet days as well as the simple daily intensity index all show an increase in Georgia, although all trends manifest a low spatial coherence. The contribution of very heavy and extremely heavy precipitation to total precipitation increased between 1971 and 2010, whereas the number of wet days decreases.

  2. Implications of land use change on the national terrestrial carbon budget of Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olofsson Pontus

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Globally, the loss of forests now contributes almost 20% of carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. There is an immediate need to reduce the current rates of forest loss, and the associated release of carbon dioxide, but for many areas of the world these rates are largely unknown. The Soviet Union contained a substantial part of the world's forests and the fate of those forests and their effect on carbon dynamics remain unknown for many areas of the former Eastern Bloc. For Georgia, the political and economic transitions following independence in 1991 have been dramatic. In this paper we quantify rates of land use changes and their effect on the terrestrial carbon budget for Georgia. A carbon book-keeping model traces changes in carbon stocks using historical and current rates of land use change. Landsat satellite images acquired circa 1990 and 2000 were analyzed to detect changes in forest cover since 1990. Results The remote sensing analysis showed that a modest forest loss occurred, with approximately 0.8% of the forest cover having disappeared after 1990. Nevertheless, growth of Georgian forests still contribute a current national sink of about 0.3 Tg of carbon per year, which corresponds to 31% of the country anthropogenic carbon emissions. Conclusions We assume that the observed forest loss is mainly a result of illegal logging, but we have not found any evidence of large-scale clear-cutting. Instead local harvesting of timber for household use is likely to be the underlying driver of the observed logging. The Georgian forests are a currently a carbon sink and will remain as such until about 2040 if the current rate of deforestation persists. Forest protection efforts, combined with economic growth, are essential for reducing the rate of deforestation and protecting the carbon sink provided by Georgian forests.

  3. Road and Street Centerlines, Hogansville, Georgia Downtown City Streetscape Map, Published in 2007, 1:9600 (1in=800ft) scale, Chattahoochee-Flint Regional Development.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — , published at 1:9600 (1in=800ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2007. It is described as 'Hogansville, Georgia Downtown...

  4. Road and Street Centerlines, Franklin, Georgia T-Project Map, Published in 2006, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Chattahoochee-Flint Regional Development.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — , published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2006. It is described as 'Franklin, Georgia T-Project...

  5. Road and Street Centerlines, Meriwether County, Georgia Roads Map, Published in 2006, 1:9600 (1in=800ft) scale, Chattahoochee-Flint Regional Development.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — , published at 1:9600 (1in=800ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2006. It is described as 'Meriwether County, Georgia Roads...

  6. Road and Street Centerlines, Hogansville, Georgia T-Project Map, Published in 2006, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Chattahoochee-Flint Regional Development.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — , published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2006. It is described as 'Hogansville, Georgia T-Project...

  7. 2011 Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GADNR) Environmental Protection Division (EPD) Lidar: Seven Counties (Bibb, Harris, Heard, Jasper, Jones, Monroe, Walton)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is the topographic elevation point data derived from multiple return light detection and ranging (LiDAR) measurements for seven counties in Georgia....

  8. Road and Street Centerlines, Troup County, Georgia Roads UTM - NAD 83, Published in 2005, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Chattahoochee-Flint Regional Development.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — , published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2005. It is described as 'Troup County, Georgia Roads...

  9. 2011 Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GADNR) Environmental Protection Division (EPD) Lidar: Seven Counties (Bibb, Harris, Heard, Jasper, Jones, Monroe, Walton)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is the topographic elevation point data derived from multiple return light detection and ranging (LiDAR) measurements for seven counties in Georgia....

  10. Geodatabase of the datasets used to represent the four subunits of the Southeastern Coastal Plain aquifer system, Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina, and Tennessee

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This geodatabase includes spatial datasets that represent the Southeastern Coastal Plain aquifer system in the States of Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, South...

  11. Water use in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin, Alabama, Florida, and Georgia, 2010, and water-use trends, 1985-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Stephen J.

    2016-02-25

    The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin encompasses about 20,230 square miles in parts of Alabama, Florida, and Georgia. Increasing population growth and agricultural production from the 1970s to 2010 has prompted increases in water-resources development and substantially increased water demand in the basin. Since the 1980s, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are parties to litigation concerning water management in the ACF River Basin.

  12. Pre-Teen Alcohol Use as a Risk Factor for Victimization and Perpetration of Bullying among Middle and High School Students in Georgia

    OpenAIRE

    Swahn, Monica; Topalli, Volkan; Ali, Bina; Strasser, Sheryl; Ashby, Jeffrey; Meyers, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We examined the association between pre-teen alcohol use initiation and the victimization and perpetration of bullying among middle and high school students in Georgia. Methods: We computed analyses using data from the 2006 Georgia Student Health Survey (N=175,311) of students in grades 6, 8, 10 and 12. The current analyses were limited to students in grades 8, 10 and 12 (n=122,434). We used multilogistic regression analyses to determine the associations between early alco...

  13. The Effect of Policy Changes of State Scholarship Programs on Enrollment and Financial Aid Awards to Students Attending Two-Year Technical Colleges in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, Tonya F.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation is a policy evaluation of the HOPE Grant Program in the state of Georgia. It examines if the HOPE Grant policy change related to the shifts in enrollment and financial aid awards at two-year technical colleges in Georgia. It particularly focuses on the FY2011 policy change where the GPA was raised from a 2.0 to a 3.0 as a…

  14. Children's Growth and Classroom Experiences in Georgia's Pre-K Program: Findings from the 2011-2012 Evaluation Study. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peisner-Feinberg, Ellen; Schaaf, Jennifer; LaForett, Dore

    2013-01-01

    Georgia has one of the few state-funded universal pre-kindergarten programs in the United States, with the aim of providing pre-k services to all 4-year-olds whose families want their children to participate in the program, regardless of family income level. In the 2011-2012 school year, Georgia's Pre-K Program served a total of over 94,000…

  15. La misión de observación de la UE en Georgia: ¿Instrumento para el reconocimiento de territorios secesionistas?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Julià Barceló

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Since their creation in 2003 by the EU, the development of the European Security and Defence Policy (ESDP civilian missions has experienced great advances regarding their conception and also their framework of actuation. The recent monitoring mission in Georgia (EUMM, devoted to control the ceasefire agreement between Russia and Georgia after the Russian invasion of South Ossetia, demonstrates the overcoming of the ordinary ways of actuation of ESDP –which only had a surveillance role to that time. EUMM allows us to consider the new tactics undertaken by the secessionist territories (with the support of the major powers in the instrumentalization of monitoring missions in order to legitimize their declarations of independence. Under international law, is an essential prerequisite to have the consent of the hosting State of a peacekeeping mission in order the mission not to violate the principle of nonintervention. In this sense, the development in Georgia of the OSCE’s mission has cleared the intentions of Russia when conditioning its continuation to the authorization by Abkhazia and Georgia. If this authorization takes place, it would mean the actual recognition of the independence of these territories. This article analyzes the EU monitoring mission in Georgia and considers this case which has effectively blocked the ongoing mission of the OSCE, leading us to question whether this criterion could be invoked to determine the continuity of the EU mission in Georgia, thus legitimizing the aspirations of independence of South Ossetia and Abajsia

  16. Serologic survey of wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) and evidence of exposure to avian encephalomyelitis virus in Georgia and Florida, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Dallas R; Miller, Debra L; Baldwin, Charles A; Turco, Jenifer; Lockhart, J Mitchell

    2015-04-01

    Wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) are susceptible to many of the same diseases as domestic turkeys. Before 2005, most Wild Turkeys in southern Georgia, US, had little or no exposure to commercial poultry operations. As part of a pathogen survey examining the effects of commercial poultry on Wild Turkeys, samples were collected from Wild Turkeys from March 2005 through May 2008. The turkeys were collected from 13 counties in southern Georgia and Madison County, Florida, and tested for antibodies to various pathogens of poultry. Three (13%) of the turkeys were positive for antibodies to Salmonella. Thirteen turkeys (54%) were positive for Newcastle disease virus antibodies, and 15 turkeys (63%) were positive for antibodies to reticuloendotheliosis virus. One turkey (4%) from Madison County was positive for avian encephalomyelitis virus antibodies.

  17. Assessment of groundwater pathways and contaminant transport in Florida and Georgia using multiple chemical and microbiological indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    The hydrogeology of Florida, especially in the northern part of the state, and southwestern Georgia is characterized by a predominance of limestone aquifers overlain by varying amounts of sands, silts, and clays. This karstic system of aquifers and their associated springs is particularly vulnerable to contamination from various anthropogenic activities at the land surface. Numerous sinkholes, disappearing streams, and conduit systems or dissolution pathways, often associated with large spring systems, allow rapid movement of contaminants from the land surface to the groundwater system with little or no attenuation or degradation. The fate of contaminants in the groundwater system is not fully understood, but traveltimes from sources are greatly reduced when conduits are intercepted by pumping wells and springs. Contaminant introduction to groundwater systems in Florida and Georgia is not limited to seepage from land surface, but can be associated with passive (drainage wells) and forced subsurface injection (aquifer storage and recovery, waste-water disposal).

  18. The Evolution of Splint Armour in Georgia and Byzantium: Lamellar and Scale Armour in the 10th-12th Centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamuka TSURTSUMIA

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Byzantine technology was part of the military technology that existed in vast areas of Eurasia; hence study of the armament of its neighbours is important.The purpose of the present paper is to add new data about Byzantium’s Caucasian neighbour (namely, Georgia. Besides that, it also includes certain views about the stages of the evolution and provenance of splint (scale and lamellar armour. This paper also attempts to clarify the difference between banded and linear suits of lamellar armour.There is no doubt that the Byzantine military machine exercised considerable influence on its neighbours, though an opposite phenomenon can also be noticed. The article shows that changes in armour were taking place almost simultaneously in the Byzantine Empire and the Georgian kingdoms and that some of the types of armour that were widespread in Byzantium may have originated in Georgia.

  19. Preliminary assessment of habitat protection needs for West Indian manatees on the east coast of Florida and Georgia. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-12-01

    The report assesses information on the status of endangered West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus) on the east coast of Florida and Georgia in the southeastern United States and recommends actions to improve protection of the species and its habitat in that area. Manatees on the east coast of Florida and Georgia appear to constitute a discrete population numbering perhaps 700 to 900 animals. Based on carcass-salvage data, recent annual mortality rates of between 8% and 10% are indicated. Perhaps 3% to 4% of the population was killed as a result of collisions with boats during 1987, and this threat appears to be increasing. Collisions with boats and destruction of essential habitat are the principal threats to the population. Recommendations include: quadruple the size of the boat-speed regulatory system on the east coast of Florida; limit development in essential manatee habitats; acquire additional manatee habitat as additions to Federal and State refuges and preserves.

  20. Hydrologic conditions, recharge, and baseline water quality of the surficial aquifer system at Jekyll Island, Georgia, 2012-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Debbie W.; Torak, Lynn J.

    2016-03-08

    An increase of groundwater withdrawals from the surficial aquifer system on Jekyll Island, Georgia, prompted an investigation of hydrologic conditions and water quality by the U.S. Geological Survey during October 2012 through December 2013. The study demonstrated the importance of rainfall as the island’s main source of recharge to maintain freshwater resources by replenishing the water table from the effects of hydrologic stresses, primarily evapotranspiration and pumping. Groundwater-flow directions, recharge, and water quality of the water-table zone on the island were investigated by installing 26 shallow wells and three pond staff gages to monitor groundwater levels and water quality in the water-table zone. Climatic data from Brunswick, Georgia, were used to calculate potential maximum recharge to the water-table zone on Jekyll Island. A weather station located on the island provided only precipitation data. Additional meteorological data from the island would enhance potential evapotranspiration estimates for recharge calculations.

  1. Highly diverse, poorly studied and uniquely threatened by climate change: an assessment of marine biodiversity on South Georgia's continental shelf.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver T Hogg

    Full Text Available We attempt to quantify how significant the polar archipelago of South Georgia is as a source of regional and global marine biodiversity. We evaluate numbers of rare, endemic and range-edge species and how the faunal structure of South Georgia may respond to some of the fastest warming waters on the planet. Biodiversity data was collated from a comprehensive review of reports, papers and databases, collectively representing over 125 years of polar exploration. Classification of each specimen was recorded to species level and fully geo-referenced by depth, latitude and longitude. This information was integrated with physical data layers (e.g. temperature, salinity and flow providing a visualisation of South Georgia's biogeography across spatial, temporal and taxonomic scales, placing it in the wider context of the Southern Hemisphere. This study marks the first attempt to map the biogeography of an archipelago south of the Polar Front. Through it we identify the South Georgian shelf as the most speciose region of the Southern Ocean recorded to date. Marine biodiversity was recorded as rich across taxonomic levels with 17,732 records yielding 1,445 species from 436 families, 51 classes and 22 phyla. Most species recorded were rare, with 35% recorded only once and 86% recorded <10 times. Its marine fauna is marked by the cumulative dominance of endemic and range-edge species, potentially at their thermal tolerance limits. Consequently, our data suggests the ecological implications of environmental change to the South Georgian marine ecosystem could be severe. If sea temperatures continue to rise, we suggest that changes will include depth profile shifts of some fauna towards cooler Antarctic Winter Water (90-150 m, the loss of some range-edge species from regional waters, and the wholesale extinction at a global scale of some of South Georgia's endemic species.

  2. Determinants of an Environmental Horticulture Firm’s Recycle Process in terms of type and quantity: the Case of Georgia

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Ting; Anna M., Klepacka; Florkowski, Wojciech; Kristine, Braman

    2015-01-01

    Environmental horticulture firms provide a variety of commercial/residential landscape products and services encompassing ornamental plant production, design, installation, and maintenance. The companies generate tons of waste including plastic containers, trays, and greenhouse/field covers, creating the need to reduce and utilize plastic waste. Based on survey data collected in Georgia in 2013, this paper investigates determinants of the environmental horticulture firms’ recycling decision (...

  3. "Buying Local" Means "Selling Local" - Using a Transportation Alliance of environmental and Food Horticulture Producers in Georgia

    OpenAIRE

    Stegelin, Forrest E.; Houston, Jack E.; Compte, Javier Mantilla; Thomas, Paul A.; Chappell, Matthew R.

    2011-01-01

    The costs of transporting agricultural products to market and of the acquisition of production inputs are of concern to environmental and food horticulture crops producers. This study is to determine if transportation alliances would reduce shipping costs, increase distribution efficiencies and reduce carbon dioxide emissions among floriculture, ornamental plants, and fruit and vegetable producers in Georgia. Using data from surveys and the ArcLogistics 9.3 GIS software, routing systems were ...

  4. Highly diverse, poorly studied and uniquely threatened by climate change: an assessment of marine biodiversity on South Georgia's continental shelf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Oliver T; Barnes, David K A; Griffiths, Huw J

    2011-01-01

    We attempt to quantify how significant the polar archipelago of South Georgia is as a source of regional and global marine biodiversity. We evaluate numbers of rare, endemic and range-edge species and how the faunal structure of South Georgia may respond to some of the fastest warming waters on the planet. Biodiversity data was collated from a comprehensive review of reports, papers and databases, collectively representing over 125 years of polar exploration. Classification of each specimen was recorded to species level and fully geo-referenced by depth, latitude and longitude. This information was integrated with physical data layers (e.g. temperature, salinity and flow) providing a visualisation of South Georgia's biogeography across spatial, temporal and taxonomic scales, placing it in the wider context of the Southern Hemisphere. This study marks the first attempt to map the biogeography of an archipelago south of the Polar Front. Through it we identify the South Georgian shelf as the most speciose region of the Southern Ocean recorded to date. Marine biodiversity was recorded as rich across taxonomic levels with 17,732 records yielding 1,445 species from 436 families, 51 classes and 22 phyla. Most species recorded were rare, with 35% recorded only once and 86% recorded <10 times. Its marine fauna is marked by the cumulative dominance of endemic and range-edge species, potentially at their thermal tolerance limits. Consequently, our data suggests the ecological implications of environmental change to the South Georgian marine ecosystem could be severe. If sea temperatures continue to rise, we suggest that changes will include depth profile shifts of some fauna towards cooler Antarctic Winter Water (90-150 m), the loss of some range-edge species from regional waters, and the wholesale extinction at a global scale of some of South Georgia's endemic species.

  5. Character-Defining Features of Contributing Buildings and Structures in the Fort Gordon, Georgia, Signal School Campus Historic District

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Richard Aeck (1912–1996).” New Georgia Encyclopedia . Available at http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/articles/arts- culture /richard-aeck-1912-1996...Center 2902 Newmark Drive Champaign, IL 61822 Final report Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Prepared for Cultural Resources...359 ERDC/CERL TR-16-8 Preface This study was conducted for the Cultural Resources office in the Direc- torate of

  6. Smoke-Free Public Policies and Voluntary Policies in Personal Settings in Tbilisi, Georgia: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Carla J; Smith, Samantha A; Bascombe, Ta Misha; Maglakelidze, Nino; Starua, Lela; Topuridze, Marina

    2016-01-25

    Georgia has limited tobacco control policies, particularly in the area of smoke-free public policies, which may influence the adoption of smoke-free home rules. We qualitatively examined knowledge about and reactions to public and personal smoke-free policies among Tbilisi residents. In Spring 2014, we conducted six focus groups among 47 total participants--two among male smokers, one among male nonsmokers, two among female smokers, and one among female nonsmokers. Our sample was 48.9% male and 70.2% past 30-day smokers. Most believed that SHS was dangerous, with particular concern regarding the impact of SHS on children and pregnant women. Many had misconceptions about how to protect others from SHS and the effectiveness of some approaches. Many indicated that they had some type of home rules, but few reported a complete ban on smoking in the home. Even when some restrictions were in place, they rarely were effective or enforced. Common concerns about the partial smoke-free public policy in Georgia included its economic impact, perceived discrimination among smokers, and the policy being against the Georgian culture. These concerns were heightened when participants were asked about the possible implementation of a complete smoke-free policy. Educational programs are needed to promote smoke-free policies in Georgia.

  7. Hydrologic monitoring and selected hydrologic and environmental studies by the U.S. Geological Survey in Georgia, 2011–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, John S.; Dalton, Melinda J.

    2013-01-01

    This compendium of papers describes results of hydrologic monitoring and hydrologic and environmental studies completed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Georgia during 2011–2013. The USGS addresses a wide variety of water issues in the State of Georgia working with local, State, and Federal partners. As the primary Federal science agency for water resource information, the USGS monitors the quantity and quality of water in the Nation’s rivers and aquifers, assesses the sources and fate of contaminants in aquatic systems, collects and analyzes data on aquatic ecosystems, develops tools to improve the application of hydrologic information, and ensures that its information and tools are available to all potential users. During 2011–2013, the USGS continued a long-term program of monitoring stream and groundwater resources, including flow, water quality, and water use. In addition, a variety of hydrologic and environmental studies were completed to assess water availability, hydrologic hazards, and the impact of development on water resources. Information on USGS activities in Georgia is available online at http://ga.water.usgs.gov/.

  8. Factors Associated with HIV Testing History among Pregnant Women and Their Partners in Georgia: The ANRS 12127 Prenahtest Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Butsashvili

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the benefits of timely diagnosis of HIV infection and the wide availability of VCT services, the acceptance of HIV testing and counseling still remains a challenge in Georgia. The goal of our study was to assess the history of HIV testing and associated factors among pregnant women. The recruitment of study participants took place during routine antenatal care visits at one of the large Maternity Hospitals in Tbilisi, capital of Georgia. A total of 491 pregnant women were included in the sample. More than a third of women (38.5% reported that they were tested for HIV before the current pregnancy and almost all of them (91.5% were tested during previous pregnancies. Bivariate analysis revealed statistically significant association of women’s history of HIV testing with age, education level, remunerated activity, history of STI, and multiparity. In multivariate analysis, the only independent predictor of being HIV tested was ever being pregnant. In conclusion, HIV testing history among women at reproductive age was poor in Georgia. Women mostly received HIV testing at prenatal centers. Efforts should be made to promote HIV testing in primary care settings, which would increase its acceptability and overall testing rate in the population.

  9. Distribution of limnoterrestrial Tardigrada in Georgia and the Gulf Coast states of the United States of America with ecological remarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry A. MEYER

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This report is an effort to improve understanding of the distribution of limnoterrestrial tardigrades in Georgia and the states along the Gulf Coast of the United States of America. We collected 14 species of tardigrades from cryptogams (mosses, lichens, and liverworts and leaf litter in a statewide survey of Louisiana and reviewed all publications and theses reporting tardigrade distributions in the Gulf Coast states. Statewide surveys have been also conducted in Alabama, Florida, and Texas, while sampling in Mississippi and Georgia has been more localized. Currently 51 species have been identified in the region: 19 in Texas, 16 in Louisiana, 10 in Mississippi, 33 in Alabama, 3 in Georgia, and 15 in Florida. These tardigrades have been collected from cryptogams (mosses, lichens, and liverworts on trees and rocks, from soil and leaf litter, and from freshwater. Twenty species are widely distributed in the region (i.e., found in ≥ 2 non-contiguous states, while 27 have been found in only one state. Eighteen species are probably cosmopolitan. Seven species, widespread in the Gulf Coast states but unknown elsewhere in the Nearctic Region – Echiniscus kofordi, Echiniscus cavagnaroi, Parexapodibius pilatoi, Hexapodibius christenberryae, Biserovus bindae, Minibiotus fallax and a new Macrobiotus cf. hufelandi – may represent a distinctive regional fauna in cryptogams.

  10. Estimating flood magnitude and frequency for urban and small, rural streams in Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feaster, Toby D.; Gotvald, Anthony J.; Weaver, J. Curtis

    2014-01-01

    Reliable estimates of the magnitude and frequency of floods are essential for the design of transportation and water-conveyance structures, flood insurance studies, and flood-plain management. Flood-frequency estimates are particularly important in densely populated urban areas. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used a multistate approach to update methods for determining the magnitude and frequency of floods in urban and small, rural streams that are not substantially affected by regulation or tidal fluctuations in Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina (Feaster and others, 2014). The multistate approach has the advantage over a single state approach of increasing the number of streamflow-gaging station (streamgages) available for analysis, expanding the geographical coverage that would allow for application of regional regression equations across state boundaries, and building on a previous flood-frequency investigation of rural streamgages in the Southeastern United States. This investigation was funded as part of a cooperative program of water-resources investigations between the USGS, the South Carolina Department of Transportation, and the North Carolina Department of Transportation. In addition, much of the data and information for the Georgia streamgages was funded through a similar cooperative program with the Georgia Department of Transportation.

  11. The changing pattern of human brucellosis: clinical manifestations, epidemiology, and treatment outcomes over three decades in Georgia

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    Zenaishvili Otar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brucellosis is an endemic infection in Georgia. We conducted a review of patient records with a suspected or confirmed diagnosis of brucellosis over three decades at the central referral hospital for brucellosis cases, the Institute of Parasitology and Tropical Medicine (IPTM in Tbilisi. The purpose was to describe the demographic profile and clinical characteristics as well as diagnostic and treatment strategies in patients with brucellosis. Methods Data were abstracted from randomly selected patient records at the IPTM. In total, 300 records were reviewed from three time periods: 1970-73, 1988-89, and 2004-2008. Results The age distribution of patients shifted from a median age of 40 years in the first time period to 20 years in the third time period. Azeri ethnicity was an increasing proportion of the total number of cases. The frequency of relapsed infection was 14.7% (44 cases. A total of 50 patients received vaccine therapy, and although the vaccine produced immune responses, demonstrated by an increase in agglutination titers, it was not associated with improved outcome. Conclusion The demographics of brucellosis in Georgia fit a profile of persons that tend sheep. Osteoarticular complications were commonly detected, especially in children. The changing pattern of brucellosis in Georgia suggests clinicians should be updated about different trends in brucellosis in their country.

  12. Evidence of local persistence of human anthrax in the country of georgia associated with environmental and anthropogenic factors.

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    Ian T Kracalik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anthrax is a soil-borne disease caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis and is considered a neglected zoonosis. In the country of Georgia, recent reports have indicated an increase in the incidence of human anthrax. Identifying sub-national areas of increased risk may help direct appropriate public health control measures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of human anthrax and identify environmental/anthropogenic factors associated with persistent clusters. METHODS/FINDINGS: A database of human cutaneous anthrax in Georgia during the period 2000-2009 was constructed using a geographic information system (GIS with case data recorded to the community location. The spatial scan statistic was used to identify persistence of human cutaneous anthrax. Risk factors related to clusters of persistence were modeled using a multivariate logistic regression. Areas of persistence were identified in the southeastern part of the country. Results indicated that the persistence of human cutaneous anthrax showed a strong positive association with soil pH and urban areas. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Anthrax represents a persistent threat to public and veterinary health in Georgia. The findings here showed that the local level heterogeneity in the persistence of human cutaneous anthrax necessitates directed interventions to mitigate the disease. High risk areas identified in this study can be targeted for public health control measures such as farmer education and livestock vaccination campaigns.

  13. Evidence of Local Persistence of Human Anthrax in the Country of Georgia Associated with Environmental and Anthropogenic Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracalik, Ian T.; Malania, Lile; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Manvelyan, Julietta; Bakanidze, Lela; Imnadze, Paata; Tsanava, Shota; Blackburn, Jason K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Anthrax is a soil-borne disease caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis and is considered a neglected zoonosis. In the country of Georgia, recent reports have indicated an increase in the incidence of human anthrax. Identifying sub-national areas of increased risk may help direct appropriate public health control measures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of human anthrax and identify environmental/anthropogenic factors associated with persistent clusters. Methods/Findings A database of human cutaneous anthrax in Georgia during the period 2000–2009 was constructed using a geographic information system (GIS) with case data recorded to the community location. The spatial scan statistic was used to identify persistence of human cutaneous anthrax. Risk factors related to clusters of persistence were modeled using a multivariate logistic regression. Areas of persistence were identified in the southeastern part of the country. Results indicated that the persistence of human cutaneous anthrax showed a strong positive association with soil pH and urban areas. Conclusions/Significance Anthrax represents a persistent threat to public and veterinary health in Georgia. The findings here showed that the local level heterogeneity in the persistence of human cutaneous anthrax necessitates directed interventions to mitigate the disease. High risk areas identified in this study can be targeted for public health control measures such as farmer education and livestock vaccination campaigns. PMID:24040426

  14. A brucellosis disease control strategy for the Kakheti region of the country of Georgia: an agent-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havas, K A; Boone, R B; Hill, A E; Salman, M D

    2014-06-01

    Brucellosis has been reported in livestock and humans in the country of Georgia with Brucella melitensis as the most common species causing disease. Georgia lacked sufficient data to assess effectiveness of the various potential control measures utilizing a reliable population-based simulation model of animal-to-human transmission of this infection. Therefore, an agent-based model was built using data from previous studies to evaluate the effect of an animal-level infection control programme on human incidence and sheep flock and cattle herd prevalence of brucellosis in the Kakheti region of Georgia. This model simulated the patterns of interaction of human-animal workers, sheep flocks and cattle herds with various infection control measures and returned population-based data. The model simulates the use of control measures needed for herd and flock prevalence to fall below 2%. As per the model output, shepherds had the greatest disease reduction as a result of the infection control programme. Cattle had the greatest influence on the incidence of human disease. Control strategies should include all susceptible animal species, sheep and cattle, identify the species of brucellosis present in the cattle population and should be conducted at the municipality level. This approach can be considered as a model to other countries and regions when assessment of control strategies is needed but data are scattered.

  15. New evidence for determining of the date of adoption of Christianity as a state religion in Georgia

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    Marina, Gigolashvili; George, Ramishvili; Vasili, Kukhianidze

    2011-01-01

    At present it is considered that Christianity was declared a state religion in Georgia in circa 326 AD, during the reign of King Mirian and Queen Nana. In the Georgian Chronicle [1] (Kaukhchishvili, 1955) it is stated that this event is connected with the adoption of Christianity by King Mirian. Once he was hunting somewhere between Mtskheta (the ancient capital of Georgia) and Khashuri, near Mt. Tkhoti in dense woodland. It rapidly got dark and the Sun disappeared from the sky. Mirian began to ask his traditional pagan gods, but to no avail. Then he addressed the god whom Nino from Cappadocia believed in (subsequently she became Saint Nino, a woman whose name is inseparably linked with the spread of Christianity in Georgia) and there was a miracle; the darkness suddenly disappeared and the Sun began shining in the sky again. Then Mirian turned to the East and thanked "Nino's god". In the authors' opinion, the eclipse seen by King Mirian happened on the evening of 6 May, 319 AD. Later, in May 320 AD, cypress ...

  16. [STUDY OF LIPIDS OF THE FRUITS OF USUAL HAZEL-NUT CORYLUS AVELLANA L., GROWING IN GEORGIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikalishvili, B; Gorgaslidze, N; Zurabashvili, D; Sulakvelidze, Ts; Malania, M; Turabelidze, D

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this investigation was the study of lipids from the fruits of usual hazel-nut Corylus avellana L, growing in Georgia. Ripe fruits was collected in the West Georgia, just in Imereti. From the powdered fruits was obtained the sums of neutral and pollar lipids. Qualitatively there were established classes entered in them. By using High performance liquid chromatography qualitatively and quantitatively were identified ten fatty acids, which time of deduction hesitate from 4,01 min to 13,00 min. By the analyses there were determined unsaturated fatty acids C12:0 to C24:0. The content of unsaturated fatty acids considerably is distinquished from the content of the oil from the hazel-nut, growing in the other eco-geographical conditions. In the oil of the hazel-nut growing in Georgia content of hexadecanoic acid is by far exceled (surpassed) than of the oil from the nut growing in the other natural conditions. In the other matters dominant acid is octadecanoic acid. The oil from the fruits of hazel-nut content physiologically active compounds, which desirably correlation is interesting not only for receiving (obtaining) cosmetic means, not is important for usage in practical medicine.

  17. Estimating Demand for and Supply of Pediatric Preventive Dental Care for Children and Identifying Dental Care Shortage Areas, Georgia, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shanshan; Gentili, Monica; Griffin, Paul M; Griffin, Susan O; Harati, Pravara; Johnson, Ben; Serban, Nicoleta; Tomar, Scott

    Demand for dental care is expected to outpace supply through 2025. The objectives of this study were to determine the extent of pediatric dental care shortages in Georgia and to develop a general method for estimation that can be applied to other states. We estimated supply and demand for pediatric preventive dental care for the 159 counties in Georgia in 2015. We compared pediatric preventive dental care shortage areas (where demand exceeded twice the supply) designated by our methods with dental health professional shortage areas designated by the Health Resources & Services Administration. We estimated caries risk from a multivariate analysis of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data and national census data. We estimated county-level demand based on the time needed to perform preventive dental care services and the proportion of time that dentists spend on pediatric preventive dental care services from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Pediatric preventive dental care supply exceeded demand in Georgia in 75 counties: the average annual county-level pediatric preventive dental care demand was 16 866 hours, and the supply was 32 969 hours. We identified 41 counties as pediatric dental care shortage areas, 14 of which had not been designated by the Health Resources & Services Administration. Age- and service-specific information on dental care shortage areas could result in more efficient provider staffing and geographic targeting.

  18. Major advance of South Georgia glaciers during the Antarctic Cold Reversal following extensive sub-Antarctic glaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Alastair G. C.; Kuhn, Gerhard; Meisel, Ove; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Hodgson, Dominic A.; Ehrmann, Werner; Wacker, Lukas; Wintersteller, Paul; Dos Santos Ferreira, Christian; Römer, Miriam; White, Duanne; Bohrmann, Gerhard

    2017-03-01

    The history of glaciations on Southern Hemisphere sub-polar islands is unclear. Debate surrounds the extent and timing of the last glacial advance and termination on sub-Antarctic South Georgia in particular. Here, using sea-floor geophysical data and marine sediment cores, we resolve the record of glaciation offshore of South Georgia through the transition from the Last Glacial Maximum to Holocene. We show a sea-bed landform imprint of a shelf-wide last glacial advance and progressive deglaciation. Renewed glacier resurgence in the fjords between c. 15,170 and 13,340 yr ago coincided with a period of cooler, wetter climate known as the Antarctic Cold Reversal, revealing a cryospheric response to an Antarctic climate pattern extending into the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. We conclude that the last glaciation of South Georgia was extensive, and the sensitivity of its glaciers to climate variability during the last termination more significant than implied by previous studies.

  19. Bio indication of soil samples from contaminated military sites in Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakariadze, N.; Gagelidze, N.; Amiranashvili, L.; Nabakhtiani, G.; Tsigroshvili, Z. [GEO-ECO TAO, Geo-Ecology, Testing and Assessment Operations, Tbilisi (Georgia)

    2005-07-01

    State of environment in Georgia is influenced significantly by political and economic situation of the last several years.The consequences of these conditions are pollution of water, air, and soil with health-hazardous emissions, dissemination of uncontrolled waste, highly toxic substances and unfit military and industrial materials in civil, agricultural, and military sites and respective facilities. In Georgia the specific problems of soil contamination are: spot type distribution of contaminants; simultaneous (synergetic) impacts of various pollutants; chronic and enduring impacts; pollution of moderate or low intensity. Pollutants, at low doses, may not cause immediate changes; however in some time they can create danger and become the risk factors for acquired lethal diseases developed in living organisms and accumulated in environment. Several cases of contamination with radionuclide substances distribution have been detected on in a number of regions in Georgia, which became the range for investigation of specific, spot type of pollution. The soil samples contaminated with following nuclides were studied: Single sources {sup 226}Ra, Dust {sup 226}Ra, Single sources {sup 90}Sr, Single sources {sup 137}Cs. The main goal of the team is complex study of contaminated territories. In parallel with polluted spots' indication, the investigation of ecological systems' reactions to diverse impacts is carried out. Bioassays application significantly increases quality and reliability of: assessment of contaminated territories; selection of optimal and available technologies for sanation and remediation; recommendations on urgent measures. As bio-indicators the main groups of microorganisms were studied: Bacteria, Actinomycetes and Microphyte fungi. The primary results showed that behaviour of observed microorganisms colonies could be satisfactorily described with the following parameters: CCU; Meeting factor; Diameter of colonies; Morphological similarity and

  20. Avian influenza virus surveillance in wild birds in Georgia: 2009-2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola S Lewis

    Full Text Available The Caucasus, at the border of Europe and Asia, is important for migration and over-wintering of wild waterbirds. Three flyways, the Central Asian, East Africa-West Asia, and Mediterranean/Black Sea flyways, converge in the Caucasus region. Thus, the Caucasus region might act as a migratory bridge for influenza virus transmission when birds aggregate in high concentrations in the post-breeding, migrating and overwintering periods. Since August 2009, we have established a surveillance network for influenza viruses in wild birds, using five sample areas geographically spread throughout suitable habitats in both eastern and western Georgia. We took paired tracheal and cloacal swabs and fresh feces samples. We collected 8343 swabs from 76 species belonging to 17 families in 11 orders of birds, of which 84 were real-time RT-PCR positive for avian influenza virus (AIV. No highly pathogenic AIV (HPAIV H5 or H7 viruses were detected. The overall AIV prevalence was 1.6%. We observed peak prevalence in large gulls during the autumn migration (5.3-9.8%, but peak prevalence in Black-headed Gulls in spring (4.2-13%. In ducks, we observed increased AIV prevalence during the autumn post-moult aggregations and migration stop-over period (6.3% but at lower levels to those observed in other more northerly post-moult areas in Eurasia. We observed another prevalence peak in the overwintering period (0.14-5.9%. Serological and virological monitoring of a breeding colony of Armenian Gulls showed that adult birds were seropositive on arrival at the breeding colony, but juveniles remained serologically and virologically negative for AIV throughout their time on the breeding grounds, in contrast to gull AIV data from other geographic regions. We show that close phylogenetic relatives of viruses isolated in Georgia are sourced from a wide geographic area throughout Western and Central Eurasia, and from areas that are represented by multiple different flyways, likely

  1. Spatial and temporal source apportionment of PM2.5 in Georgia, 2002 to 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xinxin; Mulholland, James A.; Russell, Armistead G.; Holmes, Heather A.

    2017-07-01

    The Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) receptor model was applied to estimate PM2.5 source impacts over Georgia from 2002 to 2013 using ambient PM2.5 species concentration data from 13 sites. Measurements of 19 PM2.5 species were used as inputs along with measurement-based source profiles to estimate the impacts of nine sources, including both primary components (from heavy duty diesel vehicle, light duty gasoline vehicle, biomass burning, coal combustion, and suspended dust sources) and secondary pollutants (ammonium sulfate, ammonium bisulfate, ammonium nitrate, and secondary organic carbon). From 2002 to 2013, PM2.5 total mass decreased from 13.8 μg/m3 to 9.2 μg/m3 averaged across all sites, a 33% decrease. Largest decreases were observed for secondary sulfate and nitrate species (58% and 44%, respectively). The amount of neutralization by ammonium did not change substantially over the time period in spite of substantial decreases in sulfate and nitrate concentrations. Total mobile source impacts decreased more at urban sites (39%) than rural sites (23%), whereas biomass burning decreased more at rural sites (34%) than urban sites (27%). The estimated central-site source impacts are found to spatially represent large areas for secondary pollutants, smaller areas for biomass burning and dust, and very local areas for mobile sources and coal combustion. Trends from the National Emissions Inventory were compared with the annual trends of mobile source impacts, coal combustion impacts, and sulfate concentrations, resulting in statistically significant positive trends with Pearson R2 of 0.80, 0.64, and 0.79, respectively. Results presented here suggest that PM2.5 reductions in Georgia and the Southeast have been achieved by control of both stationary and mobile sources, and that PM2.5 is comprised of increasing fractions of biomass burning emissions and suspended dust. The temporal trends of source impacts at each site adds information about source changes beyond the

  2. Incrimination of Phlebotomus kandelakii and Phlebotomus balcanicus as vectors of Leishmania infantum in Tbilisi, Georgia.

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    Ekaterina Giorgobiani

    Full Text Available A survey of potential vector sand flies was conducted in the neighboring suburban communities of Vake and Mtatsminda districts in an active focus of visceral Leishmaniasis (VL in Tbilisi, Georgia. Using light and sticky-paper traps, 1,266 male and 1,179 female sand flies were collected during 2006-2008. Five Phlebotomus species of three subgenera were collected: Phlebotomus balcanicus Theodor and Phlebotomus halepensis Theodor of the subgenus Adlerius; Phlebotomus kandelakii Shchurenkova and Phlebotomus wenyoni Adler and Theodor of the subgenus Larroussius; Phlebotomus sergenti Perfil'ev of the subgenus Paraphlebotomus. Phlebotomus sergenti (35.1% predominated in Vake, followed by P. kandelakii (33.5%, P. balcanicus (18.9%, P. halepensis (12.2%, and P. wenyoni (0.3%. In Mtatsminda, P. kandelakii (76.8% comprised over three fourths of collected sand flies, followed by P. sergenti (12.6%, P. balcanicus (5.8%, P. halepensis (3.7%, and P. wenyoni (1.1%. The sand fly season in Georgia is exceptionally short beginning in early June, peaking in July and August, then declining to zero in early September. Of 659 female sand flies examined for Leishmania, 12 (1.8% specimens without traces of blood were infected including 10 of 535 P. kandelakii (1.9% and two of 40 P. balcanicus (5.0%. Six isolates were successfully cultured and characterized as Leishmania by PCR. Three isolates from P. kandelakii (2 and P. balcanicus (1 were further identified as L. infantum using sequence alignment of the 70 kDa heat-shock protein gene. Importantly, the sand fly isolates showed a high percent identity (99.8%-99.9% to human and dog isolates from the same focus, incriminating the two sand fly species as vectors. Blood meal analysis showed that P. kandelakii preferentially feeds on dogs (76% but also feeds on humans. The abundance, infection rate and feeding behavior of P. kandelakii and the infection rate in P. balcanicus establish these species as vectors in the Tbilisi

  3. A comparative study of laparoscopic and open Nissen fundoplication for GERD in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Kiladze, Merab; T Giuashvili, Shalva; M Kiladze, Merab; V Elgandashvili, David

    2014-01-01

    Lo studio paragona ed analizza l’efficacia ed i risultati della fundoplicatio di Nissen in laparotomia secondo la modifica di Chernousov (CMNF) e la fundoplicatio totale laparoscopica eseguite in Georgia per la malattia da reflusso gastroesofageo (GERD), prendendo in considerazione la tecnica operatoria, le complicanze postoperatorie, i vantaggi per la sintomatologia, le recidive e la necessità di successivi reinterventi. Si tratta di uno studio prospettico randomizzato eseguito su 243 pazienti: 123 sottoposti alla procedura laparotomica CMNF e 120 pazienti trattati con la fundoplicatio totale laparoscopica. Gli esami pre- e postoperatori comprendono l’endoscopia, lo studio radiologico, un questionario da sottoporre al paziente (secondo lo schema GERD-HQRL) e lo studio clinico. Tutti i paziente sono stati controllati per un follow-up di 10 anni. Questo trial prospettico randomizzato ha mostrato risultati a lungo termine rispettivamente buoni ed eccellenti dopo chirurgia laparotomica e laparoscopica per GERD (92,7% vs 88,5% rispettivamente) (p=0,03). Dopo CMNF laparotomica si sono verificati tre casi di laparocele e 9 casi di modica disfagia. In nessun caso di è registrata una recidiva. Dopo approccio laparoscopico si sono osservati 7 casi di disfagia transitoria per i solidi, 3 casi di stenosi grave a livello cardiaco in rapporto alla plicatura. Vi sono stati due casi di recidiva, 3 casi di reflusso ed 1 caso di ernia epigastrica a livello del foro del trocar. Come nel resto del mondo, attualmente in Georgia la fundoplicatio totale per via laparoscopica rappresenta il metodo preferito di scelta per il trattamento della GERD. Esso presenta i migliori risultati estetici, il minor dolore ed i minori problemi a livello delle ferite, un più breve ricovero e un più precoce ritorno all’attività. Anche la procedura CMNF laparotomica è efficace e sicura. In essa si previene la sindrome da scivolamento ed è caratterizzata da un migliore controllo del reflusso ed

  4. Georgia's collaborative approach to expanding mosquito surveillance in response to Zika virus: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustin, R Christopher; Martin, Deonte; Sevilimedu, Varadan; Pandeya, Sarbesh; Rochani, Haresh; Kelly, Rosmarie

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) was declared an international public health emergency by the World Health Organization on February 1, 2016. Due to the known and estimated range of the ZIKV mosquito vectors, southern and central US states faced increased risk of ZIKV transmission. With the state of Georgia hosting the world's busiest international airport, a climate that supports the ZIKV vectors, and limited surveillance (13 counties) and response capacity, the Department of Public Health (DPH) was challenged to respond and prevent ZIKV transmission. This case study describes and evaluates the state's surveillance capacity before and after the declaration of ZIKV as a public health emergency. We analyzed surveillance data from the DPH to compare the geographical distribution of counties conducting surveillance, total number, and overall percentage of mosquito species trapped in 2015 to 2016. Counties conducting surveillance before and after the identification of the ZIKV risk were mapped using ArcMap 10.4.1. Using SAS (version 9.2) (SAS Institute, Inc, Cary, NC), we performed the independent 2 sample t test to test for differences in prevalence in both years, and a χ² analysis to test for differences between numbers of species across the 13 counties. In addition, weighted frequency counts of mosquitoes were used to test (χ²) an association between major mosquito vector species and 7 urban counties. Lastly, using data from 2012-2016, a time-trend analysis was conducted to evaluate temporal trends in species prevalence. From 2015 to 2016, surveillance increased from 13 to 57 (338% increase) counties geographically dispersed across Georgia. A total of 76,052 mosquitoes were trapped and identified in 2015 compared to 144,731 (90.3% increase) in 2016. Significant differences between species (Psurveillance footprint. Existing and new partnerships were developed with the military and local health departments to expand and share data. This additional surveillance data allowed DPH to

  5. Prevailing HCV genotypes and subtypes among hiv infected patients in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karchava, M; Sharvadze, L; Gatserelia, L; Badridze, N; Tsertsvadze, T

    2009-12-01

    Recent analysis of antiretroviral treatment (ART) program data in Georgia showed that end-stage liver disease was a leading cause of death among HIV/HCV co infected patients in 2005. The objective of this retrospective study was to study prevailing genotypes and subtypes of HCV virus in a cohort of HIV infected patients. The investigation revealed that of 1490 patients, 879 (59%) were hepatitis C antibody positive. Detectable HCV RNA was found among 91% of patients. Median liver HCV RNA level was higher than among mono-infected patients. The most prevalent genotypes were genotype 1 (41.6%), followed by genotype 3 (34.7%) and genotype 2 (17.6%), inter (mix) genotype recombinants were found among 5.8 % of patients. The genotype distribution in our study is slightly different from what was seen in Georgia in 2000. The differences of prevailing HCV genotypes among general population and HIV co infected group was probably attributed to the different methods for sample selection used within our study or possible influence of diverse transmission networks among HIV infected group. Another explanation can be the possible shift from predominance of genotype 1 to non 1 genotypes. The higher number intergenotype recombinant forms might be the result of continues parenteral exposure to different HCV genotypes during drug injection paraphernalia. Our study demonstrated high prevalence of HCV infection among HIV-infected patients and revealed 1b as predominant genotype. IDUs were less likely to spontaneously clear the virus than homosexual man and heterosexually infected woman. A greater HCV RNA levels were associated with a greater chance to be infected with HCV genotypes 1. Possible shift from predominance of genotype 1 to non 1 genotypes can be of option. This shift may have a major and beneficial impact on treatment schedules and costs. The higher number intergenotype recombinant forms might be the results of continues parenteral exposure to different HCV genotypes during

  6. Comparative analysis of eu membership candidate countries legal economic framework (Ukraine, Georgia, Moldova

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Zharova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The article represents the results of analytical review and comparative analysis of EU membership candidate countries legal economic framework for Ukraine, Georgia and Moldova. The aim of the research is to show opportunities and illuminate the gaps for timely fulfillment of obligation in framework of euro integration process. The results of the analysis. The choice of countries is determined by similarity of political, economic, and social conditions including, inter alia: 1 the aftermath of the global economic crisis; 2 political crisis; 3 threat to sovereignty and territorial integrity, including the risk of armed conflict (the unlawful annexation of the Crimea and Sevastopol and destabilization in the Eastern Ukraine; occupation of Abkhazia and South Ossetia in Georgia; and the Transnistria conflict in Moldova. Economic growth based on more efficient use of available scarce resources is the key to successful withstanding and overcoming these adverse factors. It implies that implementing the Association Agreement is closely linked with the transition toward a green economy. The comparative analysis determined some similarities in positive shifts for all countries. The following positive shifts characterizing the progress achieved by the countries can be highlighted: demonstration of proactive efforts toward meeting their commitments under the Association Agreement; existing policies, practices and programmes aiming to support the sustainable industrial and business development; reflection of the sustainable development and green economy issues in the official development strategies and their considering to be a priority; activation of effort to develop a system of specific indicators including those that can be used for measuring the efficiency of national policies; incorporation sustainable development objectives in the local development agendas and environmental action plans; taking active part in the international

  7. Health and treatment implications of food insufficiency among people living with HIV/AIDS, Atlanta, Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalichman, Seth C; Cherry, Chauncey; Amaral, Christina; White, Denise; Kalichman, Moira O; Pope, Howard; Swetsze, Connie; Jones, Michel; Macy, Rene

    2010-07-01

    HIV/AIDS is concentrated among the inner-city poor and poverty may directly interfere with HIV treatment. This study examined food insufficiency in relation to HIV-related health and treatment. A sample of 344 men and women living with HIV/AIDS in Atlanta, Georgia completed measures of food security, health, and HIV disease progression and treatment. HIV treatment adherence was monitored using unannounced pill counts. Results showed that half of people living with HIV/AIDS in this study lacked sufficient food, and food insufficiency was associated with multiple indicators of poor health, including higher HIV viral loads, lower CD4 cell counts, and poorer treatment adherence. Adjusted analyses showed that food insufficiency predicted HIV treatment non-adherence over and above years of education, employment status, income, housing, depression, social support, and non-alcohol substance use. Hunger and food insecurity are prevalent among people living with HIV/AIDS, and food insufficiency is closely related to multiple HIV-related health indicators, particularly medication adherence. Interventions that provide consistent and sustained meals to people living with HIV/AIDS are urgently needed.

  8. Sexually transmitted diseases during pregnancy: screening, diagnostic, and treatment practices among prenatal care providers in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbord, J S; Koumans, E H; Toomey, K E; Grayson, C; Markowitz, L E

    2001-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) during pregnancy are associated with adverse outcomes. We conducted a prenatal care provider survey to determine STD screening, diagnosis, and treatment practices. Standard questionnaires were mailed to Georgia-licensed obstetrician/ gynecologists, family practitioners, and nurse-midwives (N = 3,082) in 1998. Of the 1,300 care providers who returned the survey, 565 (44%) provided prenatal care, 390 (57%) were male, and 396 (70%) were obstetrician/ gynecologists. Overall, 553 prenatal care providers (98%) reported screening all pregnant patients for syphilis, 551 (98%) for hepatitis B, 501 (89%) for trichomonas, 474 (84%) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), 401 (71%) for gonorrhea, 403 (71%) for chlamydia, 475 (84%) for group B streptococci, and 130 (23%) for bacterial vaginosis (BV) (high risk). Less than 10% used amplification tests for chlamydia or gonorrhea. Most providers used appropriate regimens to treat STD in pregnant women. A written office policy on testing for BV or HIV was associated with increased screening. Provider education is needed about diagnosis and treatment of STD during pregnancy.

  9. The Older They Are, the Less Successful They Become? Findings from the Georgia Centenarian Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinmyoung Cho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined whether oldest-old adults are successful agers. Three hundred and six octogenarians and centenarians of Phase III of the Georgia Centenarian Study participated in this study. A first model examined Rowe and Kahn’s successful aging model (Rowe and Khan (1997 and 1998 including the probability of disease, physical or cognitive capacity, and engagement with life. All three components were applied to assess how many oldest-old adults satisfied all three criteria. The result showed about 15% of octogenarians (15.1%, and none of centenarians satisfied all three components of successful aging. Consequently, a second alternative model focused on psychosocial aspects including three different components: subjective health, perceived economic status, and happiness. Different from Rowe and Kahn’s successful aging model, a total of 62.3% of octogenarians and 47.5% of centenarians satisfied all three components of the alternative model of successful aging. The results suggest that additional criteria of successful aging should be considered thereby expanding the concepts and multidimensional aspects of successful aging among oldest-old adults.

  10. Russian gas and european energy security: Interdependence following the crisis with Georgia and the Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Gullo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available At the present time, gas represents one of the main energy raw materials that are used for producing electricity and other private uses. The dual political conflict between the Ukraine and the Russian Federation (winter 2005 and Christmas 2008 and 2009 has highlighted the EU’s position of structural weaknesses both in terms of the supply of its raw materials and as regards possible alternatives to Russia as an energy supplier. The European countries worst hit by Russian-Ukrainian tensions have been those with the greatest dependence on Russian gas. This crisis scenario has led governments to promote a common European energy policy with the aim of, in the future, being in a stronger position than Europe’s current one when negotiating with both Russia and all the other suppliers of energy sources. The article attempts to develop and analyse what has happened since 2005 between the two crises (also with particular references to the recent conflicts between Georgia and Russia in August 2008. The authors begin by analysing the main theoretical framework with respect to interdependence. They then go on to analyse the events, identifying and delimiting the movements of the actors so as to be able to understand both the present situation and the foreseeable consequences of same. In the last part, the authors attempt to analyse the different theoretical frameworks delimited at the beginning of the research by comparing them with the events that have taken place.

  11. Development and application of a spatial hydrology model of Okefenokee Swamp, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftin, C.S.; Kitchens, W.M.; Ansay, N.

    2001-01-01

    The model described herein was used to assess effects of the Suwannee River sill (a low earthen dam constructed to impound the Suwannee River within the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge to eliminate wildfires) on the hydrologic environment of Okefenokee Swamp, Georgia. Developed with Arc/Info Macro Language routines in the GRID environment, the model distributes water in the swamp landscape using precipitation, inflow, evapotranspiration, outflow, and standing water. Water movement direction and rate are determined by the neighborhood topographic gradient, determined using survey grade Global Positioning Systems technology. Model data include flow rates from USGS monitored gauges, precipitation volumes and water levels measured within the swamp, and estimated evapotranspiration volumes spatially modified by vegetation type. Model output in semi-monthly time steps includes water depth, water surface elevation above mean sea level, and movement direction and volume. Model simulations indicate the sill impoundment affects 18 percent of the swamp during high water conditions when wildfires are scarce and has minimal spatial effect (increasing hydroperiods in less than 5 percent of the swamp) during low water and drought conditions when fire occurrence is high but precipitation and inflow volumes are limited.

  12. Models of metal binding structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leenheer, J.A.; Brown, G.K.; Cabaniss, S.E. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); MacCarthy, P. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-08-15

    Fulvic acid, isolated from the Suwannee River, Georgia, was assessed for its ability to bind Ca{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+} ions at pH 6 before and after extensive fractionation that was designed to reveal the nature of metal binding functional groups. The binding constant for Ca{sup 2+} ion had the greatest increase of all the ions in a metal binding fraction that was selected for intensive characterization for the purpose of building quantitative average model structures. The metal binding fraction was characterized by quantitative {sup 13}C NMR, {sup 1}H NMR, and FT-IR spectrometry and elemental, titrimetric, and molecular weight determinations. The characterization data revealed that carboxyl groups were clustered in short-chain aliphatic dibasic acid structures. The Ca{sup 2+} binding data suggested that ether-substituted oxysuccinic acid structures are good models for the metal binding sites at pH 6. Structural models were derived based upon oxidation and photolytic rearrangements of cutin, lignin, and tannin precursors. These structural models rich in substituted dibasic acid structures revealed polydentate binding sites with the potential for both inner-sphere and outer-sphere type binding. The majority of the fulvic acid molecule was involved with metal binding rather than a small substructural unit.

  13. Land Cover Differences in Soil Carbon and Nitrogen at Fort Benning, Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garten Jr., C.T.

    2004-02-09

    Land cover characterization might help land managers assess the impacts of management practices and land cover change on attributes linked to the maintenance and/or recovery of soil quality. However, connections between land cover and measures of soil quality are not well established. The objective of this limited investigation was to examine differences in soil carbon and nitrogen among various land cover types at Fort Benning, Georgia. Forty-one sampling sites were classified into five major land cover types: deciduous forest, mixed forest, evergreen forest or plantation, transitional herbaceous vegetation, and barren land. Key measures of soil quality (including mineral soil density, nitrogen availability, soil carbon and nitrogen stocks, as well as properties and chemistry of the O-horizon) were significantly different among the five land covers. In general, barren land had the poorest soil quality. Barren land, created through disturbance by tracked vehicles and/or erosion, had significantly greater soil density and a substantial loss of carbon and nitrogen relative to soils at less disturbed sites. We estimate that recovery of soil carbon under barren land at Fort Benning to current day levels under transitional vegetation or forests would require about 60 years following reestablishment of vegetation. Maps of soil carbon and nitrogen were produced for Fort Benning based on a 1999 land cover map and field measurements of soil carbon and nitrogen stocks under different land cover categories.

  14. Identification and evaluation of shark bycatch in Georgia's commercial shrimp trawl fishery with implications for management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, C.N.; Jennings, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Many US states have recreational and commercial fisheries that occur in nursery areas occupied by subadult sharks and can potentially affect their survival. Georgia is one of few US states without a directed commercial shark fishery, but the state has a large, nearshore penaeid shrimp trawl fishery in which small sharks occur as bycatch. During our 1995–1998 investigation of bycatch in fishery-dependent sampling events, 34% of 127 trawls contained sharks. This bycatch totalled 217 individuals from six species, with Atlantic sharpnose shark, Rhizoprionodon terraenovae (Richardson), the most common and finetooth shark, Carcharhinus isodon (Müller & Henle) and spinner shark, Carcharhinus brevipinna (Müller & Henle), the least common. The highest catch rates for sharks occurred during June and July and coincided with the peak months of the pupping season for many species. Trawl tow speed and tow time did not significantly influence catch rates for shark species. Gear configurations [net type, turtle excluder device (TED), bycatch reduction device] affected catch rates for shark species. Results of this study indicate gear restrictions, a delayed season opening, or reduced bar spacing on TEDs may reduce shark bycatch in this fishery.

  15. Building America Case Study: Rehabilitation of USDA Multifamily Homes, Georgia (Climate Zones 2-4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-04-01

    Rea Ventures Group, LLC, (Rea Ventures) partnered with Southface Energy Institute (Southface) on the rehabilitation of 418 low-income rental multifamily apartments located at 14 different properties in Georgia (Climate Zones 2-4). These 22-year old, individually-metered units were arranged in rowhouse or townhouse style units. Rehabilitation plans were developed using a process prescribed by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development program, who partially funded the building upgrades. The USDA is responsible for building, upgrading, and subsidizing housing in rural areas nationwide. In 2012, over $100 million was allocated in grants and loans. Due to the unique financing mechanism as well as long-term ownership requirements, property owners are especially motivated to invest in upgrades that will increase durability and tenant retention. These buildings represent a large stock of rural affordable housing that have the potential for significant energy and cost savings for property owners and tenants. Southface analyzed the energy upgrade potential of one stereotypical property in the Rea Ventures portfolio. This study will provide insight into the most cost-effective, implementable energy efficiency and durability upgrades for this age multifamily housing, having an enormous impact not only on the portfolio of Rea Ventures but on the vast USDA and larger Federal portfolio. Additionally, Southface will identify gaps in the current capital needs assessment process, examine available audit and simulation tools and protocols, and evaluate additional auditor training or certification needs.

  16. Intestinal parasites of the gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) from eight populations in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Jessica L; Miller, Elizabeth A; Norton, Terry M; Raphael, Bonnie L; Spratt, Jeffrey S; Yabsley, Michael J

    2013-12-01

    The gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus), one of five tortoise species endemic in the USA, was recently classified as a candidate for federal listing as a threatened species. Fecal samples collected from 117 tortoises from eight sites in Georgia were examined for endoparasites using a combination of sedimentation and flotation. Samples from an island population were examined for parasitic oocysts and ova only by flotation, protozoan cysts by trichrome-stained direct smear, and Cryptosporidium by direct immunofluorescence assay and ProSpecT rapid assay. A total of 99 tortoises (85, range 0-100%) was infected with pinworms (Alaeuris spp.), 47 (40, 0-86%) with cestodes (Oochorstica sp.), 34 (41, 0-74%) with Chapiniella spp., 2 (3, 0-33%) with Eimeria paynei, and a single tortoise each with a capillarid and ascarid (1%). On the island, Entamoeba was detected in one tortoise (2%) while Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in eight (17%). In conclusion, at least eight species of parasites were detected including Cryptosporidium, a possible pathogen of tortoises. Interestingly, we detected spatial variation in the distribution of several parasites among populations suggesting additional work should be conducted across a gradient of tortoise densities, land use, and habitat characteristics.

  17. Small reservoir effects on headwater water quality in the rural-urban fringe, Georgia Piedmont, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.. Amber R. Ignatius, Geographer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Small reservoirs are prevalent landscape features that affect the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of headwater streams. Tens of thousands of small reservoirs, often less than a hectare in size, were constructed over the past century within the United States. While remote-sensing and geographic-mapping technologies assist in identifying and quantifying these features, their localized influence on water quality is uncertain. We report a year-long physicochemical study of nine small reservoirs (0.15–2.17 ha within the Oconee and Broad River Watersheds in the Georgia Piedmont. Study sites were selected along an urban-rural gradient with differing amounts of agricultural, forested, and developed land covers. Sites were sampled monthly for discharge and inflow/outflow water quality parameters (temperature, specific conductance, pH, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, alkalinity, total phosphorus, total nitrogen, nitrate, ammonium. While the proportion of developed land cover within watersheds had positive correlations with reservoir specific conductivity values, agricultural and forested land covers showed correlations (positive and negative, respectively with reservoir alkalinity, total nitrogen, nitrate, and specific conductivity. The majority of outflow temperatures were warmer than inflows for all land uses throughout the year, especially in the summer. Outflows had lower nitrate concentrations, but higher ammonium. The type of outflow structure was also influential; top-release dams showed higher dissolved oxygen and pH than bottom-release dams. Water quality effects were still evident 250 m below the dam, albeit reduced.

  18. Nutrition and health education intervention for whole grain foods in the Georgia older Americans nutrition programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Jeanna; Johnson, Mary Ann; Fischer, Joan G; Hargrove, James L

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a nutrition education intervention on improving the intake and behaviors related to whole grain foods in congregate meal recipients in senior centers in north Georgia. Participants were a convenience sample and completed a pretest, an educational intervention, and a post-test (N = 84, mean age = 77 years, 88% female, 76% Caucasian, and 24% African American). At the pre-test, most participants agreed that eating more whole grain foods would help reduce their risk of cancer (69%), heart disease (76%), type 2 diabetes (65%), and bowel disorders (82%), but consumption of 11 whole grain foods was low (10.5 times/week). Following the intervention, participants were more likely to suggest one or more correct ways to identify whole grain foods (45 vs. 62%, P< or = 0.05), and to report an increased intake of whole grain bread, cereal, and crackers (5.8 vs. 6.9 times/week, P < or = 0.05). While awareness of the health benefits of whole grain foods was high, the intakes were low. As a first step, this intervention improved several aspects of the consumption of whole grain foods; however, additional interventions that target the individual and the congregate meal program are needed to increase intakes to the recommended three servings daily.

  19. Geochemistry, faunal composition and trophic structure in reducing sediments on the southwest South Georgia margin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James B; Aquilina, Alfred; Woulds, Clare; Glover, Adrian G; Little, Crispin T S; Reid, William D K; Hepburn, Laura E; Newton, Jason; Mills, Rachel A

    2016-09-01

    Despite a number of studies in areas of focused methane seepage, the extent of transitional sediments of more diffuse methane seepage, and their influence upon biological communities is poorly understood. We investigated an area of reducing sediments with elevated levels of methane on the South Georgia margin around 250 m depth and report data from a series of geochemical and biological analyses. Here, the geochemical signatures were consistent with weak methane seepage and the role of sub-surface methane consumption was clearly very important, preventing gas emissions into bottom waters. As a result, the contribution of methane-derived carbon to the microbial and metazoan food webs was very limited, although sulfur isotopic signatures indicated a wider range of dietary contributions than was apparent from carbon isotope ratios. Macrofaunal assemblages had high dominance and were indicative of reducing sediments, with many taxa common to other similar environments and no seep-endemic fauna, indicating transitional assemblages. Also similar to other cold seep areas, there were samples of authigenic carbonate, but rather than occurring as pavements or sedimentary concretions, these carbonates were restricted to patches on the shells of Axinulus antarcticus (Bivalvia, Thyasiridae), which is suggestive of microbe-metazoan interactions.

  20. Ground-Water Conditions and Studies in the Brunswick-Glynn County Area, Georgia, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Gregory S.; Clarke, John S.

    2008-01-01

    The Upper Floridan aquifer is contaminated with saltwater in a 2-square-mile area of downtown Brunswick, Georgia. This contamination has limited the development of the ground-water supply in the Glynn County area. Hydrologic, geologic, and water-quality data are needed to effectively manage water resources. Since 1959, the U.S. Geological Survey has conducted a cooperative water-resources program with the City of Brunswick to monitor and assess the effect of ground-water development on saltwater contamination of the Floridan aquifer system. The potential development of alternative sources of water in the Brunswick and surficial aquifer systems also is an important consideration in coastal areas. During calendar year 2007, the cooperative water-resources monitoring program included continuous water-level recording of 13 wells completed in the Floridan, Brunswick, and surficial aquifer systems; collecting water levels from 22 wells to map the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer during July and August 2007; and collecting and analyzing water samples from 76 wells to map chloride concentrations in the Upper Floridan aquifer during July and August 2007. In addition, work was initiated to refine an existing ground-water flow model for evaluation of water-management scenarios.

  1. Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Twelve. Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L

    1981-01-01

    A detailed description of the laws and programs of the State of Georgia governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  2. An Evaluation of the Relationship Smarts Plus Program on Adolescents in Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted G. Futris

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study examines the impact of Relationship Smarts Plus among 1,657 adolescents age 12-18 across 25 Georgia counties. The program, aimed at increasing awareness about healthy versus unhealthy relationships and promoting smart dating strategies and the application of healthy communication and conflict resolution skills, was offered 54 times by 23 different FCS or 4-H agents during a 53-month period. After each lesson, participants completed a 5-item retrospective pre- and post-test assessing changes in awareness and understanding of the concepts and skills learned. Overall, 949 (57% youth responded to an overall post-evaluation administered at the conclusion of the program series to document confidence levels in having a healthy relationship, likelihood of using the skills learned, perceived helpfulness of the program, and changes in how youth felt about themselves. On average, youth demonstrated significant increases in knowledge for all lessons and reported positive improvements across all post-evaluation indicators following participation in the program. Implications for future youth-focused outreach programming to promote healthy relationships are shared.

  3. The Fecal Microbial Community of Breast-fed Infants from Armenia and Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Zachery T; Sidamonidze, Ketevan; Tsaturyan, Vardan; Tsereteli, David; Khachidze, Nika; Pepoyan, Astghik; Zhgenti, Ekaterine; Tevzadze, Liana; Manvelyan, Anahit; Balayan, Marine; Imnadze, Paata; Torok, Tamas; Lemay, Danielle G.; Mills, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Multiple factors help shape the infant intestinal microbiota early in life. Environmental conditions such as the presence of bioactive molecules from breast milk dictate gut microbial growth and survival. Infants also receive distinct, personalized, bacterial exposures leading to differential colonization. Microbial exposures and gut environmental conditions differ between infants in different locations, as does the typical microbial community structure in an infant’s gut. Here we evaluate potential influences on the infant gut microbiota through a longitudinal study on cohorts of breast-fed infants from the neighboring countries of Armenia and Georgia, an area of the world for which the infant microbiome has not been previously investigated. Marker gene sequencing of 16S ribosomal genes revealed that the gut microbial communities of infants from these countries were dominated by bifidobacteria, were different from each other, and were marginally influenced by their mother’s secretor status. Species-level differences in the bifidobacterial communities of each country and birth method were also observed. These community differences suggest that environmental variation between individuals in different locations may influence the gut microbiota of infants. PMID:28150690

  4. Etiologic agents of central nervous system infections among febrile hospitalized patients in the country of Georgia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Akhvlediani

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: There is a large spectrum of viral, bacterial, fungal, and prion pathogens that cause central nervous system (CNS infections. As such, identification of the etiological agent requires multiple laboratory tests and accurate diagnosis requires clinical and epidemiological information. This hospital-based study aimed to determine the main causes of acute meningitis and encephalitis and enhance laboratory capacity for CNS infection diagnosis. METHODS: Children and adults patients clinically diagnosed with meningitis or encephalitis were enrolled at four reference health centers. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF was collected for bacterial culture, and in-house and multiplex RT-PCR testing was conducted for herpes simplex virus (HSV types 1 and 2, mumps virus, enterovirus, varicella zoster virus (VZV, Streptococcus pneumoniae, HiB and Neisseria meningitidis. RESULTS: Out of 140 enrolled patients, the mean age was 23.9 years, and 58% were children. Bacterial or viral etiologies were determined in 51% of patients. Five Streptococcus pneumoniae cultures were isolated from CSF. Based on in-house PCR analysis, 25 patients were positive for S. pneumoniae, 6 for N. meningitidis, and 1 for H. influenzae. Viral multiplex PCR identified infections with enterovirus (n = 26, VZV (n = 4, and HSV-1 (n = 2. No patient was positive for mumps or HSV-2. CONCLUSIONS: Study findings indicate that S. pneumoniae and enteroviruses are the main etiologies in this patient cohort. The utility of molecular diagnostics for pathogen identification combined with the knowledge provided by the investigation may improve health outcomes of CNS infection cases in Georgia.

  5. The Police System Reform in Georgia (Informal Power its Forms, Types and Spheres of Influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charkviani Tamar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is a widely accepted notion that the major change brought by the 2003 November revolution in Georgia was the reform of the public services. Two major tasks were to be achieved for the state institutions: to monopolize the use of legitimate power on the state territory and to start providing services to the citizens. Police reform was at the heart of both these objectives. The major obstacle identified on the way of this reform was corruption. Indeed it was widely known that posts in police forces were to be purchased; policemen were involved in organized crime, extortion, and other illegal pursuits. But the corruption itself was the effect of the broader system in which patrimonial system of not distinguishing between the public office and private sphere was hybridized with the legal-rational rule, having its origin in the Soviet Union. The main subject of our research is to analyze the model of informal power network in Georgian police, to describe its configurations and identify its social actors.

  6. Predicting Successful Aging in a Population-Based Sample of Georgia Centenarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Used a population-based sample (Georgia Centenarian Study, GCS, to determine proportions of centenarians reaching 100 years as (1 survivors (43% of chronic diseases first experienced between 0–80 years of age, (2 delayers (36% with chronic diseases first experienced between 80–98 years of age, or (3 escapers (17% with chronic diseases only at 98 years of age or older. Diseases fall into two morbidity profiles of 11 chronic diseases; one including cardiovascular disease, cancer, anemia, and osteoporosis, and another including dementia. Centenarians at risk for cancer in their lifetime tended to be escapers (73%, while those at risk for cardiovascular disease tended to be survivors (24%, delayers (39%, or escapers (32%. Approximately half (43% of the centenarians did not experience dementia. Psychiatric disorders were positively associated with dementia, but prevalence of depression, anxiety, and psychoses did not differ significantly between centenarians and an octogenarian control group. However, centenarians were higher on the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS than octogenarians. Consistent with our model of developmental adaptation in aging, distal life events contribute to predicting survivorship outcome in which health status as survivor, delayer, or escaper appears as adaptation variables late in life.

  7. Characterization of Sarcocystis from four species of hawks from Georgia, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabsley, Michael J; Ellis, Angela E; Stallknecht, David E; Howerth, Elizabeth W

    2009-02-01

    During 2001 to 2004, 4 species of hawks (Buteo and Accipiter spp.) from Georgia were surveyed for Sarcocystis spp. infections by examining intestinal sections. In total, 159 of 238 (66.8%) hawks examined were infected with Sarcocystis spp. Samples from 10 birds were characterized by sequence analysis of a portion of the 18S rRNA gene (783 base pairs). Only 3 of the 10 sequences from the hawks were identical; the remainder differed by at least 1 nucleotide. Phylogenetic analysis failed to resolve the position of the hawk Sarcocystis species, but they were closely related several Sarcocystis species from raptors, rodents, and Sarcocystis neurona. The high genetic diversity of Sarcocystis suggests that more than 1 species infects these 4 hawk species; however, additional molecular or experimental work will be required to determine the speciation and diversity of parasites infecting these avian hosts. In addition to assisting with determining species richness of Sarcocystis in raptors, molecular analysis should be useful in the identification of potential intermediate hosts.

  8. The Holocene landscape development of the Gareja region in eastern Georgia (Caucasus region) - an interdisciplinary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elashvili, M.; Sukhishvili, L.; Navrozashvili, L.; Kikvadze, B.; Janelidze, Z.; von Suchodoletz, H.

    2014-12-01

    Recognizing the fact that we are living in a constantly changing world became actual during the last decades, and promoted numerous studies related to the environmental consequences of climate change and human impact. In this context, the study of human- and naturally-triggered palaeoenvironmental changes leads to a better understanding of possible changes during the future. Human impact became progressively important during the last millenia, and caused dramatic changes of the natural environment especially in fragile landscapes. The semi-arid Gareja region in the Iori Highland in the eastern part of the Republic of Georgia is characterized by an annual precipitation water resources today, hinting to some sources of fresh water allowing people to live there during those periods. Furthermore, former archaeo-botanical studies assume that the region was covered by forests instead of steppes during the past, although there is no final proof yet. The goal of this study is to shed light on the development of the Gareja landscape during the prehistoric period and thus to address some of the issues described above. To do so, our work is based on the spatial pattern of prehistoric settlements derived from archaeologic data of the Soviet period, GIS stream modelling and the analysis of fluvial and slope deposits from the area using a multi-proxy approach. Altogether, these data indicate a dramatic palaeoenvironmental change in the Gareja region ca. 3 ka ago, leading to the recent steppe and almost unpopulated character of the landscape.

  9. The ecological problems of rivers of Georgia (the Caspian Sea basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zurab Lomsadze

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demands of fresh water in the world threaten the biodiversity and the supply of water for food production and other vital human needs. Providing adequate quantities of pure, fresh water for humans and their diverse activities is the major problem worldwide. In spite of the fact that Georgia is considered rather rich of fresh water resources our research showed that the major rivers of The Caspian Sea basin are polluted with different contaminants like, nitrates, ammonium nitrogen. Heavy metals, oil products, pesticides and other toxic chemicals. From researched rivers the most polluted are Mashavera and Kazretula (Bolnisi Municipality. They are mainly contaminated with toxic releases of joint-stock company, Madneuli's activities. The rivers are also polluted from other plants, agricultural activities and farms. To protect the public and the environment from toxic releases the government should prevent pollution by requiring industries to reduce their use of toxic chemicals and restore and strengthen protection for all water objects. Concerted actions are needed to safely manage the use of toxic chemicals and develop monitoring and regulatory guidelines. The principles and practices of sustainable development will help to contain or eliminate risks resulting from the chemical pollution.

  10. Solar hot water system installed at Day's Lodge, Atlanta, Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-09-01

    The solar energy hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., Day's Lodge I-85 and Shallowford Road, NE Atlanta, Georgia is described. This system is one of eleven systems planned under this grant and was designed to provide for 81% of the total hot water demand. There are two separate systems, each serving one building of the lodge (total of 65 suites). The entire system contains only potable city water. The 1024 square feet of Grumman Sunstream Model 332 liquid flat plate collectors and the outside piping drains whenever the collector plates approach freezing or when power is interrupted. Solar heated water from the two above ground cement lined steel tanks (1000 gallon tank) is drawn into the electric domestic hot water (DHW) tanks as hot water is drawn. Electric resistance units in the DHW tanks top off the solar heated water, if needed, to reach thermostat setting. Operation of this system was begun in August, 1979. The solar components were partly funded ($18,042 of $36,084 cost) by the Department of Energy.

  11. Integration of footprints information systems in palliative care: the case of Medical Center of Central Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsavatewa, Christopher; Musa, Philip F; Ramsingh, Isaac

    2012-06-01

    Healthcare in America continues to be of paramount importance, and one of the most highly debated public policy issues of our time. With annual expenditures already exceeding $2.4 trillion, and yielding less than optimal results, it stands to reason that we must turn to promising tools and solutions, such as information technology (IT), to improve service efficiency and quality of care. Presidential addresses in 2004 and 2008 laid out an agenda, framework, and timeline for national health information technology investment and development. A national initiative was long overdue. This report we show that advancements in both medical technologies and information systems can be capitalized upon, hence extending information systems usage beyond data collection to include administrative and decision support, care plan development, quality improvement, etc. In this paper we focus on healthcare services for palliative patients. We present the development and preliminary accounts of a successful initiative in the Medical Center of Central Georgia where footprints information technology was modified and integrated into the hospital's palliative care service and existing EMR systems. The project provides evidence that there are a plethora of areas in healthcare in which innovative application of information systems could significantly enhance the care delivered to loved ones, and improve operations at the same time..

  12. Ground-water-quality data for Albany and surrounding areas, Southwest Georgia, 1951-99

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Debbie; Easoz, Jamie A.; Priest, Sherlyn

    2002-01-01

    This report presents ground-water-quality data from the surficial, Upper Floridan, Claiborne, Clayton, and Upper Cretaceous aquifers in the Albany and surrounding areas of southwest Georgia. Water-quality data from about 186 wells in Baker, Calhoun, Dougherty, Lee, Mitchell, Terrell, and Worth Counties are presented for the period from 1951 through 1999. The data include field water-quality parameters collected during 1951-99, volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds collected during 1981-97, inorganic compounds collected during 1951-99, trace metals collected during 1964-99, radiochemicals collected during 1993-95, herbicides and insecticides collected during 1980-97, and recovery data for laboratory surrogate compounds (used for quality control and quality assurance for organic samples) collected during 1993-97. Ground-water quality data are presented in tables by data type and arranged by well number. Illustrations in this report contain information about study area location, well location, stratigraphy, and formation water-bearing properties. Ground-water-quality data are presented in text files and in a data base that includes geographic and tabular data. Data presented in this report provide a base with which to better define and interpret the quality of ground water in Albany, Ga., and surrounding areas. Although some of these data may have been published in previous reports associated with water-resources investigations, water-quality data are compiled as a useful resource.

  13. Suicide by jumping from high-rise hotels. Fulton County, Georgia, 1967-1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanzlick, R; Masterson, K; Walker, B

    1990-12-01

    During a 20-year period from 1967 through 1986, 19 suicidal jumps from high-rise hotels (HRHs) accounted for 24% of all fatal jumping episodes and 1% of all suicides in Fulton County, Georgia, U.S.A. The rate of suicidal jumps from HRHs did not increase during the study period. The number of fatal jumps per hotel-year correlated with the height of the interior hotel atrium. The mean age for all victims was 34 years, and 63% of victims were white males. The majority of victims were local residents who were alone when they jumped and were not registered hotel guests. Registered guests tended to jump from the floor on which their room was located whereas nonregistered individuals tended to jump from the upper-most floors in the hotel. Of 19 HRH jumps, 13 occurred from the inside. Suicide notes were found in 37% of cases. HRH jumps were least common between 6 p.m. and midnight, all decedents were dressed in street clothing, only one was heard to have screamed, and all but one were dead on the scene. Alcohol and drug involvement was minimal. We hope that this information will be useful to those who investigate such deaths and to those who study the behavioral manifestations of suicide.

  14. Personality Traits and Successful Aging: Findings From the Georgia Centenarian Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Yousun; Martin, Peter; Siegler, Ilene C; Davey, Adam; Poon, Leonard W

    2016-09-01

    The current study attempted to describe how personality traits of older adults are associated with components of successful aging (cognition, volunteering, activities of daily living, and subjective health). Three-hundred and six octogenarians and centenarians who participated in the third phase of the Georgia Centenarian Study provided data for this study. Factor analysis was conducted to test the existence of two higher-order factors of the Big Five personality traits, and a two-factor model (alpha and beta) fit the data well. Also, blocked multiple regression analysis was conducted to examine the association between personality traits and four components of successful aging. Results indicated that low scores on neuroticism and high scores on extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness, and conscientiousness are significantly related to the components of successful aging. After controlling for demographic variables (age, gender, residential type, and race/ethnicity), alpha (i.e., emotional stability, agreeableness, and conscientiousness) was associated with higher levels of cognition, higher likelihood of engaging in volunteer work, higher levels of activities of daily living, and higher levels of subjective health. Beta (i.e., extraversion and openness to experience) was also positively associated with cognition and engaging in volunteer work.

  15. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 88-156-1984, Georgia Gulf Corporation, Tiptonville, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvert, G.M.; Mathias, C.G.T.

    1989-08-01

    The Georgia Gulf Corporation, Tiptonville, Tennessee, was investigated because of an outbreak of dermatitis. The facility produced polyvinyl-chloride compound by blending polyvinyl-chloride resin with other ingredients. Rashes were reported by 22 production workers and three clerical or management workers. Examination of seven of the workers indicated that all of them appeared to have contact dermatitis. Rashes were found in areas of the body where powders may come in contact with the body, and the rashes improved when away from work. Blender operators had a significantly elevated risk of developing dermatitis compared with production workers who had lower exposures to dusts and powders. The report concludes that the dermatitis was probably of occupational origin, due to exposure to airborne pigment powders and acrylic polymers containing residual monomers. The report recommends measures to reduce exposures and prevent dermatitis, including showering at the end of a work shift that involved exposure to dusts and powders, reduction of airborne dust levels through engineering controls, and the use of protective clothing, barrier creams, and skin moisturizers.

  16. The effect of nitrification in the oxygen balance of the Upper Chattahoochee River, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlke, Theodore A.

    1979-01-01

    Oxygen consumption as a result of nitrification, and carbonaceous bacterial oxidation were compared in a 108 kilometer reach of the Chattahoochee River, Georgia. Nitrogenous and carbonaceous oxygen consumption were separated by using an inhibitor of nitrification 1-allyl-2-thiourea. The comparison was conducted in the laboratory using samples collected from the water column. Nitrification accounted for 38 to 52 percent of the total oxygen consumption. Nitrifying bacteria were enumerated from the same reach of the river. The population of Nitrosomonas ranged from 10 to 1,000 per milliliter in the water column and 100 to 100,000 per gram of benthic sediment. The nitrobacter population ranged from 10 to 100 per milliliter in the water column and 100 to 1,000 per gram in the benthic sediment. The concentration of ammonium, nitrite, and nitrate as N was determined from water samples collected throughout the study reach. The average rate of ammonium disappearance and of nitrate appearance was 0.02 milligram per liter per hour of flow time. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. Ambient Air Pollution and Cardiovascular Malformations in Atlanta, Georgia, 1986–2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Mitchel; Correa, Adolfo; Reller, Mark D.; Mahle, William T.; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany J.; Botto, Lorenzo D.; Flanders, W. Dana; Mulholland, James A.; Siffel, Csaba; Marcus, Michele; Tolbert, Paige E.

    2009-01-01

    Associations between ambient air pollution levels during weeks 3–7 of pregnancy and risks of cardiovascular malformations were investigated among the cohort of pregnancies reaching at least 20 weeks’ gestation that were conceived during January 1, 1986–March 12, 2003, in Atlanta, Georgia. Surveillance records obtained from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, which conducts active, population-based surveillance on this cohort, were reviewed to classify cardiovascular malformations. Ambient 8-hour maximum ozone and 24-hour average carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter with an average aerodynamic diameter of <10 μm (PM10), and sulfur dioxide measurements were obtained from centrally located stationary monitors. Temporal associations between these pollutants and daily risks of secundum atrial septal defect, aortic coarctation, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, patent ductus arteriosus, valvar pulmonary stenosis, tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, muscular ventricular septal defect, perimembranous ventricular septal defect, conotruncal defects, left ventricular outflow tract defect, and right ventricular outflow defect were modeled by using Poisson generalized linear models. A statistically significant association was observed between PM10 and patent ductus arteriosus (for an interquartile range increase in PM10 levels, risk ratio = 1.60, 95% confidence interval: 1.11, 2.31). Of the 60 associations examined in the primary analysis, no other significant associations were observed. PMID:19258486

  18. Integrating the UAS in Undergraduate Teaching and Research - Opportunities and Challenges at University of North Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, J. B.; Hulsey, D.

    2014-11-01

    The University of North Georgia (UNG) has begun to evaluate both fixed and rotary UAS platforms across the departments to evaluate their potential for furthering both student learning experiences and undergraduate research. A research project of the Institute for Spatial Analysis (IESA) at UNG has acquired the fixed wing eBee UAS and is currently piloting its integration into the undergraduate geospatial science curriculum. Limited very low altitude, line of sight calibration runs within areas of our campus have help us understand the capabilities that this technology brings to learning and research opportunities at UNG. In our pilot area of study on the UNG Gainesville Campus, we will collect overlapping imagery and generate 3-D models. These models will be compared with models based on LiDAR data. Geographic Object Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA) methods are essential to the analysis of voluminous high resolution UAS data and the associated computational and regulatory issues are discussed. Several future interdisciplinary projects are envisaged with the eBee UAS and this project helps establish their viability.

  19. [Investigation of stomatologic status of middle-aged and elderly people in Western Georgia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morchadze, L A; Margvelashvili, V V; Lobzhanidze, T A

    2009-12-01

    The world's population is aging at an accelerated rate. People aged 65 and over now comprise a greater share of the world's population than ever before, and this proportion will increase during the 21st century. Increased lifetime in old age is combined with a concern about its quality. Oral health care of the elderly is one of the important aspects affecting the quality of life. The aim of the present study was to describe stomatologic status among middle-aged and elderly people in western Georgia. 355 subjects aged 55-90 years old were surveyed. According to oral health survey data, a high prevalence and intensity of dental caries and periodontal disease were apparent. Prosthetic status and treatment need were recorded in standard condition using oral health assessment forms. It is concluded that a high percentage of elderly were dentate but the average number of teeth was low and their status was poor, with very high need for therapeutic and prosthetic treatment.

  20. Body Mass Index Is Associated with Dietary Patterns and Health Conditions in Georgia Centenarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy B. Hausman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Associations between body mass index (BMI and dietary patterns and health conditions were explored in a population-based multiethnic sample of centenarians from northern Georgia. BMI ≤20 and ≥25 was prevalent in 30.9% and 25.3% of study participants, respectively. In a series of logistic regression analyses controlled for gender and place of residence, the probability of having BMI ≥25 was increased by being black versus white and having a low citrus fruit, noncitrus fruit, orange/yellow vegetable or total fruit and vegetable intake. The probability of having BMI ≤20 was not associated with dietary intake. When controlled for race, gender, residence, and total fruit and vegetable intake, BMI ≥25 was an independent risk factor for diabetes or having a systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mmHg, whereas BMI ≤20 was a risk factor for anemia. Given the many potential adverse consequences of under- and overweight, efforts are needed to maintain a healthy weight, even in the oldest old.

  1. Chiyoda Thoroughbred CT-121 clean coal project at Georgia Power`s Plant Yates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burford, D.P. [Southern Company Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Chiyoda Thoroughbred CT-121 flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process at Georgia Power`s Plant Yates completed a two year demonstration of its capabilities in late 1994 under both high- and low-particulate loading conditions. This $43 million demonstration was co-funded by Southern Company, the Electric Power Research Institute and the DOE under the auspices of the US Department of Energy`s Round II Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) program. The focus of the Yates Project was to demonstrate several cost-saving modifications to Chiyoda`s already efficient CT-121 process. These modifications included: the extensive use of fiberglass reinforced plastics (FRP) in the construction of the scrubber vessel and other associated vessels, the elimination of flue gas reheat through the use of an FRP wet chimney, and reliable operation without a spare absorber module. This paper focuses on the testing results from the last trimester of the second phase of testing (high-ash loading). Specifically, operation under elevated ash loading conditions, the effects of low- and high-sulfur coal, air toxics verification testing results and unexpected improvements in byproduct gypsum quality are discussed.

  2. Territoriality of feral pigs in a highly persecuted population on Fort Benning, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparklin, B.D.; Mitchell, M.S.; Hanson, L.B.; Jolley, D.B.; Ditchkoff, S.S.

    2009-01-01

    We examined home range behavior of female feral pigs (Sus scrofa) in a heavily hunted population on Fort Benning Military Reservation in west-central Georgia, USA. We used Global Positioning System location data from 24 individuals representing 18 sounders (i.e., F social groups) combined with markrecapture and camera-trap data to evaluate evidence of territorial behavior at the individual and sounder levels. Through a manipulative experiment, we examined evidence for an inverse relationship between population density and home range size that would be expected for territorial animals. Pigs from the same sounder had extensive home range overlap and did not have exclusive core areas. Sounders had nearly exclusive home ranges and had completely exclusive core areas, suggesting that female feral pigs on Fort Benning were territorial at the sounder level but not at the individual level. Lethal removal maintained stable densities of pigs in our treatment area, whereas density increased in our control area; territory size in the 2 areas was weakly and inversely related to density of pigs. Territorial behavior in feral pigs could influence population density by limiting access to reproductive space. Removal strategies that 1) match distribution of removal efforts to distribution of territories, 2) remove entire sounders instead of individuals, and 3) focus efforts where high-quality food resources strongly influence territorial behaviors may be best for long-term control of feral pigs.

  3. Predicting successful aging in a population-based sample of georgia centenarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Jonathan; Dai, Jianliang; Nahapetyan, Lusine; Arte, Ankit; Johnson, Mary Ann; Hausman, Dorothy; Rodgers, Willard L; Hensley, Robert; Martin, Peter; Macdonald, Maurice; Davey, Adam; Siegler, Ilene C; Jazwinski, S Michal; Poon, Leonard W

    2010-01-01

    Used a population-based sample (Georgia Centenarian Study, GCS), to determine proportions of centenarians reaching 100 years as (1) survivors (43%) of chronic diseases first experienced between 0-80 years of age, (2) delayers (36%) with chronic diseases first experienced between 80-98 years of age, or (3) escapers (17%) with chronic diseases only at 98 years of age or older. Diseases fall into two morbidity profiles of 11 chronic diseases; one including cardiovascular disease, cancer, anemia, and osteoporosis, and another including dementia. Centenarians at risk for cancer in their lifetime tended to be escapers (73%), while those at risk for cardiovascular disease tended to be survivors (24%), delayers (39%), or escapers (32%). Approximately half (43%) of the centenarians did not experience dementia. Psychiatric disorders were positively associated with dementia, but prevalence of depression, anxiety, and psychoses did not differ significantly between centenarians and an octogenarian control group. However, centenarians were higher on the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) than octogenarians. Consistent with our model of developmental adaptation in aging, distal life events contribute to predicting survivorship outcome in which health status as survivor, delayer, or escaper appears as adaptation variables late in life.

  4. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Georgia. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  5. Spatial and temporal variations of mercury levels in Okefenokee invertebrates: Southeast Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Bagie M. [Department of Entomology, University of Georgia, 413 Biological Sciences Building, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)], E-mail: bgeorge@ggc.usg.edu; Batzer, Darold [Department of Entomology, University of Georgia, 413 Biological Sciences Building, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Accumulation of mercury in wetland ecosystems has raised concerns about impacts on wetland food webs. This study measured concentrations of mercury in invertebrates of the Okefenokee Swamp in Georgia, focusing on levels in amphipods, odonates, and crayfish. We collected and analyzed total mercury levels in these invertebrates from 32 sampling stations across commonly occurring sub-habitats. Sampling was conducted in December, May, and August over a two-year period. The highest levels of mercury were detected in amphipods, with total mercury levels often in excess of 20 ppm. Bioaccumulation pathways of mercury in invertebrates of the Okefenokee are probably complex; despite being larger and higher in the food chain, levels in odonates and crayfish were much lower than in amphipods. Mercury levels in invertebrates varied temporally with the highest levels detected in May. There was a lack of spatial variation in mercury levels which is consistent with aerial deposition of mercury. - This study measured mercury levels in invertebrates and found the highest levels in amphipods.

  6. Active inversion tectonics, simple shear folding and back-thrusting at Rioni Basin, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibaldi, A.; Alania, V.; Bonali, F. L.; Enukidze, O.; Tsereteli, N.; Kvavadze, N.; Varazanashvili, O.

    2017-03-01

    The Rioni Basin, located between the Greater and Lesser Caucasus in Georgia, is an outstanding example of ongoing inversion tectonics. Marine and continental deposits of Cretaceous-Neogene age have been locally uplifted since the end of Miocene. The uplifted area totals 1300 km2, and Plio-Quaternary river deposits have been raised up to 200 m above the surrounding plains. Inversion tectonics has been accompanied by the development of south-vergent asymmetrical folds and strike-slip faults along the border of the uplifted area. The folds have locally an en-échelon geometry and microtectonic data indicate rotation of the paleostress direction over time, suggesting simple shear deformation. In the interiors of the uplifted area, there are gentle symmetrical folds and one main active south-dipping reverse fault, corresponding to a backthrust. Morphostructural evidence, as well as the tilting of Quaternary strata, the offset of Quaternary alluvial deposits and the presence of crustal seismic activity, indicate that compressional tectonics is still active. The combination of field data with seismic reflection sections shows that inversion tectonics took place through a series of north-dipping blind thrusts and a wedge with passive back-thrusting. Uplift and contraction are more developed along the eastern part of the study area, suggesting the westward propagation of the closure of the Transcaucasian depression.

  7. Mobile farm clinic outreach to address health conditions among Latino migrant farmworkers in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, John S; Reyes-Ortiz, Carlos; Marella, Prasen; Bowers, Angelica; Panchal, Viral; Anderson, Lisa; Charles, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Agricultural labor involves exposure to many occupational hazards, some of which can lead to chronic health conditions. The purpose of this study was to conduct an occupational health needs assessment of illnesses and work-related injuries among a Latino migrant farmworker population (recruited to harvest Vidalia onions) in South Georgia. Study data included survey responses from 100 farmworkers attending mobile farm clinics in 2010 at their worker housing residences, supplemented by medical diagnoses data from the same clinics collected over 3 years (2009-2011) for 1161 farmworkers at six different farms. From the survey, the main health problems reported were hypertension (25%), eye problems (12%), musculoskeletal problems (11%), diabetes (10%), and depression (7%). In multivariate analyses, depression scores were associated with having a history of musculoskeletal problems (p = .002). According to the mobile farm clinic data, the most common medical diagnoses included back pain (11.8%), hypertension (11.4%), musculoskeletal problems (11.3%), gastrointestinal disorders (8.6%), eye problems (7.2%), dermatitis or rash (7.0%), and tinea or fungal skin infections (5.6%). The study identified eye and musculoskeletal problems as the major occupational health conditions for this population of farmworkers.

  8. Solar energy system performance evaluation: Honeywell OTS 41, Shenandoah (Newman), Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, A. K.; Pederson, S.

    1982-08-01

    The operation and technical performance of the Solar Operational Test Site (OTS 41) located at Shenandoah, Georgia, are described, based on the analysis of the data collected between January and August 1981. The following topics are discussed: system description, performance assessment, operating energy, energy savings, system maintenance, and conclusions. The solar energy system at OTS 41 is a hydronic heating and cooling system consisting of 702 square feet of liquid-cooled flat-plate collectors; a 1000-gallon thermal storage tank; a 3-ton capacity organic Rankine-cycle-engine-assisted air conditioner; a water-to-are heat exchanger for solar space heating; a finned-tube coil immersed in the storage tank to preheat water for a gas-fired hot water heater; and associated piping, pumps, valves, and controls. The solar system has six basic modes of operation and several combination modes. The system operation is controlled automatically by a Honeywell-designed microprocessor-based control system, which also provides diagnostics.

  9. Geochemistry, faunal composition and trophic structure in reducing sediments on the southwest South Georgia margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilina, Alfred; Woulds, Clare; Glover, Adrian G.; Little, Crispin T. S.; Hepburn, Laura E.; Newton, Jason; Mills, Rachel A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite a number of studies in areas of focused methane seepage, the extent of transitional sediments of more diffuse methane seepage, and their influence upon biological communities is poorly understood. We investigated an area of reducing sediments with elevated levels of methane on the South Georgia margin around 250 m depth and report data from a series of geochemical and biological analyses. Here, the geochemical signatures were consistent with weak methane seepage and the role of sub-surface methane consumption was clearly very important, preventing gas emissions into bottom waters. As a result, the contribution of methane-derived carbon to the microbial and metazoan food webs was very limited, although sulfur isotopic signatures indicated a wider range of dietary contributions than was apparent from carbon isotope ratios. Macrofaunal assemblages had high dominance and were indicative of reducing sediments, with many taxa common to other similar environments and no seep-endemic fauna, indicating transitional assemblages. Also similar to other cold seep areas, there were samples of authigenic carbonate, but rather than occurring as pavements or sedimentary concretions, these carbonates were restricted to patches on the shells of Axinulus antarcticus (Bivalvia, Thyasiridae), which is suggestive of microbe–metazoan interactions. PMID:27703692

  10. Susceptibility to Heat-Related Fluid and Electrolyte Imbalance Emergency Department Visits in Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Heidari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Identification of populations susceptible to heat effects is critical for targeted prevention and more accurate risk assessment. Fluid and electrolyte imbalance (FEI may provide an objective indicator of heat morbidity. Data on daily ambient temperature and FEI emergency department (ED visits were collected in Atlanta, Georgia, USA during 1993–2012. Associations of warm-season same-day temperatures and FEI ED visits were estimated using Poisson generalized linear models. Analyses explored associations between FEI ED visits and various temperature metrics (maximum, minimum, average, and diurnal change in ambient temperature, apparent temperature, and heat index modeled using linear, quadratic, and cubic terms to allow for non-linear associations. Effect modification by potential determinants of heat susceptibility (sex; race; comorbid congestive heart failure, kidney disease, and diabetes; and neighborhood poverty and education levels was assessed via stratification. Higher warm-season ambient temperature was significantly associated with FEI ED visits, regardless of temperature metric used. Stratified analyses suggested heat-related risks for all populations, but particularly for males. This work highlights the utility of FEI as an indicator of heat morbidity, the health threat posed by warm-season temperatures, and the importance of considering susceptible populations in heat-health research.

  11. Haplotypes of beta S chromosomes among patients with sickle cell anemia from Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Y; Kutlar, F; Kutlar, A; McKie, V C; Huisman, T H

    1986-01-01

    Fetal hemoglobin and G gamma levels have been correlated with the presence or absence of eight restriction sites within the beta globin gene cluster (haplotypes) for numerous sickle cell anemia patients from Georgia. The most common haplotypes were #19 (Benin) and #20 (CAR); all patients with haplotype combinations 19/19, 20/20, and 19/20 were severely affected with low Hb F and low G gamma levels. A modified #19 beta S chromosome with a -G gamma-G gamma- globin gene arrangement, instead of -G gamma-A gamma-, was present in SS and SC newborn babies with G gamma values above 80%. Haplotype #3 (Senegal) was present among 15% of the beta S chromosomes; the two adult patients with the 3/3 combination were mildly affected with high Hb F and G gamma values. The haplotype AT with the variant A gamma T chain was a rarity. A new haplotype was found in one 17-year-old SS patient and five of his Hb S heterozygous relatives. This haplotype is associated with an increased production of Hb F in heterozygous and homozygous Hb S individuals; this Hb F contained primarily A gamma chains. A comparison was made between the different haplotypes among SS patients and normal Black individuals, and a remarkable similarity was noted in the fetal hemoglobin data for subjects with these different chromosomes.

  12. Synoptic water-level measurements of the Upper Floridan aquifer in Florida and parts of Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama, May-June 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnaman, Sandra L.

    2012-01-01

    Water levels for the Upper Floridan aquifer were measured throughout Florida and in parts of Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama in May-June 2010. These measurements were compiled for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Floridan Aquifer System Groundwater Availability Study and conducted as part of the USGS Groundwater Resources Program. Data were collected by personnel from the USGS Florida Water Science Center, Georgia Water Science Center, South Carolina Water Science Center and several state and county agencies in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama using standard techniques. Data collected by USGS personnel are stored in the USGS National Water Information System (NWIS), Groundwater Site-Inventory System (GWSI). Furnished records from cooperators are stored in NWIS/GWSI when possible, but are available from the source agency.

  13. Gibel carp population and its parasites in Madatapa Lake (South Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bella Japoshvili

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Madatapa Lake is an oligotrophic lake located in Javakheti plateau (Southern Georgia at 2108 m a.s.l. and is the part of the Javakheti Protected Areas since 2011. The lake have a natural volcanic origin with a surface area of 8.8 km2 and with a maximum depth of 1.7 m. The lake is historically known to be free of fish species which is believed to be a result of severe winter conditions. After the middle 90th the gibel carp [Carassius gibelio (Bloch, 1782] was firstly appeared there. However the exact date and the source of invasion of gibel carp in the lake is unknown and currently untraceable. While gibel carp is a very successful invasive fish species in Georgian inland waters, very limited data is available on its biology, ecology and even distribution as well as its ecological impacts and economic importance in the region. For the first time, we studied the population characteristics of gibel carp in Lake Madatapa (South Georgia with the aim to reveal the extent of its morphological variability, sex ratio, length-weight relationship and its parasitic community. One hundred and forty one individuals presented a mean weight 37.5 g (SD=53, range [13.3-471.7] and average length of 12.5 cm (SD=2.9, range[9.4-30]. The number of lateral line scales and gill rakers varied between 29-31, and 36-47, respectively. Sex was determined in 105 specimens (the gonads of remaining specimens were either strongly damaged by the parasites or were not developed and the sex ratio was significantly female biased (1/1.8, Chi-square test p0.05 between the regression coefficients for males and females and the slope (b do not differ significantly from 3. A sub-sample of thirty four individuals were examined for parasitic infections and 91% (31 were infected with one or two parasites. The plerocercoids of cestoda (Ligula intestinalis L., 1758 had highest prevalence (75%, whereas only 38% of studied fishes were infected with metacercariae of digenean trematode

  14. Overview of the gaps in the health care legislation in Georgia: short-, medium-, and long-term priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiknadze, Nino; Beletsky, Leo

    2013-12-12

    After gaining independence following the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Georgia has aspired to become the region's leader in progressive legal reform. Particularly in the realm of health care regulation, Georgia has proceeded with extensive legislative reforms intended to modernize its health care system, and bring it in line with international standards. As part of a larger project to improve human rights in patient care, we conducted a study designed to identify gaps in the current Georgian health care legislation. Using a cross-site research framework based on the European Charter of Patients’ Rights, an interdisciplinary working group oversaw a comprehensive review of human rights legislation pertinent to health care settings using various sources, such as black letter law, expert opinions, court cases, research papers, reports, and complaints. The study identified a number of serious inconsistencies, gaps, and conflicts in the definition and coverage of terms used in the national legislative canon pertinent to human rights in patient care. These include inconsistent definitions of key terms "informed consent" and "medical malpractice" across the legislative landscape. Imprecise and overly broad drafting of legislation has left concepts like patient confidentiality and implied consent wide open to abuse. The field of health care provider rights was entirely missing from existing Georgian legislation. To our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind in Georgia. Gaps and inconsistencies uncovered were categorized based on a short-, medium-, and long-term action framework. Results were presented to key decision makers in Georgian ministerial and legislative institutions. Several of the major recommendations are currently being considered for inclusion into future legal reform. Copyright © 2013 Kiknadze and Beletsky. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http

  15. Partitioning and bioaccumulation of PCBs and PBDEs in marine plankton from the Strait of Georgia, British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouin, Heloise; Dangerfield, Neil; Macdonald, Robie W.; Galbraith, M.; Crewe, Norman; Shaw, Patrick; Mackas, David; Ross, Peter S.

    2013-08-01

    The Strait of Georgia is a large, deep, fjord-like estuary on the southern coast of British Columbia which is subject to local and atmospheric inputs of persistent environmental contaminants. We measured 204 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 61 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) seasonally in water (two depths; dissolved and particle-bound) and plankton (vertical tow) samples collected at two stations. Principal components analysis clearly distinguished the dissolved and particulate water fractions and plankton samples, with the latter two compartments associated more with heavier congeners. Bioaccumulation factors (log BAFs) for PCBs and PBDEs in plankton were best described by parabolic relationships against octanol-water partitioning coefficients (log Kow), peaking at a log Kow of 5-7, underscoring the important role of physico-chemical properties in driving the uptake of these persistent contaminants by plankton from water. The estimated total quantity of PCBs (annual average of 0.61 ± SEM 0.12 kg) and PBDEs (annual average of 0.64 ± 0.19 kg) in Strait of Georgia plankton biomass were remarkably similar, highlighting the emergence of currently-used PBDEs as a priority concern. The estimated total of 52.1 ± 8.41 kg of PCBs in water (dissolved + particle-bound) was higher than the estimated 26.8 ± 5.20 kg of PBDEs (dissolved + particle-bound), reflecting the dichotomous use histories for these two contaminant classes. Results provide insight into the biological availability of PCBs and PBDEs to the Strait of Georgia food web, and describe an important initial partitioning process by which the region's endangered killer whales have become highly contaminated.

  16. Solar total energy: large scale experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia Site. Annual report, June 1978-June 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ney, E.J.

    1979-07-01

    A background summary and a complete description of the progress and current status of activities relative to the Cooperative Agreement for the Solar Total Energy - Large Scale Experiment at the Bleyle Knitwear Plant at Shenandoah, Georgia are presented. A statement of objectives and an abstract of progress to date are included. This is followed by a short introduction containing a project overview, a summary of the participants and their respective roles, a brief description of the Solar Total Energy System (STES) design concept, and a chronological summary of progress to date. A general description of the site is given, a detailed report of progress is reported, and drawings and equipment lists are included. The closed-loop solar energy system planned for Shenandoah begins with circulation of Syltherm 800, a heat transfer fluid of the Dow-Corning Corporation, through the receiver tubes of a parabolic dish solar collector field. As solar energy is focused on the receivers, the heat transfer fluid is heated to approximately 399/sup 0/C (750/sup 0/F) and is pumped to a heat exchanger for immediate use, or to a thermal storage system for later use. Once in the heat exchanger, the fluid heats a working fluid that produces the steam required for operating the turbine. After performing this task, the heat transfer fluid returns to the collectors to repeat the cycle, while the steam turbine-generator system supplies the electrical demands for the knitwear plant and the STES. During STES operation, maximum thermal and electrical requirements of the application are expected to be at 1.08 MWth and 161 kWe, respectively. During the power generation phase, some of the steam is extracted for use as process steam in the knitwear manufacturing process, while exhaust steam from the turbine is passed through a condenser to produce hot water for heating, domestic use, and absorption air conditioning. (WHK)

  17. Bondi Cave and the Middle-Upper Palaeolithic transition in western Georgia (south Caucasus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleurdeau, David; Moncel, Marie-Hélène; Pinhasi, Ron; Yeshurun, Reuven; Higham, Tom; Agapishvili, Tamar; Bokeria, Maka; Muskhelishvili, Alexander; Le Bourdonnec, François-Xavier; Nomade, Sébastien; Poupeau, Gérard; Bocherens, Hervé; Frouin, Marine; Genty, Dominique; Pierre, Monique; Pons-Branchu, Edwige; Lordkipanidze, David; Tushabramishvili, Nikoloz

    2016-08-01

    The late Pleistocene expansion of anatomically modern humans (AMHs) into Eurasia and the concurrent demise of the Neanderthals appears to be a complex and regionally variable process. The southern Caucasus region, with its rich cave-sites, has recently provided important results regarding this process. In this paper we report on the results of fieldwork in Bondi Cave, Western Georgia, providing a new radiocarbon chronology, stratigraphic observations, analyses of lithic technology and provenance, faunal and floral remains as well as paleoenvironmental data. The cave includes Middle Palaeolithic (ca, 45,000 ka cal. BP) cultural horizons and a long Upper Palaeolithic sequence (ca. 40,000-27,000 cal. BP from layer V to IV). A modern human tooth was found in layer Vb. We estimate its age at 39,000-35,800 Cal BP (95.4%), based on the Bayesian age model we built. If the context of the tooth is reliable, as we think it is, this would make it the oldest morphologically modern human in the Caucasus. Upper Palaeolithic hunting of tur and bison, as well as the collection of various plants including flax is attested. Mobile Upper Palaeolithic foragers inhabited the cave in generally cold and dry periods, but a mosaic of environments, including forests and meadows, was nonetheless available to them. The archaeological sequence of Bondi and adjacent sites indicates a substantial time gap between the Middle and Upper Palaeolithic occupations, thus disproving Neanderthal-AMH interaction in this area and lending support to a replacement scenario in the southern Caucasus, assuming of course that the Early Upper Palaeolithic (EUP) is related to the arrival of AMHs.

  18. Political-economic transition in Georgia and its implications for tourism in Svaneti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voll Frieder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Private tourism entrepreneurship relies on special knowledge of the service sector with a strong focus on individual action and a general service mentality. The organization and regulation of tourism in post-socialist European countries experienced a shift from being state-driven to being determined by individual entrepreneurs. Yet in some cases, the adoption of the new entrepreneurial business principles is contested by different cultural understandings of how tourism should be 'produced'. With examples from the Caucasus Mountains in Georgia (Svaneti we will demonstrate that these different understandings can play a major role in creating barriers for developing community-based tourism. Shortly after the transition to the market economy, a number of different small-scale, community-based tourism projects emerged, with individual entrepreneurship contesting the traditional values of hospitality in these regions (predominantly based on religious and 'tribal' values and norms rather than purely on entrepreneurial values. The methods used for this preliminary study of post-socialist tourism development included a short-term, mobile ethnography consisting of semi-structured interviews of tourism producers in the region, participant observation, as well as mapping occupancy of buildings according to unoccupied, agriculture and agritourism and second homes categories based on the condition of the gardens. Further changes in the political-economic framework have now shifted the focus towards larger-scale tourism developments supported by public-private partnerships. This paper analyses the impacts of these political-economic changes on the development of community-based tourism in Svaneti and explores in particular the friction between collective traditions and individual entrepreneurship in the experience economy of transition countries and its relationship with regional economic growth and rural depopulation.

  19. Bryozoan diversity around the Falkland and South Georgia Islands: Overcoming Antarctic barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figuerola, Blanca; Barnes, David K A; Brickle, Paul; Brewin, Paul E

    2017-05-01

    There are a number of remote archipelagos distributed between 45 and 60 °S. The biota of these islands provide useful information to describe and understand patterns in biodiversity and biogeography as well as potential impacts of climate change on marine ecosystems. They are in key locations either side of the Polar Front but also have limited influence from human activities. Here we investigate one taxon, bryozoans, on South Atlantic shelf habitats of the Falkland (FI) and the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia (SG). We present new data on spatial distribution in these islands, as well as an analysis of the bryozoological similarities between these and neighbouring regions. A total of 85 species of cheilostome bryozoans (351 samples) were found, belonging to 33 genera, including 18 potentially new genera and 23 new species. Remarkably 65% and 41% of species were reported for the first time at FI and SG, respectively. The highest and the lowest value of species richness and species/genus ratio were found at East (EFI) and West Falkland (WFI), respectively, likely showing a tendency for stronger intrageneric competition. New data from this study were jointly analysed with data from the literature and existing databases, revealing new bathymetric ranges in 32 species. The biogeographic affinities of the bryozoans found give further evidence of the hypothesis of sequential separation of Gondwana and support the changing concept that although the Polar Front acts as a circumpolar biogeographic barrier it is not as impermeable as originally thought. Potential dispersal mechanisms are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Food Insecurity and Eating Behavior Relationships Among Congregate Meal Participants in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myles, TaMara; Porter Starr, Kathryn N; Johnson, Kristen B; Sun Lee, Jung; Fischer, Joan G; Ann Johnson, Mary

    2016-01-01

    This study explored relationships of food insecurity with cognitive restraint, uncontrolled eating, and emotional eating behaviors among congregate meal participants in northeast Georgia [n = 118 years, age 60 years and older, mean (SD) age = 75 ( 8 ) years, 75% female, 43% Black, 53% obese (Body Mass Index ≥ 30)]. Food insecurity was assessed with a 6-item questionnaire. Scores ranged from 0 to 6 and were defined as high or marginal food security, FS, 0-1 (70%); low food security, LFS, 2-4 (20%); very low food security, VLFS, 5-6 (10%); and low and very low food security, LVLFS, 2-6 (30%). Eating behavior was assessed with an 18-item Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire R-18. In bivariate analyses food insecurity was consistently associated with cognitive restraint scores above the median split and to a lesser extent with uncontrolled eating scores (p ≤ 0.05). No association was found between emotional eating and food insecurity. In multivariate linear and logistic regression analyses, food insecurity was consistently associated with cognitive restraint (p ≤ 0.05) even when controlled for potential confounders (demographics, Body Mass Index, and chronic diseases). Food insecurity was also associated with uncontrolled eating (p ≤ 0.05), but the relationship was attenuated when controlled for potential confounding variables. Although cognitive restraint is defined as the conscious restriction of food intake to control body weight or promote weight loss, these findings suggest there may be other dimensions of cognitive restraint to consider in nutritional assessment and interventions among food-insecure older adults.