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Sample records for georgia poultry farms

  1. Human Contacts and Potential Pathways of Disease Introduction on Georgia Poultry Farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vieira, Antonio; Hofacre, C.L.; Smith, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    As highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus continues to circulate in the world, poultry farm biosecurity and timely reporting of morbidity and mortality among commercial poultry farms in the United States are major concerns. To assess the vulnerability of poultry farms to the introduction...... and spread of a highly infectious pathogen, such as the currently circulating H5N1 influenza virus, a survey was administered to growers in two counties in Georgia representing areas of low and high poultry densities. Survey questions regarding horizontal contacts and management were sent to commercial...

  2. Survey of biosecurity protocols and practices adopted by growers on commercial poultry farms in Georgia, U. S. A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorea, F C; Berghaus, R; Hofacre, C; Cole, D J

    2010-09-01

    The integrated commercial poultry system is a highly connected network in which routine activities keep farms within a geographic area in constant contact. Consequently, biosecurity practices designed to minimize the transmission of infectious diseases between and within farms are an important component of modern flock health programs. A survey of Georgia poultry growers was conducted in order to assess the level of adoption of standard biosecurity measures by farm personnel and visitors. The results showed that compliance with recommended biosecurity practices did not significantly vary by company, farm size, or number of farms owned by the same grower. However, biosecurity was higher in the northern part of the state, where the density of farms is higher, and where there was an ongoing outbreak of infectious laryngotracheitis at the time of the study. The survey found that growers place more emphasis on biosecurity measures targeting farm visitors than those targeting farm personnel. Most growers reported that all visitors to the farm were required to wear shoe covers, although visitors were not typically required to park outside the farm entrance or to wash tires on their vehicles. No visitor type was reportedly excluded from poultry houses during grow out on all farms. The results highlight the need to evaluate the comparative efficacy of specific biosecurity measures in order to set priorities and attain feasible rates of implementation of targeted biosecurity practices.

  3. Organic Poultry Farming in India- issues and approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Dodamani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades poultry industry has transformed from mere back yard poultry to commercial farm, but the issues of food safety and quality remains unaddressed. Hence, organic poultry farming has become as an approach to address these issues. This paper attempts to discuss the various issues of organic farming along with necessary interventions required in poultry breeding, feeding, housing and health care management under Indian Scenario. Further, necessary policy interventions were also suggested in order to promote organic poultry farming. [Vet. World 2011; 4(6.000: 273-277

  4. Rural Poultry Farming with Improved Breed of Backyard Chicken

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Livestock and poultry rearing is an imperative factor for improving the nutritional security of rural poor in India. Rural farmers rear Desi type chicken with low egg and meat production in backyard system. For developing the rural poultry farming, improved backyard poultry like Vanaraja/Gramapriya birds rearing is of utmost important. These improved birds can rear in both intensive and free ranging system. Birds can be reared for egg production in small numbers (10- 20) in fre...

  5. Haematophagus Mites in Poultry Farms of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rahbari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood sucking mites are important avian ectoparasites which being found on bird species worldwide. Their presence are problematic for the producers either through potential direct effects on weight gain, egg produc­tion, sperm production in roosters or as nuisance pests on worker handle hens and eggs. The aim of this study was pointing out of the status of haematophagus mites."nMethods: Eight caged layer and four breeder flocks were visited, monitoring for the presence of chicken mites per­formed by removing and examining debris from poultry house, infested nesting material collected into zip lock plas­tic bags and at least 20 birds were also randomly selected to examine the presence of chicken mites. Mites obtained from each population were mounted in Hoyer,s medium on microscope slides and identified. All eight caged layer and four breeder flocks were inspected, which were infested with chicken blood feeding mites."nResults: Massive infestations of Dermanyssus gallinae were common with huge numbers of parasites on birds, cages and the conveyor belts for egg. Only one farm from Mazandaran Province was infested to Ornithonyssus bursa."nConclusion: Dermanyssus gallinae was the most prevalent blood feeder mite in the breeder and caged layer flocks in Iran, while O. bursa was reported as a first record, which found only in a breeder flock in Mazanderan Province. It seems that its presence is limited into the area which affected by both warm and humid environmental conditions.  Keywords: Dermanyssus gallinae, Ornithonyssus bursa, Poultry, Iran

  6. Technical efficiency and profitability of backyard poultry farming in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Technical efficiency and profitability of backyard poultry farming in Ika South Local Government Area, ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... Gross margin analysis and stochastic frontier production function were used to analyze the data.

  7. Haematophagus Mites in Poultry Farms of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbari, S; Nabian, S; Ronaghi, H

    2009-01-01

    Background: Blood sucking mites are important avian ectoparasites which being found on bird species worldwide. Their presence are problematic for the producers either through potential direct effects on weight gain, egg production, sperm production in roosters or as nuisance pests on worker handle hens and eggs. The aim of this study was pointing out of the status of haematophagus mites. Methods: Eight caged layer and four breeder flocks were visited, monitoring for the presence of chicken mites performed by removing and examining debris from poultry house, infested nesting material collected into zip lock plastic bags and at least 20 birds were also randomly selected to examine the presence of chicken mites. Mites obtained from each population were mounted in Hoyer’s medium on microscope slides and identified. All eight caged layer and four breeder flocks were inspected, which were infested with chicken blood feeding mites. Results: Massive infestations of Dermanyssus gallinae were common with huge numbers of parasites on birds, cages and the conveyor belts for egg. Only one farm from Mazandaran Province was infested to Ornithonyssus bursa. Conclusion: Dermanyssus gallinae was the most prevalent blood feeder mite in the breeder and caged layer flocks in Iran, while O. bursa was reported as a first record, which found only in a breeder flock in Mazanderan Province. It seems that its presence is limited into the area which affected by both warm and humid environmental conditions. PMID:22808378

  8. Haematophagus Mites in Poultry Farms of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rahbari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood sucking mites are important avian ectoparasites which being found on bird species worldwide. Their presence are problematic for the producers either through potential direct effects on weight gain, egg produc­tion, sperm production in roosters or as nuisance pests on worker handle hens and eggs. The aim of this study was pointing out of the status of haematophagus mites.Methods: Eight caged layer and four breeder flocks were visited, monitoring for the presence of chicken mites per­formed by removing and examining debris from poultry house, infested nesting material collected into zip lock plas­tic bags and at least 20 birds were also randomly selected to examine the presence of chicken mites. Mites obtained from each population were mounted in Hoyer,s medium on microscope slides and identified. All eight caged layer and four breeder flocks were inspected, which were infested with chicken blood feeding mites.Results: Massive infestations of Dermanyssus gallinae were common with huge numbers of parasites on birds, cages and the conveyor belts for egg. Only one farm from Mazandaran Province was infested to Ornithonyssus bursa.Conclusion: Dermanyssus gallinae was the most prevalent blood feeder mite in the breeder and caged layer flocks in Iran, while O. bursa was reported as a first record, which found only in a breeder flock in Mazanderan Province. It seems that its presence is limited into the area which affected by both warm and humid environmental conditions.

  9. Prevalence and key figures for the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae infections in poultry farm systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparagano, O.; Pavlicevic, A.; Murano, T.; Camarda, A.; Sahibi, H.; Kilpinen, O.; Mul, M.F.; Emous, van R.A.; Bouquin, Le S.; Hoel, K.; Cafiero, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Recent surveys and sample collection have conWrmed the endemicity of Dermanyssus gallinae in poultry farming worldwide. The reduction in number and eYcacy of many acaricide products has accentuated the prevalence rates of this poultry ectoparasite observed more often in non intensive systems such as

  10. Economic epidemiology of avian influenza on smallholder poultry farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boni, Maciej F; Galvani, Alison P; Wickelgren, Abraham L; Malani, Anup

    2013-12-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) is often controlled through culling of poultry. Compensating farmers for culled chickens or ducks facilitates effective culling and control of HPAI. However, ensuing price shifts can create incentives that alter the disease dynamics of HPAI. Farmers control certain aspects of the dynamics by setting a farm size, implementing infection control measures, and determining the age at which poultry are sent to market. Their decisions can be influenced by the market price of poultry which can, in turn, be set by policy makers during an HPAI outbreak. Here, we integrate these economic considerations into an epidemiological model in which epidemiological parameters are determined by an outside agent (the farmer) to maximize profit from poultry sales. Our model exhibits a diversity of behaviors which are sensitive to (i) the ability to identify infected poultry, (ii) the average price of infected poultry, (iii) the basic reproductive number of avian influenza, (iv) the effect of culling on the market price of poultry, (v) the effect of market price on farm size, and (vi) the effect of poultry density on disease transmission. We find that under certain market and epidemiological conditions, culling can increase farm size and the total number of HPAI infections. Our model helps to inform the optimization of public health outcomes that best weigh the balance between public health risk and beneficial economic outcomes for farmers.

  11. Calibration of an electronic nose for poultry farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, A. H.; Shukor, S. A.; Kamis, M. S.; Shakaff, A. Y. M.; Zakaria, A.; Rahim, N. A.; Mamduh, S. M.; Kamarudin, K.; Saad, F. S. A.; Masnan, M. J.; Mustafa, H.

    2017-03-01

    Malodour from the poultry farms could cause air pollution and therefore potentially dangerous to humans' and animals' health. This issue also poses sustainability risk to the poultry industries due to objections from local community. The aim of this paper is to develop and calibrate a cost effective and efficient electronic nose for poultry farm air monitoring. The instrument main components include sensor chamber, array of specific sensors, microcontroller, signal conditioning circuits and wireless sensor networks. The instrument was calibrated to allow classification of different concentrations of main volatile compounds in the poultry farm malodour. The outcome of the process will also confirm the device's reliability prior to being used for poultry farm malodour assessment. The Multivariate Analysis (HCA and KNN) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) pattern recognition technique was used to process the acquired data. The results show that the instrument is able to calibrate the samples using ANN classification model with high accuracy. The finding verifies the instrument's performance to be used as an effective poultry farm malodour monitoring.

  12. FARM SUCCESSION PLANS AMONG POULTRY FARMERS IN OGUN STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasina O.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ageing of farmers in Nigeria and especially in capitalized sectors of agriculture requires attention to enhance sustainability and food security. The study thus examined the farm succession plans of 60 long established poultry farmers purposively selected from the Poultry Association of Nigeria in Ogun State Nigeria. Descriptive statistics and the Chi square analysis were used to present the findings of the study. Mean age of respondents was 61years. Their children were mostly over 18years (65%. Poultry farms were solely owned (76.7% with mean age of 17.9 years. Succession rate i.e. identification of a successor was eighty percent and were mostly respondents children (63.3%. This choice was based on their level of involvement in the business (63.6%. Majority (60% were not willing to fully retire from farming until death. Chi square analysis revealed age of farmer was significantly related to succession rate.

  13. Predicting the distribution of intensive poultry farming in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Boeckel, Thomas P; Thanapongtharm, Weerapong; Robinson, Timothy; D'Aietti, Laura; Gilbert, Marius

    2012-03-01

    Intensification of animal production can be an important factor in the emergence of infectious diseases because changes in production structure influence disease transmission patterns. In 2004 and 2005, Thailand was subject to two highly pathogenic avian influenza epidemic waves and large surveys were conducted of the poultry sector, providing detailed spatial data on various poultry types. This study analysed these data with the aim of establishing the distributions of extensive and intensive poultry farms, based on the number of birds per holder. Once poultry data were disaggregated into these two production systems, they were analysed in relation to anthropogenic factors using simultaneous autoregressive models. Intensive chicken production was clustered around the capital city of Bangkok and close to the main consumption and export centres. Intensively-raised ducks, mainly free-grazing, showed a distinct pattern with the highest densities distributed in a large area located in the floodplain of the Chao Phraya River. Accessibility to Bangkok, the percentage of irrigated areas and human population density were the most important predictors explaining the geographical distribution of intensively-raised poultry. The distribution of extensive poultry showed a higher predictability. Extensive poultry farms were distributed more homogeneously across the country and their distribution was best predicted by human population density.

  14. Prevalence and key figures for the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae infections in poultry farm systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparagano, Olivier; Pavlićević, Aleksandar; Murano, Takako; Camarda, Antonio; Sahibi, Hamid; Kilpinen, Ole; Mul, Monique; van Emous, Rick; le Bouquin, Sophie; Hoel, Kristian; Cafiero, Maria Assunta

    2009-06-01

    Recent surveys and sample collection have confirmed the endemicity of Dermanyssus gallinae in poultry farming worldwide. The reduction in number and efficacy of many acaricide products has accentuated the prevalence rates of this poultry ectoparasite observed more often in non intensive systems such as free-range, barns or backyards and more often in laying hens than in broiler birds. The lack of knowledge from producers and the utilisation of inadequate, ineffective or illegal chemicals in many countries have been responsible for the increase in infestation rates due to the spread of acaricide resistance. The costs for control methods and treatment are showing the tremendous economic impact of this ectoparasite on poultry meat and egg industries. This paper reviews the prevalence rates of this poultry pest in different countries and for different farming systems and the production parameters which could be linked to this pest proliferation.

  15. Control of campylobacter in poultry industry from farm to poultry processing unit: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umaraw, Pramila; Prajapati, A; Verma, Akhilesh K; Pathak, V; Singh, V P

    2017-03-04

    Campylobacter is an emerging zoonotic bacterial threat in the poultry industry. Most of the human cases of campylobacteriosis recorded have revealed their poultry origins. Various control measures have been employed both at the farm and processing levels to combat with it. The antibiotic treatment, phage therapy, competitive exclusion, and vaccination have been adapted at the farm level to reduce colonization of Campylobacter in poultry gut. While prevention of intestinal spillage, scheduled slaughter, logistic slaughter, chemical decontamination of carcasses are recommended to reduce contamination during processing. The postharvest interventions such as heat treatment, freezing, irradiation of contaminated carcass can effectively reduce Campylobacter contamination. Thus, integrated approaches are required to tackle infection of Campylobacter in humans.

  16. Prevalence and key figures for the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae infections in poultry farm systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparango, Olivier; Pavlićević, Aleksandar; Murano, Takako

    2009-01-01

    Recent surveys and sample collection have conWrmed the endemicity of Dermanyssus gallinae in poultry farming worldwide. The reduction in number and eYcacy ofin poultry farming worldwide. The reduction in number and eYcacy of many acaricide products has accentuated the prevalence rates of this pou...

  17. Rural Poultry Farming with Improved Breed of Backyard Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.K. Pathak

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Livestock and poultry rearing is an imperative factor for improving the nutritional security of rural poor in India. Rural farmers rear Desi type chicken with low egg and meat production in backyard system. For developing the rural poultry farming, improved backyard poultry like Vanaraja/Gramapriya birds rearing is of utmost important. These improved birds can rear in both intensive and free ranging system. Birds can be reared for egg production in small numbers (10- 20 in free range conditions if plenty of natural feed resources are available. Chicks need brooding during initial 6 weeks of age to maintain the required body temperature and to protect from predators. In nursery rearing, feeding of broiler starter up to 28 days is better option but it can also be formulated with locally available materials. At 42 days of age, the birds can be let out under backyard free-range conditions. Birds should be vaccinated specifically against the Newcastle disease and fowl pox. The backyard poultry farming with improved birds provide a solution to food security to the needy villagers paving a way for sustainable agriculture in rural areas of India.

  18. Evaluation of Microbiological and Chemical Contaminants in Poultry Farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Skóra

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the microbiological and chemical contamination in settled dust at poultry farms. The scope of research included evaluating the contributions of the various granulometric fractions in settled dust samples, assessing microbial contamination using culture methods, concentrations of secondary metabolites in dust and their cytotoxicity against hepatocyte chicken cells by means of MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide tests. In addition, we also evaluated the concentration of selected volatile odorous compounds (VOCs using gas chromatographic and spectrophotometric methods and airborne dust concentration in the air with DustTrak™ DRX Aerosol Monitor. Studies were carried out on chicken broilers and laying hens at 13 poultry farms, with numbers of birds ranging from 8000 to 42,000. The airborne total dust concentration at poultry farms averaged 1.44 mg/m3 with a high percentage of the PM10 fraction (particulate matter with a diameter less than 10 μm. Microorganism concentrations in the settled dust were: 3.2 × 109 cfu/g for bacteria and 1.2 × 106 cfu/g for fungi. Potential pathogens (Enterococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Aspergillus fumigatus, Paecilomyces variotii were also found. Secondary metabolites included aurofusarin, deoxynivalenol, 15-hydroxyculmorin zearalenone, zearalenone-sulfate, infectopyron, and neochinulin A. However, the dust samples showed weak cytotoxicity towards chicken hepatocyte cells, which ranged between 9.2% and 29.7%. Among volatile odorous compounds ammonia, acrolein, methyloamine, acetic acid, acetoaldehyde and formaldehyde were detected in the air. In conclusion, settled dust can be a carrier of microorganisms, odours and secondary metabolites in poultry farms, which can be harmful to workers’ health.

  19. Evaluation of Microbiological and Chemical Contaminants in Poultry Farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skóra, Justyna; Matusiak, Katarzyna; Wojewódzki, Piotr; Nowak, Adriana; Sulyok, Michael; Ligocka, Anna; Okrasa, Małgorzata; Hermann, Janusz; Gutarowska, Beata

    2016-02-04

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the microbiological and chemical contamination in settled dust at poultry farms. The scope of research included evaluating the contributions of the various granulometric fractions in settled dust samples, assessing microbial contamination using culture methods, concentrations of secondary metabolites in dust and their cytotoxicity against hepatocyte chicken cells by means of MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) tests. In addition, we also evaluated the concentration of selected volatile odorous compounds (VOCs) using gas chromatographic and spectrophotometric methods and airborne dust concentration in the air with DustTrak™ DRX Aerosol Monitor. Studies were carried out on chicken broilers and laying hens at 13 poultry farms, with numbers of birds ranging from 8000 to 42,000. The airborne total dust concentration at poultry farms averaged 1.44 mg/m³ with a high percentage of the PM10 fraction (particulate matter with a diameter less than 10 μm). Microorganism concentrations in the settled dust were: 3.2 × 10⁸ cfu/g for bacteria and 1.2 × 10⁶ cfu/g for fungi. Potential pathogens (Enterococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Aspergillus fumigatus, Paecilomyces variotii) were also found. Secondary metabolites included aurofusarin, deoxynivalenol, 15-hydroxyculmorin zearalenone, zearalenone-sulfate, infectopyron, and neochinulin A. However, the dust samples showed weak cytotoxicity towards chicken hepatocyte cells, which ranged between 9.2% and 29.7%. Among volatile odorous compounds ammonia, acrolein, methyloamine, acetic acid, acetoaldehyde and formaldehyde were detected in the air. In conclusion, settled dust can be a carrier of microorganisms, odours and secondary metabolites in poultry farms, which can be harmful to workers' health.

  20. A bovine botulism outbreak associated with a suspected cross-contamination from a poultry farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souillard, R; Le Maréchal, C; Ballan, V; Mahé, F; Chemaly, M; Le Bouquin, S

    2017-09-01

    In October 2014, an outbreak of botulism type D/C occurred on two cattle farms in close proximity. A poultry farm located nearby with no history of botulism had transferred poultry manure to both bovine farms before the beginning of the outbreak. Given this context, epidemiological investigation was conducted to determine if the poultry farm was a reservoir of C. botulinum type D/C and to identify the source of contamination on the cattle farms. Environmental samples were collected at three houses on the poultry farm (boot swabs from the surroundings, swabs from the ventilation system, boot swabs from the poultry litter and darkling beetles samples), and on the two cattle farms (silage samples, boot swabs from the cattle stalls, boot swabs from the cattle pasture and poultry manure samples). These samples were analyzed using real-time PCR after an enrichment step to detect C. botulinum type D/C. On the poultry farm, three boot swabs from the surroundings, two swabs from the ventilation system, one boot swab from the litter and one sample of darkling beetles were detected positive. On one cattle farm, C. botulinum type D/C was identified in a sample of silage made from grass grown on a field on which the poultry manure had previously been stored and in a boot swab from a pasture. On the other cattle farm, C. botulinum type D/C was detected in a sample of poultry manure stored on the cattle farm and in a boot swab from a pasture. This investigation shows that the healthy poultry farm might have been the reservoir of C. botulinum type D/C and that cross-contamination between poultry and cattle likely occurred, resulting in the botulism outbreak on the two cattle farms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Contacts between poultry farms, their spatial dimension and their relevance for avian influenza preparedness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Fiebig

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Ongoing economic losses by and exposure of humans to highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI in poultry flocks across Asia and parts of Africa and Europe motivate also outbreak-free countries such as Switzerland to invest in preparedness planning. Country-specific population data on between-farm contacts are required to anticipate probable patterns of pathogen spread. Information is scarce; in particular on how strongly small, non-commercial poultry farms are involved in between-farm contacts. We aimed to identify between-farm contacts of interest for HPAI spread at both commercial and non-commercial farms in a non-outbreak situation: whether or not commercial and non-commercial farms were involved in poultry and person movements and shared resources by company integration. Focus was on poultry movements for the purpose of purchase, sale and poultry show visits, their spatial dimension, their frequencies and the farm types they connected. Of the total 49,437 recorded poultry farms in Switzerland, 95% had less than 500 birds. The farm number resulted in densities of up to 8 poultry farms per km2 and a median number of 47 neighbour farms within a 3 km radius around the farms. Person movements and shared resources were identified in 78% of the surveyed farms (93% among commercials, 67% among non-commercials. Poultry trading movements over extensive spatial ranges were stated at 65% (79% among commercials, 55% among non-commercials. Movement frequencies depended on farm specialization and were higher for commercial than for non-commercial farms except for poultry show visits. Estimates however for the entire population revealed 3.5 times higher chances of a poultry purchase, and 14.6 times higher chances of exhibiting birds at poultry shows occurring in a given time by a farm smaller than 500 birds (non-commercial farm than by a larger (commercial farm. These findings indicate that both commercial and non-commercial farms are involved in

  2. EFFECTS OF LARGE-SCALE POULTRY FARMS ON AQUATIC MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES: A MOLECULAR INVESTIGATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of large-scale poultry production operations on water quality and human health are largely unknown. Poultry litter is frequently applied as fertilizer to agricultural lands adjacent to large poultry farms. Run-off from the land introduces a variety of stressors into t...

  3. EFFECTS OF LARGE-SCALE POULTRY FARMS ON AQUATIC MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES: A MOLECULAR INVESTIGATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of large-scale poultry production operations on water quality and human health are largely unknown. Poultry litter is frequently applied as fertilizer to agricultural lands adjacent to large poultry farms. Run-off from the land introduces a variety of stressors into t...

  4. Prevalence of Dermanyssus gallinae (Mesostigmata: Dermanyssidae) in industrial poultry farms in North-East Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharbi, Mohamed; Sakly, Nadhem; Darghouth, Mohamed Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Dermanyssus gallinae (Mesostigmata: Dermanyssidae), a mite of poultry, represents the most important ecotoparasite of egg-laying poultry in several countries. We estimated the prevalence of D. gallinae infestation in 38 industrial poultry farms (28 egg-laying and 10 reproductive hen farms) in the governorate of Nabeul (North-East Tunisia). Traps were placed in two locations of each farm during 24 h in August. The overall prevalence at the farms was estimated to be 34%. A total number of 329 D. gallinae were collected, giving an intensity of 0.0028 and an abundance of 0.0015. Infestation intensity and abundance were significantly higher in egg production farms than reproductive farms. There was no correlation between the intensity of infestation and temperature. An exponential correlation was observed between the birds' age and infestation intensity. We recommend a systematic survey of poultry farms during the whole breeding period. Prompt treatment is recommended to avoid the exponential increase of mite population.

  5. The performance of poultry egg farms after the 2006 avian influenza outbreak in north central, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.Y. Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The study assessed the performance of the poultry egg farms after the outbreak of avian influenza in 2006 in the north central part of Nigeria. Seventeen poultry (17 farms were purposefully sampled for the study. The net farm income model, simple descriptive statistics and data envelopment analysis were used as analytical tools. The result shows that the poultry farms are making profits after the losses obtained due to the outbreak of avian influenza (AVI. The revenue from eggs and spent layers constitutes 52.3 % and 47.7 % of the total revenue respectively. The medium size farms are however making higher profits and are more technically efficient than the small size poultry farms. The technical efficiency scores for the small scale farms range from 0.23-1 with a mean of 0.51, while that for the medium size farms range from 0.38-1 with a mean of 0.73. The major constraints affecting poultry egg production include; fluctuations in egg production and high cost of feeds as well as vaccines. The study concluded that the performance of poultry egg farms in Nigeria can be enhanced through improvements in technical efficiency or an increase in scale of operation. The provision of subsidies to poultry farmers by the government was however recommended to ease the high production cost.

  6. Postural evaluation in a poultry farm for broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Kong, Yong-Ku; Jung, Myung-Chul

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate working postures in 9 operations of poultry farming for broiler chickens for 14 body segments with 4 categories, and for fingers with 14 categories. Overall, the farmers commonly bent almost all their body segments and used power grips. The operations of cleaning with water wand and inspecting chickens seemed light work because the farmers walked around most of their working time. The operations of detaching base from hanging feeder and attaching base to hanging feeder had the farmers continue squatting to handle the feeders close to the floor. The farmers also repeatedly bent their trunks in shoveling feces, unloading a box of chicks, and releasing chicks. A power grip was frequently observed due to using tools with round handles. Workplace design to raise working height would be necessary for a better working environment for broiler farmers.

  7. Avian influenza virus RNA in groundwater wells supplying poultry farms affected by the 2015 influenza outbreak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three poultry farms affected by the 2015 influenza outbreak had groundwater supplies test positive for the influenza matrix gene. One well was H5-positive, matching the outbreak virus HA gene. Virus transport to underlying aquifers was corroborated by finding poultry-specific parvovirus DNA in seven...

  8. Avian influenza transmission risks: analysis of biosecurity measures and contact structure in Dutch poultry farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssematimba, A; Hagenaars, T J; de Wit, J J; Ruiterkamp, F; Fabri, T H; Stegeman, J A; de Jong, M C M

    2013-04-01

    In the 2003 epidemic of highly pathogenic avian influenza in Dutch poultry, between-farm virus transmission continued for considerable time despite control measures. Gaining more insight into the mechanisms of this spread is necessary for the possible development of better control strategies. We carried out an in-depth interview study aiming to systematically explore all the poultry production activities to identify the activities that could potentially be related to virus introduction and transmission. One of the between-farm contact risks that were identified is the movement of birds between farms during thinning with violations of on-farm biosecurity protocols. In addition, several other risky management practices, risky visitor behaviours and biosecurity breaches were identified. They include human and fomite contacts that occurred without observing biosecurity protocols, poor waste management practices, presence of other animal species on poultry farms, and poor biosecurity against risks from farm neighbourhood activities. Among the detailed practices identified, taking cell phones and jewellery into poultry houses, not observing shower-in protocols and the exchange of unclean farm equipment were common. Also, sometimes certain protocols or biosecurity facilities were lacking. We also asked the interviewed farmers about their perception of transmission risks and found that they had divergent opinions about the visitor- and neighbourhood-associated risks. We performed a qualitative assessment of contact risks (as transmission pathways) based on contact type, corresponding biosecurity practices, and contact frequency. This assessment suggests that the most risky contact types are bird movements during thinning and restocking, most human movements accessing poultry houses and proximity to other poultry farms. The overall risk posed by persons and equipment accessing storage rooms and the premises-only contacts was considered to be medium. Most of the exposure

  9. Prevalence and characterization of motile Salmonella in commercial layer poultry farms in Bangladesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barua, Himel; Biswas, Paritosh K.; Olsen, Katharina E. P.;

    2012-01-01

    at farm/holding level, and the zoonotic serovars circulating in layer poultry in the South and South-East Asian countries including Bangladesh, where small-scale commercial farms are predominant, is limited. To investigate the prevalence of Salmonella at layer farm level, and to identify the prevalent...... serovars we conducted a cross-sectional survey by randomly selecting 500 commercial layer poultry farms in Bangladesh. Faecal samples from the selected farms were collected following standard procedure, and examined for the presence of Salmonella using conventional bacteriological procedures. Thirty...... showed that all of them were clonally related because only one genotype and three subtypes were determined based on the variation in two or three bands. This is also the first report on the presence of any specific serovar of Salmonella enterica in poultry in Bangladesh....

  10. Monitoring of Dermanyssus gallinae in free-range poultry farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenner, L; Bon, G; Chauve, C; Nemoz, C; Lubac, S

    2009-06-01

    Various methods for monitoring Dermanyssus gallinae infestations within free-range egg production units were compared. The study was carried out in five egg-producing free-range poultry buildings infested with D. gallinae. Each farm was divided into six zones (each zone including nest boxes, perches and duckboard) for placing two types of traps (corrugated cardboard and thick card traps) or examining dried droppings for presence of mites. Traps were removed 24 h later, placed into bags and mites were counted at the laboratory using binocular magnification. Droppings were also inspected by eye and mite numbers were estimated. All the methods used allowed us to detect mites although their efficacy differed. The number of mites collected was independent of the type of trap used. Examination of the droppings did not differentiate between buildings with differing mite populations. Placing traps in the nest boxes is a less reliable indicator than placing them on the perches. It appears that the most coherent method for evaluating the D. gallinae population within a free-range flock is to place thick card traps throughout the building, on perches favoured by birds.

  11. Risk for Low Pathogenicity Avian Influenza Virus on Poultry Farms, the Netherlands, 2007-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwstra, Ruth; Gonzales, Jose L; de Wit, Sjaak; Stahl, Julia; Fouchier, Ron A M; Elbers, Armin R W

    2017-09-01

    Using annual serologic surveillance data from all poultry farms in the Netherlands during 2007-2013, we quantified the risk for the introduction of low pathogenicity avian influenza virus (LPAIV) in different types of poultry production farms and putative spatial-environmental risk factors: distance from poultry farms to clay soil, waterways, and wild waterfowl areas. Outdoor-layer, turkey (meat and breeder), and duck (meat and breeder) farms had a significantly higher risk for LPAIV introduction than did indoor-layer farms. Except for outdoor-layer, all poultry types (i.e., broilers, chicken breeders, ducks, and turkeys) are kept indoors. For all production types, LPAIV risk decreased significantly with increasing distance to medium-sized waterways and with increasing distance to areas with defined wild waterfowl, but only for outdoor-layer and turkey farms. Future research should focus not only on production types but also on distance to waterways and wild bird areas. In addition, settlement of new poultry farms in high-risk areas should be discouraged.

  12. Integrated Poultry-Fish Farming Systems for Sustainable Rural Livelihood Security in Kumaon Hills of Uttarakhand

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The study has analyzed socio-economic impact of poultry based farming system on farmers for their livelihood security and women empowerment. The analysis is based on the data collected from 95 poultry farmers selected from three hill districts of Kumaon region for two production years, 2011-12 and 2012- 13. It has been observed that the farmers’ access to day-old chicks (DOCs)/fish seed/fingerlings plays the key role in popularization of integrated poultry-fish farming. The economics of pre...

  13. Surveillance of avian influenca viruses in farmed poultry in 2009 in Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetkovik Iskra

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the presence and distribution or to confirm the absence of avian influenca viruses in farmed poultry in the poultry production systems 1 and 2 from the eight statistical regions in R. Macedonia. Total number of 1215 cloacal swabs from poultry were sampled. Each sample was processed and analysed by both molecular (RRT-PCR and classical virology methods (virus isolation and identification. All samples gave negative result for presence of avian influenza viruses. Commercial poultry production systems have biosecurity measures preventing the entry of pathogens i.e avian influenza viruses, therefore resulting with no circulation of these viruses in the sampled farmed poultry flocks.

  14. Entrepreneurial Traits and the Distribution of Poultry Farm Entrepreneurs in Delta State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Isiorhovoja

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The authors attempted to ascertain the entrepreneurial potential of poultry farmers in Delta State using farmers’ scores in six entrepreneurial traits measured on a five-point Likert scale. The study covered the population of 275 poultry farmers in the State. The objectives were to ascertain the level of entrepreneurial traits of Poultry farmers and to determine the distribution of poultry farm entrepreneurs by category, namely; low, average and high potential, across the three agricultural zones. The hypotheses tested were that entrepreneurial traits of poultry farmers were not above average and that there was no significant variation in poultry farmers’ entrepreneurial potentials across the three agricultural zones. Primary data were collected using copies of a structured questionnaire. By using analysis of variance and test of differences between a test value of 3.4, major findings were that poultry farmers were above average in three entrepreneurial traits but with significant variation across the zones; that entrepreneurial potential was generally below average, finally, that the three categories of poultry farm entrepreneurs were randomly distributed across the zones. The authors concluded that while there may not be any inherent biases in drawing sample of poultry farmers across the State for development projects purposes, there may be differences in cost implications for farmers’ entrepreneurial development.

  15. Practices and Factors Influencing the Use of Antibiotics in Selected Poultry Farms in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boamah, VE; Odoi, H; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    and to assess factors influencing farmers’ choice of antibiotics for use on their farms. A cross-sectional survey using questionnaires and semistructured interviews was conducted among 400 poultry farms in the Ashanti, Brong-Ahafo and Greater Accra regions of Ghana. Data was analysed using IBM SPSS...

  16. THREATS/RISKS IN POULTRY FARMS: MICROBIOLOGICAL CONTAMINANTS, DUST, ODOURS AND BIOLOGICAL METHOD FOR ELIMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Matusiak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the microbiological contamination, odour and dust concentration in poultry farms. In addition, the effectiveness of biopreparation and Yucca schidigera plant extract in manure hygienisation and selected odorous compounds removal was determined. The airborne total dust concentration at poultry production premises averaged 1.44 mg/m3 with a high percentage of the PM10 fraction. High number of bacteria and fungi at 106-1010 CFU / g. was determined in both poultry manure and settled dust. Poultry farm’s air limits of the bacteria and fungi number have not been exceeded. Reported concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 fractions were 18-20 times higher than acceptable for a 24-hour exposure determined by the World Health Organization. Volatile odorous compounds dominant in poultry farms were: ammonia, acrolein, methyl amine, acetic acid, acetaldehyde and formaldehyde. The concentrations are variable depending on the farm type and stage of the cycle production. The permissible concentration/ exposure limits of ammonia in the air has been exceeded in the laying hens farms I and II, while the concentration of carbon dioxide exceeded the limit value in the third stage of the cycle production on broiler farm III and was close to the limit for laying hens farm I. The maximum cytotoxicity of odorous compounds mixture tested on chick liver hepatocellular carcinoma cell line LMH was 45.7%. It was confirmed by cells morphologic changes after the odorous compounds treatment (ammonia, di-, and trimethylamine. Mineral-microbial biopreparation with Yucca schidigera extract reduced the total number of microorganisms by 1 logarythmic unit in poultry manure and decreased concentration of odorous compounds by 37% - 70% depending on the compound. The use in sequence Y. schidigera extract, and then after 2 days biopreparation can be an effective way to reduce microbiological and odorous hazards on poultry farms.

  17. Measuring the costs of biosecurity on poultry farms: a case study in broiler production in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Siekkinen Kirsi-Maarit; Heikkilä Jaakko; Tammiranta Niina; Rosengren Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Farm-level biosecurity provides the foundation for biosecurity along the entire production chain. Many risk management practices are constantly in place, regardless of whether there is a disease outbreak or not. Nonetheless, the farm-level costs of preventive biosecurity have rarely been assessed. We examined the costs incurred by preventive biosecurity for Finnish poultry farms. Methods We used a semi-structured phone interview and obtained results from 17 broiler produce...

  18. Energy efficiency in intensive livestock Estonia. Energy-saving measures on poultry farms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annuk, A.; Nurste, H.; Damskier, S.S.

    2004-07-01

    The overall purpose of this report on energy-saving measures is to provide the Estonian Ministry of Economics and Communication with an overview of the energy consumption on poultry farms at a national level. This report compromises detailed information on energy consumption per ton of broiler meat, egg and young laying hen produced in Estonia and Denmark, respectively, based on field investigations and Danish statistics. To collect information on electricity consumption within Estonian poultry farming on a national level, three pilot farms were analysed with regard to the use of energy consumption on each farm. Results from the three farms are presented in Appendix 1. In addition, a calculation of national energy consumption within chicken meet production, egg production and breeding of young laying hens is presented in this report. The calculation shows the difference between the Danish and Estonian energy consumption on poultry farms. This report presents a proposal for a ten-year development plan for the reduction of the energy consumption on Estonian poultry farms. (au)

  19. Risk factors for infectious diseases in backyard poultry farms in the Poyang Lake area, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Jiang, Zhiben; Jin, Zhenyu; Tan, Hua; Xu, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Emergence and transmission of infectious diseases have an enormous impact on the poultry industry and present a serious threat to the health of humans and wild birds. Noncommercial poultry operations, such as backyard poultry facilities in China, are potential sources of virus exchange between commercial poultry and wild birds. It is particularly critical in wetland areas where backyard poultry have close contact with commercial poultry and migratory birds, therefore increasing the risk of contracting infectious diseases. To evaluate the transmission risks, a cross-sectional study was undertaken in the Poyang Lake area, China, involving 309 residents in the backyard poultry farms in three counties (Region A, B, and C) of Jiangxi Province. We examined the backyard poultry population, poultry species, presence of poultry deaths from infectious diseases, food sources, and biosecurity practices. Region B ranked highest for biosecurity while region C ranked lowest. The risks of infectious diseases were assessed by adjusted odds ratio based on multivariate logistic regression analysis. Potential risk factors in the three regions of the study site were compared. In Region A, significant factor was contact of poultry with wild birds (OR: 6.573, 95% CI: 2.148-20.115, P=0.001). In Region B, the most significant factor was contact of poultry with neighboring backyard waterfowls (OR: 3.967, 95% CI: 1.555-10.122, P=0.004). In Region C, significant factors were poultry purchase from local live bird markets (OR: 3.740, 95% CI: 1.243-11.255, P=0.019), and contact of poultry with wild birds (OR: 3.379, 95% CI: 1.058-10.791, P=0.040). In summary, backyard poultry was significantly affected by neighboring commercial poultry and close contact with wild birds. The results are expected to improve our understanding of the transmission risks of infectious diseases in a typical backyard poultry environment in rural China, and address the need to improve local farming practices and take

  20. Risk factors for infectious diseases in backyard poultry farms in the Poyang Lake area, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wang

    Full Text Available Emergence and transmission of infectious diseases have an enormous impact on the poultry industry and present a serious threat to the health of humans and wild birds. Noncommercial poultry operations, such as backyard poultry facilities in China, are potential sources of virus exchange between commercial poultry and wild birds. It is particularly critical in wetland areas where backyard poultry have close contact with commercial poultry and migratory birds, therefore increasing the risk of contracting infectious diseases. To evaluate the transmission risks, a cross-sectional study was undertaken in the Poyang Lake area, China, involving 309 residents in the backyard poultry farms in three counties (Region A, B, and C of Jiangxi Province. We examined the backyard poultry population, poultry species, presence of poultry deaths from infectious diseases, food sources, and biosecurity practices. Region B ranked highest for biosecurity while region C ranked lowest. The risks of infectious diseases were assessed by adjusted odds ratio based on multivariate logistic regression analysis. Potential risk factors in the three regions of the study site were compared. In Region A, significant factor was contact of poultry with wild birds (OR: 6.573, 95% CI: 2.148-20.115, P=0.001. In Region B, the most significant factor was contact of poultry with neighboring backyard waterfowls (OR: 3.967, 95% CI: 1.555-10.122, P=0.004. In Region C, significant factors were poultry purchase from local live bird markets (OR: 3.740, 95% CI: 1.243-11.255, P=0.019, and contact of poultry with wild birds (OR: 3.379, 95% CI: 1.058-10.791, P=0.040. In summary, backyard poultry was significantly affected by neighboring commercial poultry and close contact with wild birds. The results are expected to improve our understanding of the transmission risks of infectious diseases in a typical backyard poultry environment in rural China, and address the need to improve local farming

  1. The role of rodents in avian influenza outbreaks in poultry farms: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velkers, Francisca C; Blokhuis, Simon J; Veldhuis Kroeze, Edwin J B; Burt, Sara A

    2017-12-01

    Wild migratory birds are associated with global avian influenza virus (AIV) spread. Although direct contact with wild birds and contaminated fomites is unlikely in modern non-free range poultry farms applying biosecurity measures, AIV outbreaks still occur. This suggests involvement of other intermediate factors for virus transmission between wild birds and poultry. This review describes current evidence of the potential role of rodents in AIV transmission from wild birds to poultry and between poultry houses. Rodents can be abundant around poultry houses, share their habitat with waterfowl and can readily enter poultry houses. Survival of AIV from waterfowl in poultry house surroundings and on the coat of rodents suggests that rodents are likely to act as mechanical vector. AIVs can replicate in rodents without adaptation, resulting in high viral titres in lungs and nasal turbinates, virus presence in nasal washes and saliva, and transmission to naïve contact animals. Therefore, active AIV shedding by infected rodents may play a role in transmission to poultry. Further field and experimental studies are needed to provide evidence for a role of rodents in AIV epidemiology. Making poultry houses rodent-proof and the immediate surroundings unattractive for rodents are recommended as preventive measures against possible AIV introduction.

  2. Veterinary antibiotic resistance, residues, and ecological risks in environmental samples obtained from poultry farms, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahshan, Hesham; Abd-Elall, Amr Mohamed Mohamed; Megahed, Ayman Mohamed; Abd-El-Kader, Mahdy A; Nabawy, Ehab Elsayed

    2015-02-01

    In Egypt, poultry production constitutes one of the main sources of pollution with veterinary antibiotics (VAs) into the environment. About 80 % of meat production in Egypt is of poultry origin, and the potential environmental risks associated with the use of VAs in these farms have not yet been properly evaluated. Thus, the main purpose of this research was to evaluate the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant enteric key bacteria and the incidence of residual antibiotics in poultry farm environmental samples and to determine whether fertilizing soils with poultry litter from farms potentially brings ecological risks. From December 2011 to September 2012, a total of 225 litter, bird dropping, and water samples were collected from 75 randomly selected boiler poultry farms. A high prevalence of Escherichia coli (n = 179; 79.5 %) in contrast to the low prevalence of Salmonella spp. (n = 7; 3.1 %) was detected. Amongst E. coli isolates, serotypes O142:K86, O125:K70, O91:K, and O119:K69 were the most common. Meanwhile, Salmonella enterica serotypes emek and enteritidis were recovered. The antibiograms using the disc diffusion method revealed significantly more common resistant and multi-resistant isolates in broiler poultry farms. Residues of tetracycline and ciprofloxacin were detected at 2.125 and 1.401 mg kg(-1) mean levels, respectively, in environmental samples contaminated with E. coli-resistant strains by HPLC. The risk evaluations highlighted that tetracycline residues in poultry litter significantly display environmental risks with a hazard quotient value above 1 (1.64). Our study implies that ineffective implementation of veterinary laws which guide and guard against incorrect VA usage may potentially bring health and environmental risks.

  3. Antibiotic usage pattern in selected poultry farms in Ogun state

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    2013-12-27

    Dec 27, 2013 ... College of Veterinary Medicine, Federal University of Agriculture Abeokuta, PMB 2240 Abeokuta, ... the antibiotics used in poultry is for treatment of ..... Compendium of veterinary ... technologies in microbial ecology aid in.

  4. Prevalence of Salmonella Infection in Intensive Poultry Farms in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    result may indicate the challenge that the poultry industry of the country may face .... they were inoculated immediately on appropriate culture media. Postmortem ... on blood agar (Green Star Impex Pvt. Ltd., Secunderabad, India) and XLD.

  5. The development of poultry farms risk assessment tool for avian influenza in Imo State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obinani, Chidi; Onweagba, Anthony; Lloyd, Linda; Ross, Micheal; Troisi, Cathrine; Ohazurika, Nathaniel; Chukwu, Andrew O

    2014-09-01

    This study validated the content of a questionnaire that will be used for risk stratification in poultry farms in Imo State, Nigeria. The questionnaire was developed from avian influenza risk domains peculiar to poultry farms in Nigeria. The questionnaire was verified and modified by a group of five experts with research interest in Nigeria's poultry industry and avian influenza prevention. The questionnaire was distributed to 30 poultry farms selected from Imo State, Nigeria. The same poultry farms were visited one week after they completed the questionnaires for on-site observation. Agreement between survey and observation results was analyzed using the kappa statistic and rated as poor, fair, moderate, substantial, or nearly perfect; internal consistency of the survey was also computed. The mean kappa statistic for agreement between the survey and observations (validation) ranged from 0.06 to 1, poor to nearly perfect agreement. Eight questions showed poor agreement, four had a fair agreement, two items had moderate agreement, nineteen survey questions had substantial agreement and ten questions had nearly perfect agreement. Out of the 43 items in the questionnaire, 32 items were considered validated with coefficient alpha >0.70.

  6. Genetic characterization of glycopeptide-resistant enterococci of human and animal origin from mixed pig and poultry farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Bogø; Willems, R.J.L.; Van den Bogaard, A.E.

    2003-01-01

    promoter. All investigated animal isolates were from mixed pig and poultry farms in the Netherlands and the human isolated from the farmers of these farms. A total of 24 isolates were investigated. AFLP and Tn1546 typing revealed that both pig and poultry related enterococcal and vanA transposon genotypes...

  7. Genetic characterization of glycopeptide-resistant enterococci of human and animal origin from mixed pig and poultry farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Bogø; Willems, R.J.L.; Van den Bogaard, A.E.

    2003-01-01

    promoter. All investigated animal isolates were from mixed pig and poultry farms in the Netherlands and the human isolated from the farmers of these farms. A total of 24 isolates were investigated. AFLP and Tn1546 typing revealed that both pig and poultry related enterococcal and vanA transposon genotypes...

  8. Efficacy of anthelmintics on South American camelid (llama and alpaca) farms in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Rose-Ann M; Williamson, Lisa H; Terrill, Thomas H; Kaplan, Ray M

    2010-08-27

    The number of South American camelid (SAC; llama and alpaca) farms is growing in the southeastern United States, and infection with gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) is a major health concern in this region. There is widespread resistance to anthelmintic remedies in small ruminants (sheep and goats), but a paucity of information on llamas and alpacas. Anthelmintic resistance was evaluated on three SAC farms (two llama; one alpaca) in Georgia in the southern United States using fecal egg count reduction (FECR) tests. For each farm, animals were randomly assigned to 1 of 5 treatment groups based on initial fecal egg count (FEC) and number of animals available (2-5 groups, n=9-11 per treatment). Ivermectin (IVM, subcutaneous injection; 0.3mg/kg body weight (BW)) and a control group were tested on an alpaca farm, and fenbendazole (FBZ, oral; 10mg/kg BW; two farms), moxidectin (MOX oral; 0.2mg/kg BW; two farms), and levamisole (LEV, oral; 8 mg/kg BW; one farm) were added for the llama farms. Anthelmintic efficacy was determined by comparing FEC of treatment and control animals 14 days post-treatment, with resistance evaluated using the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP) guidelines. Based upon these guidelines, there was GIN resistance to IVM in both llamas and alpacas in Georgia and to FBZ on both llama farms where this drug was tested. There was MOX resistance on one llama farm using the FECR test, while there was no resistance to LEV detected in this study. These data demonstrate a serious emerging problem in the United States of llama and alpaca GIN resistant to drugs from two of the three major anthelmintic classes.

  9. Quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli in Poultry Farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hricová, Kristýna; Röderová, Magdaléna; Pudová, Vendula; Hanulík, Vojtěch; Halová, Dana; Julínková, Pavla; Dolejská, Monika; Papoušek, Ivo; Bardoň, Jan

    2017-06-01

    Increasing bacterial resistance to quinolone antibiotics is apparent in both humans and animals. For humans, a potential source of resistant bacteria may be animals or their products entering the human food chain, for example poultry. Between July 2013 and September 2014, samples were collected and analyzed in the Moravian regions of the Czech Republic to isolate the bacterium Escherichia coli. As a result, 212 E. coli isolates were obtained comprising 126 environmental isolates from poultry houses and 86 isolates from cloacal swabs from market-weight turkeys. Subsequently, the E. coli isolates were tested for susceptibility to selected antibiotics. Resistance of the poultry isolates to quinolones ranged from 53% to 73%. Additionally, the presence of plasmid-mediated resistance genes was studied. The genes were confirmed in 58% of the tested strains. The data on resistance of isolates from poultry were compared with results of resistance tests in human isolates obtained in the same regions. The high levels of resistance determined by both phenotyping and genotyping methods and reported in the present study confirm the fact that the use of fluoroquinolones in poultry should be closely monitored. Copyright© by the National Institute of Public Health, Prague 2017.

  10. Practices and Factors Influencing the Use of Antibiotics in Selected Poultry Farms in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boamah, VE; Odoi, H; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Many of the antibiotics employed in animal production also serve as essential medicines for use in humans. However, only a handful of studies address antibiotic use in animal husbandry in Ghana. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of essential antibiotics in poultry production in Ghana...... and to assess factors influencing farmers’ choice of antibiotics for use on their farms. A cross-sectional survey using questionnaires and semistructured interviews was conducted among 400 poultry farms in the Ashanti, Brong-Ahafo and Greater Accra regions of Ghana. Data was analysed using IBM SPSS...... and Microsoft Excel. Multivariate analyses were used to evaluate correlations between farm variables and the dependency of antibiotic use on internal and external farm characteristics. Farmers reported the use of 35 different antimicrobial agents for management of conditions such as Newcastle, fowl pox...

  11. Rice production systems and avian influenza: Interactions between mixed-farming systems, poultry and wild birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzaffar, S.B.; Takekawa, J.Y.; Prosser, D.J.; Newman, S.H.; Xiao, X.

    2010-01-01

    Wild waterfowl are the reservoir for avian influenza viruses (AIVs), a family of RNA viruses that may cause mild sickness in waterbirds. Emergence of H5N1, a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) strain, causing severe disease and mortality in wild birds, poultry and humans, had raised concerns about the role of wild birds in possible transmission of the disease. In this review, the link between rice production systems, poultry production systems, and wild bird ecology is examined to assess the extent to which these interactions could contribute towards the persistence and evolution of HPAI H5N1. The rice (Oryza sativa) and poultry production systems in Asia described, and then migration and movements of wild birds discussed. Mixed farming systems in Asia and wild bird movement and migration patterns create opportunities for the persistence of low pathogenic AIVs in these systems. Nonetheless, there is no evidence of long-term persistence of HPAI viruses (including the H5N1 subtype) in the wild. There are still significant gaps in the understanding of how AIVs circulate in rice systems. A better understanding of persistence of AIVs in rice farms, particularly of poultry origins, is essential in limiting exchange of AIVs between mixed-farming systems, poultry and wild birds.

  12. Human influenza A(H7N9) virus infection associated with poultry farm, Northeastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ming; Huang, Biao; Wang, Ao; Deng, Liquan; Wu, Donglin; Lu, Xinrong; Zhao, Qinglong; Xu, Shuang; Havers, Fiona; Wang, Yanhui; Wu, Jing; Yin, Yuan; Sun, Bingxin; Yao, Jianyi; Xiang, Nijuan

    2014-11-01

    We report on a case of human infection with influenza A(H7N9) virus in Jilin Province in northeastern China. This case was associated with a poultry farm rather than a live bird market, which may point to a new focus for public health surveillance and interventions in this evolving outbreak.

  13. The assessment of the intensive poultry rearing farms within the context of the IPPC Directive (B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIHĂIESCU Tania

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Poultry production in intensive farms has been steadily increasing since the 1970s. This has occurredthrough a number of factors including increased feed supply through greater use of nitrogen (N fertilizer andincreased use of supplementary forage feeds. Potentially, the integration of low-protein forage (e.g. maize, toreduce dietary-N concentration, or management practices (e.g. deep layer, cage tier, to reduce excreta to waste,water and soil, can mitigate environmental N emissions and increase efficiency. However, effects of thesemitigation practices on resource use efficiency and environmental emissions, such as greenhouse gas emissionsand N leaching, are becoming more and more substantial, as the production on wider basis increased. This is oneof the reasons for including the large scale poultry farms on the list of the economical activities with significantimpact on environment, being subjected to more and stricter regulations. The direct and indirect environmentalimpacts of poultry farming are currently being investigated by using simulation modelling. The model simulationusing a life cycle assessment approach indicates that N fertilizer increases production and economic efficiencybut decreases environmental efficiency through predicted increases in N leaching and greenhouse gas emissions.In contrast, using forage increases the use of land and production efficiency, with a decrease in N leaching andno increase in greenhouse gas emissions (per capita. A comparison of an average poultry farm applying the BestAvailable Technologies versus an older technology is provided, together with considerations regarding themitigation of impacts on various scales.

  14. Avian influenza trasnmission risks: analysis of biosecuritiy measures and contact structure in Dutch poultry farming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ssematimba, A.; Hagenaars, T.H.J.; Wit, de J.J.; Ruiterkamp, F.; Fabri, T.H.F.; Stegeman, J.A.; Jong, de M.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the 2003 epidemic of highly pathogenic avian influenza in Dutch poultry, between-farm virus transmission continued for considerable time despite control measures. Gaining more insight into the mechanisms of this spread is necessary for the possible development of better control strategies. We car

  15. Mathematical formulation and numerical simulation of bird flu infection process within a poultry farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Arrival Rince; Nova, Tertia Delia; Watanabe, M.

    2016-02-01

    Bird flu infection processes within a poultry farm are formulated mathematically. A spatial effect is taken into account for the virus concentration with a diffusive term. An infection process is represented in terms of a traveling wave solutions. For a small removal rate, a singular perturbation analysis lead to existence of traveling wave solutions, that correspond to progressive infection in one direction.

  16. [Experience in controlling the Salmonella carrier state on a pedigree poultry breeding farm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savov, D; Dimitrov, N; Slavkov, I; Tsonev, Ts; Duparinov, I

    1976-01-01

    Systematic microbiologic control was carried out in the 1972-1975 period on an elite poultry farm whereas from the 23,724 samples studied, taken from objects of the epizootic chain forage-birds-hatchery, 78 cultures of Salmonella organisms of 14 species or 0.32 per cent of the total number of samples were isolated. A trend was observed toward the year-to-year drop in the number of positive findings of Salmonellae, and by the end of 1975 the results were negative. This fact was backed by the investigations in the poultry dressing combines throughout the country that have received the parental forms of birds from the sanated elite poultry farm. Established was vertical (congenital) transmission of Salmonella enteritidis, and using the typhoid-pullorosis test all carrier birds were detected and eliminated. Thus serologically were followed up and eliminated the hidden sources of infection among the flocks on the elite poultry farm. The alimentary mechanism of infection transmission (horizontally with the chain forage-birds was discontinued through the storage of feed mixtures packed in bags (not in bulk). The chain birds-hatchery was interrupted by means of fumigation, the eggs being treated up to the second hour following laying, and then subjected to four subsequent treatment with disinfectants up to hatching. The environment was sanated by three-fold disinfections every sixth day with lysol, formalin or veraform, anf fumigation with formaldehyde vapours, resulting in 100 per cent effectiveness. This was demonstrated many times bacteriologically. The overall observation of hygiene measures contributed to the sanation of the elite farm. The parallel examination of personnel on the farm made by organs of the Hygiene and Epidemiologic Inspection detected a female worker that acted as a carrier of S. enteritidis. Upon her elimination the complex of measures for the study and complete sanation of the farm was considered fulfilled.

  17. On-farm study of human contact networks to document potential pathways for avian influenza transmission between commercial poultry farms in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, T E; Guerin, M T; Kelton, D; Ribble, C; Stephen, C

    2011-12-01

    Human movements associated with poultry farming create contact networks that might facilitate transmission of avian influenza (AI) between farms during outbreaks. In Canada, no information is available about how these networks connect poultry farms. The purpose of this study was to document human contacts between commercial poultry farms in Ontario, Canada, to learn how AI might be transmitted during outbreaks. We used face-to-face interviews with people entering the farm biosecurity perimeter on four layer, one turkey and three broiler breeder poultry farms in Ontario to collect information on between-farm contacts and biosecurity practices. Over a four-day study period on each farm, a median of 10.5 people entered the farm biosecurity perimeter (range 2-31). Ninety-six per cent (111/118) of people consented to be interviewed. Of these, fifty-three per cent (59/111) had contact with one or more (median 2, degree range 1-14) other poultry farms within 72 h. A median of 25 (range 7-65) human contacts linked study farms to other poultry farms. The mean distance of between-farm contacts was 53 km. Eighty-six per cent of people who answered the biosecurity questions (94/109) reported using one or more biosecurity practices. However, on 7/8 farms, at least one person reported that they did not use any biosecurity practices. Fifty per cent of social visitors used biosecurity, whereas 96% of all other people used biosecurity. Ninety-two per cent of people that entered the poultry barns (46/50) used one or more biosecurity practices, whereas 81% of people (48/59) that did not enter the poultry barns used one or more biosecurity practices. Because our study documented farm visitors who did not use any biosecurity practices and moved between commercial poultry farms, we suggest that rapid trace-out of human movements is as important as containment zoning to limiting disease spread during an outbreak of highly pathogenic AI in Ontario. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Occupational exposure to Aspergillus by swine and poultry farm workers in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino, R; Faísca, V M; Carolino, E; Veríssimo, C; Viegas, C

    2012-01-01

    Aspergillus is among a growing list of allergens that aggravate asthmatic responses. Significant pulmonary pathology is associated with Aspergillus-induced allergic and asthmatic lung disease. Environments with high levels of exposure to fungi are found in animal production facilities such as for swine and poultry, and farmers working with these are at increased risk for occupational respiratory diseases. Seven Portuguese poultry and seven swine farms were analyzed in order to estimate the prevalence, amount, and distribution of Aspergillus species, as well as to determine the presence of clinical symptoms associated with asthma and other allergy diseases in these highly contaminated settings. From the collected fungal isolates (699), an average incidence of 22% Aspergillus was detected in poultry farms, while the prevalence at swine farms was 14%. The most frequently isolated Aspergillus species were A. versicolor, A. flavus, and A. fumigatus. In poultry farms, A. flavus presented the highest level of airborne spores (>2000 CFU/m³), whereas in swine farms the highest was A. versicolor, with an incidence fourfold greater higher than the other mentioned species. Eighty workers in these settings were analyzed, ranging in age from 17 to 93 yr. The potentially hazardous exposure of poultry workers to mold allergens using sensitization markers was evaluated. Although no significant positive association was found between fungal contamination and sensitization to fungal antigens, a high incidence of respiratory symptoms in professionals without asthma was observed, namely, wheezing associated with dyspnea (23.8%) and dyspnea after strenuous activities (12.3%), suggesting underdiagnosed respiratory disturbances. Further, 32.5% of all exposed workers noted an improvement of respiratory ability during resting and holidays. From all the analyzed workers, seven were previously diagnosed with asthma and four reported the first attack after the age of 40 yr, which may be

  19. Animal welfare decisions in Dutch poultry and pig farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gocsik, E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The minimum level of animal welfare (AW) is guaranteed by EU and national legislation in most European countries. Within the current international economic and political environment further improvements in the welfare of farm animals predominantly rely on market initiative

  20. Appraisal of Chicken Production with Associated Biosecurity Practices in Commercial Poultry Farms Located in Jos, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maduka, C V; Igbokwe, I O; Atsanda, N N

    2016-01-01

    A questionnaire-based study of chicken production system with on-farm biosecurity practices was carried out in commercial poultry farms located in Jos, Nigeria. Commercial and semicommercial farms had 75.3% and 24.5% of 95,393 birds on 80 farms, respectively. Farms using deep litter and battery cage systems were 69 (86.3%) and 10 (12.5%), respectively. In our biosecurity scoring system, a correct practice of each indicator of an event scored 1.00 and biosecurity score (BS) of each farm was the average of the scores of biosecurity indicators for the farm, giving BS of zero and 1.00 as absence of biosecurity and optimal biosecurity, respectively. Semicommercial farms had higher BS than commercial farms. The flock size did not significantly (p > 0.05) affect the mean BS. Disease outbreaks correlated (r = -0.97) with BS, showing a tendency of reduction of disease outbreaks with increasing BS. Outbreaks were significantly (p biosecurity practices and weak points in the biosecurity could be ameliorated by extension of information to farmers in order to support expansion of chicken production with robust biosecurity measures that drastically reduce risk of disease outbreak.

  1. Managing soil nutrients with compost in organic farms of East Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghambashidze, Giorgi

    2013-04-01

    Soil Fertility management in organic farming relies on a long-term integrated approach rather than the more short-term very targeted solutions common in conventional agriculture. Increasing soil organic matter content through the addition of organic amendments has proven to be a valuable practice for maintaining or restoring soil quality. Organic agriculture relies greatly on building soil organic matter with compost typically replacing inorganic fertilizers and animal manure as the fertility source of choice. In Georgia, more and more attention is paid to the development of organic farming, occupying less than 1% of total agricultural land of the country. Due to increased interest towards organic production the question about soil amendments is arising with special focus on organic fertilizers as basic nutrient supply sources under organic management practice. In the frame of current research two different types of compost was prepared and their nutritional value was studied. The one was prepared from organic fraction municipal solid waste and another one using fruit processing residues. In addition to main nutritional properties both composts were tested on heavy metals content, as one of the main quality parameter. The results have shown that concentration of main nutrient is higher in municipal solid waste compost, but it contains also more heavy metals, which is not allowed in organic farming system. Fruit processing residue compost also has lower pH value and is lower in total salt content being is more acceptable for soil in lowlands of East Georgia, mainly characterised by alkaline reaction. .

  2. Animal poisoning in Europe. Part 1: Farm livestock and poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guitart, Raimon; Croubels, Siska; Caloni, Francesca; Sachana, Magda; Davanzo, Franca; Vandenbroucke, Virginie; Berny, Philippe

    2010-03-01

    The lack of a reference Veterinary Poison Control Centre for the European Union (EU) means that clinicians find it difficult to obtain information on poisoning episodes. This three-part review collates published and unpublished data obtained from Belgium, France, Greece, Italy and Spain over the last decade in order to provide a broader toxicoepidemiological perspective. The first article critically evaluates the national situation in the five European countries and concludes that information for livestock and poultry is limited and fragmentary compared to other animal groups. The analysis has revealed that clinical cases of poisoning are only occasionally studied in depth and that cattle are the species most frequently reported. Several plants and mycotoxins, a few pesticides and metals, together with contaminants of industrial origin, such as dioxins, are responsible for most of the recorded cases. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A critical review of biosecurity-based interventions and strategies to reduce Campylobacter on the poultry farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    The control of Campylobacter colonization in poultry flocks is an important public health strategy to control human campylobacteriosis. A critical review of potential controls for Campylobacter in poultry on farms was undertaken using a systematic approach. Our question was “What are the available a...

  4. EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ); Scientific Opinion on Composting on-farm of dead poultry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tine

    EFSA’s Scientific Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ) was asked for a scientific opinion on two alternative methods for processing Category (Cat) 2 Animal By-Products (ABP). The material to be treated consists of poultry manure, straw and dead-on-farm poultry; this implies that the animals died...... due to a disease, which in most cases was not properly diagnosed. The proposed processes are composting methods to be used on-farm. The first method is a continuous open system where composting is done under roof in piles separated by wooden partition walls. The piles are processed without enforced...... aeration. The second method is a discontinuous closed system consisting of two different types of containers (Box-Compost®) coupled with a device for conditioning temperature and humidity during composting (Compostronic®). The end-product obtained is intended to be used as an organic fertiliser. According...

  5. Study of poultry coccidiosis in organized and backyard farms of Jammu region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourabh Sharma

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to know the Prevalence of chicken coccidiosis in Jammu division in both organized and backyard chickens during the year 2010-11. Materials and Methods: A total of 720 faecal samples were collected from both organized farms and backyard poultry (unorganized sector of Jammu. Results: The overall prevalence of 39.58% was recorded in the present study and five Eimeria species were identified viz., E. tenella, E. necatrix, E. maxima, E. acervulina and E. mitis. E. tenella was the predominant species in both organized and unorganized farms. Conclusion: Higher prevalence of 53.61% in unorganized (backyard poultry birds as compared to organized birds (25.55% was recorded. The prevalence was the highest in monsoon from both organized and unorganized managemental practices. [Vet World 2013; 6(8.000: 467-469

  6. The poultry-associated microbiome: network analysis and farm-to-fork characterizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian B Oakley

    Full Text Available Microbial communities associated with agricultural animals are important for animal health, food safety, and public health. Here we combine high-throughput sequencing (HTS, quantitative-PCR assays, and network analysis to profile the poultry-associated microbiome and important pathogens at various stages of commercial poultry production from the farm to the consumer. Analysis of longitudinal data following two flocks from the farm through processing showed a core microbiome containing multiple sequence types most closely related to genera known to be pathogenic for animals and/or humans, including Campylobacter, Clostridium, and Shigella. After the final stage of commercial poultry processing, taxonomic richness was ca. 2-4 times lower than the richness of fecal samples from the same flocks and Campylobacter abundance was significantly reduced. Interestingly, however, carcasses sampled at 48 hr after processing harboured the greatest proportion of unique taxa (those not encountered in other samples, significantly more than expected by chance. Among these were anaerobes such as Prevotella, Veillonella, Leptrotrichia, and multiple Campylobacter sequence types. Retail products were dominated by Pseudomonas, but also contained 27 other genera, most of which were potentially metabolically active and encountered in on-farm samples. Network analysis was focused on the foodborne pathogen Campylobacter and revealed a majority of sequence types with no significant interactions with other taxa, perhaps explaining the limited efficacy of previous attempts at competitive exclusion of Campylobacter. These data represent the first use of HTS to characterize the poultry microbiome across a series of farm-to-fork samples and demonstrate the utility of HTS in monitoring the food supply chain and identifying sources of potential zoonoses and interactions among taxa in complex communities.

  7. Antibiotic resistance and resistance genes in Escherichia coli from poultry farms, southwest Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Adelowo, Olawale O.; Obasola E. Fagade; Agersø, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigated the mechanisms of resistance in 36 E. coli isolated from waste, litter, soil and water samples collected from poultry farms in Southwestern Nigeria. Methodology: Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) distributions of the isolates were determined using the methods of the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute and resistance genes detected by PCR. Results: A total of 30 isolates (94%) showed resistance to more than one antimicrobial. Percentage resista...

  8. Biosecurity and geospatial analysis of mycoplasma infections in poultry farms at Al-Jabal Al-Gharbi region of Libya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammon, Abdulwahab; Mulatti, Paolo; Lorenzetto, Monica; Ferre, Nicola; Sharif, Monier; Eldaghayes, Ibrahim; Dayhum, Abdunaser

    2017-01-01

    Geospatial database of farm locations and biosecurity measures are essential to control disease outbreaks. A study was conducted to establish geospatial database on poultry farms in Al-Jabal Al-Gharbi region of Libya, to evaluate the biosecurity level of each farm and to determine the seroprevalence of mycoplasma and its relation to biosecurity level. A field team of 7 Veterinarians belongs to the National Center of Animal Health was assigned for data recording and collection of blood samples. Personal information of the producers, geographical locations, biosecurity measures and description of the poultry farms were recorded. The total number of poultry farms in Al-Jabal Al-Gharbi Region is 461 farms distributed in 13 cities. Out of these, 102 broiler farms and one broiler breeder farm (10 houses) which were in operation during team visit were included in this study. Following collection of blood, sera were separated and tested by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the presence of antibodies against Mycoplasma (General antigen for M. gallisepticum and M. synoviae). The seroprevalence of Mycoplasma in the region was 28% (29 poultry farms out of 103 were infected). About 50% (23 out of 47) of poultry farms located in Garian city were infected with Mycoplasma and one significant cluster of Mycoplasma infection in the city was identified. Low level of biosecurity was found in poultry farms of the region. Out of the 103 farms included, 63% of poultry houses has a ground of soil and 44% of them has uncoated walls which may influence the proper cleaning and disinfection. Almost 100% of the farms are at risk of exposure to diseases transmitted by wild birds such as avian influenza and Newcastle disease due to absence of wild birds control program. Although, 81% of the farms have entry restrictions, only 20% have disinfectants at entry which increase the risk of exposure to pathogens. The results of this study highlight the weakness points of biosecurity

  9. Biosecurity and geospatial analysis of mycoplasma infections in poultry farms at Al-Jabal Al-Gharbi region of Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulwahab Kammon

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Geospatial database of farm locations and biosecurity measures are essential to control disease outbreaks. A study was conducted to establish geospatial database on poultry farms in Al-Jabal Al-Gharbi region of Libya, to evaluate the biosecurity level of each farm and to determine the seroprevalence of mycoplasma and its relation to biosecurity level. A field team of 7 Veterinarians belongs to the National Center of Animal Health was assigned for data recording and collection of blood samples. Personal information of the producers, geographical locations, biosecurity measures and description of the poultry farms were recorded. The total number of poultry farms in Al-Jabal Al-Gharbi Region is 461 farms distributed in 13 cities. Out of these, 102 broiler farms and one broiler breeder farm (10 houses which were in operation during team visit were included in this study. Following collection of blood, sera were separated and tested by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for the presence of antibodies against Mycoplasma (General antigen for M. gallisepticum and M. synoviae. The seroprevalence of Mycoplasma in the region was 28% (29 poultry farms out of 103 were infected. About 50% (23 out of 47 of poultry farms located in Garian city were infected with Mycoplasma and one significant cluster of Mycoplasma infection in the city was identified. Low level of biosecurity was found in poultry farms of the region. Out of the 103 farms included, 63% of poultry houses has a ground of soil and 44% of them has uncoated walls which may influence the proper cleaning and disinfection. Almost 100% of the farms are at risk of exposure to diseases transmitted by wild birds such as avian influenza and Newcastle disease due to absence of wild birds control program. Although, 81% of the farms have entry restrictions, only 20% have disinfectants at entry which increase the risk of exposure to pathogens. The results of this study highlight the weakness points of

  10. Cloacael Carriage and Multidrug Resistance Escherichia coli O157:H7 from Poultry Farms, Eastern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mude Shecho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine antimicrobial drug resistance patterns of E. coli O157:H7 isolates and estimate the level of the pathogen. A total of 194 cloacae swab samples were collected randomly in two poultry farms. Standard cultural, biochemical, and serological (latex agglutination methods were used to isolate E. coli O157:H7. The isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing using disc diffusion method. Out of 194 cloacae samples examined, 13.4% (n=26 were found to be positive for E. coli O157:H7. The finding indicated differences in E. coli O157:H7 infection among the different risk factors. Chicken from Adele Poultry Farm showed higher E. coli O157:H7 infection (OR = 3.89 than Haramaya University poultry farm and young birds had more infection (OR = 4.62 than adult birds. Of the total 14 antimicrobials included in the panel of study, the susceptibility results were varied with 96.15% and 0% E. coli O157:H7 isolates expressing resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin, spectinomycin, and ciprofloxacin, respectively. Multidrug resistance to more than two antimicrobial agents was detected in 24 (92.30% of the isolates. The study showed high presence of antimicrobial resistant isolates of E. coli O157:H7. Further study is required to better understand the ecology and evolution of bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents.

  11. Cloacael Carriage and Multidrug Resistance Escherichia coli O157:H7 from Poultry Farms, Eastern Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shecho, Mude; Muktar, Yimer

    2017-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine antimicrobial drug resistance patterns of E. coli O157:H7 isolates and estimate the level of the pathogen. A total of 194 cloacae swab samples were collected randomly in two poultry farms. Standard cultural, biochemical, and serological (latex agglutination) methods were used to isolate E. coli O157:H7. The isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing using disc diffusion method. Out of 194 cloacae samples examined, 13.4% (n = 26) were found to be positive for E. coli O157:H7. The finding indicated differences in E. coli O157:H7 infection among the different risk factors. Chicken from Adele Poultry Farm showed higher E. coli O157:H7 infection (OR = 3.89) than Haramaya University poultry farm and young birds had more infection (OR = 4.62) than adult birds. Of the total 14 antimicrobials included in the panel of study, the susceptibility results were varied with 96.15% and 0% E. coli O157:H7 isolates expressing resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin, spectinomycin, and ciprofloxacin, respectively. Multidrug resistance to more than two antimicrobial agents was detected in 24 (92.30%) of the isolates. The study showed high presence of antimicrobial resistant isolates of E. coli O157:H7. Further study is required to better understand the ecology and evolution of bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents.

  12. Molecular characterization of motile serovars of Salmonella enterica from breeder and commercial broiler poultry farms in Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himel Barua

    Full Text Available Contaminated poultry and poultry products are a major source of motile Salmonellae for human salmonellosis worldwide. Local circulation of any motile Salmonella serovar in poultry has a wider public health impact beyond its source of origin for being dispersed elsewhere through poultry trades or human travels. To investigate the status of motile Salmonella serovars in breeder farms in Bangladesh, multiple flocks of two breeder farms were observed for a period of six months. In addition, a cross-sectional survey was carried out to determine the prevalence and serovar distribution of motile Salmonella by randomly selecting 100 commercial broiler poultry farms. Five pooled faecal samples representing an entire housed flock of breeders or broilers were screened for presence of motile Salmonella following conventional bacteriological procedures. The Salmonella isolates obtained were subsequently serotyped, and characterized by plasmid profiling and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. The results revealed that both the breeder farms were positive with three Salmonella serovars: S. Virchow, S. Paratyphi B var Java (S. Java and S. Enteritidis. Eleven of the 100 broiler farms investigated were positive for motile Salmonella, giving a farm-level prevalence of 11% (95% confidence interval 5-17%. S. Virchow and S. Kentucky were the two predominant serovars isolated from the broiler farms. The PFGE genotyping demonstrated that the isolates belonging to the same serovars were closely related due to variation in only 1-4 bands. All the S. Virchow and S. Java isolates, irrespective of breeder or broiler farm origin, were plasmid-free, except for one S. Virchow isolate from a broiler farm that harboured a 9.7 kb-sized plasmid. The S. Kentucky isolates belonged to three plasmid profiles having plasmids of four different sizes, ranging from 2.7 to 109 kb. This is the first report of any motile Salmonella serovars from breeder and commercial broiler poultry

  13. Distribution of Aspergillus species among apparently healthy birds in poultry farms in Kaduna state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara N Kwanashie

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The study wasconducted to determine the prevalence and distribution of Aspergilllus species among apparently healthy birds in poultryfarms. Trachea swabs from 1500 birds in 52 commercial (10% of birds in eachpoultry farm visited poultry farms were collected for this study. Six speciesof Aspergillus were isolated wasisolated from 718 (47.87% of the birds viz: A. fumigatus made up 52.37% (376 of the Aspergillus isolates followed by A. flavus 21.87% (157, A.niger 11.42% (82, A. terreus8.64% (62, A. restrictus 2.79% (20and A. ochraceous 2.92% (21. Aspergillus species was found to occurthroughout the year in the farms though with a higher incidence during therainy season compared to the dry season.

  14. Estimation of the population size of Canadian commercial poultry farms by log-linear capture-recapture analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Allaki, Farouk; Christensen, Jette; Vallières, André; Paré, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the population size of Canadian poultry farms in 3 subpopulations (British Columbia, Ontario, and Other) by poultry category. We used data for 2008 to 2011 from the Canadian Notifiable Avian Influenza (NAI) Surveillance System (CanNAISS). Log-linear capture-recapture models were applied to estimate the number of commercial chicken and turkey farms. The estimated size of farm populations was validated by comparing sizes to data provided by the Canadian poultry industry in 2007, which were assumed to be complete and exhaustive. Our results showed that the log-linear modelling approach was an appropriate tool to estimate the population size of Canadian commercial chicken and turkey farms. The 2007 farm population size for each poultry category was included in the 95% confidence intervals of the farm population size estimates. Log-linear capture-recapture modelling might be useful for estimating the number of farms using surveillance data when no comprehensive registry exists.

  15. Mobile farm clinic outreach to address health conditions among Latino migrant farmworkers in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, John S; Reyes-Ortiz, Carlos; Marella, Prasen; Bowers, Angelica; Panchal, Viral; Anderson, Lisa; Charles, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Agricultural labor involves exposure to many occupational hazards, some of which can lead to chronic health conditions. The purpose of this study was to conduct an occupational health needs assessment of illnesses and work-related injuries among a Latino migrant farmworker population (recruited to harvest Vidalia onions) in South Georgia. Study data included survey responses from 100 farmworkers attending mobile farm clinics in 2010 at their worker housing residences, supplemented by medical diagnoses data from the same clinics collected over 3 years (2009-2011) for 1161 farmworkers at six different farms. From the survey, the main health problems reported were hypertension (25%), eye problems (12%), musculoskeletal problems (11%), diabetes (10%), and depression (7%). In multivariate analyses, depression scores were associated with having a history of musculoskeletal problems (p = .002). According to the mobile farm clinic data, the most common medical diagnoses included back pain (11.8%), hypertension (11.4%), musculoskeletal problems (11.3%), gastrointestinal disorders (8.6%), eye problems (7.2%), dermatitis or rash (7.0%), and tinea or fungal skin infections (5.6%). The study identified eye and musculoskeletal problems as the major occupational health conditions for this population of farmworkers.

  16. Environmental and human health challenges of industrial livestock and poultry farming in China and their mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuanan; Cheng, Hefa; Tao, Shu

    2017-10-01

    Driven by the growing demand for food products of animal origin, industrial livestock and poultry production has become increasingly popular and is on the track of becoming an important source of environmental pollution in China. Although concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have higher production efficiency and profitability with less resource consumption compared to the traditional family-based and "free range" farming, they bring significant environmental pollution concerns and pose public health risks. Gaseous pollutants and bioaerosols are emitted directly from CAFOs, which have health implications on animal producers and neighboring communities. A range of pollutants are excreted with the animal waste, including nutrients, pathogens, natural and synthetic hormones, veterinary antimicrobials, and heavy metals, which can enter local farmland soils, surface water, and groundwater, during the storage and disposal of animal waste, and pose direct and indirect human health risks. The extensive use of antimicrobials in CAFOs also contributes to the global public health concern of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Efforts on treating the large volumes of manure generated in CAFOs should be enhanced (e.g., by biogas digesters and integrated farm systems) to minimize their impacts on the environment and human health. Furthermore, the use of veterinary drugs and feed additives in industrial livestock and poultry farming should be controlled, which will not only make the animal food products much safer to the consumers, but also render the manure more benign for treatment and disposal on farmlands. While improving the sustainability of animal farming, China also needs to promote healthy food consumption, which not only improves public health from avoiding high-meat diets, but also slows down the expansion of industrial animal farming, and thus reduces the associated environmental and public health risks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Industry-Wide Surveillance of Marek's Disease Virus on Commercial Poultry Farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David A; Cairns, Christopher; Jones, Matthew J; Bell, Andrew S; Salathé, Rahel M; Baigent, Susan J; Nair, Venugopal K; Dunn, Patricia A; Read, Andrew F

    2017-06-01

    Marek's disease virus is a herpesvirus of chickens that costs the worldwide poultry industry more than US$1 billion annually. Two generations of Marek's disease vaccines have shown reduced efficacy over the last half century due to evolution of the virus. Understanding where the virus is present may give insight into whether continued reductions in efficacy are likely. We conducted a 3-yr surveillance study to assess the prevalence of Marek's disease virus on commercial poultry farms, determine the effect of various factors on virus prevalence, and document virus dynamics in broiler chicken houses over short (weeks) and long (years) timescales. We extracted DNA from dust samples collected from commercial chicken and egg production facilities in Pennsylvania, USA. Quantitative PCR was used to assess wild-type virus detectability and concentration. Using data from 1018 dust samples with Bayesian generalized linear mixed effects models, we determined the factors that correlated with virus prevalence across farms. Maximum likelihood and autocorrelation function estimation on 3727 additional dust samples were used to document and characterize virus concentrations within houses over time. Overall, wild-type virus was detectable at least once on 36 of 104 farms at rates that varied substantially between farms. Virus was detected in one of three broiler-breeder operations (companies), four of five broiler operations, and three of five egg layer operations. Marek's disease virus detectability differed by production type, bird age, day of the year, operation (company), farm, house, flock, and sample. Operation (company) was the most important factor, accounting for between 12% and 63.4% of the variation in virus detectability. Within individual houses, virus concentration often dropped below detectable levels and reemerged later. These data characterize Marek's disease virus dynamics, which are potentially important to the evolution of the virus.

  18. PRODUCTS OF PROCESSING OF RAPESEED IN FEEDING OF FARM ANIMALS AND POULTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Коnоnеnко S. I.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the current economic conditions of the import substitution, special importance is given to the search for new feed sources, methods of preparing them for feeding, the use of biologically active substances and enzymes. At the forefront of feed production is rape as breeding work with this culture has showed positive results. Currently, selectionists have bred yellow double-zero "00" varieties of rapeseeds free of erucic acid of "Canole" type, that have low glucosinolate level. The development of new and modern technology standards are required for preparation them for feeding, since they are fundamentally different from the previously used rapeseed varieties and have fewer restrictions for feeding to different types of farm animals and poultry. The article presents a fairly lengthy and reasoned review of the literature of a large number of authors on the topic, as well as given rapeseed market analysis, rational and advanced methods of preparing rapeseed processed products for feeding to young and adult animals. Much attention is paid to the use of a variety of biologically active substances and enzymes, which improve digestion and absorption of nutrients from rations with rapeseed processingproducts, increase productivity and reduce feed costs per unit of production. The use of processing products of rapeseed improves the profitability of livestock production. Feeding of rapeseedcake to cattle increases the protein content and volatile fatty acids in the rumen content, increases the number of infusoria and decreases ammonia levels. The inclusion of rape forage in diets of farm animals and poultry improves hematological parameters. Products of rapeseed processing of the varieties with low glucosinolatesa1re recommended for the rations of farm animals and poultry depending on the species, age and physiological state

  19. Antibiotic Resistance in Animal and Environmental Samples Associated with Small-Scale Poultry Farming in Northwestern Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Braykov, Nikolay P.; Eisenberg, Joseph N. S.; Grossman, Marissa; Lixin, Zhang; Vasco, Karla; CEVALLOS, WILLIAM; Muñoz, Diana; Acevedo,Andrés; Moser, Kara A.; Marrs, Carl F.; Foxman, Betsy; Trostle, James; Trueba, GAbriel; Levy, Karen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The effects of animal agriculture on the spread of antibiotic resistance (AR) are cross-cutting and thus require a multidisciplinary perspective. Here we use ecological, epidemiological, and ethnographic methods to examine populations of Escherichia coli circulating in the production poultry farming environment versus the domestic environment in rural Ecuador, where small-scale poultry production employing nontherapeutic antibiotics is increasingly common. We sampled 262 “production ...

  20. Prevalence and antibiotic resistance of coagulase-negative Staphylococci isolated from poultry farms in three regions of Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boamah, Vivian Etsiapa; Agyare, Christian; Odoi, Hayford

    2017-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in animal production has been associated with the development and spread of antibiotic-resistant organisms including commensals. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) species, which were until recently considered non-pathogenic, have been associated with opportunistic...... infections and high resistance to several antibiotics. This study sought to determine the prevalence, identity, and phenotypic resistance of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. isolated from some selected poultry farms and farm workers in the Ashanti, Brong Ahafo, and Greater Accra regions of Ghana...... (57.03%), doxycycline (43.75%), and oxacillin (43.36%). Multi-drug resistance (MDR) was observed in 19.14% of the isolates. MDR was higher in isolates obtained from poultry farm workers (61.22%) than isolates from poultry litter (38.78%). The above findings call for stricter monitoring of antibiotic...

  1. The Trends and Tides of Poultry Farm Building in Makurdi, Benue State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.D Chia

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Adequate poultry housing is needed to protect birds from rain, direct sunlight, heat, cold, turbulent winds, dust etc. Birds are unlikely to perform satisfactorily if the housing is poor, therefore correct housing must be provided to meet the optimum environmental requirements for birds’ performance either through growth or egg production. Moreso, poultry houses cannot function satisfactorily unless they are properly equipped and supplied with the needed appliances. In the light of this, nine farms where chosen from different parts of Makurdi (Wurukum, Welfare Quarters, Judges Quarters, Achusa and Lobi Quarters and visited. Their housing structures and equipment were evaluated. Different aspects of their designs were compared with those found in the relevant literature. All the building accessed were naturally ventilated, opensided houses. However, some aspects such as the stock density, orientation of buildings, space between buildings, roof designs needed improvement, while other aspects were almost non-existent such as bio-security and environment control. Typical house dimensions ranged from lengths ( 11m - 22m, widths (6m - 12m and heights (3.0m - 4.7m. In Makurdi, there is need for an ideal poultry house which should be well ventilated, dry, clean and spacious.

  2. Poultry farms as a source of avian influenza A (H7N9) virus reassortment and human infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Donglin; Zou, Shumei; Bai, Tian; Li, Jing; Zhao, Xiang; Yang, Lei; Liu, Hongmin; Li, Xiaodan; Yang, Xianda; Xin, Li; Xu, Shuang; Zou, Xiaohui; Li, Xiyan; Wang, Ao; Guo, Junfeng; Sun, Bingxin; Huang, Weijuan; Zhang, Ye; Li, Xiang; Gao, Rongbao; Shen, Bo; Chen, Tao; Dong, Jie; Wei, Hejiang; Wang, Shiwen; Li, Qun; Li, Dexin; Wu, Guizhen; Feng, Zijian; Gao, George F; Wang, Yu; Wang, Dayan; Fan, Ming; Shu, Yuelong

    2015-01-15

    Live poultry markets are a source of human infection with avian influenza A (H7N9) virus. On February 21, 2014, a poultry farmer infected with H7N9 virus was identified in Jilin, China, and H7N9 and H9N2 viruses were isolated from the patient's farm. Reassortment between these subtype viruses generated five genotypes, one of which caused the human infection. The date of H7N9 virus introduction to the farm is estimated to be between August 21, 2013 (95% confidence interval [CI] June 6, 2013-October 6, 2013) and September 25, 2013 (95% CI May 28, 2013-January 4, 2014), suggesting that the most likely source of virus introduction was the first batch of poultry purchased in August 2013. The reassortment event that led to the human virus may have occurred between January 2, 2014 (95% CI November 8, 2013-February 12, 2014) and February 12, 2014 (95% CI January 19, 2014-February 18, 2014). Our findings demonstrate that poultry farms could be a source of reassortment between H7N9 virus and H9N2 virus as well as human infection, which emphasizes the importance to public health of active avian influenza surveillance at poultry farms.

  3. Occurrence of Mycoplasma synoviae on commercial poultry farms of Pernambuco, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mércia R. Barros

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The state of Pernambuco is the largest producer of eggs in the North and Northeast of Brazil and second one in the broiler production. Mycoplasmas are important avian pathogens, which cause respiratory and joint diseases that result in large economic losses. The aim of the present study was to investigate the occurrence of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG and Mycoplasma synoviae (MS in broilers and commercial laying hens in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil. Tracheal fragments were analyzed from 55 healthy broilers, 35 broilers with respiratory signs and 30 commercial laying hens with respiratory signs, from 24 commercial poultry farms, each sample was composed of a pool of five birds. The bacteriological exam, PCR and nested PCR were used for the detection of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG and Mycoplasma synoviae (MS. All samples were negative in bacteriological isolation. In the PCR analyses, seven samples from birds with respiratory signs were positive for MS and one was positive for MG, the latter of which was confirmed as the MG-F vaccine strain. The occurrence of MS in chickens with respiratory signs may indicate inadequate sanitary management on poultry farms, favoring the propagation of mycoplasmosis.

  4. Antibiotic resistance and resistance genes in Escherichia coli from poultry farms, southwest Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelowo, Olawale O; Fagade, Obasola E; Agersø, Yvonne

    2014-09-12

    This study investigated the mechanisms of resistance in 36 E. coli isolated from waste, litter, soil and water samples collected from poultry farms in Southwestern Nigeria. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) distributions of the isolates were determined using the methods of the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute and resistance genes detected by PCR. A total of 30 isolates (94%) showed resistance to more than one antimicrobial. Percentage resistance was: tetracycline 81%, sulphamethoxazole 67%, streptomycin 56%, trimethoprim 47 %, ciprofloxacin 42%, ampicillin 36%, spectinomycin 28%, nalidixic acid 25%, chloramphenicol 22%, neomycin 14%, gentamicin 8%, amoxicillin-clavulanate, ceftiofur, cefotaxime, colistin, florfenicol and apramycin 0%. Resistance genes found among the isolates include bla-TEM (85%), sul2 (67%), sul3 (17%), aadA (65%), strA (70%), strB (61%), catA1 (25%), cmlA1 (13%), tetA (21%) and tetB (17%). Class 1 and 2 integrons were found in five (14%) and six (17%) isolates, respectively, while one isolate was positive for both classes of integrons. Seven out of eight isolates with resistance to ciprofloxacin and MIC ≤ 32 mg/L to nalidixic acid contained qnrS genes. Our findings provided additional evidence that the poultry production environment in Nigeria represents an important reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes such as qnrS that may spread from livestock production farms to human populations via manure and water.

  5. Defining "Sector 3" Poultry Layer Farms in Relation to H5N1-HPAI-An Example from Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durr, Peter A; Wibowo, Michael Haryadi; Tarigan, Simson; Artanto, Sidna; Rosyid, Murni Nurhasanah; Ignjatovic, Jagoda

    2016-05-01

    To help guide surveillance and control of highly pathogenic avian influenza subtype H5N1 (H5N1-HPAI), the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations in 2004 devised a poultry farm classification system based on a combination of production and biosecurity practices. Four "Sectors" were defined, and this scheme has been widely adopted within Indonesia to guide national surveillance and control strategies. Nevertheless, little detailed research into the robustness of this classification system has been conducted, particularly as it relates to independent, small to medium-sized commercial poultry farms (Sector 3). Through an analysis of questionnaire data collected as part of a survey of layer farms in western and central Java, all of which were classified as Sector 3 by local veterinarians, we provide benchmark data on what defines this sector. A multivariate analysis of the dataset, using hierarchical cluster analysis, identified three groupings of the farms, which were defined by a combination of production-and biosecurity-related variables, particularly those related to farm size and (the lack of) washing and disinfection practices. Nevertheless, the relationship between production-related variables and positive biosecurity practices was poor, and larger farms did not have an overall higher total biosecurity score than small or medium-sized ones. Further research is required to define the properties of poultry farms in Indonesia that are most closely related to effective biosecurity and the prevention of H5N1-HPAI.

  6. Occurrence of C. botulinum in healthy cattle and their environment following poultry botulism outbreaks in mixed farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souillard, R; Le Maréchal, C; Hollebecque, F; Rouxel, S; Barbé, A; Houard, E; Léon, D; Poëzévara, T; Fach, P; Woudstra, C; Mahé, F; Chemaly, M; Le Bouquin, S

    2015-10-22

    Ten cattle farms located in an area with a recent history of poultry botulism outbreaks were investigated to evaluate the occurrence of toxigenic C. botulinum in healthy cattle. Environmental samples in the 10 cattle farms and bovine fecal contents in farms with a confirmed environmental contamination were collected. Detection of C. botulinum toxin genes C, D, C/D, D/C and E was performed using real-time PCR. 4.9% (7/143) of the environmental samples collected in the 10 investigated cattle farms were positive for C. botulinum type C/D. Theses samples (boot-swabs in stalls and on pasture and water of a stream) were collected in 3 different farms. One cow dung sample and 3 out of 64 fecal contents samples collected in a single farm were also positive for C. botulinum type C/D. This study demonstrates that cattle are probably indirectly contaminated via poultry botulism in the area and that they can be intermittent carrier of C. botulinum type C/D after poultry botulism outbreaks in mixed farms.

  7. Temporal and spatial analysis of psittacosis in association with poultry farming in the Netherlands, 2000-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogerwerf, Lenny; Holstege, Manon M C; Benincà, Elisa; Dijkstra, Frederika; van der Hoek, Wim

    2017-07-26

    Human psittacosis is a highly under diagnosed zoonotic disease, commonly linked to psittacine birds. Psittacosis in birds, also known as avian chlamydiosis, is endemic in poultry, but the risk for people living close to poultry farms is unknown. Therefore, our study aimed to explore the temporal and spatial patterns of human psittacosis infections and identify possible associations with poultry farming in the Netherlands. We analysed data on 700 human cases of psittacosis notified between 01-01-2000 and 01-09-2015. First, we studied the temporal behaviour of psittacosis notifications by applying wavelet analysis. Then, to identify possible spatial patterns, we applied spatial cluster analysis. Finally, we investigated the possible spatial association between psittacosis notifications and data on the Dutch poultry sector at municipality level using a multivariable model. We found a large spatial cluster that covered a highly poultry-dense area but additional clusters were found in areas that had a low poultry density. There were marked geographical differences in the awareness of psittacosis and the amount and the type of laboratory diagnostics used for psittacosis, making it difficult to draw conclusions about the correlation between the large cluster and poultry density. The multivariable model showed that the presence of chicken processing plants and slaughter duck farms in a municipality was associated with a higher rate of human psittacosis notifications. The significance of the associations was influenced by the inclusion or exclusion of farm density in the model. Our temporal and spatial analyses showed weak associations between poultry-related variables and psittacosis notifications. Because of the low number of psittacosis notifications available for analysis, the power of our analysis was relative low. Because of the exploratory nature of this research, the associations found cannot be interpreted as evidence for airborne transmission of psittacosis from

  8. Prevalence and diversity of Campylobacter jejuni in pig herds on farms with and without cattle or poultry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boes, J.; Nersting, L.; Nielsen, Eva;

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence and diversity of Campylobacter jejuni was investigated in pig herds on farms with and without cattle or poultry production. A bacteriological screening of pig cecal samples from 247 finisher herds was carried out at the slaughterhouse. Subsequently, a follow-up study was conducted ...

  9. Numerical study of regional environmental carrying capacity for livestock and poultry farming based on planting-breeding balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lihong; Bai, Yu

    2013-09-01

    In consideration of the need to maintain planting-breeding balance, this article examines the capacity of the soil in Putian City, Fujian Province to absorb livestock and poultry excreta, and computes the environmental carrying capacity for livestock and poultry farming (ECCLPF) in each district of the city in terms of the fertility characteristics of the soil in the city, as well as its mix of crops cultivated and farming methods. On the basis of the computations, this work proceeds to classify the alarm grades of the city's environmental carrying capacity for livestock and poultry framing, and assess the environmental impact of the livestock and poultry farming industry. The results of our study indicate that, the city's ECCLPF ranges from 8.27 to 23.23 heads per ha when computed on the basis of nitrogen, and from 5.79 to 24.53 heads per ha when computed on the basis of phosphorus. A comparison between our research findings and the existing farming scale in Putian reveals that, in certain parts of the city, ECCLPF is overburdened to varying degrees. Specifically, Chengxiang District is severely overburdened, Hanjiang District and Meizhou Island have a level of overburdening between virtual overburdening and significant overburdening, Licheng District is virtually overburdened, and Xiuyu, Xianyou, and Bei'an Districts have not exceeded their environmental carrying capacity and therefore have varying levels of potential for growth.

  10. A study of risk factors for infection with HPAI H5N1 in small poultry farms in Thailand using a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siengsanan-Lamont, J; Robertson, I D; Blacksell, S D; Ellis, T; Saengchoowong, S; Suwanpukdee, S; Yongyuttawichai, P; Cheewajorn, K; Jangjaras, J; Chaichoun, K; Wiriyarat, W; Ratanakorn, P

    2013-05-01

    A questionnaire was used to collect data on small poultry farm management and wild bird observed in poultry keeping areas to identify putative risk factors for infection with HPAI H5N1. The study was conducted in 2008 in four subdistricts of central Thailand that had experienced outbreaks of HPAI H5N1 in poultry. Descriptive and inferential analyses including univariable analyses and multivariable logistic regression were used to identify putative risk factors. Risk factors included purchasing native chickens/fighting cocks from commercial hatcheries, replacing or restocking birds individually, and observing lesser whistling ducks (Dendrocygna javanica) on the farm daily. Selecting healthy animals when purchasing animals to ensure that they were disease free was a protective factor. To fully understand the epidemiology of infection of small poultry farms with HPAI H5N1, control of movement of domestic poultry and serological and virological testing of the poultry population should be applied.

  11. Risk Factors for Infectious Diseases in Backyard Poultry Farms in the Poyang Lake Area, China

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Emergence and transmission of infectious diseases have an enormous impact on the poultry industry and present a serious threat to the health of humans and wild birds. Noncommercial poultry operations, such as backyard poultry facilities in China, are potential sources of virus exchange between commercial poultry and wild birds. It is particularly critical in wetland areas where backyard poultry have close contact with commercial poultry and migratory birds, therefore increasing the risk of co...

  12. Outbreaks of salmonellosis in three different poultry farms of Kerala, India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramachandranpillai Rajagopal; Mangattumuruppel Mini

    2013-01-01

    Avian salmonellosis is an important disease causing serious impediment to the development of poultry industry especially in developing countries of Asia and Africa. Since no “effective”immunoprophylactic measures are available for the disease till date, strict biosecurity is the only alternative to preclude the disease. For formulating the control measures, an understanding of the epidemiology of the disease, proper diagnosis and identification of the causative agent is quintessential. This report sheds light on three different outbreaks of salmonellosis in three different farms in Kerala (India) describing the disease diagnosis, antibiotic resistance and the suggested control measures. All the three isolates were revealed to be Salmonella gallinarum and were resistant to at least three of the antimicrobial agents tested.

  13. Characterization of Salmonella Enteritidis strains isolated from poultry and farm environments in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campioni, F; Zoldan, M M; Falcão, J P

    2014-07-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is a major causative agent of foodborne outbreaks worldwide. Using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), this study assessed the genetic relatedness, the pathogenic potential, and antimicrobial resistance in 60 strains isolated from chickens and the farm environment in Brazil between 2004 and 2010. The resulting concatenated dendrogram of the two methodologies distinguished the strains into two clusters. Some strains isolated from the two sources were indistinguishable. All the strains contained the 13 virulence markers investigated. Forty-four strains were resistant to nalidixic acid. Quinolone resistance presented by many strains suggests that quinolones may have been used to treat chickens. The high prevalence of virulence markers highlights the importance of poultry as vehicles of S. Enteritidis strains that have the potential to cause disease.

  14. [Detection of Brachyspira pilosicoli and other Brachyspira species in Argentine poultry farms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illanes, Natalia V; Tamiozzo, Pablo J; Cabral, Ana; Bertone, Judith; Romanini, Silvia; Yaciuk, Raúl; Vázquez, Mercedes; Pelliza, Bibiana R

    2016-01-01

    Some species of the genus Brachyspira such as Brachyspira pilosicoli, Brachyspira intermedia and Brachyspira alvinipulli are pathogenic species capable of producing disease in laying hens. In our country, the presence of B. pilosicoli and other species of Brachyspira has been reported in pigs and dogs but there is no record of their presence in poultry. Fecal and cecal content samples from 34 laying hens of 4, 12 and 24 months of age from two farms were analyzed by isolation, biochemical tests and PCR. B. pilosicoli and Brachyspira spp. were identified in samples taken from laying hens of 12 and 24 months of age. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Outbreaks of salmonellosis in three different poultry farms of Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandranpillai Rajagopal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Avian salmonellosis is an important disease causing serious impediment to the development of poultry industry especially in developing countries of Asia and Africa. Since no “effective” immunoprophylactic measures are available for the disease till date, strict biosecurity is the only alternative to preclude the disease. For formulating the control measures, an understanding of the epidemiology of the disease, proper diagnosis and identification of the causative agent is quintessential. This report sheds light on three different outbreaks of salmonellosis in three different farms in Kerala (India describing the disease diagnosis, antibiotic resistance and the suggested control measures. All the three isolates were revealed to be Salmonella gallinarum and were resistant to at least three of the antimicrobial agents tested.

  16. Outbreaks of salmonellosis in three different poultry farms of Kerala, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Ramachandranpillai; Mini, Mangattumuruppel

    2013-06-01

    Avian salmonellosis is an important disease causing serious impediment to the development of poultry industry especially in developing countries of Asia and Africa. Since no "effective" immunoprophylactic measures are available for the disease till date, strict biosecurity is the only alternative to preclude the disease. For formulating the control measures, an understanding of the epidemiology of the disease, proper diagnosis and identification of the causative agent is quintessential. This report sheds light on three different outbreaks of salmonellosis in three different farms in Kerala (India) describing the disease diagnosis, antibiotic resistance and the suggested control measures. All the three isolates were revealed to be Salmonella gallinarum and were resistant to at least three of the antimicrobial agents tested.

  17. Antibiotic resistance and resistance genes in Escherichia coli from poultry farms, southwest Nigeria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adelowo, Olawale O.; Fagade, Obasola E.; Agersø, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigated the mechanisms of resistance in 36 E. coli isolated from waste, litter, soil and water samples collected from poultry farms in Southwestern Nigeria. Methodology: Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) distributions of the isolates were determined using...... the methods of the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute and resistance genes detected by PCR. Results: A total of 30 isolates (94%) showed resistance to more than one antimicrobial. Percentage resistance was: tetracycline 81%, sulphamethoxazole 67%, streptomycin 56%, trimethoprim 47 %, ciprofloxacin 42......%, ampicillin 36%, spectinomycin 28%, nalidixic acid 25%, chloramphenicol 22%, neomycin 14%, gentamicin 8%, amoxicillin-clavulanate, ceftiofur, cefotaxime, colistin, florfenicol and apramycin 0%. Resistance genes found among the isolates include bla-TEM (85%), sul2 (67%), sul3 (17%), aadA (65%), strA (70%), str...

  18. Dutch notes on BAT (Best Available Techniques) for pig- and poultry intensive lifestock farms (draft)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendriks, H.J.M.; Van de Weerdhof, A.M. [Ministry of Agriculture, Nature Management and Fisheries, National Reference Centre Agriculture, Ede (Netherlands)

    1999-08-01

    This document describes available environmental control techniques for the pig- and poultry intensive lifestock farms. The purpose of this document is to support the identification of BAT for the European pig- and poultry housing, following the requirements of article 16 of the Council Directive 96/61, concerning Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control (IPPC Directive), which has been adopted on 24 September 1996. In this document, an attempt is made to include all relevant environmental aspects of the presented techniques. In this way, the integral weighing of available techniques is facilitated. Economical aspects of presented techniques are given as well. This document comprises the following elements: Process description; Emissions, economics and energy demand; and Candidate Best Available Techniques The rules concerning covered manure storage and low emission housing are based on the Environmental Management Act. This act sees to the activities in the 'appliance', which is in fact the farmyard and the animal-housing. The permit based on the Environmental Management Act regulates the nuisance and the environmental effects in relation to the housing. Manure application does not take place in the appliance but the application techniques are also added in this document as extra information. Those measures which are based on the Manure Act and the Manure Relocation Act are not taken into account. The Netherlands will deliver separate information on these subjects.

  19. Does monensin in chicken manure from poultry farms pose a threat to soil invertebrates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zižek, Suzana; Hrženjak, Rok; Kalcher, Gabrijela Tavčar; Srimpf, Karin; Semrov, Neva; Zidar, Primož

    2011-04-01

    Monensin is a carboxylic polyether ionophore used in the poultry industry as a coccidiostat. It enters the environment via manure from broiler farms. In spite of its potential presence in the environment, information concerning monensin residues in manure and soil and its toxicity to soil organisms are insufficient. In the present study, two beneficial soil invertebrate species, earthworms (Eisenia andrei) and woodlice (Porcellio scaber), were used to assess the toxicity of monensin. Animals were exposed to a range of monensin concentrations via soil or food. Earthworm reproduction was found to be the most susceptible endpoint (NOEC=3.5 mg kg(-1) dry soil; EC(50)=12.7 mg kg(-1) dry soil), while no adverse effects were recorded in isopods (NOEC⩾849mgkg(-1) dry soil, NOEC⩾357mgkg(-1) dry food). The obtained toxicity data were compared with potential concentrations of monensin in soil. In view of this, manure from broiler chickens treated with monensin at a poultry farm was sampled. According to monensin and nitrogen concentrations in the chicken manure and the degradation time of monensin, the predicted environmental concentration (PEC) was calculated. PEC of monensin is around 0.013 mg kg(-1) soil if manure is used after 3 months of composting and 0.05 mg kg(-1) soil if used without storage. Data for earthworm reproduction was used to estimate the predicted no-effect concentration (PNEC). If fresh chicken manure is applied to terrestrial ecosystems, the risk quotient (PEC/PNEC ratio) is above 1, which indicates that monensin might pose an environmental risk under certain conditions. To prevent this, it is strongly recommended to compost chicken manure for several months before using it as fertiliser. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Prevalence and antibiotic resistance of coagulase-negative Staphylococci isolated from poultry farms in three regions of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boamah VE

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vivian Etsiapa Boamah,1 Christian Agyare,1 Hayford Odoi,1 Francis Adu,1 Stephen Yao Gbedema,1 Anders Dalsgaard2 1Microbiology Section, Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana; 2Section of Food Safety and Zoonoses, Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederisksberg, Denmark Abstract: The use of antibiotics in animal production has been associated with the development and spread of antibiotic-resistant organisms including commensals. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS species, which were until recently considered non-pathogenic, have been associated with opportunistic infections and high resistance to several antibiotics. This study sought to determine the prevalence, identity, and phenotypic resistance of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. isolated from some selected poultry farms and farm workers in the Ashanti, Brong Ahafo, and Greater Accra regions of Ghana. Poultry litter samples and oral swabs of poultry farm workers were collected, from which bacterial species were isolated, identified, and analyzed. Various selective media were used for the presumptive identification of the different species. Confirmation of bacterial identity was done using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Antibiotic susceptibility testing of the isolates was performed using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Zones of growth inhibition were interpreted based on the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST guidelines. Two hundred and fifty-six coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp., comprising S. sciuri (42.97%, S. lentus (35.94%, S. gallinarum (6.64%, S. xylosus (4.30%, S. haemolyticus (3.91%, S. saprophyticus (1.95%, and S. cohnii (0.39% were confirmed by MALDI-TOF. CoNS were isolated from samples

  1. Numerical study of regional environmental carrying capacity for livestock and poultry farming based on planting-breeding balance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lihong Peng; Yu Bai

    2013-01-01

    In consideration of the need to maintain planting-breeding balance,this article examines the capacity of the soil in Putian City,Fujian Province to absorb livestock and poultry excreta,and computes the environmental carrying capacity for livestock and poultry farming (ECCLPF) in each district of the city in terms of the fertility characteristics of the soil in the city,as well as its mix of crops cultivated and farming methods.On the basis of the computations,this work proceeds to classify the alarm grades of the city's environmental carrying capacity for livestock and poultry framing,and assess the environmental impact of the livestock and poultry farming industry.The results of our study indicate that,the city's ECCLPF ranges from 8.27 to 23.23 heads per ha when computed on the basis of nitrogen,and from 5.79 to 24.53 heads per ha when computed on the basis of phosphorus.A comparison between our research findings and the existing fanning scale in Putian reveals that,in certain parts of the city,ECCLPF is overburdened to varying degrees.Specifically,Chengxiang District is severely overburdened,Hanjiang District and Meizhou Island have a level of overburdening between virtual overburdening and significant overburdening,Licheng District is virtually overburdened,and Xiuyu,Xianyou,and Bei'an Districts have not exceeded their environmental carrying capacity and therefore have varying levels of potential for growth.

  2. A QMRA for the Transmission of ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli and Campylobacter from Poultry Farms to Humans Through Flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Eric G; Blaak, Hetty; Hamidjaja, Raditijo A; de Jonge, Rob; Schets, Franciska M

    2016-02-01

    The public health significance of transmission of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli and Campylobacter from poultry farms to humans through flies was investigated using a worst-case risk model. Human exposure was modeled by the fraction of contaminated flies, the number of specific bacteria per fly, the number of flies leaving the poultry farm, and the number of positive poultry houses in the Netherlands. Simplified risk calculations for transmission through consumption of chicken fillet were used for comparison, in terms of the number of human exposures, the total human exposure, and, for Campylobacter only, the number of human cases of illness. Comparing estimates of the worst-case risk of transmission through flies with estimates of the real risk of chicken fillet consumption, the number of human exposures to ESBL-producing E. coli was higher for chicken fillet as compared with flies, but the total level of exposure was higher for flies. For Campylobacter, risk values were nearly consistently higher for transmission through flies than for chicken fillet consumption. This indicates that the public health risk of transmission of both ESBL-producing E. coli and Campylobacter to humans through flies might be of importance. It justifies further modeling of transmission through flies for which additional data (fly emigration, human exposure) are required. Similar analyses of other environmental transmission routes from poultry farms are suggested to precede further investigations into flies.

  3. Molecular detection of avian pathogens in poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae) collected in chicken farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huong, Chu Thi Thanh; Murano, Takako; Uno, Yukiko; Usui, Tatsufumi; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi

    2014-12-01

    Poultry red mite (PRM, Dermanyssus gallinae) is a blood-sucking ectoparasite as well as a possible vector of several avian pathogens. In this study, to define the role of PRM in the prevalence of avian infectious agents, we used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to check for the presence of seven pathogens: Avipox virus (APV), Fowl Adenovirus (FAdV), Marek's disease virus (MDV), Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae (ER), Salmonella enterica (SE), Mycoplasma synoviae (MS) and Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG). A total of 159 PRM samples collected between 2004 and 2012 from 142 chicken farms in 38 prefectures in Japan were examined. APV DNA was detected in 22 samples (13.8%), 19 of which were wild-type APV. 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) of MS was detected in 15 samples (9.4%), and the mgc2 gene of MG was detected in 2 samples (1.3%). Eight of 15 MS 16S rRNA sequences differed from the vaccine sequence, indicating they were wild-type strains, while both of the MG mgc2 gene sequences detected were identical to the vaccine sequences. Of these avian pathogen-positive mite samples, three were positive for both wild-types of APV and MS. On the other hand, the DNAs of ER, SE, FAdV and MDV were not detected in any samples. These findings indicated that PRM can harbor the wild-type pathogens and might play a role as a vector in spreading these diseases in farms.

  4. Updraft gasification of poultry litter at farm-scale--A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupe, N C; Lynch, D; Wnetrzak, R; Kwapinska, M; Kwapinski, W; Leahy, J J

    2016-04-01

    Farm and animal wastes are increasingly being investigated for thermochemical conversion, such as gasification, due to the urgent necessity of finding new waste treatment options. We report on an investigation of the use of a farm-scale, auto-thermal gasification system for the production of a heating gas using poultry litter (PL) as a feedstock. The gasification process was robust and reliable. The PL's ash melting temperature was 639°C, therefore the reactor temperature was kept around this value. As a result of the low reactor temperature the process performance parameters were low, with a cold gas efficiency (CGE) of 0.26 and a carbon conversion efficiency (CCE) of 0.44. The calorific value of the clean product gas was 3.39 MJ m(-3)N (LHV). The tar was collected as an emulsion containing 87 wt.% water and the extracted organic compounds were identified. The residual char exceeds thresholds for Zn and Cu to obtain European biochar certification; however, has potential to be classified as a pyrogenic carbonaceous material (PCM), which resembles a high nutrient biochar.

  5. Poultry

    OpenAIRE

    Juliana Pinto de Medeiros

    2010-01-01

    The quality of the egg farm is determined by the quality of the shell, resistant to handling, age, genetic origin and health condition of chickens, as well as the duration and conditions of storage. This study aimed to evaluate the productive performance and egg quality of laying hens supplemented with organic minerals. Used in 2400 Dekalb hens with 42 weeks of age. Throughout the period of the experiment was given the supplement. The animals were divided, at random into 2 groups, each ...

  6. Prospective study of avian influenza H9 infection in commercial poultry farms of Punjab Province and Islamabad Capital Territory, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Mamoona; Ahmad, Maqbool; Rashid, Hamad Bin; Sultan, Bakhat; Chaudhry, Haroon Rashid; Riaz, Aayesha; Shaheen, Muhammad Shabir

    2017-01-01

    A prospective study was conducted from November 2013 to February 2014 to estimate the spatial clustering; cumulative incidence and risk factors associated with avian influenza (AI) subtype H9 infection on commercial poultry farms of Pakistan. A total of 400 farms were enrolled and followed during the study period. Among these, 109 farms submitted samples suspected for AI to the laboratory, and only 47 farms were confirmed positive by hemagglutinin inhibition (HI) test. Data was collected from these 109 farms about their demography, management, and biosecurity practices. The cumulative incidence of H9N2 was 11.75 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) 8.76-15.23). The highest number of cases (40.42 %) was reported in January. One most likely cluster (p = 0.009, radius = 4.61 km) occurred in the Kasur district. Multivariable logistic regression analyses showed that the presence of wild birds on the farms (odds ratio (OR) = 16.18; 95 % CI 3.94-66.45) was independently associated with H9N2 infection. Cleaning of cages before delivery on farm (OR = 0.16; 95 % CI = 0.06-0.47), presence of a footbath at the entrance of farm (OR = 0.24; 95 % CI 0.08-0.79), and changing of gloves (OR = 0.33; 95 % CI 0.11-0.99) were protective factors against H9N2 infection. Reducing the exposure to risk factors and adapting biosecurity measures may reduce the risk of AI H9N2 infection on commercial poultry farms in Pakistan.

  7. Molds and mycotoxins in poultry feeds from farms of potential mycotoxicosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Shareef

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Forty five finished poultry feed samples, collected from different broilers, broiler breeders and layers farms were divided into two parts, for mycological and mycotoxins examination. In counting of molds, dilute plate technique was used, whereas feed parts were used for mycotoxin estimation, they were subjected to four standard kits of Aflatoxin, Ochratoxin, T-2 toxin and Fumonisins. Mold counts were around 105 cfu.g-1 sample. Fourteen mold genera were recovered. From the systematic point of view, 2 genera belonged to Zygomycetes (i.e. Mucor, Rhizopus,, 1 genus belong to Ascomycetes (i.e. Eurotium; the majority, within so-called mitotic fungi (formerly Deuteromycetes, encompassed 11 genera (i.e. Acremonium, Alternaria, Aspergillus, Fusarium, Paecilomyces, Penicillium, Scopulariopsis,, Trichothecium, Ulocladium and Aerobasidium. The most frequent fungi were those from the genus Aspergillus. The concentrations of the four analyzed mycotoxins in the poultry finished feeds, and the percentages of the recovered mycotoxins, revealed that aflatoxins was recovered in 91.1% of the examined samples, with a mean value of 179.1µg/kg. The same percentage was found with Ochratoxins, but with lower mean concentration of 159.4µg/kg. In the third order were Fumonisins mycotoxins were in the third order, and they were recovered in 51.1% of the tested samples with a mean value of 127µg/kg. In the fourth order was T-2 toxin, with a percentage of 2.2% and a value of 50.0µg/kg.

  8. Characteristics of commercial and traditional village poultry farming in Mali with a focus on practices influencing the risk of transmission of avian influenza and Newcastle disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molia, Sophie; Traoré, Idrissa; Kamissoko, Badian; Diakité, Adama; Sidibé, Maimouna Sanogo; Sissoko, Kadiatou Diarra; Pfeiffer, Dirk Udo

    2015-10-01

    We aimed at characterizing commercial and traditional village poultry farming in Mali, with a focus on practices influencing the risk of transmission of avian influenza and Newcastle disease. Surveys were conducted in 2009-2011 in a study area covering approximately 98% of the Malian poultry population. Among the 282 commercial farms investigated, of which 64 had not been known by the government authorities, 83% were located within a 50km radius from the capitals of the country and regions and 54% had low biosecurity standard. Among the 152 randomly selected village household flocks investigated, characteristics were overall similar to those in other African countries but some differences were notable including a large flock size (median 44 poultry), a low presence of ducks and geese (11% and 1.1% of flocks, respectively), vaccination against Newcastle disease being common (49% of flocks), a low proportion of households selling sick and dead birds (0.7% and 0%, respectively) and limited cohabitation between poultry and humans at night. Our recommendations to limit the risk of disease transmission include (1) for commercial farms, to introduce compulsory farm registration and accreditation, to increase technical proficiency and access to credit for farms with low biosecurity, and to support poultry producer associations; (2) for village poultry, to promote better quarantine and management of sick and dead birds. Such detailed knowledge of country-specific characteristics of poultry production systems is essential to be able to develop more efficient disease risk management policies.

  9. Temporal changes in the abundance of Musca domestica Linn (Diptera: Muscidae) in poultry farms in Penang, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Bong Lee; Jaal, Zairi

    2009-08-01

    Changes in the abundance of the house fly, Musca domestica, was studied for a period of one year in two poultry farms in Penang, Malaysia: one in Balik Pulau, located in Penang island, and the other in Juru, located on mainland Penang. The sampling of house flies were carried out from March 2007 to April 2008 using the Scudder grill, and the correlation with meteorological conditions particularly rainfall, relative humidity and temperature were observed. In Balik Pulau, the fly abundance showed an inverse relationship to relative humidity and total rainfall. However, no significant correlations were found between the abundance of flies and the above mentioned climatic factors. In contrast, the occurrence of flies in Juru showed strong correlation indices with relative humidity (r=0.803, p<0.05) and total rainfall (r=0.731, p<0.05). Temperature had no significant effect on the abundance of flies in both poultry farms due to imperceptible changes in monthly temperature.

  10. [Surveillance measures at joint-stock company "Poultry Farm Lubinskaya" during the period of avian flu epizootia in Omsk region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uskov, P A; Gerasimov, A M; Putiatova, O N; Turchaninov, D V

    2006-01-01

    The organization of sanitary-and-epidemiologic supervision of an integrated poultry farm during epizootia of avian flu is devoted. The unsuccessful situation demands acceptance of additional measures which provided performance antiepizootic, preventive and antiepidemic measures with a view of restriction and distribution of an infection on poultry-farming enterprise. The disinfection barriers of several levels are established. Are organized a sanitary filtrates for the personnel and regular medical supervision over workers of the enterprise and their families. It is carried out the serological control over presence of specific antibodies to a virus of influenza virus among the workers contacting to a bird. Monitoring research of tests of blood of birds on antibodies to the influenza virus was carried out since August, 2005.

  11. Prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Salmonella isolated from a poultry farm and processing plant environment in the state of Kuwait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Zenki, Sameer; Al-Nasser, Affaf; Al-Safar, AbdulAmir

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of Salmonella isolated from a poultry farm and from the poultry processing plant environment were evaluated from August 2004 to July 2005 along with microbial antibiotic resistance. In total, 3242 samples were collected from the farm and processing plant. Samples collected from...... of Salmonella was 4.7% with prevalence rates of 6.1% and 3.3% for carcass rinse and ceca samples, respectively. Salmonella Enteritidis was the most prevalent serotype. All of the isolates were resistant to at least one antibiotic and 10 different resistance profiles were found among 173 isolates of Salmonella...... Enteritidis. Resistance to ampicillin, nalidixic acid, and tetracycline were the most common. The widespread occurrence of multiple resistant Salmonella Enteritidis is a cause for concern, and local regulatory enforcement agencies should ensure prudent use of antibiotics....

  12. Measuring the costs of biosecurity on poultry farms: a case study in broiler production in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Farm-level biosecurity provides the foundation for biosecurity along the entire production chain. Many risk management practices are constantly in place, regardless of whether there is a disease outbreak or not. Nonetheless, the farm-level costs of preventive biosecurity have rarely been assessed. We examined the costs incurred by preventive biosecurity for Finnish poultry farms. Methods We used a semi-structured phone interview and obtained results from 17 broiler producers and from 5 hatching egg producers, corresponding to about 10% of all producers in Finland. Results Our results indicate that the average cost of biosecurity is some 3.55 eurocent per bird for broiler producers (0.10 eurocent per bird per rearing day) and 75.7 eurocent per bird for hatching egg producers (0.27 eurocent per bird per rearing day). For a batch of 75,000 broilers, the total cost would be €2,700. The total costs per bird are dependent on the annual number of birds: the higher the number of birds, the lower the cost per bird. This impact is primarily due to decreasing labour costs rather than direct monetary costs. Larger farms seem to utilise less labour per bird for biosecurity actions. There are also differences relating to the processor with which the producer is associated, as well as to the gender of the producer, with female producers investing more in biosecurity. Bird density was found to be positively related to the labour costs of biosecurity. This suggests that when the bird density is higher, greater labour resources need to be invested in their health and welfare and hence disease prevention. The use of coccidiostats as a preventive measure to control coccidiosis was found to have the largest cost variance between the producers, contributing to the direct costs. Conclusions The redesign of cost-sharing in animal diseases is currently ongoing in the European Union. Before we can assert how the risk should be shared or resort to the 'polluter pays' principle

  13. Degradation of Insecticides in Poultry Manure: Determining the Insecticidal Treatment Interval for Managing House Fly (Diptera: Muscidae) Populations in Poultry Farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Song-Quan; Ab Majid, Abdul Hafiz; Ahmad, Hamdan

    2016-04-01

    It is crucial to understand the degradation pattern of insecticides when designing a sustainable control program for the house fly, Musca domestica (L.), on poultry farms. The aim of this study was to determine the half-life and degradation rates of cyromazine, chlorpyrifos, and cypermethrin by spiking these insecticides into poultry manure, and then quantitatively analyzing the insecticide residue using ultra-performance liquid chromatography. The insecticides were later tested in the field in order to study the appropriate insecticidal treatment intervals. Bio-assays on manure samples were later tested at 3, 7, 10, and 15 d for bio-efficacy on susceptible house fly larvae. Degradation analysis demonstrated that cyromazine has the shortest half-life (3.01 d) compared with chlorpyrifos (4.36 d) and cypermethrin (3.75 d). Cyromazine also had a significantly greater degradation rate compared with chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin. For the field insecticidal treatment interval study, 10 d was the interval that had been determined for cyromazine due to its significantly lower residue; for ChCy (a mixture of chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin), the suggested interval was 7 d. Future work should focus on the effects of insecticide metabolites on targeted pests and the poultry manure environment.

  14. Abusive use of antibiotics in poultry farming in Cameroon and the public health implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guetiya Wadoum, R E; Zambou, N F; Anyangwe, F F; Njimou, J R; Coman, M M; Verdenelli, M C; Cecchini, C; Silvi, S; Orpianesi, C; Cresci, A; Colizzi, V

    2016-08-01

    The types and methods of use of antibiotics in poultry farms in Cameroon, residual levels and potential microbial resistance were determined. A questionnaire-based survey identified the different antibiotics used and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to determine residual levels of antibiotics. Pathogens were isolated, identified by use of commercial API kits and minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) was determined. Oxytetracyclin, tylocip and TCN (oxytetracycline, chloramphenicol and neomycin) were the most frequently used antibiotics. Antibiotics screened by HPLC were chloramphenicol, tetracycline and vancomycin. All of them except vancomycin were detected, and the concentration of these antibiotics was higher than the maximum residual limits (MRL) set by regulatory authorities. No residues of various antibiotics were found in egg albumen or yolk. The concentration of tetracycline was significantly higher in liver (150 ± 30 µg/g) than in other tissues. Foodborne pathogens, including Salmonella spp., Staphylococcus spp., Listeria spp., Clostridium spp. and Escherichia spp., were identified. Most of the pathogens were resistant to these various antibiotics tested. These findings imply the need for better management of antibiotic use to control sources of food contamination and reduce health risks associated with the presence of residues and the development of resistant pathogens by further legislation and enforcement of regulations on food hygiene and use of antibiotics.

  15. Microbial and Oligosaccharides Treatments of Feces and Slurry in Reducing Ammonia of the Poultry Farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yusrizal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of Lactobacillus sp and fructooligosaccaride (FOS to reduce the volatile ammonia formation from chicken excreta and layer slurry. For each treatment-replication, 150 g of fecal material were collected from the poultry farm and placed in 500 ml beaker glass. The fecal sample was then treated with 2% Lactobacillus sp (2.6x106 cfu/g and 2% FOS and covered with plastic wraps. The volatile ammonia contents and pH were measured after one hour of standing (0 d and repeated at 48 h intervals for 6 d. For the dropping slurry study, 300 g of each layer dropping slurry sample were used. Results indicated that 2% Lactobacillus sp or FOS supplementations in the feces and dropping slurry after 1 h up to 6 d reduced the ammonia odor formation, fecal pH, and moisture content. The Lactobacillus sp and FOS treated manure resulted in increasing Lactobacillus sp count and reducing in E. coli, Salmonella, and Campylobacter in 6 days for both feces and layer dropping slurry. In addition, reducing moisture content was observed in treated manure. It is concluded that Lactobacillus sp and FOS reduced the volatile ammonia formation and pathogenic bacteria from chicken excreta and layer slurry.

  16. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF ELECTRO TECHNOLOGICAL OZONIZATION OF EGG STORES OF POULTRY FARMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voloshin A. P.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sanitization of eggs is an essential way to fight bacteria, fungi and other microorganisms. Hatchability of eggs and the safety of day-old chicks are dependent on the quality of eggs processing. Leading scientists of our country have proved high efficacy of ozone application for processing of hatching eggs. To obtain a positive result by this method of sanitizing hatching eggs ozone, it is necessary to create a uniform concentration of ozone around the egg store volume. Decrease in ozone concentration from the set point may result in insufficient exposure to pathogens and because of this, may reduce hatchability. Significant excess of ozone concentration from the set point can kill the embryo. Because of mathematical modeling of electro eggs ozone treatment process, there was a mathematical model of the process of electroozonation of egg stores of poultry farms. This model takes into account decomposition of ozone on the surface of eggs and decomposition of ozone on the walls of an egg store. This mathematical model proves the desired control action at different initial data, such as: the required concentration of ozone in the egg store, the number of eggs, egg store geometric dimensions, the fan power, the design parameters of the discharge unit, the location of the ozone generator in the room

  17. Comparative possession of Shiga toxin, intimin, enterohaemolysin and major extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) genes in Escherichia coli isolated from backyard and farmed poultry

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The present work was conducted to compare the occurrence of Escherichia coli possessing virulence and ESBL genes in backyard and farmed poultry. Three hundred and sixty samples from the poultry kept in backyard system and 120 samples from the farmed birds were collected from West Bengal, India. Among the E. coli isolates of backyard poultry (O2, O10, O25, O55, O60, O106, UT), none of them possessed any of the Shiga toxin genes and eight E. coli isolates (8/272; 2.9%) harboured eaeA gene alone...

  18. Design and implementation of temperature and humidity monitoring system for poultry farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnomo, Hindriyanto Dwi; Somya, Ramos; Fibriani, Charitas; Purwoko, Angga; Sadiyah, Ulfa

    2016-10-01

    Automatic monitoring system gains significant interest in poultry industry due to the need of consistent environment condition. Appropriate environment increase the feed conversion ratio as well as birds productivity. This will increase the competitiveness of the poultry industry. In this research, a temperature and humidity monitoring system is proposed to observer the temperature and relative humidity of a poultry house. The system is intended to be applied in the poultry industry with partnership schema. The proposed system is equipped with CCTV for visual monitoring. The measured temperature and humidity implement wireless sensor network technology. The experiment results reveals that proposed system have the potential to increase the effectiveness of monitoring of poultry house in poultry industry with partnership schema.

  19. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Resistance of Enterobacteriaceae in Shell Eggs from Small-Scale Poultry Farms and Farmers' Markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilonzo-Nthenge, A; Nahashon, S N; Godwin, S; Liu, S; Long, D

    2016-12-01

    Public health concerns over the emergence of antimicrobial resistant bacteria have increased recently. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of antimicrobial resistant Enterobacteriaceae in shell eggs purchased from small poultry farms and farmers' markets. A total of 504 eggs were pooled to make 252 composite samples, consisting of 2 eggs per composite. The microbial quality of shell eggs was determined by standard quantitative, biochemical, and PCR techniques. Susceptibility to 13 antimicrobial agents was determined by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion technique, and results were interpreted based on Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute values. Shell eggs and egg contents were positive for Escherichia coli (11.9 and 5.2%, respectively), Enterobacter (9.1 and 7.9%), and Serratia (11.5 and 4.8%). Salmonella was isolated from 3.6% of egg shells but not from egg contents. Mean (±SD) Enterobacteriaceae levels (4.4 ± 2.0 log CFU per eggshell) on shell eggs from poultry farms was significantly higher (P ≤ 0.05) than that on shell eggs from farmers' markets (2.1 ± 1.3 log CFU per eggshell). Of the 134 isolates recovered, resistance among isolates from farm and market shell eggs to erythromycin was most common (48.5 and 32.8%, respectively) followed by ampicillin (44.8 and 17.2%), and tetracycline (29.9 and 17.2%). The multiple antibiotic resistance index value for E. coli and Pantoea was 0.62, and that for Salmonella and Klebsiella terrigena was 0.08, indicating that Enterobacteriaceae in shell eggs can be resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents. These data reveal that shell eggs from small poultry farms and farmers' markets can harbor antimicrobial resistant pathogenic and commensal bacteria. Thus, failure to properly handle shell eggs poses a potential health hazard to consumers.

  20. Poultry farm hygiene: microbiological quality assessment of drinking water used in layer chickens managed under the battery cage and deep litter systems at three poultry farms in southwestern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folorunso, O R; Kayode, Sule; Onibon, V O

    2014-01-01

    Water troughs from deep litter and caged chicken water troughs (drinkers) fixed to each of the different 3-tier cages containing layer chickens in Farms A, B and C were subjected to a 7-day study which involved the monitoring of poultry farm hygiene. Drinkers were washed before filling with water on Day 1. For Days 3, 5 and 7 water was served without prior washing. The occurrence and characterization of the bacteria isolates were investigated and data obtained were analyzed and compared. For the bacterial count on Day 1, for layer chickens on cage system, no significant differences (p > 0.05) among the farms and between the farms tier interactions. On Day 3, no significant difference (p > 0.05) among the parameters. On Day 5, there was significant difference (p0.05) among the tiers nor between the interactions of the farms and tiers. The bacterial count in water troughs of layer chickens in deep litter system, on Day 1, had no significant differences (p > 0.05) between the farms, water troughs and their interactions. On Day 3, no significant difference (p > 0.05) among the parameters. On Days 5 and 7, there were significant difference (p<0.05) and a high significant difference (p < 0.01) between the farms respectively. On Days 5 and 7, no significant differences between the water troughs and between the interaction of the farms and the water troughs. Farm A isolates contained Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris, Streptococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Klebsiella sp., Salmonella sp., Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus salivarius and Corynebacterium sp. Farm B had Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermis, Bacillus subtilis, Corynebacterium sp., Escherichia coli, Streptococcus faecalis and Klebsiella sp. while for Farm C, apart from the prevalent bacteria isolates obtained in Farms A and B, additional 2 bacterial isolates, Lactobacillus salivarius and Pseudomonas aeuriginosa were found. In conclusion, water troughs when cleaned on daily basis

  1. Seroprevalence of Mycoplasma synoviae and Mycoplasma gallisepticum at Batna Commercial poultry farms in Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouzha Heleili

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to know the seroprevalence of Mycoplasma synoviae (MS and Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG in broiler and layer chickens in the area of Batna, eastern Algeria. This investigation was conducted during the period from 2008 to 2011. Materials and Methods: A total of 505 sera samples were collected and tested by serum plate agglutination (SPA test using Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synoviae antigens (Soleil Diagnostic to detect the presence of antibodies against MS and MG. Results: The overall prevalence of MS and MG infection in the 27 flocks visited in this investigation were recorded as 66.33% and 69.90% respectively. Seroprevalence of MG infection was found significantly (p<0.05 higher during winter season (61.48% than in summer (47.74% while MS infection is more dominant in summer (91.25% against 46.69%. Again this was recorded in different age groups, with significantly higher occurrence in young compared to adult with 85.14% in layer hens and 90.73% in broiler chickens. On the other hand, the seroprevalence of MG and MS infection was found little (p>0.05 higher in large flocks (76.97% in comparison to small flocks (63.63%. The highest prevalence (76.59% of mycoplasmal infection in layer hens was found in Lohman strain. Conclusion: It has been found that MG and MS infections are still important disease problems in poultry farms in Algeria. [Vet World 2012; 5(12.000: 709-712

  2. Comparative possession of Shiga toxin, intimin, enterohaemolysin and major extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) genes in Escherichia coli isolated from backyard and farmed poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, I; Joardar, S N; Das, P K; Sar, T K

    2015-01-01

    The present work was conducted to compare the occurrence of Escherichia coli possessing virulence and ESBL genes in backyard and farmed poultry. Three hundred and sixty samples from the poultry kept in backyard system and 120 samples from the farmed birds were collected from West Bengal, India. Among the E. coli isolates of backyard poultry (O2, O10, O25, O55, O60, O106, UT), none of them possessed any of the Shiga toxin genes and eight E. coli isolates (8/272; 2.9%) harboured eaeA gene alone. Whereas among the E. coli isolated from the farmed poultry (O17, O20, O22, O102, O114, O119, rough, UT), four isolates (4/78, 5.1%) harboured stx 1/stx 2 gene and 11 isolates (11/78, 14.1%) possessed eaeA gene. None of the E. coli isolates from the backyard poultry harboured any studied ESBL gene. Whereas 29.4% of E. coli isolates from the farmed poultry were found to possess the ESBL genes.

  3. Lesser mealworms on poultry farms: A potential arena for the dissemination of pathogens and antimicrobial resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increase in poultry production due to market demand stimulates an increase in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO) and thus confined raising resulting in an increased density of birds in poultry houses. The close quarters and high bird numbers generally favor the survival of insect pes...

  4. Antibiotic Resistance in Animal and Environmental Samples Associated with Small-Scale Poultry Farming in Northwestern Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braykov, Nikolay P; Eisenberg, Joseph N S; Grossman, Marissa; Zhang, Lixin; Vasco, Karla; Cevallos, William; Muñoz, Diana; Acevedo, Andrés; Moser, Kara A; Marrs, Carl F; Foxman, Betsy; Trostle, James; Trueba, Gabriel; Levy, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The effects of animal agriculture on the spread of antibiotic resistance (AR) are cross-cutting and thus require a multidisciplinary perspective. Here we use ecological, epidemiological, and ethnographic methods to examine populations of Escherichia coli circulating in the production poultry farming environment versus the domestic environment in rural Ecuador, where small-scale poultry production employing nontherapeutic antibiotics is increasingly common. We sampled 262 "production birds" (commercially raised broiler chickens and laying hens) and 455 "household birds" (raised for domestic use) and household and coop environmental samples from 17 villages between 2010 and 2013. We analyzed data on zones of inhibition from Kirby-Bauer tests, rather than established clinical breakpoints for AR, to distinguish between populations of organisms. We saw significantly higher levels of AR in bacteria from production versus household birds; resistance to either amoxicillin-clavulanate, cephalothin, cefotaxime, and gentamicin was found in 52.8% of production bird isolates and 16% of household ones. A strain jointly resistant to the 4 drugs was exclusive to a subset of isolates from production birds (7.6%) and coop surfaces (6.5%) and was associated with a particular purchase site. The prevalence of AR in production birds declined with bird age (P Ecuador, where such backyard poultry operations have become established over the past decade. Our previous research in the region suggests that introduction of AR bacteria through travel and commerce may be an important source of AR in villages of this region. This report extends the prior analysis by examining small-scale production chicken farming as a potential source of resistant strains. Our results suggest that AR strains associated with poultry production likely originate from sources outside the study area and that these outside sources might be a better place to target control efforts than local management practices.

  5. Wind-Mediated Spread of Low-Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus into the Environment during Outbreaks at Commercial Poultry Farms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Jonges

    Full Text Available Avian influenza virus-infected poultry can release a large amount of virus-contaminated droppings that serve as sources of infection for susceptible birds. Much research so far has focused on virus spread within flocks. However, as fecal material or manure is a major constituent of airborne poultry dust, virus-contaminated particulate matter from infected flocks may be dispersed into the environment. We collected samples of suspended particulate matter, or the inhalable dust fraction, inside, upwind and downwind of buildings holding poultry infected with low-pathogenic avian influenza virus, and tested them for the presence of endotoxins and influenza virus to characterize the potential impact of airborne influenza virus transmission during outbreaks at commercial poultry farms. Influenza viruses were detected by RT-PCR in filter-rinse fluids collected up to 60 meters downwind from the barns, but virus isolation did not yield any isolates. Viral loads in the air samples were low and beyond the limit of RT-PCR quantification except for one in-barn measurement showing a virus concentration of 8.48 x 10(4 genome copies/m(3. Air samples taken outside poultry barns had endotoxin concentrations of ~50 EU/m(3 that declined with increasing distance from the barn. Atmospheric dispersion modeling of particulate matter, using location-specific meteorological data for the sampling days, demonstrated a positive correlation between endotoxin measurements and modeled particulate matter concentrations, with an R(2 varying from 0.59 to 0.88. Our data suggest that areas at high risk for human or animal exposure to airborne influenza viruses can be modeled during an outbreak to allow directed interventions following targeted surveillance.

  6. Heavy metals pollution in poultry and livestock feeds and manures under intensive farming in Jiangsu Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CANG Long; WANG Yu-jun; ZHOU Dong-mei; DONG Yuan-hua

    2004-01-01

    The heavy metals pollution in poultry and livestock feeds and manures under intensive farming in Jiangsu Province was investigated. 97 feed and manure samples were sampled from 31 farming plants in 10 major cities of Jiangsu. 14 metals, including Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd, Cr, Ni, Mo, Mn, Ba, Co, Sr, Ti, As and Hg, were analyzed after samples acid digestion. The results showed that the most feed samples contained high concentration of metals exceeding National Hygienical Standard for Feeds. Meanwhile, it was found that Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd and Cr concentrations in animal manures were also high, for example, Cu concentration in a manure sample reached to as much as 1726.3 mg/kg. Heavy metals loading quantities in soil per year were then calculated when metals contaminated organic fertilizers were applied, and its effects on soil environmental quality were further evaluated.

  7. Use of observed wild bird activity on poultry farms and a literature review to target species as high priority for avian influenza testing in 2 regions of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Theresa E; Ribble, Carl; Stephen, Craig; Kelton, David; Toews, Lorraine; Osterhold, Jason; Wheeler, Hazel

    2012-02-01

    The risk of avian influenza outbreaks in poultry is partially dependent on the probability of contact between domestic poultry and wild birds shedding avian influenza (AI) virus. The major objective of this study was to document wild bird activity on poultry farms to determine which wild bird species should be targeted for AI surveillance in Canada. We collected data in 2 major poultry producing regions of Canada, southwestern Ontario and the Fraser Valley of British Columbia, on the relative abundance of various wild bird species found on poultry farms and on how these species utilized habitat around poultry farms. We reviewed the published literature to determine what was known about AI pathobiology in the species we observed. From these results we created a list of 10 wild bird species that are a priority for further study. These species are the European starling, barn swallow, rock dove, American crow, northwestern crow, American robin, dark-eyed junco, song sparrow, horned lark, and common grackle. Abundance of these and other species varied between provinces and seasons.

  8. PREVALENCE OF SOME HELMINTHS IN RODENTS CAPTURED FROM DIFFERENT CITY STRUCTURES INCLUDING POULTRY FARMS AND HUMAN POPULATION OF FAISALABAD, PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. RAFIQUE, S. A. RANA, H. A. KHAN AND A. SOHAIL1

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate prevalence of zoonotic helminths from human, Rattus rattus (R. rattus, Rattus norvegicus (R. norvegicus and Mus musculus of eight different structures, namely grain shops in grain market, departmental stores, railway godowns, food processing plants (bakeries, poultry farms, houses in kachi-abadies, houses in departmental colonies and posh residences and banglows in Faisalabad city. All the structures were sampled for 2 months each and completed in 16 months. Highest prevalence (70% of Vsmpirolepis spp. was observed in R. rattus sampled from poultry farms, which was significantly higher (P<0.05 than the prevalence of all the helminths recovered from other structures. Hymenolepis nana (H. nana was observed in 60% of the sampled Mus musculus collected from kachi-abadies, which was significantly higher (P<0.05 than all other structures studies for H. nana, except R. rattus from kachi-abadies (55% and R. norvegicus from grain shops in grain market (55%. The rodent’s endo-parasites viz., Hymenolepis nana, Teania taenaeformis, Entrobius spps and Trichuiris spps observed in R. rattus, R. norvegicus and M. musculus at different percentages were also recorded in human stool samples with an incidence of 48, 21, 76 and 10%, respectively.

  9. Molecular investigations of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) in the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae, in northern Europe and implications for its transmission between laying poultry farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oines, O; Brännström, S

    2011-12-01

    Samples of Dermanyssus gallinae (DeGeer) (Acari: Dermanyssidae) from more than 49 Norwegian and Swedish laying poultry farms, and additional samples collected from Scottish, Finnish, Danish and Dutch layer farms, were compared genetically. Analysis of partial mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) sequences of mites from Norway and Sweden revealed 32 haplotypes. Only single haplotypes were found on most farms, which suggests that infections are recycled within farms and that transmission routes are few. Both Norwegian and Swedish isolates were found in the two major haplogroups, but no haplotypes were shared between Norway and Sweden, indicating little or no recent exchange of mites between these countries. There appears to be no link between haplotypes and geographical location as identical haplotypes were found in both the northern and southern Swedish locations, and haplotypes were scattered in locations between these extremes. The current data suggest that wild birds in Sweden are not a reservoir for D. gallinae infection of layer farms as their mites were genetically distinct from D. gallinae of farm layer birds. Transmission of the poultry red mite in Scandinavia is thus likely to depend on synantropic factors such as the exchange of contaminated material or infested birds between farms or facilities.

  10. Evaluation of ionophore sensitivity of Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria maxima isolated from the Algerian to Jijel province poultry farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djemai, Samir; Mekroud, Abdeslam; Jenkins, Mark C

    2016-07-15

    The present study represents the first description of ionophore resistance in recovered from commercial Algerian (Jijel-Algeria) broiler farms. Microscopy and intervening transcribed sequence 1 PCR (ITS1 PCR) revealed only 2 Eimeria species present in litter from these farms- namely Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria maxima. A pool of these isolates were evaluated in broiler chickens (Cobb 500) for sensitivity to 5 anticoccidial compounds-diclazuril (1ppm), lasalocid (125ppm), monensin (125ppm), narasin (70ppm) and salinomycin (60ppm). As indicated by anticoccidial sensitivity profiles based on lesion scores and anticoccidial index (ACI), complete resistance to monensin and narasin, partial resistance to salinomycin and lasalocid, and complete sensitivity to diclazuril was observed. While lack of sensitivity to monensin is not surprising given its use for years as the sole anticoccidial compound, the resistance to monoether (narasin) and polyether (lasalocid) ionophores suggests that cross-resistance has developed in a segment of the Eimeria population. The fairly uniform Eimeria species composition among all poultry farms suggests that E. acervulina and E. maxima more rapidly develop resistance to ionophore drugs.

  11. Avoparcin used as a growth promoter is associated with the occurrence of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium on Danish poultry and pig farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Flemming; Madsen, M.; Christensen, J.;

    1997-01-01

    We determined the association between the use of the glycopeptide antibiotic avoparcin as a growth promoter and the occurrence of Enterococcus faecium (VREF) with high-level resistance to vancomycin (MIC greater than or equal to 64 mu g ml(-1)) on poultry and pig farms. The investigations were...

  12. Assessment of biosecurity measures against highly pathogenic avian influenza risks in small-scale commercial farms and free-range poultry flocks in the northcentral Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhaji, N B; Odetokun, I A

    2011-04-01

    There is considerable global concern over the emergence of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) that has affected domestic poultry flocks in Nigeria and other parts of the world. There have been little investigations on the proposition that free-range flocks are potentially at higher risk of HPAI than confined small-scale commercial enterprises. The objective is to analyse the biosecurity measures instituted in the small-scale commercial poultry farms and established free-range bird flocks owned by households in the rural areas and qualitatively assess the risk status at the two levels of poultry management systems in northcentral Nigeria. We used data collected through questionnaire administration to farms and flock owners and subjected them to a traffic light system model to test for relative risks of HPAI infection based on the biosecurity measures put in place at the farm and flock levels. The results indicate that free-range flocks are at lower risk compared to small-scale commercial operations. These findings are plausible as birds from free-range flocks have more opportunities to contact wild bird reservoirs of low-pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) strains than small-scale commercial poultry, thus providing them with constant challenge and maintenance of flock immunity. The development of efficient and effective biosecurity measures against poultry diseases on small-scale commercial farms requires adequate placement of barriers to provide segregation, cleaning and disinfection, while concerted community-led sanitary measures are required for free-range poultry flocks in the developing topical and subtropical economies.

  13. SURVEILLANCE FOR NEWCASTLE DISEASE VIRUS, AVIAN INFLUENZA VIRUS AND MYCOPLASMA GALLISEPTICUM IN WILD BIRDS NEAR COMMERCIAL POULTRY FARMS SURROUNDED BY ATLANTIC RAINFOREST REMNANTS, SOUTHEASTERN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MB Guimarães

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The geographic overlap between areas of Atlantic rainforest and human activities allows interactions to occur between humans and wild and domestic animals. Despite the great importance of the domestic animal-wildlife-human interface that occurs at poultry farms in terms of public health, economic production and wildlife conservation, there are few studies in Brazil examining the distribution and health of wild birds that interact with poultry farms. From January to December 2010, mist nets were used to capture 166 free-ranging birds that were within close proximity to three poultry farms in Atlantic rainforest remnants in south-eastern Brazil. The species composition was examined, and molecular methods were used to test for avian influenza virus, Newcastle disease virus, and Mycoplasma gallisepticum. The avian communities near the poultry farms were dominated by three synanthropic species, which corresponded to 70% of all captured individuals: house sparrows Passer domesticus (33%, saffron finches (Sicalis flaveola (22%, and ruddy ground-doves (Columbina talpacoti (15%. These predominant bird species were in poor body condition (27%, were infested with feather mites (43%, or presented both conditions (23%. No evidence of infection by avian influenza virus, Newcastle disease virus or M. gallisepticum was identified in any of the studied birds. Although no evidence of the studied pathogens was, our findings demonstrate that differences in the environmental characteristics and biosecurity practices influence the wild bird community near poultry farms, which in turn may affect the health status of these synanthropic birds and strengthen their role in the transmission of pathogens.

  14. Evaluation of strategies to enhance biosecurity compliance on poultry farms in Québec: effect of audits and cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racicot, Manon; Venne, Daniel; Durivage, André; Vaillancourt, Jean-Pierre

    2012-02-01

    Biosecurity compliance is generally poor in all types of animal production systems around the world. Therefore, it is essential to define strategies to improve the implementation of biosecurity measures. This study evaluated the value of audits and visible cameras on compliance with biosecurity measures required when entering and exiting poultry barns on 24 poultry farms in Québec, Canada. Short term (first two weeks) and medium term (six months later) compliance were determined. Application of biosecurity measures was evaluated using hidden cameras. Video viewing revealed a total of 2748 visits by 259 different individuals. Results showed that bimonthly audits did not have any impact on medium term compliance. Visible cameras had a significant impact on changing boots (OR=9.6; 1.9-48.4) and respecting areas (contaminated vs. clean) during the visit (OR=14.5; 1.2-175.1) for the short term period. However, six months later, compliance declined and was no longer significantly different from controls. Duration and moment of the visit, presence of the grower or an observer, barn entrance design, number of barns, number of biosecurity measures requested, type of boots worn, gender and being a member of a grower's family were significantly associated with biosecurity compliance.

  15. Leaching of Copper and Zinc in a Garden Soil Receiving Poultry and Livestock Manures from Intensive Farming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The leaching characteristics of a garden soil may be greatly affected by application of poultry and livestock manures from intensive farming.Packed soil columns of a garden soil(CK)and the soils after respectively receiving 2% pig manure (PM),chicken manure(CM),and commercial organic manure(OM)were leached with 0.05 mol L-1 Ca(NO3)2 and 0.01 mol L-1 EDTA solutions.The leachate EC(electric conductivity)values gradually increased at the beginning and then reached a stable value when the soil columns were leached with 0.05 mol L-1 Ca(NO3)2 solution.The leachate EC values showed a peak-shape when leached with 0.01 mol L-1 EDTA solution.In all the soil columns,the pH values of the leachates decreased with increase of displacement volumes when the Ca(NO3)2 solution was used.The total amounts of Cu and Zn eluted from the four soil columns were significantly correlated with the extracted soil Cu and Zn concentrations by 1.0 mol L-1 NH4NO3,but were not correlated with the leachate dissolved organic carbon(DOC)contents.The Zn concentration in the leachate of the PM-treated soil column with 0.05 mol L-1 Ca(NO3)2 solution was above the Quality Standard III for Ground Water of China(GB/T 14848-93,Zn < 1.0 mg L-1).When compared with 0.05 mol L-1 Ca(NO3)2,the EDTA solution significantly accelerated Cu and Zn elutions in the manure-treated columns.This suggested that applying poultry and livestock manures from intensive farming to farmland might pose a threat to the groundwater quality.

  16. Free-ranging farm cats: home range size and predation on a livestock unit in Northwest Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitts-Morgan, Susanna E; Caires, Kyle C; Bohannon, Lisa A; Parsons, Elizabeth I; Hilburn, Katharine A

    2015-01-01

    This study's objective was to determine seasonal and diurnal vs. nocturnal home range size, as well as predation for free-ranging farm cats at a livestock unit in Northwest Georgia. Seven adult cats were tracked with attached GPS units for up to two weeks for one spring and two summer seasons from May 2010 through August 2011. Three and five cats were tracked for up to two weeks during the fall and winter seasons, respectively. Feline scat was collected during this entire period. Cats were fed a commercial cat food daily. There was no seasonal effect (P > 0.05) on overall (95% KDE and 90% KDE) or core home range size (50% KDE). Male cats tended (P = 0.08) to have larger diurnal and nocturnal core home ranges (1.09 ha) compared to female cats (0.64 ha). Reproductively intact cats (n = 2) had larger (P cats. Feline scat processing separated scat into prey parts, and of the 210 feline scats collected during the study, 75.24% contained hair. Of these 158 scat samples, 86 contained non-cat hair and 72 contained only cat hair. Other prey components included fragments of bone in 21.43% of scat and teeth in 12.86% of scat. Teeth were used to identify mammalian prey hunted by these cats, of which the Hispid cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) was the primary rodent. Other targeted mammals were Peromyscus sp., Sylvilagus sp. and Microtus sp. Invertebrates and birds were less important as prey, but all mammalian prey identified in this study consisted of native animals. While the free-ranging farm cats in this study did not adjust their home range seasonally, sex and reproductive status did increase diurnal and nocturnal home range size. Ultimately, larger home ranges of free-ranging cats could negatively impact native wildlife.

  17. Free-Ranging Farm Cats: Home Range Size and Predation on a Livestock Unit In Northwest Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitts-Morgan, Susanna E.; Caires, Kyle C.; Bohannon, Lisa A.; Parsons, Elizabeth I.; Hilburn, Katharine A.

    2015-01-01

    This study’s objective was to determine seasonal and diurnal vs. nocturnal home range size, as well as predation for free-ranging farm cats at a livestock unit in Northwest Georgia. Seven adult cats were tracked with attached GPS units for up to two weeks for one spring and two summer seasons from May 2010 through August 2011. Three and five cats were tracked for up to two weeks during the fall and winter seasons, respectively. Feline scat was collected during this entire period. Cats were fed a commercial cat food daily. There was no seasonal effect (P > 0.05) on overall (95% KDE and 90% KDE) or core home range size (50% KDE). Male cats tended (P = 0.08) to have larger diurnal and nocturnal core home ranges (1.09 ha) compared to female cats (0.64 ha). Reproductively intact cats (n = 2) had larger (P cats. Feline scat processing separated scat into prey parts, and of the 210 feline scats collected during the study, 75.24% contained hair. Of these 158 scat samples, 86 contained non-cat hair and 72 contained only cat hair. Other prey components included fragments of bone in 21.43% of scat and teeth in 12.86% of scat. Teeth were used to identify mammalian prey hunted by these cats, of which the Hispid cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) was the primary rodent. Other targeted mammals were Peromyscus sp., Sylvilagus sp. and Microtus sp. Invertebrates and birds were less important as prey, but all mammalian prey identified in this study consisted of native animals. While the free-ranging farm cats in this study did not adjust their home range seasonally, sex and reproductive status did increase diurnal and nocturnal home range size. Ultimately, larger home ranges of free-ranging cats could negatively impact native wildlife. PMID:25894078

  18. Outbreaks of salmonellosis in three different poultry farms of Kerala, India

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Avian salmonellosis is an important disease causing serious impediment to the development of poultry industry especially in developing countries of Asia and Africa. Since no “effective” immunoprophylactic measures are available for the disease till date, strict biosecurity is the only alternative to preclude the disease. For formulating the control measures, an understanding of the epidemiology of the disease, proper diagnosis and identification of the causative agent is quintessential. This ...

  19. Zoonotic transmission of mcr-1 colistin resistance gene from small-scale poultry farms, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trung, Nguyen Vinh; Matamoros, Sébastien; Carrique-Mas, Juan J.; Nghia, Nguyen Huu; Nhung, Nguyen Thi; Chieu, Tran Thi Bich; Mai, Ho Huynh; Rooijen, van Willemien; Campbell, James; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Hardon, Anita; Mai, Nguyen Thi Nhu; Hieu, Thai Quoc; Thwaites, Guy; Jong, de Menno D.; Schultsz, Constance; Hoa, Ngo Thi

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the consequences of colistin use in backyard chicken farms in Vietnam by examining the prevalence of mcr-1 in fecal samples from chickens and humans. Detection of mcr-1-carrying bacteria in chicken samples was associated with colistin use and detection in human samples with exposure

  20. Comparison of different poultry breeds under station and on-farm conditions in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wondmeneh, E.; Waaij, Van der E.H.; Udo, H.M.J.; Tadelle, D.; Arendonk, Van J.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    A selective breeding program was implemented to improve the performance of indigenous chickens. Improved chicken from the 7th generation was compared with commercial layer, crossbred and unselected indigenous chickens both on-station and on-farm. A total of 870 chickens were used. More than 600

  1. Decision enhancement for poultry farmers in East Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tumwebaze, Rebecca Pearl

    2016-01-01

    Increased attention to economic viability towards agriculture has seen commercial poultry farms in East Africa evolve from the previously common small holder/backyard poultry production operations. These poultry farms have however been faced with numerous challenges including high disease

  2. Prevalence, risk factors, and antimicrobial resistance profiles of Salmonella from commercial broiler farms in two important poultry-producing regions of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donado-Godoy, P; Gardner, I; Byrne, B A; Leon, M; Perez-Gutierrez, E; Ovalle, M V; Tafur, M A; Miller, W

    2012-05-01

    Salmonella is one of the most common foodborne pathogens associated with diarrheal disease in humans. Food animals, especially poultry, are important direct and indirect sources of human salmonellosis, and antimicrobial resistance is an emerging problem of public health concern. The use of antimicrobials benefits producers but contributes to the emergence of antimicrobial resistant bacteria. As a step toward implementing the Colombian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance, this study was conducted to establish the prevalence, distribution of serovars, antimicrobial resistance profiles, and risk factors for Salmonella on poultry farms in the two largest states of poultry production in Colombia. Salmonella was isolated from 41% of farms and 65% of the 315 chicken houses sampled. Salmonella Paratyphi B variant Java was the most prevalent serovar (76%), followed by Salmonella Heidelberg (23%). All Salmonella isolates were resistant to 2 to 15 of the antimicrobial drugs tested in this study. For Salmonella Paratyphi B variant Java, 34 drug resistance patterns were present. The predominant resistance pattern was ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, tetracycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ceftiofur, streptomycin, enrofloxacin, and nalidixic acid; this pattern was detected in 15% of isolates. The resistance pattern of tetracycline, ceftiofur, and nalidixic acid was found in over 40% of the isolates of Salmonella Heidelberg. Of the biosecurity practices considered, two factors were significantly associated with reduction in Salmonella: cleaning of fixed equipment and composting of dead birds on the farm. Findings from the present study provide scientific evidence to inform implementation of official policies that support new biosecurity legislation in an effort to decrease the prevalence of Salmonella on Colombian poultry farms.

  3. Exchange of Newcastle disease viruses in Korea: the relatedness of isolates between wild birds, live bird markets, poultry farms and neighboring countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byoung-Yoon; Lee, Dong-Hun; Kim, Myeong-Seob; Jang, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Yu-Na; Park, Jae-Keun; Yuk, Seong-Su; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Choi, In-Soo; Song, Chang-Seon

    2012-03-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has a worldwide distribution and is often carried by wild ducks, which may represent one of the natural reservoirs. However, the epidemiological relatedness of NDV between wild ducks and domestic poultry is unclear. A total of 14 isolates were obtained from 8439 samples from live bird markets (LBMs) and wild bird populations in Korea during from 2007 to 2010. These isolates were characterized genetically and phylogenetic analysis was conducted to investigate the relatedness between isolates from wild birds, LBM and poultry farms. In phylogenetic analysis, all 14 isolates belonged to genotype I virus within class II. Of these, nine isolates from wild birds were most closely related to the Aomori-like cluster. The five LBM isolates were most closely related to the V4-like cluster. All isolates in this study were closely related to isolates from domestic duck farms in Korea and Chinese LBM isolates. The results indicate that NDV exchange occurs between wild birds, poultry farms, LBMs and neighboring countries. Enhanced NDV surveillance is required to monitor the introduction of variant NDV in consequence of evolution in LBMs and to investigate NDV epidemiology in various species of putative hosts.

  4. Contamination of poultry flocks by the human pathogen Campylobacter spp. and strategies to reduce its prevalence at the farm level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Théwis A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Enteric Campylobacter spp. bacteria are human pathogens that frequently contaminate poultry flocks. Consumption of products from poultry origin may then lead to acute bacterial enteritis called campylobacteriosis of which prevalence is increasing for about ten years in Europe. This review summarizes Campylobacter epidemiological data, risk factors for contamination in poultry flocks and conceivable strategies to control this pathogen.

  5. Comparative performance of three sampling techniques to detect airborne Salmonella species in poultry farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adell, Elisa; Moset, Verónica; Zhao, Yang; Jiménez-Belenguer, Ana; Cerisuelo, Alba; Cambra-López, María

    2014-01-01

    Sampling techniques to detect airborne Salmonella species (spp.) in two pilot scale broiler houses were compared. Broilers were inoculated at seven days of age with a marked strain of Salmonella enteritidis. The rearing cycle lasted 42 days during the summer. Airborne Salmonella spp. were sampled weekly using impaction, gravitational settling, and impingement techniques. Additionally, Salmonella spp. were sampled on feeders, drinkers, walls, and in the litter. Environmental conditions (temperature, relative humidity, and airborne particulate matter (PM) concentration) were monitored during the rearing cycle. The presence of Salmonella spp. was determined by culture-dependent and molecular methods. No cultivable Salmonella spp. were recovered from the poultry houses' surfaces, the litter, or the air before inoculation. After inoculation, cultivable Salmonella spp. were recovered from the surfaces and in the litter. Airborne cultivable Salmonella spp. Were detected using impaction and gravitational settling one or two weeks after the detection of Salmonella spp. in the litter. No cultivable Salmonella spp. were recovered using impingement based on culture-dependent techniques. At low airborne concentrations, the use of impingement for the quantification or detection of cultivable airborne Salmonella spp. is not recommended. In these cases, a combination of culture-dependent and culture-independent methods is recommended. These data are valuable to improve current measures to control the transmission of pathogens in livestock environments and for optimising the sampling and detection of airborne Salmonella spp. in practical conditions.

  6. Modeling emissions from CAFO poultry farms in Poland and evaluating potential risk to surrounding populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, H R; Citra, M; Abadin, H A; Szadkowska-Stańczyk, I; Kozajda, A; Ingerman, L; Nguyen, A; Murray, H E

    2017-03-01

    The world-wide use of concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) for livestock production demands the need to evaluate the potential impact to public health. We estimated the exposure of various airborne pollutants for populations residing in close proximity to 10 poultry CAFOs located in Central Poland. Ammonia (NH3), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methane (CH4), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitrous oxide (N2O), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and organic dust were the pollutants of interest for this study. Because no monitoring data were available, we used the steady-state Gaussian dispersion model AERMOD to estimate pollutant concentrations for the exposed population in order to calculate the hazard index (HI) for a combined mixture of chemicals. Our results indicate that while the levels of certain pollutants are expected to exceed background levels commonly found in the environment they did not result in calculated hazard indexes which exceeded unity suggesting low potential for adverse health effects for the surrounding community for the mixture of chemicals. The study was conducted through a cooperation between the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) in the USA and the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine (NIOM) in Poland.

  7. Influence of laying hen systems on the mite fauna (Acari) community of commercial poultry farms in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Tamara Bianca; Körbes, Júlia Horn; Granich, Juliana; Senter, Malena; Ferla, Noeli Juarez

    2016-01-01

    Intensive production of confined laying hens affects their welfare and increases the risk of epidemics. Ectoparasites as hematophagous and feather mites cause low productivity and decreased egg quality. This study aimed to determine the diversity of mites captured with traps in different commercial systems of laying hens (Gallus gallus L.) (Phasianidae) in Taquari Valley, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Samplings were conducted from August 2013 to August 2014, totaling 21 sampling events in three different commercial laying hen systems: automatic production systems (A(1), (2), (3)), semiautomatic systems (S(1), (2)), and free-range system (FR). A total of 9981 mites belonging to 21 families, 31 genera, and 35 species were found. Acaridae, Caligonellidae, and Cheyletidae showed the highest richness with four species each. Megninia ginglymura (Mégnin, 1877) (Analgidae) was the most abundant ectoparasite species with 1328 specimens and was present in all commercial laying hen systems. No hematophagous mites were found. Cheyletus malaccensis(Cheyletidae) (3503), Typhlodromus transvaalensis (Phytoseiidae) (304), and Blattisocius keegani (Blattisocidae) (181) were the predators present in all systems. The similarity with control system (S(1)--without pesticide) was low (36.5 %) when compared to all other commercial laying hen systems, and it had the highest richness. In FR, low populations of mites and highest diversity were observed. The commercial laying hen system and the management influence the mite fauna in poultry farms.

  8. Identification of Mardivirus Serotypes Circulating in Poultry Farms in Sukabumi and Cianjur District, West Java, 2011 using Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (mPCR Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risza Hartawan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Three serotypes of Mardivirus had been circulating in the farm environments, these being Marek’s disease virus serotype 1 (MDV-1, Gallid hepesvirus 3 (GaHV3 and herpesvirus of turkey (HVT. However, only MDV-1 poses a significant hazard to the poultry farm. The virus causes a neoplastic syndrome that inflicting severe economic loss to the affected farms. Although vaccination has successfully reduced the frequency and severity of outbreaks, the threat does not disappear since several more pathogenic strains have evolved, and these can overcome protection by vaccination. The aim of this study was to investigate the circulation of three Mardivirus serotypes in commercial poultry farms in Sukabumi and Cianjur district using mPCR approach for the feather samples. A low prevalence of these three serotypes was detected. However, the practice of vaccinating using live attenuated MDV-1 caused difficulty in the investigation. Differentation between virulent field strains and CVI988 vaccine strain using the 132 bp repeat motif attenuation marker within the terminal and inverted repeats flanking the unique long region generated an ambiguous result. Thus, other approaches are required to address this issue, such as selection of other markers, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP, high-resolution melt curve analysis (HRM and gene sequencing.

  9. Farm Models and Eco-Health of Poultry Production Clusters (PPCs following Avian Influenza Epidemics in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worapol Aengwanich

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Thailand is located in Southeast Asia and is a country that was affected by highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI epidemics during 2003–2004. Nevertheless, the Thai government’s issuance policy of strict control and prevention of the disease has resulted in efficient disease control of avian influenza (AI. Poultry farmers have been both positively and negatively affected by this policy. There are three poultry cluster models worthy of attention in Thailand: (1 egg chicken poultry clusters over ponds; (2 egg chicken poultry clusters in coops raised from the ground and managed by a cooperative; and (3 poultry clusters in closed coops under contract with the private sector. Following the AI epidemics, additional poultry husbandry and biosecurity systems were developed, thereby generating income and improving the quality of life for poultry farmers. Nevertheless, raising large clusters of poultry in the same area results in disadvantages, particularly problems with both air and water pollution, depending upon the environments of each poultry model. Furthermore, the government’s policy for controlling AI during epidemics has had a negative effect on the relationship between officials and farmers, due to poultry destruction measures.

  10. Organochlorine pesticide residuals in chickens and eggs at a poultry farm in Beijing, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, S. [Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Geosciences and Center for Applied Environmental Research, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO 64110-2499 (United States)], E-mail: taos@urban.pku.edu.cn; Liu, W.X.; Li, X.Q.; Zhou, D.X.; Li, X.; Yang, Y.F.; Yue, D.P. [Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Coveney, R.M. [Department of Geosciences and Center for Applied Environmental Research, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO 64110-2499 (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Chicken organs, animal feed, droppings, and ambient air were sampled at a farm in Beijing to determine the concentrations of hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and metabolites (DDTs). Mean fresh weight concentrations of HCHs and DDTs were 0.122 {+-} 0.061 ng/g and 0.051 {+-} 0.038 ng/g in the muscles. These values are 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than those reported in China in 1980. Contaminated feed was the main source of HCHs and DDTs. Only 12.8% of HCH and 3.3% of DDT of the amount consumed were excreted. Accumulated quantities of HCHs and DDTs increased during growth. However, concentrations of HCHs and DDTs did not increase because of dilution from rapid growth. Based on the observed residual levels in mature chicken and the average diet of residents of China, the contributions from chicken and egg consumption to per capita daily intake of HCHs and DDTs were 487% and 88% of those of fish consumption. - Ingestion of chicken and eggs is an important pathway of HCHs and DDTs exposure.

  11. Farm Models and Eco-Health of Poultry Production Clusters (PPCs) following Avian Influenza Epidemics in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Worapol Aengwanich

    2014-01-01

    Thailand is located in Southeast Asia and is a country that was affected by highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) epidemics during 2003–2004. Nevertheless, the Thai government’s issuance policy of strict control and prevention of the disease has resulted in efficient disease control of avian influenza (AI). Poultry farmers have been both positively and negatively affected by this policy. There are three poultry cluster models worthy of attention in Thailand: (1) egg chicken poultry cluster...

  12. A survey on the occurrence of ochratoxin A in feeds and sera collected in conventional and organic poultry farms in Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cavallarin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A survey has been conducted on conventional and organic poultry farms located in northern Italy in order to investigate the occurrence of ochratoxin A (OTA in feeds and sera in 2006. Ten poultry farms were monitored by taking 20 samples of feed and 94 samples of blood. OTA was assessed through immunoaffinity column purification and HPLC analysis. For in-house validation, recovery experiments, carried out on the spiked samples in the range of 1.0-10.0 μg OTA kg-1 and 0.3-3.0 ng OTA ml-1 for the feed and serum samples, respectively, led to overall recovery averages of 80.6% (RDS=7.3%, n=9 and 83.3% (RDS=3.1%, n=9, respectively. All the feed samples were contaminated by OTA with values ranging from 0.04 to 6.50 μg kg-1. Fiftythree percent of the sera samples were positive, with values ranging from 0.003- 0.165 ng ml-1. None of the feed samples was above the limits set by the European Union on OTA contamination in poultry feeds. No statistically significant differences in OTA contamination of feed or sera were observed either between the organic vs conventional group or between the laying hens vs broiler group.

  13. Study on design of LED bulb for poultry farming%家禽养殖专用LED球泡灯的设计研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈永航

    2013-01-01

    针对家禽养殖业的照明需求,提出了家禽养殖专用LED球泡灯的设计输入,研究了现有LED球泡灯的外观及发光角度等设计特点,提出了全角度发光、防尘防水及整体结构设计的方法及解决方案最后,通过对样品的试制与检测以及对检测结果与设计输入的比较,验证了家禽养殖专用LED球泡灯的结构设计及照明需求的可行性.%To meet the needs of lighting for poultry framing,design inputs of LED bulbs applied in poultry farming are put forward; the features of the existing LED bulb such as appearance and lighting angle are studied,then the design methods and solutions about 360° lighting,waterproof,dustproof and overall structural are proposed.Finally,through the sample testing and the comparision between the testing results and design input,the feasibility of the structural design and the needs of lighting of LED bulb applied in poultry farming are verified.

  14. An overview of microbial food safety programs in beef, pork, and poultry from farm to processing in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajić, Andrijana; Waddell, Lisa A; Sargeant, Jan M; Read, Susan; Farber, Jeff; Firth, Martin J; Chambers, Albert

    2007-05-01

    Canada's vision for the agri-food industry in the 21st century is the establishment of a national food safety system employing hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) principles and microbiological verification tools, with traceability throughout the gate-to-plate continuum. Voluntary on-farm food safety (OFFS) programs, based in part on HACCP principles, provide producers with guidelines for good production practices focused on general hygiene and biosecurity. OFFS programs in beef cattle, swine, and poultry are currently being evaluated through a national recognition program of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. Mandatory HACCP programs in federal meat facilities include microbial testing for generic Escherichia coli to verify effectiveness of the processor's dressing procedure, specific testing of ground meat for E. coli O157:H7, with zero tolerance for this organism in the tested lot, and Salmonella testing of raw products. Health Canada's policy on Listeria monocytogenes divides ready-to-eat products into three risk categories, with products previously implicated as the source of an outbreak receiving the highest priority for inspection and compliance. A national mandatory identification program to track livestock from the herd of origin to carcass inspection has been established. Can-Trace, a data standard for all food commodities, has been designed to facilitate tracking foods from the point of origin to the consumer. Although much work has already been done, a coherent national food safety strategy and concerted efforts by all stakeholders are needed to realize this vision. Cooperation of many government agencies with shared responsibility for food safety and public health will be essential.

  15. Newcastle disease virus infection in sparrows (Passer domesticus, Linneaus, 1758 captured in poultry farms of the agreste region of the State of Pernambuco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JSA Silva

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Reservoir competence for the Newcastle Disease virus (NDV was evaluated in sparrows (Passer domesticus, Linnaeus 1758 captured on a commercial poultry farm and a chicken hatchery in the State of Pernambuco, Northeastern Brazil. A total number of 103 birds collected from a poultry farm (24/103 and a chicken hatchery (79/103 were examined. Hemagglutination inhibition tests, isolation, and viral characterization were performed in all samples collected from each bird. Titers ranging from 1:2 to 1:64 were detectable in 10.68% of sparrows, but positive serology and viral isolation were obtained only from sparrows captured at the hatchery. Hemagglutination activity was inhibited by anti-avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (APMV-1 serum, and this sample showed an intracerebral pathogenicity index (ICOI of 0.21, which is similar to the B1 stock vaccine (0.20 used for vaccination in those farms. Therefore, it was concluded that the sparrows were infected by stock vaccine virus, and that these birds could be a reservoir for NDV. However, additional studies involving sequencing of the virus genome of stock vaccine must be carried out.

  16. 家禽养殖场气候控制系统设计%Control System Design for Poultry Farms Climate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范爱华; 周越

    2012-01-01

    为设计一种方便家禽养殖场气候控制系统装置,利用AT89S51单片机进行可编程控制,结合外围温度传感器、湿度传感器、光线检测、气味采集、显示电路、按键、报警等电路,实现了根据不同的光照、温度、气味和湿度等条件自动调节养殖场气候变化。%In order to design a convenient poultry farms climate control system, using AT89S51MCU pro- grammable control, combined with the external temperature sensor, humidity sensor, light detection, odor acquisition, display circuit, alarm circuit, keys, realized according to different illumination, temperature, hu- midity and other conditions of odor and automatic adjustment of farm climate change. The system adopts the design of the modular structure of management, which is convenient for later expansion, low hardware cost, suitable for poultry farm management.

  17. Surveillance for highly pathogenic H5 avian influenza virus in synanthropic wildlife associated with poultry farms during an acute outbreak

    Science.gov (United States)

    In November 2014, a Eurasian strain H5N8 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus was detected in poultry in Canada. Introduced viruses were soon detected in the United States and within six months had spread to 21 states with more than 48 million poultry affected. In an effort to study potential mec...

  18. Use of Neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss Oil in The Control of Musca domestica L.(Diptera:Muscidae in Poultry Breeding Farms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Flávia S Rovida

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pest infestation, in general such as flies, is a problem faced by poultry workers in poultry breeding farms. Control of these populations is desirable, due to the damage they cause and, most times, it is done through chemical management, with insecticide application. Musca domestica is one of the species with the greatest ability to develop resistance to insecticides, and the digestive system, especially the midgut, is one of the most vulnerable organs to structural alteration, because in it there is production of digestive enzymes and absorption of nutrients. Damage caused by use of synthetic insecticides reactivated studies with bioinsecticides for being one of the most selective options in pest control. Furthermore, they do not cause environmental alterations such as food, soil, water poisoning and they are practically nontoxic to mammals. Among vegetable species with insecticidal activities that have been used a lot, we have neem, subtropical plant that shows low residual power and lower risk of intoxication for mammals and poultry. Thus the objectives that guided this work, was the observation of morphological alteration in M. domestica larvae and malformation of pupae after the use of neem, powder and emulsifiable oil at different concentrations (0,5%, 1%, 1,5% were tested. Following, after the applications, the midgut of flies in larval stage was isolated, processed and analyzed under light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. As in most dipterous, the cell types found were columnar cells and regenerative cells, which showed alterations such as: coalescing vacuoles, intercellular spaces, formation of cytoplasmic protrusions, broken microvilli, rough endoplasmic reticulum and dilated mitochondria. The statistical analysis registered for pupa malformation showed significant results in comparison to control, but there was no difference among treatments. The different concentrations of neem oil contributed in altering

  19. Preliminary assessment of the emission levels of ammonia and hydrogen sulfide in different production modalities in poultry farms in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Herrera

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A characterization of the ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions generated by different production models in poultry farms of Costa Rica was carried out. It was found that egg production farms have the largest emissions since they mostly use management systems based on cages with pits which generates a high emission of ammonia (16 ppm. While the fattening farms had the lower emissions since they mostly use open systems, which are low ammonia emission models (6 ppm. There were no significant concentrations of hydrogen sulfide in the evaluated models, except when a mechanical removal of mounds of chicken manure, with several weeks of storage, took place. A peak of 163 ppm of hydrogen sulfide was observed during the process. The ammonia emissions were modeled for some farms using an atmospheric dispersion model, AERMOD (USEPA, to determine the impact in the surroundings. Using the results of the validated model, it was found that the ammonia concentrations around the farms met the local regulation for air quality. But in some cases is highly probable to exceed the odor threshold for ammonia, which is one of the main complaints of the population living around this kind of agricultural and livestock activities.

  20. 家禽养殖小区的消毒误区及对策%The Misunderstanding and Measures on Poultry Farming Community Disinfection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴素俭

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid development of animal husbandry,environment pollution caused by poultry farming community has increasingly attracted people's attention.Now,disinfection has become more and more important.This paper describes the misunderstanding on poultry farming community disinfection in practice,and puts forward some measures on disinfection,in order to help farmers improve their basic knowledge of distinction and maintain moderately higher income.%随着畜牧业的迅猛发展,家禽养殖小区污染逐渐引起人们重视,消毒在养殖环节中的重要性日益呈现,对实践中常见的消毒误区进行总结,以期帮助养殖户掌握消毒的基本知识并充分认识消毒的重要性,使养殖户获得较高的经济效益.

  1. Pig, cattle and poultry farmers with a known interest in research have comparable perspectives on disease prevention and on-farm biosecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laanen, M; Maes, D; Hendriksen, C; Gelaude, P; De Vliegher, S; Rosseel, Y; Dewulf, J

    2014-07-01

    To motivate farmers for the implementation of preventive measures for animal health, it is crucial to understand their perspective on disease prevention and on-farm biosecurity. To study this, an online questionnaire was conducted in which 218 pig, 279 cattle and 61 poultry farmers in Flanders, Belgium have participated. The participants are farmers known for their interest in research and are therefore probably better informed on these topics. Although approximately half of the respondents in all three sectors are convinced of the positive effect of biosecurity on reduction of diseases at their farms, the farmers estimated their own level of knowledge on biosecurity as being rather low. Less than 10% of the farmers in all three sectors were able to give a correct explanation of the term 'biosecurity', even though the participants are likely to be better informed than the average farmer. In general, pig, cattle and poultry farmers share comparable ideas on disease prevention and biosecurity. Cattle farmers perceived animal welfare as more important. Pig farmers indicated stability of the farm more important than farmers in the other sectors. Farmers indicate that little to no barriers are present for taking preventive measures. The often observed absence or limited implementation of biosecurity and disease prevention measures is therefore likely due to insufficient motivation. Across the species, farmers indicate that insufficient information on costs and especially revenues is a major holdback for investments in preventive measures. Not surprisingly, more information on the economic benefits of measures is indicated as the primary interest for taking measures in disease prevention. The veterinarian is seen as the main source of information concerning disease prevention and biosecurity, so it is important that veterinarians have sufficient knowledge on these topics and are able to communicate this to farmers. Especially since farmers indicate that receiving more

  2. Prevalence of Ascaridia galli in white leghorn layers and Fayoumi-Rhode Island red crossbred flock at government poultry farm Dina, Punjab, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz, Allah Bachaya; Muhammad, Asif Raza; Muhammad, Ashraf Anjum; Imran, Ahmad Khan; Abdul, Aziz; Zahid, Manzoor; Shaukat, Hussain Munawar

    2015-03-01

    Poultry farming not only provides high nutritious food but also creates employment opportunity for rural masses. Documented evidences elaborates that helminth parasitism is most deciduous problem of chickens especially in developing world. Ascaridia (A.) galli, a nematode of small intestine, has been considered as the most common and important parasite of chicken. The present study was carried out to investigate prevalence and severity of A. galli in White Leghorn layers (housing type: battery cage and deep litter, 50 each) and Fayoumi-Rhode Island Red crossbred (male and female: 50 each) flock rearing at Government Poultry Farm, Dina, Punjab, Pakistan. Two hundred faecal samples were examined by using standard parasitological and McMaster egg counting technique. The overall prevalence was 24.5% at farm, 13% in White leghorn layer (battery cage=2%, deep litter=24%) and 36% in Fayoumi-Rhode Island Red (male=34%, female=38%). It was also observed that White leghorn layer rearing in deep litter had more severe infection (EPG=1920) of A. galli compare with battery cages birds (EPG=500). Parasite prevalence was significantly related with sex (P<0.05) in Fayoumi-Rhode Island Red and male birds had less number of average parasites (0.34±0.47) as compared to females (0.38±0.490). Additionally, female birds were under serious threat of infection (EPG=2270) compared with its counterpart (EPG=1250). Given the high infection rates, particular attention should be paid to management and provision of feed supplement to White leghorn layer housing in deep litter and female bird of Fayoumi-Rhode Island Red crossbred.

  3. Effect of organic fertilizers on maize production in Eastern Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolokhava, Tamar; Kenchiashvili, Naira; Tarkhnishvili, Maia; Ghambashidze, Giorgi

    2016-04-01

    Maize remains to be the most important cereal crop in Georgia. Total area of arable land under cereal crops production equals to 184 thousands hectares (FAO statistical yearbook, 2014), from which maize takes the biggest share. Leading position of maize among other cereal crops is caused by its dual purpose as food and feed product. In Spite of a relatively high production of maize to other cereals there is still a high demand on it, especially as feed for animal husbandry. The same tendency is seen in organic production, where producers of livestock and poultry products require organically grown maize, the average yield of which is much less than those produced conventionally. Therefore, it is important to increase productivity of maize in organic farms. Current study aimed to improve maize yield using locally produced organic fertilizers and to compare them to the effect of mineral fertilizers. The study was carried out in Eastern Georgia under dry subtropical climate conditions on local hybrid of maize. This is the first attempt to use hybrid maize (developed with organic plant breeding method) in organic field trials in Georgia. The results shown, that grain yield from two different types of organic fertilizers reached 70% of the yields achieved with industrial mineral fertilizers. As on farm level differences between organic and conventional maize production are much severe, the results from the field trials seems to be promising for future improvement of organic cereal crop production.

  4. Assessment of soil-gas and soil contamination at the Old Metal Workshop Hog Farm Area, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2009-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Andral W.; Falls, W. Fred; Guimaraes, Wladmir B.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Soil gas and soil were assessed for contaminants at the Old Metal Workshop Hog Farm Area at Fort Gordon, Georgia, from October 2009 to September 2010. The assessment included delineating organic contaminants present in soil-gas and inorganic contaminants present in soil samples collected from the area estimated to be the Old Metal Workshop Hog Farm Area. This assessment was conducted to provide environmental contamination data to Fort Gordon personnel pursuant to requirements for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Hazardous Waste Permit process. All soil-gas samplers contained total petroleum hydrocarbons above the method detection level. The highest total petroleum hydrocarbon mass detected was 121.32 micrograms in a soil-gas sampler from the western corner of the Old Metal Workshop Hog Farm Area along Sawmill Road. The highest undecane mass detected was 73.28 micrograms at the same location as the highest total petroleum hydrocarbon mass. Some soil-gas samplers detected toluene mass greater than the method detection level of 0.02 microgram; the highest detection of toluene mass was 0.07 microgram. Some soil-gas samplers were installed in areas of high-contaminant mass to assess for explosives and chemical agents. Explosives or chemical agents were not detected above their respective method detection levels for all soil-gas samplers installed. Inorganic concentrations in five soil samples collected did not exceed regional screening levels established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Barium concentrations, however, were up to eight times higher than the background concentrations reported in similar Coastal Plain sediments of South Carolina.

  5. Wind-mediated spread of low-pathogenic avian influenza virus into the environment during outabreaks at commercial poultry farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonges, Marcel; Leuken, Van Jeroen; Wouters, Inge; Koch, Guus; Meijer, Adam; Koopmans, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Avian influenza virus-infected poultry can release a large amount of virus-contaminated droppings that serve as sources of infection for susceptible birds. Much research so far has focused on virus spread within flocks. However, as fecal material or manure is a major constituent of airborne poult

  6. Wind-mediated spread of low-pathogenic avian influenza virus into the environment during outabreaks at commercial poultry farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Jonges (Marcel); Van Leuken, J. (Jeroen); I.M. Wouters (Inge M); G. Koch (Guus); A. Meijer (Adam); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAvian influenza virus-infected poultry can release a large amount of virus-contaminated droppings that serve as sources of infection for susceptible birds. Much research so far has focused on virus spread within flocks. However, as fecal material or manure is a major constituent of airbo

  7. Characterization of egg laying hen and broiler fecal microbiota in poultry farms in Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary and Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videnska, Petra; Rahman, Md Masudur; Faldynova, Marcela; Babak, Vladimir; Matulova, Marta Elsheimer; Prukner-Radovcic, Estella; Krizek, Ivan; Smole-Mozina, Sonja; Kovac, Jasna; Szmolka, Ama; Nagy, Bela; Sedlar, Karel; Cejkova, Darina; Rychlik, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Poultry meat is the most common protein source of animal origin for humans. However, intensive breeding of animals in confined spaces has led to poultry colonisation by microbiota with a zoonotic potential or encoding antibiotic resistances. In this study we were therefore interested in the prevalence of selected antibiotic resistance genes and microbiota composition in feces of egg laying hens and broilers originating from 4 different Central European countries determined by real-time PCR and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, respectively. strA gene was present in 1 out of 10,000 bacteria. The prevalence of sul1, sul2 and tet(B) in poultry microbiota was approx. 6 times lower than that of the strA gene. tet(A) and cat were the least prevalent being present in around 3 out of 10,000,000 bacteria forming fecal microbiome. The core chicken fecal microbiota was formed by 26 different families. Rather unexpectedly, representatives of Desulfovibrionaceae and Campylobacteraceae, both capable of hydrogen utilisation in complex microbial communities, belonged among core microbiota families. Understanding the roles of individual population members in the total metabolism of the complex community may allow for interventions which might result in the replacement of Campylobacteraceae with Desulfovibrionaceae and a reduction of Campylobacter colonisation in broilers, carcasses, and consequently poultry meat products.

  8. Characterization of egg laying hen and broiler fecal microbiota in poultry farms in Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary and Slovenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Videnska

    Full Text Available Poultry meat is the most common protein source of animal origin for humans. However, intensive breeding of animals in confined spaces has led to poultry colonisation by microbiota with a zoonotic potential or encoding antibiotic resistances. In this study we were therefore interested in the prevalence of selected antibiotic resistance genes and microbiota composition in feces of egg laying hens and broilers originating from 4 different Central European countries determined by real-time PCR and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, respectively. strA gene was present in 1 out of 10,000 bacteria. The prevalence of sul1, sul2 and tet(B in poultry microbiota was approx. 6 times lower than that of the strA gene. tet(A and cat were the least prevalent being present in around 3 out of 10,000,000 bacteria forming fecal microbiome. The core chicken fecal microbiota was formed by 26 different families. Rather unexpectedly, representatives of Desulfovibrionaceae and Campylobacteraceae, both capable of hydrogen utilisation in complex microbial communities, belonged among core microbiota families. Understanding the roles of individual population members in the total metabolism of the complex community may allow for interventions which might result in the replacement of Campylobacteraceae with Desulfovibrionaceae and a reduction of Campylobacter colonisation in broilers, carcasses, and consequently poultry meat products.

  9. Prevalence and characterization of motile Salmonella in commercial layer poultry farms in Bangladesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barua, Himel; Biswas, Paritosh K.; Olsen, Katharina E. P.;

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella is a globally widespread food-borne pathogen having major impact on public health. All motile serovars of Salmonella enterica of poultry origin are zoonotic, and contaminated meat and raw eggs are an important source to human infections. Information on the prevalence of Salmonella...

  10. Evaluation of ionophore sensitivity of Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria maxima isolated from the Algerian Jijel province poultry farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study represents the first description of ionophore resistance in Eimeria recovered from commercial Algerian (Jijel-Algeria) broiler farms. Microscopy and ITS1 PCR revealed only 2 Eimeria species present in litter from these farms- namely E. acervulina and E. maxima. A pool of these is...

  11. The Establishment of the Colombian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (COIPARS): A Pilot Project on Poultry Farms, Slaughterhouses and Retail Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donado-Godoy, P; Castellanos, R; León, M; Arevalo, A; Clavijo, V; Bernal, J; León, D; Tafur, M A; Byrne, B A; Smith, W A; Perez-Gutierrez, E

    2015-04-01

    The development of antimicrobial resistance among bacteria (AMR) is currently one of the world's most pressing public health problems. The use of antimicrobial agents in humans and animals has resulted in AMR which has narrowed the potential use of antibiotics for the treatment of infections in humans. To monitor AMR and to develop control measures, some countries, such as the USA, Canada and Denmark, have established national integrated surveillance systems (FDA, , CIPARS, 2007, DANMAP,2002). The components of these programs monitor changes in susceptibility/resistance to antimicrobial agents of selected zoonotic pathogens and commensal organisms recovered from animals, retail meats and humans. The rapid development of Colombia's animal production industry has raised food safety issues including the emergence of antibiotic resistance. The Colombian Integrated Surveillance Program for Antimicrobial Resistance (COIPARS) was established as a pilot project to monitor AMR on poultry farms, slaughter houses and retail markets. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Analysis on the Surveillance of Avian Influenza Virus in Poultry Farming Environment in Ningxiang County%宁乡县家禽养殖环境禽流感病毒监测分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘菊辉; 何锋; 周仲南; 贺灿

    2012-01-01

    目的 对宁乡县家禽养殖环境进行禽流感病毒(Avian influenza virus,AIV)监测,了解环境中AIV的分布状况.方法 2010年从3个禽类环境监测点(家禽散养户、规模化养殖交易场所和规模化养殖场)共采集环境标本80份,real-time PCR方法检测环境标本(污水、禽类粪便和禽类笼具表面涂抹标本)AIV核酸.结果 监测数据显示,80份环境标本中检出20份AIV核酸阳性,阳性率为25%;17份H5亚型AIV阳性,阳性率21.25%.家禽散养户H5亚型AIV核酸阳性率最高,阳性率为30%,其次为规模化养殖交易场所和规模化养殖场,阳性率分别为23.33%和13.33%;不同环境标本H5亚型AIV标本检出率不同,其中污水标本阳性率最高,阳性率41.67%,显著高于粪便和笼具涂抹样的阳性率.结论 宁乡县家禽养殖环境标本中H5亚型AIV核酸阳性率较高,各监测点需要及时对环境进行清扫和消毒,以减少H5亚型AIV传播至人的风险.%Objective To investigate the distribution of avian influenza virus (AIV) in Ningxiang County by monitoring the AIV in the poultry farming environment. Methods Totally, 80 environment samples including sewage, poultry feces and smearing samples of poultry cages, were collected from 3 monitoring sites, a backyard poultry farm, a trading floor for large-scale poultry and a large - scale poultry farm, in Ningxiang County in 2010. AIV nucleic acid was detected by real - time PCR. Results Surveillance showed that AIV nucleic acids were detected in 25% (20/80) of the samples, and the nucleic acids of H5 subtype were determined in 21.25 % (17/80). The positive rate of H5 subtype AIV nucleic acid was the highest (30 %) in the backyard poultry farm, followed by 23.33 % in the trading floor for large - scale poultry and 13.33 % in the large - scale poultry farm. It also differed among different types of samples, with the highest positive rate (41.67%) in sewage, which was significantly higher than those of

  13. Wind Power in Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-11-01

    Georgia has good wind power potential. Preliminary analyses show that the technical wind power potential in Georgia is good. Meteorological data shows that Georgia has four main areas in Georgia with annual average wind speeds of over 6 m/s and two main areas with 5-6 m/s at 80m. The most promising areas are the high mountain zone of the Great Caucasus, The Kura river valley, The South-Georgian highland and the Southern part of the Georgian Black Sea coast. Czech company Wind Energy Invest has recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Georgian authorities for development of the first wind farm in Georgia, a 50MW wind park in Paravani, Southern Georgia, to be completed in 2014. Annual generation is estimated to 170.00 GWh and the investment estimated to 101 million US$. Wind power is suited to balance hydropower in the Georgian electricity sector Electricity generation in Georgia is dominated by hydro power, constituting 88% of total generation in 2009. Limited storage capacity and significant spring and summer peaks in river flows result in an uneven annual generation profile and winter time shortages that are covered by three gas power plants. Wind power is a carbon-free energy source well suited to balance hydropower, as it is available (often strongest) in the winter and can be exported when there is a surplus. Another advantage with wind power is the lead time for the projects; the time from site selection to operation for a wind power park (approximately 2.5 years) is much shorter than for hydro power (often 6-8 years). There is no support system or scheme for renewable sources in Georgia, so wind power has to compete directly with other energy sources and is in most cases more expensive to build than hydro power. In a country and region with rapidly increasing energy demands, the factors described above nevertheless indicate that there is a commercial niche and a role to play for Georgian wind power. Skra: An example of a wind power development

  14. Improving risk models for avian influenza: the role of intensive poultry farming and flooded land during the 2004 Thailand epidemic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P Van Boeckel

    Full Text Available Since 1996 when Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza type H5N1 first emerged in southern China, numerous studies sought risk factors and produced risk maps based on environmental and anthropogenic predictors. However little attention has been paid to the link between the level of intensification of poultry production and the risk of outbreak. This study revised H5N1 risk mapping in Central and Western Thailand during the second wave of the 2004 epidemic. Production structure was quantified using a disaggregation methodology based on the number of poultry per holding. Population densities of extensively- and intensively-raised ducks and chickens were derived both at the sub-district and at the village levels. LandSat images were used to derive another previously neglected potential predictor of HPAI H5N1 risk: the proportion of water in the landscape resulting from floods. We used Monte Carlo simulation of Boosted Regression Trees models of predictor variables to characterize the risk of HPAI H5N1. Maps of mean risk and uncertainty were derived both at the sub-district and the village levels. The overall accuracy of Boosted Regression Trees models was comparable to that of logistic regression approaches. The proportion of area flooded made the highest contribution to predicting the risk of outbreak, followed by the densities of intensively-raised ducks, extensively-raised ducks and human population. Our results showed that as little as 15% of flooded land in villages is sufficient to reach the maximum level of risk associated with this variable. The spatial pattern of predicted risk is similar to previous work: areas at risk are mainly located along the flood plain of the Chao Phraya river and to the south-east of Bangkok. Using high-resolution village-level poultry census data, rather than sub-district data, the spatial accuracy of predictions was enhanced to highlight local variations in risk. Such maps provide useful information to guide

  15. Improving risk models for avian influenza: the role of intensive poultry farming and flooded land during the 2004 Thailand epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Boeckel, Thomas P; Thanapongtharm, Weerapong; Robinson, Timothy; Biradar, Chandrashekhar M; Xiao, Xiangming; Gilbert, Marius

    2012-01-01

    Since 1996 when Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza type H5N1 first emerged in southern China, numerous studies sought risk factors and produced risk maps based on environmental and anthropogenic predictors. However little attention has been paid to the link between the level of intensification of poultry production and the risk of outbreak. This study revised H5N1 risk mapping in Central and Western Thailand during the second wave of the 2004 epidemic. Production structure was quantified using a disaggregation methodology based on the number of poultry per holding. Population densities of extensively- and intensively-raised ducks and chickens were derived both at the sub-district and at the village levels. LandSat images were used to derive another previously neglected potential predictor of HPAI H5N1 risk: the proportion of water in the landscape resulting from floods. We used Monte Carlo simulation of Boosted Regression Trees models of predictor variables to characterize the risk of HPAI H5N1. Maps of mean risk and uncertainty were derived both at the sub-district and the village levels. The overall accuracy of Boosted Regression Trees models was comparable to that of logistic regression approaches. The proportion of area flooded made the highest contribution to predicting the risk of outbreak, followed by the densities of intensively-raised ducks, extensively-raised ducks and human population. Our results showed that as little as 15% of flooded land in villages is sufficient to reach the maximum level of risk associated with this variable. The spatial pattern of predicted risk is similar to previous work: areas at risk are mainly located along the flood plain of the Chao Phraya river and to the south-east of Bangkok. Using high-resolution village-level poultry census data, rather than sub-district data, the spatial accuracy of predictions was enhanced to highlight local variations in risk. Such maps provide useful information to guide intervention.

  16. The relationship between NH3 emissions from a poultry farm and soil NO and N2O fluxes from a downwind forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiba, U.; Dick, J.; Storeton-West, R.; Lopez-Fernandez, S.; Woods, C.; Tang, S.; Vandijk, N.

    2006-08-01

    Intensive livestock farms emit large concentrations of NH3, most of which is deposited very close to the source. The presence of trees enhances the deposition. Rates to downwind forests can exceed 40 kg N ha-1 y-1. The steep gradient in large NH3 concentrations of 34.3±20.4, 47.6±24.9, 21.7±16.8 µg NH3 m3 at the edge of a forest 15, 30 and 45 m downwind of the farm to near background concentrations within 270 m downwind (1.15±0.7 µg NH3 m3) provides an ideal site to study the effect of different rates of atmospheric NH3 concentrations and inferred deposition on biological and chemical processes under similar environmental conditions. We have investigated the effect of different NH3 concentrations and implied deposition rates on the flux of NO and N2O from soil in a mixed woodland downwind of a large poultry farm (160 000 birds) in Scotland, which has been operating for about 40 years. Measurements were carried out for a 6 month period, with hourly NO flux measurements, daily N2O fluxes close to the farm and monthly at all sites, and monthly cumulative wet and dry N deposition. The increased NH3 and NH4+ deposition to the woodland increased emissions of NO and N2O and soil available NH4+ and NO3- concentrations. Average NO and N2O fluxes measured 15, 25 and 45 m downwind of the farm were 111.2±41.1, 123.3±40.7, 38.3±28.8 µg NO-N m-2 h-1 and 9.9±7.5, 34.3±33.3 and 21.2±6.1 µg N2O-N m-2 h-1, respectively. At the background site 270 m downwind the N2O flux was reduced to 1.75±2.1 µg N2O-N m-2 h-1. NO emissions were significantly influenced by seasonal and daily changes in soil temperature and followed a diurnal pattern with maximum emissions approximately 3 h after noon. For N2O no consistent diurnal pattern was observed. Changes in soil moisture content had a less clear effect on the NO and N2O flux. In spite of the large NO and N2O emissions accounting for >3% of the N deposited to the woodland downwind of the farm, extrapolation to the entire British

  17. Baseline Susceptibility and Cross-Resistance in Adult and Larval Alphitobius diaperinus (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) Collected from Poultry Farms in Arkansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Narinderpal; Johnson, Donn

    2015-08-01

    Insecticide resistance in the lesser mealworm, Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), can pose a serious threat to their successful management in broiler chicken farms in Arkansas. Resistance and cross-resistance were determined in lesser mealworm populations collected from two broiler farms in Arkansas, with different insecticide application histories. Farm M was treated with insecticides over the past 10 yr, whereas Farm S had no insecticidal usage history. Concentration-mortality bioassays using selected insecticides were conducted on adults and seventh-instar larval beetles. A probit analysis suggested the M population to be resistant to cyfluthrin and tetrachlorvinphos, while the S population was susceptible to both compounds. The M population showed no cross-resistance to imidacloprid, spinosad, or chlorfenapyr. The M and S populations were similar in their susceptibility to imidacloprid, spinosad, and chlorfenapyr. The suitability of imidacloprid and spinosad, and further testing of chlorfenapyr as a potential candidate for lesser mealworm control is discussed. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF AVIAN INFLUENZA (H9N2 VIRUS FROM AN OUTBREAK AT POULTRY FARMS IN KARACHI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Muneer, Ali Mohammad Bahram, Zahid Munir, I. Hussain, K. Muhammad, Masood Rabbani, S. Akhtar, M. Aleem, Bakht Sultan1, Munir A. Tariq and K. Naeem2

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza virus (AIV type H9N2 was isolated from poultry flocks which were suffering from acute respiratory illness in Karachi area. High haemagglutination inhibition (HI titers against AIV virus type H9N2, ranging from 6.38 to 7.81, in the convalescent sera of birds were demonstrated. The infected flocks had mortality between 30 to 80 per cent. Those flocks also had considerable of HI titres against infectious bronchitis (IB virus stains D274 and D1466, against which they were never vaccinated. It is believed that AI H9N2 virus in collaboration with IBV and some unidentified bacterial species caused high mortality in the infected flocks

  19. Intestinal cestodes of poultry Raillietina echinobothrida and Choanotaenia Infundibulum infection in a commercial Japanese quail (coturnix coturnix japonica farm in Apomu, Osun State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.W. Gamra

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Raillietina echinobothrida and Choanotaenia infundibulum are important species of cosmopolitan cestodes of poultry occurring in the small intestine and transmitted by ants, houseflies and beetles. Ten moribund and fifteen carcasses of Japanese quail birds (Coturnix coturnix japonica with heavy intestinal tapeworm infection were brought to the post-mortem section of the department of Veterinary Pathology, University of Ibadan. The farmer reported that there was sporadic mortality (11.2% on his farm as he has lost almost 112 birds of a total flock size of 1000 capacity within the space of two weeks as an average of 8 mortalities were recorded per day prior to the time of presentation. Postmortem examination revealed severe emaciation of the breast muscles and protrusion of the keel bone, as intestinal lumen of all the carcasses was severely filled with whitish worms measuring about 15cm-25cm in length as their anterior ends were firmly attached to the intestinal mucosal and dark red exudates (digested blood was seen. Histopathology reveals transverse section of worms associated with sloughing off, necrosis and degeneration of intestinal villi. The worms were confirmed to be Choanotaenia infundibulum and Raillietina echinobothrida. This is the first recorded case of Choanotaenia infundibulum and Raillietina echinobothrida infection in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica in Nigeria. This report may be an alert of the possibility of on-going pathogenicity of these poultry cestodes in quails in Nigeria. We strongly encourage quail farmers to frequently change the birds' bedding and always keep it dry which can help to avoid infections because it shortens the survival of the gravid segments and the eggs. Also farmers should put up measures to avoid contamination of feed with ants, houseflies and beetles, and also prevent access of these intermediate hosts to birds as chemical control of flies, ants and termites in poultry houses is essential for the

  20. POULTRY-RELATED MICROBIOME CHANGES FROM EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT TO FINAL PRODUCT: A SINGLE PASTURED-RAISED FLOCK FARM-TO-FORK ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: While conventionally grown poultry continues to dominate the U.S. poultry industry, there is an increasing demand for locally-grown, “all natural” alternatives. Unfortunately, limited research has been done on this type of poultry management practice, and thus many of these management e...

  1. Decision enhancement for poultry farmers in East Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tumwebaze, Rebecca Pearl

    2016-01-01

    Increased attention to economic viability towards agriculture has seen commercial poultry farms in East Africa evolve from the previously common small holder/backyard poultry production operations. These poultry farms have however been faced with numerous challenges including high disease prevalence

  2. The relationship between ammonia emissions from a poultry farm and soil NO and N2O fluxes from a downwind source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tang

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Intensive livestock farms emit large concentrations of NH3, most of which is deposited very close to the source. The presence of trees enhances the deposition. Rates to down wind forests can exceed 40 kg N ha-1. The steep gradient in large NH3 concentration and deposition at the edge of a downwind forest to background concentrations within a few hundred meters provides an ideal site to study the effect of different rates of N deposition on biological and chemical processes under similar environmental conditions. We have investigated the effect of different rates of NH3 deposition (62, 45, 24 and 5 kg NH3-N ha-1 y-1 on the flux of NO and N2O from soil in a mixed woodland downwind of a large poultry farm (160000 birds in Scotland, which has been operating for about 40 years. Measurements were carried out for a 6 month period, with hourly NO flux measurements, daily N2O fluxes close to the farm and monthly at all sites and monthly cumulative wet and dry N deposition. The increased NH3 and NH4+ deposition to the woodland increased emissions of NO and N2O and soil available NH4+ and NO3- concentrations. Average NO and N2O fluxes measured 15, 25 and 45 m downwind of the farm were 111.2±41.1, 123.3±40.7, 38.3±28.8 µg NO-N m-2 h-1 and 9.9±7.5, 34.3±33.3 and 21.2±6.1 µg NO-N m-2 h-1, respectively. At the background site 270 m downwind the N2O flux was reduced to 1.75±2.1 µg N2O-N m-2 h-1. NO emissions were significantly influenced by seasonal and daily changes in soil temperature and followed a diurnal pattern with maximum emissions approximately 3h after noon. For N2O no consistent diurnal pattern was observed. Changes in soil moisture content had a less clear effect on the NO and N2O flux. On average the NO emissions expressed as a fraction of the elevated N deposited were 7.1% (at 15 m, 6% (at 25 m and 2.3% (at 45 m downwind of the farm, whereas for N2O the emissions were only 2.8% (at 15 m, 3% (at 25 m and 3% (at 45 m downwind. These

  3. Gram-Positive Bacteria Are a Major Reservoir of Class 1 Antibiotic Resistance Integrons in Poultry Litter

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sobhan Nandi; John J. Maurer; Charles Hofacre; Anne O. Summers; James M. Tiedje

    2004-01-01

    .... Using traditional cultivation and cultivation-independent molecular techniques, we quantified antibiotic resistance genes and mobile elements called integrons in poultry house litter from commercial poultry farms...

  4. [Poultry husbandry and animal health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, U

    2003-08-01

    Close interactions are existing between poultry husbandry and poultry health. The more housing systems and the environment of the animals can be controlled, the less the general risk of disorders in poultry flocks--especially of diseases which are caused by the introduction of microoganisms. Resulting deterimental effects will affect not only the animals themselves, but also pose a risk indirectly for humans via food originating from animals under production. Also, by keeping the risk of infections as low as possible, the use of therapeutics can be avoided. This will reduce the risk of residues in food of animal origin. In summary, with all probability open poultry husbandry systems, especially those including free range systems pose increased risks for poultry health and consequently for the quality of food originating from poultry production. At least, those systems require highest standards of biosecurity, defined as management, location, farm layout, cleaning and desinfection incl. pest control programs, immunization and specific veterinary monitoring concepts to prevent infections.

  5. Aspergillus fumigatus in Poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Arné

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus remains a major respiratory pathogen in birds. In poultry, infection by A. fumigatus may induce significant economic losses particularly in turkey production. A. fumigatus develops and sporulates easily in poor quality bedding or contaminated feedstuffs in indoor farm environments. Inadequate ventilation and dusty conditions increase the risk of bird exposure to aerosolized spores. Acute cases are seen in young animals following inhalation of spores, causing high morbidity and mortality. The chronic form affects older birds and looks more sporadic. The respiratory tract is the primary site of A. fumigatus development leading to severe respiratory distress and associated granulomatous airsacculitis and pneumonia. Treatments for infected poultry are nonexistent; therefore, prevention is the only way to protect poultry. Development of avian models of aspergillosis may improve our understanding of its pathogenesis, which remains poorly understood.

  6. 7 CFR 701.56 - Poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Poultry. 701.56 Section 701.56 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGRICULTURAL CONSERVATION PROGRAM EMERGENCY CONSERVATION PROGRAM AND CERTAIN RELATED PROGRAMS PREVIOUSLY ADMINISTERED UNDER THIS PART § 701.56 Poultry. (a)...

  7. A pilot study to access whether high expansion CO2-enriched foam is acceptable for on-farm emergency killing of poultry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritzen, M.A.; Sparrey, J.

    2008-01-01

    This pilot experiment was conducted to ascertain whether CO2-enriched high expansion foam could be an acceptable and efficient alternative in emergency killing of poultry. This method could have wide-ranging applications but with particular emphasis on small (backyard) flocks, free-range sheds or op

  8. Antibiotic Resistance of Escherichia Coli Isolated From Poultry and Poultry Environment of Bangladesh

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muhammad A. Akond; S. M.R. Hassan; Saidul Alam; Momena Shirin

    2009-01-01

    .... Wide spread use of antimicrobials in poultry farming here is a concern of multi-drug microbial resistance development that can potentially be transmitted to human pathogens even from non-pathogenic carrier strains...

  9. Frequency of iss and irp2 genes by PCR method in Escherichia coli isolated from poultry with colibacillosis in comparison with healthy chicken in poultry farms of Zabol, South East of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi Bonjar, M S; Salari, S; Jahantigh, M; Rashki, A

    2017-03-01

    There is no special trait for differentiation of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli from Avian Fecal Escherichia coli. This investigation is aimed, as a case control study, to evaluate and compare the frequency of iss and irp2 in 43 AFEC strains and also 40 and 56 E. coli strains isolated from the liver and kidney of chickens with colibacillosis, respectively, farmed in Zabol, as a border region of Iran, by PCR. 86.9% and 37.2% of isolates collected from chickens with colibacillosis and feces samples obtained from healthy chickens were positive for iss gene, respectively (Piss and irp2 genes makes these two genes good markers to differentiate AFEC and APEC strains especially in Sistan region to improve colibacillosis control measurements.

  10. Sustainable development perspectives of poultry production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaarst, Mette; Steenfeldt, Sanna; Horsted, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    The concept of ‘sustainability’ or ‘sustainable development’ is multi-dimensional, encompassing economic, environmental, social, and institutional governance aspects. The theoretical framework for this article on sustainability in poultry production is built on this multi-dimensional understanding...... or more of the four aspects, e.g., pollution and antibiotic use, biodiversity (environmental aspects), conditions for farm workers and animal welfare (social aspects), governance of the food chain (institutional aspects), and the development of poultry from a valuable food to a cheap staple food...... throughout major parts of the world (economic aspects). There are numerous potential pathways for sustainable development of poultry production. Poultry are living, sentient animals that can be well integrated into many different types of urban and rural farming systems, where they benefit from...

  11. Backyard Poultry

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-01-18

    Dr. Colin Basler, an epidemiologist with CDC, discusses his article on Salmonella infections associated with keeping live poultry in backyards.  Created: 1/18/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/18/2017.

  12. Analysis of illumination systems in poultry farms for fertile eggs production; Analise de sistemas de iluminacao em granjas de producao de ovos ferteis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Rodrigo Aparecido; Tavares, Maria Herminia Ferreira [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana (UNIOESTE), Cascavel, PR (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas

    2000-07-01

    In the productive chain of the aviculture, the most consumed input, ignoring the ration, is the electric energy, mainly in production of one day's chicks, occurring consumption in all the phases, from the egg's production to the incubation. For the egg's production, it is used a huge amount of light, due to the exhibition's need to the light in the wave's length of the yellow color, indispensable factor for the bird maintain the fertile egg's production in a excellent level. The reduction of the energy's expense is related to the improvement of the illumination's systems, since the common system is formed by lamps of large potency, low efficiency and brief useful life. Among the 9 poultries from Parana's West and Southwest, just one uses 20000 incandescent lamps of 100 W. So, our work has aimed to develop a illumination's system that used a smaller amount of lamps, demanded smaller amount of electric energy and presented larger durability. The illumination's systems with vapor of sodium 70, mixed vapor 250 and fluorescent H O 110 were mounted, being obeyed the minimum index of luminosity of 40 luxes. The electric measures were performed through a digital recorder, with data being taken every 5 minutes, during one month. The system with vapor of sodium has proved to be the most economic and durable. (author)

  13. Phylogenetic characterization of the fusion genes of the Newcastle disease viruses isolated in Fars province poultry farms during 2009-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabanpour, Mohammad Javad; Khoobyar, Setareh; Rahimian, Abdollah; Nazari, Mohammad Bagher; Keshtkar, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Despite routine vaccination programs against Newcastle disease (ND), sporadic cases have occasionally occurred that remain a constant threat to commercial poultry. Ten isolates of Newcastle disease viruses (NDV) from infected broiler chicken cases were obtained from various locations in Fars province during 2009-2011 and genetically analyzed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT- PCR) with primers specific to the viral fusion (F) protein- gene. The viruses were confirmed as NDV by hemagglutination inhibition assay and RT- PCR. The isolates based on the sequence and phylogenetic analyses of partial F gene were genotypically analyzed by RT PCR. In the present investigation, the pathogenicity of NDV strains was determined by internationally recognized test mean death time (MDT). Analysis based on F gene showed that characterized isolates possess three different types of protease cleavage site motifs and appear to show maximum identities with isolates in the region. The subsequent phylogenetic analysis was implemented using MEGA and the phylogenetic tree. The results of RT-PCR and MDT showed that 10 isolates were positive for NDV, (60% velogenic, 30% mesogenic and 10% lentogenic). The results of the phylogenetic analysis showed that 10 NDV isolates from Iran belong to the class II, genotype III viruses. This information is fundamental to improve the efficacy of controlling strategies and vaccine development for NDV.

  14. Key Factors for Formulation of Immunization Programs in Animal and Poultry Farms%制定养殖场免疫程序应考虑的主要因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹子静; 刘裕田

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is an effective way for infectious disease prevention and control, and the quality of immunization programs directly determines the immune effect. In this paper,some key factors for formulation of immunization pro-grams in animal and poultry farms are discussed, including local disease situation,antibody level, vaccination routes, vaccine types and properties,breed sources, feeding management level. The immunization programs must be formu-lated according to the local conditions and the key factors mentioned above.%免疫接种是预防控制传染病的有效方法,免疫程序合理与否直接决定到免疫效果,因此养殖场要按照因地制宜的原则,根据本地的疫病种类、疫病流行情况、抗体水平、免疫途径、疫苗种类与性质、种畜禽来源、饲养管理水平等综合因素,科学制定适合本场的免疫程序。

  15. Poultry power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loram, G.

    2000-02-01

    This article gives details of the world's largest power plant fired by poultry litter and forestry waste fired in Thetford, UK. The processing of the waste, the injection of the waste by air, the plant operation, and the cleaning of the flue gas are described. The low levels of odour and noise, and the environmental benefits of the plant which produces no methane or carbon dioxide emissions are noted. (uk)

  16. Poultry cryptosporidiosis

    OpenAIRE

    KURAL, Vladimír

    2012-01-01

    A total of 270 samples of domestic hen (Gallus gallus f. domestica) from 20 farms were collected during two consecutive years (from 2011 to 2012). Microscopical examination of aniline-carbol-methyl violet stained fecal smears revealed 5 positive samples originating from one farm. DNA was extracted from Cryptosporidium positive samples and all microscopically negative samples. Nested PCR was performed to amplify the partial SSU rRNA gene of Cryptosporidium. The sequence analyses of PCR-positiv...

  17. Antibiotic resistance, phylogenetic grouping and virulence potential of Escherichia coli isolated from the faeces of intensively farmed and free range poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeng, Akua Serwaah; Rickard, Heather; Ndi, Olasumbo; Sexton, Margaret; Barton, Mary

    2012-01-27

    Antibiotic use in poultry production is a risk factor for promoting the emergence of resistant Escherichia coli. To ascertain differences in different classes of chickens, the resistance profile, some virulence genes and phylogenetic grouping on 251 E. coli isolates from intensive meat (free range and indoor commercial) and free range egg layer chickens collected between December 2008 and June 2009 in South Australia were performed. Among the 251 strains, 102 (40.6%) and 67 (26.7%) were found to be resistant to tetracycline and ampicillin respectively. Resistance was also observed to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (12.4%), streptomycin (10.8%), spectinomycin (9.6%), neomycin (6.0%) and florfenicol (2.0%) but no resistance was found to ceftiofur, ciprofloxacin or gentamicin. Amplification of DNA of the isolates by polymerase chain reaction revealed the presence of genes that code for resistant determinants: tetracycline (tet(A), tet(B) and tet(C)), ampicillin (bla(TEM) and bla(SHV)), trimethoprim (dhfrV and dhfrXIII), sulphonamide (sulI and sulII), neomycin (aph(3)-Ia(aphA1)), and spectinomycin-streptinomycin (aadA2). In addition, 32.3-39.4% of the isolates were found to belong to commensal groups (A and B1) and 11.2-17.1% belonged to the virulent groups (B2 and D). Among the 251 E. coli isolates, 25 (10.0%) carried two or more virulence genes typical of Extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). Furthermore, 17 of the isolates with multi-resistance were identified to be groups B2 and D. Although no significant difference was observed between isolates from free range and indoor commercial meat chickens (P>0.05), significant differences was observed between the different classes of meat chickens (free range and indoor commercial) and egg layers (Ppoultry E. coli isolates. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Knowledge, attitudes, and poultry-handling practices of poultry workers in relation to avian influenza in India

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sudhir Kumar; Naveen Ramesh; Srinand Sreevatsan; Bobby Joseph; Prashanth Alle; Kumar Belani; Michael Osterholm

    2013-01-01

    .... Materials and Methods: A pretested and semistructured survey instrument was administered to both live bird market and poultry farm workers in two most populous cities in Karnataka in South India to collect data...

  19. Chemical forms and stabilization of phosphorus in manures from large-scale livestock and poultry farms%规模化养殖场畜禽粪中磷的化学形态与稳定化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢国雄; 吴崇书; 孔樟良; 姜铭北

    2015-01-01

    Summary Intensive confined livestock and poultry production systems generate large quantities of manure by‐products , which have the potential for being recycled on agricultural land . Beneficial use through land application is based on their ability to alter favorably soil properties . However , protecting environmental quality is a major consideration w hen developing management practices are carried out to use effectively manure by‐products as a nutrient resource and soil conditioner in agricultural production system . To date , most of the environmental problems associated with land application of manure by‐products have centered on the contamination of groundwater and surface water with nitrogen and phosphorus . High concentration and high water solubility of phosphorus in animal manures have become a limiting factor for agricultural safety application of manures . Optimum use of these by‐products requires the knowledge of their composition not only in relation to beneficial uses but also to environmental implications . To understand the chemical form of phosphorus in manures of large‐scale livestock and poultry farms , and to seek the ways to stabilize phosphorus in manures , 92 manure samples were collected from representative large‐scale farms in Zhejiang Province . The chemical forms of phosphorus in the manures were identified by the modified Hedley�s phosphorus fractionation . Six amendments , including alum , calcium carbonate , gypsum , fly ash and two soil materials , were used to test their effects on the stability of phosphorus in the manures . One pig manure sample was mixed separately with alum , calcium carbonate , gypsum , and the fly ash at the rates of 0% , 2% , 4%and 6% , and the two soil materials at the rates of 0% , 5% and 10% , and it was incubated at room temperature for 30 days . The incubated materials were analyzed for bio‐available phosphorus ( P) , water extractable P and chemical forms of P . The results showed

  20. Backyard poultry: legislation, zoonoses and disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, M L; Roberts, V

    2014-10-01

    In law, backyard poultry are "food-producing animals" and "farmed animals" and are subject to regulations regarding welfare, prescribing, banned procedures, disposal of carcases, feeding bans, notifiable diseases and disease surveillance in addition to those applying to most other pets. Many owners and some veterinary surgeons are unclear about the requirements of these regulations. Backyard poultry are also associated with some different zoonotic disease risks to mammalian pets. Because a high proportion of poultry morbidity and mortality relates to infectious diseases, the health of backyard poultry is amenable to improvement through basic husbandry, biosecurity, hygiene and preventive medicine measures that can be incorporated into a simple "flock-health plan". This article reviews these topics.

  1. POULTRY WASTE MANAGEMENT IN BOTSWANA: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Moreki

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A literature review was conducted to identify methods that are used to dispose of poultry waste in Botswana. It appears that the predominant methods of poultry waste disposal in Botswana are direct disposal at the landfills, application as a fertilizer in gardens or farms, burning and compositing. The use of poultry manure and/or litter to raise fertility status of the soil appears to be appropriate given that soils in Botswana are generally poor in plant nutrients, especially phosphorus. Given the high feed costs in Botswana it is suggested that the use of poultry manure and/or litter as livestock feed should be considered in areas where foot and mouth disease (FMD is endemic such as Chobe and North West Districts, as meat from these districts does not enter the European Union market.

  2. Economic epidemiology of avian influenza on smallholder poultry farms☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boni, Maciej F.; Galvani, Alison P.; Wickelgren, Abraham L.; Malani, Anup

    2013-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) is often controlled through culling of poultry. Compensating farmers for culled chickens or ducks facilitates effective culling and control of HPAI. However, ensuing price shifts can create incentives that alter the disease dynamics of HPAI. Farmers control certain aspects of the dynamics by setting a farm size, implementing infection control measures, and determining the age at which poultry are sent to market. Their decisions can be influenced by the market price of poultry which can, in turn, be set by policy makers during an HPAI outbreak. Here, we integrate these economic considerations into an epidemiological model in which epidemiological parameters are determined by an outside agent (the farmer) to maximize profit from poultry sales. Our model exhibits a diversity of behaviors which are sensitive to (i) the ability to identify infected poultry, (ii) the average price of infected poultry, (iii) the basic reproductive number of avian influenza, (iv) the effect of culling on the market price of poultry, (v) the effect of market price on farm size, and (vi) the effect of poultry density on disease transmission. We find that under certain market and epidemiological conditions, culling can increase farm size and the total number of HPAI infections. Our model helps to inform the optimization of public health outcomes that best weigh the balance between public health risk and beneficial economic outcomes for farmers. PMID:24161559

  3. Campylobacter in Poultry: Ecology and Potential Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Orhan; Kassem, Issmat I; Shen, Zhangqi; Lin, Jun; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Zhang, Qijing

    2015-06-01

    Avian hosts constitute a natural reservoir for thermophilic Campylobacter species, primarily Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli, and poultry flocks are frequently colonized in the intestinal tract with high numbers of the organisms. Prevalence rates in poultry, especially in slaughter-age broiler flocks, could reach as high as 100% on some farms. Despite the extensive colonization, Campylobacter is essentially a commensal in birds, although limited evidence has implicated the organism as a poultry pathogen. Although Campylobacter is insignificant for poultry health, it is a leading cause of food-borne gastroenteritis in humans worldwide, and contaminated poultry meat is recognized as the main source for human exposure. Therefore, considerable research efforts have been devoted to the development of interventions to diminish Campylobacter contamination in poultry, with the intention to reduce the burden of food-borne illnesses. During the past decade, significant advance has been made in understanding Campylobacter in poultry. This review summarizes the current knowledge with an emphasis on ecology, antibiotic resistance, and potential pre- and postharvest interventions.

  4. Georgia - Energy Rehabilitation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — Gustavson Associates was retained by Millennium Challenge Georgia (MCG) to prepare a model to calculate the economic rate of return (ERR) for rehabilitation work...

  5. Livelihoods and farm efficiency in rural Georgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, D; Balcombe, K; Davis, J; Fraser, [No Value

    2005-01-01

    This study contributes to the literature on the role of livelihood strategies in rural growth and poverty reduction. It distinguishes between livelihood diversity strategies that contribute to sustainable growth in household incomes, and those that mainly have a 'coping' function. It suggests that t

  6. Distribution and Diversity of Salmonella Strains in Shipments of Hatchling Poultry, United States, 2013

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Multistate outbreaks of salmonellosis associated with live poultry contact have been occurring with increasing frequency. In 2013, multistate outbreaks of salmonellosis were traced back to exposure to live poultry, some of which were purchased at a national chain of farm stores (Farm store chain Y). This study was conducted at 36 stores of Farm store chain Y and was concurrent with the timing of exposure for the human outbreaks of salmonellosis in 2013. We used environmental swabs of arriving...

  7. Certified safe farm: identifying and removing hazards on the farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautiainen, R H; Grafft, L J; Kline, A K; Madsen, M D; Lange, J L; Donham, K J

    2010-04-01

    This article describes the development of the Certified Safe Farm (CSF) on-farm safety review tools, characterizes the safety improvements among participating farms during the study period, and evaluates differences in background variables between low and high scoring farms. Average farm review scores on 185 study farms improved from 82 to 96 during the five-year study (0-100 scale, 85 required for CSF certification). A total of 1292 safety improvements were reported at an estimated cost of $650 per farm. A wide range of improvements were made, including adding 9 rollover protective structures (ROPS), 59 power take-off (PTO) master shields, and 207 slow-moving vehicle (SMV) emblems; improving lighting on 72 machines: placing 171 warning decals on machinery; shielding 77 moving parts; locking up 17 chemical storage areas, adding 83 lockout/tagout improvements; and making general housekeeping upgrades in 62 farm buildings. The local, trained farm reviewers and the CSF review process overall were well received by participating farmers. In addition to our earlier findings where higher farm review scores were associated with lower self-reported health outcome costs, we found that those with higher farm work hours, younger age, pork production in confinement, beef production, poultry production, and reported exposure to agrichemicals had higher farm review scores than those who did not have these characteristics. Overall, the farm review process functioned as expected. encouraging physical improvements in the farm environment, and contributing to the multi-faceted CSF intervention program.

  8. Collection of Coleoptera from a poultry farm in Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil Flutuação de Coleoptera em granja avícola, em Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Moscarelli Pinto

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the population fluctuation of Coleoptera from a poultry farm in Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, two sampling methods were used: a tube-type trap and a sandwich trap. The analyses of polynomial regression were applied independent of the type of sampling method used. The experiment was carried out for twelve months, from April 2002 to March 2003, in a broiler barn aviary at the Conjunto Agrotécnico Visconde da Graça/UFPEL. A total of 43.945 Coleopterans were captured from the following species: Alphitobius diaperinus, Carcinops troglodytes, Euspilotus rubriculus, Gnathocerus cornutus, Mezium americanum and Somotrichus unifasciatus. Among these, Alphitobius diaperinus was present in all months of the year, with larval population peak in February (235 and lowest capture in August (01. The adult population peak was in March (12,020 and the lowest capture in July (27. The remaining captured Coleopterans did not occur in all twelve months, however they also had population peaks in the months of February and March, which also were the months with the highest temperatures.Para avaliação da flutuação populacional de Coleoptera, em granja avícola, em Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, foram utilizados dois métodos de coleta: armadilha do tipo tubo e do tipo sanduíche, durante doze meses. A análise de regressão polinomial foi aplicada independentemente do tipo de método de coleta utilizado. O experimento foi conduzido durante 12 meses, de abril de 2002 a março de 2003, em um aviário de aves poedeiras do Conjunto Agrotécnico Visconde da Graça da Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPEL. Foram capturados 43.945 Coleopteros das espécies Alphitobius diaperinus, Carcinops troglodytes, Euspilotus rubriculus, Gnathocerus cornutus, Mezium americanum e Somotrichus unifasciatus. Entre esses Coleopteros, Alphitobius diaperinus esteve presente em todos os meses do ano, com pico populacional de larvas em fevereiro (235 e menor índice de

  9. Energy balance and biogas production potential in a laying poultry farm in the region of Marilia, Sao Paulo state; Balanco energetico e potencial de producao de biogas em granja de postura comercial na regiao de Marilia, SP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Sebastiao M.R. de [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Agronomicas. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Agronomia]. E-mail: smrc@terra.com.br; Lucas Junior, Jorge de [UNESP, Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Agrarias e Veterinarias]. E-mail: jlucas@fcav.unesp.br

    2001-03-01

    Characterized as a study of case, a system of production of eggs was analyzed in a laying poultry farm, through the following of a fowl lot housed during all of its productive cycle (535 days). It was performed collection of data and measurements and indirectly involved in the egg production process (energy consumption - in the form of electricity, o.l.g (petroleum liquefied gas), ration water, labor cost, machines and equipment, combustible, engine lubricative oil, grease, installations and equipment). It was calculated the energy balance and the energy efficiency of each of the four phases of the process of industrial production of eggs comparing them - starter, grower, pre-laying and laying. It was tried to identified the main points of energy strangulation. It was calculated the estimation of the potential energy recoverable from the recycling of laying fowl dejections making use of continuous bio digesters. In each phase of the productive process, energy inputs and outputs were determined through the caloric power of the raw material involved in each phase of the process. The energy efficiency was obtained performing the ratio between the total amounts of outputs and inputs of energy in every phase. It was performed the calculation and estimation of the potential recoverable through the contained energy in te estimation of biogas production on the lot of fowls in study. The results have indicated that the system of industrial egg production fitted in the traits of an industrial agro ecosystem highly specialized, importing practically 100% of the energy spent in the production process and addressing its production to exportation, with energy efficiency 0.1850 in the breeding phase, 0.2943 in the grower phase, 0.5827 in the pre-laying phase, and 0.8904 in the laying phase. The performed analysis indicates that the process of egg industrial production presents high index of expenses in energy, needing studies overall in the fowl feeding and nutrition areas and

  10. An ecohealth assessment of poultry production clusters (PPCs) for the livelihood and biosecurity improvement of small poultry producers in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Libin; Basuno, Edi; Nguyen, Tuan; Aengwanich, Worapol; Ilham, Nyak; Li, Xiaoyun

    2015-01-01

    Poultry production cluster (PPC) programs are key strategies in many Asian countries to engage small commercial poultry producers in high-value production chains and to control infectious poultry diseases. This study assessed the multiple impacts of PPCs through a transdisciplinary ecohealth approach in four Asian countries, and drew the implications for small producers to improve their livelihoods and reduce the risk of spreading infectious diseases in the poultry sector. The data collection combined both quantitative and qualitative methods. It comprised: formal structured household survey questionnaires, measuring the biosecurity level of poultry farms with a biosecurity score card; and key informant interviews. Descriptive statistics were used to process the quantitative data and a content analysis was used to process the qualitative data. This research found that poultry farms in clusters do not necessarily have better economic performance than those outside PPCs. Many farmers in PPCs only consider them to be an advantage for expanding the scale of their poultry operations and improving household incomes, and they are less concerned about-and have limited capacities to-enhancing biosecurity and environmental management. We measured the biosecurity level of farms in PPCs through a 14-item checklist and found that biosecurity is generally very low across all sample sites. The increased flies, mosquitoes, rats, and smells in and around PPCs not only pollute the environment, but also cause social conflicts with the surrounding communities. This research concluded that a poultry cluster, mainly driven by economic objectives, is not necessarily a superior model for the control of infectious diseases. The level of biosecurity in PPCs was found to be low. Given the intensity of poultry operations in PPCs (farms are densely packed into clusters), and the close proximity to residential areas of some PPCs, the risk of spreading infectious diseases, in fact, increases

  11. Village poultry production system

    OpenAIRE

    Wondmeneh, E.; Waaij, van der, Liesbeth; Udo, H.M.J.; Tadelle, D.; van Arendonk,

    2016-01-01

    This study identified perception of poultry farmers’ on impact of interventions in village poultry production and quantified the impacts of interventions on flock and economic performance using modelling. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data on perceptions of poultry keeping and performances from 240 randomly selected households in two districts of Ethiopia. Crop was the major source of income, and poultry generated supplementary income. Farmers perceived that demand and price ...

  12. A estruturação da rede de empresas processadoras de aves no Estado de Santa Catarina: governança contratual e dependência de recursos Structuring of the dynamic power resources of poultry farming and processing companies in Santa Catarina, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Nakazato Pinotti

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo é verificar a formação distribuição de recursos dinâmicos de poder das empresas processadoras avícolas do estado de Santa Catarina. O desenvolvimento do sistema de contratos de integração na avicultura catarinense teve influencia de diversos fatores: características históricas (experiência com a suinocultura, regional (proximidade com a cultura da soja, participação política, ações individuais e coletivas (associações dos atores, recursos dinâmicos de poder (constitucionais, tecnológicos, financeiros, políticos, organizacionais e jurídicos. Nesse contexto, foi possível concluir a avicultura sulista teve trajetória de dependência (path dependence bem distinta, o que conduziu à estruturação do sistema de contratos de forma mais eficiente do quem outras regiões do país.This article discusses the formation and distribution of dynamic power resources in the poultry processing companies of the state Santa Catarina, Brazil. The development of the integration contract system in Santa Catarina's poultry processing industry was influenced by various factors: historical characteristics (experience with pig breeding, regional characteristics (proximity to soybean farming, political participation, individual and collective actions of the actors (associations, and dynamic power resources (constitutional, technological, financial, legal, political and organizational. In this context, it was concluded that the poultry farming and processing industry in the state of Santa Catarina followed a very distinct path of dependence, which led to the structuring of a more efficient contract system than that of other regions in the country.

  13. CONTRACT BROILER FARMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todsadee Areerat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Thailand, poultry sector is the main economic growth of livestock sector, especially broiler production. The rapid expansion in broiler production has been made possible by the increase in the number of commercial farms or contract farming. The objective of this research was to understand better how contract farming works, who gets involved and why and who benefits from the agreement. The study is based on the broiler file survey in Chiang Mai province of Thailand. As the results, contract farming looks quite attractive for farmers as well as for private companies but most of the farmers complained about long waiting until the delivery of the next cycle of chicks have started.

  14. Slaughter of poultry during the epidemic of avian influenza in the Netherlands in 2003

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritzen, M.A.; Lambooij, E.; Stegeman, J.A.; Spruijt, B.M.

    2006-01-01

    During an outbreak of avian influenza in the Netherlands in spring 2003, the disease was controlled by destroying all the poultry on the infected farms and on all the farms within a radius of 3 km. In total, 30 million birds were killed on 1242 farms and in more than 8000 hobby flocks, by using

  15. Coccidiostats in unmedicated feedingstuffs for poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radičević, T.; Janković, S.; Stefanović, S.; Nikolić, D.; Đinović-Stojanović, J.; Spirić, D.

    2017-09-01

    Coccidiostats are compounds that are widely used as feed additives to prevent and treat coccidiosis, a contagious disease affecting mainly poultry, and which is associated with warm and humid conditions, as can be found on poultry farms. In Serbia and in the EU, specific coccidiostats are authorized as poultry feed additives. A wide range of these products is available for prevention (as additives) and treatment of coccidiosis (as veterinary medicinal products). The aim of this study is to present findings of residues of coccidiostats in unmedicated feed for chickens for fattening and laying hens as possible causes for coccidiostat residues in liver and eggs. The reasons for these compounds occurring in animal tissues and primary products of animal origin could be an inappropriate withdrawal period after the last administration of medicated feed or cross-contamination of unmedicated feed during the production on the same production line as medicated feedingstuffs, because of inadequate cleaning procedures and/or hygiene practices.

  16. Banking Reform in Georgia

    OpenAIRE

    Mercan, Metin

    2006-01-01

    Georgia's banking system restructure began in 1991 when Soviet Union collopsed.This paper tries to compare and constract the performance of banks and banking system between 1999 and 2004 with banks in other transition countries. Although Georgia banking system showed a long processing in banking sector, it is still lags behind other transition countries Central and Eastern Europe. Neverthless.An efficient financial institution and performance will not come without further economic development...

  17. Characterization, prevalence and antibiogram study of Staphylococcus aureus in poultry

    OpenAIRE

    Yeasmeen Ali; Md. Ashraful Islam; Nazmul Hasan Muzahid; Mohd. Omar Faruk Sikder; Md. Amzad Hossain; Lolo Wal Marzan

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To reveal the presence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) (MRSA) in poultry samples and to determine the antibiogram pattern against five antibiotics. Methods: Samples from different poultry farm of Chittagong city, Bangladesh were examined for S. aureus by different biochemical tests and confirmed as MRSA by identifying the presence of mecA gene using PCR. Antibiotic resistance pattern in S. aureus was determined by antibiotic disk diffusion method. R...

  18. Antibiotic Resistance of Escherichia Coli Isolated From Poultry and Poultry Environment of Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad A. Akond; S. M.R. Hassan; Saidul Alam; Momena Shirin

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: Increased emergence in microbial resistance to antibiotics is a growing problem in Bangladesh, a tropical country with a large agrarian population having limited medical facilities. Wide spread use of antimicrobials in poultry farming here is a concern of multi-drug microbial resistance development that can potentially be transmitted to human pathogens even from non-pathogenic carrier strains. Attempt was made to assess drug susceptibility in Escherichia coli from poultry s...

  19. Zeolites in poultry and swine production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Félix Schneider

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Zeolites are minerals that have intriguing properties such as water absorption, ion adsorption and cation exchange capacity. There are approximately 80 species of natural zeolites recognized and hundreds of artificial zeolites, which have been researched in several fields. Due to their chemical characteristics, zeolites have great potential for use in animal production, especially in poultry and swine farms, as food additives, litter amendment and treatment of residues, with direct and indirect effects on performance, yield and quality of carcass, ambience of farm sheds and reduction of environmental pollution.

  20. Combustion Of Poultry-Derived Fuel in a CFBC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lufei; Anthony, Edward J.

    Poultry farming generates large quantities of waste. Current disposal practice is to spread the poultry wastes onto farmland as fertilizer. However, as the factory farms for poultry grow both in numbers and size, the amount of poultry wastes generated has increased significandy in recent years. In consequence, excessive application of poultry wastes on farmland is resulting in more and more contaminants entering the surface water. One of the options being considered is the use of poultry waste as power plant fuel. Since poultry-derived fuel (PDF) is biomass, its co-firing will have the added advantage of reducing greenhouse gas emissions from power generation. To evaluate the combustion characteristics of co-firing PDF with coal, combustion tests of mixtures of coal and PDF were conducted in CanmetENERGY's pilot-scale CFBC. The goal of the tests was to verify that PDF can be co-fired with coal and, more importantly, that emissions from the combustion process are not adversely affected by the presence of PDF in the fuel feed. The test results were very promising and support the view that co-firing in an existing coal-fired CFBC is an effective method of utilizing this potential fuel, both resolving a potential waste disposal problem and reducing the amount of CO2 released by the boiler.

  1. Visiting An "Egg Factory" on the Farm: A Resource Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    The resource unit indicates how elementary school teachers can use contemporary poultry farming to teach the concepts of change and specialization in American society and to show the effects of automation of American farms. The unit lists general objectives for students: to develop an understanding of farm specialization, especially in egg…

  2. Visiting An "Egg Factory" on the Farm: A Resource Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    The resource unit indicates how elementary school teachers can use contemporary poultry farming to teach the concepts of change and specialization in American society and to show the effects of automation of American farms. The unit lists general objectives for students: to develop an understanding of farm specialization, especially in egg…

  3. Feeding and management strategies for rural poultry production in Central Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goromela, E.H.

    2009-01-01

    Keywords: Central Tanzania, rural poultry, scavengeable feed resources, nutrient composition, crop contents, season, farming system, chemical composition, supplementary feeding, weaning, egg production, growth rate, survival rate, laying management, indigenous chickens The main objective of the

  4. Salmonella sp. bacteriology monitoring in laying hens at different growing and laying periods from poultry farms in Metropolitan Region of Fortaleza Monitoramento bacteriológico para Salmonella sp. em poedeira comercial em diferentes fases de recria e produção de empresas avícolas da Região Metropolitana de Fortaleza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuella Evangelista da Silva

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available

    This work aimed to verify Salmonella occurrence in laying hen flocks from eight poultry farms in Metropolitan Region of Fortaleza city. Swab collections were performed in transport boxes of day-old-chicks, totaling 40 feces samples (5 samples/flock, which presented no Salmonella contamination. Bacterial analyses from a pool of feces were performed in the same flocks at 10, 20, 30 and 40 weeks of age. Salmonella enterica rough strain and Salmonella Newport were found in two flocks at 20 and 40 weeks of age, respectively. These results suggest that the birds were infected with Salmonella after their arrival in the poultry farms. It was verified that 25% of the poultry farms presented positive feces samples for Salmonella contamination, indicating the need for a more efficacious preventive program in the poultry farms for egg production. This work suggests that day old birds were of Salmonella contamination which indicates no vertical Salmonella transmission, however the rearing phase present failures regarding bacterial control.

     

    KEY WORDS: Bacteriology, chickens, eggs, feces, Salmonella.

    O presente trabalho objetivou investigar a presença de Salmonella em lotes de poedeiras comerciais de oito empresas da região metropolitana de Fortaleza,CE, Brasil. Realizaram-se suabes em cinco caixas de transporte por lote das oito empresas analisadas, totalizando quarenta amostras de mecônio, sendo todas negativas para Salmonella. Os mesmos lotes (oito foram monitorados na décima, vigésima, trigésima e quadragésima semanas de idade com exame bacteriológico de pool de cem fezes frescas. Foram isoladas Salmonella enterica subsepécie enterica cepa rugosa e Salmonella Newport das amostras de fezes nas empresas 2 e 6 na

  5. Seroprevalence of antibodies against highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1 virus among poultry workers in Bangladesh, 2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifa Nasreen

    Full Text Available We conducted a cross-sectional study in 2009 to determine the seroprevalence and risk factors for highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1 [HPAI H5N1] virus antibodies among poultry workers at farms and live bird markets with confirmed/suspected poultry outbreaks during 2009 in Bangladesh. We tested sera by microneutralization assay using A/Bangladesh/207095/2008 (H5N1; clade 2.2.2 virus with confirmation by horse red blood cell hemagglutination inhibition and H5-specific Western blot assays. We enrolled 212 workers from 87 farms and 210 workers from three live bird markets. One hundred and two farm workers (48% culled poultry. One hundred and ninety-three farm workers (91% and 178 market workers (85% reported direct contact with poultry that died during a laboratory confirmed HPAI H5N1 poultry farm outbreak or market poultry die-offs from suspected HPAI H5N1. Despite exposure to sick poultry, no farm or market poultry workers were seropositive for HPAI H5N1 virus antibodies (95% confidence interval 0-1%.

  6. Awareness and Perceptions of Food Safety Risks and Risk Management in Poultry Production and Slaughter: A Qualitative Study of Direct-Market Poultry Producers in Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Patrick; Frattaroli, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to document and understand the perceptions and opinions of small-scale poultry producers who market directly to consumers about microbial food safety risks in the poultry supply chain. Between January and November 2014, we conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews with a convenience sample of 16 owner-operators of Maryland direct-market commercial poultry farms. Three overarching thematic categories emerged from these interviews that describe: 1) characteristics of Maryland direct-market poultry production and processing; 2) microbial food safety risk awareness and risk management in small-scale poultry production, slaughter and processing; and 3) motivations for prioritizing food safety in the statewide direct-market poultry supply chain. Key informants provided valuable insights on many topics relevant to evaluating microbial food safety in the Maryland direct-market poultry supply chain, including: direct-market poultry production and processing practices and models, perspectives on issues related to food safety risk management, perspectives on direct-market agriculture economics and marketing strategies, and ideas for how to enhance food safety at the direct-market level of the Maryland poultry supply chain. The findings have policy implications and provide insights into food safety in small-scale commercial poultry production, processing, distribution and retail. In addition, the findings will inform future food safety research on the small-scale US poultry supply chain.

  7. Awareness and Perceptions of Food Safety Risks and Risk Management in Poultry Production and Slaughter: A Qualitative Study of Direct-Market Poultry Producers in Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Patrick; Frattaroli, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to document and understand the perceptions and opinions of small-scale poultry producers who market directly to consumers about microbial food safety risks in the poultry supply chain. Between January and November 2014, we conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews with a convenience sample of 16 owner-operators of Maryland direct-market commercial poultry farms. Three overarching thematic categories emerged from these interviews that describe: 1) characteristics of Maryland direct-market poultry production and processing; 2) microbial food safety risk awareness and risk management in small-scale poultry production, slaughter and processing; and 3) motivations for prioritizing food safety in the statewide direct-market poultry supply chain. Key informants provided valuable insights on many topics relevant to evaluating microbial food safety in the Maryland direct-market poultry supply chain, including: direct-market poultry production and processing practices and models, perspectives on issues related to food safety risk management, perspectives on direct-market agriculture economics and marketing strategies, and ideas for how to enhance food safety at the direct-market level of the Maryland poultry supply chain. The findings have policy implications and provide insights into food safety in small-scale commercial poultry production, processing, distribution and retail. In addition, the findings will inform future food safety research on the small-scale US poultry supply chain. PMID:27341034

  8. Seroepidemiological Studies on Poultry Salmonellosis and its Public Health Importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Ibrahim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-typhoid Salmonella serovars remain a potential threat to human health, and poultry species are possible sources of these organisms. In this study, trials for Salmonella isolation from poultry and humans were conducted in the period April 2009 through March 2010 in Beni-Suef Governorate, Egypt. Cloacal swabs were collected from different live poultry species including 150 broilers, 50 breeders, 50 layers, 50 turkeys, and 50 ducks, beside 30 litter samples from various poultry farms. Regarding the humans, stool samples as well as hand swabs were collected from 90 workers and poultry contacts of the examined farms. All poultry and human samples were subjected to bacteriological examination and serological identification for Salmonella spp. The recovered Salmonella strains were found belonging to S. Kentucky, S. Typhimurium and S. SaintPaul. The obtained results demonstrated that the occurrence of Salmonella spp. accounted for 16.66, 10.0, 2.0, 6.0 and 2.0% in broilers, breeders, layers, ducks and turkeys respectively. Investigation of litter samples revealed that the occurrence of S. Kentucky was 53.33, 66.66 and 28.57% in broiler's, breeder's and duck's litters respectively. Examination of human samples declared that 8 out of 90 hand swabs were found positive for S. Kentucky whereas all stool samples reacted negatively to all Salmonella spp. In the present study, conclusively Salmonella serovars (S. Kentucky isolated from chickens were frequently isolated from hand swabs of the examined poultry contacts, this provided evidence that direct contact with poultry or poultry environment may pose health hazards for humans.

  9. Verification of Egg Farming Systems from the Netherlands and New Zealand Using Stable Isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogers, Karyne M.; Ruth, Van Saskia; Alewijn, Martin; Philips, Andy; Rogers, Pam

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotopes were used to develop authentication criteria of eggs laid under cage, barn, free range, and organic farming regimens from The Netherlands and New Zealand. A training set of commercial poultry feeds and egg albumen from 49 poultry farms across The Netherlands was used to determine

  10. MLST Genotypes and Antibiotic Resistance of Campylobacter spp. Isolated from Poultry in Grenada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Diana; Davis, Margaret; Baker, Katherine; Besser, Tom; Roopnarine, Rohini; Sharma, Ravindra

    2013-01-01

    This study determined whether multilocus sequence types (MLST) of Campylobacter from poultry in 2 farms in Grenada, West Indies, differed by farm, antimicrobial resistance and farm antibiotic use. Farm A used fluoroquinolones in the water and Farm B used tetracyclines. The E-test was used to determine resistance of isolates to seven antibiotics. PCR of the IpxA gene confirmed species and MLST was used to characterize 38 isolates. All isolates were either C. jejuni or C. coli. Farm antibiotic use directly correlated with antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter isolates. Almost 80% of the isolates from Farm A were fluoroquinolone resistant and 17.9% of the isolates from Farm B were fluoroquinolone resistant. All Campylobacter isolates from Farm A were tetracycline sensitive, whereas 35.7% of isolates from Farm B were tetracycline resistant. Six previously recognized sequence types (STs) and 2 novel STs were identified. Previously recognized STs were those overwhelmingly reported from poultry and humans globally. Isolates with the same ST did not always have the same antibiotic resistance profile. There was little ST overlap between the farms suggesting that within-farm transmission of Campylobacter genotypes may dominate. MLST typing was useful for tracking Campylobacter spp. among poultry units and can help elucidate Campylobacter host-species population structure and its relevance to human health. PMID:23555097

  11. MLST Genotypes and Antibiotic Resistance of Campylobacter spp. Isolated from Poultry in Grenada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Stone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study determined whether multilocus sequence types (MLST of Campylobacter from poultry in 2 farms in Grenada, West Indies, differed by farm, antimicrobial resistance and farm antibiotic use. Farm A used fluoroquinolones in the water and Farm B used tetracyclines. The E-test was used to determine resistance of isolates to seven antibiotics. PCR of the IpxA gene confirmed species and MLST was used to characterize 38 isolates. All isolates were either C. jejuni or C. coli. Farm antibiotic use directly correlated with antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter isolates. Almost 80% of the isolates from Farm A were fluoroquinolone resistant and 17.9% of the isolates from Farm B were fluoroquinolone resistant. All Campylobacter isolates from Farm A were tetracycline sensitive, whereas 35.7% of isolates from Farm B were tetracycline resistant. Six previously recognized sequence types (STs and 2 novel STs were identified. Previously recognized STs were those overwhelmingly reported from poultry and humans globally. Isolates with the same ST did not always have the same antibiotic resistance profile. There was little ST overlap between the farms suggesting that within-farm transmission of Campylobacter genotypes may dominate. MLST typing was useful for tracking Campylobacter spp. among poultry units and can help elucidate Campylobacter host-species population structure and its relevance to human health.

  12. Georgia : Accounting and Auditing

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of accounting, financial reporting and auditing requirements and practices within the enterprise and financial sectors in Georgia. The report uses International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), International Standards on Auditing (ISA) and draws on international experience and good practices in the field of accounting and audit regulation, including in ...

  13. Georgia's Unusual "Electoral College"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Andrea L.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports a unique partnership between Kennesaw State University and the Georgia state government involving the participation of computer experts in the deployment or electronic voting machines. The effort has received attention in Washington as scientists and government officials search for ways to reform election procedures across the…

  14. My Classroom: Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    Khatuna Kharkheli is an English language teacher in the Faculty of Education, Exact, and Natural Sciences at Gori State Teaching University (GSTU) in Gori, Georgia. With her passion for developing innovative and creative lessons and with her commitment to professional development, Ms. Kharkheli works to inspire her students to achieve success both…

  15. Smallholder Poultry Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kryger, Karsten Nellemann; Thomsen, Karin; Whyte, Michael;

    Smallholder poultry production is practised by most rural households throughout the developing world; despite the fact that its contribution to livelihoods appears to be of little nominal value when observed by researchers and other outsiders. This paper utilizes a Sustainable Livelihoods Framework...... of smallholder poultry productionhave been given little attention in research and or in development projects. Poultry has played, and still plays, important social and cultural roles in the life of rural people, not least for building social relations with other villagers. While income and consumption have been...... poultry keeping to the income and internal household position of women. Institutional structures are not favourable to smallholder poultry production. The interventions that could enhance productivity are well recognized, but the animal health services needed to promote these interventions are, in general...

  16. TRENDS IN POULTRY PRODUCTION IN THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayduk V. I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the factors, which influence the formation of the market of poultry production. Agricultrual producers have developed diversified business channels, which depend on the nature of the economic interests of the owners of farms, local market conjuncture, the level of development of its own product processing and logistics structures. The growing share of imports has created a tangible threat to food security and the increasing dependence of megalopolises and big cities on import, in addition long-term relationaships have been destroyed within the existing socialist system, increased prices disparity. Only at the beginning of the 21st century Russian poultry industry started to get rid of the consequences of liberal market reforms. In many ways, the development of industry were contributed by the realization of the priority national project «Development of agriculture» and by the State program of development of agriculture and regulation of markets for agricultural products, raw materials and food for 2008-2012. However, the modernization of poultry subcomplex was mainly catching and accompanied by increasing dependence on imports cross, equipment, premixes and feed. Poultry organizations have high debt on loans, subsidies for reimbursement of the cost of interest com unevenly, putting poultry farms in a disastrous situation. In 2014, Russia has 21 region – poultry donor (where the volume of domestic production exceeds consumption and 61 recipient regions (where the volume of domestic production is less than consumption

  17. Assessment of gender differentials in economic and technical efficiency of poultry egg, a case study in Lagos State, Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafis Odunlami

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gender has been seen as an important factor in the distribution and utilization of productive resources worldwide. In the agricultural sector, gender differential could influence the sourcing and efficient utilization of factors of production, particularly in the livestock sub-sector of the economy. This study assessed the gender differentials in economic and technical efficiency of poultry eggs production in Lagos State, Nigeria. Multistage sampling technique was used to select respondent poultry farmers. The first and second stages were the purposive selection of five Local Government Areas (LGAs reputed for poultry production and farm settlements in the state. The third stage involved a simple random sampling of 150 poultry farms consisting of 75 farms each managed by a male and a female Stochastic Frontier Analysis (SFA. The SFA revealed that for male management of poultry egg farms, labour input (p<0.01 and cost of medications (p<0.05 increased the poultry egg output. On the other hand, for female management, stock of birds (p<0.01, labour input (p<0.01 and feed cost (p<0.01 were the factors that increased poultry eggs output. The inefficiency model revealed that male farmers were more technically efficient (p<0.01 than female counterparts. Female managed poultry farms had less productivity (0.90 compared to males(1.22. However, 88.1% of male farms compared to 86.7% of female farms had economic efficiency ratios between 0.29 and 0.79. The study concluded that gender had impact on poultry farmers’ efficiency in the study area. The study therefore recommended that training should be organised for female managed farms while male managed farms should utilize less of cost intensive capital input.

  18. Prevalence of Salmonella in poultry carcasses serotypes in Birjand industrial slaughterhouses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Zare Bidaki

    2013-08-01

    Conclusion: The results indicate that there is a relatively low prevalence of salmonella contamination in the poultry farms in the South Khorasan. Furthermore, lack of diversity in salmonella isolates reveals good health control and low levels of microbial transmission into poultry farms of this area. The outbreak of Salmonella infantis is uniformly consistent with the global spread of this serotype. Differences in the frequency of positive samples before and after placing the carcasses in boiling water may reveal the role of boiling process in reducing salmonella contamination of slaughtered poultry.

  19. spatial statistics of poultry production in anambra state of nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    spatial features, it has become expedient that proper ... helps to determine if features are random, clustered, or evenly dispersed ... of Agriculture and Rural Development Awka. ... geographical co-ordinate of these poultry farms for ..... Table 1: Yearly bio-waste production capacity of towns and geographical coordinate point.

  20. Antibiotic Resistance of Escherichia Coli Isolated From Poultry and Poultry Environment of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad A. Akond

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Increased emergence in microbial resistance to antibiotics is a growing problem in Bangladesh, a tropical country with a large agrarian population having limited medical facilities. Wide spread use of antimicrobials in poultry farming here is a concern of multi-drug microbial resistance development that can potentially be transmitted to human pathogens even from non-pathogenic carrier strains. Attempt was made to assess drug susceptibility in Escherichia coli from poultry sources of Bangladesh. Approach: Eighty selected strains isolated from poultry sources were thoroughly characterized by standard cultural and biochemical tests followed by final identification using latex agglutination test of polyvalent anti-sera, from which 50 were tested for susceptibility to 13 antibiotics following disk diffusion method. Results: 145 (58%, out of total 250, were found positive for E. coli. 52-88% of tested E. coli strains from poultry sources were found resistant to Penicillin, Ciprofloxacin, Riphampicin, Kanamycin, Streptomycin, Cefixine, Erythromycin, Ampicillin, Tetracycline, and 20% strains showed resistance to both Chloramphenicol and Neomycin. No strains showed resistance to Norfloxacin and Gentamicin. Sensitivity was recorded in case of 60-86% strains to Norfloxacin, Gentamicin, Chloramphenicol, and Neomycin; and 26-36% strains against Tetracycline, Streptomycin, and Ampicillin. Intermediate resistance/ susceptibility to various antibiotics were observed for 12-36% Escherichia coli strains. Both, resistance and susceptibility were exhibited against Chloramphenicol, Ampicillin, Gentamicin, Neomycin, Tetracycline, Streptomycin and Norfloxacin. Multi drug resistance was found in case of 6-10 antibiotics for all strains tested. Conclusion: Further study is required on the role of poultry borne bacteria as vectors in transmitting drug resistance. Attention is to be paid for personnel hygiene in processing and handling of poultry and

  1. THE USE OF POULTRY SLAUGHTERHOUSE WASTE TO PRODUCE COMPOST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Kopeć

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Poultry industry generates large amounts of waste, which in the biological treatment process creates a number of problems. One of them is a high amount of fat and creatine which is hard to decompose. Composting process was carried out with the waste from poultry farms and abattoirs mixed with maize straw, which was used to improve the structure and to increase the amount of carbon in the substrate. The chemical composition of composts from poultry waste involving maize straw meets the minimum requirements for organic fertilizers. It seems that recycling of organic waste from the poultry industry should be the primary method of nutrient recovery for plants and organic matter contained in them, however on condition that the health safety is preserved.

  2. Salmonella and Campylobacter: Antimicrobial resistance and bacteriophage control in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Ar'Quette; Hashem, Fawzy; Parveen, Salina

    2016-02-01

    Salmonella and Campylobacter are major causes of foodborne related illness and are traditionally associated with consuming undercooked poultry and/or consuming products that have been cross contaminated with raw poultry. Many of the isolated Salmonella and Campylobacter that can cause disease have displayed antimicrobial resistance phenotypes. Although poultry producers have reduced on-the-farm overuse of antimicrobials, antimicrobial resistant Salmonella and Campylobacter strains still persist. One method of bio-control, that is producing promising results, is the use of lytic bacteriophages. This review will highlight the current emergence and persistence of antimicrobial resistant Salmonella and Campylobacter recovered from poultry as well as bacteriophage research interventions and limitations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli isolated from poultry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Rikke Heidemann; Bisgaard, Magne; Löhren, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    and with a potential for zoonotic transfer to human beings, ESBL-producing E. coli represents a major risk both to poultry production and to human health. This review presents some of the current problems with ESBL-producing E. coli in relation to poultry production, with a focus on chickens. To illustrate issues...... occasionally of sequence types often associated with human infections, such as ST131. With improved tools to trace and screen for ESBL-producing E. coli at farm level, strategies can be selected that aim to reduce or eliminate the presence of ESBL-producing E. coli in poultry and poultry products meant...

  4. Biosecurity and Disinfection Controls of Poultry Microbial Pathogen Infections in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene U. Chima

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In Nigeria, industrial poultry production occupies a place of pride among the livestock enterprises due to its rapid monetary turnover. However, Intensive poultry farming provides the optimum conditions for the concentration of disease causing pathogens and transmission. The presence of these diseases has created the need for the control of poultry pathogens in the intensive farming system. Microbiological contamination can be prevented and controlled using proper management practices and healthcare products such as disinfectants. Disinfection consists of destroying disease-producing microbes by chemical and physical means. Hygiene involves the setting up of physical barriers to restrict the access of disease causing agents to the flock and to limit the spread of infectious materials. Biosecurity on the other hand is the protection of poultry flock from any type of infectious agents, whether viral, bacterial, fungi or parasitic in nature. In many developing countries, such as Nigeria, provision for biosecurity are usually inadequate due to; outdated laws and inadequate legal infrastructure; lack of resources, budget and infrastructure for inspection and enforcement; poor cooperation between agencies; lack of technical resources and infrastructure for risk assessment, etc. Measures to enhance safety of food and good quality poultry products from farm to table are however key concerns for all stakeholders in the industry. Since Global concerns about poultry pathogen play a prime role in poultry exports and food policy decisions in international trade, Nigerian poultry farmers need proper diseases control environment in order to sustain asses to international trade.

  5. Nutrition in Relation to Diseases and Heat stress in Poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Das

    Full Text Available Different diseases conditions and stress factors are responsible for high morbidity and mortality of present day poultry. Nutritional strategy and proper feed formulation with specific dietary regimen can combat this up to a certain extent. The incidence of various infectious diseases, nervous disorders and metabolic disorders can be minimized through proper feed regimen. There is a stiff competition and restrictions in the global market of poultry products which can be addressed with proper management of emerging and important diseases with economic productions and quality poultry products free of elements detrimental to human health. Researchers have made efforts to prevent such damage to poultry and poultry product through dietary manipulations. Heat stress can lead to a reduction in the defense mechanisms of birds or to a relative state of immunosuppression. The health status of the poultry is facing new challenges today which can be suitably addressed by the right scientific and advanced nutritional manoeuvres and make the poultry farming more profitable and presentable in the global market. [Vet. World 2011; 4(9.000: 429-432

  6. Salmonellosis in poultry breeding in view of introducing vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resanović Radmila

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available With the increased demand of consumers for safe poultry products, efficient control of pathogenic microorganisms that cause diseases in humans is becoming the chief challenge in contemporary poultry production. Poultry meat, eggs and related products present the main source of salmonellosis in humans that occurs as a result of the consumption of contaminated food. Any serotype of Salmonella spp. that is not strictly linked to the host is capable of causing gastrointestinal disorders of various degrees in humans. However, according to the World Health Organization (WHO, Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis has been the leading cause of salmonellosis in humans over the past 10 years. One of the available prophylactic measures is resorting to the vaccination of poultry against salmonellosis. Several vaccines against poultry salmonellosis, produced by different manufacturers, have been registered in Serbia. In order for these vaccines to become widely used in our country, it is necessary that the factors in primary poultry production are aquainted with the mechanisms of action of these vaccines, the effects achieved by their implementation, the economic feasibility, and the possibilities for monitoring in keeping with the valid legal regulations. Certainly, vaccination should not be taken as the only method in the prophylaxis of salmonellosis, but as one of the very important methods in a series of biosafety and other measures that should be applied on poultry farms for the successful curbing of salmonellosis infections.

  7. The role of poultry industry in indian economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SC Vetrivel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Poultry farming in India, in spite of several constraints, has progressed considerably during the last decade. The present study has been undertaken to examine various aspects related to the growth and development of poultry production in the country. Poultry production in India was confined to backyards till recently. Local breed of birds were reared for the supply of eggs and meat. The increasing demand for poultry products necessitates augmenting the supply by importing improved breeds of poultry. In 1961, the proportion of hybrid populations in the total population of poultry was about 2 percent. Within a couple of decades, these birds have dominated the market sidelining the indigenous birds. The technological advances have revolutionized the role and the structure of poultry industry in India. It became one of the most specialized enterprises in many parts of the country. A general confidence has been created among the people that green revolution has ushered an era of self-reliance in the food grain production. The rapidly growing population has created some doubts in the said hypothesis. In fact, crop production alone may not solve the food problem of the country. The advances in cereal technology, of course, can fill the empty stomach, but it may not help in the balanced growth of the human body. The chief ingredients of balanced diet also comprise proteins, fats, minerals and vitamins, which are essential for growth. The supply of these items can easily be increased through increased production of livestock products.

  8. Libraries in Georgia: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Library → Libraries in Georgia URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/georgia.html Libraries in Georgia ... PRINCE AVENUE ATHENS, GA 30606 706-475-3416 http://www.armc.org/mdx.shtml Atlanta Atlanta Medical ...

  9. Molecular versus conventional culture for detection of respiratory bacterial pathogens in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, A M; Abd El-Aziz, N K; Abd El Wanis, S; Bakry, N R

    2016-02-29

    Acute respiratory tract infections are leading causes of morbidity in poultry farms allover the world. Six pathogens; Escherichia coli, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Staphylococcus aureus, Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were involved in respiratory infections in poultry. Herein, conventional identification procedures and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were applied for detection of the most common respiratory bacterial pathogens in clinical specimens of poultry obtained from 53 Egyptian farms with various respiratory problems and the results were compared statistically. The analyzed data demonstrated a significantly higher rate of detection of the most recovered microorganisms (Ppoultry farms were E. coli and Ps. aeruginosa (54.71% each), followed by M. haemolylica (35.85%) and M. gallisepticum (20.75%). In conclusion, PCR assay offered an effective alternative to traditional typing methods for the identification and simultaneous detection of the most clinically relevant respiratory pathogens in poultry.

  10. 9 CFR 94.26 - Restrictions on importation of live poultry, poultry meat, and other poultry products from...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND... poultry, poultry meat, and other poultry products from specified regions. Argentina and the Mexican...

  11. Prevalence and antibiogram of Salmonella species isolated from poultry products in Ebonyi State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iroha Ifeanyichukwu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the occurrence and antimicrobial susceptibility profile of Salmonella species isolated from various poultry products including chicken meat, poultry eggs, poultry bird's drinking water, and poultry feed. Materials and methods: A total of 79 samples comprising of chicken meat (n=20, egg shell (n=15, poultry egg contents (n=18, drinking water (n=14, and poultry feed (n=12 were bacteriologically and microscopically analyzed for the isolation of Salmonella species. Results: Overall, this study reported a high prevalence of Salmonella species (62% from various poultry products especially in poultry (chicken meat and poultry egg contents where the percentage occurrence of Salmonella species was 100% and 20.4% respectively. The antibiogram conducted on the Salmonella species isolated from the various poultry samples reveal that all the isolates were multi-drug resistant to more than 50% of the tested antibiotics especially to tetracycline, gentamicin, tobramycin, nitrofurantoin and imipenem. However, most of the Salmonella species were also found to be highly susceptible to ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, ertapenem and ceftazidime. It was also observed in this study that the highest level of resistance to the tested antibiotics was recorded in Salmonella species isolated from poultry meat samples. Conclusion: Salmonellosis due to the consumption of contaminated or infected poultry products could pose serious public health problem to the general public if allowed. Thus, poultry farms and other poultry product outlets should be operated under sanitized conditions that ward-off the incidence of foodborne pathogens such as Salmonella. The use of antibiotics as growth promoting agents and prophylaxis in the production of poultry birds in this region should be discouraged and ndash; since such practices allowed drug-resistant bacteria to emerge and spread in the community. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2016; 3(4.000: 353-359

  12. Campylobacter in poultry, pork and beef

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josefsen, Mathilde Hasseldam; Carroll, C.; Rudi, K.

    2011-01-01

    Campylobacter infection has become one of the most important zoonoses worldwide. A low prevalence of Campylobacter is generally found in beef and pork at retail, although they may still be sources of infection. Based on the high prevalence of poultry-associated infections, this chapter mainly...... focuses on rapid methods for detection of Campylobacter in this particular production chain, and describes the routes of transmission and sampling in the different levels as well as intervention strategies. The chapter focuses on the introduction, infection dynamics, and sampling of Campylobacter...... throughout the poultry production chain, from farm to consumer level. It also describes culture-based, immunological, and molecular methods for rapid detection, characterization, and enumeration for Campylobacter. Rapid methods can generally be also more sensitive and specific than culture-based methods...

  13. Capacity building needs of poultry farmers for quail production in Kwara State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olorunfemi Oluwasogo D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the capacity building needs of poultry farmers for quail production in Kwara State, Nigeria. A questionnaire was used to elicit information from 80 randomly sampled poultry farmers from the Poultry Association of Nigeria, Kwara State Chapter. The findings revealed that the majority (70.0% of the poultry farmers were male with a mean age of 44 years, married (75.0% and formally educated (98.75%. The poultry farmers were mostly (78.75% small-scale producers rearing less than or equal to 500 birds on their farms. Capacity building was highly needed for quail husbandry and management practices, feeding and nutrition, housing and equipment, processing and marketing of products, among others. Seven challenges were identified by the poultry farmers as severe challenges militating against the diversification of their poultry enterprise to include quail production. Chi-square analysis revealed a significant relationship between the poultry farmers’ capacity building needs for quail production and their age (X2 = 5.545, educational level (X2 = 11.859 and years of farming experience (X2 = 9.604. It was recommended that extension agencies should package a robust training programme for poultry farmers on the areas of capacity deficiencies indicated for quail production.

  14. Managing Manure from China’s Pigs and Poultry: The Influence of Ecological Rationality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, C.; Bluemling, B.; Liu, Y.; Mol, A.P.J.; Chen, J.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated manure management practices at three farm scales in Chinese pig and poultry production. The concept of ecological rationality was employed to explore empirically how environmental concerns drive adoption of environmental-friendly manure management technologies at different farm

  15. Serologic survey of wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) and evidence of exposure to avian encephalomyelitis virus in Georgia and Florida, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Dallas R; Miller, Debra L; Baldwin, Charles A; Turco, Jenifer; Lockhart, J Mitchell

    2015-04-01

    Wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) are susceptible to many of the same diseases as domestic turkeys. Before 2005, most Wild Turkeys in southern Georgia, US, had little or no exposure to commercial poultry operations. As part of a pathogen survey examining the effects of commercial poultry on Wild Turkeys, samples were collected from Wild Turkeys from March 2005 through May 2008. The turkeys were collected from 13 counties in southern Georgia and Madison County, Florida, and tested for antibodies to various pathogens of poultry. Three (13%) of the turkeys were positive for antibodies to Salmonella. Thirteen turkeys (54%) were positive for Newcastle disease virus antibodies, and 15 turkeys (63%) were positive for antibodies to reticuloendotheliosis virus. One turkey (4%) from Madison County was positive for avian encephalomyelitis virus antibodies.

  16. Demonstration of a Small Modular BioPower System Using Poultry Litter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John P. Reardon; Art Lilley; Jim Wimberly; Kingsbury Browne; Kelly Beard; Jack Avens

    2002-05-22

    The purpose of this project was to assess poultry grower residue, or litter (manure plus absorbent biomass), as a fuel source for Community Power Corporation's small modular biopower system (SMB). A second objective was to assess the poultry industry to identify potential ''on-site'' applications of the SMB system using poultry litter residue as a fuel source, and to adapt CPC's existing SMB to generate electricity and heat from the poultry litter biomass fuel. Bench-scale testing and pilot testing were used to gain design information for the SMB retrofit. System design approach for the Phase II application of the SMB was the goal of Phase I testing. Cost estimates for an onsite poultry litter SMB were prepared. Finally, a market estimate was prepared for implementation of the on-farm SMB using poultry litter.

  17. Demonstration of a Small Modular BioPower System Using Poultry Litter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John P. Reardon; Art Lilley; Jim Wimberly; Kingsbury Browne; Kelly Beard; Jack Avens

    2002-05-22

    The purpose of this project was to assess poultry grower residue, or litter (manure plus absorbent biomass), as a fuel source for Community Power Corporation's small modular biopower system (SMB). A second objective was to assess the poultry industry to identify potential ''on-site'' applications of the SMB system using poultry litter residue as a fuel source, and to adapt CPC's existing SMB to generate electricity and heat from the poultry litter biomass fuel. Bench-scale testing and pilot testing were used to gain design information for the SMB retrofit. System design approach for the Phase II application of the SMB was the goal of Phase I testing. Cost estimates for an onsite poultry litter SMB were prepared. Finally, a market estimate was prepared for implementation of the on-farm SMB using poultry litter.

  18. Knowledge, attitudes, and poultry-handling practices of poultry workers in relation to avian influenza in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir C Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza (AI is a viral disease of domestic and wild birds. The recent pandemics caused by highly pathogenic AIA (H5N1 in domestic poultry is currently rated phase 3 by the World Health Organization on the pandemic alert scale. Materials and Methods: A pretested and semistructured survey instrument was administered to both live bird market and poultry farm workers in two most populous cities in Karnataka in South India to collect data on demographics, knowledge, attitude, and practices among them. Results: The mean age was similar among both population groups (31.5 years. There was a higher level of biosecurity practices adopted in poultry farms compared with those adopted in live bird market. Knowledge regarding AI was acceptable but poorly correlated with actual biosecurity practices. Discussion: Live bird market and poultry farm workers have been identified as the weakest link in the prevention and control of the spread of AI in the two most populous cities studied in Karnataka. Conclusion: Risk reduction models of behavior change targeting these groups are important toward the control and prevention of AI spread.

  19. Techniques for evaluating nutrient status in farm animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansman, A.J.M.; Pas, te M.F.W.

    2015-01-01

    It is the aim of the study to present a literature review on methods and techniques for determining nutrient status of different farm animal species (ruminants, pigs and poultry). The study focusses especially on the options to determine nutrient status in farm animals from a research perspective ra

  20. Anthropogenization in Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana M. Berdzenishvili

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of towns and natural environment interection shows that creating the most convenient living conditions for the public depends on correct and systematic actions, concerning protection and restoration of all natural components, including clean air preservation, cities planting, water and land resources protection. It should be noted that recultivation activities are unsatisfactory and are held on small scale. Despite there is little farmland per head in Georgia, 3000 hectares of agricultural land, more than half of which is allocated for plough lands and perennial trees is lost due to urbanization and industrialization.

  1. EVOLUTION AND STRATEGY OF POULTRY PRODUCTION DEVELOPMENT IN THE REPUBLIC OF MOLDOVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinaida BARBACARU (Pistol,

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Poultry farming is a strategic branch of the livestock sector with high potential recovery in a short period of time. Today poultry farming in our country is developed in three basic systems: industrial-intensive, household-intensive and household-extensive, more importance and priority being given to intensive-industry system, the share of which in the production of eggs and meat consumption, is 50-60% of the total volume of poultry production. Intensive-industrial system is characteristic of poultry factories using biological material with valuable productive potential, are equipped with modern technological equipment, which ensures increasing the rate of production and delivery of eggs and meat, poultry achieve high production, reducing costs per unit production. In this system annually will produce 25-30 thousand tons of meat, 280-350 million eggs for consumption, including 100-150 million eggs for export. The household-intensive system is specific for small and medium farms is characteristic of which optimal dimension is considered of 1-10 thousand laying hens or up to 20-40 thousand chickens bred for meat. Household-extensive system is specific for individual poultry farms; the production obtained was mainly used to ensure family needs.

  2. Current situation of fish farming in Togo

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    practiced in ponds and water reservoirs and the semi intensive system (12.09%) implemented in tanks and ponds. ... The extensive fish farming system deserves to be improved and ..... yeast of beer, droppings of poultry, kitchen rests, maggots, blood meal, shell of oyster .... socio-economic welfare reasons made early.

  3. Welfare issues of modern laying hen farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Ferrante

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This review starts with a brief outline of poultry behaviour and biology and a description of the present laying hen farming situation in Italy. Moreover, it points out the situation of EU legislation currently in effect for laying hen welfare. It then reviews the main welfare issues of layer farming. The following aspects are considered: rearing system (e.g. stocking density, light intensity and photoperiod, equipment and facilities and some health aspects. All these aspects represent important issues for farmed species, but special attention should be paid when we deal with intensively farmed species like poultry, where a lot of potential stressors may impair the welfare with consequences on health and production. The adoption of suitable housing systems and of adequate management techniques, as well as the presence of well trained stockpersons with a sound knowledge of poultry physiology and behaviour, are particularly important in guaranteeing a sufficient welfare level to poultry. Therefore, the adoption of specific codes of recommendations is highly desirable.

  4. Organic Fertilizer Resources of Poultry and Livestock's Farms and their Utilization Status in Liaoning Province in 2009%辽宁省2009年畜禽养殖场有机肥资源及其利用状况

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋丹

    2012-01-01

    通过对辽宁省各市规模养殖畜禽粪便有机肥资源利用情况和商品有机肥料生产使用情况的调查,掌握了我省畜禽养殖场有机肥资源的利用现状和有机肥料产业的发展现状,并针对目前辽宁省有机肥资源利用中存在的问题提出了相应的建议。%Through the survey of organic fertilizer resources' utilization in fowl and livestock farms and the merchandised organic fertilizers' production and application in different cities of Liaoning Province,we kept abreast of the development of livestock and poultry farms' organic fertilizer resources and organic fertilizer's industry.Furthermore,we advanced some advice aiming at solving the problems in the organic fertilizer resources' application.

  5. Hepatitis Virus Infections in Poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yugo, Danielle M; Hauck, Ruediger; Shivaprasad, H L; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Viral hepatitis in poultry is a complex disease syndrome caused by several viruses belonging to different families including avian hepatitis E virus (HEV), duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV-1, -2, -3), duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3, fowl adenoviruses (FAdV), and turkey hepatitis virus (THV). While these hepatitis viruses share the same target organ, the liver, they each possess unique clinical and biological features. In this article, we aim to review the common and unique features of major poultry hepatitis viruses in an effort to identify the knowledge gaps and aid the prevention and control of poultry viral hepatitis. Avian HEV is an Orthohepevirus B in the family Hepeviridae that naturally infects chickens and consists of three distinct genotypes worldwide. Avian HEV is associated with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome or big liver and spleen disease in chickens, although the majority of the infected birds are subclinical. Avihepadnaviruses in the family of Hepadnaviridae have been isolated from ducks, snow geese, white storks, grey herons, cranes, and parrots. DHBV evolved with the host as a noncytopathic form without clinical signs and rarely progressed to chronicity. The outcome for DHBV infection varies by the host's ability to elicit an immune response and is dose and age dependent in ducks, thus mimicking the pathogenesis of human hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections and providing an excellent animal model for human HBV. DHAV is a picornavirus that causes a highly contagious virus infection in ducks with up to 100% flock mortality in ducklings under 6 wk of age, while older birds remain unaffected. The high morbidity and mortality has an economic impact on intensive duck production farming. Duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3 are astroviruses in the family of Astroviridae with similarity phylogenetically to turkey astroviruses, implicating the potential for cross-species infections between strains. Duck astrovirus (DAstV) causes

  6. Agriculture. Poultry Livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This task-based curriculum guide for agricultural production, specifically for poultry, is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a task sheet for developing leadership skills, and a task list.…

  7. Respiratory Diseases of Poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new Respiratory Diseases of Poultry CRIS will be established effective October 1, 2006. Initially, the disease agents to be studied will include Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale (ORT), Bordetella avium (BART) and Pasteurella multocida. The research will focus on development of more effective vacc...

  8. Agriculture. Poultry Livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This task-based curriculum guide for agricultural production, specifically for poultry, is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a task sheet for developing leadership skills, and a task list.…

  9. Smallholder Poultry Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kryger, Karsten Nellemann; Thomsen, Karin; Whyte, Michael

    Smallholder poultry production is practised by most rural households throughout the developing world; despite the fact that its contribution to livelihoods appears to be of little nominal value when observed by researchers and other outsiders. This paper utilizes a Sustainable Livelihoods Framewo...

  10. Animal Farm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐蓉蓉

    2015-01-01

    This essay first introduce the background of Animal Farm and a brief introduction of the author.Then it discuss three thesis about this novel and briefly discussed about it.At last it give highly review on Animal Farm.

  11. 2009 Chatham County Georgia Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LiDAR generated point cloud acquired in spring 2009 for Chatham County, Georgia for the Metropolitan Planning Commission. The data are classified as follows: Class 1...

  12. 2009 Chatham County Georgia Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LiDAR generated point cloud acquired in spring 2009 for Chatham County, Georgia for the Metropolitan Planning Commission. The data are classified as follows: Class...

  13. Distribution of Georgia Oyster Reefs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The feature class in this ESRI Geodatabase contains polygons representing oyster reefs along the Georgia coastal waterways from Chatham County south to Glynn County....

  14. Antimicrobial Activity of Leaves Extracts of Diplazium muricatum and Diplazium travancoricum on Poultry Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nallaiyan, S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of the Indian poultry industry in general, Namakkal, Tamil Nadu, layer industry in particular, is remarkably fast and it is growing on leaps and bounds with respect to poultry egg production. The layer birds in poultry were affected by bacterial pathogens. However, antimicrobial activities of Diplazium muricatum and Diplazium travancoricum were examined using agar diffusion method against E. coli, Bacillus and Klebsiella isolated from poultry litter collected from poultry farms. The experimental studies revealed, the crude extracts of Diplazium muricatum and D. travancoricum used in this study were inhibited the growth of microorganisms and zone of clearance ranged from 9 to 16 mm. The results indicated that D. muricatum and D. travancoricum had the potential antimicrobial compounds and great potential to use as a feed ingredient to prevent the pathogens.

  15. Metapopulation dynamics enable persistence of influenza A, including A/H5N1, in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Parviez Rana; Fuller, Trevon; Harrigan, Ryan; Zhao, Delong; Arriola, Carmen Sofia; Gonzalez, Armandoe; Miller, Matthew Joshua; Xiao, Xiangming; Smith, Tom B; Jones, Jamie Holland; Daszak, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Highly pathogenic influenza A/H5N1 has persistently but sporadically caused human illness and death since 1997. Yet it is still unclear how this pathogen is able to persist globally. While wild birds seem to be a genetic reservoir for influenza A, they do not seem to be the main source of human illness. Here, we highlight the role that domestic poultry may play in maintaining A/H5N1 globally, using theoretical models of spatial population structure in poultry populations. We find that a metapopulation of moderately sized poultry flocks can sustain the pathogen in a finite poultry population for over two years. Our results suggest that it is possible that moderately intensive backyard farms could sustain the pathogen indefinitely in real systems. This fits a pattern that has been observed from many empirical systems. Rather than just employing standard culling procedures to control the disease, our model suggests ways that poultry production systems may be modified.

  16. Occupational exposure to poultry dust and effects on the respiratory system in workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, S; Faísca, V M; Dias, H; Clérigo, A; Carolino, E; Viegas, C

    2013-01-01

    Farmers are occupationally exposed to many respiratory hazards at work and display higher rates of asthma and respiratory symptoms than other workers. Dust is one of the components present in poultry production that increases risk of adverse respiratory disease occurrence. Dust originates from poultry residues, molds, and feathers and is biologically active as it contains microorganisms. Exposure to dust is known to produce a variety of clinical responses, including asthma, chronic bronchitis, chronic airways obstructive disease (COPD), allergic alveolitis, and organic dust toxic syndrome (ODTS). A study was developed to determine particle contamination in seven poultry farms and correlate this with prevalence rate of respiratory defects and record by means of a questionnaire the presence of clinical symptoms associated with asthma and other allergy diseases by European Community Respiratory Health Survey. Poultry farm dust contamination was found to contain higher concentrations of particulate matter (PM) PM5 and PM10. Prevalence rate of obstructive pulmonary disorders was higher in individuals with longer exposure regardless of smoking status. In addition, a high prevalence for asthmatic (42.5%) and nasal (51.1%) symptoms was noted in poultry workers. Data thus show that poultry farm workers are more prone to suffer from respiratory ailments and this may be attributed to higher concentrations of PM found in the dust. Intervention programs aimed at reducing exposure to dust will ameliorate occupational working conditions and enhance the health of workers.

  17. Prevalence and antibiogram profile of Mycobacterium spp. in poultry and its environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rubayet Reza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an attempt was undertaken to know the prevalence and antibiogram profile of Mycobacterium spp. in poultry and its immediate environments. A total of 130 samples comprising of droppings (n=80, egg washing (n=18, drinking water (n=14, hand washing from farm workers (n=6 and litter (n=12 were collected from six poultry farms located in and around Bangladesh Agricultural University (BAU. Samples were inoculated onto 7H10 Middlebrook agar and incubated aerobically at 37ºC for 7-14 days. Identification of Mycobacterium spp. was performed by colonial morphology, acid fast staining, and biochemical tests. Molecular identification of Mycobacterium spp. at genus level was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay targeting 65-kDa heat shock protein gene. Antibiogram profile of Mycobacterium spp. was performed against five antibiotics namely Rifampin, Azithromycin, Ciprofloxacin, Streptomycin and Doxycycline by disc diffusion method. Three Mycobacterium spp. were isolated from dropping samples of poultry. The overall prevalence of Mycobacterium spp. was 2.3% (n=3/130. All the isolates were resistant to Rifampin and sensitive to Azithromycin and Ciprofloxacin. Data of this study indicated that multidrug resistant Mycobacterium spp. are prevalent in the poultry farms of the study area which underscore the need of implementation of good biosecurity to poultry husbandry practice to ensure poultry and human health.

  18. Silicas for control of the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae

    OpenAIRE

    Maurer, Veronika; Perler, Erika

    2006-01-01

    Control of the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae is a challenge for organic as well as conventional egg producers. In organic agriculture, control should be attempted by mechanically acting substances (e.g. oils or diatomaceous earth), before acaricides are applied. Diatomaceous earth (DE) without acaricides was at least as effective as DE supplemented with pyrethrum or essential oils and a liquid formulation of silica in vitro. In on farm experiments, DE was effective during a limited pe...

  19. Removal of ammonia generated from farm poultry and their use in the fuel cells and as fertilizer; Remocao de amonia gerada em granjas avicolas e sua utilizacao em celulas a combustivel e uso como fertilizante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Joao Coutinho

    2010-07-01

    The process here stressed uses a cation exchange material. The aim of the present work has been to prepare a suitable cation exchanger material with especially high selectivity for ammonia, as the cation NH{sub 4+} or as aqueous ammonia solution containing NH{sub 4}OH hydroxide as well. Aliquots of the above mentioned exchangers were set up inside an chicken farm production near Sao Paulo city. Periodically the exchanger was removed to the laboratory and eluted with a convenient acid to regenerate the exchanger for the new cycle. The ammonia retention was quite high and presents no difficulty for its elution. The selected exchanger is a solid material, non toxic, without smell and have good physical properties. The first results encouraged us and our plants to do large experiments that in progress. This process is a contribution to remediation of the avicola local, removing the ammonia gas and suppressing greatly its smell and bad effect to the animals and even to workers. (author)

  20. Isolation and Identiifcation of Salmonella in a Poultry Farm in Urumqi, Xinjiang%乌鲁木齐某农场沙门氏菌的分离鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭永刚; 于倩; 刘建华

    2014-01-01

    A disease occurred recently in a chicken farm in Urumqi, Xinjiang Autonomous Region characterized by depression, anorexia and diarrhea. It was confirmed that the disease was caused by Salmonella pullorum by means of the pathogen isolation and identification of the submitted samples in combination with molecular biology, animal regression and drug sensitivity tests. Proposes were made for prevention and control of the disease.%新疆乌鲁木齐某养鸡场近期发生一起临床表现为实验结果可为精神萎顿、食欲减少、腹泻、有的出现眼盲或肢关节呈跛行等症状的疫情。对送检病料进行病原分离和生化鉴定,结合分子生物学方法、动物回归及药敏试验,确认该鸡场疫情病原为鸡白痢沙门氏菌。建议加强饲养管理、改善环境卫生、做好隔离消毒。本实验可为该病的防控提供参考。

  1. Poultry housing and husbandry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elson, H A

    2010-08-01

    1. In order to conduct this anniversary review, 10 excellent papers were carefully selected from the 148 available papers published on housing and husbandry in British Poultry Science (BPS) over the past 50 years. 2. The 10 selected papers on this subject covered mainly the housing and husbandry of laying hens, but two of them dealt with various aspects of broiler production. 3. Aspects of housing considered included a wide range of intensive and extensive systems of broiler and egg production. Specific topics included the effects of husbandry system on bird welfare, including skeletal damage in laying hens and contact dermatitis in broiler chickens, as well as the design and management of nest boxes, perches, feeders and drinkers, conventional laying cages (CCs), furnished laying cages (FCs) and non-cage systems (NCs). 4. A variety of the findings in these and related papers have enlightened our understanding of many aspects of poultry housing and husbandry; most of them have found application in the poultry industry and thus improved its efficiency.

  2. 2010 Coastal Georgia Elevation Project Lidar Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Between January and March 2010, lidar data was collected in southeast/coastal Georgia under a multi-agency partnership between the Coastal Georgia Regional...

  3. Poultry Slaughtering and Processing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Agriculture Production Poultry Slaughtering and Processing in the United States This dataset consists of facilities which engage in slaughtering, processing, and/or...

  4. Production function analysis for smallholder semi-subsistence and semi-commercial poultry production systems in three agro-ecological regions in Northern provinces of Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tung, Dinh Xuan; Rasmussen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    A formal cross section survey of 360 smallholder poultry keeping farms located in three agro-ecological regions in Vietnam was conducted. Cobb-Douglas production functions were applied to analyse and compare semi-subsistence and semi-commercial smallholder poultry systems in three regions...

  5. MONITORING THE PRESENCE OF ESCHERICHIA COLI AND SALMONELLA SPP. IN INDUSTRIAL GROWING POULTRY IN ALBANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Boci

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available During 2006 – 2010, out of many poultry farms located in different geographic areas within the country (Fier, Kavaje, Durres, Elbasan, Shkoder, Korce, Lezhe and Lushnje were championed/selected visceral organs and intestinal materials. In this study, were isolated a total of 1.496 strains of E. coli and Salmonella spp. The findings obtained from this study, provide a clear picture on the presence, distribution and the behavioral of poultry pathogenosity of E.coli and Salmonella spp., based on the usage of innovative diagnostic methods. Even though, attenuated and live vaccines are continuously produced for immunization of poultry against enterobacterias, salmonellosis and colibacillosis, these diseases remain among the most encountered bacterial infections in poultry industry. Nowadays, poultry breeding in Albania has a very heterogeneous characteristic. The development of poultry industry and breeding of many avian species is mainly based on the existence of intensive modern farms with huge capacities, which often are mixed in another form- widely distributed in country, such as rural breeding, extensive and family ones. Many in vivo and in vitro studies have not yet clarified the mechanisms with which pathogen enterobacters in poultry are able to cause the infection. The routine diagnose in the field, followed by isolation of E. coli and species of Salmonella genres in reference laboratories cannot lead in classification or full recognition of circulative strains in a territory, if it is not performed a differentiation among the present microorganisms in intensive farms and those in rural areas. Foremost, it cannot be concluded the fact whether these strains are acting as prime pathogens or are part of secondary infections, which occur very often in intensive poultry breeding industry.

  6. Various aspects of sustainability analysis in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. J. Cieszewski; M. Zasada; B. E. Borders; R. Lowe; M. L. Clutter; R. F. Daniels; R. Izlar

    2002-01-01

    In 2001 the Georgia Traditional Industries Program (TIP) sponsored a cooperative study at the D.B. Warnell School of Forest Resources, University of Georgia, to analyze the long-term sustainability of the fiber supply in Georgia. The subject of this study is relevant to a diverse array of disciplines, and it offers the opportunity to explore various aspects of...

  7. Comparison of antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes strains isolated from organic and conventional poultry meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, J M; Vázquez, B I; Fente, C A; Calo-Mata, P; Cepeda, A; Franco, C M

    2008-12-01

    The presence of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes was determined in 55 samples of organic poultry meat and in 61 samples of conventional poultry meat. A total of 220 E. coli, 192 S. aureus, and 71 L. monocytogenes strains were analyzed by an agar disk diffusion assay for their resistance to ampicillin, cephalothin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, doxycycline, fosfomycin, gentamicin, nitrofurantoin, streptomycin, and sulfisoxazole (E. coli); chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, doxycycline, erythromycin, gentamicin, nitrofurantoin, oxacillin, and sulfisoxazole (S. aureus); and chloramphenicol, doxycycline, erythromycin, gentamicin, sulfisoxazole, and vancomycin (L. monocytogenes). The results indicated a significantly higher (P poultry meat as compared with conventional poultry meat. E. coli isolated from organic poultry meat exhibited lower levels of antimicrobial resistance against 7 of the 10 antimicrobials tested as compared with isolates recovered from conventional meat. In the case of S. aureus and L. monocytogenes isolated from conventional poultry, antimicrobial resistance was significantly higher only for doxycycline as compared with strains isolated from organic poultry. In the case of E. coli, the presence of multiresistant strains was significantly higher (P poultry meat as compared with organic poultry meat. Organically farmed poultry samples showed significantly lower development of antimicrobial resistance in intestinal bacteria such as E. coli.

  8. A BIOPHYSIOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF SETTLED LIVESTOCK AND POULTRY HOUSING DUSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carresse Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The levels and composition of agricultural dusts are influenced by animal species, production strategy, housing type and ventilation efficiency. Agricultural dust within animal houses is complex and consists of feed particles, microbes and their products, dander, fecal matter, gases, metals and other organic and inorganic components. Livestock and poultry production facilities may be categorized as confinement, semi-confinement or pasture-based. Characterization of animal husbandry building dust will provide insight into understanding exposures experienced by animals, workers and farm visitors. The goal was to characterize biophysiochemical features of livestock dusts from swine, small ruminant, equine, poultry and cattle husbandry units. Settled dust samples were collected from livestock and poultry housing units at the University Farm and other livestock farms across the state. Morphological features were determined by electron microscopy and gravimetry. Biochemical evaluation consisted of pH determination and trace metal detection via mass spectrometry. Biological assessment centered on bacterial characterization via selective media, DNA analysis and endotoxin quantitation. Morphological analyses revealed higher levels of respirable and thoracic particles in poultry, swine, small ruminant and equine units compared to the dairy unit (p<0.01. Dusts were slightly acidic with the exception of the NCAT small ruminant unit (p<0.05. Dust endotoxin levels were consistent and bacterial species detected include Listeria and Escherichia coli. These findings suggest animal husbandry buildings harbor higher levels of smaller respirable and thoracic dust particles compared to inhalable particles. This information may be helpful in understanding dust exposures experienced by animals, farmers and agricultural workers.

  9. Legal abortion in Georgia, 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, A M; Oberle, M; Zaro, S M

    1984-02-01

    According to data reported to the Georgia Department of Human Resources (DHR), the number of induced abortions performedin Georgia in 1980 decreased for the 1st time since 1968 when the state legalized abortion. To verify this reported decrease, the DHR data were compared with statistics obtained by the Alan Guttmacher Institute in a 1980 survey of abortion providers in Georgia. Since the AGI contacts providers directly, its statistics are considered a more accurate reflection of abortions performed. According to the DHR, the number of abortions dropped from 36,579 in 1979 to 33,288 in 1980, a 9% decrease, and the abortion rate fell from 26.6/1000 women ages 15-44 years to 23.9/1000. AGI data indicated a drop from 38,760 abortions in 1979 to 37,890 in 1980, a 2% decrease. Since both sources noted a similar trend despite differences in data collection methods, the 1980 decline in abortion procedures in Georgia is considered to represent a true decline rather than s statistical artifact. The sociodemographic characteristics of women obtaining abortions in Georgia in 1980 were also analyzed on the basis of DHR data. Although the number of abortions in Georgia performed on Georgia residents increased 2.5% from 1979-80 to 90.7%, the abortion ratio for residents decreased from 367.7 to 327.4 abortions/1000 live births. There was little change in the age, race, or marital status distribution of women receiving abortions. The ratio for white women was 317 abortions/1000 live births and that for blacks was 342/1000. The abortion ratio for unmarried women (1166/1000) was 13 times that for married women (88/1000). The number of repeat abortions decreased form 34% in 1979 to 29% in 1980. Moreover, 93% of women obtaining abortions did so in the 1st 12 weeks of gestation compared with 89% in 1979. The percentage of abortions performed in clinics increased from 66.5% in 1979 to 75.3% in 1980, with suction curettage accounting for 85% of all abortions in the 1st 12 weeks of

  10. Discordant detection of avian influenza virus subtypes in time and space between poultry and wild birds; Towards improvement of surveillance programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, Josanne H; Lexmond, Pascal; Vuong, Oanh; Schutten, Martin; Guldemeester, Judith; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Elbers, Armin R W; Slaterus, Roy; Hornman, Menno; Koch, Guus; Fouchier, Ron A M

    2017-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses from wild birds can cause outbreaks in poultry, and occasionally infect humans upon exposure to infected poultry. Identification and characterization of viral reservoirs and transmission routes is important to develop strategies that prevent infection of poultry, and subsequently virus transmission between poultry holdings and to humans. Based on spatial, temporal and phylogenetic analyses of data generated as part of intense and large-scale influenza surveillance programs in wild birds and poultry in the Netherlands from 2006 to 2011, we demonstrate that LPAIV subtype distribution differed between wild birds and poultry, suggestive of host-range restrictions. LPAIV isolated from Dutch poultry were genetically most closely related to LPAIV isolated from wild birds in the Netherlands or occasionally elsewhere in Western Europe. However, a relatively long time interval was observed between the isolations of related viruses from wild birds and poultry. Spatial analyses provided evidence for mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) being more abundant near primary infected poultry farms. Detailed year-round investigation of virus prevalence and wild bird species distribution and behavior near poultry farms should be used to improve risk assessment in relation to avian influenza virus introduction and retarget avian influenza surveillance programs.

  11. Local feed resources for poultry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenstra, F.R.

    2013-01-01

    In poultry ‘no input’, ‘low input’ and commercial production can be distinguished. ‘No input’ implies scavenging poultry with some kitchen waste or crop residues as supplemental feed. Input is negligible and economic efficiency is high, provided there is any output. Commercial production is capital

  12. Farm Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Debra

    2001-01-01

    Describes a Philadelphia high school in which urban students study agricultural sciences to prepare for college and careers. The campus has a complete working farm, and students are exposed to a wide range of agricultural career opportunities while also studying core academic subjects. The school's farm units are real businesses, so students are…

  13. After the outbreak: how the British Columbia commercial poultry industry recovered after H7N3 HPAI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowes, Victoria A

    2007-03-01

    In spring 2004, an outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), subtype H7N3, occurred in the Fraser Valley of British Columbia, Canada. The active outbreak lasted more than 90 days; 42 commercial poultry farms were identified as infected premises, and more than 17 million birds were culled. Through the depopulation of HPAI-positive farms and the strategic depopulation of adjacent test-negative farms, a total of 410 commercial poultry farms were emptied. The goals for the commercial poultry industry were to expedite restocking, reduce nonproductive downtime, negotiate equitable financial compensation, review and restructure emergency disease response plans, and identify and implement mitigation strategies. After the outbreak, multijurisdictional reviews identified the strengths and weaknesses of the outbreak control strategy. Lessons learned were incorporated into current emergency disease response protocols for both industry and government. The industry-led challenge to initial compensation values, especially for specialty poultry and breeder birds, resulted in a review of the federal Health of Animals Act. The British Columbia poultry industry, in collaboration with the British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture and Lands, developed an Enhanced Biosecurity Initiative that included the identification of mandatory on-farm biosecurity standards for commercial producers, an educational biosecurity self-assessment guide, and provisions for a producer self-quarantine to be enacted upon the first suspicion of disease.

  14. ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS OF REGISTERED POULTRY EGG PRODUCERS IN ILORIN, KWARA STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurudeen Ayoyinka Jatto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzed the economics and social characteristics of registered poultry egg producers in Ilorin, Kwara State. Primary data was used for the study. The data was collected using structured questionnaires administered to 150 stratified sampled registered poultry egg producer. Both descriptive and gross margin analysis were employed to analyze the data. Socio-economic analyses revealed that 68.7% of the poultry egg farmers were males with a mean age of 40 years and 78% having tertiary education with a mean year of poultry experience of 7years. 76.7% were married with a mean family size of 4. Majority (53.3% of the farmers were civil servant with a mean farm size of 334 number of birds and 50% of the farmers have been participating in cooperative society for over 6 to 10 years with majority (84.7% having no extension contact. The gross margin calculated shows that the farms had an average margin of N3,652 per bird per year and the net average revenue of N3,024 per bird per year showing that poultry egg production is profitable. It was recommended that government should endeavour to subsidize inputs such as feed ingredients and this can be achieved through poultry farmer's participation in crop production.

  15. Survey for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza from Poultry in Two Northeastern States, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Waziri Musa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI is a major global zoonosis. It has a complex ecological distribution with almost unpredictable epidemiological features thus placing it topmost in the World Organization for Animal Health list A poultry diseases. Structured questionnaire survey of poultry farmer’s knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP in two Nigerian states revealed the presence of risk farming practices that may enable avian influenza high chance of introduction/reintroduction. There existed significant statistical association between farmer’s educational levels and AI awareness and zoonotic awareness (. Poultry rearing of multiage and species (81%, multiple sources of stock (62%, inadequate dead-bird disposal (71%, and access to live bird markets (LBMs (62% constituted major biosecurity threats in these poultry farming communities. Haemagglutination inhibition (HI test detected antibodies against H5 avian influenza (AI in 8 of the 400 sera samples; rapid antigen detection test kit (RADTK was negative for all the 400 cloaca and trachea swabs. These results and other poultry diseases similar to AI observed in this study could invariably affect avian influenza early detection, reporting, and control. We recommend strong policy initiatives towards poultry farmers’ attitudinal change and increasing efforts on awareness of the implications of future HPAI outbreaks in Nigeria.

  16. Biosecurity survey in relation to the risk of HPAI outbreaks in backyard poultry holdings in Thimphu city area, Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenzin, Tenzin; Wangdi, Chador; Rai, Purna Bdr

    2017-04-21

    A questionnaire survey was conducted to assess the biosecurity and other practices of backyard poultry holdings and knowledge and practices of poultry keepers following an outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1) virus in poultry in Thimphu city area, Bhutan. The study identified 62 backyard poultry holdings in 12 settlement areas, and the owners were subsequently interviewed. The birds are kept in a low-input low-output system, fed locally available scavenging feed base, and supplemented with food scraps and some grain. Although the birds are housed at night in a small coop to protect them against theft and predators, they are let loose during the day to scavenge in the homestead surroundings. This invariably results in mixing with other poultry birds within the settlement and wild birds, creating favorable conditions for disease spread within and between flocks. Moreover, the poultry keepers have a low level of knowledge and awareness related to the importance of biosecurity measures, as well as veterinary care of the birds and reporting systems. Of particular concern is that sick birds within backyard holdings may not be detected rapidly, resulting in silent spread of disease and increased risk of humans contacting the virus (e.g. HPAI) from infected poultry. Nevertheless, all the respondents have indicated that they know and practice hand washing using soap and water after handling poultry and poultry products, but rarely use face-masks and hand gloves while handling poultry or cleaning poultry house. This study highlights the importance of educating poultry keepers to improve the housing and management systems of poultry farming within the backyard holdings in the Thimphu city area in order to prevent future disease outbreaks.

  17. Antimicrobial resistance in Enterococcus spp. isolated from environmental samples in the area of intensive poultry production

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we investigated antimicrobial resistance of Enterococcus spp. from different environmental compartments including litter from two farms, 12 surface and 28 groundwater sites in an area of intensive poultry production and litter application. The enumerated isolates (n=250) were tested ...

  18. The Adipose Tissue in Farm Animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauerwein, Helga; Bendixen, Emoke; Restelli, Laura

    2014-01-01

    and immune cells. The scientific interest in adipose tissue is largely based on the worldwide increasing prevalence of obesity in humans; in contrast, obesity is hardly an issue for farmed animals that are fed according to their well-defined needs. Adipose tissue is nevertheless of major importance...... in these animals, as the adipose percentage of the bodyweight is a major determinant for the efficiency of transferring nutrients from feed into food products and thus for the economic value from meat producing animals. In dairy animals, the importance of adipose tissue is based on its function as stromal...... and metabolic disorders. We herein provide a general overview of adipose tissue functions and its importance in farm animals. This review will summarize recent achievements in farm animal adipose tissue proteomics, mainly in cattle and pigs, but also in poultry, i.e. chicken and in farmed fish. Proteomics...

  19. Microbiological quality of poultry meat: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GC Mead

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Poultry meat can be contaminated with a variety of microorganisms, including those capable of spoiling the product during chill storage, and certain foodborne pathogens. Human illness may follow from handling of raw meat, undercooking or mishandling of the cooked product. While Salmonella and Campylobacter spp. remain the organisms of greatest global concern in this respect, others present include the more recently reported Arcobacter and Helicobacter spp. and, occasionally, verotoxigenic Escherichia coli. Also considered here is the growing problem of antimicrobial resistance among poultry-associated pathogens. Because of the need for a systematic and universally applicable approach to food safety control, the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP concept is increasingly being introduced into the Poultry Industry, and Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA is being applied to microbial hazards. Among a number of completed and on-going studies on QRA are those undertaken by FAO/WHO on Salmonella and Campylobacter in broilers. In the case of Campylobacter, however, any QRA must assume at present that all strains have the same pathogenic potential for humans and comparable survival capabilities, even though this is unlikely to be the case. Implementation of the HACCP system in poultry processing plants addresses zoonotic agents that are not detectable by conventional meat inspection procedures and can help to control contamination of carcasses with spoilage organisms. The system brings obvious benefits in optimising plant hygiene, ensuring compliance with legislation and providing evidence of 'due diligence' on the part of the processor. It is now being applied globally in two different situations: in one, such as that occurring in the USA, carcass contamination is clearly reduced as carcasses pass through the process and are finally chilled in super-chlorinated water. There is also the option to use a chemical-rinse treatment for further

  20. Fungal contamination of poultry litter: a public health problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, C; Carolino, E; Malta-Vacas, J; Sabino, R; Viegas, S; Veríssimo, C

    2012-01-01

    Although numerous studies have been conducted on microbial contaminants associated with various stages related to poultry and meat products processing, only a few reported on fungal contamination of poultry litter. The goals of this study were to (1) characterize litter fungal contamination and (2) report the incidence of keratinophilic and toxigenic fungi presence. Seven fresh and 14 aged litter samples were collected from 7 poultry farms. In addition, 27 air samples of 25 litters were also collected through impaction method, and after laboratory processing and incubation of collected samples, quantitative colony-forming units (CFU/m³) and qualitative results were obtained. Twelve different fungal species were detected in fresh litter and Penicillium was the most frequent genus found (59.9%), followed by Alternaria (17.8%), Cladosporium (7.1%), and Aspergillus (5.7%). With respect to aged litter, 19 different fungal species were detected, with Penicillium sp. the most frequently isolated (42.3%), followed by Scopulariopsis sp. (38.3%), Trichosporon sp. (8.8%), and Aspergillus sp. (5.5%). A significant positive correlation was found between litter fungal contamination (CFU/g) and air fungal contamination (CFU/m³). Litter fungal quantification and species identification have important implications in the evaluation of potential adverse health risks to exposed workers and animals. Spreading of poultry litter in agricultural fields is a potential public health concern, since keratinophilic (Scopulariopsis and Fusarium genus) as well as toxigenic fungi (Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Penicillium genus) were isolated.

  1. Economic analysis of wind-powered farmhouse and farm building heating systems. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stafford, R.W.; Greeb, F.J.; Smith, M.F.; Des Chenes, C.; Weaver, N.L.

    1981-01-01

    The study evaluated the break-even values of wind energy for selected farmhouses and farm buildings focusing on the effects of thermal storage on the use of WECS production and value. Farmhouse structural models include three types derived from a national survey - an older, a more modern, and a passive solar structure. The eight farm building applications that were analyzed include: poultry-layers, poultry-brooding/layers, poultry-broilers, poultry-turkeys, swine-farrowing, swine-growing/finishing, dairy, and lambing. These farm buildings represent the spectrum of animal types, heating energy use, and major contributions to national agricultural economic values. All energy analyses were based on hour-by-hour computations which allowed for growth of animals, sensible and latent heat production, and ventilation requirements. Hourly or three-hourly weather data obtained from the National Climatic Center was used for the nine chosen analysis sites, located throughout the United States and corresponding to regional agricultural production centers.

  2. Determinants of Knowledge and Biosecurity Preventive Behaviors for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Risk Among Chinese Poultry Farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Bin; Liu, Zong Ping

    2016-06-01

    Biosecurity measures are the first line of defense against highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) on farms. It is generally recognized that an individual's behavior can be influenced by the knowledge they possess. However, empirical study has not reported an association between poultry producers' awareness of HPAI symptoms and their actual biosecurity actions. The aim of this study is to classify knowledge items of HPAI by exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and to examine the determinants of different types of knowledge and the effect of different types of knowledge on biosecurity preventive behaviors (BPBs). The survey (n = 297) was conducted using a questionnaire to measure the level of awareness of items related to HPAI and the actual adoption of BPBs among poultry farmers in the Chinese province of Jiangsu. The EFA revealed three main types of knowledge, which were categorized as avian influenza (AI) epidemic characteristics, primary biosecurity preventive knowledge (basic biosecurity preventive knowledge against AI), and essential biosecurity preventive knowledge (crucial biosecurity preventive knowledge against infection of AI). Multivariate regression showed that only poultry farmers' awareness of essential biosecurity preventive knowledge was positively associated with their actual BPBs. Additionally, educational attainment, number of years of experience raising poultry, farming operation size, and training were associated both with BPB and most of the knowledge factors or knowledge items. Training of existing poultry farmers is probably a feasible scheme; furthermore, the training should focus on the essential biosecurity preventive knowledge. On the other hand, policy initiatives to encourage large-scale poultry farming while discouraging small-scale backyard poultry husbandry would be an effective method of improving the management standards of rural poultry farming.

  3. Glycopeptides susceptibility among enterococci isolated from a poultry farm in São Paulo, Brazil (1996/1997 Perfil de suscetibilidade a glicopeptídeos em enterococos isolados de frangos de um aviario de São Paulo, Brasil (1996-1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivani Lúcia Leme

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Enterococci resistance to glycopeptides was evaluated em Brazilian poultry fed with feed supplemented with avoparcin as growth promoter. The susceptibility to the glycopeptides avoparcin, teicoplanin and vancomycin was determined for 217 enterococci isolated from cloacal swabs (one swab per bird in tests and controls groups. Tests group comprised three groups (A, B and C of Hubbard broiler-chickens 14, 21 and 35 days old, respectively. These birds were from one single farm, with a common feed source supplemented with avoparcin (10 mg/kg of feed. Controls groups (1 and 2 comprised 25 and 42 days old broilers, respectively, obtained from the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine’s aviary (University of São Paulo where avoparcin was never used. No glycopeptide resistant enterococci strain was found, but an increase of Enterococcus faecium in faeces of chickens fed with avoparcin, independent of the age of the bird, was detected.Para avaliar a resistência de enterococos de origem animal aos antibióticos glicopeptídeos foi projetado um estudo em aves comerciais que usavam rações suplementadas com avoparcina como promotor de crescimento. A suscetibilidade aos glicopeptídeos avoparcina, teicoplanina e vancomicina foi determinada em 217 enterococos isolados de fezes de frango colhidas através de swab cloacal (uma amostra/ave. Nos três grupos Teste foram usadas fezes de frangos em diferentes fases de crescimento, com 14, 21 e 35 dias de idade. As aves foram alimentadas com ração contendo avoparcina (10 mg/kg de ração desde o primeiro dia de vida. Como controle foram usadas fezes de frangos do biotério da Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária da Universidade de São Paulo, onde nunca foram usados glicopeptídeos nas rações das aves ou no local. Nenhum enterococo resistente à vancomicina (ERV foi isolado nas amostras examinadas, porém, foi detectado um aumento de Enterococcus faecium na microbiota fecal de frangos que utilizavam avoparcina na ra

  4. Farm Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... same bacterium that has become resistant to certain antibiotics, which can make infections harder to treat. MRSA can be passed back and forth between people and farm animals through direct contact. In humans, MRSA can cause ...

  5. A study of poultry processing plant noise characteristics and potential noise control techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyvill, J. C.; Jape, A. D.; Moriarity, L. J.; Atkins, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The noise environment in a typical poultry processing plant was characterized by developing noise contours for two representative plants: Central Soya of Athens, Inc., Athens, Georgia, and Tip Top Poultry, Inc., Marietta, Georgia. Contour information was restricted to the evisceration are of both plants because nearly 60 percent of all process employees are stationed in this area during a normal work shift. Both plant evisceration areas were composed of tile walls, sheet metal ceilings, and concrete floors. Processing was performed in an assembly-line fashion in which the birds travel through the area on overhead shackles while personnel remain at fixed stations. Processing machinery was present throughout the area. In general, the poultry processing noise problem is the result of loud sources and reflective surfaces. Within the evisceration area, it can be concluded that only a few major sources (lung guns, a chiller component, and hock cutters) are responsible for essentially all direct and reverberant sound pressure levels currently observed during normal operations. Consequently, any effort to reduce the noise problem must first address the sound power output of these sources and/or the absorptive qualitities of the room.

  6. Prevalence and cross-immunity of Eimeria species on Korean chicken farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    The epidemiology of Eimeria species in poultry flocks is important to increase the effectiveness of vaccinations and prophylactic strategies on chicken farms. In this study, fecal samples from 356 chicken farms were collected randomly and examined for the prevalence of Eimeria species. Through micro...

  7. Will family farms continue to dominate agricultural production in the future? Implications for data collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahearn, M.; Poppe, K.J.; Salvioni, C.; Boone, J.A.; Henke, K.; Roest, A.

    2009-01-01

    Agricultural production is dominated by family farms, although other types of farming exist. In some sectors of agriculture (e.g. pigs and poultry, horticulture, wine) the increase in scale leads to a concentration of the production on very large holdings. At the same time we see farmers exploring d

  8. Energy analysis of the poultry rising located at the Sertao do Pajeu, Pernambuco, Brazil; Analise energetica de aviarios localizados no Sertao do Pajeu pernambucano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Heitor Scalambrini; Lopes, Tiago Pessoa de Melo Queiroz [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Nucleo de Apoio a Projetos de Energias]. E-mail: naper@ufpe.br

    2006-07-01

    The activity of poultry raising is today an alternative for income generation in the backlands of Pajeu, State of Pernambuco. In the City of Sao Jose do Egito, distant 402 km from the State Capital Recife, there is a large poultry plant with 284 integrated poultry farms owned by small rural producers. Those poultry farms are built in masonry and lateral woven wire fencing within the standard size of 9 m X 125 m. Their capacity is 10,000 birds and they are equipped with drinking and feed boxes, silos, fans, nebuliser, motor-pumps, lights and heaters. In their first 18 days of the bird's life, called 'baby chick phase', it needs a warm environment temperature of about 34 deg C, which is fundamental for its survival. In that phase the energy consumption is mainly related to water pumping and lighting. From the 19th day up to the 45th day - the period called 'poultry phase' - the birds need lower temperatures. The feeders are automatic, fans and nebulizers are used to ease the air circulation and to improve the poultry comfort. This phase is the one, which requires more electric energy consumption. After 45 days the poultry is slaughtered with about 2.8 kg and the poultry farm comes into a time period of cleaning and resting called 'cleaning and resting phase', which takes from 15 to 28 days. This is the phase with the lowest energy consumption. Then the poultry farm cycle is completed, which takes about 70 days, that is, the time span of one year accounts for 5.5 cycles. In this work an energy consumption analysis for all phases of poultry raising is performed and alternative proposals for the energy conservation and energy consumption reduction is presented. (author)

  9. The Perception of National Security in Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merabishvili Gela

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines how the on-going confrontation between Russia and the West affects perceptions of security in Georgia. Our angle is twofold: in addition to comparing previous National Security Concepts of Georgia we examine both governmental and public perceptions of security in the light of Georgia’s foreign policy priorities, its relationship with neighbouring countries and conflict resolution policy. Since Georgia declares 20 per cent of its territory to be occupied, the article focuses particularly on the crisis in Ukraine and its effect on security debates in Georgia. As the upcoming parliamentary elections in Georgia in autumn 2016 are highly important to maintain the current foreign policy course and secure achievements, the paper also tries to answer how these global and regional developments may be interpreted and reflected in the next National Security Concept of Georgia (whenever it might be published.

  10. Risk factors for highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 infection in backyard chicken farms, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Mathilde; Wongnarkpet, Sirichai; Gasqui, Patrick; Poolkhet, Chaithep; Thongratsakul, Sukanya; Ducrot, Christian; Roger, François

    2011-06-01

    To reduce the risk of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 infection in humans, the pathways by which HPAI is spread in poultry must be determined. Backyard poultry farmers are particularly vulnerable to the threat of HPAI, with both their health and livelihoods at risk. Identifying the risk factors for HPAI infection in backyard farms should allow control measures to be better targeted. To study the risk factors of HPAI H5N1 infection, we carried out a case-control study on backyard chicken farms in Thailand, analyzing 104 case farms and 382 control farms. Data on farming practices and environmental characteristics were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression models. We show that farms where owners bought live chickens from another backyard farm had a higher risk of HPAI H5N1 infection (OR 3.34, 95% CI 1.72-6.47), while those where owners used a disinfectant to clean poultry areas were exposed to lower risk (OR 0.48, 95% CI 0.26-0.87). Our results highlight the important role of the trade of poultry between farms in the transmission of HPAI H5N1, in addition to farming practices and environmental characteristics. Findings from this study may help to tailor prevention measures to the local circumstances of backyard farms in different regions of the world.

  11. Meat and Poultry Labeling Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... regulations enacted in 2004 to protect consumers against Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, mechanically separated beef is considered inedible ... in raising the animals. [ Top of Page ] NO ANTIBIOTICS (red meat and poultry): The terms "no antibiotics ...

  12. Color of Meat and Poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or freezer, color changes are normal for fresh meat and poultry. 2. Does a change in color indicate spoilage? Change in color alone does not mean the product is spoiled. Color changes are normal for fresh ...

  13. Epidemiology of Campylobacter in poultry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs-Reitsma, W.

    1994-01-01

    Campylobacter , causing human infections with severe symptoms of diarrhoea, is mainly transmitted by food, especially poultry meat products.Several studies on Campylobacter colonization in breeders, laying hens, and broilers were carried out. Campylobacter isolates were serotyped, using a modificati

  14. The potential spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus via dynamic contacts between poultry premises in Great Britain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kao Rowland R

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI viruses have had devastating effects on poultry industries worldwide, and there is concern about the potential for HPAI outbreaks in the poultry industry in Great Britain (GB. Critical to the potential for HPAI to spread between poultry premises are the connections made between farms by movements related to human activity. Movement records of catching teams and slaughterhouse vehicles were obtained from a large catching company, and these data were used in a simulation model of HPAI spread between farms serviced by the catching company, and surrounding (geographic areas. The spread of HPAI through real-time movements was modelled, with the addition of spread via company personnel and local transmission. Results The model predicted that although large outbreaks are rare, they may occur, with long distances between infected premises. Final outbreak size was most sensitive to the probability of spread via slaughterhouse-linked movements whereas the probability of onward spread beyond an index premises was most sensitive to the frequency of company personnel movements. Conclusions Results obtained from this study show that, whilst there is the possibility that HPAI virus will jump from one cluster of farms to another, movements made by catching teams connected fewer poultry premises in an outbreak situation than slaughterhouses and company personnel. The potential connection of a large number of infected farms, however, highlights the importance of retaining up-to-date data on poultry premises so that control measures can be effectively prioritised in an outbreak situation.

  15. Economic Appraisal of Small and Medium Scale Poultry Egg Production in Ife and Ilesha Metropolis, Osun State, Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busari Ahmed Olugbenga

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The study appraised the economic performance of small and medium scale poultry egg production in Ife and Ilesha metropolis, Osun State Nigeria. A purposive sampling was used to select one hundred and twenty poultry egg farmers, cluster sampling was used to select areas where small and medium scale were concentrated in the study area then sixty (60 small scale and sixty (60 medium scale were randomly selected to form the population of the study. Data were collected through structured interview schedule. Descriptive statistics such as means and percentages were employed for budgetary analysis and economic performance. The ordinary least square was used to determine the significant variables influencing the gross margin of poultry egg farmers at different levels of scale of production. The study shows that the gross margin of small farms was ₦575.65 while the gross margin of medium farms was ₦43672.62. The total production cost of small and medium farms were ₦1480.25 and ₦29654.43 respectively. The results further reveal that costs of feed constituted the largest share of the total costs for the two categories of farm size. The amount spent on drug and feed were the only significant determining factors of revenue accruable to both categories of poultry egg farmers. Although, poultry egg production was profitable in the study area, the level of profit depended on the scale of operation.

  16. A survey for selected avian viral pathogens in backyard chicken farms in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjola, L; Tammiranta, N; Ek-Kommonen, C; Soveri, T; Hänninen, M L; Fredriksson Ahomaa, M; Huovilainen, A

    2017-04-01

    Backyard poultry are regaining popularity in Europe and increased interest in the health and management of non-commercial farms has resulted. Furthermore, commercial poultry farm owners have become concerned about the risk represented by contagious avian diseases that nearby backyard poultry could transmit. Fifty-one voluntary backyard chicken farms were visited between October 2012 and January 2013. Blood samples and individual cloacal swabs were collected from 457 chickens. In 44 farms (86%), one or more of the tested chickens had antibodies against avian encephalomyelitis and chicken infectious anaemia viruses, 24 farms (47%) had chickens seropositive for infectious bronchitis virus, 10 farms (20%) had chickens seropositive for infectious bursal disease virus, six farms (12%) had chickens seropositive for infectious laryngotracheitis virus and two farms (5.4%) had chickens seropositive for avian influenza virus. No farms had chickens seropositive for Newcastle disease virus. Of the 51 farms, five (10%) had chickens positive for coronavirus reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. A phylogenetic analysis showed that all backyard chicken coronaviruses collected were QX type infectious bronchitis viruses. All chickens tested for avian influenza and Newcastle disease viruses using real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were negative. To our knowledge, there is no evidence to date to suggest that these diseases would have been transmitted between commercial and non-commercial flocks.

  17. Assessment of Risks and Uncertainties in Poultry Farming in Kwara ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    home

    2014-11-25

    Nov 25, 2014 ... INTRODUCTION ... Also, the return to investment is high, thus farmers need ... In practice, both concepts are very much ... ii. identify the risks and uncertainties encountered by the ... more concentrated in the zone than any part of the state. ..... Evidence of Small-Scale Crop Producers in Kwara State,. Nigeria.

  18. Treatment of animal carcasses in poultry farms using sealed ditches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, M; González, J L; Gutiérrez, M A Díez; Guimaraes, A Correa; Gracia, L M Navas

    2008-10-01

    Several hen carcass elimination experiments were conducted by isolating corpses in a sealed ditch and adding different doses of lime. The aim was to evaluate the viability of this method as an alternative to other elimination techniques, as required in the European regulation CE 1774/2002 [Reglamento CE 1774/2002, de 3 de octubre por el que se establecen las normas sanitarias aplicables a los subproductos animales no destinados a consumo humano]. The experiments were carried out at a natural scale, in a 200m3 ditch located in a livestock enterprise, using a proportion of 200g of lime/kg of carcass. We observed a high degradation of carcasses after six months, the method being also safe from a microbiological point of view. The material extracted from the ditch had a high calcium content (330.7gkg(-1)), which makes it an ideal product for soil lacking this element, or as an acidity corrector in acid soils due to its basic (pH 8.48) nature. It also contains a significant amount of mineral nutrients (17.0gkg(-1) N, 2.4gkg(-1) P and 4.9gkg(-1) K) and organic matter (101.5gkg(-1)). We also analysed the material extracted from the ditch prior to its renovation for the experiments and followed the processes taking place in the ditch during the first six months, when lime doses of 100, 200 and 300 gkg(-1) of treated carcass were applied. Simultaneously, we carried out laboratory experiments in cylindrical 25L deposits to evaluate the gas release of the three (100, 200 and 300g of lime/kg carcass) doses of lime used. After the tenth week, we observed CO2 concentrations ranging from 5% for the lower lime doses to very low levels for the 300g lime/kg carcass dose. As regards methane, in the three series of experiments, the release was highest during the first weeks, began to decrease in the eighth week and reached its lower value during the fourteenth week. Emissions of NO2 were not observed, and the levels of NH3 and SH2 were usually so high that they exceeded the detection level of the apparatus used to register them.

  19. FUZZY MODELING APPLIED TO THE WELFARE OF POULTRY FARMS WORKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEONARDO SCHIASSI

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue desarrollar un modelo fuzzy para evaluar y clasificar el ambiente de trabajo de las granjas de pollos de engorde. Para ello datos de temperatura del aire, humedad relativa, nivel de ruido y la concentración de amoníaco fueron colectados en un galpón avícola con ventilación positiva lateral. Un esquema de trabajo de ocho horas al día fue simulado y los resultados dieron un soporte para la clasificación del nivel de confort bajo las diferentes condiciones térmicas, acústicas y de concentración de gas. Por lo tanto, fueron utilizadas tres variables de entrada, índice de temperatura y humedad (ITU, nivel de ruido (dB y concentración de amoníaco (ppm, y la de salida fue la clasificación del entorno de trabajo (CET. Fueron definidas sesenta (60 reglas con base en las combinaciones de ITU, nivel del ruido y concentración de amoníaco, donde cada resultado es una función de combinación de los datos de entrada. Los datos de campo fueron usados para validar el sistema propuesto. Los resultados indican que la metodología propuesta es viable para determinar el nivel de bienestar de los trabajadores pudiendo ayudar en la toma de decisiones relacionadas con el control climático y se puede utilizar con el fin de reducir o eliminar las fuentes que son consideradas como causantes de estrés en el hombre.

  20. Profitability of Backyard Poultry Farming in Sokoto Metropolis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    positive contribution while cost of heating (P< 0.01) had significant negative ... encouraged to make loan available to those people engaged in the enterprise. ... profitability and quick economic returns in .... It is also revealing that banks do not.

  1. Poultry management: a useful tool for the control of necrotic enteritis in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiouris, Vasilios

    2016-06-01

    The intestinal ecosystem of poultry has been inevitably changed as a result of the ban of antimicrobial growth promoters. The re-emergence of necrotic enteritis has been the most significant threat for the poultry industry, which, in clinical form, causes high mortality and in subclinical forms, affects growth and feed conversion. It is one of the most common and economically devastating bacterial diseases in modern broiler flocks in terms of performance, welfare and mortality. Necrotic enteritis is a multi-factorial disease process, in which a number of co-factors are usually required to precipitate an outbreak of the disease. Although, Clostridium perfringens has been identified as the aetiological agent of the disease, the predisposing factors that lead to over-proliferation of C. perfringens and the subsequent progression to disease are poorly understood. Any factor that causes stress in broiler chicks could suppress the immune system and disturb the balance of the intestinal ecosystem, in such a way that the risk of a necrotic enteritis (NE) outbreak increases. Poultry management could significantly affect the pathogenesis of NE. In particular, feed restriction and coccidiosis vaccination can protect against NE, while extreme house temperature, feed mycotoxins and high stocking density predispose to NE. It becomes really important to understand the pathogenesis of the disease, as well as to clarify the interactions between husbandry, nutritional and infectious factors and the outbreak of necrotic enteritis. This is necessary and extremely important in order to develop managerial strategies at the farm level to control the incidence and severity of the disease in the post-antibiotic era.

  2. Farm Tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blichfeldt, Bodil Stilling; Nielsen, Niels Christian; Nissen, Kathrine Aae

    2011-01-01

    This paper draws on a study of one specific type of small tourism enterprises (i.e. farm tourism enterprises) and argues that these enterprises differ from other enterprises in relation to a series of issues other than merely size. The analysis shows that enterprises such as these are characterized...... by blurriness of boundaries between „home spheres‟ and work situations as well as by a unique blend of commercial and private hospitality. Furthermore, the study shows that „social‟ motivations and non-monetary benefits gained through host-guest interactions are of great importance to the hosts. In particular......, our study suggests that it is problematic to threat farm tourism enterprises as if they have much in common with both larger corporations and other types of SMTEs. Farm tourism enterprises seem to differ significantly from other enterprises as the hosts are not in the tourism business because...

  3. EIMERIOSIS IN POULTRY OF RAWALPINDI/ISLAMABAD AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Q. KHAN, H. IRSHAD, R. ANJUM, M. JAHANGIR AND U. NASIR

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine the prevalence of eimeriosis in poultry and identify potential risk factors for its spread in Rawalpindi/Islamabad area of Pakistan. Of 359 gut samples (suspected for harbouring eimeriosis examined, 258 (71.86% were found infected. Four species of Eimeria (E. maxima, 34.10%, E. tenella, 30.62%, E. mitis, 13.95% and E. necatrix, 7.75% were recorded. The prevalence of eimeriosis was highest in the month of September (89.74%, while lowest during June (28.57%. The disease was more common at the farms where the litter was wet and not managed properly.

  4. [Drug resistance of Escherichia coli strains isolated from poultry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giurov, B; Korudzhiĭski, N; Bineva, I

    1981-01-01

    Studied was the sensitivity of a total of 143 strains of Escherichia coli, isolated from young birds and broilers died from coli septicaemia, to antibiotics and chemotherapeutics. The following descending order was established: gentamycin, carbenicillin, ampicillin, furazolidon, borgal, kanamycin, strep tomycin, chloramphenicol, neomycin sulphathiazole, and tetracycline. Markers of resistance were established with all strains with regard to the therapeutic agents in current and prospective use in industrial poultry farming. It is stated that a preliminary antibiogram is indispensable in order to obtain dependable results in the treatment of animals affected with colibacteriosis. An alternative is to apply directly those drugs to which the strains have shown highest sensitivity.

  5. Evaluation of poultry litter as a feasible fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davalos, Juan Z.; Roux, Maria Victoria; Jimenez, Pilar [Laboratorio de Termoquimica, Instituto de Quimica Fisica ' Rocasolano' , CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2002-10-19

    Caloric values (massic energy of combustion) of poultry litter coming from the chicken farm 'Cantos Blancos' (Guadalajara-Spain) were determined by static bomb calorimetry. These values correspond to samples treated in different conditions of drying-up. The massic energy of combustion of the 'dry samples' was 14447kJ/kg and for 'wet samples' decreased linearly with increasing water content. The optimum conditions to use these waste product as an economic fuel were also established.

  6. Effect of Fresh Poultry Litter and Compost on Soil Physical and Chemical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Stacy; Tsegaye, Teferi; Coleman, Tommy

    1998-01-01

    Application of poultry litter and compost as a substitute for fertilizer not only uses unwanted waste and decreases expenditures for commercial fertilizer, it adds nutrients to soil for plant uptake. The properties of soil affected by poultry litter were analyzed to determine the positive and negative aspects of using this substitute fertilizer. This study focused on changes associated with saturated hydraulic conductivity, bulk density, nitrate concentrations, and pH after application of varying concentrations of poultry litter and compost. Soil samples from Tennessee Valley Substation in Alabama were analyzed in a laboratory at Alabama A&M University. As a result of the application of fresh poultry litter and compost, we found that the saturated hydraulic conductivity increased and the bulk density decreased, while the pH was generally not affected. Using poultry litter and compost as an alternative commercial fertilizers could be adapted by the farming community to protect the sustainability of our environment. Unwanted waste is used productively and soil is enriched for farming.

  7. Ant Farm

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Publié à l’occasion de l’exposition d’Ant Farm au Frac Centre du 12 au 23 décembre 2007, ce très beau catalogue, qui fait état des dix ans de création du collectif californien, propose un nombre important de documents iconographiques, de notices et de textes concernant leurs différents projets. Fondé en 1968 par Doug Michels et Chip Lord, rejoints par la suite par Curtis Schreier, Hudson Marquez, Douglas Hurr et d’autres encore, le collectif Ant Farm a marqué les esprits par quelques œuvres s...

  8. Identification and prevalence of tetracycline resistance in enterococci isolated from poultry in Ilishan, Ogun State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funmilola A Ayeni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tetracycline is one of the most frequently used antibiotics in Nigeria both for human and animal infections because of its cheapness and ready availability. The use of tetracycline in animal husbandry could lead to horizontal transfer of tet genes from poultry to human through the gut microbiota, especially enterococci. Therefore, this study is designed to identify different enterococcal species from poultry feces in selected farms in Ilishan, Ogun State, Nigeria, determine the prevalence of tetracycline resistance/genes and presence of IS256 in enterococcal strains. MaterialsandMethods: Enterococci strains were isolated from 100 fresh chicken fecal samples collected from seven local poultry farms in Ilishan, Ogun State, Nigeria. The strains were identified by partial sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Antibiotic susceptibility of the isolates to vancomycin, erythromycin, tetracycline, gentamicin, amoxycillin/claulanate, and of loxacin were performed by disc diffusion method. Detection of tet, erm, and van genes and IS256 insertion element were done by polymerase chain reaction amplification. Results: Sixty enterococci spp. were identified comprising of Enterococcus faecalis 33 (55%, Enterococcus casseliflavus 21 (35%, and Enterococcus gallinarium 6 (10%. All the isolates were resistant to erythromycin (100%, followed by tetracycline (81.67%, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (73.33%, ofloxacin (68.33%, vancomycin (65%, and gentamicin (20%. None of the enterococcal spp. harbored the van and erm genes while tet(M was detected among 23% isolates and is distributed mostly among E. casseliflavus. IS256 elements were detected only in 33% of E. casseliflavus that were also positive for tet(M gene. Conclusion: This study provides evidence that tetracycline resistance gene is present in the studied poultry farms in Ilishan, Ogun State, Nigeria and underscores the need for strict regulation on tetracycline usage in poultry farming in the studied

  9. Biosecurity-Based Interventions and Strategies To Reduce Campylobacter spp. on Poultry Farms▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, D. G.; Elvers, K. T.; Dopfer, D.; Hansson, I.; Jones, P.; James, S.; Gittins, J.; Stern, N. J.; Davies, R.; Connerton, I.; Pearson, D.; Salvat, G.; Allen, V. M.

    2011-01-01

    The prevention and control of Campylobacter colonization of poultry flocks are important public health strategies for the control of human campylobacteriosis. A critical review of the literature on interventions to control Campylobacter in poultry on farms was undertaken using a systematic approach. Although the focus of the review was on aspects appropriate to the United Kingdom poultry industry, the research reviewed was gathered from worldwide literature. Multiple electronic databases were employed to search the literature, in any language, from 1980 to September 2008. A primary set of 4,316 references was identified and scanned, using specific agreed-upon criteria, to select relevant references related to biosecurity-based interventions. The final library comprised 173 references. Identification of the sources of Campylobacter in poultry flocks was required to inform the development of targeted interventions to disrupt transmission routes. The approach used generally involved risk factor-based surveys related to culture-positive or -negative flocks, usually combined with a structured questionnaire. In addition, some studies, either in combination or independently, undertook intervention trials. Many of these studies were compromised by poor design, sampling, and statistical analysis. The evidence for each potential source and route of transmission on the poultry farm was reviewed critically, and the options for intervention were considered. The review concluded that, in most instances, biosecurity on conventional broiler farms can be enhanced and this should contribute to the reduction of flock colonization. However, complementary, non-biosecurity-based approaches will also be required in the future to maximize the reduction of Campylobacter-positive flocks at the farm level. PMID:21984249

  10. 78 FR 19080 - Importation of Live Birds and Poultry, Poultry Meat, and Poultry Products From a Region in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ..., Imports, Livestock, Meat and meat products, Milk, Poultry and poultry products, Reporting and..., infectious allantoic fluid; (2) Any H5 or H7 virus that does not meet the criteria in paragraph (1) of...

  11. National Farm Medicine Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Areas Applied Sciences Biomedical Informatics Clinical Research Epidemiology Farm Medicine Human Genetics Oral-Systemic Health Clinical ... Consulting Agritourism Farm MAPPER Lyme Disease ROPS Rebate Zika Virus National Farm Medicine Center The National Farm ...

  12. Amaranth farming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Araceli; Kjær, Tyge; Kjærgård, Bente

    2008-01-01

    natural resources that small-scale farmers have to combat the abovementioned problems. The study identified several local and regional barriers for increasing the level of farming, production, processing and consumption. A striking and paradoxical limitation is the monopolization practices developed...... by some of the associations in relation to knowledge and technology transfer, seeds distribution and contact to potential national and foreign buyers....

  13. Molecular farming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merck, K.B.; Vereijken, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Molecular Farming is a new and emerging technology that promises relatively cheap and flexible production of large quantities of pharmaceuticals in genetically modified plants. Many stakeholders are involved in the production of pharmaceuticals in plants, which complicates the discussion on the poss

  14. Contamination of poultry environment with campylobacter Spp. and significance for colonisation of broilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lydekaitiene, Viktorija Legaudaite; Malakauskas, Mindangas; Kudirkiene, Egle

    2016-01-01

    to identify the sources of Campylobacter in poultry farm environment and their significance for broiler colonisation. For this purpose, Campylobacter spp. were isolated from broilers and their environment (litter, water of puddle, concentric zones, tap water) by both direct inoculation on mCCDA selective...... genotypes, which had not been transmitted to other broiler flocks reared in the same building. Studies have shown that Campylobacter can survive in poultry environment. They can be transferred from the environment into broiler houses by shoes, cloths and wildlife. Therefore, strict bio-security and hygiene...

  15. 76 FR 59177 - Georgia Disaster #GA-00036

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ... ADMINISTRATION Georgia Disaster GA-00036 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of GEORGIA dated 09/13..., Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street, SW., Suite...

  16. The University System of Georgia's GALILEO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penson, Merryll

    1998-01-01

    The University System of Georgia and the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) built the innovative electronic library GALILEO (GeorgiA LIbrary LEarning Online system). This article describes the cooperation, leadership, and technology that made GALILEO possible; the proposal; planning and implementation; governance; current status; and future…

  17. Chelated minerals for poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SL Vieira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Organic minerals have been subject of an increasing number of investigations recently. These compounds can be considered the most significant event regarding commercial forms of minerals targeting animal supplementation in the last decades. Minerals, especially metals, are usually supplemented in poultry feeds using cheap saline sources and have never required a lot of attention in terms of quality. On the other hand, definitions of organic minerals are very broad and frequently lead to confusion when decision-making becomes necessary. Organic minerals include any mineral bound to organic compounds, regardless of the type of existing bond between mineral and organic molecules. Proteins and carbohydrates are the most frequent candidates in organic mineral combinations. Organic fraction size and bond type are not limitations in organic mineral definition; however, essential metals (Cu, Fe, Zn, and Mn can form coordinated bonds, which are stable in intestinal lumen. Metals bound to organic ligands by coordinated bonds can dissociate within animal metabolism whereas real covalent bonds cannot. Chelated minerals are molecules that have a metal bound to an organic ligand through coordinated bonds; but many organic minerals are not chelates or are not even bound through coordinated bonds. Utilization of organic minerals is largely dependent on the ligand; therefore, amino acids and other small molecules with facilitated access to the enterocyte are supposed to be better utilized by animals. Organic minerals with ligands presenting long chains may require digestion prior to absorption. After absorption, organic minerals may present physiological effects, which improve specific metabolic responses, such as the immune response. Many studies have demonstrated the benefits of metal-amino acid chelates on animal metabolism, but the detection positive effects on live performance is less consistent.

  18. Avian influenza H5N1 virus infections in vaccinated commercial and backyard poultry in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, M H; Arafa, A; Abdelwhab, E M; Selim, A; Khoulosy, S G; Hassan, M K; Aly, M M

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we describe results from a high-pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus (AIV) surveillance program in previously H5-vaccinated commercial and family-backyard poultry flocks that was conducted from 2007 to 2008 by the Egyptian National Laboratory for Veterinary Quality Control on Poultry Production. The real-time reverse transcription PCR assay was used to detect the influenza A virus matrix gene and detection of the H5 and N1 subtypes was accomplished using a commercially available kit real-time reverse transcription PCR assay. The virus was detected in 35/3,610 (0.97%) and 27/8,682 (0.31%) of examined commercial poultry farms and 246/816 (30%) and 89/1,723 (5.2%) of backyard flocks in 2007 and 2008, respectively. Positive flocks were identified throughout the year, with the highest frequencies occurring during the winter months. Anti-H5 serum antibody titers in selected commercial poultry ranged from poultry in Egypt to combat H5N1 AIV, continuous circulation of the virus in vaccinated commercial and backyard poultry was reported and the efficacy of the vaccination using a challenge model with the current circulating field virus should be revised.

  19. THE STATE OF THE POULTRY PRODUCTION MARKET IN THE KRASNODAR REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayduk V. I.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the marketing research of consumers and consumer preferences that affect the formation of the market of poultry products in the Krasnodar region. We have shown a composition of market participants of poultry products: agricultural organizations, private households, small farms; trade and procurement enterprises and their associations, consumers' organizations; processing plants; enterprises and organizations of industrial infrastructure (production and technical, combined feed, transport, construction, and others; organization of the market infrastructure (credit, marketing audit, insurance, wholesale and retail, information and commercial centers, exchanges, wholesale markets, other forming distribution and logistics system. Using the results of market segmentation, companies can choose the strategy of marketing to different segments of the market (the choice between a differentiated approach to the segment and to the adaptation of products to each of them and one for global sales, taking into account the needs of all segments, or focus only on any particular segment. Segment structure of the market of poultry products is a division of the demand segment of the domestic market; at the same time, the sectors of the market dictate poultry enterprises how to prioritize areas of their activities. Competitive advantages of poultry organizations appear in the case of presenting customers high requirements for poultry products. We characterize the approaches to the choice for the producers on their own market niche

  20. Endemic Poultry Viral Diseases 2016 Research Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viral infections of the avian gastrointestinal tract negatively impact poultry production; however, determining the complex etiologies of the viral enteric diseases in poultry has been difficult. Project scientists are continuing to investigate the species specificity, molecular phylogenetics, and p...

  1. 9 CFR 381.7 - Coverage of all poultry and poultry products processed in official establishments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coverage of all poultry and poultry... AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION REGULATIONS Administration; Application of Inspection and Other Requirements § 381.7 Coverage of all...

  2. Control of poultry red mites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilpinen, Ole; Steenberg, Tove

    2008-01-01

    The poultry red mite (PRM), Dermanyssus gallinae, is the most important ectoparasite in European egg production. The mites hide in cracks and crevices in the near vicinity of the resting places of the birds, coming out to feed mainly during the night. Under favourable conditions the population can...... grow rapidly, leading to serious problems. Large mite populations may cause anaemia or even death to the poultry, but also in lower numbers mites may be a nuisance to the birds causing decreased egg production and egg quality. Furthermore, they may have the potential of acting as reservoir...

  3. 9 CFR 94.23 - Importation of poultry meat and other poultry products from Sinaloa and Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Importation of poultry meat and other...: PROHIBITED AND RESTRICTED IMPORTATIONS § 94.23 Importation of poultry meat and other poultry products from... under the following conditions: (a) The poultry meat or other poultry products are derived from poultry...

  4. Comparison of Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence Factors among Escherichia coli Isolated from Conventional and Free-Range Poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Vanessa L; Scandorieiro, Sara; Vespero, Eliana C; Oba, Alexandre; de Brito, Benito G; de Brito, Kelly C T; Nakazato, Gerson; Kobayashi, Renata K T

    2015-01-01

    Microbiological contamination in commercial poultry production has caused concerns for human health because of both the presence of pathogenic microorganisms and the increase in antimicrobial resistance in bacterial strains that can cause treatment failure of human infections. The aim of our study was to analyze the profile of antimicrobial resistance and virulence factors of E. coli isolates from chicken carcasses obtained from different farming systems (conventional and free-range poultry). A total of 156 E. coli strains were isolated and characterized for genes encoding virulence factors described in extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed for 15 antimicrobials, and strains were confirmed as extended spectrum of β-lactamases- (ESBLs-) producing E. coli by phenotypic and genotypic tests. The results indicated that strains from free-range poultry have fewer virulence factors than strains from conventional poultry. Strains from conventionally raised chickens had a higher frequency of antimicrobial resistance for all antibiotics tested and also exhibited genes encoding ESBL and AmpC, unlike free-range poultry isolates, which did not. Group 2 CTX-M and CIT were the most prevalent ESBL and AmpC genes, respectively. The farming systems of poultries can be related with the frequency of virulence factors and resistance to antimicrobials in bacteria.

  5. Comparison of Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence Factors among Escherichia coli Isolated from Conventional and Free-Range Poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa L. Koga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbiological contamination in commercial poultry production has caused concerns for human health because of both the presence of pathogenic microorganisms and the increase in antimicrobial resistance in bacterial strains that can cause treatment failure of human infections. The aim of our study was to analyze the profile of antimicrobial resistance and virulence factors of E. coli isolates from chicken carcasses obtained from different farming systems (conventional and free-range poultry. A total of 156 E. coli strains were isolated and characterized for genes encoding virulence factors described in extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed for 15 antimicrobials, and strains were confirmed as extended spectrum of β-lactamases- (ESBLs- producing E. coli by phenotypic and genotypic tests. The results indicated that strains from free-range poultry have fewer virulence factors than strains from conventional poultry. Strains from conventionally raised chickens had a higher frequency of antimicrobial resistance for all antibiotics tested and also exhibited genes encoding ESBL and AmpC, unlike free-range poultry isolates, which did not. Group 2 CTX-M and CIT were the most prevalent ESBL and AmpC genes, respectively. The farming systems of poultries can be related with the frequency of virulence factors and resistance to antimicrobials in bacteria.

  6. 9 CFR 381.159 - Poultry rolls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Poultry rolls. 381.159 Section 381.159 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION...

  7. Amaranth farming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Araceli; Kjær, Tyge; Kjærgård, Bente

    2008-01-01

    Though amaranth has been studied intensively for its exceptional nutritional properties, little has been reported about its capacity for fighting poverty, securing food supplies, turning migrations, or its impact on the environment and the prospect for mprovement of living conditions of those...... natural resources that small-scale farmers have to combat the abovementioned problems. The study identified several local and regional barriers for increasing the level of farming, production, processing and consumption. A striking and paradoxical limitation is the monopolization practices developed...

  8. Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in wild birds on Danish livestock farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Birthe; Skov, Marianne Nielsine; Nielsen, Eva Møller

    2016-01-01

    , fat score, gender, and migration range were not found to be associated with Campylobacter spp. carriage. A correlation was found between the prevalence (%) of C. jejuni in wild birds and the proportions (%) of C. jejuni in both manure on cattle farms (R-2 = 0.92) and poultry farms (R-2 = 0......Background: Reducing the occurrence of campylobacteriosis is a food safety issue of high priority, as in recent years it has been the most commonly reported zoonosis in the EU. Livestock farms are of particular interest, since cattle, swine and poultry are common reservoirs of Campylobacter spp....... The farm environment provides attractive foraging and breeding habitats for some bird species reported to carry thermophilic Campylobacter spp. We investigated the Campylobacter spp. carriage rates in 52 wild bird species present on 12 Danish farms, sampled during a winter and a summer season, in order...

  9. Dermanyssus gallinae in layer farms in Kosovo: a high risk for Salmonella prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Afrim; Sherifi, Kurtesh; Muji, Skender; Behluli, Behlul; Latifi, Fatgzim; Robaj, Avni; Postoli, Rezart; Hess, Claudia; Hess, Michael; Sparagano, Olivier

    2011-07-15

    The poultry red mite (PRM), Dermanyssus gallinae (D.g.) is a serious ectoparasitic pest of poultry and potential pathogen vector. The prevalence of D. g. and the prevalence of Salmonella spp. within mites on infested laying poultry farms were investigated in Kosovo. In total, 14 populated layer farms located in the Southern Kosovo were assessed for D. g. presence. Another two farms in this region were investigated 6 months after depopulation. Investigated flocks were all maintained in cages, a common housing system in Kosovo. A total of eight farms were found to be infested with D. g. (50%) at varying levels, including the two depopulated farms. The detection of Salmonella spp. from D. g. was carried out using PCR. Out of the eight layer farms infested with D. g., Salmonella spp. was present in mites on three farms (37.5%). This study confirms the high prevalence of D. g. in layer flocks in Kosovo and demonstrates the link between this mite and the presence of Salmonella spp. on infested farms.

  10. Dermanyssus gallinae in layer farms in Kosovo: a high risk for salmonella prevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postoli Rezart

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The poultry red mite (PRM, Dermanyssus gallinae (D.g. is a serious ectoparasitic pest of poultry and potential pathogen vector. The prevalence of D. g. and the prevalence of Salmonella spp. within mites on infested laying poultry farms were investigated in Kosovo. Findings In total, 14 populated layer farms located in the Southern Kosovo were assessed for D. g. presence. Another two farms in this region were investigated 6 months after depopulation. Investigated flocks were all maintained in cages, a common housing system in Kosovo. A total of eight farms were found to be infested with D. g. (50% at varying levels, including the two depopulated farms. The detection of Salmonella spp. from D. g. was carried out using PCR. Out of the eight layer farms infested with D. g., Salmonella spp. was present in mites on three farms (37.5%. Conclusions This study confirms the high prevalence of D. g. in layer flocks in Kosovo and demonstrates the link between this mite and the presence of Salmonella spp. on infested farms.

  11. Dermanyssus gallinae in layer farms in Kosovo: a high risk for salmonella prevalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The poultry red mite (PRM), Dermanyssus gallinae (D.g.) is a serious ectoparasitic pest of poultry and potential pathogen vector. The prevalence of D. g. and the prevalence of Salmonella spp. within mites on infested laying poultry farms were investigated in Kosovo. Findings In total, 14 populated layer farms located in the Southern Kosovo were assessed for D. g. presence. Another two farms in this region were investigated 6 months after depopulation. Investigated flocks were all maintained in cages, a common housing system in Kosovo. A total of eight farms were found to be infested with D. g. (50%) at varying levels, including the two depopulated farms. The detection of Salmonella spp. from D. g. was carried out using PCR. Out of the eight layer farms infested with D. g., Salmonella spp. was present in mites on three farms (37.5%). Conclusions This study confirms the high prevalence of D. g. in layer flocks in Kosovo and demonstrates the link between this mite and the presence of Salmonella spp. on infested farms. PMID:21762497

  12. Cytotoxicity of Odorous Compounds from Poultry Manure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Nowak

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Long-term exposure and inhalation of odorous compounds from poultry manure can be harmful to farm workers and the surrounding residents as well as animals. The aim of the present study was to determine the cytotoxicity and IC50 values of common odorous compounds such as ammonium, dimethylamine, trimethylamine, butyric acid, phenol, and indole in the chick liver hepatocellular carcinoma cell line LMH (Leghorn Male Hepatoma, in vitro, using MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and PrestoBlue cytotoxicity assays. The cells were microscopically examined for any morphological changes post treatment. Dimethylamine exhibited the strongest cytotoxic effect on LMH cells with an IC50 value of 0.06% and 0.04% after an exposure of 24 h and 48 h, respectively. Both ammonium and trimethylamine had comparable cytotoxicity and their IC50 values were 0.08% and 0.04% after 24 h and 48 h, respectively. Of note, indole had the lowest cytotoxicity as the majority of cells were viable even after 72 h exposure. Thus, the IC50 for indole was not calculated. Results achieved from both MTT and PrestoBlue assays were comparable. Moreover, the morphological changes induced by the tested odours in LMH cells resulted in monolayer destruction, cytoplasm vacuolisation, chromatin condensation, and changes in nucleus and cell shape. Our study showed harmful effects of odorous compounds in chick tissues.

  13. Cytotoxicity of Odorous Compounds from Poultry Manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Adriana; Matusiak, Katarzyna; Borowski, Sebastian; Bakuła, Tadeusz; Opaliński, Sebastian; Kołacz, Roman; Gutarowska, Beata

    2016-10-26

    Long-term exposure and inhalation of odorous compounds from poultry manure can be harmful to farm workers and the surrounding residents as well as animals. The aim of the present study was to determine the cytotoxicity and IC50 values of common odorous compounds such as ammonium, dimethylamine, trimethylamine, butyric acid, phenol, and indole in the chick liver hepatocellular carcinoma cell line LMH (Leghorn Male Hepatoma), in vitro, using MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) and PrestoBlue cytotoxicity assays. The cells were microscopically examined for any morphological changes post treatment. Dimethylamine exhibited the strongest cytotoxic effect on LMH cells with an IC50 value of 0.06% and 0.04% after an exposure of 24 h and 48 h, respectively. Both ammonium and trimethylamine had comparable cytotoxicity and their IC50 values were 0.08% and 0.04% after 24 h and 48 h, respectively. Of note, indole had the lowest cytotoxicity as the majority of cells were viable even after 72 h exposure. Thus, the IC50 for indole was not calculated. Results achieved from both MTT and PrestoBlue assays were comparable. Moreover, the morphological changes induced by the tested odours in LMH cells resulted in monolayer destruction, cytoplasm vacuolisation, chromatin condensation, and changes in nucleus and cell shape. Our study showed harmful effects of odorous compounds in chick tissues.

  14. Diary of a poultry intern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garton, William

    2015-05-16

    In his post as poultry intern, William Garton is finding that CPD takes up a large proportion of his time. This, he says, can be quite enjoyable, particularly when events are sponsored by international pharmaceutical companies. This month, he has been on two training courses, one in Spain and the other in Belgium. British Veterinary Association.

  15. Occupational exposure to aflatoxin (AFB₁) in poultry production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Susana; Veiga, Luisa; Malta-Vacas, Joana; Sabino, Raquel; Figueredo, Paula; Almeida, Ana; Viegas, Carla; Carolino, Elisabete

    2012-01-01

    Aflatoxin B₁ (AFB₁) has been recognized to produce cancer in human liver. In addition, epidemiological and laboratory studies demonstrated that the respiratory system was a target for AFB₁. Exposure occurs predominantly through the food chain, but inhalation represents an additional route of exposure. The present study aimed to examine AFB₁ exposure among poultry workers in Portugal. Blood samples were collected from a total of 31 poultry workers from six poultry farms. In addition, a control group (n = 30) was included comprised of workers who undertook administrative tasks. Measurement of AFB₁ in serum was performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). For examining fungi contamination, air samples were collected through an impaction method. Air sampling was obtained in pavilion interior and outside the premises, since this was the place regarded as the reference location. Using molecular methods, toxicogenic strains (aflatoxin-producing) were investigated within the group of species belonging to Aspergillus flavus complex. Eighteen poultry workers (59%) had detectable levels of AFB₁ with values ranging from <1 ng/ml to 4.23 ng/ml and with a mean value of 2 ± 0.98 ng/ml. AFB₁ was not detected in the serum sampled from any of the controls. Aspergillus flavus was the fungal species third most frequently found in the indoor air samples analyzed (7.2%) and was the most frequently isolated species in air samples containing only Aspergillus genus (74.5%). The presence of aflatoxigenic strains was only confirmed in outdoor air samples from one of the units, indicating the presence of a source inside the building in at least one case. Data indicate that AFB₁ inhalation represents an additional risk in this occupational setting that needs to be recognized, assessed, and prevented.

  16. Different environmental drivers of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 outbreaks in poultry and wild birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Yali; de Boer, Willem F; Gong, Peng

    2013-01-01

    A large number of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 outbreaks in poultry and wild birds have been reported in Europe since 2005. Distinct spatial patterns in poultry and wild birds suggest that different environmental drivers and potentially different spread mechanisms are operating. However, previous studies found no difference between these two outbreak types when only the effect of physical environmental factors was analysed. The influence of physical and anthropogenic environmental variables and interactions between the two has only been investigated for wild bird outbreaks. We therefore tested the effect of these environmental factors on HPAI H5N1 outbreaks in poultry, and the potential spread mechanism, and discussed how these differ from those observed in wild birds. Logistic regression analyses were used to quantify the relationship between HPAI H5N1 outbreaks in poultry and environmental factors. Poultry outbreaks increased with an increasing human population density combined with close proximity to lakes or wetlands, increased temperatures and reduced precipitation during the cold season. A risk map was generated based on the identified key factors. In wild birds, outbreaks were strongly associated with an increased Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and lower elevation, though they were similarly affected by climatic conditions as poultry outbreaks. This is the first study that analyses the differences in environmental drivers and spread mechanisms between poultry and wild bird outbreaks. Outbreaks in poultry mostly occurred in areas where the location of farms or trade areas overlapped with habitats for wild birds, whereas outbreaks in wild birds were mainly found in areas where food and shelters are available. The different environmental drivers suggest that different spread mechanisms might be involved: HPAI H5N1 spread to poultry via both poultry and wild birds, whereas contact with wild birds alone seems to drive the outbreaks

  17. Resistance to antimicrobials drugs and control measures of Salmonella spp in the poultry industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velhner Maja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide prevalence of multiple resistant Salmonella spp is described. Clonally distributed Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 and Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 are among the most pathogenic strains for humans. Recently there have been reports on the prevalence of ST “like” monophasic 4(5,12:i strains in some countries. Vaccination strategy and antimicorbial agent therapy is also briefly discussed. Products of animal origin must be safe and without the risk of antimicrobial resistance. Subsequently, the good management practice at farm level and HACCP in feed factories are required to cope with salmonella infections. Poultry producers in developed countries have been motivated to participate in salmonella control programs, because of public awareness on safe food and risks in the food chain. Export of poultry and poultry products is more successful in the regions where Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium have been eradicated. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR31071

  18. The poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae): a potential vector of pathogenic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente Moro, Claire; De Luna, Carlos J; Tod, Alexander; Guy, Jonathan H; Sparagano, Olivier A E; Zenner, Lionel

    2009-06-01

    The poultry red mite, D. gallinae has been involved in the transmission of many pathogenic agents, responsible for serious diseases both in animals and humans. Nowadays, few effective methods are available to control the ectoparasite in poultry farms. Consequently, this is an emerging problem which must be taken into account to maintain good health in commercial egg production. This paper addresses the vector capacity of the ectoparasite with special emphasis on salmonellae, pathogenic agents responsible for many of the most important outbreaks of food-borne diseases worlwide. It has been experimentally shown that D. gallinae could act as a biological vector of S. enteritidis and natural carriage of these bacteria by the mite on poultry premises has also been reported. It was also found that D. gallinae carried other pathogens such as E. coli, Shigella sp., and Staphylococcus, thus increasing the list of pathogenic agents potentially transmitted by the mite.

  19. Seroprevalence of egg drop syndrome--76 virus as cause of poor egg productivity of poultry in Nsukka, South East Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeibe, M C O; Okoroafor, O N; Eze, J I; Eze, I C

    2008-02-01

    To determine if egg drop syndrome 76 virus infection is among the causes of lowered egg productivity in commercial poultry farms in South Eastern Part of Nigeria and to know the prevalence of the infection, ten farms with history of lowered egg production in Nsukka local government area of Enugu State were randomly selected. Sera from ten hens in each of the selected farms were assayed for antibodies against EDS 76 virus by the haemagglutination-inhibition (HI) test. The mean HI titre of the ten hens in each of the farms was recorded as EDS - 76 antibody titre for the farm. Nine out of the 10 farms tested were positive for EDS - 76 antibodies with HI titres ranging between 16 and 256. Out of 10 flocks with production of 65% and above 9 were EDS-76 HI negative.

  20. Analysis of risk factors from salmonella infections and determination of critical control points in poultry industry production chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velhner Maja

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper encompasses problems related to infection caused by Salmonella spp in poultry. The need to carry out adequate control measures and to provide safe food is emphasized. Using experiences from other countries, critical control points are presented in flocks during rearing and in hatcheries. In attempt to diagnose disease as early as possible and to advise proper therapy, the significance of serology monitoring is underlined. In order to produce safe food there is a need to control disease applying our Regulations concerning eradication of Salmonella spp in poultry flocks that is given in Official paper of Republic of Serbia No 6&88 and also to include serology monitoring in poultry flocks. Veterinary practitioners are expected to perform analysis of critical control points in poultry industry as well as to determine specificity and differences in production for single farms, which would enable more effective struggle with diseases in general.

  1. Consumer acceptance of irradiated poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, I B; Resurreccion, A V; McWatters, K H

    1995-08-01

    A simulated supermarket setting (SSS) test was conducted to determine whether consumers (n = 126) would purchase irradiated poultry products, and the effects of marketing strategies on consumer purchase of irradiated poultry products. Consumer preference for irradiated poultry was likewise determined using a home-use test. A slide program was the most effective educational strategy in changing consumers' purchase behavior. The number of participants who purchased irradiated boneless, skinless breasts and irradiated thighs after the educational program increased significantly from 59.5 and 61.9% to 83.3 and 85.7% for the breasts and thighs, respectively. Using a label or poster did not increase the number of participants who bought irradiated poultry products. About 84% of the participants consider it either "somewhat necessary" or "very necessary" to irradiate raw chicken and would like all chicken that was served in restaurants or fast food places to be irradiated. Fifty-eight percent of the participants would always buy irradiated chicken if available, and an additional 27% would buy it sometimes. About 44% of the participants were willing to pay the same price for irradiated chicken as for nonirradiated. About 42% of participants were willing to pay 5% or more than what they were currently paying for nonirradiated chicken. Seventy-three percent or more of consumers who participated in the home-use test (n = 74) gave the color, appearance, and aroma of the raw poultry products a minimum rating of 7 (= like moderately). After consumers participated in a home-use test, 84 and 88% selected irradiated thighs and breasts, respectively, over nonirradiated in a second SSS test.

  2. National Seismic Network of Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumanova, N.; Kakhoberashvili, S.; Omarashvili, V.; Tserodze, M.; Akubardia, D.

    2016-12-01

    Georgia, as a part of the Southern Caucasus, is tectonically active and structurally complex region. It is one of the most active segments of the Alpine-Himalayan collision belt. The deformation and the associated seismicity are due to the continent-continent collision between the Arabian and Eurasian plates. Seismic Monitoring of country and the quality of seismic data is the major tool for the rapid response policy, population safety, basic scientific research and in the end for the sustainable development of the country. National Seismic Network of Georgia has been developing since the end of 19th century. Digital era of the network started from 2003. Recently continuous data streams from 25 stations acquired and analyzed in the real time. Data is combined to calculate rapid location and magnitude for the earthquake. Information for the bigger events (Ml>=3.5) is simultaneously transferred to the website of the monitoring center and to the related governmental agencies. To improve rapid earthquake location and magnitude estimation the seismic network was enhanced by installing additional 7 new stations. Each new station is equipped with coupled Broadband and Strong Motion seismometers and permanent GPS system as well. To select the sites for the 7 new base stations, we used standard network optimization techniques. To choose the optimal sites for new stations we've taken into account geometry of the existed seismic network, topographic conditions of the site. For each site we studied local geology (Vs30 was mandatory for each site), local noise level and seismic vault construction parameters. Due to the country elevation, stations were installed in the high mountains, no accessible in winter due to the heavy snow conditions. To secure online data transmission we used satellite data transmission as well as cell data network coverage from the different local companies. As a result we've already have the improved earthquake location and event magnitudes. We

  3. Effect of heating and aging of poultry litter on the persistence of enteric bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, K G; Tee, E; Tomkins, R B; Hepworth, G; Premier, R

    2011-01-01

    Food-borne illnesses have rarely been associated with the reuse of poultry litter as an organic fertilizer and soil amendment in agriculture. Yet farming practices in many countries have come under increased scrutiny because of heightened consumer awareness of food safety and environmental issues. This study was conducted to determine whether simple on-farm management practices could improve the microbiological safety of poultry litter. First, the effects of heat and moisture on the survival of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in poultry litter were investigated under laboratory conditions. Second, the persistence and regrowth of enteric bacteria were examined in poultry litter that had been aged for up to 12 wk in either a turned or static (unturned) windrow. Escherichia coli and Salmonella counts in poultry litter were reduced by >99% in 1 h at 55 or 65°C under laboratory conditions. At 35°C, both persisted longer under moist (65% wt/wt, wet basis) than dry (30% wt/wt) conditions. Poultry litter aged for 3 wk in a turned windrow, and up to 6 wk in a static windrow, supported increased E. coli densities when incubated in the laboratory at 37°C for 21 d. Peak temperatures >65°C were observed in both windrows within the first 3 wk of aging; after this point, the turned windrow was more consistently exposed to temperatures >45°C than the static windrow. By 12 wk, however, E. coli counts were very similar (3 to 3.6 log(10)) in the outside edge of both windrows. This study highlights the need for a better understanding of the interrelationship between spontaneous heating in organic waste streams, organic matter stabilization, and pathogen reduction.

  4. Practices associated with Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza spread in traditional poultry marketing chains: Social and economic perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Mathilde; Baritaux, Virginie; Wongnarkpet, Sirichai; Poolkhet, Chaithep; Thanapongtharm, Weerapong; Roger, François; Bonnet, Pascal; Ducrot, Christian

    2013-04-01

    In developing countries, smallholder poultry production contributes to food security and poverty alleviation in rural areas. However, traditional poultry marketing chains have been threatened by the epidemics caused by the Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (H5N1) virus. The article presents a value chain analysis conducted on the traditional poultry marketing chain in the rural province of Phitsanulok, Thailand. The analysis is based on quantitative data collected on 470 backyard chicken farms, and on qualitative data collected on 28 poultry collectors, slaughterhouses and market retailers, using semi-structured interviews. The article examines the organization of poultry marketing chains in time and space, and shows how this may contribute to the spread of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 in the small-scale poultry sector. The article also discusses the practices and strategies developed by value chain actors facing poultry mortality, with their economic and social determinants. More broadly, this study also illustrates how value chain analysis can contribute to a better understanding of the complex mechanisms associated with the spread of epidemics in rural communities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Demonstration of a Small Modular Biopower System Using Poultry Litter-Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Reardon; Art Lilley

    2004-06-15

    On-farm conversion of poultry litter into energy is a unique market connected opportunity for commercialization of small modular bioenergy systems. The United States Department of Energy recognized the need in the poultry industry for alternative litter management as an opportunity for bioenergy. The DOE created a relevant topic in the December 2000 release of the small business innovative research (SBIR) grant solicitation. Community Power Corporation responded to this solicitation by proposing the development of a small modular gasification and gas cleanup system to produce separate value streams of clean producer gas and mineral rich solids. This phase II report describes our progress in the development of an on-farm litter to energy system.

  6. A cross-sectional study of ownership of backyard poultry in two areas of Palmerston North, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, C Y; Stevenson, M A; Rawdon, T G

    2010-06-01

    To determine the proportion of residential land parcels with backyard poultry in an urban and urban-rural fringe area of provincial New Zealand. To document key husbandry and biosecurity practices of owners of backyard poultry, and to identify factors that might assist animal health authorities in locating backyard poultry flocks in the event of an infectious disease emergency. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken, in which residents of 449 land parcels in an urban and urban-rural fringe area within and adjacent to the city of Palmerston North, respectively, were visited between February and November 2006. Residents were asked if backyard poultry were kept on the premises. Details recorded for those that kept poultry included the type and number of birds kept, and details of management and biosecurity practices. The geographical distribution of poultry-positive land parcels was assessed for evidence of spatial clustering. Backyard poultry were kept on 3.5 (95% CI=2.1- 5.0)% of land parcels; 1.6 (95% CI=0.7-3.4)% in the urban area and 18.9 (95% CI=11.6-29.3)% in the urban-rural fringe area. There were no significant clusters of poultry-positive land parcels in either area. On all poultry-positive parcels birds were allowed, for at least a portion of the day, to range freely over the property. Three poultry-positive land parcels were within a distance of 1 km of a commercial poultry enterprise in the urban-rural fringe area. Most owners of backyard poultry used feed prepared commercially. The prevalence of ownership of backyard poultry in this area of New Zealand was low, and varied according to classification of the land, viz urban, or urban-rural fringe. The close proximity of backyard flocks to the single commercial enterprise in the urban-rural fringe area reiterates the importance of strict biosecurity measures on commercial farms. In the event of an infectious disease emergency, it is proposed that a sampling frame of owners of backyard poultry might be

  7. Comparison of Six Culture Methods for Salmonella Isolation from Poultry Fecal Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morshed, R. (PhD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Salmonellosis is one of the most important food-borne bacterial zoonotic diseases worldwide, and poultry and its products are the major sources for salmonella transmission to human. Isolation of Salmonella enterica from poultry needs bacteriologic enrichment and selected cultures of fecal samples. In this study, different culture methods for the isolation of salmonella from fecal samples were compared. Material and Methods: Forty- five positive samples from infected farms and 45 negative samples from normal farms were processed using enrichment media including tetrathionate broth, selenite cistine and Rappaport-Vassiliadis. Then the samples were incubated in selective cultures, and after 24 h, their results were compared with standard method. Results: Specificity of all methods for salmonella isolation was 100%, and salmonella was not isolated from the negative samples. The highest susceptibility was related to the method in which the sample first in Selenite cistine and later in Rappaport-Vassiliadis was enriched (100%. Enrichment in Rappaport-Vassiliadis could isolate 41 salmonella from 45 positive samples (91% while the result of enrichment in tetrathionate was 6 isolates (13.3%. Conclusion: This study shows that enrichment in selenite cistine and then in Rappaport-Vassiliadis is currently the best method for isolating salmonella from fecal samples of poultry. Key words: Salmonella; Bacteriologic Culture; Diagnosis; Isolation; Enrichment; Poultry

  8. 2012 Oconee County, Georgia ADS80 Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — All imagery was collected during the 2012 Spring flying season during leaf-off conditions for deciduous vegetation in the State of Georgia. The sun angle was at...

  9. 2013 Athens-Clarke County, Georgia Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of 0.5 foot pixel resolution, four band (RGB, Near IR) orthoimages covering Athens-Clarke Georgia. An orthoimage is remotely sensed image data...

  10. Antibiotics in Canadian poultry productions and anticipated alternatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moussa Sory Diarra

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibiotics in food-producing animals has significantly increased animal health by lowering mortality and the incidence of diseases. Antibiotics also have largely contributed to increase productivity of farms. However, antibiotic usage in general and relevance of non-therapeutic antibiotics in feed (growth promoters need to be reevaluated especially because bacterial pathogens of humans and animals have developed and shared a variety of antibiotic resistance mechanisms that can easily spread within microbial communities. In Canada, poultry production involves more than 2,600 regulated chicken producers. There are several antibiotics approved as feed additives available for poultry farmers. Feed recipes and mixtures greatly vary geographically and from one farm to another, making links between use of a specific antibiotic feed additive and production yields or selection of specific antibiotic-resistant bacteria difficult to establish. Many on-farm studies have revealed the widespread presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in broiler chickens. While sporadic reports linked the presence of antibiotic-resistant organisms to the use of feed supplemented with antibiotics, no recent studies could clearly demonstrate the benefit of antimicrobial growth promoters on performance and production yields. With modern biosecurity and hygienic practices, there is a genuine concern that intensive utilization of antibiotics or use of antimicrobial growth promoters in feed might no longer be useful. Public pressure and concerns about food and environmental safety (antibiotic residues, antibiotic-resistant pathogens have driven researchers to actively look for alternatives to antibiotics. Some of the alternatives include pre- and probiotics, organic acids and essential oils. We will describe here the properties of some bioactive molecules, like those found in cranberry, which have shown interesting polyvalent antibacterial and immuno

  11. Investigations of sensitivity to antibiotics of salmonella strain species originating from poultry from different epizootiological areas

    OpenAIRE

    Stošić Zorica; Mitrić Milan; Kiškarolj Ferenc; Mišić Dušan; Ašanin Ružica

    2006-01-01

    A total of 1666 samples were examined, of which 512 samples of parenchymatous organs of dead or deliberately sacrtificed animals, 60 samples of non-hatched fertilized eggs, 202 samples of feces, 652 samples of cloacal smears, 221 samples of smears from walls of maintenance objects, incubator stations, and transport vehicles, 19 samples of beddings and shavings. The samples originated from poultry farms and which were taken to a laboratory immediately on sampling and sown the same day. A total...

  12. Distribution and Diversity of Salmonella Strains in Shipments of Hatchling Poultry, United States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habing, G G; Kessler, S E; Mollenkopf, D F; Wittum, T E; Anderson, T C; Barton Behravesh, C; Joseph, L A; Erdman, M M

    2015-08-01

    Multistate outbreaks of salmonellosis associated with live poultry contact have been occurring with increasing frequency. In 2013, multistate outbreaks of salmonellosis were traced back to exposure to live poultry, some of which were purchased at a national chain of farm stores (Farm store chain Y). This study was conducted at 36 stores of Farm store chain Y and was concurrent with the timing of exposure for the human outbreaks of salmonellosis in 2013. We used environmental swabs of arriving shipment boxes of hatchling poultry and shipment tracking information to examine the distribution, diversity and anti-microbial resistance of non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) across farm stores and hatcheries. Isolates recovered from shipment boxes underwent serotyping, anti-microbial resistance (AMR) testing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Postal service tracking codes from the shipment boxes were used to determine the hatchery of origin. The PFGE patterns were compared with the PFGE patterns of NTS causing outbreaks of salmonellosis in 2013. A total of 219 hatchling boxes from 36 stores in 13 states were swabbed between 15 March 2013 and 18 April 2013. NTS were recovered from 59 (27%) of 219 hatchling boxes. Recovery was not significantly associated with species of hatchlings, number of birds in the shipment box, or the presence of dead, injured or sick birds. Four of the 23 PFGE patterns and 23 of 50 isolates were indistinguishable from strains causing human outbreaks in 2013. For serotypes associated with human illnesses, PFGE patterns most frequently recovered from shipment boxes were also more frequent causes of human illness. Boxes positive for the same PFGE pattern most frequently originated from the same mail-order hatchery. Only one of 59 isolates was resistant to anti-microbials used to treat Salmonella infections in people. This study provides critical information to address recurrent human outbreaks of salmonellosis associated with mail-order hatchling

  13. Improving village poultry's survival rate through community-based poultry health management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sodjinou, Epiphane; Henningsen, Arne; Koudande, Olorounto Delphin

    2012-01-01

    Community-based poultry health management (CBM) is a strategy for village poultry improvement based on the installment of “poultry interest groups” in experimental villages. These groups serve as a channel for the dissemination of village poultry improvement technologies. The use of CBM is due...... that governments and development agencies can improve village poultry survival rates by investing in the dissemination of information regarding best husbandry management practices through approaches that rely on the community such as CBM because CBM groups serve as channels for the dissemination of village poultry...

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility and distribution of antimicrobial-resistance genes among Enterococcus and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus isolates recovered from poultry litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simjee, Shabbir; McDermott, Patrick F; White, David G; Hofacre, Charles; Berghaus, Roy D; Carter, Peggy J; Stewart, Leigh; Liu, Tongrui; Maier, Marie; Maurer, John J

    2007-12-01

    Data on the prevalence of antimicrobial resistant enterococci and staphylococci from the poultry production environment are sparse in the United States. This information is needed for science-based risk assessments of antimicrobial use in animal husbandry and potential public-health consequences. In this study, we assessed the susceptibility of staphylococci and enterococci isolated from poultry litter, recovered from 24 farms across Georgia, to several antimicrobials of veterinary and human health importance. Among the 90 Enterococcus isolates recovered, E. hirae (46%) was the most frequently encountered species, followed by E. faecium (27%), E. gallinarum (12%), and E. faecalis (10%). Antimicrobial resistance was most often observed to tetracycline (96%), followed by clindamycin (90%), quinupristin-dalfopristin (62%), penicillin (53%), erythromycin (50%), nitrofurantoin (49%), and clarithromycin (48%). Among the 110 staphylococci isolates recovered, only coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) were identified with the predominant Staphylococcus species being S. sciuri (38%), S. lentus (21%), S. xylosus (14%) and S. simulans (12%). Resistance was less-frequently observed among the Staphylococcus isolates for the majority of antimicrobials tested, as compared with Enterococcus isolates, and was primarily limited to clarithromycin (71%), erythromycin (71%), clindamycin (48%), and tetracycline (38%). Multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotypes were prevalent in both Enterococcus and Staphylococcus; however, Enterococcus exhibited a statistically significant difference in the median number of antimicrobials to which resistance was observed (median = 5.0) compared with Staphylococcus species (median = 3.0). Because resistance to several of these antimicrobials in gram-positive bacteria may be attributed to the shuttling of common drug-resistance genes, we also determined which common antimicrobial-resistance genes were present in both enterococci and staphylococci. The

  15. "Explaining the Gender Wage Gap in Georgia"

    OpenAIRE

    Khitarishvili, Tamar

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates gender wage differentials in Georgia between 2000 and 2004. Using ordinary least squares, we find that the gender wage gap in Georgia is substantially higher than in other transition countries. Correcting for sample selection bias using the Heckman approach further increases the gender wage gap. The Blinder Oaxaca decomposition results suggest that most of the wage gap remains unexplained. The explained portion of the gap is almost entirely attributed to industrial variab...

  16. Risk factors of poultry outbreaks and human cases of H5N1 avian influenza virus infection in West Java Province, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yupiana, Yuni; de Vlas, Sake J; Adnan, Nana M; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the association of potential risk factors to the spread and maintenance of the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus in poultry and humans at the district level in West Java Province, Indonesia. The association of demography and environmental risk factors including poultry density, human density, road density, percentage of paddy field, and percentage of swamp, dyke and pond with both HPAI human cases and HPAI outbreaks in poultry were assessed using a descriptive epidemiological design. We also assessed the association of HPAI outbreaks in poultry with HPAI human cases. Poisson regression (generalized linear modeling and generalized estimating equations) was used to analyze the data corrected for over-dispersion. There were 794 HPAI outbreaks in poultry covering 24 of the 25 districts in our study during 2003-2008 and 34 HPAI human cases involving 12 districts during 2005-2008. We found that two risk factors--poultry density and road density--had a statistically significant correlation with the number of HPAI outbreaks in poultry. The number of poultry outbreaks had a negative association with poultry density (29% effect) and a positive association with road density (67% effect). The number of human cases was significantly associated with the number of poultry outbreaks (34% effect), but with none of the other risk factors considered. We conclude that the most effective way to prevent human HPAI cases is to intervene directly in the poultry sector. Our study further suggests that implementing preventive measures in backyard chicken farming and limiting transport of live poultry and their products are promising options to this end. Copyright © 2010 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Influenza H7N9 and H9N2 Viruses: Coexistence in Poultry Linked to Human H7N9 Infection and Genome Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Xinfen; Jin, Tao; Cui, Yujun; Pu, Xiaoying; Li, Jun; Xu, Jin; Liu, Guang; Jia, Huijue; Dan LIU; Song, Shili; yu, yang; Xie, Li; Huang, Renjie; Ding, Hua; Kou, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Avian influenza virus A of the novel H7N9 reassortant subtype was recently found to cause severe human respiratory infections in China. Live poultry markets were suspected locations of the human H7N9 infection sources, based on the cases' exposure histories and sequence similarities between viral isolates. To explore the role of live poultry markets in the origin of the novel H7N9 virus, we systematically examined poultry and environmental specimens from local markets and farms in Hangzhou, u...

  18. Biosecurity Conditions in Small Commercial Chicken Farms, Bangladesh 2011-2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rimi, N A; Sultana, R; Muhsina, M

    2017-01-01

    In Bangladesh, highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 is endemic in poultry. This study aimed to understand the biosecurity conditions and farmers' perception of avian influenza biosecurity in Bangladeshi small commercial chicken farms. During 2011-2012, we conducted observations, in-depth interv......In Bangladesh, highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 is endemic in poultry. This study aimed to understand the biosecurity conditions and farmers' perception of avian influenza biosecurity in Bangladeshi small commercial chicken farms. During 2011-2012, we conducted observations, in...

  19. Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N8) in domestic poultry and its relationship with migratory birds in South Korea during 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jipseol; Kang, Hyun-Mi; Lee, Eun-Kyoung; Song, Byung-Min; Kwon, Yong-Kuk; Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Choi, Kang-Seuk; Kim, Ji-Ye; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Moon, Oun-Kyong; Jeong, Wooseog; Choi, Jida; Baek, Jong-Ho; Joo, Yi-Seok; Park, Yong Ho; Lee, Hee-Soo; Lee, Youn-Jeong

    2014-10-10

    Highly pathogenic H5N8 avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) were introduced into South Korea during 2014, thereby caused outbreaks in wild birds and poultry farms. During the 2014 outbreak, H5N8 HPAIVs were isolated from 38 wild birds and 200 poultry farms (up to May 8, 2014). To better understand the introduction of these viruses and their relationships with wild birds and poultry farm, we analyzed the genetic sequences and available epidemiological data related to the viruses. Genetic analysis of 37 viruses isolated from wild birds and poultry farms showed that all of the isolates belonged to clade 2.3.4.6 of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene, but comprised two distinct groups. During the initial stage of the outbreak, identical isolates from each group were found in wild birds and poultry farms near Donglim Reservoir, which is a resting site for migratory birds, thereby indicating that two types of H5N8 HPAIVs were introduced into the lake at the same time. Interestingly, the one group of H5N8 HPAIV predominated around Donglim Reservoir, and the predominant virus was dispersed by wild birds among the migratory bird habitats in the western region of South Korea as time passed, and it was also detected in nearby poultry farms. Furthermore, compared with the results of the annual AIV surveillance of captured wild birds, which has been performed since 2008, more HPAIVs were isolated and H5 sero-prevalence was also detected during the 2014 outbreak. Overall, our results strongly suggest that migratory birds played a key role in the introduction and spread of viruses during the initial stage of the 2014 outbreak.

  20. The effects of Georgia's Choice curricular reform model on third grade science scores on the Georgia Criterion Referenced Competency Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phemister, Art W.

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Georgia's Choice reading curriculum on third grade science scores on the Georgia Criterion Referenced Competency Test from 2002 to 2008. In assessing the effectiveness of the Georgia's Choice curriculum model this causal comparative study examined the 105 elementary schools that implemented Georgia's Choice and 105 randomly selected elementary schools that did not elect to use Georgia's Choice. The Georgia's Choice reading program used intensified instruction in an effort to increase reading levels for all students. The study used a non-equivalent control group with a pretest and posttest design to determine the effectiveness of the Georgia's Choice curriculum model. Findings indicated that third grade students in Non-Georgia's Choice schools outscored third grade students in Georgia's Choice schools across the span of the study.

  1. Quantitative detection of fecal contamination with domestic poultry feces in environments in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Fang-Fang; Li, Hu; Zhou, Xin-Yuan; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Su, Jian-Qiang

    2017-12-01

    Poultry are an important source of fecal contamination in environments. However, tools for detecting and tracking this fecal contamination are in the early stages of development. In practice, we have found that source tracking methods targeting the 16S rRNA genes of poultry-specific microbiota are not sufficiently sensitive. We therefore developed two quantitative PCR assays for detection of poultry fecal contamination, by targeting chicken and duck mitochondrial genes: NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 (ND5) and cytochrome b (cytb). The sensitivity of both assays was 100% when tested on 50 chicken and duck fecal samples from 10 provinces of China. These assays were also tested in field samples, including soil and water collected adjacent to duck farms, and soils fertilized with chicken manure. Poultry mitochondrial DNA was detected in most of these samples, indicating that the assays are a robust method for monitoring environmental contamination with poultry feces. Complemented with existing indicators of fecal contamination, these markers should improve the efficiency and accuracy of microbial source tracking.

  2. Analysis of pork and poultry meat and bone meal mixture using hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Mirae; Lee, Hoonsoo; Torres, Irina; Garrido Varo, Ana; Pérez Marín, Dolores; Kim, Moon S.

    2017-05-01

    Meat and bone meal (MBM) has been banned as animal feed for ruminants since 2001 because it is the source of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Moreover, many countries have banned the use of MBM as animal feed for not only ruminants but other farm animals as well, to prevent potential outbreak of BSE. Recently, the EU has introduced use of some MBM in feeds for different animal species, such as poultry MBM for swine feed and pork MBM for poultry feed, for economic reasons. In order to authenticate the MBM species origin, species-specific MBM identification methods are needed. Various spectroscopic and spectral imaging techniques have allowed rapid and non-destructive quality assessments of foods and animal feeds. The objective of this study was to develop rapid and accurate methods to differentiate pork MBM from poultry MBM using short-wave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral imaging techniques. Results from a preliminary investigation of hyperspectral imaging for assessing pork and poultry MBM characteristics and quantitative analysis of poultry-pork MBM mixtures are presented in this paper.

  3. Development and testing of technical measures for the abatement of PM10 emissions from poultry housings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogink, N.W.M.; Aarnink, A.J.A.; Mosquera, J.; Winkel, A. [Wageningen UR Livestock Research, Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2010-07-01

    In order to comply with the European Union's ambient air quality standards, the Netherlands must reduce emissions of PM10. As a contributor to PM10, the poultry industry must implement mitigation measures before 2012. An extensive research and development program was launched in 2008 to provide abatement technology for broiler and layer houses. This paper presented results from studies carried out in 2008 and 2009 by Wageningen UR Livestock Research. The supply industry and poultry farmers participated in the study in which different methods and approaches were examined, including bedding material, light schedules, oil spraying systems, ionization systems, water scrubbers, combined scrubbers, electrostatic filters, and dry filters. Most methods were first tested and optimized in small units at an experimental poultry facility Lelystad. Several methods were validated in a next step on poultry farms, where PM10 emissions were measured to establish official emission factors. The oil spraying system and ionization system were tested in broiler houses and are nearing implementation. Reductions in PM10 emissions by different methods ranged from no effect to levels of 60 per cent. An outlook on adequate dust abatement measures for poultry housings was also provided.

  4. Metapopulation dynamics enable persistence of influenza A, including A/H5N1, in poultry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviez Rana Hosseini

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic influenza A/H5N1 has persistently but sporadically caused human illness and death since 1997. Yet it is still unclear how this pathogen is able to persist globally. While wild birds seem to be a genetic reservoir for influenza A, they do not seem to be the main source of human illness. Here, we highlight the role that domestic poultry may play in maintaining A/H5N1 globally, using theoretical models of spatial population structure in poultry populations. We find that a metapopulation of moderately sized poultry flocks can sustain the pathogen in a finite poultry population for over two years. Our results suggest that it is possible that moderately intensive backyard farms could sustain the pathogen indefinitely in real systems. This fits a pattern that has been observed from many empirical systems. Rather than just employing standard culling procedures to control the disease, our model suggests ways that poultry production systems may be modified.

  5. Detection of avian influenza A(H7N9 virus from live poultry markets in Guangzhou, China: a surveillance report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongqiu Chen

    Full Text Available A virologic surveillance program for A(H7N9 virus was conducted from April 15, 2013 to February 14, 2014 in Guangzhou, aiming to clarify the geographical distribution of A(H7N9 viruses among live poultry markets (LPMs and poultry farms in Guangzhou. Virological and serological surveys of poultry workers were also conducted to evaluate the risk of poultry-to-human transmission of the A(H7N9 virus.36 retail LPMs, 6 wholesale LPMs and 8 poultry farms were involved in our surveillance program. About 20 live poultry and environmental samples were obtained from each surveillance site at every sampling time. Different environmental samples were collected to represent different poultry-related work activities. RT-PCR and virus culture were performed to identify the A(H7N9 virus. Hemagglutinin inhibition assay and RT-PCR were conducted to detect possible A(H7N9 infection among poultry workers.A total of 8900 live poultry and environmental samples were collected, of which 131(1.5% were tested positive for A(H7N9 virus. 44.4% (16/36 of retail LPMs and 50.0% (3/6 of wholesale LPMs were confirmed to be contaminated. No positive samples was detected from poultry farms. A significant higher positive sample rate was found in environmental samples related to poultry selling (2.6% and slaughtering (2.4%, compared to poultry holding (0.9%. Correspondingly, A(H7N9 viruses were isolated most frequently from slaughter zone. In addition, 316 poultry workers associated with the 19 contaminated-LPMs were recruited and a low seroprevalence (1.6% of antibody against A(H7N9 virus was detected. An asymptomatic A(H7N9 infection was also identified by RT-PCR.Our study highlights the importance of conducting effective surveillance for A(H7N9 virus and provides evidence to support the assumption that slaughtering is the key process for the propagation of A(H7N9 virus in retail LPMs. Moreover, the ability of A(H7N9 virus to cross species barrier is proved to be still limited.

  6. Influenza A Virus in Backyard Pigs and Poultry in Rural Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osbjer, K; Berg, M; Sokerya, S; Chheng, K; San, S; Davun, H; Magnusson, U; Olsen, B; Zohari, S

    2017-10-01

    Surveillance of influenza virus in humans and livestock is critical, given the worldwide public health threats and livestock production losses. Livestock farming involving close proximity between humans, pigs and poultry is often practised by smallholders in low-income countries and is considered an important driver of influenza virus evolution. This study determined the prevalence and genetic characteristics of influenza A virus (IAV) in backyard pigs and poultry in Cambodia. A total of 751 animals were tested by matrix gene-based rRT-PCR, and influenza virus was detected in 1.5% of sampled pigs, 1.4% of chickens and 1.0% of ducks, but not in pigeons. Full-length genome sequencing confirmed triple reassortant H3N2 in all IAV-positive pigs and various low pathogenic avian influenza subtypes in poultry. Phylogenetic analysis of the swine influenza viruses revealed that these had haemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes originating from human H3N2 viruses previously isolated in South-East Asia. Phylogenetic analysis also revealed that several of the avian influenza subtypes detected were closely related to internal viral genes from highly pathogenic H5N1 and H9N2 formerly sequenced in the region. High sequence homology was likewise found with influenza A viruses circulating in pigs, poultry and wild birds in China and Vietnam, suggesting transboundary introduction and cocirculation of the various influenza subtypes. In conclusion, highly pathogenic subtypes of influenza virus seem rare in backyard poultry, but virus reassortment, involving potentially zoonotic and pandemic subtypes, appears to occur frequently in smallholder pigs and poultry. Increased targeted surveillance and monitoring of influenza circulation on smallholdings would further improve understanding of the transmission dynamics and evolution of influenza viruses in humans, pigs and poultry in the Mekong subregion and could contribute to limit the influenza burden. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Investigation of dissemination of aspergillosis in poultry and possible control measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapetanov Miloš C.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi belonging to genus Aspegillus are ubiquitous saprophytic microorganisms which are, in certain circumstances, responsible for clinical infections of respiratory tract in all poultry, particularly in young birds. In case of a lung form, Aspergillus fumigatus, A. niger and A. glaucus are the most frequently isolated fungi. In general, poultry is constantly exposed to these fungi in its environment. Predisposing factors, such as long exposition and highly contaminated environment and litter, high humidity in poultry houses, poor ventilation, malnutrition and stress, all contribute to clinical aspergillosis. Some geographic and seasonal regularities are observed in relation to the distribution of disease outbreaks. In this sense, cases of aspergillosis in our country were more frequently noted in wild areas located northern from the rivers Sava and Danube. Influence of some factors on the outbreak and spreading, as well as predominant clinical features of aspergillosis in poultry were investigated in this paper. Possible prophylactic and intervention measures were discussed. The occurrence of Aspergillus sp. in poultry was analyzed according to the clinical and laboratory investigations performed during the two selected years, 2000 and 2010. Widespread aspergillosis was noted in poultry flocks of different age, both in young and adult birds. During the years 2000 and 2010, acute aspergillosis was found in 12 and 16 commercial flocks of chickens and turkeys, respectively. Ocular infection with Aspergillus was determined in 10 day old broilers from two flocks. Aspergillus sp. was isolated from unhatched eggs (6.86%, litter (23.07%, environmental (36.17% and hatchery swabs (3.85%. Besides the appropriate antifungal therapy, enforcement of proper sanitary-hygiene measures on poultry farms and hatcheries, as well as microbiological control of feed are considered essential for an efficient control of infection and its spreading.

  8. Prevalence and characterization of multidrug-resistant zoonotic Enterobacter spp. in poultry of Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Shuvro Prokash; Sultana, Munawar; Hossain, M Anwar

    2013-05-01

    Poultry and poultry products are major contributors of zoonotic pathogens. Limited data are available on Enterobacter spp. as a potent zoonotic pathogen in poultry. The present study is a first endeavor on the emergence of multidrug-resistant zoonotic Enterobacter spp. and its prevalence arising from poultry in Bangladesh. Cloacal swabs from poultry samples of five different farms at Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh were collected and from 106 isolates, 18 presumptive Enterobacter spp. were obtained. Antibiogram using 19 used antibiotics belonging to 15 major groups revealed that all of the 18 isolates were completely resistant to penicillin and rifampicin, but differed in their drug resistance pattern against ampicillin (94.4%), clindamycin (94.4%), erythromycin (94.4%), vancomycin (88.9%), sulfonamides (72.2%), imipenem (66.6%), streptomycin (55.6%), nitrofurantoin (33.3%), doxycycline (33.3%), tetracyclines (33.3%), cefepime (11.1%), and gentamicin (5.6%). All Enterobacter spp. were found to be plasmid free, implying that multidrug-resistant properties are chromosomal borne. The vanA and sulI were detected by polymerase chain reaction assay in 17 and 13 isolates, respectively. Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA distributed the 18 multidrug-resistant Enterobacter spp. into three genotypes. Phylogenetic analysis of the representatives of the three genotypes using partial 16S rRNA gene sequence (approximately 900 bp) showed that the genotypically diverse groups belonged to Enterobacter hormaechei, E. cloacae, and E. cancerogenus, respectively. The clinical significance of the close relative Enterobacter spp. is indicative of their zoonotic potential. Therefore, urgent intervention is required to limit the emergence and spread of these bacteria in poultry feed as well as prudent use of antibiotics among poultry farmers in Bangladesh.

  9. Radiation decontamination of poultry viscera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamdar, S.N. [Food Technology Division, FIPLY, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)], E-mail: snjam2@yahoo.com; Harikumar, P. [Food Technology Division, FIPLY, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2008-04-15

    Application of gamma radiation for decontamination of poultry viscera was examined. Exposure to a dose of 20 kGy rendered the viscera sterile (<1 CFU/10 g tissue), while 5 and 10 kGy reduced the total bacterial count by 4 and 6 log{sub 10} cycles, respectively, eliminating the coliforms to <1 CFU/g of tissue. Analysis of organoleptic and biochemical parameters [proximate composition, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVBN), lipid peroxidation (TBARS value), and levels of TCA soluble peptides and proteolytic enzyme] showed that gamma irradiation (20 kGy) followed by storage at 4 deg. C for 62 days induced no significant change (except lipid peroxidation) in the acceptability of poultry viscera. However, storage at ambient temperature (26 {sup o}C) produced enhanced levels of TVBN and TCA soluble products accompanied by higher drip loss. Activities of proteolytic enzymes, except acid protease, did not show any significant change during post-irradiation storage at either temperature.

  10. Radiation decontamination of poultry viscera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamdar, S. N.; Harikumar, P.

    2008-04-01

    Application of gamma radiation for decontamination of poultry viscera was examined. Exposure to a dose of 20 kGy rendered the viscera sterile (TVBN), lipid peroxidation (TBARS value), and levels of TCA soluble peptides and proteolytic enzyme] showed that gamma irradiation (20 kGy) followed by storage at 4 °C for 62 days induced no significant change (except lipid peroxidation) in the acceptability of poultry viscera. However, storage at ambient temperature (26 °C) produced enhanced levels of TVBN and TCA soluble products accompanied by higher drip loss. Activities of proteolytic enzymes, except acid protease, did not show any significant change during post-irradiation storage at either temperature.

  11. Control of poultry red mites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilpinen, Ole; Steenberg, Tove

    2008-01-01

    The poultry red mite (PRM), Dermanyssus gallinae, is the most important ectoparasite in European egg production. The mites hide in cracks and crevices in the near vicinity of the resting places of the birds, coming out to feed mainly during the night. Under favourable conditions the population can...... grow rapidly, leading to serious problems. Large mite populations may cause anaemia or even death to the poultry, but also in lower numbers mites may be a nuisance to the birds causing decreased egg production and egg quality. Furthermore, they may have the potential of acting as reservoir....../carriers for various micro-organisms e.g. Salmonella. In SAFEHOUSE, an EU-project running from 2006-2009, partners from 11 European countries aim at developing new methods for prevention and control of Salmonella in egg production systems with particular focus on the transition to enriched cages in the EU. Enriched...

  12. Real-time measurement of dust in the workplace using video exposure monitoring: Farming to pharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, P. T.; Forth, A. R.; Clark, R. D. R.; Dowker, K. P.; Thorpe, A.

    2009-02-01

    Real-time, photometric, portable dust monitors have been employed for video exposure monitoring (VEM) to measure and highlight dust levels generated by work activities, illustrate dust control techniques, and demonstrate good practice. Two workplaces, presenting different challenges for measurement, were used to illustrate the capabilities of VEM: (a) poultry farming activities and (b) powder transfer operations in a pharmaceutical company. For the poultry farm work, the real-time monitors were calibrated with respect to the respirable and inhalable dust concentrations using cyclone and IOM reference samplers respectively. Different rankings of exposure for typical activities were found on the small farm studied here compared to previous exposure measurements at larger poultry farms: these were mainly attributed to the different scales of operation. Large variations in the ratios of respirable, inhalable and real-time monitor TWA concentrations of poultry farm dust for various activities were found. This has implications for the calibration of light-scattering dust monitors with respect to inhalable dust concentration. In the pharmaceutical application, the effectiveness of a curtain barrier for dust control when dispensing powder in a downflow booth was rapidly demonstrated.

  13. EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON POULTRY PRODUCTION IN ONDO STATE, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.B. Adesiji

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The study assesses the effects of climate change on poultry production in Ondo State, Nigeria. Eighty three (83 poultry farmers were interviewed to elicit relevant information in line with the objectives of the study. Descriptive statistics and inferential statistical tools were used for data analysis. Findings revealed that majority (93.3% of the respondents are aware of climate change, 78%, 98.8% and 86.7% of the respondents agreed that temperature fluctuation, increased in sunshine intensity and global warming has a negative effects on poultry production, 72.4% of the respondents agreed that prices of feed grains are usually high in hot and dry seasons which may affect cost of production and number of birds to raise for egg and meat production in the farm, 73.5% of the respondents agreed that climate change has effect on feed grain availability, this implies that high temperature and low rainfall are climatic factors that affect general grain harvest, their supply to the market and ultimately cost of poultry production. the findings further revealed that 94% of the respondents agreed that climate change affects egg and meat production pattern and 95.2% of the respondents agreed that moist climatic conditions encouraged the distribution and development of diseases. Infrential statistics shows that there is a significant relationship between respondents' socio-economic characteristics and perception of poultry farmers on effects of climate change on poultry production since p > 0.05 (r = 0.454, p= 0.001, the findings also shows that there is a significant relationship between socio-economic characteristics of respondents and their level of awareness of climate change since the p > 0.05 (r = 0.652, p = 0.001. it is recomended extension agents and other development agencies need to educate the poultry farmers more about the effects posed by climate change on poultry production and intensify awareness campaign to poultry farmers on how to reduce

  14. Minimization of Salmonella contamination on raw poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, N A; Cason, J A; Richardson, L J

    2011-01-01

    Many reviews have discussed Salmonella in poultry and suggested best practices to minimize this organism on raw poultry meat. Despite years of research and conscientious control efforts by industry and regulatory agencies, human salmonellosis rates have declined only modestly and Salmonella is still found on raw poultry. Expert committees have repeatedly emphasized the importance of controlling risk, but information about Salmonella in poultry is often limited to prevalence, with inadequate information about testing methods or strains of Salmonella that are detected by these methods and no information about any impact on the degree of risk. This review examines some assumptions behind the discussion of Salmonella in poultry: the relationships between sampling and cultural methodology, prevalence and numbers of cells, and the implications of serotype and subtype issues. Minimizing Salmonella contamination of poultry is not likely to reduce human salmonellosis acquired from exposure to contaminated chicken until these issues are confronted more systematically.

  15. Sero-survey of Avian Influenza in backyard poultry and wild bird species in Iran-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah Mehrabadi, M H; Bahonar, A R; Vasfi Marandi, M; Sadrzadeh, A; Tehrani, F; Salman, M D

    2016-06-01

    In almost all villages in Iran backyard birds, especially chickens, are kept for egg and meat production. AI H9N2 subtype is endemic in Iran. Therefore, estimation of AI prevalence among these birds is important to determine the risk of transmission of infection to commercial farms. The aim of this study was to estimate subclinical infections or previous exposure to H5, H7, and H9 subtypes and to identify potentially important determinants of prevalence of this infectious at premises level in backyard poultry, bird gardens, zoos, and wild bird markets in Iran. A survey was conducted using a cross-sectional design throughout the entire country. A total of 329 villages, seven bird gardens, three zoos and five wild bird markets were included. In each village four families that kept birds were included in the collection of biological samples and background information. The Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) was used as the screening test and all ELISA-positive samples were examined with the HI test to differentiate H5, H7, and H9. Among the bird gardens, eight of 15 premises (53.3%) were positive in both the ELISA test and HI for H9N2. Testing of samples collected in the villages revealed that 296 out of 329 villages (90%) had positive ELISA tests and also HI tests for H9. The HI-H9 mean titers in positive units were significantly higher than negative units (Pbird gardens in the case of H9 (P>.05). The results of this study showed that among the risk variables, mountainous area was a protective factor and lack of hygienic disposal of dead birds was a risk factor for AI; this was also observed in rural poultry. The high sero-prevalence of influenza H9N2 in rural domestic poultry indicates that the disease is endemic. It is necessary to include backyard poultry in any surveillance system and control strategy due to the existence of AIV in backyard poultry and the possibility of transmission of infection to commercial poultry farms. Implementation of an AI

  16. Tracking domestic ducks: A novel approach for documenting poultry market chains in the context of avian influenza transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chang-Yong; Takekawa, John Y.; Xiong, Yue; Wikelski, Martin; Heine, George; Prosser, Diann J.; Newman, Scott H.; Edwards, John; Guo, Fusheng; Xiao, Xiangming

    2016-01-01

    Agro-ecological conditions associated with the spread and persistence of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) are not well understood, but the trade of live poultry is suspected to be a major pathway. Although market chains of live bird trade have been studied through indirect means including interviews and questionnaires, direct methods have not been used to identify movements of individual poultry. To bridge the knowledge gap on quantitative movement and transportation of poultry, we introduced a novel approach for applying telemetry to document domestic duck movements from source farms at Poyang Lake, China. We deployed recently developed transmitters that record Global Positioning System (GPS) locations and send them through the Groupe Spécial Mobile (GSM) cellular telephone system. For the first time, we were able to track individually marked ducks from 3 to 396 km from their origin to other farms, distribution facilities, or live bird markets. Our proof of concept test showed that the use of GPS-GSM transmitters may provide direct, quantitative information to document the movement of poultry and reveal their market chains. Our findings provide an initial indication of the complexity of source-market network connectivity and highlight the great potential for future telemetry studies in poultry network analyses.

  17. Case study the poultry industry in Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    "As developing countries open their economies further to trade, their food industries are striving to raise safety and quality standards in order to compete in new markets. Such is the case with the Colombian poultry industry... Critical questions face the Colombian poultry industry: Is it ready to compete with foreign poultry producers on price, quality, and safety? Can industry efforts to produce better quality products assure an increased share of domestic and regional markets? This brief ...

  18. Best available technology for European livestock farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loyon, L.; Burton, C. H.; Misselbrook, T.

    2016-01-01

    and European initiatives remain. Uptake of the more cost-effective and environmentally-friendly farming methods (such as dietary control, building design and good manure management) is already widespread but unlikely to be enough in itself to ensure that current environmental targets are fully met. Some...... of the abatement options available for intensive pig and poultry farming are brought together under the European IPPC/IED directive where they are listed as Best Available Techniques (BAT). This list is far from complete and other methods including many treatment options are currently excluded. However......, the efficacies of many of the current BAT-listed options are modest, difficult to regulate and in some cases they may even be counterproductive with respect to other objectives ie pollution swapping. Evaluation of the existing and new BAT technologies is a key to a successful abatement of pollution from...

  19. 9 CFR 381.156 - Poultry meat content standards for certain poultry products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Poultry meat content standards for certain poultry products. 381.156 Section 381.156 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY...

  20. Organic farming at the farm level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian H.; Madsen, Niels; Ørum, Jens Erik

    The purpose of this report is to present possible impacts of new technology and changes in legislation on the profitability of different types of organic farms. The aim is also to look at both the current and future trends in the organic area in Denmark. The farm level analyses are carried out...... as part of a larger project entitled “Economic analyses of the future development of organic farming – effects at the field, farm, sector and macroeconomic level”. The project links effects at the field-level with analyses at the farm level. These effects are then used in sector and macroeconomic analyses...

  1. Detailed Performance Calculations: Georgia Institute of Technology Group, Appendix E

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Conditions for system intercomparison; signal strength evaluation; background total source strength; signal-to-noise ratio; performance of present Georgia Tech system; and special comments on current Georgia Tech system are discussed.

  2. Georgia Black Bear Project Report and Status Update

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A 2009 synopsis of black bear populations throughout Georgia (including the south Georgia population) for the purposes of determining distribution and population...

  3. Assessment of the risks of communicable disease transmission through the movement of poultry exhibited at agricultural shows in New South Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusan, F; Toribio, J-A; East, I J

    2010-09-01

    To assess biosecurity practices in the fancy poultry show sector that would influence the establishment and spread of exotic diseases in poultry in New South Wales. A cross-sectional survey of 105 fancy poultry exhibitors at seven agricultural shows. Exhibitors were interviewed about biosecurity practices on their farms and their knowledge of exotic diseases. Poultry stewards at 18 shows were interviewed about biosecurity practices at their shows. Although many exhibitors travelled only short distances to attend shows, some exhibitors attended up to 30 shows per year and travelled interstate to exhibit poultry. A network diagram revealed extensive connections and interactions of poultry throughout the eastern half of NSW. Five of 18 shows included cash sales without any record of purchasers; 46% of exhibitors reintroduced exhibited birds back into their flocks without a quarantine period; and 16% failed to wash cages used to transport the birds. There was a general awareness that exhibition of birds posed a risk to flock health, but knowledge of avian influenza and practices that could be adopted to minimise the risk of disease introduction was limited. The factors that could assist the establishment and spread of exotic diseases in poultry in NSW include the mixing of birds at shows, inadequate recording of exhibitor details at shows, inadequate biosecurity practices when reintroducing exhibited poultry back into flocks, cash sales associated with shows that did not include the collection of purchaser details, and inadequate identification of birds.

  4. Grapevine phytoplasma disease in Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.M. Chkhaidze

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Results of grapevine yellows disease (GY studies in 2005–2015 are reported. Based on symptoms and Dienes' staining method the disease was detected in Kartli, Kakheti and Guria regions on Vitis vinifera (L. Rkatsiteli, Saperavi, Shavkapito, Tavkveri, Aladasturi, Kachichi, Ganjuri, Chardonnay, Vitis labrusca (L. cultivar Isabella, species hybrid cultivar Noah. The phytoplasmas were also visualized by using electron microscopy. The disease seriously modifies the structure of leaf the grapevine phloem, the chlorophyll content and the functioning of sink–source system. According to anatomical characters the studied cultivars showed a decreasing resistance from Noah, to Aladasturi, Rkatsiteli, Kachichi and Saperavi. In the areas of disease epidemic 12 leafhopper species were identified: Agalmatium grylloides (Fabricius, 1794, Cicadella viridis (Linnaeus, 1758, Dictyophara europaea (Linnaeus, 1767, Empoasca vitis (Gothe, 1875, Erythroneura imeretina Dekanoidze, 1962, Hyalesthes mlokosieviczi Signoret, 1879, Hyalesthes obsoletus Signoret, 1865, Lepironia coleoptrata (Linnaeus, 1758, Pentastiridius leporinus (Linnaeus, 1761, Philaenus spumarius (Linnaeus, 1758, Metcalfa pruinosa (Say, 1830, Ricania japonica (Melichar, 1898, which may be possible vectors of grapevine phytoplasmas in Georgia.

  5. Exploring Homophobia in Tbilisi, Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestvirishvili, Maia; Zurabishvili, Tinatin; Iakobidze, Tamar; Mestvirishvili, Natia

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine statistical predictors of homophobic attitudes among the residents of Tbilisi, Georgia. We analyze 2013 survey data from a representative sample of the Tbilisi adult population. Residents were asked about their attitudes, beliefs, and political and social values in the context of the May 17, 2013 attack on LGBT activists on the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia (IDAHOT). Findings show that homophobia is significantly predicted by male gender, lower levels of education, acceptance of social inequality, nonliberal attitudes, and perceiving homosexuals as a "threat to national security." However, psychological perceptions and personal experiences also indirectly influence homophobic attitudes: the findings suggest that males report homophobic attitudes more often than females do and tend to be even more homophobic when they believe that homosexuality is inborn rather than acquired. The study also found that people without liberal attitudes tend to be more homophobic when they have personal contacts with homosexuals. This article highlights the need for a more comprehensive approach to education and the promotion of liberal values as well as legal equality for LGBTQ individuals to decrease the level of homophobia in Georgian society and, specifically, in Tbilisi.

  6. ECONOMIC ANALYSIS LAYING HENS FARM AT FARM HARMA NGEMPLAK DISTRICT, SLEMAN REGENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pes Murib

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laying Poultry is one of local farm potential that can developed for years to come because they have a favorable earnings outlook for entrepreneurs laying hens. This study aimed to: 1 determine factors that influence egg production, 2 knowing revenues laying hens, 3 knowing feasibility of laying hens. Subjects in this study were laying poultry Farm Harma at Banjarharjo, Sleman. Data in this research obtained through observation, interviews, and recording. Used analysis: 1 analysis of Factors Affecting Production of Livestock Laying Chickens used Multiple Linear Regression Analysis, 2 Analysis of revenues, and 3 analysis of feasibility of laying hens used analysis of R/C. Results: 1 factors of production which includes amount of labor, housing, medicines, seeds, and feed together affect production of laying hens. Then individual variables showed that only drugs that do not significantly affect production of laying hens. While variable amount of labor, cages, seed and feed significantly affect production of laying hens, 2 gross income received by farmers is IDR 277,525,208, while net income amounted to IDR 105,214,234, and 3 rated R/C ratio of 1.52 which can be concluded that business of laying hens at Farm Harma Banjarharjo worth effort.

  7. [Avian influenza virus in various environments and risk factors for the contamination of live poultry markets during winter and spring season in Zhejiang province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxiao; Cheng, Wei; Yu, Zhao; Mao, Haiyan; Chen, Enfu

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of avian influenza virus in various environment and the influence factors for subtype H7 prevalence in live poultry markets. We collected environmental samples from various environments across 11 cities of Zhejiang province between October 2014 and March 2015. Cage surface swabs, chopping board surface swabs, feces, water for cleaning, drinking water and swabs of other surfaces were collected. A total of 6 457 samples were collected, including 4 487 samples from poultry markets, 820 samples from poultry farms, 715 samples from backyard poultry pens, 118 samples from poultry processing factories, 118 samples from wild bird habitats and 86 samples from other sites. The chi-squared test was used to compare virus prevalence among sample types, sites types, and poultry markets types. Binary logistic regression was used to analyze factors on H7 subtype prevalence in poultry markets. Of 6 457 samples, 32.54% (2 101) samples were positive for avian influenza, with 3.67% (237) positive for H5 subtype, 12.02%(776) positive for H7 subtype, 11.77%(760) positive for H9 subtype. Of 237 live poultry markets, 33.8% (80) were positive for H7 subtype. The prevalence of influenza A in poultry processing factories was the highest at 43.72% (101/231) (χ(2)=737.80, Pcontaminated most seriously by subtype H5/H7/H9 with the prevalence of 27.55% (1 236/4 487) (χ(2)=436.37, Pcontaminated most seriously by avian influenza. The types of poultry might be the factor which influenced the subtype H7 prevalence in poultry markets.

  8. Generating social network data using partially described networks: an example informing avian influenza control in the British poultry industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickbakhsh Sema

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeted sampling can capture the characteristics of more vulnerable sectors of a population, but may bias the picture of population level disease risk. When sampling network data, an incomplete description of the population may arise leading to biased estimates of between-host connectivity. Avian influenza (AI control planning in Great Britain (GB provides one example where network data for the poultry industry (the Poultry Network Database or PND, targeted large premises and is consequently demographically biased. Exposing the effect of such biases on the geographical distribution of network properties could help target future poultry network data collection exercises. These data will be important for informing the control of potential future disease outbreaks. Results The PND was used to compute between-farm association frequencies, assuming that farms sharing the same slaughterhouse or catching company, or through integration, are potentially epidemiologically linked. The fitted statistical models were extrapolated to the Great Britain Poultry Register (GBPR; this dataset is more representative of the poultry industry but lacks network information. This comparison showed how systematic biases in the demographic characterisation of a network, resulting from targeted sampling procedures, can bias the derived picture of between-host connectivity within the network. Conclusions With particular reference to the predictive modeling of AI in GB, we find significantly different connectivity patterns across GB when network estimates incorporate the more demographically representative information provided by the GBPR; this has not been accounted for by previous epidemiological analyses. We recommend ranking geographical regions, based on relative confidence in extrapolated estimates, for prioritising further data collection. Evaluating whether and how the between-farm association frequencies impact on the risk of between-farm

  9. Organic Farming in Austria

    OpenAIRE

    Vogl, C.R.; Heß, J

    1999-01-01

    During the present decade, Austria has experienced a dramatic increase in organic farming among those countries that comprise the European Union (EU). For example, in 1992, approximately 2,000 farms were practicing organic, ecological, or biodynamic farming methodes. By 1997 the number of certified organic farms plus those in transition from conventional farming had increased 10-fold to some 20,000 farms. This represents almost 9% of the total farms in Austria and an area of 345,375 ha, or 10...

  10. 30 CFR 910.700 - Georgia Federal program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Enviromental Protection Division, pertaining to solid waste management. (5) Georgia Seed Laws and Rules and....700 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA § 910.700 Georgia Federal...

  11. Assessment of Aflatoxin Contamination of Maize, Peanut Meal and Poultry Feed Mixtures from Different Agroecological Zones in Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kana, Jean Raphaël; Gnonlonfin, Benoit Gbemenou Joselin; Harvey, Jagger; Wainaina, James; Wanjuki, Immaculate; Skilton, Robert A.; Teguia, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    Mycotoxins affect poultry production by being present in the feed and directly causing a negative impact on bird performance. Carry-over rates of mycotoxins in animal products are, in general, small (except for aflatoxins in milk and eggs) therefore representing a small source of mycotoxins for humans. Mycotoxins present directly in human food represent a much higher risk. The contamination of poultry feed by aflatoxins was determined as a first assessment of this risk in Cameroon. A total of 201 samples of maize, peanut meal, broiler and layer feeds were collected directly at poultry farms, poultry production sites and poultry feed dealers in three agroecological zones (AEZs) of Cameroon and analyzed for moisture content and aflatoxin levels. The results indicate that the mean of the moisture content of maize (14.1%) was significantly (P aflatoxin, with concentrations overall ranging from aflatoxin content of layer feed did not vary by AEZ, while the highest (16.8 µg/kg) and the lowest (8.2 µg/kg) aflatoxin content of broiler feed were respectively recorded in Western High Plateau and in Rainforest agroecological zones. These results suggest that peanut meal is likely to be a high risk feed, and further investigation is needed to guide promotion of safe feeds for poultry in Cameroon. PMID:23628785

  12. Reducing phosphorus runoff and inhibiting ammonia loss from poultry manure with aluminum sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, P.A. Jr.; Daniel, T.C.; Edwards, D.R.

    2000-02-01

    Applications of aluminum sulfate (Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} {center_dot} 14H{sub 2}O), commonly referred to as alum, to poultry litter have been shown to decrease P runoff from lands fertilized with litter and to inhibit NH{sub 3} volatilization. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of alum applications in commercial broiler houses on: (1) NH{sub 3} volatilization (in-house), (2) poultry production, (3) litter chemistry, and (4) P runoff following litter application. Two farms were used for this study: one had six poultry houses and the other had four. The litter in half of the houses at each farm was treated with alum; the other houses were controls. Alum was applied at a rate of 1,816 kg/house, which corresponded to 0.091 kg/bird. Each year the houses were cleaned in the spring and the litter was broadcast onto paired watersheds in tall fescue at each farm. Results from this study showed that alum applications lowered the litter pH, particularly during the first 3 to 4 wk of each growout. Reductions in litter pH resulted in less NH{sub 3} volatilization, which led to reductions in atmospheric NH{sub 3} in the alum-treated houses. Broilers grown on alum-treated litter were significantly heavier than controls (1.73 kg vs. 1.66 kg). Soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentrations in runoff from pastures fertilized with alum-treated litter averaged 73% lower than that from normal litter throughout a 3-yr period. These results indicate that alum-treatment of poultry litter is a very effective best management practice that reduces nonpoint source pollution while it increases agricultural productivity.

  13. Vaccination of poultry against Campylobacter in the EU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Grinsted; Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård

    2013-01-01

    in the food chain, from farm-to-fork, where poultry meat is considered to be one of the major vehicles of Campylobacter infections in humans, accounting for 50–80% of reported cases. One way to reduce this economic loss to society is perhaps the introduction of a new Campylobacter vaccine, which could...... be administered to one-day old chicks. This would effectively reduce the outbreak of illness among the general population, enhancing general well-being, and increase the efficiency of the employed labor force. In the present paper, we assess the potential economic benefits of a mandatory vaccination program...... at the EU27 level. In this study, benefits are mainly assumed to comprise lower risk of illness due to Campylobacter infections, and hence increased labor productivity. In the modeled analysis presented in this paper, the possible price of the vaccine is estimated when it is assumed that: (i) the number...

  14. FACTORS INFLUENCING COMPOSTING POULTRY WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Kopeć

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Organic recycling of waste, taking into account sanitary safety, should be a fundamental method for recovering the nutrients present in the waste for plants and organic matter. It also refers to by-products of animal origin, which are not intended for consumption by humans. In the present research , composting of hydrated poultry slaughterhouse waste with maize straw was carried out. A combination with fodder yeast and post-cellulose lime was also introduced, which modified chemical and physico-chemical properties of the mixtures. The experiment was carried out by recording the biomass temperature for 110 days in 1.2×1.0×0.8 m reactors with perforated bottoms enabling active aeration. The following parameters were taken into consideration in the composted material: carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, respiratory activity, microorganisms, fractions of compost obtained after washing on sieves. Small amounts of fodder yeast favoured the development of microorganisms and caused a sanitary risk in the final product. At the initial stage, the temperature of raw compost in that object was several degrees lower than in the case of the composted mass without yeast addition. The addition of post-cellulose lime at ratios 6.5:1:6.5 (maize straw: poultry slaughterhouse waste: post-cellulose lime caused a change in the time of microbiological activity, and led to its inhibition in the final process. In comparison to objects with poultry waste, the highest degree of hygienization was found in the compost with post-cellulose lime (with pH close to neutral. By adjusting the ratios of substrates we can influence the microbiological activity, but the amounts of individual substrates should be determined taking into account the quality of the obtained compost.

  15. Occurrence of Eimeria species parasites on small-scale commercial chicken farms in Africa and indication of economic profitability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M Fornace

    Full Text Available Small-scale commercial poultry production is emerging as an important form of livestock production in Africa, providing sources of income and animal protein to many poor households, yet the occurrence and impact of coccidiosis on this relatively new production system remains unknown. The primary objective of this study was to examine Eimeria parasite occurrence on small-scale commercial poultry farms in Ghana, Tanzania and Zambia. Additionally, farm economic viability was measured by calculating the farm gross margin and enterprise budget. Using these economic measures as global assessments of farm productivity, encompassing the diversity present in regional husbandry systems with a measure of fundamental local relevance, we investigated the detection of specific Eimeria species as indicators of farm profitability. Faecal samples and data on production parameters were collected from small-scale (less than 2,000 birds per batch intensive broiler and layer farms in peri-urban Ghana, Tanzania and Zambia. All seven Eimeria species recognised to infect the chicken were detected in each country. Furthermore, two of the three genetic variants (operational taxonomic units identified previously in Australia have been described outside of Australia for the first time. Detection of the most pathogenic Eimeria species associated with decreased farm profitability and may be considered as an indicator of likely farm performance. While a causal link remains to be demonstrated, the presence of highly pathogenic enteric parasites may pose a threat to profitable, sustainable small-scale poultry enterprises in Africa.

  16. Occurrence of Eimeria species parasites on small-scale commercial chicken farms in Africa and indication of economic profitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornace, Kimberly M; Clark, Emily L; Macdonald, Sarah E; Namangala, Boniface; Karimuribo, Esron; Awuni, Joseph A; Thieme, Olaf; Blake, Damer P; Rushton, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Small-scale commercial poultry production is emerging as an important form of livestock production in Africa, providing sources of income and animal protein to many poor households, yet the occurrence and impact of coccidiosis on this relatively new production system remains unknown. The primary objective of this study was to examine Eimeria parasite occurrence on small-scale commercial poultry farms in Ghana, Tanzania and Zambia. Additionally, farm economic viability was measured by calculating the farm gross margin and enterprise budget. Using these economic measures as global assessments of farm productivity, encompassing the diversity present in regional husbandry systems with a measure of fundamental local relevance, we investigated the detection of specific Eimeria species as indicators of farm profitability. Faecal samples and data on production parameters were collected from small-scale (less than 2,000 birds per batch) intensive broiler and layer farms in peri-urban Ghana, Tanzania and Zambia. All seven Eimeria species recognised to infect the chicken were detected in each country. Furthermore, two of the three genetic variants (operational taxonomic units) identified previously in Australia have been described outside of Australia for the first time. Detection of the most pathogenic Eimeria species associated with decreased farm profitability and may be considered as an indicator of likely farm performance. While a causal link remains to be demonstrated, the presence of highly pathogenic enteric parasites may pose a threat to profitable, sustainable small-scale poultry enterprises in Africa.

  17. DVD Database Astronomical Manuscripts in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonia, I.; Simonia, Ts.; Abuladze, T.; Chkhikvadze, N.; Samkurashvili, L.; Pataridze, K.

    2016-06-01

    Little known and unknown Georgian, Persian, and Arabic astronomical manuscripts of IX-XIX centuries are kept in the centers, archives, and libraries of Georgia. These manuscripts has a form of treaties, handbooks, texts, tables, fragments, and comprises various theories, cosmological models, star catalogs, calendars, methods of observations. We investigated this large material and published DVD database Astronomical Manuscripts in Georgia. This unique database contains information about astronomical manuscripts as original works. It contains also descriptions of Georgian translations of Byzantine, Arabic and other sources. The present paper is dedicated to description of obtained results and DVD database. Copies of published DVD database are kept in collections of the libraries of: Ilia State University, Georgia; Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, UK; Congress of the USA, and in other centers.

  18. Historical Earthquakes and Active Structure for Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsereteli, Nino; Varazanashivli, Otar

    2014-05-01

    Long-term seismic history is an important foundation for reliable assessment of seismic hazard and risk. Therefore, completeness of earthquake catalogues in the longest historical part is very important. Survived historical sources, as well as special researches from the institutes, museums, libraries and archives in Georgia, the Caucasus and the Middle East indicate to high level of seismicity which entailed numerous human casualties and destruction on the territory of Georgia during the historical period. The study and detailed analysis of these original documents and researches have allowed us to create a new catalogue of historical earthquakes of Georgia from 1250 BC to 1900 AD. The method of the study is based on a multidisciplinary approach, i.e. on the joint use of methods of history and paleoseismology, archeoseismology, seismotectonics, geomorphology, etc. We present here a new parametric catalogue of 44 historic earthquakes of Georgia and a full "descriptor" of all the phenomena described in it. Constructed on its basis, the summarized map of the distribution of maximum damage in the historical period (before 1900) on the territory of Georgia clearly shows the main features of the seismic field during this period. In particular, in the axial part and the southern slope of the Greater Caucasus there is a seismic gap, which was filled in 1991 by the strongest earthquake and its aftershocks in Racha. In addition, it is also obvious that very high seismic activity in the central and eastern parts of the Javakheti highland is not described in historical materials and this fact requires further searches of various kinds of sources that contain data about historical earthquakes. We hope that this catalogue will enable to create a new joint (instrumental and historical) parametric earthquake catalogue of Georgia and will serve to assess the real seismic hazard and risk in the country.

  19. Meat and Poultry Processing. Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide contains instructional materials for a program that provides students with job skills in meat and poultry processing. The curriculum consists of 10 units that cover the following material: orientation to meat and poultry processing; maintaining plant facilities; equipment and equipment maintenance; purchasing livestock for…

  20. Meat and Poultry Processing. Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide contains instructional materials for a program that provides students with job skills in meat and poultry processing. The curriculum consists of 10 units that cover the following material: orientation to meat and poultry processing; maintaining plant facilities; equipment and equipment maintenance; purchasing livestock for…

  1. Competitiveness of the EU poultry meat sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horne, van P.L.M.; Bondt, N.

    2013-01-01

    EU poultry meat producers have to comply with legislation on environmental protection, animal welfare and food safety. This legislation has increased the production costs of poultry meat. At the same time the EU is negotiating with other countries or groups of countries to liberalise trade in agricu

  2. Salmonellosis: the role of poultry meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, P; Mourão, J; Campos, J; Peixe, L

    2016-02-01

    Salmonellosis remains one of the most frequent food-borne zoonoses, constituting a worldwide major public health concern. Currently, at a global level, the main sources of infection for humans include meat products, including the consumption of contaminated poultry meat, in spite of the success of Salmonella control measures implemented in food-animal production of industrialized countries. In recent years, a shift in Salmonella serotypes related to poultry and poultry production has been reported in diverse geographical regions, being particularly associated with the spread of certain well-adapted clones. Moreover, antimicrobial resistance in non-typhoidal Salmonella is considered one of the major public health threats related with food-animal production, including the poultry production chain and poultry meat, which is an additional concern in the management of salmonellosis. The circulation of the same multidrug-resistant Salmonella clones and/or identical mobile genetic elements encoding antibiotic resistance genes from poultry to humans highlights this scenario. The purpose of this review was to provide an overview of the role of poultry meat on salmonellosis at a global scale and the main problems that could hinder the success of Salmonella control measures at animal production level. With the increasing globalization of foodstuffs like poultry meat, new problems and challenges might arise regarding salmonellosis control, making new integrated intervention strategies necessary along the food chain.

  3. Nutrition and feeding of organic poultry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blair, Robert

    2008-01-01

    ... information on organic standards in certain countries; IFOAM and the Soil Association for their advice; and the Brill Corporation, Norcross, Georgia, USA, for the gift of the Brill Feed Formulati...

  4. A community-based education trial to improve backyard poultry biosecurity in rural Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conan, Anne; Ponsich, Aurélia; Luce Goutard, Flavie; Khiev, Ratana; Tarantola, Arnaud; Sorn, San; Vong, Sirenda

    2013-03-01

    The emergence and spread of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 has caused substantial poultry-related economic losses and public health concerns in relation to a potential pandemic. While biosecurity measures for commercial poultry industry are of the highest standards, these measures are difficult to implement and often unaffordable for backyard poultry farming, particularly in tropical and low-income settings. We designed a feasible biosecurity intervention to improve flock hygiene in Cambodia, - based on community hygiene, cleaning of poultry flock areas and human and poultry movement control. We conducted a cluster randomized and controlled intervention trial in 18 villages in Takeo province to evaluate improvements in biosecurity-related knowledge and practices. The intervention relied on community involvement and community education using special information dissemination tools. We trained village teams (VT) to assist villagers in implementing the intervention using a cascade training approach, in which a few individuals were trained, who in turn trained a larger group of people. During the 14 month follow up, we conducted observational and interview-based surveys (baseline vs. final surveys, VT supervision visits, monitoring surveys) to assess VTs' motivation, intervention messages dissemination and the implementation of recommended measures. Most of villagers (95%, confidence interval: 87.8-100.0%) in intervention villages received general information about how to raise poultry. Farmers in intervention villages reported to have made more changes (≥1 biosecurity related practice during the study period) compared with that of control villages (70.0% (260/372) vs. 22.6% (85/377), p valuebiosecurity-related practices in intervention villages, overall scores increased significantly (pbiosecurity practices in the community. However, further follow-ups are needed to assess whether practices-related changes persist over a longer period of time.

  5. Resistance to quinolones in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli from Danish broilers at farm level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl; Wedderkopp, A.

    2003-01-01

    Aims : To investigate the prevalence of quinolone resistance among Campylobacter jejuni and Camp. coli isolates from Danish poultry at the farm level, as well as for the whole country. Methods and Results : Data and isolates were collected from a national surveillance of Campylobacter in poultry......-resistant variant. Conclusions : Overall, quinolone resistance among Campylobacter isolates from Danish broilers was 7.5% in 1998 and 1999; it was higher among Camp. coli than Camp. jejuni . Genetic diversity among resistant isolates was lower than among susceptible isolates, and certain clones existed in both...... a resistant and a susceptible variant. Some resistant clones appeared to persist on the farms and were repeatedly isolated from poultry flocks. Significance and Impact of the Study : The study is important for the understanding of persistence and dynamics of Campylobacter in broiler houses. It also highlights...

  6. Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in wild birds on Danish livestock farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Birthe; Skov, Marianne Nielsine; Nielsen, Eva Møller;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reducing the occurrence of campylobacteriosis is a food safety issue of high priority, as in recent years it has been the most commonly reported zoonosis in the EU. Livestock farms are of particular interest, since cattle, swine and poultry are common reservoirs of Campylobacter spp. ...

  7. Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in wild birds on Danish livestock farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Birthe; Skov, Marianne Nielsine; Nielsen, Eva Møller

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reducing the occurrence of campylobacteriosis is a food safety issue of high priority, as in recent years it has been the most commonly reported zoonosis in the EU. Livestock farms are of particular interest, since cattle, swine and poultry are common reservoirs of Campylobacter spp...

  8. Starch digestion capacity of poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svihus, B

    2014-09-01

    Starch is quantitatively the most important nutrient in poultry diets and will to a large extent be present as intact starch granules due to very limited extent of gelatinization during pelleting. Although native starch is difficult to digest due to a semi-crystalline structure, even fast-growing broiler chickens appears to be able to digest this starch more or less completely during passage through the jejunum. However, reduced starch digestibility has been observed, particularly in pelleted diets containing large quantities of wheat. Although properties of the starch granule such as size and components on the granule surface may affect digestibility, the entrapment of starch granules in cell walls and a protein matrix may be even more important factors impeding starch digestion. In that case, this and the fact that amylase secretion is normally very high in poultry may explain the lack of convincing effects of exogenous α-amylase added to the diet. However, few well-designed experiments assessing mechanisms of starch digestion and the effect of α-amylase supplementation have been carried out, and thus more research is needed in this important area.

  9. Georgia's Surface-Water Resources and Streamflow Monitoring Network, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2008-01-01

    Surface water provides 5 billion gallons per day, or 78 percent, of the total freshwater used (including thermoelectric) in Georgia (Fanning, 2003). Climate, geology, and landforms control the natural distribution of Georgia's water resources. Georgia is a 'headwaters' State, with most of the rivers beginning in northern Georgia and increasing in size downstream (see map at right for major watersheds). Surface water is the primary source of water in the northern one-half of the State, including the Atlanta metropolitan area, where limited ground-water resources are difficult to obtain. In Georgia, periodic droughts exacerbate competition for surface-water supplies. Many areas of Georgia also face a threat of flooding because of spring frontal thunderstorms and the potential for hurricanes from both the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. As the population of Georgia increases, these flood risks will increase with development in flood-risk zones, particularly in the coastal region.

  10. Direct detection of Marek's disease virus in poultry dust by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniakowski, Grzegorz; Samorek-Salamonowicz, Elżbieta

    2014-11-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a serious concern for poultry production and represents a unique herpesvirus model. MDV can be shed by doubly infected chickens despite vaccination. The fully infectious MDV particles are produced in the feather follicle epithelium (FFE), and MDV remains infectious for many months in fine skin particles and feather debris. Molecular biology methods including PCR and real-time PCR have been shown to be valuable for the detection of MDV DNA in farm dust. Recently, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) was found to be useful in the detection of MDV in feathers and internal organs of infected chickens. LAMP is also less affected by the inhibitors present in DNA samples. Taking into account the advantages of LAMP, direct detection of MDV DNA in poultry dust has been conducted in this research. The detection of MDV DNA was possible in 11 out of the 12 examined dust samples without DNA extraction. The DNA was retrieved from dust samples by dilution and incubation at 95 °C for 5 min. The direct detection of MDV DNA in the dust was possible within 30 min using a water bath and UV light. The results were confirmed by electrophoresis and melting curve analysis of the LAMP products. Our results show that LAMP may be used to test for the presence of virulent MDV in poultry farm dust without DNA extraction.

  11. The nutritive value of poultry diets containing sunflower meal supplemented by enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sredanović Slavica A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The international limitations imposed on the utilization of meat and bone meals in animal diets, together with the increasing demand for soybean meal, create a necessity to search for other protein sources to economically balance compound feeds. In this regard it is important to note that sunflower is the best adapted high-protein crop available in some European regions and that is useful to use it in poultry farming as the replacement of other protein sources. Protein and many other nutrients are “imprisoned” to variable degrees, inside sunflower meal fibrous structures, and remain less available for digestion by the poultry’s own proteases and other endogenous enzymes. Added exogenous enzymes (phytase, hemicellulase, cellulase, carbohydrase, protease, etc. offer a number of creative possibilities for breakdown and “liberation” of these nutrients, their easier digestion and absorption, and thus development of new nutritional standards and new diets formulation. Supplementation of poultry diets containing sunflower meal by different enzymes increasingly contribute to sustainable poultry farming by enhancing production efficiency, increasing the effectiveness of nutrient utilization and upgrading in environmental protection. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III46012

  12. Current and emerging technologies for rapid detection and characterization of Salmonella in poultry and poultry products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Si Hong; Aydin, Muhsin; Khatiwara, Anita; Dolan, Maureen C; Gilmore, David F; Bouldin, Jennifer L; Ahn, Soohyoun; Ricke, Steven C

    2014-04-01

    Salmonella is the leading cause of foodborne illnesses in the United States, and one of the main contributors to salmonellosis is the consumption of contaminated poultry and poultry products. Since deleterious effects of Salmonella on public health and the economy continue to occur, there is an ongoing need to develop more advanced detection methods that can identify Salmonella accurately and rapidly in foods before they reach consumers. Rapid detection and identification methods for Salmonella are considered to be an important component of strategies designed to prevent poultry and poultry product-associated illnesses. In the past three decades, there have been increasing efforts towards developing and improving rapid pathogen detection and characterization methodologies for application to poultry and poultry products. In this review, we discuss molecular methods for detection, identification and genetic characterization of Salmonella associated with poultry and poultry products. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of the established and emerging rapid detection and characterization methods are addressed for Salmonella in poultry and poultry products. The methods with potential application to the industry are highlighted in this review.

  13. Migrant farm workers' access to pesticide protection and information: Cultivando Buenos Habitos campaign development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, R; Wilson, K; Buttram, C; Jones, K; Steiner, C

    1999-01-01

    Formative evaluation of south Georgian migrant farm workers' access to information and products to promote pesticide protection and understanding of cancer risk associated with pesticide exposure was conducted using field observation, in-depth interviews of Georgia's Migrant Health Program's outreach workers, and structured face-to-face surveys of migrant farm workers. The data indicated that fewer than one-third of the pesticide products reviewed contained messages about pesticide use and exposure risk for humans. Risk information on products appeared in English only. Few protective devices were available for purchase. Migrant farm workers were aware in a very general sense of health risks posed by pesticides, but they were specifically unaware of the reach of pesticides sprayed, as illustrated by their field behaviors. Findings also demonstrated the need to educate outreach workers about migrant farm workers' cancer risk, so that they may act as migrant farm workers' health advocates to reduce the adverse effects associated with pesticide exposure.

  14. Use of antibiotics in the poultry industry in Saudi Arabia: implications for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mustafa, Zaki H; Al-Ghamdi, Mastour S

    2002-01-01

    The use of antimicrobial agents in food-producing animals has become an important public health issue due to the spread of microbial resistance. This study was aimed at identifying the antimicrobial agents available for poultry use and highlighting their possible impact on public health. Twenty-three randomly selected poultry farms and all veterinary pharmacies in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia were surveyed for the antibiotics used or dispensed. Further, a comprehensive literature survey was performed. Twenty-nine antimicrobial agents were identified as being available for poultry use, of which 22 (75.9%) were important for the treatment of human infections. Enrofloxacin, oxytetracycline, ampicillin, neomycin, sulphamethoxazole, colistin, doxycycline and erythromycin were the most frequently used drugs. Food-borne hypersensitivity reactions and the emergence of microbial resistance, as well as cross-resistance to the various groups of antibiotics in animals and its transfer to human pathogens, are well documented. The misuse of antibiotics in the local poultry industry poses a serious health risk to the public and may complicate the treatment of human infections. The veterinary use of antimicrobial agents, especially those with dual animal and human applications, should therefore be restricted. The establishment of a government department concerned with food and drug safety is also highly recommended.

  15. Antimicrobial Resistance in Enterococcus spp. Isolated from Environmental Samples in an Area of Intensive Poultry Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A. Chambers

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Enterococcus spp. from two poultry farms and proximate surface and ground water sites in an area of intensive poultry production were tested for resistance to 16 clinical antibiotics. Resistance patterns were compared to assess trends and possible correlations for specific antimicrobials and levels of resistance. Enterococci were detected at all 12 surface water sites and three of 28 ground water sites. Resistance to lincomycin, tetracycline, penicillin and ciprofloxacin in poultry litter isolates was high (80.3%, 65.3%, 61.1% and 49.6%, respectively. Resistance in the surface water to the same antibiotics was 87.1%, 24.1%, 7.6% and 12.9%, respectively. Overall, 86% of litter isolates, 58% of surface water isolates and 100% of ground water isolates were resistant to more than one antibiotic. Fifty-four different resistance patterns were recognised in isolates obtained from litter and environmental samples and several E. faecium and E. faecalis isolates from litter and environment samples shared the same resistance pattern. Multiple antibiotic resistant (MAR indices calculated to assess health risks due to the presence of resistant enterococci suggested an increased presence of antibiotics in surface water, likely from poultry sources as no other wastewater contributions in the area were documented.

  16. Geological hazard monitoring system in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaprindashvili, George

    2017-04-01

    Georgia belongs to one of world's most complex mountainous regions according to the scale and frequency of Geological processes and damage caused to population, farmlands, and Infrastructure facilities. Geological hazards (landslide, debrisflow/mudflow, rockfall, erosion and etc.) are affecting many populated areas, agricultural fields, roads, oil and gas pipes, high-voltage electric power transmission towers, hydraulic structures, and tourist complexes. Landslides occur almost in all geomorphological zones, resulting in wide differentiation in the failure types and mechanisms and in the size-frequency distribution. In Georgia, geological hazards triggered by: 1. Activation of highly intense earthquakes; 2. Meteorological events provoking the disaster processes on the background of global climatic change; 3. Large-scale Human impact on the environment. The prediction and monitoring of Geological Hazards is a very wide theme, which involves different researchers from different spheres. Geological hazard monitoring is essential to prevent and mitigate these hazards. In past years in Georgia several monitoring system, such as Ground-based geodetic techniques, Debrisflow Early Warning System (EWS) were installed on high sensitive landslide and debrisflow areas. This work presents description of Geological hazard monitoring system in Georgia.

  17. Human cutaneous anthrax, Georgia 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracalik, Ian; Malania, Lile; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Manvelyan, Julietta; Bakanidze, Lela; Imnadze, Paata; Tsanava, Shota; Blackburn, Jason K

    2014-02-01

    We assessed the occurrence of human cutaneous anthrax in Georgia during 2010--2012 by examining demographic and spatial characteristics of reported cases. Reporting increased substantially, as did clustering of cases near urban centers. Control efforts, including education about anthrax and livestock vaccination, can be directed at areas of high risk.

  18. Ibsen in Georgia: milestones in the reception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakhaber Loria

    2015-02-01

    Ibsen was and is constantly referred to in Georgian literary studies, not least in connection with Georgian writers. In post-Soviet Georgia, Ibsen is very much on the agenda, and his plays are produced and discussed as they always have been.

  19. Climate change vulnerability assessment in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binita KC; J. Marshall Shepherd; Cassandra Johnson Gaither

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is occurring in the Southeastern United States, and one manifestation is changes in frequency and intensity of extreme events. A vulnerability assessment is performed in the state of Georgia (United States) at the county level from 1975 to 2012 in decadal increments. Climate change vulnerability is typically measured as a function of exposure to physical...

  20. Human Cutaneous Anthrax, Georgia 2010–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracalik, Ian; Malania, Lile; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Manvelyan, Julietta; Bakanidze, Lela; Imnadze, Paata; Tsanava, Shota

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the occurrence of human cutaneous anthrax in Georgia during 2010–-2012 by examining demographic and spatial characteristics of reported cases. Reporting increased substantially, as did clustering of cases near urban centers. Control efforts, including education about anthrax and livestock vaccination, can be directed at areas of high risk. PMID:24447721

  1. 77 FR 51099 - Georgia Disaster #GA-00046

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-23

    ... ADMINISTRATION Georgia Disaster GA-00046 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY...: 05/14/2013. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration... CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street...

  2. Progressive Education in Georgia: Tradition or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopaliani, Bella; Harnisch, Delwyn L.; Doliashvili, Nana; Guetterman, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Despite differences among progressive educators, they share the conviction that democracy means active participation by all citizens in the social, political, and economic decisions of their countries. The aim of this paper is to explore how Georgia is meeting goals and perspectives of progressive education by widely implementing civic education…

  3. Jazz in Georgia Schools: Twin Residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Mark; Blackman, Gary

    1984-01-01

    A very successful artist-in-education program in which jazz musicians introduced elementary students in Augusta (Georgia) to jazz music is described. Students were involved in many activities, including instrumental improvisation, singing, reading staff notation, choreography, and composing jazz. (RM)

  4. Sixty Years of Creationism in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladin, Kenneth S.

    1983-01-01

    Examines sociopolitical conditions that allowed pro-creationist and anti-evolutionist movements to thrive in Georgia and other southern States. Describes efforts by leading citizens to influence legislation toward propagation of the creationist philosophy, especially in education. Stresses the need for scientists and educators to oppose…

  5. MODELING MERCURY FATE IN SEVEN GEORGIA WATERSHEDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field and modeling studies were conducted in support of total maximum daily loads (TMDLs)for mercury in six south Georgia rivers and the Savannah River. Mercury is introduced to these rivers primarily by atmospheric deposition, with minor point source loadings. To produce mercu...

  6. Sixty Years of Creationism in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladin, Kenneth S.

    1983-01-01

    Examines sociopolitical conditions that allowed pro-creationist and anti-evolutionist movements to thrive in Georgia and other southern States. Describes efforts by leading citizens to influence legislation toward propagation of the creationist philosophy, especially in education. Stresses the need for scientists and educators to oppose…

  7. Milkweed, stink bugs, and Georgia cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    In peanut-cotton farmscapes in Georgia, stink bugs, i.e., Nezara viridula (L.)(Say) and Chinavia hilaris (Say), develop in peanut and then disperse at the crop-to-crop interface to feed on fruit in cotton. The main objective of this study was to examine the influence of a habitat of tropical milkwe...

  8. Competition on the Georgia Education Marketplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnidze, Archil; Maglakelidze, Shorena

    2017-01-01

    Georgia implemented a nationwide, full scale school voucher program in 2005. The new voucher plan was designed with the intent to provide equitable distribution and efficient utilization of financial and human resources. By introducing the voucher scheme, the government hoped to promote competition among public as well as private schools to push…

  9. Antibiotic Resistance Pattern Of Bacterial Pathogens Isolated From Poultry Manure Used To Fertilize Fish Ponds In New Bussa, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funso Omojowo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to isolate and identify antibiotic resistant bacteria from poultry manure usually used for pond fertilization. Poultry manure from 120 Chickens in National Institute for Freshwater Fisheries Research (NIFFR integrated fish farms, New-Bussa, Nigeria was collected. Five bacterial pathogens; Salmonella typhi, Escherichia coli, Shigella dysenteriae, Staphylococcus aureus and Aeromonas hydrophila were isolated. Antibiotic susceptibility testing carried out using the disk diffusion technique. Antibiotics used were; ofloxacin, amoxicillin, tetracycline, ampicillin, erythromycin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid and chloramphenicol. All the isolated organisms were 100% sensitive to ofloxacin. The multiple resistance pattern revealed that 100% were resistant to tetracycline, 84.34% resistant to ampicillin, 76.68% resistant to amoxicillin, 66% resistant to chloramphenicol, 66% resistant to gentamicin, 29% resistant to erythromycin, 28.34% resistant to nalidixic acid. The risk posed by untreated poultry manure used in fish pond fertilization and the public health implications of these results were discussed.

  10. Developing Poultry Facility Type Information from USDA Agricultural Census Data for Use in Epidemiological and Economic Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melius, C

    2007-12-05

    The epidemiological and economic modeling of poultry diseases requires knowing the size, location, and operational type of each poultry type operation within the US. At the present time, the only national database of poultry operations that is available to the general public is the USDA's 2002 Agricultural Census data, published by the National Agricultural Statistics Service, herein referred to as the 'NASS data'. The NASS data provides census data at the county level on poultry operations for various operation types (i.e., layers, broilers, turkeys, ducks, geese). However, the number of farms and sizes of farms for the various types are not independent since some facilities have more than one type of operation. Furthermore, some data on the number of birds represents the number sold, which does not represent the number of birds present at any given time. In addition, any data tabulated by NASS that could identify numbers of birds or other data reported by an individual respondent is suppressed by NASS and coded with a 'D'. To be useful for epidemiological and economic modeling, the NASS data must be converted into a unique set of facility types (farms having similar operational characteristics). The unique set must not double count facilities or birds. At the same time, it must account for all the birds, including those for which the data has been suppressed. Therefore, several data processing steps are required to work back from the published NASS data to obtain a consistent database for individual poultry operations. This technical report documents data processing steps that were used to convert the NASS data into a national poultry facility database with twenty-six facility types (7 egg-laying, 6 broiler, 1 backyard, 3 turkey, and 9 others, representing ducks, geese, ostriches, emus, pigeons, pheasants, quail, game fowl breeders and 'other'). The process involves two major steps. The first step defines the rules used to

  11. Impact of Heat Stress on Poultry Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas J. Lara

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding and controlling environmental conditions is crucial to successful poultry production and welfare. Heat stress is one of the most important environmental stressors challenging poultry production worldwide. The detrimental effects of heat stress on broilers and laying hens range from reduced growth and egg production to decreased poultry and egg quality and safety. Moreover, the negative impact of heat stress on poultry welfare has recently attracted increasing public awareness and concern. Much information has been published on the effects of heat stress on productivity and immune response in poultry. However, our knowledge of basic mechanisms associated to the reported effects, as well as related to poultry behavior and welfare under heat stress conditions is in fact scarce. Intervention strategies to deal with heat stress conditions have been the focus of many published studies. Nevertheless, effectiveness of most of the interventions has been variable or inconsistent. This review focuses on the scientific evidence available on the importance and impact of heat stress in poultry production, with emphasis on broilers and laying hens.

  12. 9 CFR 56.7 - Mortgage against poultry or eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mortgage against poultry or eggs. 56.7... AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES CONTROL OF H5/H7 LOW PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA § 56.7 Mortgage against poultry or eggs. When poultry or eggs have been...

  13. 9 CFR 93.216 - Poultry from Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Poultry from Canada. 93.216 Section 93... EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS...

  14. 9 CFR 93.210 - Poultry quarantine facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Poultry quarantine facilities. 93.210... AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS;...

  15. Farm nitrogen balances in six European landscapes as an indicator for nitrogen losses and basis for improved management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Tommy; Bienkowski, J F; Bleeker, A

    2012-01-01

    ± 55 kg N ha−1 yr−1, respectively) when landless poultry farming was included. We found farm N balances to be a useful indicator for N losses and the potential for improving N management. Significant correlations to N surplus were found, both with ammonia air concentrations and nitrate concentrations...... in all landscapes. The implemented N-surplus method was thus effective for comparing and synthesizing results on farm N emissions and the potentials of mitigation options. It is recommended for use in combination with other methods for the assessment of landscape N emissions and farm N efficiency...

  16. Development of a farm-firm modelling system for evaluation of herbaceous energy crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    English, B.C.; Alexander, R.R.; Loewen, K.H.; Coady, S.A.; Cole, G.V.; Goodman, W.R. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology)

    1992-01-01

    A complete analysis is performed to simulate biomass production incorporated into a realistic whole farm situation, including or replacing a typical crop mix. Representative farms are constructed to accommodate such simulation. Four management systems are simulated for each firm, with each simulation depicting a different crop mix and/or use of different farming technologies and production methods. The first simulation was a base farm plan in which the operator would maintain the historical crop mix for the area, participate in all price support programs, and not participate in either a conservative reserve or a biomass production program. In the second simulation, the operator would again maintain the historical crop mix, would not participate in a conservation reserve or biomass production program, and would be ineligible to participate in any price support system. The third simulation introduced the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and included participation in all price support programs. The fourth simulation introduced a biomass crop production enterprise (switchgrass) as an alternative to enrolling highly erodible cropland in the CRP and allowed participation in price support programs. Simulations were made for three farms, two in West Tennessee and on in South Georgia. Results indicate that erosion is likely to be reduced more by the diversion of cropland to permanent vegetative cover on farms similar to the more highly erodible West Tennessee farms than on the less erodible Tift County, Georgia farm. Equivalent reductions in erosion rates result from entering highly erodible cropland in the CRP and from production of switchgrass as a biomass energy crop. Both switchgrass and CRP farm plans result in decreased net returns from the base plan, although the biomass farm plans are, in general, more profitable than the CRP plans.

  17. Determination of Arsenic Species in Poultry Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, B. P.; Bertsch, P. M.

    2001-05-01

    Two benzenearsenic compounds, p-arsanilic acid (p-ASA) and roxarsone (ROX), are commonly used feed additives in the poultry industry for disease prevention and increased weight gain. Because these compounds are not readily adsorbed by poultry, As in poultry litter can reach concentrations >41 mg/kg, which, for comparison, is the maximum allowable concentration for land application of sewage sludge according to USEPA 503 regulations. In contrast to land application of sewage sludge or industrial by-products such as fly ash, the potential for As loading of soil from poultry litter application has received little attention, despite the more prevalent use of poultry litter as a soil amendment. Furthermore, little is known concerning the biogeochemistry of these organo-arsenic compounds in soils. In incubation studies, we found that soil solution As concentrations were higher for poultry litter amendments when compared with fly ash amendments despite much higher As loading rates for the fly ashes. Further work has shown that >90% of total As can be solubilized from poultry litter through simple water extractions. In order to identify the two benzenearsenic feed additives we have developed ion chromatography methodology to separate As(III), As(V), MMA, DMA, p-ASA and ROX with element specific detection by ICP-MS. All species are well separated and detection limits are <50 ng/L for all species. Analysis of a water extraction of a poultry litter sample showed that the majority of soluble As was present as ROX but trace concentrations of As(V) and DMA were also identified along with an number of unknown As compounds. This methodology will prove useful in future studies of the fate and transport of p-ASA and ROX, and in identifying these compounds in watersheds where poultry litter has been extensively applied.

  18. Obstetric Provider Maldistribution: Georgia, USA, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spelke, Bridget; Zertuche, Adrienne D; Rochat, Roger

    2016-07-01

    Objectives In 2010, Georgia had the nation's highest maternal mortality rate, sixteenth highest infant mortality rate, and a waning obstetrician/gynecologist (ob/gyn) workforce. Statewide ob/gyn workforce data, however, masked obstetric-specific care shortages and regional variation in obstetric services. The Georgia Maternal and Infant Health Research Group thereby assessed each Georgia region's obstetric provider workforce to identify service-deficient areas. Methods We identified 63 birthing facilities in the 82 Primary Care Service Areas (PCSAs) outside metropolitan Atlanta and interviewed nurse managers and others to assess the age, sex, and expected departure year of each delivering professional. Using accepted annual delivery rates of 155 per obstetrician (OB), 100 per certified nurse midwife (CNM), and 70 per family medicine physician (FP) we converted obstetric providers into "OB equivalents" to standardize obstetric services available in any given area. Using facility births and computed OB equivalents (contemporary and 2020 estimates), we calculated current and projected average annual births per provider (AABP) for each PCSA, categorizing its obstetric provider workforce as "adequate" (AABP  166). We mapped results using ArcGIS. Results Of 82 surveyed PCSAs, 52 % (43) were deficient in obstetric care; 16 % (13) had a shortage and 37 % (30) lacked obstetric providers entirely. There were no delivering FPs in 89 % (73) of PCSAs and no CNMs in 70 % (56). If Georgia fails to recruit delivering providers, 72 % (58/77) of PCSAs will have deficient or no obstetric care by 2020. Conclusions Obstetric provider shortages in Georgia hinder access to prenatal and delivery services. Care-deficient areas will expand if recruitment and retention of delivering professionals does not improve.

  19. Poultry Diseases Expert System using Dempster-Shafer Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Maseleno, Andino

    2012-01-01

    Based on World Health Organization (WHO) fact sheet in the 2011, outbreaks of poultry diseases especially Avian Influenza in poultry may raise global public health concerns due to their effect on poultry populations, their potential to cause serious disease in people, and their pandemic potential. In this research, we built a Poultry Diseases Expert System using Dempster-Shafer Theory. In this Poultry Diseases Expert System We describe five symptoms which include depression, combs, wattle, bluish face region, swollen face region, narrowness of eyes, and balance disorders. The result of the research is that Poultry Diseases Expert System has been successfully identifying poultry diseases.

  20. Faba beans and peas in poultry feed: economic assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskina, Liga; Cerina, Sallija

    2017-10-01

    Broiler diets mainly consist of cereals and protein-rich feed sources; in the EU-27, poultry farming consumes 24% of the total amount of protein-rich feedstuffs. Since the EU produces only 30% of the total quantity of protein crops used for feed, it is necessary to promote the use of traditional European protein crops (beans, peas) for feed in livestock farming. The research aim is to identify economic gains from the production of broiler chicken meat, replacing soybean meal with domestic faba beans and field peas in broiler chicken diets. Adding field peas and faba beans to the broiler feed ration resulted in a significant live weight increase (5.74-11.95%) at the selling age, a decrease in the feed conversion ratio by 0.61-6.06%, and decrease in the product unit cost (15.34-37.06%) as well as an increase in the production efficiency factor (8.70-48.54), compared with the control group. The optimum kind of legume species used in the broiler diet was peas, which were added in the amount of 200 g kg(-1) , resulting in live weight gain, a decrease in the feed conversion ratio and an increase in the production efficiency factor. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. SPECIFIC CONTROL OF SALMONELLA IN POULTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimenov N.V.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Scientifically based and clinically validated new tools and methods to combat Salmonella infection in poultry, allowing to ensure the safety and health safety products - eggs and poultry meat. The method of selective decontamination involves the use of bivalent bacteriophage that is based on highly selected phages Phagum Salmonella typhimurium and Phagum Salmonella enteritidis, as well as probiotic laktobifadola. The developed tools and methods of selective decontamination followed by immunization with inactivated vaccine associated "Virosalm" allows you to eliminate salmonella infection in poultry.

  2. An exploration of how perceptions of the risk of avian influenza in poultry relate to urbanization in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finucane, Melissa L; Nghiem, Tuyen; Saksena, Sumeet; Nguyen, Lam; Fox, Jefferson; Spencer, James H; Thau, Trinh Dinh

    2014-01-01

    This research examined how perceptions of outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) subtype H5N1 in poultry are related to urbanization. Via in-depth interviews with village leaders, household farmers, and large farm operators in modern, transitional, and traditional communes in the north of Vietnam, we explored behaviors, attitudes, cultural values, and traditions that might amplify or attenuate HPAI outbreaks. We also explored conceptualizations of urbanization and its impacts on animal husbandry and disease outbreaks. Qualitative theme analyses identified the key impacts, factors related to HPAI outbreaks, and disease prevention and management strategies. The analyses also highlighted how urbanization improves some aspects of life (e.g., food security, family wealth and health, more employment opportunities, and improved infrastructure), but simultaneously poses significant challenges for poultry farming and disease management. Awareness of qualitative aspects of HPAI risk perceptions and behaviors and how they vary with urbanization processes may help to improve the prevention and management of emerging infectious diseases.

  3. Organic farming at the farm level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian H.; Madsen, Niels; Ørum, Jens Erik

    The purpose of this report is to present possible impacts of new technology and changes in legislation on the profitability of different types of organic farms. The aim is also to look at both the current and future trends in the organic area in Denmark. The farm level analyses are carried out...... as part of a larger project entitled “Economic analyses of the future development of organic farming – effects at the field, farm, sector and macroeconomic level”. The project links effects at the field-level with analyses at the farm level. These effects are then used in sector and macroeconomic analyses......, which are described in other reports from Food and Resource Economic Institute (Jacobsen, 2005 and Andersen et al., 2005). This gives coherent results from the field to the macroeconomic level regarding changes in technology and legislation....

  4. 76 FR 42595 - Importation of Live Birds and Poultry, Poultry Meat, and Poultry Products From a Region in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... requirements. 9 CFR Part 94 Animal diseases, Imports, Livestock, Meat and meat products, Milk, Poultry and... 1:10 dilution of a bacteria-free, infectious allantoic fluid; (2) Any H5 or H7 virus that does...

  5. 21 CFR 579.40 - Ionizing radiation for the treatment of poultry feed and poultry feed ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ionizing radiation for the treatment of poultry feed and poultry feed ingredients. 579.40 Section 579.40 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... § 579.40 Ionizing radiation for the treatment of poultry feed and poultry feed ingredients....

  6. Effect of fractionation and pyrolysis on fuel properties of poultry litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kaushlendra; Risse, L Mark; Das, K C; Worley, John; Thompson, Sidney

    2010-07-01

    Raw poultry litter has certain drawbacks for energy production such as high ash and moisture content, a corrosive nature, and low heating values. A combined solution to utilization of raw poultry litter may involve fractionation and pyrolysis. Fractionation divides poultry litter into a fine, nutrient-rich fraction and a coarse, carbon-dense fraction. Pyrolysis of the coarse fraction would remove the corrosive volatiles as bio-oil, leaving clean char. This paper presents the effect of fractionation and pyrolysis process parameters on the calorific value of char and on the characterization of bio-oil. Poultry litter samples collected from three commercial poultry farms were divided into 10 treatments that included 2 controls (raw poultry litter and its coarse fraction having particle size greater than 0.85 mm) and 8 other treatments that were combinations of three factors: type (raw poultry litter or its coarse fraction), heating rate (30 or 10 degrees C/min), and pyrolysis temperature (300 or 500 degrees C). After the screening process, the poultry litter samples were dried and pyrolyzed in a batch reactor under nitrogen atmosphere and char and condensate yields were recorded. The condensate was separated into three fractions on the basis of their density: heavy, medium, and light phase. Calorific value and proximate and nutrient analysis were performed for char, condensate, and feedstock. Results show that the char with the highest calorific value (17.39 +/- 1.37 MJ/kg) was made from the coarse fraction at 300 degrees C, which captured 68.71 +/- 9.37% of the feedstock energy. The char produced at 300 degrees C had 42 +/- 11 mg/kg arsenic content but no mercury. Almost all of the Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, and P remained in the char. The pyrolysis process reduced ammoniacal-nitrogen (NH4-N) in char by 99.14 +/- 0.47% and nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) by 95.79 +/- 5.45% at 500 degrees C.

  7. Biosecurity State in Gamecock (Gallus gallus Breeding Farms in Yacuanquer, Nariño, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Astaíza Martínez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The poultry industry in Colombia is sanitarily controlled and regulated; therefore, gamecock breeding farms should be regulated, but to this moment there are no studies about the biosecurity measurements implemented, which is a growing concern due to the sanitary impact this might have on the poultry industry. The goal of this work was to assess the knowledge and application of biosecurity norms in gamecock (Gallus gallus breeding farms from the Yacuanquer municipality, in Nariño, Colombia, as regulated by Resolution 3642 of August 21st of 2013, issued by the Instituto Colombiano Agropecuario. 157 breeders were surveyed, from which 88.54% does not recognize the biosecurity concept and does not control the entrance of people not related to the farm; 61.15% does not disinfect locations; 100% does not keep a pediluvium at the entrance of the farm nor do they carry out disinfection procedures for their vehicles; only 23.57% does a sanitary break inside their breeding farms and 63.7% does not put a quarantine period in place for the new specimens they acquire; 64.33% does not vaccinate and 98.09% does not have any veterinary advice. In conclusion, it was established that gamecock breeders in Yacuanquer do not know and have not implemented biosecurity measurements, which represents a risk factor for the poultry industry of the region.

  8. ARCH Models Efficiency Evaluation in Prediction and Poultry Price Process Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Fakari Sardehae

    2016-09-01

    fluctuate. When poultry imports decline, as well as the dependence of the poultry price to world prices declines therefore lower fluctuations of world prices are transmitted to domestic prices. Expanding poultry farms, cold storage and balance the raw materials market, would lead to less fluctuations in the poultry price industry and can be effective.

  9. Emissions modeling of fluidised bed co-combustion of poultry litter and peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henihan, A.M.; Leahy, J.J.; Kelleher, B.P. [University of Limerick (Ireland). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Science; Leahy, M.J. [University of Limerick (Ireland). Dept. of Physics; Cummins, E. [University College, Dublin (Ireland). Dept. of Agricultural and Food Engineering

    2003-05-01

    Gaseous emissions from the fluidised bed co-combustion of 50% w/w chicken litter and peat were monitored and recorded. Emission data were used to create a dispersion model for a proposed site on a poultry farm in Ireland. Variables within the combustion unit influenced both combustion and emission levels of pollutants such as SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}, CO. Concentrations of atmospheric pollutants decreased with use of the correct ratio between fluidising and secondary air. Dispersion modelling of combustion at a proposed poultry unit predicted that ground level concentrations for the set of emissions data would be below the limits and guidelines set by air quality standards. (author)

  10. Reduced turning frequency and delayed poultry manure addition reduces N loss from sugarcane compost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryndum, Sofie; Muschler, R.; Nigatu, Abebe Nigussie

    2017-01-01

    Composting is an effective method to recycle biodegradable waste as soil amendment in smallholder farming systems. Although all essential plant nutrients are found in compost, a substantial amount of nitrogen is lost during composting. This study therefore investigated the potential of reducing N...... losses by (i) delaying the addition of nitrogen-rich substrates (i.e. poultry manure), and (ii) reducing the turning frequency during composting. Furthermore, we tested the effect of compost application method on nitrogen mineralization. Sugarcane-waste was composted for 54days with addition of poultry...... manure at the beginning (i.e. early addition) or after 21days of composting (delayed addition). The compost pile was then turned either every three or nine days. Composts were subsequently applied to soil as (i) homogeneously mixed, or (ii) stratified, and incubated for 28days to test the effect...

  11. Economic viability of the construction and operation of a biomass gasificator for poultry houses heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanatta, Fabio Luiz; Silva, Jadir Nogueira da; Tinoco, Ilda de Fatima Ferreira; Martin, Samuel; Melo, Lucas D.; Bueno, Mateus [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (DEA/UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Agricola], E-mail: fzanatta@vicosa.ufv.br

    2008-07-01

    In all poultry farms, at least in the first days of life of the chicken, it is necessary to heat the environment to obtain a good development of the chicken and good economics results. However, this additional heat generation is sometimes neglected or not well executed, because of the costs that this practice could bring. This research has the objective of analyze the costs of construction and operation of a Biomass Gasificator for Poultry Houses Heating in comparison with a direct furnace system. The fuel used in both systems was firewood of eucalyptus. For so much, economic analyzes was make considering the costs of the gasification systems implementation in substitution of the traditional system used in the company (direct furnace system). For the viability the adopted method was the partial budget and the complementary investments were analyzed through the cash flow elaboration and of determination of indicator of economic feasibility. (author)

  12. Values in Organic Farming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgård, Bente; Pedersen, Kirsten Bransholm; Land, Birgit

    The study focuses on the recent debate about what is, or what constitutes, organic farming and what is the right path for organic farming in the future. The study is based on a critical discourse analysis of the controversy about suspending the private standard for organic farming adopted...

  13. Values in Organic Farming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgård, Bente; Pedersen, Kirsten Bransholm; Land, Birgit

    The study focuses on the recent debate about what is, or what constitutes, organic farming and what is the right path for organic farming in the future. The study is based on a critical discourse analysis of the controversy about suspending the private standard for organic farming adopted...

  14. Persistence of free-living protozoan communities across rearing cycles in commercial poultry houses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baré, Julie; Houf, Kurt; Verstraete, Tine; Vaerewijck, Mario; Sabbe, Koen

    2011-03-01

    The introduction and survival of zoonotic bacterial pathogens in poultry farming have been linked to bacterial association with free-living protozoa. To date, however, no information is available on the persistence of protozoan communities in these environments across consecutive rearing cycles and how it is affected by farm- and habitat-specific characteristics and management strategies. We therefore investigated the spatial and temporal dynamics of free-living protozoa in three habitats (pipeline, water, and miscellaneous samples) in three commercial poultry houses across three rearing cycles by using the molecular fingerprinting technique denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Our study provides strong evidence for the long-term (ca. 6-month) persistence of protozoa in broiler houses across consecutive rearing cycles. Various free-living protozoa (flagellates, ciliates, and amoebae), including known vectors of bacterial pathogens, were observed during the down periods in between rearing cycles. In addition, multivariate analysis and variation partitioning showed that the protozoan community structure in the broiler houses showed almost no change across rearing cycles and remained highly habitat and farm specific. Unlike in natural environments, protozoan communities inside broiler houses are therefore not seasonal. Our results imply that currently used biosecurity measures (cleaning and disinfection) applied during the down periods are not effective against many protozoans and therefore cannot prevent potential cross-contamination of bacterial pathogens via free-living protozoa between rearing cycles.

  15. Population Diversity of Campylobacter jejuni in Poultry and Its Dynamic of Contamination in Chicken Meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofolo, Giuliano; Di Donato, Guido; Cianciavicchia, Silvia; Alessiani, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyse the diversity of the Campylobacter jejuni population in broilers and to evaluate the major source of contamination in poultry meat. Eight rearing cycles over one year provided samples from three different broiler farms processed at the same slaughterhouse. A total of 707  C. jejuni were isolated from cloacal swabs before slaughter and from the breast skin of carcasses after slaughter and after chilling. All suspected Campylobacter colonies were identified with PCR assays and C. jejuni was genotyped by sequence analysis of the flaA short variable region (SVR) and by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using SmaI enzyme. Phenotypic antibiotic resistance profiles were also assayed using minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC). The flocks carried many major C. jejuni clones possibly carrying over the rearing cycles, but cross contamination between farms may happen. Many isolates were resistant to fluoroquinolones, raising an issue of high public concern. Specific Campylobacter populations could be harboured within each poultry farm, with the ability to contaminate chickens during each new cycle. Thus, although biosecurity measures are applied, with a persistent source of contamination, they cannot be efficient. The role of the environment needs further investigation to better address strategies to control Campylobacter. PMID:26543870

  16. Comprehensive resistome analysis reveals the prevalence of NDM and MCR-1 in Chinese poultry production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Rongmin; Li, Jiyun; Wu, Zuowei; Yin, Wenjuan; Schwarz, Stefan; Tyrrell, Jonathan M; Zheng, Yongjun; Wang, Shaolin; Shen, Zhangqi; Liu, Zhihai; Liu, Jianye; Lei, Lei; Li, Mei; Zhang, Qidi; Wu, Congming; Zhang, Qijing; Wu, Yongning; Walsh, Timothy R; Shen, Jianzhong

    2017-02-06

    By 2030, the global population will be 8.5 billion, placing pressure on international poultry production, of which China is a key producer(1). From April 2017, China will implement the withdrawal of colistin as a growth promoter, removing over 8,000 tonnes per year from the Chinese farming sector(2). To understand the impact of banning colistin and the epidemiology of multi-drug-resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli (using blaNDM and mcr-1 as marker genes), we sampled poultry, dogs, sewage, wild birds and flies. Here, we show that mcr-1, but not blaNDM, is prevalent in hatcheries, but blaNDM quickly contaminates flocks through dogs, flies and wild birds. We also screened samples directly for resistance genes to understand the true breadth and depth of the environmental and animal resistome. Direct sample testing for blaNDM and mcr-1 in hatcheries, commercial farms, a slaughterhouse and supermarkets revealed considerably higher levels of positive samples than the blaNDM- and mcr-1-positive E. coli, indicating a substantial segment of unseen resistome-a phenomenon we have termed the 'phantom resistome'. Whole-genome sequencing identified common blaNDM-positive E. coli shared among farms, flies, dogs and farmers, providing direct evidence of carbapenem-resistant E. coli transmission and environmental contamination.

  17. Occurrence of ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli in Livestock and Farm Workers in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahms, Carmen; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Kossow, Annelene; Mellmann, Alexander; Dittmann, Kathleen; Kramer, Axel

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) producing bacteria have been found in livestock, mainly as asymptomatic colonizers. The zoonotic risk for people working in close contact to animal husbandry has still not been completely assessed. Therefore, we investigated the prevalence of ESBL-producing Escherichia spp. in livestock animals and workers to determine the potential risk for an animal-human cross-transmission.In Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, northeast Germany, inguinal swabs of 73 individuals with livestock contact from 23 different farms were tested for ESBL-producing Escherichia spp. Two pooled fecal samples per farm of animal origin from 34 different farms (17 pig farms, 11 cattle farms, 6 poultry farms) as well as cloacal swabs of 10 randomly selected broilers or turkeys were taken at each poultry farm. For identification, selective chromogenic agar was used after an enrichment step. Phenotypically ESBL-producing isolates (n = 99) were tested for CTX-M, OXA, SHV and TEM using PCR, and isolates were further characterized using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). In total, 61 diverse isolates from different sources and/or different MLST/PCR results were acquired. Five farm workers (three from cattle farms and two from pig farms) harbored ESBL-producing E. coli. All human isolates harbored the CTX-M β-lactamase; TEM and OXA β-lactamases were additionally detected in two, resp. one, isolates. ESBL-producing Escherichia spp. were found in fecal samples at pig (15/17), cattle (6/11) and poultry farms (3/6). In total, 70.6% (24/36) of the tested farms were ESBL positive. Furthermore, 9 out of 60 cloacal swabs turned out to be ESBL positive. All isolated ESBL-producing bacteria from animal sources were E. coli, except for one E. hermanii isolate. CTX-M was the most prevalent β-lactamase at cattle and pig farms, while SHV predominated in poultry. One human isolate shared an identical MLST sequence type (ST) 3891 and CTX-M allele to the isolate

  18. Occurrence of ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli in Livestock and Farm Workers in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Dahms

    Full Text Available In recent years, extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL producing bacteria have been found in livestock, mainly as asymptomatic colonizers. The zoonotic risk for people working in close contact to animal husbandry has still not been completely assessed. Therefore, we investigated the prevalence of ESBL-producing Escherichia spp. in livestock animals and workers to determine the potential risk for an animal-human cross-transmission.In Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, northeast Germany, inguinal swabs of 73 individuals with livestock contact from 23 different farms were tested for ESBL-producing Escherichia spp. Two pooled fecal samples per farm of animal origin from 34 different farms (17 pig farms, 11 cattle farms, 6 poultry farms as well as cloacal swabs of 10 randomly selected broilers or turkeys were taken at each poultry farm. For identification, selective chromogenic agar was used after an enrichment step. Phenotypically ESBL-producing isolates (n = 99 were tested for CTX-M, OXA, SHV and TEM using PCR, and isolates were further characterized using multilocus sequence typing (MLST. In total, 61 diverse isolates from different sources and/or different MLST/PCR results were acquired. Five farm workers (three from cattle farms and two from pig farms harbored ESBL-producing E. coli. All human isolates harbored the CTX-M β-lactamase; TEM and OXA β-lactamases were additionally detected in two, resp. one, isolates. ESBL-producing Escherichia spp. were found in fecal samples at pig (15/17, cattle (6/11 and poultry farms (3/6. In total, 70.6% (24/36 of the tested farms were ESBL positive. Furthermore, 9 out of 60 cloacal swabs turned out to be ESBL positive. All isolated ESBL-producing bacteria from animal sources were E. coli, except for one E. hermanii isolate. CTX-M was the most prevalent β-lactamase at cattle and pig farms, while SHV predominated in poultry. One human isolate shared an identical MLST sequence type (ST 3891 and CTX-M allele to the

  19. Presence of influenza viruses in backyard poultry and swine in El Yali wetland, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Vasquez, N; Di Pillo, F; Lazo, A; Jiménez-Bluhm, P; Schultz-Cherry, S; Hamilton-West, C

    2016-11-01

    In South America little is known regarding influenza virus circulating in backyard poultry and swine populations. Backyard productive systems (BPS) that breed swine and poultry are widely distributed throughout Chile with high density in the central zone, and several BPS are located within the "El Yali" (EY) ecosystem, which is one of the most important wetlands in South America. Here, 130 different wild bird species have been described, of them, at least 22 species migrate yearly from North America for nesting. For this reason, EY is considered as a high-risk zone for avian influenza virus. This study aims to identify if backyard poultry and swine bred in the EY ecosystem have been exposed to influenza A virus and if so, to identify influenza virus subtypes. A biosecurity and handling survey was applied and samples were collected from BPS in two seasons (spring 2013 and fall 2014) for influenza seroprevalence, and in one season (fall 2014) for virus presence. Seroprevalence at BPS level was 42% (95% CI:22-49) during spring 2013 and 60% (95% CI 43-72) in fall 2014. rRT-PCR for the influenza A matrix gene indicated a viral prevalence of 27% (95% CI:14-39) at BPS level in fall 2014. Eight farms (73% of rRT-PCR positive farms) were also positive to the Elisa test at the same time. One BPS was simultaneously positive (rRT-PCR) in multiple species (poultry, swine and geese) and a H1N2 virus was identified from swine, exemplifying the risk that these BPS may pose for generation of novel influenza viruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Detection of antibiotic residues in poultry meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Abdul; Kashif, Natasha; Kifayat, Nasira; Ahmad, Shabeer

    2016-09-01

    The antibiotic residues in poultry meat can pose certain hazards to human health among them are sensitivity to antibiotics, allergic reactions, mutation in cells, imbalance of intestinal micro biota and bacterial resistance to antibiotics. The purpose of the present paper was to detect antibiotic residue in poultry meat. During the present study a total of 80 poultry kidney and liver samples were collected and tested for detection of different antibiotic residues at different pH levels Eschericha coli at pH 6, 7 and Staphyloccocus aureus at pH 8 & 9. Out of 80 samples only 4 samples were positive for antibiotic residues. The highest concentrations of antibiotic residue found in these tissues were tetracycline (8%) followed by ampicilin (4%), streptomycine (2%) and aminoglycosides (1%) as compared to other antibiotics like sulfonamides, neomycine and gentamycine. It was concluded that these microorganism at these pH levels could be effectively used for detection of antibiotic residues in poultry meat.

  1. Additives In Meat and Poultry Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Additives in Meat and Poultry Products People have been using food additives for thousands ... may be used in canned hams or jellied meat products. HUMECTANT - substance added to foods to help retain ...

  2. Aspects of epidemiology of Campylobacter in poultry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs-Reitsma, W.F.

    1997-01-01

    Campylobacter bacteria, which in humans cause infections with severe symptoms of diarrhoea, are mainly transmitted by food, especially poultry meat products. Several studies on Campylobacter colonization in breeders, laying hens, and broilers were carried out. Isolates were serotyped, using a

  3. Genetic progress in the poultry industry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    different and changing demands of poultry producers around the world. .... is an increased appetite and increased fat deposition (Sorensen,. 1980). It would not ... fat content and increasing lean tissue gain simultaneously, would be to select.

  4. Muscle Growth and Poultry Meat Quality Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Massimiliano Petracci; Claudio Cavani

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 50 years the worldwide growing demand of poultry meat has resulted in pressure on breeders, nutritionists and growers to increase the growth rate of birds, feed efficiency, size of breast muscle and reduction in abdominal fatness. Moreover, the shift toward further processed products has emphasized the necessity for higher standards in poultry meat to improve sensory characteristics and functional properties. It is believed that genetic progress has put more stress on the growin...

  5. Microbiological status of mechanically separated poultry meat

    OpenAIRE

    Jovanović, Jelena; Borović, Branka; Velebit, Branko; Lakićević, Brankica; Baltić, Tatjana; Mitrović, Radmila; Milijašević, Milan

    2013-01-01

    Mechanically separated meat is often contaminated with microorganisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the microbiological status of mechanically separated poultry meat samples from June 2011 to December 2012. Microbiological testing included Salmonella species, Escherichia coli and the number of aerobic bacteria. In 5.26% of the samples the presence of Salmonella species was revealed, whereas 22.95% and 4.92% of the mechanically separated poultry meat samples were incompliant in reg...

  6. Muscle Growth and Poultry Meat Quality Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Massimiliano Petracci; Claudio Cavani

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 50 years the worldwide growing demand of poultry meat has resulted in pressure on breeders, nutritionists and growers to increase the growth rate of birds, feed efficiency, size of breast muscle and reduction in abdominal fatness. Moreover, the shift toward further processed products has emphasized the necessity for higher standards in poultry meat to improve sensory characteristics and functional properties. It is believed that genetic progress has put more stress on the growin...

  7. Vegetable Contamination by the Fecal Bacteria of Poultry Manure: Case Study of Gardening Sites in Southern Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atidégla, Séraphin C.; Huat, Joël; Agbossou, Euloge K.; Saint-Macary, Hervé; Glèlè Kakai, Romain

    2016-01-01

    A study was conducted in southern Benin to assess the contamination of vegetables by fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, and fecal streptococci as one consequence of the intensification of vegetable cropping through fertilization with poultry manure. For this purpose, on-farm trials were conducted in 2009 and 2010 at Yodo-Condji and Ayi-Guinnou with three replications and four fertilization treatments including poultry manure and three vegetable crops (leafy eggplant, tomato, and carrot). Sampling, laboratory analyses, and counts of fecal bacteria in the samples were performed in different cropping seasons. Whatever the fertilization treatment, the logs of mean fecal bacteria count per g of fresh vegetables were variable but higher than AFNOR criteria. The counts ranged from 8 to 10 fecal coliforms, from 5 to 8 fecal streptococci, and from 2 to 6 Escherichia coli, whereas AFNOR criteria are, respectively, 0, 1, and 0. The long traditional use of poultry manure and its use during the study helped obtain this high population of fecal pathogens. Results confirmed that the contamination of vegetables by fecal bacteria is mainly due to the use of poultry manure. The use of properly composted poultry manure with innovative cropping techniques should help reduce the number and incidence of pathogens. PMID:27069914

  8. Description of 44 biosecurity errors while entering and exiting poultry barns based on video surveillance in Quebec, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racicot, Manon; Venne, Daniel; Durivage, André; Vaillancourt, Jean-Pierre

    2011-07-01

    The effectiveness of biosecurity measures depends largely on the consistency of their applications by all those involved in poultry production. Unfortunately, poor biosecurity compliance has been reported repeatedly in poultry, as well in all other major animal productions. As part of a larger study, we conducted an investigation on eight poultry farms in Quebec, Canada, to evaluate compliance of existing biosecurity measures using hidden cameras. The objectives were to evaluate and describe the application of biosecurity measures when entering and exiting poultry barns. A total of 44 different mistakes were observed from 883 visits done by 102 different individuals. On average, four errors were recorded per visit. The maximum number of errors made by one individual during one visit was 14. People observed over several visits made on average six different errors. Twenty-seven out of the 44 errors (61.4%) were related to area delimitation (clean versus contaminated), six to boots (13.6%), five to hand washing (11.4%), three to coveralls (6.8%) and three to logbooks (6.8%). The nature and frequency of errors suggest a lack of understanding of biosecurity principles. There is thus a need to improve biosecurity training by making educational material available to all poultry personnel demonstrating why and how to apply biosecurity measures.

  9. Mycotoxins and their impact on poultry production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivković Goran R.Ž.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Only two years after the great expansion of "AGROŽIV" company, it was evident that mycotoxins have great impact on all segments of poultry production. During that year we were for the first time faced up with problems in poultry fattening. It was not possible to explain the present problems only by bacterial and viral infections, so we assumed that there is another reason for the observed clinical picture. From that time we started to pay more attention on contamination of poultry feed with mycotoxins. In the four years' period, from 1988 to 2002, 57 samples were analyzed for the presence of mycotoxins. Mycotoxicological investigations revealed the presence of T-2 toxin in 19 samples at concentrations less than 0.3 mg/kg, in 18 samples at concentration of 0.5 mg/kg, and in 3 samples 1.0 mg/kg. Beside this, type A trichotecene DAS was found in 6 of tested samples, and ochratoxin A and in 1 sample. Clinical picture and damages varied depending on mycotoxins' concentrations and poultry age. To exceede this problem in animal production we tried to use the organic and anorganic mycotoxin adsorbents as additives of poultry feed, but the results were not satisfactory enough. So, we resumed that if we really want to resolve problem of mycotoxins we have to start from the field production of poultry feed components.

  10. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Georgia. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2011 Georgia State Code base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Georgia.

  11. Alley Farming in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teerapol Silakul

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Poverty alleviation and environmental preservation are very important issues to many governments. Alley farming is beneficial to the environment because it conserves soil and sustains yields over time. Specifically, alley farming reduces soil erosion, which is a major problem in Thailand. Alley farming was conducted on a farmer’s field at Khaokwan Thong, a village in Uthaithani Province, Northern Thailand. We did a two-by-two factorial with and without alley farming, and with and without fertilizer. From this study, we observed that the two species used, Leucaena leucocephala and Acacia auriculiformis, grow well in Thailand, and that alley farming is suitable for Thailand. Few Thai farmers have heard about alley farming. However, it is nevertheless useful to know that there is potential for alley farming in Thailand using the two species. These plants, based upon the diameter and height measurements provided, grew well.

  12. Training Needs of Farm Women Towards Entrepreneurial Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Venkatesan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The study revealed that majority (45.83% of the Farm women had medium training need and 30.83 per cent of them had high training need in case of homestead vegetable production. In term of training need in nursery establishment, about 45.00 per cent of the Farm women fell under medium training need category while 35.00 per cent of them fell under high training need category. As regards to their training needs in livestock & poultry rearing, the majority (49.17% of the Farm women had high training needs compared to 35.00 per cent of them having medium training needs. A big share (40.83% of the Farm women had high training needs in food processing, while 33.33 per cent of them had medium training needs. Farmers’ education, farm size, annual income, organizational participation and agricultural knowledge showed negative significant correlation, while fatalism had significant positive association with the training needs. The major problems faced by the Farm women in carrying out their EDPs were: lack of capital/credit, lack of irrigation water, lack of land, lack of knowledge about insect/disease control, marketing & communication facilities and attack of birds/animals, etc.

  13. Sustainable Livestock Farming for Improving Socio-Economic Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shamsuddoha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability is the most effective concept to improve socio-economic condition, including environment. Constructive socio-economic changes are getting priority in recent years among academia and business sector in Bangladesh. Bangladesh poultry sub-sector has long supply chains having associated with various stakeholders. In this paper, a case poultry farm was taken to examine a production process that links with socio-economic benefits. Design science method under the quantitative paradigm was chosen to develop a model for the case industry. A Simulation model was developed using simul8 software to construct the real poultry operation. The objectives of this paper are to construct a sustainable model for a case poultry industry along with socio-economic issues. Later, simulated model output will examine it through various performance indicators (KPIs to find out the impacts on socio-economic benefits. Numbers of KPIs have been briefly discussed in light of the research problem to illustrate positive effects of sustainable production.

  14. Economics of reducing Campylobacter at different levels within the Belgian poultry meat chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellynck, Xavier; Messens, Winy; Halet, Dirk; Grijspeerdt, Koen; Hartnett, Emma; Viaene, Jacques

    2008-03-01

    Campylobacter infections pose a serious public health problem in Belgium. Poultry meat is most likely responsible for 40% of human campylobacteriosis cases in Belgium. On a yearly basis, consumption of poultry meat causes at least 22,000 campylobacteriosis cases, with a cost of illness of Euro 10.9 million. Several intervention measures have been proposed in literature, aiming to reduce the contamination of poultry meat and thus lead to significant reductions of human campylobacteriosis cases. This study aimed to evaluate the cost-benefit ratio, i.e., the ratio of reduced costs of illness on intervention costs of various intervention measures. These measures were selected by representatives from the poultry meat sector and experts in the field of poultry science. The selection comprised measures at the farm level (phage therapy), at the processing plant (spraying of carcasses with lactic acid or electrolyzed oxidizing water, crust freezing, or irradiation), and at the consumer level (improving kitchen hygiene and application of home freezing). Among these measures, the decontamination of carcasses with electrolyzed oxidizing water applied in the processing plant was the most efficient (17.66), followed by the use of lactic acid (4.06). In addition, phage therapy generated a positive cost-benefit ratio (2.54). Irradiation indicated the highest efficacy, but its cost-benefit ratio was rather low (0.31). There seems to be less gain by trying to improve food handling in the kitchen. The cost to reach consumers is large, while only a very limited fraction of the consumers is willing to change its behavior. The outcome of this study poses valuable information for future risk-management decisions in Belgium.

  15. Waste from rearing and slaughter of poultry – treat to the environment or feedstock for energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Myszograj

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Consumption of poultry has systematically grown for over 10 years. In 2007, Poland, with the participation of 11% dealt third place in Europe in the production of poultry meat with the input of 11% has taken the third place in Europe after France and the UK (about 14%. Intensification of poultry production on one hand provides to higher profitability, on the other hand generates more and more waste products, such as manure, slaughter wastes, dead birds, and the emission of gases (e.g. ammonia into the environment. Management of waste in breeding and slaughter plants of poultry rarely complies with current regulations. This is connected with high costs of waste disposal hazardous to the environment, harmful and dangerous to human health. because of chemical composition and potential health risks. The article, based on literature data and our own research, characterizes the waste from rearing and slaughter of poultry and define the possible ways to negative impact on human health: directly by microbial infections or indirectly by emissions of ammonia to the atmosphere, the migration of pollutants into groundwater and surface water. Options of waste utilization in methane fermentation process have been presented. This technology reduces the risk of environmental hazard , while allowing for recovery renewable energy of biogas from biowaste. Waste from the turkey farm and slaughterhouse (the size of slaughterhouse about 26,000 units per week were of mesophilic anaerobic digestion. Nine types of waste: turkey manure on straw, fresh straw used for bedding, heads, guts, feet and feathers were chosen. Flotation sediment, sewage from the slaughtering and chemical sludge was also fermented. High potential for methane from slaughterhouse waste (ca. 73% and manure (63%, indicate for simultaneous disposal and energy recovery from methane fermentation process.

  16. The prevalence and genetic diversity of Campylobacter spp. in domestic 'backyard' poultry in Canterbury, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J; Horn, B J; Gilpin, B J

    2012-02-01

    Campylobacteriosis is the most commonly notified illness in New Zealand. Whilst the importance of commercial poultry in campylobacteriosis is well established, little is known about the possible role of chickens kept at home as a direct animal/faecal contact or consumption exposure pathway. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and genetic diversity of Campylobacter spp. in domestic backyard chicken flocks in the Canterbury region of New Zealand. Poultry faecal samples were collected from 35 domestic 'backyard' poultry flocks from urban and rural properties around the Canterbury Region of New Zealand. A total of 291 samples were collected and tested for the presence of thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. and positive isolates were analysed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using both SmaI and KpnI enzymes. There was a high prevalence of Campylobacter spp. with 86% of flocks testing positive. Campylobacter jejuni alone, Campylobacter coli alone and both C. jejuni and C. coli were detected in 20 (57%), 2 (6%) and 8 (23%) of the flocks respectively. SmaI/KpnI PFGE analysis identified 50 different genotypes across the 35 flocks. Genotype diversity richness was highest on the lifestyle block and farm properties with 43 different genotypes isolated, whilst urban properties displayed the least richness with 12 genotypes isolated. Rural flocks tended to have more different genotypes in a given flock than urban flocks. Comparison of the genotypes with the PulseNet Aotearoa Campylobacter database showed that 28 of the genotypes had previously been isolated from human cases of campylobacteriosis. Many of these were also indistinguishable from Campylobacter spp. previously isolated from retail chicken. Therefore, contact with backyard poultry or their faecal material is a potential additional infection pathway outside of exposure to the established pathways associated with the consumption of Campylobacter-contaminated commercial meat or foods cross

  17. Astronomy in Georgia - Present Status and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todua, M.

    2016-09-01

    Astronomy in Georgia is generally represented in Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory found in 1932. It is one of the leading scientific institutes in the country. Main fields of research are solar system bodies (including near-Earth asteroids), various aspects of solar physics, stellar astronomy (including binary stars and open clusters), extragalactic objects (AGNs), theoretical astrophysics, cosmology, atmospheric and solar-terrestrial physics. Several telescopes are operational today, as well as the instruments for atmospheric studies. In 2007 the Observatory was integrated with Ilia State University, merging scientific research and education which facilitated the growth of a new generation of researchers. There are groups of astronomers and astrophysicists in other Georgian universities and institutions as well. Georgian scientists collaborate with research centers and universities worldwide. Research groups participate in various international scientific projects. The interest in astronomy in Georgia has been growing, which increases future perspectives of its development in the country.

  18. Russia-Georgia Conflict and Beyond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Yujun; Ma Zongshi

    2008-01-01

    Yet another Post 9/11 historical event indicating a significant turning point in the Post-Cold War era, Russia-Georgia conflict represents a remarkable change in the international strategy of a resurgent Russia. It also signifies that former Soviet republics are still groping for a new identity and that a new round of realignment will persist in the vast Eurasia region. The conflict reveals declining U.S. global control, flawed European integration, and NATO embarrassment. To a certain extent, it exposes chaos brought about by international nonpolarity and world governance vacuum. It also highlights what serious consequences can a double standard inflict on the principles of international law. A reasonable arrangement for global security and economic growth is therefore challenging the resolve and wisdom of international strategists. Actually fierce geopolitical rivalry for energy resources is at work behind the Russia-Georgia conflict. This will further compound the international energy strategic environment.

  19. Development of the banking system in Georgia

    OpenAIRE

    Kbiltsetskhlashvili, Tea

    2008-01-01

    Over fifteen years have passed since the beginning of the reconstruction of the transition countries' banking systems. The analysis of the development of commercial banking in Georgia and other transition countries points out several features, which are typical for the starting period of financial sector reforms. It turns out from this article that the success of the reconstruction of banking sector in certain countries differs substantially. Since the starting of reforms the Georgian banking...

  20. Evaluating two systems of poultry production: conventional and free-range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMC Lima

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The improvement in production technology was the major factor that lead Brazil to become the third largest poultry producer. The improvement was world´s based on the careful control of several aspects, including which nutrition and management (environment, health and rearing systems. Nowadays, the search for good welfare conditions is a global tendency in animal production. Concomitantly, an extensive production system of free-range broilers has been increasing in Brazil. This study evaluated in situ production indexes of two different commercial broiler productions, an intensive and conventional (farm A and a semi-extensive free-range production (farm B, in order to assess the relationship between productivity and management. It was observed that the physical environment in farm A presented higher temperatures and relative humidity. Based on the results, the production index was better in farm A than in farm B. It was not clear that the production index was related to inadequate welfare of broilers under the conventional rearing system.