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Sample records for geopressured-geothermal energy development

  1. Geopressured-geothermal energy development: government incentives and institutional structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick, D.O.; Prestwood, D.C.L.; Roberts, K.; Vanston, J.H. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The following subjects are included: a geothermal resource overview, the evolution of the current Texas geopressured-geothermal institutional structure, project evaluation with uncertainty and the structure of incentives, the natural gas industry, the electric utility industry, potential governmental participants in resource development, industrial users of thermal energy, current government incentives bearing on geopressured-geothermal development, six profiles for utilization of the geopressured-geothermal resources in the mid-term, and probable impacts of new government incentives on mid-term resource utilization profiles. (MHR)

  2. Analysis of ecological effects of geopressured-geothermal resource development. Geopressured-geothermal technical paper No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    The activities involved in geopressured-geothermal resource production are identified and their ecological impacts are discussed. The analysis separates those activites that are unique to geopressured-geothermal development from those that also occur in oil and gas and other resource developments. Of the unique activities, those with the greatest potential for serious ecological effect are: (1) accidental brine discharge as a result of a blowout during well drilling; (2) subsidence; (3) fault activation and enhanced seismicity; and (4) subsurface contamination of water, hydrocarbon, and mineral reservoirs. Available methods to predict and control these effects are discussed.

  3. Geopressured-geothermal resource development on public free school lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    The study's findings and recommendations are based upon analysis of the following: financial and economic feasibility of geopressured-geothermal resource development; possible ecological, social, and economic impacts of resource development on PFSL; and legal issues associated with resource development. The results of the analysis are summarized and are discussed in detail in a series of four technical papers which accompany this volume. Existing rules of the General Land Office (GLO), the School Land Board (SLB), and the Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) were reviewed in light of the above analysis and were discussed with the agencies. The study's recommendations resulted from this analytical and review process; they are discussed. The preliminary draft rules and regulations to govern resource development on PFSL are presented in Appendix A; the accompanying forms and model lease are found in Appendix B.

  4. Proceedings of second geopressured geothermal energy conference, Austin, Texas, February 23--25, 1976. Volume V. Legal, institutional, and environmental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanston, J.H.; Elmer, D.B.; Gustavson, T.C.; Kreitler, C.W.; Letlow, K.; Lopreato, S.C.; Meriwether, M.; Ramsey, P.; Rogers, K.E.; Williamson, J.K.

    1976-01-01

    Three separate abstracts were prepared for Volume V of the Proceedings of the Conference. Sections are entitled: Legal Issues in the Development of Geopressured--Geothermal Resources of Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast; The Development of Geothermal Energy in the Gulf Coast; Socio-economic, Demographic, and Political Considerations; and Geothermal Resources of the Texas Gulf Coast--Environmental Concerns arising from the Production and Disposal of Geothermal waters. (MCW)

  5. Problem definition study of subsidence caused by geopressured geothermal resource development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    The environmental and socio-economic settings of four environmentally representative Gulf Coast geopressured geothermal fairways were inventoried. Subsidence predictions were prepared using feasible development scenarios for the four representative subsidence sites. Based on the results of the subsidence estimates, an assessment of the associated potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts was prepared. An inventory of mitigation measures was also compiled. Results of the subsidence estimates and impact assessments are presented, as well as conclusions as to what are the major uncertainties, problems, and issues concerning the future study of geopressured geothermal subsidence.

  6. Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, C.J.

    1992-10-01

    Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing

  7. The geopressured-geothermal resource

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wys, J.N.; Dorfman, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that the Geopressured-Geothermal resource has an estimated 5,700 recoverable quad of gas and 11,000 recoverable quad of thermal energy in the onshore Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coasts area alone. After 15 years the program is now beginning a transition to commercialization. The program presently has three geopressured-geothermal wells in Texas and Louisiana. The Pleasant Bayou Well has a 1 MWe hybrid power system converting some gas and the thermal energy to electricity. The Gladys McCall Well produced over 23 MM bbls brine with 23 scf per bbl over 4 1/2 years. It is now shut-in building up pressure. The deep Hulin Well has been cleaned out and short term flow tested. It is on standby awaiting funds for long-term flow testing. In January 1990 an Industrial Consortium for the Utilization of the Geopressured-Geothermal Resource was convened at Rice University, Houston, TX. Sixty-five participants heard industry cost-shared proposals for using the hot geopressured brine. Proposals ranged from thermal enhanced oil recovery to aquaculture, conversion, and environmental clean up processes. By the September meeting at UTA-Balcones Research Center, industry approved charters will have been received, an Advisory Board will be appointed, and election of officers from industry will he held

  8. Geopressured geothermal bibliography. Volume 1 (citation extracts)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, T.R.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1981-08-01

    This bibliography was compiled by the Center for Energy Studies at The University of Texas at Austin to serve as a tool for researchers in the field of geopressured geothermal energy resources. The bibliography represents citations of papers on geopressured geothermal energy resources over the past eighteen years. Topics covered in the bibliography range from the technical aspects of geopressured geothermal reservoirs to social, environmental, and legal aspects of tapping those reservoirs for their energy resources. The bibliography currently contains more than 750 entries. For quick reference to a given topic, the citations are indexed into five divisions: author, category, conference title, descriptor, and sponsor. These indexes are arranged alphabetically and cross-referenced by page number.

  9. Industry participation in DOE-sponsored geopressured geothermal resource development. Final report, 1 September 1977-30 April 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffer, H.F.

    1979-01-01

    A series of DOE/Industry forums were carried out to keep industry advised of the DOE program to develop the geopressured geothermal resources of the Gulf Coast. A total of eighteen meetings were held with registered attendance of 621 representing a good cross section of industry, state, and federal agencies. An Overview Group and four working subgroups - site selection, drilling and testing, environmental/laboratory research, and legal institutional were established to subdivide the DOE programs into areas of interest and expertise. During the contract period three overview, four site selection, three drilling and testing, five environmental/laboratory research and three legal/institutional meetings have been conducted. Interest in and attendance at the meetings continue to grow reflecting increased industry contact with the DOE Geopressured Geothermal Resource Development Program. Two other studies were carried out for DOE under this contract; a Salt Water Disposal Study and an Industry Survey to evaluate the DOE Resource Development Program. The Salt Water Disposal Study reviewed subsurface salt water disposal experience on the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast. This preliminary study concluded that subsurface brine disposal should be possible in the areas of interest with adequate evaluation of the geology of each area and a well designed and constructed surface and subsurface facility. The industry survey indicated general satisfaction with the technical design of the resource evaluation program but felt the program should be moving faster.

  10. Microseismic monitoring of Chocolate Bayou, Texas: The Pleasant Bayou no. 2 geopressured/geothermal energy test well program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauk, F. J.; Kimball, B.; Davis, R. A.

    The Brazoria seismic network, instrumentation, design, and specifications are described. The data analysis procedures are presented. Seismicity is described in relation to the Pleasant Bayou production history. Seismicity originating near the chemical plant east of the geopressured/geothermal well is discussed.

  11. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 4: Bibliography (annotated only for all major reports)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    This bibliography contains US Department of Energy sponsored Geopressured-Geothermal reports published after 1984. Reports published prior to 1984 are documented in the Geopressured Geothermal bibliography Volumes 1, 2, and 3 that the Center for Energy Studies at the University of Texas at Austin compiled in May 1985. It represents reports, papers and articles covering topics from the scientific and technical aspects of geopressured geothermal reservoirs to the social, environmental, and legal considerations of exploiting those reservoirs for their energy resources.

  12. Industrial Consortium for the Utilization of the Geopressured-Geothermal Resource. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negus-deWys, J. (ed.)

    1990-03-01

    The Geopressured-Geothermal Program, now in its fifteenth year, is entering the transition period to commercial use. The industry cost-shared proposals to the consortium, represented in the presentations included in these proceedings, attest to the interest developing in the industrial community in utilizing the geopressured-geothermal resource. Sixty-five participants attended these sessions, two-thirds of whom represented industry. The areas represented by cost-shared proposals include (1) thermal enhanced oil recovery, (2) direct process use of thermal energy, e.g., aquaculture and agriculture, (3) conversion of thermal energy to electricity, (4) environment related technologies, e.g., use of supercritical processes, and (5) operational proposals, e.g., a field manual for scale inhibitors. It is hoped that from this array of potential use projects, some will persist and be successful in proving the viability of using the geopressured-geothermal resource. Such industrial use of an alternative and relatively clean energy resource will benefit our nation and its people.

  13. Geopressured geothermal bibliography. Volume I. Citation extracts. Second edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepehrnoori, K.; Carter, F.; Schneider, R.; Street, S.; McGill, K.

    1983-05-01

    This annoted bibliography contains 1131 citations. It represents reports, papers, and articles appearing over the past eighteen years covering topics from the scientific and technical aspects of geopressured geothermal reservoirs to the social, environmental, and legal considerations of exploiting those reservoirs for their energy resources. Six indexes include: author, conference title, descriptor, journal title, report number, and sponsor. (MHR)

  14. Environmental analysis of geopressured-geothermal prospect areas, Brazoria and Kenedy Counties, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, W.A.; McGraw, M.; Gustavson, T.C.

    1978-01-01

    Preliminary environmental data, including current land use, substrate lithology, soils, natural hazards, water resources, biological assemblages, meteorological data, and regulatory considerations have been collected and analyzed for approximately 150 km/sup 2/ of land: (1) near Chocolate Bayou, Brazoria County, Texas, where a geopressured-geothermal test well was drilled in 1978, and (2) near the rural community of Armstrong, Kenedy County, Texas, where future geopressured-geothermal test well development may occur. The study was designed to establish an environmental data base and to determine, within spatial constraints set by subsurface reservoir conditions, environmentally suitable sites for geopressured-geothermal wells.

  15. Environmental analysis of geopressured-geothermal prospect areas, De Witt and Colorado counties, Texas. Final report, March 1 - August 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavson, T.C.; Reeder, F.S.; Badger, E.A.

    1980-02-01

    Information collected and analyzed for a preliminary environmental analysis of geopressured geothermal prospect areas in Colorado and DeWitt Counties, Texas is presented. Specific environmental concerns for each geopressured geothermal prospect area are identified and discussed. Approximately 218 km/sup 2/(85 mi/sup 2/) were studied in the vicinity of each prospect area to: (1) conduct an environmental analysis to identify more and less suited areas for geopressured test wells; and (2) provide an environmental data base for future development of geopressured geothermal energy resources. A series of maps and tables are included to illustrate environmental characteristics including: geology, water resources, soils, current land use, vegetation, wildlife, and meteorological characteristics, and additional relevant information on cultural resources, power- and pipelines, and regulatory agencies. A series of transparent overlays at the scale of the original mapping has also been produced for the purposes of identifying and ranking areas of potential conflict between geopressured geothermal development and environmental characteristics. The methodology for ranking suitability of areas within the two prospect areas is discussed in the appendix. (MHR)

  16. Parcperdue Geopressure -- Geothermal Project: Appendix E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweezy, L.R.

    1981-10-05

    The mechanical and transport properties and characteristics of rock samples obtained from DOW-DOE L.R. SWEEZY NO. 1 TEST WELL at the Parcperdue Geopressure/Geothermal Site have been investigated in the laboratory. Elastic moduli, compressibility, uniaxial compaction coefficient, strength, creep parameters, permeability, acoustic velocities (all at reservoir conditions) and changes in these quantities induced by simulated reservoir production have been obtained from tests on several sandstone and shale samples from different depths. Most important results are that the compaction coefficients are approximately an order of magnitude lower than those generally accepted for the reservoir sand in the Gulf Coast area and that the creep behavior is significant. Geologic characterization includes lithological description, SEM micrographs and mercury intrusion tests to obtain pore distributions. Petrographic analysis shows that approximately half of the total sand interval has excellent reservoir potential and that most of the effective porosity in the Cib Jeff Sand is formed by secondary porosity development.

  17. Contractor for geopressured-geothermal sites: Final contract report, Volume 1, fiscal years 1986--1990 (5 years), testing of wells through October 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    Field tests and studies were conducted to determine the production behavior of geopressured-geothermal reservoirs and their potential as future energy sources. Results are presented for Gladys McCall Site, Pleasant Bayou Site, and Hulin Site.

  18. Technical support for geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, C.J.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has operated continuous-recording, microearthquake monitoring networks at geopressured-geothermal test well sites since 1980. These microseismic networks were designed to detect microearthquakes indicative of fault activation and/or subsidence that can potentially result from the deep subsurface withdrawal and underground disposal of large volumes of brine during well testing. Seismic networks were established before the beginning of testing to obtain background levels of seismicity. Monitoring continued during testing and for some time after cessation of flow testing to assess any delayed microseismicity caused by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. No flow testing has been done at the Hulin well since January 1990, and the Pleasant Bayou well has been shut down since September 1992. Microseismic monitoring continued at the Hulin and Pleasant Bayou sites until 31 December 1992, at which time both operations were shut down and field sites dismantled. During 1992, the networks recorded seismic signals from earthquakes, sonic booms, geophysical blasting, thunderstorms, etc. However, as in previous years, no local microseismic activity attributable to geopressured-geothermal well testing was recorded

  19. Geopressured-geothermal drilling and testing plan. General Crude Oil--Dept. of Energy Pleasant Bayou No. 1 well, Brazoria County, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-05-01

    As a result of geopressured resource assessment studies in the Gulf Coast region, the Brazoria fairway, located in Brazoria County, Texas was determined to be an optimum area for additional studies. A plan is presented for drilling, completion, and testing of one geopressured-geothermal well and two disposal wells in Brazoria County, Texas. The objectives of the well drilling and testing program are to determine the following parameters: reservoir permeability, porosity, thickness, rock material properties, depth, temperature, and pressure; reservoir fluid content, specific gravity, resistivity, viscosity, and hydrocarbons in solution; reservoir fluid production rates, pressure, temperature, production decline, and pressure decline; geopressured well and surface equipment design requirements for high-volume production and possible sand production; specific equipment design for surface operations, hydrocarbons distribution, and effluent disposal; and possibilities of reservoir compaction and/or surface subsidence. (JGB)

  20. Industry participation in DOE-sponsored geopressured geothermal resource development. Interim report, September 12, 1977-April 13, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffer, H.F.

    1978-01-01

    An industry forum for detailed discussions of the DOE resource evaluation program was instituted. An Overview Group was established along with four working subgroups - Site Selection, Drilling and Testing, Environmental/Laboratory Research, Legal/Institutional - at the initial forum meeting. All forum meetings are open to the public and are announced in the Federal Register. To date, 12 meetings have been conducted including two overview, two site selection, three drilling and testing, three environmental/laboratory research and two legal/institutional meetings. The meetings have been well attended. Representatives of 15 of the 19 largest US oil companies as well as 12 other major industrial firms have participated. In addition, 25 small businesses, 12 DOE contractors, 8 state agencies and 6 federal government agencies have been represented. Discussions have been open and spirited resulting in a useful interchange of ideas. The enthusiastic cooperation of the participants has demonstrated the ability of the government and industry to work harmoniously on programs aimed at solving the energy crisis.

  1. Geopressured-geothermal aquifers. Final contract report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-08-01

    Task 1 is to provide petrophysical and reservoir analysis of wells drilled into geopressured-geothermal aquifers containing dissolved methane. The list of Design Wells and Wells of Opportunity analyzed: Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 (WOO), Pleasant Bayou No. 2 (Design), Amoco Fee No. 1 (Design), G.M. Koelemay No. 1 (WOO), Gladys McCall No. 1 (Design), P.R. Girouard No. 1 (WOO), and Crown Zellerbach No. 2 (WOO). Petrophysical and reservoir analysis of the above wells were performed based on availability of data. The analysis performed on each well, the assumptions made during simulation, and conclusions reached.

  2. Geopressured-Geothermal Drilling and Testing Plan, Volume II, Testing Plan; Dow Chemical Co. - Dept. of Energy Dow-DOE Sweezy No. 1 Well, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-02-01

    The Dow/D.O.E. L. R. Sweezy No. 1 geopressured geothermal production well was completed in August of 1981. The well was perforated and gravel packed in approximately 50 feet of sand from 13,344 feet to 13,395 feet. Permeabilities of 6 to 914 millidarcies were measured with porosity of 25 to 36%. Static surface pressure after well clean-up was 5000 psi. At 1000 B/D flow rate the drawdown was 50 psi. The water produced in clean-up contained 100,000 ppm TDS. This report details the plan for testing this well with the goal of obtaining sufficient data to define the total production curve of the small, 939 acre, reservoir. A production time of six to nine months is anticipated. The salt water disposal well is expected to be completed and surface equipment installed such that production testing will begin by April 1, 1982. The program should be finished and reports written by February 28, 1983. The brine will be produced from the No.1 well, passed through a separator where the gas is removed, then reinjected into the No.2 (SWD) well under separator pressure. Flow rates of up to 25,000 B/D are expected. The tests are divided into a two-week short-term test and six to nine-month long-term tests with periodic downhole measurement of drawdown and buildup rates. Data obtained in the testing will be relayed by phoneline computer hookup to Otis Engineering in Dallas, Texas, where the reservoir calculations and modeling will be done. At the point where sufficient data has been obtained to reach the objectives of the program, production will be ended, the wells plugged and abandoned, and a final report will be issued.

  3. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-B: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Design well program; LaFourche Crossing; MG-T/DOE Amoco Fee No. 1 (Sweet Lake); Environmental monitoring at Sweet Lake; Air quality; Water quality; Microseismic monitoring; Subsidence; Dow/DOE L.R. Sweezy No. 1 well; Reservoir testing; Environmental monitoring at Parcperdue; Air monitoring; Water runoff; Groundwater; Microseismic events; Subsidence; Environmental consideration at site; Gladys McCall No. 1 well; Test results of Gladys McCall; Hydrocarbons in production gas and brine; Environmental monitoring at the Gladys McCall site; Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well; Pleasant Bayou hybrid power system; Environmental monitoring at Pleasant Bayou; and Plug abandonment and well site restoration of three geopressured-geothermal test sites. 197 figs., 64 tabs.

  4. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-A: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Geopressured-geothermal resource description; Resource origin and sediment type; Gulf Coast resource extent; Resource estimates; Project history; Authorizing legislation; Program objectives; Perceived constraints; Program activities and structure; Well testing; Program management; Program cost summary; Funding history; Resource characterization; Wells of opportunity; Edna Delcambre No. 1 well; Edna Delcambre well recompletion; Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well; Beulah Simon No. 2 well; P.E. Girouard No. 1 well; Prairie Canal No. 1 well; Crown Zellerbach No. 2 well; Alice C. Plantation No. 2 well; Tenneco Fee N No. 1 well; Pauline Kraft No. 1 well; Saldana well No. 2; G.M. Koelemay well No. 1; Willis Hulin No. 1 well; Investigations of other wells of opportunity; Clovis A. Kennedy No. 1 well; Watkins-Miller No. 1 well; Lucien J. Richard et al No. 1 well; and the C and K-Frank A. Godchaux, III, well No. 1.

  5. Consolidation of geologic studies of geopressured geothermal resources in Texas. 1982 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.; Kaiser, W.R.; Finley, R.J.

    1983-03-01

    Detailed structural mapping at several horizons in selected study areas within the Frio growth-fault trend demonstrates a pronounced variability in structural style. At Sarita in South Texas, shale mobilization produced one or more shale ridges, one of which localized a low-angle growth fault trapping a wedge of deltaic sediments. At Corpus Christi, shale mobilization produced a series of large growth faults, shale-cored domed anticlines, and shale-withdrawal basins, which become progressively younger basinward. At Blessing, major growth faults trapped sands of the Greta/Carancahua barrier system with little progradation. At Pleasant Bayou, a major early growth-fault pattern was overprinted by later salt tectonics - the intrusion of Danbury Dome and the development of a salt-withdrawal basin. At Port Arthur, low-displacement, long-lived faults formed on a sand-poor shelf margin contemporaneously with broad salt uplifts and basins. Variability in styles is related to the nature and extent of Frio sedimentation and shelf-margin progradation and to the presence or absence of salt. Structural styles that are conducive to the development of large geothermal reservoirs include blocks between widely spaced growth faults having dip reversal, salt-withdrawal basins, and shale-withdrawal basins. These styles are widespread on the Texas Gulf Coast. However, actually finding a large reservoir depends on demonstrating the existence of sufficient sandstone with adequate quality to support geopressured geothermal energy production.

  6. Comparison of estimated and background subsidence rates in Texas-Louisiana geopressured geothermal areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, L.M.; Clayton, M.; Everingham, J.; Harding, R.C.; Massa, A.

    1982-06-01

    A comparison of background and potential geopressured geothermal development-related subsidence rates is given. Estimated potential geopressured-related rates at six prospects are presented. The effect of subsidence on the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast is examined including the various associated ground movements and the possible effects of these ground movements on surficial processes. The relationships between ecosystems and subsidence, including the capability of geologic and biologic systems to adapt to subsidence, are analyzed. The actual potential for environmental impact caused by potential geopressured-related subsidence at each of four prospects is addressed. (MHR)

  7. Inventory and case studies of Louisiana, non-electric industrial applications of geopressured geothermal resources. Quarterly progress report, March 1-May 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnadelbach, T.W. Jr.

    1977-06-01

    An inventory is provided of geopressured geothermal resources in Louisiana. The Louisiana industries; classified as Food and Kindred Products were cataloged and inventoried to determine potential and specific uses of the known energy resources. The possibility of relocating industries to the available resources is explored. Individual case studies are presented for near term industrial conversion for resource application. (MHR)

  8. Depletion and recovery behavior of the Gladys McCall geopressured geothermal reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riney, T.D.

    1991-01-01

    Many sedimentary basins throughout the world contain sealed fault blocks in which the pore fluids are at higher pressures and temperatures than normal as a consequence of their depositional environment. The U.S. Department of Energy has drilled, completed, and tested four deep research wells in selected geopressured geothermal prospects in the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast region to evaluate the recoverability of the thermal, hydraulic, and chemical (methane) energy in this potential energy resource. The wells are expensive and the specific energy of the fluids is relatively small, but the total recoverable energy from a single well can be extremely large. Long-term testing of the Gladys McCall No. 1 research well, located in Cameron Parish, Louisiana, U.S.A., has defined an impressively large geopressured geothermal reservoir. In this paper an integrated analysis of the test data is presented, and a numerical model is constructed that matches the available data for the 6.5-year test history of the well

  9. T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. Geopressured-geothermal well report, Volume II. Well workover and production testing, February 1982-October 1985. Final report. Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    The T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well was the fourth in a series of wells in the DOE Design Wells Program that were drilled into deep, large geopressured-geothermal brine aquifers in order to provide basic data with which to determine the technological and economic viability of producing energy from these unconventional resources. This brine production well was spudded on May 27, 1981 and drilling operations were completed on November 2, 1981 after using 160 days of rig time. The well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet. The target sands lie at a depth of 14,412 to 15,860 feet in the Fleming Formation of the lower Miocene. This report covers well production testing operations and necessary well workover operations during the February 1982 to October 1985 period. The primary goals of the well testing program were: (1) to determine reservoir size, shape, volume, drive mechanisms, and other reservoir parameters, (2) to determine and demonstrate the technological and economic viability of producing energy from a geopressured-geothermal brine aquifer through long-term production testing, and (3) to determine problem areas associated with such long-term production, and to develop solutions therefor.

  10. Statistical modeling of geopressured geothermal reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Esmail; Hughes, Richard; White, Christopher D.

    2017-06-01

    Identifying attractive candidate reservoirs for producing geothermal energy requires predictive models. In this work, inspectional analysis and statistical modeling are used to create simple predictive models for a line drive design. Inspectional analysis on the partial differential equations governing this design yields a minimum number of fifteen dimensionless groups required to describe the physics of the system. These dimensionless groups are explained and confirmed using models with similar dimensionless groups but different dimensional parameters. This study models dimensionless production temperature and thermal recovery factor as the responses of a numerical model. These responses are obtained by a Box-Behnken experimental design. An uncertainty plot is used to segment the dimensionless time and develop a model for each segment. The important dimensionless numbers for each segment of the dimensionless time are identified using the Boosting method. These selected numbers are used in the regression models. The developed models are reduced to have a minimum number of predictors and interactions. The reduced final models are then presented and assessed using testing runs. Finally, applications of these models are offered. The presented workflow is generic and can be used to translate the output of a numerical simulator into simple predictive models in other research areas involving numerical simulation.

  11. Investigation and Evaluation of Geopressured - Geothermal Wells, Final Report; Alice C. Plantation No. 2 Well, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana; Volume 1; Narrative Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohse, Alan; Willits, M.H.

    1978-12-01

    Gruy Federal, Inc. (Gruy) operates under Contract No. EG-77-C-08-1528 to the Department of Energy, Division of Geothermal Energy, to evaluate potential alternate energy sources occurring within geopressured-geothermal (Geo) aquifers in Miocene, Oligocene, Tuscaloosa, Wilcox, and Frio formations along the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast. The project is entitled ''Investigation and Evaluation of Geopressured-Geothermal Wells''. The original period of performance was from September 26, 1977, through September 30, 1978; the contract was later extended through September 30, 1979. The first well on which testing was attempted under this contract was the Alice C. Plantation No. 2 Well, located in St. Mary Parish, Louisiana. Originally drilled by the Sun Oil Company to a total depth of 19,000 feet, this well was abandoned as a dry hole in January 1964. Gruy's reentry attempt ended with plugging and abandonment after a saltwater flow on September 17, 1978. This report is a comprehensive document detailing all events and costs relating to the Alice C. plantation well, from its initial selection as a reentry well through the plugging and abandonment operations.

  12. Third geopressured-geothermal energy conference.Vol 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meriwether, J.

    1977-11-16

    Twenty papers were included covering the Edna Delcambre Test Well, legal studies, environmental studies, economic studies, and resource utilization. Separate abstracts were prepared for each paper. (MHR)

  13. Environmental overview of geopressured-geothermal development: Texas Gulf Coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavson, T.C.; Kreitler, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    In the summary of the recommended environmental program are: site specific studies, general studies, cost estimates for the program, socioeconomic and demographic research, potential environmental concerns, environmental research, effects of geopressure exploitation, and research plans. The socioeconomic and cultural considerations are impacts on communities. Waste disposal, geologic framework, ground subsidence, and monitoring techniques are discussed. (MHR)

  14. Preliminary environmental analysis of a geopressured-geothermal test well in Brazoria County, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, W.A.; McGraw, M.; Gustavson, T.C.; Meriwether, J.

    1977-11-16

    Preliminary environmental data, including current land use, substrate lithology, soils, natural hazards, water resources, biological assemblages, meteorological data, and regulatory considerations have been collected and analyzed for approximately 150 km/sup 2/ of land near Chocolate Bayou, Brazoria County, Texas, in which a geopressured-geothermal test well is to be drilled in the fall of 1977. The study was designed to establish an environmental data base and to determine, within spatial constraints set by subsurface reservoir conditions, environmentally suitable sites for the proposed well. Preliminary analyses of data revealed the eed for focusing on the following areas: potential for subsidence and fault activation, susceptibility of test well and support facilities to fresh- and salt-water flooding, possible effects of produced saline waters on biological assemblages and groundwaer resources, distribution of expansive soils, and effect of drilling and associated support activities on known archeological-cultural resources.

  15. Methods for collection and analysis of geopressured geothermal and oil field waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lico, M.S.; Kharaka, Y.K.; Carothers, W.W.; Wright, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    Present methods are described for the collection, preservation, and chemical analysis of waters produced from geopressured geothermal and petroleum wells. Detailed procedures for collection include precautions and equipment necessary to ensure that the sample is representative of the water produced. Procedures for sample preservation include filtration, acidification, dilution for silica, methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) extraction of aluminum, addition of potassium permanganate to preserve mercury, and precipitation of carbonate species as strontium carbonate for stable carbon isotopes and total dissolved carbonate analysis. Characteristics determined at the well site are sulfide, pH, ammonia, and conductivity. Laboratory procedures are given for the analysis of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, iron, manganese, zinc, lead, aluminum, and mercury by atomic absorption and flame emission spectroscopy. Chloride is determined by silver nitrate titration and fluoride by ion-specific electrode. Bromide and iodide concentrations are determined by the hypochlorite oxidation method. Sulfate is analyzed by titration using barium chloride with thorin indicator after pretreatment with alumina. Boron and silica are determined colorimetrically by the carmine and molybdate-blue methods, respectively. Aliphatic acid anions (C/sub 2/ through C/sub 5/) are determined by gas chromatography after separation and concentration in a chloroform-butanol mixture.

  16. Methods for collection and analysis of geopressured geothermal and oil field waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lico, Michael S.; Kharaka, Yousif K.; Carothers, William W.; Wright, Victoria A.

    1982-01-01

    Present methods are described for the collection, preservation, and chemical analysis of waters produced from geopressured geothermal and petroleum wells. Detailed procedures for collection include precautions and equipment necessary to ensure that the sample is representative of the water produced. Procedures for sample preservation include filtration, acidification, dilution for silica, methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) extraction of aluminum, addition of potassium permanganate to preserve mercury, and precipitation of carbonate species as strontium carbonate for stable carbon isotopes and total dissolved carbonate analysis. Characteristics determined at the well site are sulfide, pH, ammonia, and conductivity. Laboratory procedures are given for the analysis of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, iron, manganese, zinc, lead, aluminum, .and mercury by atomic absorption and flame emission spectroscopy. Chloride is determined by silver nitrate titration and fluoride by ion-specific electrode. Bromide and iodide concentrations are determined by the hypochlorite oxidation method. Sulfate is analyzed by titration using barium chloride with thorin indicator after pretreatment with alumina. Boron and silica are determined colorimetrically by the carmine and molybdate-blue methods, respectively. Aliphatic acid anions (C2 through C5) are determined by gas chromatography after separation and concentration in a chloroform-butanol mixture.

  17. Geopressured-geothermal test of the EDNA Delcambre No. 1 well, Tigre Lagoon Field, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana: Analysis of water and dissolved natural gas: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hankind, B.E.; Karkalits, O.C.

    1978-09-01

    The presence of large volumes of hot water (250-425 F) containing dissolved natural gas in the Gulf of Mexico coastal areas at depths of 5,000 to 25,000 feet (the geopressured zone) has been known for several years. Because natural gas and oil from conventional production methods were relatively inexpensive prior to 1973, and because foreign oil was readily available, no economic incentive existed for developing this resource. With the oil embargo and the resulting rapid escalation in prices of oil and gas since 1973, a new urgency exists for examining the economic potential of the geopressured-geothermal resource. The main objective of the research reported here was to determine the volume of gas dissolved in the geopressured water, as well as the qualitative and quantitative composition of the water and the dissolved gas. A further objective was to use an existing shut-in gas well so that drilling time and the attendant costs could be avoided.

  18. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Wells of Opportunity Program final contract report, 1980-1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    The geopressured-geothermal candidates for the Wells of Opportunity program were located by the screening of published information on oil industry activity and through direct contact with the oil and gas operators. This process resulted in the recommendation to the DOE of 33 candidate wells for the program. Seven of the 33 recommended wells were accepted for testing. Of these seven wells, six were actually tested. The first well, the No. 1 Kennedy, was acquired but not tested. The seventh well, the No. 1 Godchaux, was abandoned due to mechanical problems during re-entry. The well search activities, which culminated in the acceptance by the DOE of 7 recommended wells, were substantial. A total of 90,270 well reports were reviewed, leading to 1990 wells selected for thorough geological analysis. All of the reservoirs tested in this program have been restricted by one or more faults or permeability barriers. A comprehensive discussion of test results is presented.

  19. Environmental impact of geopressure - geothermal cogeneration facility on wetland resources and socioeconomic characteristics in Louisiana Gulf Coast region. Final report, October 10, 1983-September 31, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smalley, A.M.; Saleh, F.M.S.; Fontenot, M.

    1984-08-01

    Baseline data relevant to air quality are presented. The following are also included: geology and resource assessment, design well prospects in southwestern Louisiana, water quality monitoring, chemical analysis subsidence, microseismicity, geopressure-geothermal subsidence modeling, models of compaction and subsidence, sampling handling and preparation, brine chemistry, wetland resources, socioeconomic characteristics, impacts on wetlands, salinity, toxic metals, non-metal toxicants, temperature, subsidence, and socioeconomic impacts. (MHR)

  20. Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells. Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana. Volume I. Completion and testing. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willits, M.H.; McCoy, R.L.; Dobson, R.J.; Hartsock, J.H.

    1979-12-01

    The Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well, located in the East Franklin area of St. Mary Parish, Louisiana, is the first successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the Well-of-Opportunity program. The section tested was the MA-6 sand of lower Miocene age which has produced large quantities of gas from the adjacent but structurally separated Garden City field. In the subject well the observed temperature was 270{sup 0}F (132{sup 0}C) and the measured gradient was 0.77 psi/ft. The gross sand thickness was 270 feet, the net sand thickness 190 feet, and the tested interval 58 net feet. The temperatures and pressures encountered approached the limits of the surface-recording bottomhole pressure gauge and particularly the single-conductor cables on which the gauges were run. The objectives of the tests were all accomplished, and data were obtained which will contribute to the overall assessment of the geopressured-geothermal resource of the Upper Gulf of Mexico basin. In general, the gas solubility (22.8 scf/bbl) was as expected for the temperature, pressure, and salinity of the brine. The produced water was more saline than expected (160,000 mg/l). The high concentrations of dissolved solids, coupled with the evolution of CO{sub 2} from these waters during production, created a scaling problem in the tubular goods and surface equipment that will have to be addressed in future tests.

  1. The feasibility of applying geopressured-geothermal resources to direct uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunis, Ben C.; Dewys, Jane Negus; Plum, Martin M.; Lienau, Paul J.; Spencer, F. J.; Nitschke, George F.

    1991-09-01

    This study concludes that direct use technologies, especially desalinated water production, can contribute significantly to the value added process and the overall economic viability in developing a geopressured resource. Although agriculture and aquaculture applications are marginal projects when they are the only use of a geopressured well, the small margin of profitability can contribute to improving the overall economics of the direct use development. The added complexity from a technical and management aspect may add to the overall risk and unpredictability of the project. Six combinations of direct uses received economic evaluation that resulted in 15 percent discounted payback periods ranging from 4 to over 10 years. Many other combinations are possible depending on the resource and market variables. Selection of appropriate technologies and sizes of applications will be established by the developer that engages in geopressured resource utilization. Currently, many areas of the country where geopressured resources are located also have surplus electrical capacity and generation; thus power utilities have been selling power for less than two cents per kWH, well below a reasonable breakeven value for geopressured produced electricity. However, when the energy demand of the integrated geopressured facility is large enough to install power generation equipment, operating expenses can be reduced by not paying the 10 to 12 cents per kWH utility rate. The study includes an analysis of a geothermal turbine unit installed with a desalination and an agriculture/aquaculture facility, taking advantage of the cascading energy values. Results suggest that this scenario becomes profitable only where the market price for electricity exceeds five cents per kWH.

  2. The feasibility of applying geopressured-geothermal resources to direct uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunis, B.C.; Negus-de Wys, J.; Plum, M.M. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Lienau, P.J. (Oregon Inst. of Tech., Klamath Falls, OR (United States). Geo-Heat Center); Spencer, F.J. (International Management Services (United States)); Nitschke, G.F. (Nitschke (George F.) (United States))

    1991-09-01

    This study concludes that direct use technologies, especially desalinated water production, can contribute significantly to the value added process and the overall economic viability in developing a geopressured resource. Although agriculture and aquaculture applications are marginal projects when they are the only use of a geopressured well, the small margin of profitability can contribute to improving the overall economics of the direct use development. The added complexity from a technical and management aspect may add to the overall risk and unpredictability of the project. Six combination of direct uses received economic evaluation that resulted in 15% discounted payback periods ranging from 4 to over 10 years. Many other combinations are possible depending on the resource and market variables. Selection of appropriate technologies and sizes of applications will be established by the developer that engages in geopressured resource utilization. Currently, many areas of the country where geopressured resources are located also have surplus electrical capacity and generation, thus power utilities have been selling power for less than 2 cents per kWH, well below a reasonable breakeven value for geopressured produced electricity. However, when the energy demand of the integrated geopressured facility is large enough to install power generation equipment, operating expenses can be reduced by not paying the 10 to 12 cents per kWH utility rate. The study includes an analysis of a geothermal turbine unit installed with a desalination and an agriculture/aquaculture facility, taking advantage of the cascading energy values. Results suggest that this scenario becomes profitable only where the market price for electricity exceeds five cents per kWH.

  3. The National Energy Strategy - The role of geothermal technology development: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    Each year the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an in-depth review of its entire geothermal R D program. The conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal industry. Topics in this year's conference included Hydrothermal Energy Conversion Technology, Hydrothermal Reservoir Technology, Hydrothermal Hard Rock Penetration Technology, Hot Dry Rock Technology, Geopressured-Geothermal Technology and Magma Energy Technology. Each individual paper has been cataloged separately.

  4. Continuity and productivity analysis of three geopressured geothermal aquifer-natural gas fields: Duson, Hollywood and Church Point, Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, L.A.; Boardman, C.R.; Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L. (eds.)

    1981-01-01

    The available well logs, production records and geological structure maps were analyzed for the Hollywood, Duson, and Church Point, Louisiana oil and gas fields to determine the areal extent of the sealed geopressured blocks and to identify which aquifer sands within the blocks are connected to commercial production of hydrocarbons. Studies such as these are needed for the Department of Energy program to identify geopressured brine reservoirs that are not connected to commercial productions. The analysis showed that over the depth intervals at the geopressured zones shown on the logs essentially all of the sands of any substantial thickness had gas production from them somewhere or other in the fault block. It is therefore expected that the sands which are fully brine saturated in many of the wells are the water drive portion of the producing gas/oil somewhere else within the fault block. In this study only one deep sand was identified, in the Hollywood field, which was apparently not connected to a producing horizon somewhere else in the field. Estimates of the reservoir parameters were made for this sand and a hypothetical production calculation showed the probable production to be less than 10,000 b/d. The required gas price to profitably produce this gas is well above the current market price.

  5. Plan for the long term environmental assessment of geopressured resource development in the Louisiana Gulf Coast Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newchurch, E.J.; Bryan, C.F.; Harrison, D.P.; Muller, R.A.; Wilcox, R.E.; Bachman, A.L.; Newman, J.P.; Cunningham, K.J.; Hilding, R.K.; Rehage, J.A.

    1978-07-15

    Results of research to develop a plan for the long-term environmental assessment of geopressured/geothermal resource development in the Louisiana Gulf Coast region are reported. An overall view of the environmental issues facing decision-makers in the area of geopressured resource development is presented, along with a plan for monitoring potential environmental impacts. Separate assessments and plans are presented for geological effects, air and water quality, ecosystem quality, and socioeconomic and cultural considerations. (JGB)

  6. Proceedings of second geopressured geothermal energy conference, Austin, Texas, February 23--25, 1976. Volume IV. Surface technology and resource utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Underhill, G.K.; Carlson, R.A.; Clendinning, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the eight chapters for ERA and one chapter for EAPA. Included in appendices are the reports of two subcontractors on the flashed steam and binary-fluid systems which are discussed at length in the chapters. (MHR)

  7. On geothermal resources of India. Geotectonic aspects and recent developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, M L [National Geophysical Research Inst., Hyderabad (India)

    1988-11-10

    Research programs launched for exploration and development of the geothermal energy in India, since the 1973-1974 oil embargo, have led to the identification of many potential areas for geothermal resources. Resources comprise high/intermediate/low temperature hydrothermal convection and hot water aquifer systems, geopressured geothermal system and conduction-dominated regimes. Location and properties of these geothermal systems are controlled by the geodynamic and tectonic characteristics of the Indian continental lithosphere Main sectors for the utilization of India's proved and identified geothermal resources are the power generation, space heating, green house cultivation, aquaculture, poultry, sheep breeding, mineral processing, mushroom raising, processing of farm and forest produce, refrigeration, tourism, health-resorts and mineral water bottling. The R and D efforts have given some encouraging results. Geothermal resources of India, although primarily are of medium to low grade, could supplement, to a great extent, direct heat energy needs and may also provide electricity to some of the remote hilly areas. Development of geothermal energy sources in India is likely to get some more attention, with the setting up of separate departments and agencies, by various Provincial Governments, for R and D backing toward the alternate sources of energy.

  8. U.S. DOE Geopressured/Geothermal Program: Final report on well plug and abandonment operations and well site restoration, Louisiana and Texas wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1994-08-30

    Some of the critical operations conducted during the plugging and abandonment of the three producing wells of the U.S. DOE GEOPRESSURED/GEOTHERL PROGRAM were witnessed by D-O-R Engineering personnel. All operations witnessed by D-O-R personnel were in compliance with the respective state regulations and were conducted as per D-O-R's recommendations to the Department of Energy and their prime contractor, EG&G Idaho. It is our belief that competent cement plugs were left in all three wells. The following describes the work actually witnessed by D-O-R personnel.

  9. Parcperdue Geopressure--Geothermal Project: Appendix B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweezy, L.R.

    1981-10-05

    The reservoir models used to perform the drawdown and buildup pressure analyses consist of analytic forms in lieu of the finite difference or numeric simulator types. Analytic models are derived from solutions of the diffusion equation which relate a pressure response with time and distance in the reservoir for a specified flow system. Solutions of the diffusion equation are obtained through mathematical methods such as Laplace transforms, Fourier transforms, Neuman's product techniques and Green's functions. Before an analytic solution is derived, the diffusivity equation is expressed in terms of dimensionless potential (m{sub D}), dimensionless distance (r{sub D}) and dimensionless time (t{sub D}). For the cylindrical coordinate case, the diffusivity equation in dimensionless form for a geopressured system is given.

  10. Geopressured energy availability. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-07-01

    Near- and long-term prospects that geopressured/geothermal energy sources could become a viable alternative fuel for electric power generation were investigated. Technical questions of producibility and power generation were included, as well as economic and environmental considerations. The investigators relied heavily on the existing body of information, particularly in geotechnical areas. Statistical methods were used where possible to establish probable production values. Potentially productive geopressured sediments have been identified in twenty specific on-shore fairways in Louisiana and Texas. A total of 232 trillion cubic feet (TCF) of dissolved methane and 367 x 10/sup 15/ Btu (367 quads) of thermal energy may be contained in the water within the sandstone in these formations. Reasonable predictions of the significant reservoir parameters indicate that a maximum of 7.6 TCF methane and 12.6 quads of thermal energy may be producible from these potential reservoirs.

  11. Review of Geopressured-Geothermal and Co-Production Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-16

    This report is the minutes of the DOE/GRI/Industry meeting. They include a transcript of the questions and answers following each presentation and copies of slides and/or summaries prepared by each of the speakers.

  12. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Detailed completion prognosis for geopressured-geothermal well of opportunity, prospect #7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godchaux, Frank A.

    1981-06-01

    This book is a detailed prognosis covering the acquisition, completion, drilling, testing and abandonment of the Frank A. Godchaux, III, Well No. 1 under the Wells of Opportunity Program. The well is located approximately 12 miles southeast of the city of Abbeville, Louisiana. Eaton Operating Company proposes to test a section of the Planulina sand at a depth ranging from 15,584 to 15,692 feet. The reservoir pressure is estimated to be 14,480 psi and the temperature of the formation water is expected to be 298 F. The water salinity is calculated to be 75,000 ppm. The well is expected to produce 20,000 barrels of water per day with a gas content of 44 standard cubic feet pre barrel. The well was acquired from C and K Petroleu, Inc. on March 20, 1981. C and K abandoned the well at a total depth of 16,000 feet. The well has a 7-5/8 inches liner set at 13,387 feet. Eaton proposes to set 5-1/2 inch casing at 16,000 feet and produce the well through the casing using a 2-3/8 inch tubing string for wireline protection and for pressure control. A 4,600 foot saltwater disposal well will be drilled on the site and testing will be conducted similar to previous Eaton tests. The total estimated cost to perform the work is $2,959,000. An optional test from 14,905 to 15,006 feet may be performed after the original test and will require a workover with a rig on location to perform the plugback. The surface production equipment utilized on previous Eaton WOO tests will be utilized on this test. This equipment has worked satisfactorily and all parties involved in the testing are familiar with its operation. The Institute of Gas Technology and Mr. Don Clark will handle the sampling and testing and reservoir evaluation, respectively, as on the previous Eaton tests.

  13. Energy development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Jones, L.L.C.; Lovich, R. L.; Halama, K.J.

    2016-01-01

    Large areas of the desert southwest are currently developed or being evaluated for construction of utility-scale renewable energy projects. These projects include numerous solar and wind energy facilities some of which will be massive. Unfortunately, peer-reviewed scientific publications are not yet available to evaluate the potential effects of solar-based utility-scale renewable energy development (USRED) on any species of wildlife, including amphibians and reptiles (herpetofauna). Scientific publications on the effects of wind-based USRED and operation (USREDO) are focused almost exclusively on flying wildlife including birds and bats. To the best of our knowledge the only publications on the effects of wind-based USREDO on herpetofauna are three publications on desert tortoise ecology at a wind energy facility near Palm Springs, California. Those studies suggested that not all effects of USREDO were detrimental in the short-term. However, additional research is required to determine if wind energy operation is compatible with conservation of this long-lived species over longer periods of time.

  14. Cuban energy development perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdellans Escobar, Ilse; Perez Martin, David; Lopez Lopez, Ileana; Ricardo Mora, Henry; Gomez De la Torre, Yoandys

    2005-01-01

    In this paper from energy demand scenario calculated for the country until 2025, energy supply options were assessed. Three energy development scenarios considering economic and social development projections and different energy options were evaluated: a reference scenario which includes the nowadays energy development projections; a second scenario basing the development on intensive use of domestic fossil fuels; and a third scenario, where the development is based on the maximum use of domestic renewable energy potential. The results are analyzed and recommendations are formulated

  15. Solar energy emplacement developer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Michael; Sauls, Bob

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary design was developed for a Lunar Power System (LPS) composed of photovoltaic arrays and microwave reflectors fabricated from lunar materials. The LPS will collect solar energy on the surface of the Moon, transform it into microwave energy, and beam it back to Earth where it will be converted into usable energy. The Solar Energy Emplacement Developer (SEED) proposed will use a similar sort of solar energy collection and dispersement to power the systems that will construct the LPS.

  16. Energy and Sustainable Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    None of the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) adopted by the United Nations in 2000 directly addressed energy, although for nearly all of them - from eradicating poverty and hunger to improving education and health - progress has depended on greater access to modern energy. Thirteen years later, energy is being given more attention. The target date for the MDGs is 2015, and in 2012 the UN began deliberations to develop sustainable development goals to guide support for sustainable development beyond 2015. The Future We Want, the outcome document of the 2012 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (also known as Rio+20) gives energy a central role: ''We recognize the critical role that energy plays in the development process, as access to sustainable modern energy services contributes to poverty eradication, saves lives, improves health and helps provide for basic human needs''

  17. Energy and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gururaja, J.

    1980-03-15

    The developing countries will require higher per capita energy for improving the quality of life. This paper examines the goals and strategies for development vis-a-vis those of the developed countries. Crucial issues in India are listed. The role of technology in the utilization of energy is discussed. Difficulties in choosing the technology are pointed out. The problem of integrating several alternative energy sources in villages is mentioned. Environmental issues are considered. (DLC)

  18. Amine Solvent Regeneration for CO2 Capture Using Geothermal Energy with Advanced Stripper Configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Wagener, D.H.; Rochelle, G.T.; Gupta, A.; Bryant, S.L.

    2014-01-01

    Absorption/stripping using alkanol-amine solvents for removing CO 2 from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants requires a substantial amount of energy. Typical designs anticipate the use of steam extraction between the Intermediate Pressure (IP) and Low Pressure (LP) turbines to provide heat for the re-boiler. Geothermal energy in the form of hot brine offers an alternative to this large parasitic load on the power generation cycle. We investigate the requirements (number and spacing of extraction/injection well pairs) to provide heat at 150 deg. C for a pilot scale (60 MWe) and a full scale (900 MWe) capture process for thirty years. The calculations are based on properties of a geopressured/geothermal aquifer near the Texas Gulf Coast. In the vicinity of a large coal-fired power plant in South Texas, this aquifer lies between 3 050 and 3 350 m (10 000 and 11 000 ft) below the surface. We present a novel design of the stripper/regenerator process based on heat exchange with the brine, discharging the brine at 100 deg. C. The results indicate that the overall process is feasible and that costs are of similar magnitude to standard designs. (authors)

  19. Sustainable energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afgan, N.; Al Gobaisi, D.; Carvalho, M.; Cumo, M.

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that present energy strategy requires adaptation of new criterions to be followed in the future energy system development. No doubt that there is a link between energy consumption and environment capacity reduction. This is an alarming sign, which recently has become the leading theme for our near and distant future. Modern engineering science has to be oriented to those areas which may directly assist in our future energy planning. In this respect, it is demanding need that our attention be oriented to the global aspect og the energy development. Modern technology will help to adopt essential principles of the sustainable energy development. With the appropriate renewable energy resources introduction in our energy future and with the increase of safety of nuclear energy, it will be possible to comply with the main principles to be adapted in the sustainable energy strategy. in order to promote the sustainable energy development the respective education system is required. It was recognized that the present energy education system can not meet future demand for the knowledge dissemination. It was shown that the potential option for the future education system is the distance learning with multimedia telematic system. (authors). 46 refs, 14 figs, 1 tab

  20. Energy for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toepfer, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    Considerations about 'post-Kyoto' targets and other ways to achieve the objectives of the Protocol are critical. Scientific evidence presented by the IPCC in its third assessment in 2002 clearly indicates the need not only to implement the Protocol, but also to agree on further emission reductions in the medium term in order to keep changes in the world's climate at a manageable level. UNEP's Energy Programme addresses the environmental consequences of energy production and use, such as global climate change and local air pollution. UNEP assists decision makers in government and the private sector to make better, more informed energy choices, which fully integrate environmental and social costs. Since UNEP is not an implementing organization, its role as facilitator is core. The majority of UNEP's energy activities link to mitigation - the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions - but these are generally accompanied by broader objectives related to energy and sustainable development. This includes climate change mitigation, but not as the sole objective since many of UNEP's partners in developing countries have more immediate development objectives. UNEP's main programmes are: The Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) project, that provides solar and wind resource data and geographic information assessment tools to public and private sector executives who are involved in energy market development; A new Global Environment Facility (GEF) funded programme aiming at promoting industrial energy efficiency through a cleaner production/environmental management system framework. A parallel programme, Energy Management and Performance Related Energy Savings Scheme (EMPRESS), supports energy efficiency efforts in Eastern and Central Europe; The Mediterranean Renewable Energy Programme promotes the financing of renewable energy projects in the Mediterranean basin; The Rural Energy Enterprise Development (REED) seeks to develop new sustainable energy enterprises

  1. Energy for sustainable development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toepfer, Klaus [United Nations Environment Programme (Kenya)

    2003-09-01

    Considerations about 'post-Kyoto' targets and other ways to achieve the objectives of the Protocol are critical. Scientific evidence presented by the IPCC in its third assessment in 2002 clearly indicates the need not only to implement the Protocol, but also to agree on further emission reductions in the medium term in order to keep changes in the world's climate at a manageable level. UNEP's Energy Programme addresses the environmental consequences of energy production and use, such as global climate change and local air pollution. UNEP assists decision makers in government and the private sector to make better, more informed energy choices, which fully integrate environmental and social costs. Since UNEP is not an implementing organization, its role as facilitator is core. The majority of UNEP's energy activities link to mitigation - the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions - but these are generally accompanied by broader objectives related to energy and sustainable development. This includes climate change mitigation, but not as the sole objective since many of UNEP's partners in developing countries have more immediate development objectives. UNEP's main programmes are: The Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) project, that provides solar and wind resource data and geographic information assessment tools to public and private sector executives who are involved in energy market development; A new Global Environment Facility (GEF) funded programme aiming at promoting industrial energy efficiency through a cleaner production/environmental management system framework. A parallel programme, Energy Management and Performance Related Energy Savings Scheme (EMPRESS), supports energy efficiency efforts in Eastern and Central Europe; The Mediterranean Renewable Energy Programme promotes the financing of renewable energy projects in the Mediterranean basin; The Rural Energy Enterprise Development (REED) seeks to develop new

  2. Clean Energy for Development

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfowitz, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Paul Wolfowitz, President of the World Bank, in the development community, the interaction of energy, environment, and poverty have emerged as a central challenge. Lack of consistent electricity in developing countries is a severe obstacle to doing business. It is also affecting school attendance, particularly among girls. Inefficient energy sources can also pose health problems—as many as 1.6 million deaths per year due to indoor smoke. Rich and poor countries alike need to apply energy-effi...

  3. Energy, environment and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Hinnawi, E

    1977-01-01

    Energy is one of the most important prerequisites of life. The growing socio-economic activities and the rising standard of living have led to a rapid increase in energy consumption. The limited resources of fossil fuels and the recent geopolitical developments activated the exploration of ways and means for energy conservation and exploitation of unconventional renewable sources of energy. Of the renewable energy sources (geothermal, solar, tidal, hydropower, etc), hydro-power production has some potential environmental effects. Man-made lakes have several physical, biological, geochemical and biogeochemical impacts on the environment both in the area of the lake and downstream. From the socio-economic point of view, the harnessing of renewable sources of energy will not only lead to the enhancement of the human environment, particularly in remote rural areas in developing countries, but will also lead to substantial savings in the use of non-renewable sources of energy.

  4. Developing energy in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favennec, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    Energy and economic growth are connected and the wealth of Western countries is based on a high availability of energy. Africa is a continent vast by its size, well populated and well supplied with fossil energy (oil, gas, coal) and renewable energy (hydroelectric, biomass, solar). But consumption is limited, without distribution infrastructures and initially, without capitals for necessary investments. The situation is particularly critical in Sub-Sahara Africa since the African energy consumption is mainly concentrated in South Africa and North Africa. An annual conference, the Energy Summit in Africa, brings together all players in the sector, from all the continent's countries, from Europe and America, in an attempt to establish recommendations for more availability and a better use of energy in Africa. The next summit is scheduled for November 23 to 25, 2004 in Dakar. The program relies on the Association for the Development of Energy in Africa, which will be created shortly. (author)

  5. Energy efficiency system development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leman, A. M.; Rahman, K. A.; Chong, Haw Jie; Salleh, Mohd Najib Mohd; Yusof, M. Z. M.

    2017-09-01

    By subjecting to the massive usage of electrical energy in Malaysia, energy efficiency is now one of the key areas of focus in climate change mitigation. This paper focuses on the development of an energy efficiency system of household electrical appliances for residential areas. Distribution of Questionnaires and pay a visit to few selected residential areas are conducted during the fulfilment of the project as well as some advice on how to save energy are shared with the participants. Based on the collected data, the system developed by the UTHM Energy Team is then evaluated from the aspect of the consumers' behaviour in using electrical appliances and the potential reduction targeted by the team. By the end of the project, 60% of the participants had successfully reduced the electrical power consumption set by the UTHM Energy Team. The reasons for whether the success and the failure is further analysed in this project.

  6. Energy, sustainability and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llewellyn Smith, Ch.

    2006-01-01

    The author discusses in a first part the urgent need to reduce energy use (or at least curb growth) and seek cleaner ways of producing energy on a large scale. He proposes in a second part what must be done: introduce fiscal measures and regulation to change behavior of consumers, provide incentives to encourage the market to expand use of low carbon technologies, stimulate research and development by industry and develop the renewable energies sources. In a last part he looks what part can fusion play. (A.L.B.)

  7. Energy, sustainability and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llewellyn Smith, Ch

    2006-07-01

    The author discusses in a first part the urgent need to reduce energy use (or at least curb growth) and seek cleaner ways of producing energy on a large scale. He proposes in a second part what must be done: introduce fiscal measures and regulation to change behavior of consumers, provide incentives to encourage the market to expand use of low carbon technologies, stimulate research and development by industry and develop the renewable energies sources. In a last part he looks what part can fusion play. (A.L.B.)

  8. Energy, technology, development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldemberg, J [Ministerio da Educacao, Brasilia (Brazil)

    1992-02-01

    Energy and technology are essential ingredients of development, it is only through their use that it became possible to sustain a population of almost 5 billion on Earth. The challenges to eradicate poverty and underdevelopment in developing countries in the face of strong population increases can only be successfully met with the use of advanced technology, leapfrogging the path followed in the past by today's industrialized countries. It is shown in the paper that energy consumption can be decoupled from economic development. Such possibility will contribute significantly in achieving sustainable development. 10 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Renewable energy project development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohi, J.

    1996-12-31

    The author presents this paper with three main thrusts. The first is to discuss the implementation of renewable energy options in China, the second is to identify the key project development steps necessary to implement such programs, and finally is to develop recommendations in the form of key issues which must be addressed in developing such a program, and key technical assistance needs which must be addressed to make such a program practical.

  10. Energy Efficiency Project Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IUEP

    2004-03-01

    The International Utility Efficiency Partnerships, Inc. (IUEP) has been a leader among the industry groups that have supported voluntary initiatives to promote international energy efficiency projects and address global climate change. The IUEP maintains its leadership by both supporting international greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction projects under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and by partnering with U.S. and international organizations to develop and implement strategies and specific energy efficiency projects. The goals of the IUEP program are to (1) provide a way for U.S. industry to maintain a leadership role in international energy efficiency infrastructure projects; (2) identify international energy project development opportunities to continue its leadership in supporting voluntary market-based mechanisms to reduce GHG emissions; and (3) demonstrate private sector commitment to voluntary approaches to global climate issues. The IUEP is dedicated to identifying, promoting, managing, and assisting in the registration of international energy efficiency projects that result in demonstrated voluntary reductions of GHG emissions. This Final Technical Report summarizes the IUEP's work in identifying, promoting, managing, and assisting in development of these projects and IUEP's effort in creating international cooperative partnerships to support project development activities that develop and deploy technologies that (1) increase efficiency in the production, delivery and use of energy; (2) increase the use of cleaner, low-carbon fuels in processing products; and (3) capture/sequester carbon gases from energy systems. Through international cooperative efforts, the IUEP intends to strengthen partnerships for energy technology innovation and demonstration projects capable of providing cleaner energy in a cost-effective manner. As detailed in this report, the IUEP met program objectives and goals during the reporting period January 1

  11. Nuclear energy and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Today, about 80 developing countries are using nuclear techniques in various sectors of their national economies. In the sector of industry, the radiation processing using gamma rays of high energy electrons has grown. While in the sector of health care, an estimated 10000 gamma cameras-imaging instruments are used in combination with radioisotopes in medical diagnosis. In the field of agriculture there is, nearly, 1000 crop varieties derived from radiaton-induced mutations which are grown worldwide. Furthermore and concerning the energy sector there is 417 nuclear power plants operating in 26 countries, accounting for just 16% of the world's total electricity production; the nuclear energy helped in developing and supporting a variety of sciences. 2 tabs

  12. Energy and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Carbonnier

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Published by Palgrave MacmillanThis chapter introduces the thematic dossier of International Development Policy on the intimate relationship between energy and development. The authors discuss the centrality of fossil fuels in the economic growth of the Western world since the nineteenth century and the key role of oil in the twentieth century and question the future of this development model in the face of geological and climatic constraints. They examine the gaps and misunderstandings that separate social sciences and natural sciences as well as recent attempts to establish interdisciplinary dialogue around ecological economics and industrial ecology. The authors then analyse what is at stake for developing countries, inequalities in access to energy resources, the failure of the global governance system to deal with mounting tensions associated with the depletion of oil and the environmental consequences of an ever increasing consumption of non-renewable resources.

  13. Wind energy technology developments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Hauge; Hansen, Morten Hartvig; Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    2014-01-01

    turbine blades and towers are very large series-produced components, which costs and quality are strongly dependent on the manufacturing methods. The industrial wind energy sector is well developed in Denmark, and the competitive advantage of the Danish sector and the potential for job creation...

  14. Renewable energy development in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junfeng, Li

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the resources availability, technologies development and their costs of renewable energies in China and introduces the programs of renewable energies technologies development and their adaptation for rural economic development in China. As the conclusion of this paper, renewable energies technologies are suitable for some rural areas, especially in the remote areas for both household energy and business activities energy demand. The paper looks at issues involving hydropower, wind energy, biomass combustion, geothermal energy, and solar energy.

  15. Development of nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakeham, John [Secretary of State for Energy, London (UK)

    1991-06-01

    The Government's views on the development of nuclear energy are outlined. In this country, we continue to see some important advantages in maintaining nuclear power generation. It increases diversity, and so helps to maintain security of energy supply. It does not produce greenhouse gases or contribute to acid rain. But it is equally clear that nuclear costs must be brought under control whilst at the same time maintaining the high standards of safety and environmental protection which we have come to expect in the UK. The three main elements which the nuclear industry must address in the future are summarized. First the costs of nuclear generation must be reduced. Secondly, once the feasibility and costings of PWRs have been established consideration must be given to the choices for the future energy policy and thirdly new reactor designs should be standardized so the benefits of replication can be realised. (author).

  16. Analysis of three geopressured geothermal aquifer-natural gas fields; Duson Hollywood and Church Point, Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, L.A.; Boardman, C.R.

    1981-05-01

    The available well logs, production records and geological structure maps were analyzed for the Hollywood, Duson, and Church Point, Louisiana oil and gas field to determine the areal extent of the sealed geopressured blocks and to identify which aquifer sands within the blocks are connected to commercial production of hydrocarbons. The analysis showed that over the depth intervals of the geopressured zones shown on the logs essentially all of the sands of any substantial thickness had gas production from them somewhere or other in the fault block. It is therefore expected that the sands which are fully brine saturated in many of the wells are the water drive portion of the producing gas/oil somewhere else within the fault block. In this study only one deep sand was identified, in the Hollywood field, which was not connected to a producing horizon somewhere else in the field. Estimates of the reservoir parameters were made and a hypothetical production calculation showed the probable production to be less than 10,000 b/d. The required gas price to profitably produce this gas is well above the current market price.

  17. Rural energy and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, R.

    1997-12-01

    The author discusses the worldwide problem and need for rural electrification to support development. He points out that rural areas will pay high rates to receive such services, but cannot afford the capital cost for conventional services. The author looks at this problem from the point of energy choices, subsides, initial costs, financing, investors, local involvement, and governmental actions. In particular he is concerned with ways to make better use of biofuels, to promote sustainable harvesting, and to encourage development of more modern fuels.

  18. Energy efficiency, renewable energy and sustainable development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ervin, C.A.

    1994-12-31

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) is part of the U.S. Department of Energy that is specifically charged with encouraging the more efficient use of energy resources, and the use of renewable energy resources - such as solar power, wind power, biomass energy and geothermal energy. In the past several years, EE has increased its emphasis on technology deployment through partnerships with states, local governments and private companies. Partnerships move new discoveries more quickly into the marketplace, where they can create jobs, prevent pollution, save resources, and produce many other benefits. The author then emphasizes the importance of this effort in a number of different sections of the paper: energy consumption pervades everything we do; U.S. energy imports are rising to record levels; transportation energy demand is increasing; U.S. energy use is increasing; population growth increases world energy demand; total costs of energy consumption aren`t always counted; world energy markets offer incredible potential; cost of renewables is decreasing; clean energy is essential to sustainable development; sustainable energy policy; sustainable energy initiatives: utilities, buildings, and transportation.

  19. Energy efficiency, renewable energy and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ervin, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) is part of the U.S. Department of Energy that is specifically charged with encouraging the more efficient use of energy resources, and the use of renewable energy resources - such as solar power, wind power, biomass energy and geothermal energy. In the past several years, EE has increased its emphasis on technology deployment through partnerships with states, local governments and private companies. Partnerships move new discoveries more quickly into the marketplace, where they can create jobs, prevent pollution, save resources, and produce many other benefits. The author then emphasizes the importance of this effort in a number of different sections of the paper: energy consumption pervades everything we do; U.S. energy imports are rising to record levels; transportation energy demand is increasing; U.S. energy use is increasing; population growth increases world energy demand; total costs of energy consumption aren't always counted; world energy markets offer incredible potential; cost of renewables is decreasing; clean energy is essential to sustainable development; sustainable energy policy; sustainable energy initiatives: utilities, buildings, and transportation

  20. Bolivia renewable energy development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, P.

    1997-12-01

    The author summarizes changes which have occurred in Bolivia in the past year which have had an impact on renewable energy source development. Political changes have included the privatization of power generation and power distribution, and resulted in a new role for state level government and participation by the individual. A National Rural Electrification Plan was adopted in 1996, which stresses the use of GIS analysis and emphasizes factors such as off grid, economic index, population density, maintenance risk, and local organizational structure. The USAID program has chosen to stress economic development, environmental programs, and health over village power programs. The national renewables program has adopted a new development direction, with state projects, geothermal projects, and private sector involvement stressed.

  1. Energy, Sustainability and Development

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    A huge increase in energy use is expected in the coming decades – see the IEA’s ‘business as usual’/reference scenario below. While developed countries could use less energy, a large increase is needed to lift billions out of poverty, including over 25% of the world’s population who still lack electricity. Meeting demand in an environmentally responsible manner will be a huge challenge. The World Bank estimates that coal pollution leads to 300,000 deaths in China each year, while smoke from cooking and heating with biomass kills 1.3 million world-wide – more than malaria. The IEA’s alternative scenario requires a smaller increase in energy use than the reference scenario and is also less carbon intensive, but it still implies that CO2 emissions will increase 30% by 2030 (compared to 55% in the reference scenario). Frighteningly, implementing the alternative scenario faces “formidable hurdles” according to the IEA, despite the fact that it would yield financial savings for consumers that...

  2. A sustainable energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The French government has decided to encourage electric power production through renewable energies (such as wind energy with the Eole 2000 plan, solar water heaters in overseas departments, wood energy for space heating in buildings, photovoltaic energy), demand side management and cogeneration, and to enhance its purchase conditions by the government-owned EDF utility. Laws have been also introduced concerning air quality and the rational use of energy

  3. Energy consumption and technological developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okorokov, V.R.

    1990-02-01

    The paper determines an outline of the world energy prospects based on principal trends of the development of energy consumption analysed over the long past period. According to the author's conclusion the development of energy systems will be determined in the nearest future (30 - 40 years) by contemporary energy technologies based on the exploitation of traditional energy resources but in the far future technologies based on the exploitation of thermonuclear and solar energy will play the decisive role. (author)

  4. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David

    2011-06-15

    In addition to promoting energy efficiency, China has actively pursued alternative energy development as a strategy to reduce its energy demand and carbon emissions. One area of particular focus has been to raise the share of alternative energy in China’s rapidly growing electricity generation with a 2020 target of 15% share of total primary energy. Over the last ten years, China has established several major renewable energy regulations along with programs and subsidies to encourage the growth of non-fossil alternative energy including solar, wind, nuclear, hydro, geothermal and biomass power as well as biofuels and coal alternatives. This study thus seeks to examine China’s alternative energy in terms of what has and will continue to drive alternative energy development in China as well as analyze in depth the growth potential and challenges facing each specific technology. This study found that despite recent policies enabling extraordinary capacity and investment growth, alternative energy technologies face constraints and barriers to growth. For relatively new technologies that have not achieved commercialization such as concentrated solar thermal, geothermal and biomass power, China faces technological limitations to expanding the scale of installed capacity. While some alternative technologies such as hydropower and coal alternatives have been slowed by uneven and often changing market and policy support, others such as wind and solar PV have encountered physical and institutional barriers to grid integration. Lastly, all alternative energy technologies face constraints in human resources and raw material resources including land and water, with some facing supply limitations in critical elements such as uranium for nuclear, neodymium for wind and rare earth metals for advanced solar PV. In light of China’s potential for and barriers to growth, the resource and energy requirement for alternative energy technologies were modeled and scenario analysis

  5. Energy Research & Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to Main Content CA.gov California Energy Commission CA.gov | Contact | Newsroom | Quick Links convenience of our website visitors and is for informational purposes only. The California Energy Commission Google Translate™. The California Energy Commission does not endorse the use of Google TranslateÂ

  6. Strategies for Sustainable Energy Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Niels I

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses international strategies for establishing a sustainable energy development. Proposals are given for mitigation of global warming.......The paper analyses international strategies for establishing a sustainable energy development. Proposals are given for mitigation of global warming....

  7. Solar energy developments: photovoltaics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivoththaman, S.

    2006-01-01

    The annual photovoltaic (PV) energy production crossed the 1 Gigawatt mark a couple of years ago, and continues to grow at rates exceeding 40%. The cost of PV has been continuously dropping due to increased production and also thanks to the technological advances made over the past two decades at the material, device, and system levels. Although PV is still considered expensive, cost-competitiveness is expected to be achieved in the next 5-10 years. With the current PV market 90% dominated by crystalline silicon (Si) material, advances are being made in tackling the Si shortage issue, and new approaches in feedstock refinement are getting shape. On the other hand, progress is being made on thin film-based advanced devices and on novel organic semiconductors. Novel concepts based on quantum physics and nanotechnology do have the ability to improve device performance beyond traditional theoretical limits. The domination of Si is expected to shift when these next generation technologies mature into industry-level scalability. On the system level, advanced back-end electronics provides more efficient power conditioning for modern PV modules. Systems level combinations such as solar thermal/PV hybrids and PV/hydrogen systems are also promising. An overview of recent technology developments will be presented with highlights in the Canadian scenario. (author)

  8. Biomass energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng'eny-Mengech, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper deals more specifically with biomethanation process and non conventional sources of biomass energy such as water hyacinths and vegetable oil hydrocarbon fuels. It highlights socioeconomic issues in biomass energy production and use. The paper also contains greater details on chemical conversion methods and processes of commercial ethanol and methanol production. (author). 291 refs., 6 tabs

  9. Financing energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kariwara, Y.

    1990-01-01

    The 1990s is likely to be a decade of double growth: in energy demand and environmental protection. This leads the author of this paper to ask the pertinent questions of where the money will come from, and in what form, to finance the growth in capacity to produce this energy and the technology required to produce and burn it cleanly. With a focus on Asian energy markets, this paper first illustrates the problem by describing the rapid growth of energy demand in the region. It describes the growth in Japan as well as China and the fast-growing economies of Hong Kong, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand. Energy demand growth rates of almost 5 percent in the 1980s are expected to continue to grow at that rate at least until 2005, doubling today's level of consumption and putting the energy supply system under great strain. Because of the large sums involved, this paper pints out the necessity of inventing new, innovative devices for future fund raising. This will require the participation of institutions such as insurance companies and regional banks that have little experience in the energy field. This paper suggests that these and the established players in energy finance will have recourse to two new approaches: Build-Operate-Transfer and Trustee Borrowing schemes

  10. Sustainable development and energy indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop-Jordanov, Jordan

    2002-01-01

    Starting from the basic definition of sustainable development and its four dimensions, the role of indicators for sustainable energy development is analysed. In particular, it is shown that important energy efficiency indicators belong in fact to energy supply efficiency, while the end-use energy efficiency could be more pertinently represented by energy intensity indicators. Furthermore, the negentropic effects of science and technology related sustainable energy scenarios are pointed out. Finally, the sustainable development is related to wisdom, interpreted as a sum of knowledge, morality and timing. (Author)

  11. Energy for sustainable rural development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulscher, W.S.; Hulscher, W.S.; Hommes, E.W.; Hommes, E.W.

    1992-01-01

    Rural energy in developing countries is discussed with a view to sustainable development. The project-oriented approach in rural energy which has often dominated in the past, is contrasted with an overall strategy for sustainable rural energy demand and supply. An outline for a demand-oriented

  12. Wind Energy Workforce Development & Jobs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, Suzanne

    2016-11-08

    The United States needs a skilled and qualified wind energy workforce to produce domestic clean power. To assist with wind energy workforce development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and National Renewable Energy Laboratory are engaged with several efforts.This presentation by Suzanne Tegen describes these efforts, including a wind industry survey, DOE's Wind Career Map, the DOE Wind Vision report, and an in-depth discussion of the Jobs & Economic Development Impacts Model.

  13. Offshore wind energy developments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolpe, Mathias; Buhl, Thomas; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    This chapter will give a brief overview of a few of the activities within offshore wind energy research, specifically 1) Support structure optimization, 2) Blade coatings for wind turbines; 3) Scour protection of foundations, 4) Offshore HVDC and 5) Offshore wind services....

  14. Planning for energy resource development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magai, B S [Dept. of Mech. Eng., IIT Bombay, India

    1975-01-01

    A general review is provided of the national energy resources of India. They include wind power, tidal power, geothermal energy, and nuclear fission and fusion. Their present (1975) contribution to India's total energy requirements and the possibility of their accelerated development and impact on the national economy are discussed. Due to the serious proportions which the energy situation is assuming, it is suggested that a national energy council be set up within the Ministry of Energy to review all matters pertaining to energy, and to assume planning and evaluation responsibilities. It is also recommended that a Department of Energy Research, Development, and Demonstration be established as an autonomous agency which would carry out programs in utilization, conservation, environment, economics, and education. Present efforts by various ministries are fragmented and diverge in policy, leadership, and planning. It is believed that the proposed organizations would coordinate energy programs with national objectives.

  15. Energy indicators for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera, Ivan; Langlois, Lucille

    2007-01-01

    Energy is an essential factor in overall efforts to achieve sustainable development. Countries striving to this end are seeking to reassess their energy systems with a view toward planning energy programmes and strategies in line with sustainable development goals and objectives. This paper summarizes the outcome of an international partnership initiative on indicators for sustainable energy development that aims to provide an analytical tool for assessing current energy production and use patterns at a national level. The proposed set of energy indicators represents a first step of a consensus reached on this subject by five international agencies-two from the United Nations system (the Department of Economic and Social Affairs and the International Atomic Energy Agency), two from the European Union (Eurostat and the European Environment Agency) and one from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (the International Energy Agency). Energy and environmental experts including statisticians, analysts, policy makers and academics have started to implement general guidelines and methodologies in the development of national energy indicators for use in their efforts to monitor the effects of energy policies on the social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainable development

  16. Business development in renewable energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krozer, Yoram; Visa, Ion

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses how to foster development of renewable energy business. Factors that impede or enhance renewable energy in the EU 27 member states in the period 1998–2008 are analyzed. Nine factors are considered: population density, production output and energy sector output to indicate market

  17. Sustainable development and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-05-01

    This report has four chapters .In the first chapter world energy statute and future plans;in the second chapter Turkey's energy statute and future plans; in the third chapter world energy outlook and in the last chapter sustainable development and nuclear energy has discussed in respect of environmental effects, harmony between generations, harmony in demand, harmony in sociapolitic and in geopolitic. Additional multimedia CD-ROM has included

  18. Nuclear energy and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arts, F.; De Ruiter, W.; Turkenburg, W.C.

    1994-01-01

    The purposes of the title workshop were to exchange ideas on the possible impact of nuclear energy on the sustainable development of the society, to outline the marginal conditions that have to be fulfilled by nuclear energy technology to fit in into sustainable development, to asses and determine the differences or agreements of the workshop participants and their argumentations, and to determine the part that the Netherlands could or should play with respect to a further development and application of nuclear energy. 35 Dutch experts in the field of energy and environment attended the workshop which is considered to be a success. It is recommended to organize a follow-up workshop

  19. What drives renewable energy development?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alagappan, L.; Orans, R.; Woo, C.K.

    2011-01-01

    This viewpoint reviews renewable energy development in 14 markets that differ in market structure (restructured vs. not restructured), use of feed-in-tariff (FIT) (yes vs. no), transmission planning (anticipatory vs. reactive), and transmission interconnection cost allocated to a renewable generator (high vs. low). We find that market restructuring is not a primary driver of renewable energy development. Renewable generation has the highest percent of total installed capacity in markets that use a FIT, employ anticipatory transmission planning, and have loads or end-users paying for most, if not all, of the transmission interconnection costs. In contrast, renewable developers have been less successful in markets that do not use a FIT, employ reactive transmission planning, and have generators paying for most, if not all, of the transmission interconnection costs. While these policies can lead to higher penetration of renewable energy in the short run, their high cost to ratepayers can threaten the economic sustainability of renewable energy in the long-run. - Highlights: → Market structure seems to have little effect on renewable energy development. → Renewable energy development is more successful in markets that use a FIT. → Anticipatory transmission planning aids renewable energy development. → Low interconnection costs for developers also aids renewable energy development.

  20. Developments in high energy theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. July 2009 physics pp. 3–60. Developments in high energy theory .... and operated by CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research), this ma- ...... [2] S Dodelson, Modern cosmology (Academic Press, Amsterdam, 2003).

  1. Wind Energy Career Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwen Andersen

    2012-03-29

    Saint Francis University has developed curriculum in engineering and in business that is meeting the needs of students and employers (Task 1) as well as integrating wind energy throughout the curriculum. Through a variety of approaches, the University engaged in public outreach and education that reached over 2,000 people annually (Task 2). We have demonstrated, through the success of these programs, that students are eager to prepare for emerging jobs in alternative energy, that employers are willing to assist in developing employees who understand the broader business and policy context of the industry, and that people want to learn about wind energy.

  2. Energy investment in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovani, Y.

    1982-01-01

    The developing countries are likely to represent the fastest growing component of the global energy demand over the next two decades. The paper presents considerations based on the World Bank's approach to the energy sector in these countries. It is considered that an accelerated development of conventional indigenous sources of energy is absolutely vital if developing countries are to attain a satisfactory rate of economic growth. The cost of the energy investment, the power sector issues, the optimal use of the resources, the role of the external financing and the need of technical assistance are reviewed. One emphasizes the role of the World Bank in analyzing and preparing projects, and in mobilizing financing from other official and commercial sources

  3. Developing Government Renewable Energy Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurt S. Myers; Thomas L. Baldwin; Jason W. Bush; Jake P. Gentle

    2012-07-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers has retained Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to conduct a study of past INL experiences and complete a report that identifies the processes that are needed for the development of renewable energy projects on government properties. The INL has always maintained expertise in power systems and applied engineering and INL’s renewable energy experiences date back to the 1980’s when our engineers began performing US Air Force wind energy feasibility studies and development projects. Over the last 20+ years of working with Department of Defense and other government agencies to study, design, and build government renewable projects, INL has experienced the do’s and don’ts for being successful with a project. These compiled guidelines for government renewable energy projects could include wind, hydro, geothermal, solar, biomass, or a variety of hybrid systems; however, for the purpose of narrowing the focus of this report, wind projects are the main topic discussed throughout this report. It is our thought that a lot of what is discussed could be applied, possibly with some modifications, to other areas of renewable energy. It is also important to note that individual projects (regardless the type) vary to some degree depending on location, size, and need but in general these concepts and directions can be carried over to the majority of government renewable energy projects. This report focuses on the initial development that needs to occur for any project to be a successful government renewable energy project.

  4. Clean energy for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piro, P.

    2002-01-01

    The question of energy in developing countries is now taking an increasingly significant place on the agenda of the major international forums. It is to be a central issue at the UN Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg next August. (author)

  5. Wind Energy for Sustainable Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comsan, M.N.H.

    2009-01-01

    The growing demand in energy and concern about depleting natural resources and global warming has led states worldwide to consider alternatives to the use of fossil fuel for energy production. Several countries especially in Europe have already increased their renewable energy share 6-10%, expected to increase to 20% by the year 2020. For Egypt excellent resources of wind and solar energy exist. The article discusses perspectives of wind energy in Egypt with projections to generate ∼ 3.5 GWe by 2022, representing ∼ 9% of the total installed power at that time (40.2 GW). Total renewable (hydro + wind + solar) are expected to provide ∼ 7.4 GWe by 2022 representing ∼ 19% of the total installed power. Such a share would reduce dependence on depleting oil and gas resources, and hence improve country's sustainable development

  6. Energy Development Opportunities for Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Demick

    2012-11-01

    The Wyoming Business Council, representing the state’s interests, is participating in a collaborative evaluation of energy development opportunities with the NGNP Industry Alliance (an industry consortium), the University of Wyoming, and the US Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory. Three important energy-related goals are being pursued by the State of Wyoming: Ensuring continued reliable and affordable sources of energy for Wyoming’s industries and people Restructuring the coal economy in Wyoming Restructuring the natural gas economy in Wyoming

  7. Solar Energy Development PEIS Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    skip navigation Solar Energy Development Programmatic EIS Home About the EIS Public Involvement Solar Energy Solar Energy Zones Maps Documents secondary menu News Frequently Asked Questions Glossary E the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern

  8. Energy, environment and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omer, Abdeen Mustafa

    2008-01-01

    level of building performance (BP), which can be defined as indoor environmental quality (IEQ), energy efficiency (EE) and cost efficiency (CE). circle Indoor environmental quality is the perceived condition of comfort that building occupants experience due to the physical and psychological conditions to which they are exposed by their surroundings. The main physical parameters affecting IEQ are air speed, temperature, relative humidity and quality. circle Energy efficiency is related to the provision of the desired environmental conditions while consuming the minimal quantity of energy. circle Cost efficiency is the financial expenditure on energy relative to the level of environmental comfort and productivity that the building occupants attained. The overall cost efficiency can be improved by improving the indoor environmental quality and the energy efficiency of a building. This article discusses the potential for such integrated systems in the stationary and portable power market in response to the critical need for a cleaner energy technology. Anticipated patterns of future energy use and consequent environmental impacts (acid precipitation, ozone depletion and the greenhouse effect or global warming) are comprehensively discussed in this paper. Throughout the theme several issues relating to renewable energies, environment and sustainable development are examined from both current and future perspectives. (author)

  9. Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Charles Chamberlin; Robert Chaney; Gang Chen; Godwin Chukwu; James Clough; Steve Colt; Anthony Covescek; Robert Crosby; Abhijit Dandekar; Paul Decker; Brandon Galloway; Rajive Ganguli; Catherine Hanks; Rich Haut; Kristie Hilton; Larry Hinzman; Gwen Holdman; Kristie Holland; Robert Hunter; Ron Johnson; Thomas Johnson; Doug Kame; Mikhail Kaneveskly; Tristan Kenny; Santanu Khataniar; Abhijeet Kulkami; Peter Lehman; Mary Beth Leigh; Jenn-Tai Liang; Michael Lilly; Chuen-Sen Lin; Paul Martin; Pete McGrail; Dan Miller; Debasmita Misra; Nagendra Nagabhushana; David Ogbe; Amanda Osborne; Antoinette Owen; Sharish Patil; Rocky Reifenstuhl; Doug Reynolds; Eric Robertson; Todd Schaef; Jack Schmid; Yuri Shur; Arion Tussing; Jack Walker; Katey Walter; Shannon Watson; Daniel White; Gregory White; Mark White; Richard Wies; Tom Williams; Dennis Witmer; Craig Wollard; Tao Zhu

    2008-12-31

    The Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory was created by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in response to a congressionally mandated funding opportunity through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), specifically to encourage research partnerships between the university, the Alaskan energy industry, and the DOE. The enabling legislation permitted research in a broad variety of topics particularly of interest to Alaska, including providing more efficient and economical electrical power generation in rural villages, as well as research in coal, oil, and gas. The contract was managed as a cooperative research agreement, with active project monitoring and management from the DOE. In the eight years of this partnership, approximately 30 projects were funded and completed. These projects, which were selected using an industry panel of Alaskan energy industry engineers and managers, cover a wide range of topics, such as diesel engine efficiency, fuel cells, coal combustion, methane gas hydrates, heavy oil recovery, and water issues associated with ice road construction in the oil fields of the North Slope. Each project was managed as a separate DOE contract, and the final technical report for each completed project is included with this final report. The intent of this process was to address the energy research needs of Alaska and to develop research capability at the university. As such, the intent from the beginning of this process was to encourage development of partnerships and skills that would permit a transition to direct competitive funding opportunities managed from funding sources. This project has succeeded at both the individual project level and at the institutional development level, as many of the researchers at the university are currently submitting proposals to funding agencies, with some success.

  10. Developing solar energy in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alary-Grall, L.

    2003-01-01

    3 years ago the 'Soleil' program was launched and today 660.000 m 2 of solar cells have been installed which has made France to rank 4 behind Germany, Greece and Austria in terms of the use of solar energy. The 'Soleil' program, that will end in 2006, aims at developing solar energy in France and is composed of 4 axis: 1) the contribution to the funding of solar equipment through enticing financial helps, 2) the implementation of a quality plan for the installers of solar equipment, 3) the setting of a quality label for innovative and efficient solar equipment and 4) the promoting of solar energy to the professionals of the construction sector. (A.C.)

  11. Iran and regional energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Topics reviewed in these conference proceedings in the first session include domestic imperatives covering the economy, social imperatives - civil society and the rule of law, and the overall investment climate. Session 2 focuses on Iran and the energy sector with papers on oil and gas pipelines, and the effect of sanctions. Session 3 deals with Iran and the Persian Gulf with papers on new developments in Iran and its Arab neighbours, and Iran and Arab attempts to manage oil output. Session 4 concentrates on business and investment perspectives with papers on the low oil and gas prices and the new competition for investment capital, the investment climate, the building of connection with Iran, and identifying the predominant trends. A keynote address by the former deputy Foreign Minister of Iran examines regional energy development

  12. Developments in high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhi, Sunil; Roy, Probir

    2009-01-01

    This non-technical review article is aimed at readers with some physics background, including beginning research students. It provides a panoramic view of the main theoretical developments in high energy physics since its inception more than half a century ago, a period in which experiments have spanned an enormous range of energies, theories have been developed leading up to the standard model, and proposals - including the radical paradigm of string theory - have been made to go beyond the standard model. The list of references provided here is not intended to properly credit all original work but rather to supply the reader with a few pointers to the literature, specifically highlighting work done by Indian authors. (author)

  13. Energy problems in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasugi, Hirosaburo [Japan Industrial Tech. Association, Tokyo, Japan

    1989-06-20

    In order to rid the people's living of poverty in developing countries, first, the production of food has been planned to increase. And then, resource development and industrialization have been tried to improve with efforts. Because of such development and an increase in population, energy consumption has been increasing. Advanced countries have supported these countries in many ways, however, there is much difference in their assistance depend on various situations such as racial, religious, and political ones. Moreover, a gap between cities and farm villages has widen since infrastructure has not been fully equipped in developing countries. The electrification ratio is used as an index to show the degree of development in developing countries. It is low in the countries where development is lagging, particularly in farm villages. This gap is an urgent problem that faces developing countries. In order to cope with the actual conditions, advanced countries including Japan should be plan to reinforce their technological and economic assistance more suitable for farm villages. Furthermore, they should also improve the assistance system which includes a measure for environmental pollution control, considering the spot directly. 3 figs., 14 tabs.

  14. Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells. Notes on Gruy Federal's Well-of-Opportunity program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-02-01

    Obtaining test data from geopressured aquifers along the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast by arranging to assume operation of wells already drilled and found nonproductive of conventional oil or gas accumulations before such wells were abandoned by the operators is described. The geopressured aquifers were tested after performing whatever additional operations were required. The monitoring and screening of all wells which might qualify is described. The major activities and important milestones are summarized. (MHR)

  15. Preliminary environmental assessment of selected geopressured - geothermal prospect areas: Louisiana Gulf Coast Region. Volume II. Environmental baseline data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newchurch, E.J.; Bachman, A.L.; Bryan, C.F.; Harrison, D.P.; Muller, R.A.; Newman, J.P. Jr.; Smith, C.G. Jr.; Bailey, J.I. Jr.; Kelly, G.G.; Reibert, K.C.

    1978-10-15

    A separate section is presented for each of the six prospect areas studied. Each section includes a compilation and discussion of environmental baseline data derived from existing sources. The data are arranged as follows: geology and geohydrology, air quality, water resources and flood hazards, ecological systems, and land use. When data specific to the prospect were not available, regional data are reported. (MHR)

  16. Energy in developing countries and the role of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldemberg, Jose

    1986-01-01

    The role of nuclear energy in developing countries is discussed with respect to energy consumption, energy needs and energy future. The application of Article IV of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) is examined for the developing countries. It is suggested that a revision of the NPT is needed to encourage effective nuclear disarmament. (UK)

  17. Energy control and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The contributions are dealing with the different aspects of energy control: key figures of the world consumption, evolution perspectives (energy control and energy demand in middle- and long-term world scenarios, global challenges, European perspectives, energy control in public decision in France, the new French energy accounting), regional differences (energy control in the United States, Russia, China, India, Brazil, West Africa, Mediterranean Sea), energy control and society (electricity privatisation in Salvador, regulatory approach or voluntary agreements for domestic appliances, comparison of energy control and renewable energies in France, complex accounting for energy demand control in a consumption society)

  18. Energy transition and legal transition: renewable energies development in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darson, Alice

    2015-01-01

    The way to an energy transition will be reached with an integration of renewable energies in our energy mix. This development includes a legal transition because the current legal context that applies to green energies is not efficient and does not contribute to this emergency. Changing the legal frame becomes a necessity and particularly the way these energies are governed, planned and supported. It's also important that administrative procedures that regulate the implantation of energies production system are set. At last, this legal transition will have to conciliate imperatives linked to the development of renewable energies with those governing the protection of surroundings, all aiming to a sustainable development. (author) [fr

  19. Renewable energy policy and wind energy development in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zitzer, Suzanne E [UFZ - Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Leipzig (Germany). Department Urban Ecology, Environmental Planing and Transport

    2009-07-15

    The author of the contribution under consideration reports on the renewable energy policy and wind energy development in the Federal Republic of Germany. First of all, the author describes the historical development of the renewable energy policy since the 1970ies. Then, the environmental policies of the Red-Green Coalition (till to 2005) and of the Grand Coalition (since 2005) as well as the Renewable Energy Sources Act are described. The next section of this contribution is concern to the development of wind energy in the Federal Republic of Germany under consideration of onshore wind energy and offshore wind energy.

  20. Inertial fusion energy development strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutant, J.; Hogan, W.J.; Nakai, S.; Rozanov, V.B.; Velarde, G.

    1995-01-01

    The research and development strategy for inertial fusion energy (IFE) is delineated. The development strategy must indicate how commercial IFE power can be made available in the first part of the next century, by which is meant that a Demonstration Power Plant (DPP) will have shown that in commercial operation IFE power plants can satisfy the requirements of public and employee safety, acceptably low impact on the environment, technical performance, reliability, maintainability and economic competitiveness. The technical issues associated with the various required demonstrations for each of the subsystems of the power plant (target, driver, reaction chamber, and remainder of plant (ROP) where the tritium for future targets is extracted and thermal energy is converted into electricity) are listed. The many developments required to make IFE commercially available can be oriented towards a few major demonstrations. These demonstrations do not necessarily each need separate facilities. The goals of these demonstrations are: (i) ignition demonstration, to show ignition and thermonuclear burn in an ICF target and determine the minimum required driver conditions; (ii) high gain demonstration, to show adequate driver efficiency-gain product; (iii) engineering demonstrations, to show high pulse rate operations in an integrated system and to choose the best designs of the various reactor systems; (iv) commercial demonstrations, to prove safe, environmentally benign, reliable, economic, near-commercial operation. In this document the present status of major inertial confinement research activities is summarized including a table of the major operating or planned facilities. The aspects involved in each of the required demonstrations are discussed. Also, for each of the subsystems mentioned above the technical developments that are needed are discussed. The document ends with a discussion of the two existing detailed IFE development plans, by the United States and Japan. 9

  1. Marine renewable energies: status and development perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This document proposes an overview of the marine renewable energy (MRE) market, of the development perspectives, of the industrial, academic and institutional actors, of current technologies and technologies under development, and of French and European research and development programs. These energies comprise: tidal energy, the exploitation of sea temperature differences with respect with depth, wave energy, marine current power energy, osmotic and marine biomass energy

  2. Energy and durable development: the place of the renewable energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The 29 may 2000, took place at the UNESCO, a colloquium on the place of the renewable energies facing the economic development. This document presents the opening presentation of A. Antolini and L. Jospin and the colloquium papers and debates in the following four domains: the energy challenges of the durable development, the renewable energies sources facing the european directive, the thermal renewable energies (solar, geothermics and biomass) and the greenhouse effect, the world market of the renewable energies. (A.L.B.)

  3. Energy in the Developing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadgil, Ashok; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Sosler, Andree; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Phadke, Amol

    2011-11-01

    The five billion persons at the lower economic levels are not only poor, but commonly use technologies that are less efficient and more polluting, wasting their money, hurting their health, polluting their cites, and increasing carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Many first-world researchers, including the authors, are seeking to help these persons achieve a better life by collaborating on need-driven solutions to energy problems. Here we examine three specific examples of solutions to energy problems, and mitigation strategies in the developing world: (1) Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling in China. Between 1990 and 2025, China will add 675 million new urban residents, all of whom expect housing, electricity, water, transportation, and other energy services. Policies and institutions must be rapidly set up to manage the anticipated rapid rise in household and commercial energy consumption. This process has progressed from legislating, and setting up oversight of minimum energy performance standards in 1989 (now on 30 products) to voluntary efficiency labels in 1999 (now on 40 products) and to mandatory energy labels in 2005 (now on 21 products). The savings from just the standards and labels in place by 2007 would result in cumulative savings of 1188 teraWatt—hours (TWh) between 2000-2020. By 2020, China would save 110 TWh/yr, or the equivalent of 12 gigaWatts (GW) of power operating continuously. (2) Fuel-efficient biomass cookstoves to reduce energy consumption and reduce pollution. Compared to traditional cooking methods in Darfur, the BDS cooks faster, reduces fuel requirement, and emits less carbon monoxide air pollution. A 2010 survey of 100 households showed that users reduced spending on fuelwood in North Darfur camps from 1/2 of household non-fuelwood budget to less than 1/4 of that budget. The survey showed that each 20 stove puts 330/year in the pocket of the women using the stove, worth 1600 over the stove-life of 5 years. Per capita income of

  4. Policy for geothermal energy development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiuchi, S [Public Utilities Bureau, Ministry of International Trade and Industry, Japan

    1973-01-01

    Government actions related to Japanese geothermal energy development in the past include: a mining and industrial research subsidy of 27 million yen granted to Kyushu Electric Power Co. in 1952, a mining and industrial research subsidy of 13 million yen granted to Japan Metals and Chemicals Co. in 1960, a study on steam production technology for geothermal power generation by Japan Metals and Chemicals Co. funded at 3.5 hundred million yen from the Research Development Corporation of Japan, and a study on steam production technology for large scale geothermal power generation by Japan Metals and Chemicals Co. funded at 7.6 hundred million yen by the Research Development Corporation of Japan. The following projects are planned by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry for 1973: a two-year geothermal power promotion including investigations into the utilization of hot water, new methods for geothermal reservoir detection and steam well drilling, and environmental effects, studies on hydrothermal systems, basic investigations for geothermal indicators in 30 areas, and a means to finance the construction of geothermal power plants in Kakkonda (Iwate Prefecture) and Hatchobara (Oita Prefecture).

  5. Developing Students' Energy Literacy in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Debby R. E.; Miller, Wendy; Winter, Jennie; Bailey, Ian; Sterling, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate students' energy literacy at a UK university, and recommends ways in which it can be enhanced using a behaviour change model. Developing students' energy literacy is a key part of the "greening" agenda, yet little is known about how students develop their ideas about energy use and energy saving at…

  6. Capacity building for sustainable energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogner, Hans-Holger

    2006-01-01

    Capacity Building for Sustainable Energy Development - Mission: To build capacity in Member States (MS) for comprehensive energy system, economic and environmental analyses to assist in: - making informed policy decisions for sustainable energy development; - assessing the role of nuclear power; - understanding environmental and climate change issues related to energy production and use

  7. Wind energy development as a part of Poland's industrial development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoerring, Dagmara; Hvelplund, Frede Kloster

    2003-01-01

    The paper concludes with recommendations on how to make wind energy development a part of the industrial development in Poland by introducing renewable energy support mechanisms to improve the conditions for companies to develop wind technology in Poland....

  8. Nuclear energy supports sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koprda, V.

    2005-01-01

    The article is aimed at acceptability, compatibility and sustainability of nuclear energy as non-dispensable part of energy sources with vast innovation potential. The safety of nuclear energy , radioactive waste deposition, and prevention of risk from misuse of nuclear material have to be very seriously abjudged and solved. Nuclear energy is one of the ways how to decrease the contamination of atmosphere with carbon dioxide and it solves partially also the problem of global increase of temperature and climate changes. Given are the main factors responsible for the renaissance of nuclear energy. (author)

  9. Neighborhood Energy/Economic Development project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    Energy costs impact low income communities more than anyone else. Low income residents pay a larger percentage of their incomes for energy costs. In addition, they generally have far less discretionary energy use to eliminate in response to increasing energy prices. Furthermore, with less discretionary income, home energy efficiency improvements are often too expensive. Small neighborhood businesses are in the same situation. Improved efficiency in the use of energy can improve this situation by reducing energy costs for residents and local businesses. More importantly, energy management programs can increase the demand for local goods and services and lead to the creation of new job training and employment opportunities. In this way, neighborhood based energy efficiency programs can support community economic development. The present project, undertaken with the support of the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force, was intended to serve as a demonstration of energy/economic programming at the neighborhood level. The San Francisco Neighborhood Energy/Economic Development (NEED) project was designed to be a visible demonstration of bringing the economic development benefits of energy management home to low-income community members who need it most. To begin, a Community Advisory Committee was established to guide the design of the programs to best meet needs of the community. Subsequently three neighborhood energy/economic development programs were developed: The small business energy assistance program; The youth training and weatherization program; and, The energy review of proposed housing development projects.

  10. Developing macroeconomic energy cost indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberndorfer, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Indicators are more and more drawn on for policy making and assessment. This is also true for energy policy. However, while numerous different energy price figures are available, subordinate energy cost indicators are lacking. This paper lays out a general concept for such indicator sets and presents a flexible framework for representative and consistent energy cost indicators with an underlying weighting principle based on consumption shares. Their application would provide interesting new insights into the relationship between energy cost burdens of different sectors and countries. It would allow for more rigorous analysis in the field of energy economics and policy, particularly with regard to market monitoring and impact assessment as well as ex-post-policy analysis.

  11. Nuclear energy and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, E.

    2005-01-01

    To sustain decent environmental conditions, it is essential to contain the emission of greenhouse gases. to a great extent, this can be achieved by reducing the almost exclusive dependence of fossil fuels for producing electricity and by championing nuclear energy and the renewable, which in the end are the least contaminating. Specifically, operation of the European nuclear fleet avoids the yearly emission of 700 million tons of CO 2 to the atmosphere. The need to combat climate change is very serious and increasingly imminent, especially if we remember that the World Health Organization has said that climate change could eventually cause 300,000 deaths. The different social players are aware of the problem. In fact, the European Union's Cabinet of Ministers approved the post-kyoto Environmental Strategy, which underlines the need to reduce CO e missions by 80% by the year 2050. It seems obvious that, in the long run, technological research and development will be fundamental pieces in the battle against environmental change and in the effort to one day provide 2,000 million people with access to electricity. (Author)

  12. Integrated energy planning for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-09-01

    Improving access to energy is a multi-faceted challenge that has far-reaching implications and long-lasting obligations. Energy is essential to all human activities and, indeed, critical to social and economic development. Lack of energy is a contributing factor to states of perpetual poverty for individuals, communities, nations and regions. In contrast, access to energy opens many new opportunities; and meeting the United Nations Millennium Development Goals cannot be accomplished without access to affordable energy services

  13. Integrated energy planning for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-12-01

    Improving access to energy is a multi-faceted challenge that has far-reaching implications and long-lasting obligations. Energy is essential to all human activities and, indeed, critical to social and economic development. Lack of energy is a contributing factor to states of perpetual poverty for individuals, communities, nations and regions. In contrast, access to energy opens many new opportunities; and meeting the United Nations Millennium Development Goals cannot be accomplished without access to affordable energy services

  14. Energy 2007. Research, development, demonstration; Energi 07. Forskning, udvikling, demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byriel, I.P.; Justesen, Helle; Beck, A.; Borup Jensen, J.; Rosenfeldt Jakobsen, Kl; Jacobsen, Steen Hartvig (eds.)

    2007-08-10

    Danish energy research is in an exciting and challenging situation. Rising oil prices, unstable energy supply, climate policy responsibilities and globalization have brought development of new environmentally friendly and more efficient energy technologies into focus. Promising international markets for newly developed energy technologies are emerging, and at the same time well established Danish positions of strength are challenged by new strong actors on the global market. The Danish government has set to work on its vision of an appreciable strengthening of public energy research funding through the recent law on the energy technological development and demonstration programme EUDP and the realization of globalization funds. The interaction between basic and applied research must be kept intact. In this report the various Danish energy research programmes administered by Energinet.dk, Danish Energy Authority, Danish Energy Association, Danish Council for Strategic Research's Programme Commission on Energy and Environment and Danish National Advanced Technology Foundation, coordinate their annual reports for the first time. The aim of Energy 2007 is to give the reader an idea of how the energy research programmes collaborate on solving the major energy technology challenges - also in an international context. (BA)

  15. Modelling energy systems for developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, F.; Benders, R.M.J.; Moll, H.C.

    2007-01-01

    Developing countries' energy use is rapidly increasing, which affects global climate change and global and regional energy settings. Energy models are helpful for exploring the future of developing and industrialised countries. However, energy systems of developing countries differ from those of industrialised countries, which has consequences for energy modelling. New requirements need to be met by present-day energy models to adequately explore the future of developing countries' energy systems. This paper aims to assess if the main characteristics of developing countries are adequately incorporated in present-day energy models. We first discuss these main characteristics, focusing particularly on developing Asia, and then present a model comparison of 12 selected energy models to test their suitability for developing countries. We conclude that many models are biased towards industrialised countries, neglecting main characteristics of developing countries, e.g. the informal economy, supply shortages, poor performance of the power sector, structural economic change, electrification, traditional bio-fuels, urban-rural divide. To more adequately address the energy systems of developing countries, energy models have to be adjusted and new models have to be built. We therefore indicate how to improve energy models for increasing their suitability for developing countries and give advice on modelling techniques and data requirements

  16. Renewable Energy Development in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, K.M.

    2007-07-01

    India has done a significant progress in the power generation in the country. The installed generation capacity was 1300 megawatt (MW) at the time of Independence i.e. about 60 years back. The total generating capacity anticipated at the end of the Tenth Plan on 31-03-2007, is 1, 44,520 MW which includes the generation through various sectors like Hydro, Thermal and Nuclear. Emphasis is given to the renewable energy programme towards gradual commercialization. This programme is looked after by the Ministry of Non-Conventional Sources of energy. Since the availability of fossil fuel is on the decline therefore, in this backdrop the norms for conventional or renewable sources of energy (RSE) is given importance not only in India but has attracted the global attention. The main items under RSE are as follows: (i) Hydro Power (ii) Solar Power (iii) Wind Power (iv) Bio-mass Power (v) Energy from waste (vi) Ocean energy, and (vii) Alternative fuel for surface transportation. Evolution of power transformer technology in the country during the past five decades is quite impressive. There are manufacturers in the country with full access to the latest technology at the global level. Some of the manufacturers have impressive R&D set up to support the technology. Renewable energy is very much promoted by the Chinese Government. At the same time as the law was passed, the Chinese Government set a target for renewable energy to contribute 10% of the country's gross energy consumption by 2020, a huge increase from the current 1%. It has been felt that there is rising demand for energy, food and raw materials by a population of 2.5 billion Chinese and Indians. Both these countries have large coal dominated energy systems in the world and the use of fossil fuels such as coal and oil releases carbon dioxide (CO2) into the air which adds to the greenhouse gases which lead to global warming. (auth)

  17. Energy Security and Renewable Energy in Least Developed Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohlgemuth, N.

    2006-01-01

    The Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries (UN, 2001) states: The levels of production and consumption of energy in the majority of Least Developed Countries (LDCs) are inadequate and unstable. This clearly indicates a situation of energy insecurity. Starting from an encompassing definition of energy security (a country's ability to expand and optimise its energy resource portfolio and achieve a level of services that will sustain economic growth and poverty reduction), it becomes quickly clear that energy security in LDCs is a complex topic with numerous interlinkages to other sustainable development objectives. This paper attempts to give an overview of issues related to energy security in LDCs by focusing on the role renewable energy can play in that context.(author)

  18. Energy consumption and economic development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tremblay, M.T.

    1994-01-01

    Speaking as an economic planner, the author of this address suggests a scenario that is rather pessimistic for the future of nuclear energy. He emphasizes that technological change will lead to economic growth, but then supposes that improvements in hydrogen energy and solar energy, combined with global competition, may lead to a fall rather than an increase in oil prices early in the next century. The 10 year lead time for bringing a nuclear station from design to commissioning makes it difficult to predict the economics of operation

  19. Solar Energy - It's Growth, Development, and Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    dropdown arrow Site Map A-Z Index Menu Synopsis Solar Energy Resources with Additional Information Solar has played a major role in solar energy development through previous research and ongoing activities . As a result of research and development, the "cost of solar energy has been reduced 100-fold

  20. World energy use - 2000 developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stritar, A.

    2001-01-01

    The paper is presenting the analysis of World energy consumption in the year 2000. Special emphasis is given to the contribution of primary energy use to the global greenhouse effect. The analysis is based on data published by British Petroleum. It is also an update of my analysis published at the same conference one year ago. It can be seen that nuclear power is still the fastest growing primary energy sector in the World, that its share in primary energy mix is increasing and that it is even the fastest increasing share of all sources. Nuclear consumption in Europe is still increasing, but surprisingly the use of coal has increased too in the last year. Consumption is rapidly increasing in North America, while nuclear share there is still fastest growing. In Asia the rate of nuclear growths has slowed down in the last year, gas is now the fastest growing primary energy source. In countries of the former Soviet Union the nuclear energy is the only sector that has reached the level of production of ten years ago. It is worrying that in the countries of OECD the coal consumption is increasing again. Finally, it is also very worrying that the overall consumption of fossil fuels worldwide is increasing. What will happen with the greenhouse effect?(author)

  1. Renewable energy strategies for sustainable development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the perspective of renewable energy (wind, solar, wave and biomass) in the making of strategies for a sustainable development. Such strategies typically involve three major technological changes: energy savings on the demand side, efficiency improvements in the energy...... production, and replacement of fossil fuels by various sources of renewable energy. Consequently, large-scale renewable energy implementation plans must include strategies of how to integrate the renewable sources in coherent energy systems influenced by energy savings and efficiency measures. Based...... on the case of Denmark, this paper discusses the problems and perspectives of converting present energy systems into a 100 percent renewable energy system. The conclusion is that such development will be possible. The necessary renewable energy sources are present, if further technological improvements...

  2. Gradual prospects of development of railway energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliseev V.A.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available in the analytical review of the Energy Strategy of the RZD Holding, the target indicators of its activities are set out and the tasks of the energy policy are listed. At the identified stages of the strategy implementation, the identified priorities, benchmarks and development mechanisms were noted. The relation of the strategy to the regulatory state regulations and documents is shown, and the domestic railroad train energy – to save energy and improve the country's energy efficiency.

  3. Nuclear energy in a sustainable development perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertel, E.; Wilmer, P.

    2001-01-01

    The characteristics of nuclear energy are reviewed and assessed from a sustainable development perspective highlighting key economic, environmental and social issues, challenges and opportunities relevant for energy policy making.. The analysis covers the potential role of nuclear energy in increasing the human and man-made capital assets of the world while preserving its natural and environmental resource assets as well as issues to be addressed in order to enhance the contribution of nuclear energy to sustainable development goals. (author)

  4. Energy Issues and Problems in Developing Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehdizadeh, Saeed

    1999-01-01

    In general, the developing countries due to changes in supply and demand for energy in the world, are facing several problems, such as: 1. Energy growth. 2.Energy consumption 3.Environmental protection. The objective of this paper is to study the problems caused by the increase in the energy consumption of the developing countries. also several guideline and solution schemes are recommended for these problems

  5. New clean energy enterprises and sustainable development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usher, Eric [United Nations Environment Programme, Rural Energy Enterprise Development (REED), Paris (France); Xiaodong Wang [United Nations Foundation, Climate Change Program, Washington, DC (United States)

    2002-06-01

    Though hundreds of billions of dollars have been invested, past development efforts have been largely unable to break the cycle of poverty - a cycle that is directly linked to the provision of energy. Too often, the potential of local enterprises to provide essential energy services has been ignored. Yet such an enterprise is one of the most potent engines for shifting towards a local human capacity to produce and distribute modern energy services. This recognition lies at the heart of REED, an approach to developing new sustainable energy enterprises that use clean, efficient and renewable energy technologies to meet the energy needs of underserved populations. (Author)

  6. Sustainable development and energy resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steeg, H.

    2000-01-01

    (a) The paper describes the substance and content of sustainability as well as the elements, which determine the objective. Sustainability is high on national and international political agendas. The objective is of a long term nature. The focus of the paper is on hydrocarbon emissions (CO 2 ); (b) International approaches and policies are addressed such as the Climate change convention and the Kyoto protocol. The burden for change on the energy sector to achieve sustainability is very large in particular for OECD countries and those of central and Eastern Europe. Scepticism is expresses whether the goals of the protocol and be reached within the foreseen timeframe although governments and industry are active in improving sustainability; (c) Future Trends of demand and supply examines briefly the growth in primary energy demand as well as the reserve situation for oil, gas and coal. Renewable energy resources are also assessed in regard to their future potential, which is not sufficient to replace hydrocarbons soon. Nuclear power although not emitting CO 2 is faced with grave acceptability reactions. Nevertheless sustainability is not threatened by lack of resources; (d) Energy efficiency and new technologies are examined vis-a-vis their contribution to sustainability as well as a warning to overestimate soon results for market penetration; (e) The impact of liberalization of energy sectors play an important role. The message is not to revert back to command and control economies but rather use the driving force of competition. It does not mean to renounce government energy policies but to change their radius to more market oriented approaches; (f) Conclusions centre on the plea that all options should be available without emotional and politicized prejudices. (author)

  7. Sustainable development and energy resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steeg, H

    2002-01-01

    (a) The paper describes the substance and content of sustainability as well as the elements, which determine the objective. Sustainability is high on national and international political agendas. The objective is of a long term nature. The focus of the paper is on hydrocarbon emissions (CO 2 ); (b) International approaches and policies are addressed such as the climate change convention and the Kyoto protocol. The burden for change on the energy sector to achieve sustainability is very large in particular for OECD countries and those of central and Eastern Europe. Scepticism is expresses whether the goals of the protocol and be reached within the foreseen timeframe although governments and industry are active in improving sustainability; (c) Future trends of demand and supply examines briefly the growth in primary energy demand as well as the reserve situation for oil, gas and coal. Renewable energy resources are also assessed in regard to their future potential, which is not sufficient to replace hydrocarbons soon. Nuclear power although not emitting CO 2 is faced with grave acceptability reactions. Nevertheless sustainability is not threatened by lack of resources; (d) Energy efficiency and new technologies are examined vis-a-vis their contribution to sustainability as well as a warning to overestimate soon results for market penetration; (e) The impact of liberalization of energy sectors play an important role. The message is not to revert back to command and control economies but rather use the driving force of competition. It does not mean to renounce government energy policies but to change their radius to more market oriented approaches; (f) Conclusions centre on the plea that all options should be available without emotional and politicized prejudices. (author)

  8. Health effects of energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.; Newcombe, H.B.

    1980-01-01

    Our accumulated technology has added roughly 50 years to the average life span of a human being in North America. Most of this increase in life span has occurred within the last 100 years. Cheap and safe supplies of energy are required for the industrial prosperity that has made this possible. The best estimates available all indicate that nuclear power and natural gas are the safest forms of contemporary energy production. The largest potential radiation hazard to which we are currently exposed appears to derive from our houses; increased attention by public health authorities to the control of this particular hazard may be warranted. (Auth)

  9. Rationale for energy research and development programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-04-01

    This paper describes the rationale for the expenditure of government money on energy research and development. The Committee, organized in 1974, established the following order of project priorities: projects to determine current and future energy demand; projects concerned with the conservation and more efficient use of energy; projects concerned with the assessment of indigenous energy resources; projects concerned with the assessment of the human, financial, and organizational resources for energy production and use; and projects concerned with economic, technological, social, and environmental aspects of energy use and production over the next 15 years and beyond the next 15 years. Significant factors affecting the national energy economy, the strategy for energy research and development, and the results of committee activities are summarized. An energy scenario research is laid out. (MCW)

  10. Green energy strategies for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midilli, Adnan; Dincer, Ibrahim; Ay, Murat

    2006-01-01

    In this study we propose some green energy strategies for sustainable development. In this regard, seven green energy strategies are taken into consideration to determine the sectoral, technological, and application impact ratios. Based on these ratios, we derive a new parameter as the green energy impact ratio. In addition, the green energy-based sustainability ratio is obtained by depending upon the green energy impact ratio, and the green energy utilization ratio that is calculated using actual energy data taken from literature. In order to verify these parameters, three cases are considered. Consequently, it can be considered that the sectoral impact ratio is more important and should be kept constant as much as possible in a green energy policy implementation. Moreover, the green energy-based sustainability ratio increases with an increase of technological, sectoral, and application impact ratios. This means that all negative effects on the industrial, technological, sectoral and social developments partially and/or completely decrease throughout the transition and utilization to and of green energy and technologies when possible sustainable energy strategies are preferred and applied. Thus, the sustainable energy strategies can make an important contribution to the economies of the countries where green energy (e.g., wind, solar, tidal, biomass) is abundantly produced. Therefore, the investment in green energy supply and progress should be encouraged by governments and other authorities for a green energy replacement of fossil fuels for more environmentally benign and sustainable future

  11. Supply side energy management for sustainable energy ( development in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uqaili, M.A.; Harijan, K.; Memon, M.

    2005-01-01

    Pakistan is an energy deficient country. Indigenous reserves of oil and gas are limited and the country heavily depends on imported energy. The indigenous coal is of poor quality. Environmental pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from energy use are becoming significant environmental issues in the country. Sustainability is regarded as a major consideration for both urban and rural development in Pakistan. People in the country have been exploiting the natural resources with no consideration to the effects-both short term (environmental) and long term (resource crunch). The urban areas of the country depend to a large extent on commercial energy sources. The rural areas use non-commercial sources like firewood, agricultural wastes and animal dung. Even this is decreasing over the years, with the villagers wanting to adopt the ready to use sophisticated technology. The debate now is to identify a suitable via media. The option that fills this gap aptly is the renewable energy source. This paper analyses the supply side management of energy resources in relation to sustainable energy development. The present study shows that for achieving long-term environmental sustainable development, renewable energy is the major option that could meet the growing energy needs in Pakistan. (author)

  12. Energy services and energy poverty for sustainable rural development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaygusuz, K.

    2011-01-01

    In many rural areas, poor people still depend on wood and other biomass fuels for most of their household and income-generating activities. The difficult, time-consuming work of collecting and managing traditional fuels is widely viewed as women's responsibility, which is a factor in women's disproportionate lack of access to education and income, and inability to escape from poverty. Therefore, it is important for energy access programs to have a special focus on women. New options for energy access and sustainable livelihoods, like small-scale biofuels production, can have dramatic benefits for rural women, and their families and communities. Energy development, as both a driving force and a consequence of such tremendous changes, has had profound impact on economic, social, and environmental development. Rural energy has always been a critical issue due to years of energy shortage for both households and industries. Biomass, for long time, has been the only available fuel in many rural areas. The situation in rural areas is even more critical as local demand for energy outstrips availability and the vast majority of people depend on non-commercial energy supplies. Energy is needed for household uses, such as cooking, lighting, heating; for agricultural uses, such as tilling, irrigation and post-harvest processing; and for rural industry uses, such as milling and mechanical energy and process heat. Energy is also an input to water supply, communication, commerce, health, education and transportation in rural areas. (author)

  13. Energy for development in the real world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geel, P. van

    2005-01-01

    Developing countries have a right to economic growth. They need it to combat poverty. But growth is impossible without access to modern energy. If we are to do something about that, we must start with the basic needs of developing countries. At least one-third of humanity, most of whom live in rural areas in developing countries, do not have an adequate supply of energy to meet their daily needs, or for health care and education. This limited and unreliable energy supply is a direct obstacle to economic development. Millions of people spend a lot of time trying to gather enough firewood to survive. Companies cannot operate because of power cuts. Schools and hospitals cannot function properly. Energy is also needed to cool medicines, and to provide light so that children can do their homework in the evenings. The industrialised world must help developing countries to secure an energy supply. And more importantly, an energy supply that is sustainable

  14. Renewable Energy Project Development Assistance (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-07-01

    This fact sheet provides information on the Tribes selected to receive assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy 2013 Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, which provides technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects on tribal lands.

  15. Nuclear energy for developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemery, L.S.

    1980-01-01

    This paper examines the circumstances which must prevail before a reasonable technical, administrative and sociological case can be made to justify the introduction of nuclear power technology to a developing country. The role played by the IAEA in responding to needs of developing countries is considered and problems of nuclear plant safety and materials safeguards discussed. Plans for nuclear power in several developing countries are outlined

  16. Energy, environment and sustainable rural development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Best, G [Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome (Italy)

    1992-12-01

    This paper addresses the energy needs of the three quarters of the World's population living in the rural populations of many developing countries whose daily struggle to obtain the energy needed for survival is unaffected by international energy politics. It aims to identify energy-related actions in certain policy and technical areas which may contribute to ending rural poverty. The mutual benefits of a transition to modern technologies is stressed both for rural and urban groups, especially in terms of a more efficient use of fossil fuels and renewable energy sources such as biomass or solar power. Recommendations for sustainable rural and agricultural development are made. (UK)

  17. Development of Energy Efficiency Indicators in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    Russia is sometimes referred to as 'the Saudi Arabia of energy efficiency'; its vast potential to reduce energy consumption can be considered a significant 'energy reserve'. Russia, recognising the benefits of more efficient use of energy, is taking measures to exploit this potential. The president has set the goal to reduce energy intensity by 40% between 2007 and 2020. In the past few years, the IEA has worked closely with Russian authorities to support the development of energy efficiency indicators in Russia, critical to an effective implementation and monitoring of Russia's ambitious energy intensity and efficiency goals. The key findings of the IEA work with Russia on developing energy efficiency indicators form the core of this report.

  18. Development, energy, environment: changing the paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    A first set of contributions comments the various risks and challenges which are to be faced in terms of energy, climate and environment: the deadlock of present 'laisser-faire' policies, recent findings in climate science in 2005, oil as the reason of a possible economic crisis in developing countries, recent evolution of energy systems. The next set of contributions discusses the possible solutions and their limits: CO 2 capture and sequestration in coal plants, nuclear renaissance, renewable energies, hydro-electricity, CO 2 capture by biomass, energy sobriety, urban morphology and transports in emerging cities, integration of service demand with energy supply, energy decentralized production

  19. PEI's perspective on renewable energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.

    2005-01-01

    Approximately 7 per cent of Prince Edward Island's (PEI) energy supply is from renewable sources, acquired mainly from biomass. Wind power accounts for 0.5 per cent of electricity production. This paper discussed issues concerning renewable energy developments in PEI, with particular reference to the PEI Renewable Energy Act as well as the PEI energy framework and renewable energy strategy, which was the result of public consultation sessions held in 2003. The results of these sessions indicated that greater development of indigenous renewable energy resources was desired, particularly in wind power. It was also stated that the government should help to advance renewable energy development in the province. Several development opportunities were highlighted, including: wind; biodiesel; ethanol; biomass; bio-gas; and small-scale hydro. The advantages of wind power were reviewed and wind data was presented. The economic and community benefits of renewable energy include local price stability, development opportunities, diversity of fuel type and security of supply. It was noted that renewable energy fully complemented the energy goals of the PEI government. Several strategies were discussed towards the development of renewable energy, including feasibility studies in biogas and biomass generation. The PEI government's commitment towards developing a regulatory framework acknowledging environmental sustainability was re-stated. Objectives include the promotion of renewable energy sources through the establishment of a Renewable Portfolio Standard for electricity; improvements in the economics of small-scale electricity production from renewable resources through the introduction of net metering; decreases in peak demand; enablement of green credits; the designation of areas for large-scale wind developments; and provision of guaranteed prices paid to producers for medium and large-scale renewable energy generators through feed-in tariffs. tabs, figs

  20. The sustainable development of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Huifang

    2012-01-01

    The wide use of nuclear energy has promoted the development of China's economy and the improvement of people's living standards. To some extent, the exploitation of nuclear power plants will solve the energy crisis faced with human society. Before the utilization of nuclear fusion energy, nuclear fission energy will be greatly needed for the purpose of alleviating energy crisis for a long period of time. Compared with fossil fuel, on the one hand, nuclear fission energy is more cost-efficient and cleaner, but on the other hand it will bring about many problems hard to deal with, such as the reprocessing and disposal of nuclear spent fuel, the contradiction between nuclear deficiency and nuclear development. This paper will illustrate the future and prospect of nuclear energy from the perspective of the difficulty of nuclear development, the present reprocessing way of spent fuel, and the measures taken to ensure the sustainable development of nuclear energy. By the means of data quoting and comparison, the feasibility of sustainable development of nuclear energy will be analyzed and the conclusion that as long as the nuclear fuel cycling system is established the sustainable development of nuclear energy could be a reality will be drawn. (author)

  1. Stuart Energy's experiences in developing 'Hydrogen Energy Station' infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crilly, B.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' With over 50 years experience, Stuart Energy is the global leader in the development, manufacture and integration of multi-use hydrogen infrastructure products that use the Company's proprietary IMET hydrogen generation water electrolysis technology. Stuart Energy offers its customers the power of hydrogen through its integrated Hydrogen Energy Station (HES) that provides clean, secure and distributed hydrogen. The HES can be comprised of five modules: hydrogen generation, compression, storage, fuel dispensing and / or power generation. This paper discusses Stuart Energy's involvement with over 10 stations installed in recent years throughout North America, Asia and Europe while examining the economic and environmental benefits of these systems. (author)

  2. North Dakota Energy Workforce Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Drake [Bismarck State College, Bismarck, ND (United States)

    2014-12-29

    Bismarck State College, along with its partners (Williston State College, Minot State University and Dickinson State University), received funding to help address the labor and social impacts of rapid oilfield development in the Williston Basin of western North Dakota. Funding was used to develop and support both credit and non-credit workforce training as well as four major symposia designed to inform and educate the public; enhance communication and sense of partnership among citizens, local community leaders and industry; and identify and plan to ameliorate negative impacts of oil field development.

  3. Energy policy and development of the energy sector in Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blazhev, Blagoja.

    1996-01-01

    Energetics is an important precondition for everyday life in the economic activities as well as the social activities on the whole. The main goal of the energy sector is to monitor and support the planned social development. Consequently, the development of the society and the development of energetics must be coordinated as much as possible. If not, with an autarchic development of the energy system, because of its capital characteristic, could mean a substantial erosion of the social accumulation, without an appropriate contribution to the growth of the national income. Because of this, the issue we wish to speak of is constantly current. (author). 1 tab., 6 ills

  4. Resonant Wave Energy Converters: Concept development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arena, Felice; Barbaro, Giuseppe; Fiamma, Vincenzo; Laface, Valentina; Malara, Giovanni; Romolo, Alessandra; Strati, Federica Mara

    2015-01-01

    The Resonant Wave Energy Converter (REWEC) is a device for converting sea wave energy to electrical energy. It belongs to the family of Oscillating Water Columns and is composed by an absorbing chamber connected to the open sea via a vertical duct. The paper gives a holistic view on the concept development of the device, starting from its implementation in the context of submerged breakwaters to the recently developed vertical breakwaters. [it

  5. Developing wind energy for the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rand, Marcus [Open Univ., Milton Keynes (GB). Faculty of Technology

    1990-01-01

    There is now emerging a consensus that the sensitive development of renewable sources of energy, and in particular wind energy, is going to be of major environmental significance for the UK. Primarily, renewable sources of energy can act as a means of combating the Greenhouse Effect and of reducing the other environmental impacts of conventional energy technology, including the build-up of radioactive waste and the damaging emissions from fossil fuelled power stations. The UK has a large natural potential for harnessing energy from the wind (between 20% and 200% of our current electrical requirements). This potential is beginning to be tapped. Wind energy is now in a position where it can take advantage of the profound changes taking place in the form of the privatisation of the Electricity Supply Industry. In other countries wind energy has developed successfully. (author).

  6. Renewable energy development and prospects in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Zahedi

    2000-01-01

    Development of renewable energies in Australia is still in its infancy and will require active support by government, utilities and financing institutions to ensure a steady growth. Much has been done to increase the utilisation of renewable energies in the energy supply, but much still remains to be done, especially in the areas of promotion, demonstration, training and technology transfer. This process will lead to meeting the energy needs of the population in rural areas and to contributing to a suitable development of the region during the next century. Australia is endowed with a wealth of renewable energy resources that hold great promise for addressing a host of important environmental, employment and socioeconomic issues. Australia has a set of climate, geographic and other factors that provide favourable conditions for many specific renewable energy applications. The objectives of this paper is to look at the current situation of renewable energies in Australia, opportunities, constraints, current projects, available potential and future prospects. (Author)

  7. Energy in developing countries: prospects and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, V.

    1977-01-01

    This paper analyses requirements for primary energy and electric power in the developing countries in the light of projections of population and economic growth. It evaluates the availability of indigenous energy resources and focuses on input requirements (capital, technology, trained personnel) for accelerated energy development; it reviews possible supplies for such inputs from domestic sources, transnational corporations, multilateral institutions, and through co-operation among the developing countries themselves and between the developing and the developed countries. The paper analyses the findings of the United Nations study ''The Future of the World Economy. A Study on the Impact of the Prospective Economic Issues and Policies on the International Development Strategy'' as far as they relate to energy and the developing countries in the light of the objectives of the Declaration on the Establishment of a New International Economic Order

  8. Management of development of renewable energy sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inić Branimir P.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper: 'Management of development of renewable energy sources is to point out the possible solutions for neutralizing the threat of energy shortages. The paper outlines major short and long term energy problems facing humanity. The increase of world human population is, inevitably, accompanied by higher energy consumption. Reserves decrease of nonrenewable energy sources like oil, gas, and coal is a major threat to maintaining current living conditions, and thus requires solutions in order to neutralize the threat. This is why the management of development of renewable energy sources is an imperative for Serbia. The paper emphasizes the use of solar energy, because the annual average of solar radiation in Serbia is about 40% higher than the European average, however, the actual use of the sun's energy to generate electricity in Serbia is far behind the countries of the European Union. Solar energy is clean, renewable, and the fact that 4.2 kilowatt-hours are received daily per square meter averaged over the entire surface of the planet, makes it an almost unused energy source, Compared to EU countries, the price of non-renewable derived energy is, on average, higher in Serbia. Taking this into consideration, the use of solar energy, as an unused resource, imposes itself as indispensable.

  9. Energy for sustainable development in Malaysia: Energy policy and alternative energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman Mohamed, Abdul; Lee, Keat Teong

    2006-01-01

    Energy is often known as the catalyst for development. Globally, the per capita consumption of energy is often used as a barometer to measure the level of economic development in a particular country. Realizing the importance of energy as a vital component in economic and social development, the government of Malaysia has been continuously reviewing its energy policy to ensure long-term reliability and security of energy supply. Concentrated efforts are being undertaken to ensure the sustainability of energy resources, both depletable and renewable. The aim of this paper is to describe the various energy policies adopted in Malaysia to ensure long-term reliability and security of energy supply. The role of both, non-renewable and renewable sources of energy in the current Five-Fuel Diversification Strategy energy mix will also be discussed. Apart from that, this paper will also describe the various alternative energy and the implementation of energy efficiency program in Malaysia

  10. The IIASA'83 scenario of energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogner, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    The prospects for natural gas as a major source of energy supply are good. Spurred by the energy crises of the 'seventies, recent exploration for gas resources as well as technological advances in deep drilling have enhanced the picture of gas as a plentiful fossil resource. Technological improvements in transporting gas over large distances, as piped gas and as a liquid, suggest the strong possibility of gas as an important commodity in energy trade. In addition, gas is a high quality and relatively clean fuel, which is especially attractive in today's world of environmental concern for pollution emissions from energy combustion. Such developments led to the design of the IIASA'83 Scenario of Energy Development, which explored the techno-economic feasibility of the expanded use of gas in energy systems. The work drew on the findings of the IIASA global energy analysis, documented in 'Energy in a Finite World'. All countries of the world were covered in the quantitative analysis, grouped regionally by similarity in energy resources and economic structure and not necessarily on the basis of geographic proximity. The period studied was necessarily the next half century, from 1980 to 2030, in view of the inertia in technological and economic systems and this constraint on the development of energy infrastructures. Global primary energy consumption increases some twofold from 10 TW.a/a to 21.9 TW.a/a over the next 50 years, while economic output globally grows some threefold. The breakdown of global primary energy consumption indicates an absolute increase in the use of all primary energy sources over the study period, with fossil fuels continuing to supply the lion's share of primary energy. The buildup of non-fossil energy sources to global supply levels by 2030 is likely to be constrained by the high capital investments required at a period of modest economic growth and by the sociopolitical controversy surrounding the use of some of these technologies. (author)

  11. Energy storage research and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, US consumers experienced the highest sustained gasoline prices in recent history, in real terms, including those seen in the early 1980s1. Partially as a result of the $3/gallon gasoline prices, sales of hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) increased almost 60% in 20072, and several automakers announced plans to develop plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs)3. However, total sales of HEVs remained in the 2-3 percent range of all vehicle sales. An important step for continued HEV market penetration, as well as electrifying the nation's personal transportation, is the development of cost effective, long lasting, and abuse tolerant Li-ion batteries.

  12. Geothermal energy development in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simsek, S.; Okandan, E.

    1990-01-01

    Geothermal fields in Turkey are related to rather complex zones of collision between the Eurasian and African continents, and penetration of the Arabian plate into the Anatolian continental mass. These processes gave rise to fracturing of the lithosphere and eruption of magmas. Geothermal regional assessment studies have proven several low enthalpy sources and some high enthalpy fields suitable for electricity generation. This paper summarizes developments in exploration-drilling and give examples of direct utilization implemented in recent years

  13. Energy and development in the Third World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchanan, J.

    1982-08-01

    The subject is discussed in chapters, entitled: introduction (general statement of Third World problems); the other energy crisis - firewood and dung (erosion of traditional sources); Third World energy policies (concentration on commercial sources; fossil fuels; a grassroots approach); why not nukes (arguments against use of nuclear power, on grounds of economics, politics, unreliability, radiation hazards, potential earthquake hazards, radioactive waste management, proliferation of nuclear weapons); appropriate energy for what sort of development (renewable energy sources; energy conservation); problems of economics, politics and the technological fix (the Reagan solution; the Brandt report: the transnational corporations; 'North' and 'South'; production for need); a way out of the crisis. (U.K.)

  14. Renewable energy for sustainable development and environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omer, Abdeen

    2010-09-15

    The increased availability of reliable and efficient energy services stimulates new development alternatives. This article discusses the potential for such integrated systems in the stationary and portable power market in response to the critical need for a cleaner energy technology. Throughout the theme several issues relating to renewable energies, environment and sustainable development are examined from both current and future perspectives. It is concluded that renewable environmentally friendly energy must be encouraged, promoted, implemented and demonstrated by full-scale plan especially for use in remote rural areas.

  15. Nuclear energy in a sustainable development perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The concept of sustainable development, which emerged from the report of the 1987 World Commission on Environment and Development (the Brundtland report), is of increasing interest to policy makers and the public. In the energy sector, sustainable development policies need to rely on a comparative assessment of alternative options, taking into account their economic, health, environmental and social aspects, at local, regional and global levels. This publication by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency investigates nuclear energy from a sustainable development perspective, and highlights the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead in this respect. It provides data and analyses that may help in making trades-off and choices in the energy and electricity sectors at the national level, taking into account country-specific circumstances and priorities. It will be of special interest to policy makers in the nuclear and energy fields

  16. Solar energy for buildings: clean energies utilisation and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omer, Abdeen M.

    2015-01-01

    The move towards a de-carbonized world, driven partly by climate science and partly by the business opportunities it offers, will need the promotion of environmentally friendly alternatives, if an acceptable stabilization level of atmospheric carbon dioxide is to be achieved. This requires the harnessing and use of natural resources that produce no air pollution or greenhouse gases and provides comfortable coexistence of human, livestock, and plants. This article presents a comprehensive review of energy sources, and the development of sustainable technologies to explore these energy sources. It also includes potential renewable energy technologies, efficient energy systems, energy savings techniques and other mitigation measures necessary to reduce climate changes. The article concludes with the technical status of the ground source heat pumps (GSHP) technologies. (full text)

  17. Energy sector developments in Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantin, R.

    1997-01-01

    The current state and future development of the oil, gas and coal sector in Venezuela was discussed. Venezuela has oil reserves of 73 billion barrels, gas reserves of 143 TCF and coal reserves of 6 billion BOE. The country has a refining capacity of 2.9 million barrels per day, a petrochemical capacity of 7.7 million tons per year, and a coal capacity of 4.6 million tons per year. The largest refiners in Venezuela are Shell, Exxon, PDVSA, Mobil, BP, Chevron and Texaco. In 1996 the total oil and derivatives exports for Venezuela were 2.8 million barrels per day. Fifty-eight companies from 14 countries participate in the Venezuelan upstream market. Fifteen operating agreements have been awarded to 27 companies from nine countries. Third round operating agreements have been awarded to 26 companies and profit sharing agreements are in force involving 14 companies. Four vertically integrated projects (Maraven-Conoco, Maraven-Total, Corpoven-Arco-Texaco-Phillips, and Lagoven-Mobil-Veba) are currently underway. The Orimulsion(R) project, the refining system, the natural gas production, marketing and transmission system, associated future projects for the 1997-2006 time frame, and developments in the field of petrochemicals also have been reviewed. 21 figs

  18. Energy development potential: An analysis of Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perobelli, Fernando Salgueiro; Oliveira, Caio Cézar Calheiros de

    2013-01-01

    This paper develops an indicator for the energy development potential (EDP) of 27 Brazilian states. This indicator uses data on a state's infrastructure and its supply of and demand for energy. The indicator measures the data for three periods: the first part of the 1990s, which is a period of low economic growth; the first part of the 2000s, which is a period of high economic growth but with a historical crisis in the Brazilian energy sector; and 2009–2011, which is a period of economic growth after the energy crisis. Using a factor analysis, we are able to identify three factors for EDP. They are the demand for energy, the supply of renewable energy, and the supply of nonrenewable energy. We use these factors to classify the Brazilian states according to their EDP and to perform an exploratory spatial data analysis (ESDA) by using the Moran indicators and the local indicators of spatial association (LISA). - Highlights: • This paper deals with the spatial dimension of the Brazilian energy sector. • We construct an index of the energy development potential for Brazilian states. • Energy issues are defined over time and space, thus have spatial dimensions. • The spatial results show that there are two well-defined spatial patterns

  19. The role of energy economists in promoting sustainable energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, G.C.

    1992-01-01

    The role of energy in pursuit of policies seeking sustainable development is crucial. Correspondingly, the work of energy economists will be affected in many traditional areas of analysis and will require enhanced scope and new expertise. This would lead to a better understanding of the place of natural resources in the production process, better delineation of trade-offs between avoidance of ecological degradation and economic stagnation, and more interdisciplinary feed-back. (author)

  20. Geothermal energy geopressure subprogram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-02-01

    The proposed action will consist of drilling one geopressured-geothermal resource fluid well for intermittent production testing over the first year of the test. During the next two years, long-term testing of 40,000 BPD will be flowed. A number of scenarios may be implemented, but it is felt that the total fluid production will approximate 50 million barrels. The test well will be drilled with a 22 cm (8.75 in.) borehole to a total depth of approximately 5185 m (17,000 ft). Up to four disposal wells will provide disposal of the fluid from the designated 40,000 BPD test rate. The following are included in this assessment: the existing environment; probable environmental impacts-direct and indirect; probable cumulative and long-term environmental impacts; accidents; coordination with federal, state, regional, and local agencies; and alternative actions. (MHR)

  1. Nuclear energy development in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banal, Michel

    1975-01-01

    The present state of the nuclear development in Europe is discussed. Power plants already operating and those presently being built or to be put in operation before 1980 are considered. Only the large industrial countries near France are dealt with, the situation of the Eastern countries being too different to be envisaged in the same paper. A table gives the whole electric power production and its nuclear component for the more important industrial countries in 1974, the respective powers of the power plants operating on january 1, 1975 and those that must be in operation in 1980 and 1985, in the same countries, France, the U.K., Germany, Spain, Italy, Sweden and Belgium are successively considered [fr

  2. Sustainable development and energy supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levi, H.W.

    1997-01-01

    'Sustainable' is an old established term which has made a political career in the past ten years. The roots of this career extend back into the 18th century, when an economic concept of forest management was developed to replace yield maximization achieved by means of complete deforestation by yield optimization attained by conservative forest management. This latter type of forest management was termed 'sustainable'. The language used in today's sustainability debate was based on the idea of preserving the capital provided by nature and living on the interest. As a consequence, the term 'sustainable' became one of the key points in environmental policy and economic policy after the Brundtland report had been published (V. Hauff, 1987), which also constitutes the background to this article. (orig.) [de

  3. Analysis of the energy development variants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsvetanov, P.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of the variants of energy development is made as the third stage of a procedure of energy-economy interrelations dynamics study, the other two stages being the scenarios description and the formulation of the variants. This stage includes a research on the dimensions and the dynamics of the resources demands, the general features and the trends of the national energy development. There is a presentation of a comparative analysis of the variants in terms of economic indices and energy values, computed by the model IMPACT-B. A resource evaluation of the development variants is given in terms of investments, requirements (direct, indirect and total) and limited national resources demands of the energy system. The trends of the national energy development discussed are: trends characterizing the changes in the structure of the energy consumption, resulting from changes in the economy; trends of the energy system impact on the productivity of labor; general trends of the proportionality in the industrial, the household and services sector development. 16 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs. (R.Ts.)

  4. Energy and Development in Emerging Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, John; Vincent, Nicolas

    2015-03-01

    Energy is an important component of the economy and is a fundamental factor of production. In general we expect is use to grow in some relation to growth in economic activity. Empirically we see a closer relationship (higher E/GDP elasticity) in emerging economies where the energy intensive stage of development is still in process. Traditional fossil energy sources remain the least cost source of providing many or most energy services but present an environmental challenge. Managing the growth of energy use and its impact on the environment is a central challenge of 'green growth'. Examples of the interactions of energy development in China are used to provide a deeper understanding of these links. (author)

  5. Energy solutions for sustainable development. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soenderberg Petersen, L; Larsen, Hans [eds.

    2007-05-15

    The Risoe International Energy Conference took place 22 - 24 May 2007. The conference focused on: 1) Future global energy development options. 2) Scenario and policy issues. 3) Measures to achieve low-level stabilization at, for example, 500 ppm CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. 4) Local energy production technologies such as fuel cells, hydrogen, bio-energy and wind energy. 5) Centralized energy technologies such as clean coal technologies. 6) Providing renewable energy for the transport sector. 7) Systems aspects, differences between the various major regions throughout the world. 8) End-use technologies, efficiency improvements and supply links. 9) Security of supply with regard to resources, conflicts, black-outs, natural disasters and terrorism. (au)

  6. Development actions of wind energy in Tunisia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esseghir, M.

    1991-01-01

    The actions undertaken in Tunisia during the last few years concern research, development and industrial processes and the creation of the National Energy Agency (Agence de Maitrise de l'Energie (AME)) interested in starting up national programs for energy planning, energy saving, and the use of alternative energy sources. This study is based on the most important wind applications realized in the last few years in Tunisia. Firstly the national energy situation is observed. Then attention is paid to the activities in the field of wind energy. After this follows a general description of wind availability per region in Tunisia. Two important applications, water pumping and rural electrification, are described. Finally the perspectives and the evolution of these applications for the future are dealt with. 3 figs., 3 tabs., 2 ills

  7. Energy, pollution, and economic development in Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miniar Ben Ammar Sghari

    2016-11-01

    The rising level of energy consumption that is occurring internationally also is being mirrored at regional and national levels. An interesting case study along these lines is Tunisia, which is one of the high-growth economies in the Middle East and North African area yet lacks sufficient energy supply to satisfy its growing demand. Tunisia looks like many nations around the world with a young population, growing economy, increasing domestic energy consumption, and the need to balance economic development with environmental concerns.

  8. Army Mobility Energy Research & Development Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Energy Utilization MAJOR TECHNOLOGICAL BARRIERS: None. APPROACH: Develop (1) movie simulator, or (2) computer simulator with video display, or (3) working...cut-up chicken from slaughter, 3.5 weeks frozen storage to cooked condition, has an energy requirement of 46,000 kJ/kg edible portion contrasted to...radiation sterilized, cooked individual servings which have a comparable energy requirement of 14,160 kJ/kg edible portion. APPROACH: Conduct basic and

  9. SOLAR ENERGY POLICY DEVELOPMENTS IN EUROPE

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaela PÃCE?ILÃ

    2015-01-01

    Solar energy is one of the most important renewable energy sources in Europe offering new possibilities to generate electricity and heat. In this context, the study provides accurate information about researches that characterize the solar resource and investigates the potential of solar energy in European countries. The analysis is also focused on the current status of market development including photovoltaic capacity, electricity production from solar photovoltaic power, solar thermal capa...

  10. Energy, environment and development in Bhutan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uddin, Sk Noim; Taplin, Ros [Graduate School of the Environment, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Yu, Xiaojiang [Department of Geography, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon (China)

    2007-12-15

    Bhutan's energy and environmental situation and approaches to development are reviewed and analyzed in this paper. Conservation of natural resources and human happiness have been placed as central strategic policy themes and have been given high priority in the national development plans of Bhutan. Bhutan's unique approach to development via Gross National Happiness (GNH) or the Middle Path of development is being facilitated by the Royal Government of Bhutan as a tool to balance poverty alleviation, environmental conservation and development. However, challenges exist due to the constraints of resources, good governance, legal frameworks, and human capacity. This paper reviews selected sustainable energy projects (e.g. energy from renewables or energy conservation) in Bhutan and finds that in fact, Bhutan's renewable energy resources (e.g. water and forests) which have proved to be indispensable for development are vulnerable due to the adverse impacts of climate change and environmental degradation. Appropriate measures in order to reduce potential environmental degradation and mitigate climate change impacts have been acknowledged globally and these have potential for application in Bhutan. For example, implementation of sustainable energy projects under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) of the Kyoto Protocol could offer an opportunity for mitigating climate change impacts and also contributing to sustainable development. (author)

  11. Future development of nuclear energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Nuclear energy development in Japan has passed about 30 years, and reaches to a step to supply about 35 % of total electric power demand. However, together with globalization of economic and technical development, its future progressing method is required for its new efforts. Among such conditions, when considering a state of future type nuclear energy application, its contribution to further environmental conservation and international cooperation is essential, and it is required for adoption to such requirement how it is made an energy source with excellent economics.The Research Committee on 'Engineering Design on Nuclear Energy Systems' established under recognition in 1998 has been carried out some discussions on present and future status of nuclear energy development. And so forth under participation of outer specialists. Here were summarized on two year's committee actions containing them and viewpoints of nuclear industries, popularization of nuclear system technology, and so forth. (G.K.)

  12. Wind energy for a sustainable development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna; Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Sempreviva, Anna Maria

    2014-01-01

    of both the wind energy related research activities and the wind energy industry, as installed capacity has been increasing in most of the developed and developing countries. The DTU Wind Energy department carries the heritage of the Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy by leading the research......Wind energy is on the forefront of sustainable technologies related to the production of electricity from green sources that combine the efficiency of meeting the demand for growth and the ethical responsibility for environmental protection. The last decades have seen an unprecedented growth...... developments in all sectors related to planning, installing and operating modern wind farms at land and offshore. With as many as 8 sections the department combines specialists at different thematic categories, ranging from meteorology, aeroelastic design and composite materials to electrical grids and test...

  13. Renewable energy research and development in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chappell, M S

    1979-12-01

    Canadian research and development (R and D) in renewable energy began as a result of the oil crisis in 1974, and in keeping with government policy, is predominantly carried out in the private sector under contract to the federal government. The variety in technical maturity of the renewable energy technologies is reflected in the non-uniform funding levels among the five constituent programs. The greatest support is allotted to solar energy in recognition of its enormous potential, both in low to mid-temperature thermal and in photovoltaic applications. This report describes the technical content of these five renewable energy and R and D programs, and outlines the organization and management structures used to direct the effort. Biomass energy R and D concentrates on the harvesting, processing and conversion of wood wastes into convenient fuel forms. Near-term applications will continue to be in the forest products industries. Wind energy R and D in geothermal energy are focussed on identification and quantification of the resource. A five-megawatt experimental geothermal heating system is being established at the University of Regina. The hydraulic energy R and D program does not consider conventional hydro-electric systems which are well developed; rather, it primarily covers laboratory-scale tests on conversion devices for wave, tidal, and river flow energy systems. A substantial effort is also underway in analytic and modelling techniques for hydraulic energy systems of all types. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Nuclear energy sustainable development and public awareness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murty, G.S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper provides the latest information about the importance of energy needs and its growth in the years to come, the role of the nuclear energy and the need for public awareness and acceptability of the programs to achieve sustainable development

  15. Philippines Wind Energy Resource Atlas Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, D.

    2000-11-29

    This paper describes the creation of a comprehensive wind energy resource atlas for the Philippines. The atlas was created to facilitate the rapid identification of good wind resource areas and understanding of the salient wind characteristics. Detailed wind resource maps were generated for the entire country using an advanced wind mapping technique and innovative assessment methods recently developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  16. Energy and development : A modelling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ruijven, B.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304834521

    2008-01-01

    Rapid economic growth of developing countries like India and China implies that these countries become important actors in the global energy system. Examples of this impact are the present day oil shortages and rapidly increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. Global energy models are used explore

  17. Energy Diversity and Development in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    support for renewable energy development can be seen in Kenya’s efforts to obtain outside funding. Kenya is one of six countries selected by Climate...for Kenya (Nairobi: Repub- lic of Kenya, 2011). 17 Ministry of Energy, Feed-in Tariffs Policy on Wind, Biomass, Small-Hydro, Geothermal, Biogas and

  18. Strategy of Energy Development Until 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilemas, J.; Miskinis, V.; Galinis, V.; Zukauskas, V.; Valentukevicius, V.

    2002-01-01

    In the introductory part of the strategy for the development of energy until 2015 the specifications of the present-day energy sector are given: strengths and weaknesses, opportunities for further development, which are expedient to be used, and threats, which are necessary to be reduced as much as possible. A vision of the energy sector and State mission, i.e., the main provisions and trends of State activities, which would allow the implementation of the desirable development of energy, are also formulated. The main strategic goals are identified with the consideration taken of essential requirements and provisions of the European Association Agreement, the Energy Charter Agreement, and other international agreements in the field of energy. Special attention in the strategy is devoted to the identification of the main trends in the development of the energy sector. A number of factors, both external and internal, will have an effect on the development of Lithuania's economy in the future. In preparing this strategy three scenarios of economic growth will be possible: 1) fast economic growth scenario (5.7 percent per year, on the average, in 2000-2015); 2) the main scenario (4.1 percent); 3) slow economic growth scenario (2.3 percent). Forecasts for the needs of energy for the said economic scenarios are prepared with the application of the MAED model, taking into consideration the expected structural changes in the GDP, energy intensity changes, the development of social indices, and other factors, having an effect on the changes in the consumption of energy. The duration of exploitation of the Ignalina NPP will have an essential effect on the development of the electric energy system. On the basis of optimisation calculations, performed with the use of the WASP-4 model, the strategy presents a detailed analysis of different scenarios for the shutdown of the nuclear power plant and expenses of its replacement by other electric power plants. Seeking to ensure the

  19. The NEED (National Energy Education Development) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, D.; Spruill, M.

    2012-04-01

    The NEED (National Energy Education Development) Project is a non-profit organization which provides a wide range of K-12 curriculum on energy education topics. The curriculum is specific for primary, elementary, intermediate and secondary levels with age appropriate activities and reading levels. The NEED Project covers a wide range of topics from wind energy, nuclear energy, solar energy, hydropower, hydrogen, fossil fuels, energy conservation, energy efficiency and much more. One of the major strengths of this organization is its Teacher Advisory Board. The curriculum is routinely revised and updated by master classroom teachers who use the lessons and serve on the advisory board. This ensures it is of the highest quality and a useful resource. The NEED Project through a variety of sponsors including businesses, utility companies and government agencies conducts hundreds of teacher professional development workshops each year throughout the United States and have even done some workshops internationally. These workshops are run by trained NEED facilitators. At the workshops, teachers gain background understanding of the energy topics and have time to complete the hands on activities which make up the curriculum. The teachers are then sent a kit of equipment after successfully completing the workshop. This allows them to teach the curriculum and have their students perform the hands on labs and activities in the classroom. The NEED Project is the largest provider of energy education related curriculum in the United States. Their efforts are educating teachers about energy topics and in turn educating students in the hope of developing citizens who are energy literate. Many of the hands on activities used to teach about various energy sources will be described and demonstrated.

  20. Conference on wind energy development and biodiversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossement, Arnaud; Prevors, Lionel; Nagel, Paul-Bastian; Otto, Iris; Gourat, Fabrice; Sornin-Petit, Nicolas; Kelm, Volker; Beucher, Yannick; Rosenthal, Sonja; Strobl, Reinhard; Kozlowski, Sonia; Herrholz, Thomas; Hannemann, Thomas; Lange, Helmut; Behr, Oliver; Hochradel, Klaus; Mages, Juergen; Nagy, Martina; Korner-Nievergelt, Fraenzi; Niermann, Ivo; Simon, Ralph; Stiller, Florian; Weber, Natalie; Brinkmann, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The French-German office for Renewable energies (OFAEnR) organised a conference on wind energy development and biodiversity. In the framework of this French-German exchange of experience, about 90 participants exchanged views on the existing regulatory systems for nature protection in a wind energy context in both countries. In particular, birds fauna and chiropters protection were in the center of the debates. The question of wind energy development in a forest environment was addressed as well. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) made during this event: 1 - The development of onshore wind farms and the French environmental Code (Arnaud Gossement); 2 - Wind energy development priority - recent advances in environmental regulation (Lionel Prevors); 3 - environmental legislation and wind power deployment in Germany: An overview (Paul-Bastian Nagel); 4 - Avifauna and wind energy plants - To bring the expansion of wind energy in line with environmental issues (Iris Otto) 5 - environmental impact study in France and Germany: what challenges and what bird fauna specificities? (Fabrice Gourat); 6 - How to take into account the chiropters' aspect in authorization procedures? Regional scale experience feedback: the Champagne-Ardenne case (Nicolas Sornin-Petit); 7 - France and Germany - a comparison of bat monitoring experience (Volker Kelm, Yannick Beucher); 8 - Bat-friendly operation algorithms: reducing bat fatalities at wind turbines in central Europe (Oliver Behr); 9 - Wind energy use in forests? specifics from an environmental planning perspective (Sonja Rosenthal); 10 - expansion of wind energy in the Bavarian State Forest (Reinhard Strobl); 11 - Environmental impact assessment and environmental follow-up study for the forest wind farms: experience feedback (Sonia Kozlowski); 12 - German aviation light regulations - German aviation light regulations. Case study: eno 92 at wind farm Schoenerlinde (Thomas Herrholz); 13 - Welcome to

  1. Energy needs, developing countries and ICTP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreenivasan, K.R.

    2005-01-01

    The energy consumption in the near future will go up at a more rapid rate than before. About four billion people use little energy today (1.6 billion are without electricity). The energy consumption will increase partly because more of them will begin to use more energy and partly because the population will increase (to an estimated 10-12 billion in the steady state). Dependence on fossil fuels cannot continue as now. Supplies are limited, availability will become a greater vagary as sources dry up and greenhouse effects may make them less useful even sooner. Sustainable energy options will have to be a mix of fossil fuels, nuclear energy, renewable sources and others like hydrogen. Participation of developing countries and dialogue with them are essential. Developing countries cannot follow the same path to progress as industrialized countries did in the past. Greater ingenuity is needed, which calls for greater investment in science. The industrialized countries have a large responsibility because unsustainable development in the developing part of the world will adversely affect every other part. ICTP's involvement in this respect involve dedicated scientific workshops over the years (some in cooperation with IAEA) with considerable participation from Developing Countries and TRIL Fellows. ICTP has a new section on Earth System Physics (consolidating energy issues as well). Since 1977 ICTP organized 21 courses and workshops, which were attended by about 2000 participants

  2. Development of the Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Frigaard, Peter; Sørensen, Hans Christian

    2000-01-01

    The development of the wave energy converter Wave Dragon (WD) is presented. The WD is based on the overtopping principle. Initially a description of the WD is given. Then the development over time in terms of the various research and development projects working with the concept is described. Thi...

  3. Energy and sustainable development: issues and options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appert, O.

    2001-01-01

    Future development needs to be sustainable in all of its dimensions if it is to continue to fully contribute to human welfare. In the achievement of this objective, the manner in which energy is produced and consumed is of crucial importance. In the wake of these insights, first attempts begin to provide concrete options for steps towards sustainability in the energy sector. Two criteria can be identified for developing sustainable development policies. First, such policies need to strike a balance between the three dimensions of sustainable development - economic, environmental and social - acknowledging that all three are intrinsically linked. Second, policies in the energy sector need to reduce exposure to large-scale risks and improve the resilience of the energy system through active risk management and diversification. (authors)

  4. Developments on the wind energy scene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    The recently published report of the British Wind Energy Association (BWEA), entitled ''Power for a Sustainable Future'', is summarised. It calls on the government to: set a target of 10% of United Kingdom electricity from wind by 2025; encourage green energy trading by not charging value added tax on electricity from renewable sources; establish a fair market price for wind power; adopt a new development policy for renewable energies based on a rolling programme of equitable fixed contracts to encourage long-term investment; broaden the basis of the final Non Fossil Fuel Option, introducing new development bands and increasing the number of projects in Scotland which has half of Britain's wind resource; continue support for research and development into wind energy technologies and manufacturing methods; implement foreign aid programmes to benefit the British wind industry as well as aid recipients; continue to develop international standards for turbine design and construction to facilitate trade for manufacturers throughout the European Union. (UK)

  5. Landfill Gas Energy Project Development Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    View handbook that provides an overview of LFG energy project development guidance and presents the technological, economic and regulatory considerations that affect the feasibility and success of these projects.

  6. US energy policy and Arctic gas development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beecy, D.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation provided a perspective of Arctic energy resource development and the impact that science and technology will have on the American National Energy Policy (NEP). The role of the NEP is to provide energy security for the United States by ensuring dependable, affordable and sustainable energy for the future. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) conducts a wide range of energy and research activities that contribute to energy efficiency advances that help meet rising energy demand and reduce pollution emissions. In May 2001, the NEP proposed 100 recommendations, of which half focus on energy efficiency and developing renewable energy sources. The Clean Coal Power Initiative is also based on technological innovation and focuses on a program called FutureGen to build and operate a zero emission coal-fired power plant to produce both electricity and hydrogen. These initiatives could result in major changes in America's energy scenario. The provisions of the Energy Bill in streamlining the regulatory process for the proposed Alaska gas pipeline were outlined. The 2004 Annual Energy Outlook for the United States indicates that a pipeline from the Mackenzie Delta to Alberta would be constructed first, followed by one from Alaska. The North Slope Alaska natural gas pipeline will likely be operational by 2018 and add 4.5 BCF per day to meet growing natural gas demand in the United States. The National Petroleum Council's report on America's long-term natural gas supply and demand situation claims that lower-48 and traditional Canadian natural gas basins will be able to supply 75 per cent of the U.S. demand by the year 2025. The remainder will be made up by Alaskan natural gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG) and gas from new sources in Canada such as coalbed methane, methane hydrates, and oil sands

  7. Development of nuclear energy in Armenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevorgyan, A.A.; Galstyan, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an attempt to depict the situation in the Armenian Nuclear Energy Sector with the particular focusing on its further development. Basing on the energy independence and national security strategy principles, the Government of Armenia made a decision to construct a new nuclear unit in the Republic to replace Unit 2 of the Armenian NPP after its decommissioning. The paper shows that the only acceptable way of electricity generation in Armenia is the combined operation of thermal power plants and new nuclear unit, with the use of domestic renewable energy sources. This will allow to cover the Republic's energy demand and to export the excess electricity to the neighboring countries

  8. Renewable Energy Development in Hermosa Beach, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, K.

    2016-12-01

    The City of Hermosa Beach, California, with the support of the AGU's TEX program, is exploring the potential for renewable energy generation inside the City, as part of the implementation of the City's 2015 Municipal Carbon Neutral Plan. Task 1: Estimate the technical potential of existing and future technologies Given the City's characteristics, this task will identify feasible technologies: wind, solar, tidal/wave, wastewater biogas, landfill biogas, microscale anaerobic digestion (AD), and complementary energy storage. Some options may be open to the City acting alone, but others will require working with municipal partners and private entities that provide services to Hermosa Beach (e.g., wastewater treatment). Energy storage is a means to integrate intermittent renewable energy output. Task 2: Review transaction types and pathways In this task, feasible technologies will be further examined in terms of municipal ordinances and contractual paths: (a) power purchase agreements (PPAs) with developers, under which the City would purchase energy or storage services directly; (b) leases with developers, under which the City would rent sites (e.g., municipal rooftops) to developers; (c) ordinances related to permitting, under which the City would reduce regulatory barriers to entry for developers; (d) pilot projects, under which the City would engage with developers to test new technologies such as wind/wave/microscale AD (pursuant to PPAs and/or leases); and (e) existing projects, under which the City would work with current wastewater and landfill contractors to understand (i) current plans to develop renewable energy, and (ii) opportunities for the City to work with such contractors to promote renewable energy. Task 3: Estimate costs by technology Finally, the last task will gather existing information about the costs, both current and projected, of the feasible technologies, including (i) overnight construction cost (capital); (ii) integration costs (e

  9. Perspectives of China's wind energy development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Dexin; Wang Zhongying

    2009-01-01

    Wind energy is a kind of clean renewable energy, which is also relatively mature in technology, with large-scale development conditions and prospect for the commercialization. The development of wind energy is a systematic project, involving policy, law, technology, economy, society, environment, education and other aspects. The relation-ship among all the aspects should be well treated and coordinated. This paper has discussed the following relationships which should be well coordinated: relationship between wind resources and wind energy development, relationship be-tween the wind turbine generator system and the components, relationship between wind energy technology and wind en-ergy industry, relationship between off-grid wind power and grid-connected wind power, relationship between wind farm and the power grid, relationship between onshore wind power and offshore wind power, relationship between wind energy and other energies, relationship between technology introduction and self-innovation, relationship among foreign-funded, joint ventured and domestic-funded enterprises and relationship between the government guidance and the market regula-tion, as well as giving out some suggestions.

  10. Energy in Brazil: Toward sustainable development?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Amaro Olimpio; Soares, Jeferson Borghetti; Gorini de Oliveira, Ricardo Gorini; Pinto de Queiroz, Renato

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the evolution of the Brazilian energy sector with reference to the results of the business-as-usual scenario of the National Energy Outlook 2030 studies. The analysis was made with, as a starting point, energy indicators for sustainable development, which take into account social, economic and environmental aspects. The study demonstrates that the country has great availability of energy resources and that renewable sources can contribute to maintain a big participation in the production and use of energy, giving the country considerable advantages in economic and environmental terms. As regards the social aspect, on the other hand, the unequal distribution of income continues to be the country's principal weak point in achieving sustainable development

  11. Offshore Wind Energy Systems Engineering Curriculum Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGowan, Jon G. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Manwell, James F. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Lackner, Matthew A. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2012-12-31

    Utility-scale electricity produced from offshore wind farms has the potential to contribute significantly to the energy production of the United States. In order for the U.S. to rapidly develop these abundant resources, knowledgeable scientists and engineers with sound understanding of offshore wind energy systems are critical. This report summarizes the development of an upper-level engineering course in "Offshore Wind Energy Systems Engineering." This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive knowledge of both the technical challenges of offshore wind energy and the practical regulatory, permitting, and planning aspects of developing offshore wind farms in the U.S. This course was offered on a pilot basis in 2011 at the University of Massachusetts and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), TU Delft, and GL Garrad Hassan have reviewed its content. As summarized in this report, the course consists of 17 separate topic areas emphasizing appropriate engineering fundamentals as well as development, planning, and regulatory issues. In addition to the course summary, the report gives the details of a public Internet site where references and related course material can be obtained. This course will fill a pressing need for the education and training of the U.S. workforce in this critically important area. Fundamentally, this course will be unique due to two attributes: an emphasis on the engineering and technical aspects of offshore wind energy systems, and a focus on offshore wind energy issues specific to the United States.

  12. Energy and Development. A Modelling Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Ruijven, B.J.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid economic growth of developing countries like India and China implies that these countries become important actors in the global energy system. Examples of this impact are the present day oil shortages and rapidly increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. Global energy models are used to explore possible future developments of the global energy system and identify policies to prevent potential problems. Such estimations of future energy use in developing countries are very uncertain. Crucial factors in the future energy use of these regions are electrification, urbanisation and income distribution, issues that are generally not included in present day global energy models. Model simulations in this thesis show that current insight in developments in low-income regions lead to a wide range of expected energy use in 2030 of the residential and transport sectors. This is mainly caused by many different model calibration options that result from the limited data availability for model development and calibration. We developed a method to identify the impact of model calibration uncertainty on future projections. We developed a new model for residential energy use in India, in collaboration with the Indian Institute of Science. Experiments with this model show that the impact of electrification and income distribution is less univocal than often assumed. The use of fuelwood, with related health risks, can decrease rapidly if the income of poor groups increases. However, there is a trade off in terms of CO2 emissions because these groups gain access to electricity and the ownership of appliances increases. Another issue is the potential role of new technologies in developing countries: will they use the opportunities of leapfrogging? We explored the potential role of hydrogen, an energy carrier that might play a central role in a sustainable energy system. We found that hydrogen only plays a role before 2050 under very optimistic assumptions. Regional energy

  13. Energy policy, aid, and the development of renewable energy resources in Small Island Developing States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dornan, Matthew; Shah, Kalim U.

    2016-01-01

    Small Island Developing States (SIDS) have established ambitious renewable energy targets. The promotion of renewable energy has been motivated by several factors: a desire to lessen dependence on fossil fuels, to attract development assistance in the energy sector, and to strengthen the position of SIDS in climate change negotiations. Here we explore the interplay between the role of aid and energy policy in the development of renewable energy resources in SIDS. We find that the importance of development assistance has implications for the sustainability of renewable energy development, given that funding is not always accompanied by necessary energy policy reforms. We also identify energy efficiency and access to modern energy services as having received insufficient attention in the establishment and structure of renewable energy targets in SIDS, and argue that this is problematic due to the strong economic case for such investments. - Highlights: • SIDS have established the world's most ambitious renewable energy targets. • These are motivated by fossil fuel dependence and climate change vulnerability. • Aid dependence has influenced the ambition of renewable energy targets. • Energy efficiency and energy access have received insufficient attention. • Domestic policy reforms necessary for the achievement of targets has been limited.

  14. Advanced Energy Industries, Inc. SEGIS developments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharf, Mesa P. (Advanced Energy Industries, Inc., Bend, OR); Bower, Ward Isaac; Mills-Price, Michael A. (Advanced Energy Industries, Inc., Bend, OR); Sena-Henderson, Lisa; David, Carolyn; Akhil, Abbas Ali; Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Gonzalez, Sigifredo

    2012-03-01

    The Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems (SEGIS) initiative is a three-year, three-stage project that includes conceptual design and market analysis (Stage 1), prototype development/testing (Stage 2), and commercialization (Stage 3). Projects focus on system development of solar technologies, expansion of intelligent renewable energy applications, and connecting large-scale photovoltaic (PV) installations into the electric grid. As documented in this report, Advanced Energy Industries, Inc. (AE), its partners, and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) successfully collaborated to complete the final stage of the SEGIS initiative, which has guided new technology development and development of methodologies for unification of PV and smart-grid technologies. The combined team met all deliverables throughout the three-year program and commercialized a broad set of the developed technologies.

  15. Energy and economic development [Brazil: A country profile on sustainable energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, G.; Schaeffer, R.

    2006-01-01

    When energy specialists discuss the relationships between energy use and economic development, the focus is usually on how energy supports economic growth, alleviates poverty and increases people's well-being. On rare occasions, though, the effect that a country's choices for promoting economic development have on energy production and use is a matter of concern. The purpose of this chapter is to evaluate the way Brazil's choices for promoting economic development over time have impacted primary and final energy use in the country. Economic growth has different levels of quality, which lead to different economic development paths. Some paths are more effective than others in creating wealth and in protecting and preserving natural resources and the environment for future generations. Quality actually matters as much for economic development as for energy. This chapter is divided into four sections covering energy and economic development relationships, the evolution of final energy use in Brazil, strategies to enhance sustainable energy development in the country and a summary of main issues. In Section 5.1, energy and economic development relationships are discussed, setting the background for the analysis of the impacts on final energy use of some of Brazil's choices for promoting economic development. The section begins by focusing on the basics of energy and economic development relationships. It should be noted that most energy specialists usually discuss only the basics of energy and economic development (the 'energy in support of economic development' theme), but this approach alone is not enough to explain differences in countries' final energy use patterns, or to identify strategies to enhance sustainable energy development. In this sense, the main contribution of this section is to further illuminate the role of social and economic choices in determining the effectiveness of a given country's economic development and that country's primary and final

  16. Wind energy developments in the Americas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swisher, R.; Ancona, D.F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper will highlight the key wind energy activities and programs of American countries. In South and Central America, wind technology awareness and opportunity is spreading. Countries have projects in the beginning stages of development and many sites with excellent wind resources are believed to exist. Argentina, Costa Rica, Colombia, Mexico, and several Caribbean countries are among those active in wind energy development. In Canada, after a decade of research and systems development, the Department of Energy Mines and Resources is conducting a review of all renewable energy technologies, including wind, to develop a strategic plan for future activities. Canadian industry continues development of various vertical axis projects and the Province of Alberta has begun a program to assess wind potential in that region. In the United States, commercial application of wind energy is continuing to expand. During 1989, over 140 MW of new wind turbine capacity was installed in wind power plants, bringing the total operating in the U.S. to 14600 turbines and 1,400 MW. During 1989, these machines produced over 2.1 billion kWh, enough to supply the residential needs of Washington D.C. or San Francisco. This is an increase of 15% over the 1988 total, even though installed operating capacity dropped by about 10% as smaller, out-dated turbines were phased out or replaced. The U.S. government is in the process of formulating a new National Energy Strategy. It seems clear that renewable energy and energy efficiency will play an increasingly important role in this strategy. The U.S. wind program continues to emphasize broad-based technology development, but has also initiated conceptual design studies for an advanced wind turbine for power generation in the late 1990s. (Author)

  17. Renewable energy markets in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinot, Eric; Chaurey, Akanksha; Lew, Debra; Moreira, Jose Roberto; Wamukonya, Njeri

    2003-01-01

    Roughly 400 million households, or 40% of the population of developing countries, do not have access to electricity. Household and community demand for lighting, TV, radio, and wireless telephony in rural areas without electricity has driven markets for solar home systems, biogas-fueled lighting, small hydro mini-grids, wind or solar hybrid mini-grids, and small wind turbines. These technologies are not strictly comparable with each other, however; the level of service that households receive varies considerably by technology and by the specific equipment size used. Regardless of size, surveys and anecdotal evidence suggest that rural households value both electric lighting and television viewing. Growing numbers of individual equipment purchases, beyond government-driven programs, point to growing market demand. As energy consumption rises with increases in population and living standards, awareness is growing about the environmental costs of energy and the need to expand access to energy in new ways. As recognition grows of the contribution renewable energy can make to development, renewable energy is shifting from the fringe to the mainstream of sustainable development. Support for renewable energy has been building among those in government, multilateral organizations, industry, and non-governmental organizations. Commercial markets for renewable energy are expanding, shifting investment patterns away from traditional government and donor sources to greater reliance on private firms and banks. In this paper we take a market orientation, providing an aggregate review of past market experience, existing applications, and results of policies and programs. (BA)

  18. Nuclear energy an asset for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2007-01-01

    The energy issue is now a worldwide concern. It is showed that nuclear energy combined with renewable energies are the only efficient response to face the challenge of climate warming by cutting drastically the emission of greenhouse gases in the electricity production. The second asset of nuclear energy is to be able to meet the growing need for electric power of developing countries. Energy conservation is a good thing to do in western countries but it is far to be sufficient. The success of France's nuclear energy program has enabled the country to be independent from other countries concerning its electricity production, to produce electricity at moderate and stable costs even on the long term, and to develop nuclear industry operators that are world leaders. According to the 28 june 2006 bill that clarifies the management of radioactive wastes, the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in deep geological layers, will be put into service in 2025. The law has let the possibility of recovering the waste containers during a certain period after their burial if new solutions will have emerged. In the context of an expected renaissance of nuclear energy, the EPR (European Pressurized Reactor) is a valuable offer that must be developed. The construction of an EPR unit on the Flamanville site is necessary to perfect its design. (A.C.)

  19. Trends in the development of energy markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penkov, P.; Donchev, A.; Stefanova, E.

    2000-01-01

    The 20th annual energy symposium (7-8 Dec., 1999, Houston) has been organized by 'Arthur Andersen' company. The main subjects presented are: research, monitoring and assessment of the market risk by BUMP system; electro-energy systems development; energy markets transformation including their liberalization and convergence; necessity of investment capital and possibilities for its effective increasing; structural reform in electric energy sector, in accordance with the European requirements. A review on the achievements and problems in the energy field in the Central and Eastern European countries during the years after the democratic changes is presented at the round table discussion. It is outlined the significance of the operating energy laws in this countries and increasing productivity, and efficiency of the former government electricity companies for the development of corporations. The process of transformation and privatization in some countries in Central and Eastern Europe: Hungary, Poland, Romania, Czech Republic, Latvia, Lithuania is analyzed. As a result of the reports delivered at the 20th yearly symposium, conclusions are made that even in the developed countries the production competition gets into trouble. The right field of market competition in electric-energy field isn't a struggle for production but it is a struggle for investments

  20. Future energy options for developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaric, Z P

    1982-05-01

    An educated guess is made of the energy demand in developing countries well into the next century in order to estimate the possible role of new and renewable sources in meeting this demand. The world is roughly divided into industrialized (IND) and developing (LDC) countries. A plot of energy demand in both parts shows a possible structure of mixed energy to meet LDC demand, but there is a gap between demand and supply from conventional sources in LDCs that has to be met by new and renewable sources. When the demand for specific energy forms is projected, as much as two thirds of the final energy needed from new sources should be based on centralized-electricity and liquid-fuels technologies. Solar and geothermal energy must compete with nuclear and thermonuclear breeders, while solar prospects for chemical fuel supply in LDCs lacking adequate coal reserves seems promising. There is a large gap in research and development (R and D) spending on new energy between the two parts, which means that LDCs will have inappropriate technology at a high price. An increase in R and D spending on a regional basis should target funds to appropriate options. 6 references, 7 figures.

  1. Wind Energy Workforce Development: Engineering, Science, & Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesieutre, George A.; Stewart, Susan W.; Bridgen, Marc

    2013-03-29

    Broadly, this project involved the development and delivery of a new curriculum in wind energy engineering at the Pennsylvania State University; this includes enhancement of the Renewable Energy program at the Pennsylvania College of Technology. The new curricula at Penn State includes addition of wind energy-focused material in more than five existing courses in aerospace engineering, mechanical engineering, engineering science and mechanics and energy engineering, as well as three new online graduate courses. The online graduate courses represent a stand-alone Graduate Certificate in Wind Energy, and provide the core of a Wind Energy Option in an online intercollege professional Masters degree in Renewable Energy and Sustainability Systems. The Pennsylvania College of Technology erected a 10 kilowatt Xzeres wind turbine that is dedicated to educating the renewable energy workforce. The entire construction process was incorporated into the Renewable Energy A.A.S. degree program, the Building Science and Sustainable Design B.S. program, and other construction-related coursework throughout the School of Construction and Design Technologies. Follow-on outcomes include additional non-credit opportunities as well as secondary school career readiness events, community outreach activities, and public awareness postings.

  2. Recent developments in European energy markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, E.

    1981-01-01

    The industrial development in Europe which has created a remarkable prosperity was originally based on the availability of indigenous energy. At a later stage Europe accepted the offer of low cost crude from the world market. Since a few years we have lost our influence to moderately adjust prises to the changing circumstances in the world market for primary energies since - the multinationally operating companies have lost their balancing power and - the direct dialogue between producing and consuming countries has so far not resulted in any success. The use of the flowery expression energy crisis pretends that we are suffering from a lack of available primary energy. But the actual situation is more to the contrary. At the privailing energy price level there is a manifold offer. Considerable efforts, however, are necessary to create the prerequisits for an utilization of the options among different primary energies. Infrastructures have to be changed requiring impulse on the part of the state. There is no reason to assume a limited availability of crude oil and petroleum products for the use in such sectors in which an early substitution would cause an excessive economic burden. Besides lignite only nuclear energy does offer for the time beeing a remarkable contribution for a reduction of the energy bill in Europe. Starting with the power plants of the first generation which are sufficiently tested and via the breeder technology nuclear power production will most probably approach the aime of the utilization of renewable energies at reasonable costs over the long term. (orig.) [de

  3. Developing markets for renewable energy technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charters, W.W.S.

    2001-01-01

    Although renewable energy resources are now being utilised more on a global scale than ever before, there is no doubt their contribution to the energy economy can still be greatly increased. Recently international support for developing these relatively new sources of energy has been driven by their benefits as assessed by reduced environmental impact, particularly reduced greenhouse gas emissions. After several decades of continuous but somewhat erratic funding for research and development of renewables, it is time to take stock of the key issues to be addressed in terms of implementation of major renewable energy programmes on a large scale worldwide. One of the first steps in this process is the identification and encouragement of reliable continuous markets both in developed and developing nations. Future energy policy and planning scenarios should take into account the factors necessary to integrate renewables in all their diverse forms into the normal energy economy of the country. Other critical factors in market development will include the mass production of high quality, reliable and reasonable cost technical products and the provision of adequate finance for demonstrating market ready and near market renewables equipment. Government agencies need to aid in the removal of legislative and institutional barriers hindering the widespread introduction of non-conventional energy sources and to encourage the implementation of government purchasing schemes. Recent moves by companies in Australia to market 'green energy' to customers should also aid in the public awareness of the ultimate potential of renewables leading to greater use in the industrial, commercial and domestic sectors. (author)

  4. Capital goods for energy development: power equipment for developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parikh, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    Questions of energy policy in developing countries are considered, with the goal of 'evolution from exports to indigenization' i.e. independence. Levels of technologies are considered in relation to the resources of each country. Nuclear power is considered among other energy sources. (G.Q.)

  5. Business models for sustainable energy development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.; van den Buuse, D.

    2013-01-01

    Business-led approaches to accessing energy in development countries are becoming key factors to sustainable market development. Given the major challenges in this market, companies will blend commercial and donor-funded activities, while simultaneously finding innovative ways to bring renewable

  6. A prehistory of nuclear energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    Evolutionary progress of the LWR plants in the last half-century was reviewed in series. As a prehistory of nuclear energy development, this first lecture presented (1) discovery of nuclear energy and development of the atomic bomb and (2) development of the reactor system using nuclear energy for making electricity and for naval propulsion. The first nuclear reactor to produce electricity was the small Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-1) in Idaho, in the USA, which started up in December 1951. The Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) for naval use was developed under Hyman Rickover in the USA. The Mark I prototype naval reactor started up in March 1953 in Idaho, and the first nuclear-powered submarine, NS Nautilus, with the Mark II reactor was put into service in January 1955. (T. Tanaka)

  7. IFRI's notebooks. Energy, development and security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finon, D.; Jacquet, P.

    1999-01-01

    Today, the concept of energy security has been greatly modified by the worldwide trade, the markets deregulation, the technical progress and the nuclear contestation. This notebook is the synthesis of a colloquium jointly organized in December 16, 1997 by the IFRI and the Institute of Economy and Energy Policy (IEPE) with the sustain of the French delegation of strategic affairs of the defense ministry. It analyzes the evolution of energy markets at the year 2030 prospects and stresses on the role of Middle-East and on the stakes of the economical development and energy policy of China. Finally, it treats of the goals and modalities of the French and European energy policies. (J.S.)

  8. Development of Nuclear Energy Security Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamura, Takehisa; Suzuki, Atsuyuki; Okubo, Hiroo; Kikuchi, Masahiro.

    1990-01-01

    In establishing of the nuclear fuel cycle in Japan that have a vulnerability in own energy structure, an effectiveness of energy security should be taken into account as well as an economy based on the balance of supply and demand of nuclear fuels. NMCC develops the 'Nuclear Energy Security Code' which was able to evaluate the effectiveness of energy security. Evaluation method adopted in this code is 'Import Premium' which was proposed in 'World Oil', EMF Report 6. The viewpoints of evaluation are as follows: 1. How much uranium fuel quantity can be reduced by using plutonium fuel? 2. How much a sudden rise of fuel cost can be absorbed by establishing the plutonium cycle beforehand the energy crisis? (author)

  9. ENERGY AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN CUBA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debrayan Bravo Hidalgo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Employment and enhancing the use of renewable energy sources could be considered as the beginning of a third ¨Industrial Revolution¨. The transition to a low carbon dioxide emission permits to a momentous turning point in the fight against climate change, improve energy security, and last but not least, significantly reduce the geopolitical intentions of this. The increase in renewable sources constitutes a guideline for energy policy in Cuba. Thus, programs for the construction of small hydropower plants, plant cells and photovoltaic panels, solar thermal energy systems for various services are developed; and the use of other primary sources such as wind and biomass. This work shows the implementation of these practices in the nation, the present results and future aspirations facing the demands of sustainable and steady development of generation and power consumption.

  10. Data on development of new energy technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The paper compiles data on the trend of development of new energy technologies into a book. By category, renewable energy is solar energy, wind power generation, geothermal power generation, ocean energy, and biomass. As a category of fuel form conversion, cited are coal liquefaction/gasification, coal gasification combined cycle power generation, and natural gas liquefaction/decarbonization. The other categories are cogeneration by fuel cell and ceramic gas turbine, district heat supply system, power load leveling technology, transportation-use substitution-fuel vehicle, and others (Stirling engine, superconducting power generator, etc.). The data are systematically compiled on essential principles, transition of introduction, objectives of introduction, status of production, cost, development schedule, performance, etc. The paper also deals with the related legislation system, developmental organizations, and a menu for power companies' buying surplus power.

  11. Nuclear energy in Turkey. Recent developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alper, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Full text : The global demand for electricity is rapidly increasing. There is growing uncertainty in regard to the supply and prices of oil and natural gas. These considerations have opened new prospects for the development of nuclear energy on a global state. Despite the negative impact of the Fukushima Daichi accident, still some countries are considering or have expressed interest in developing nuclear power programmes. As the country using nuclear technology is primarily responsible for safety and as operational safety cannot be out sourced, building of sound safety expertise and strong safety culture is an essential precondition for the country introducing nuclear technology. Turkey's energy policy is naturally focused on the security, sustainability and competitiveness of energy supply. It is designed to sustain targeted economic and social growth in the long run. Turkey remains resolutely committed to the goal of ensuring safe, secure and peaceful utilization of nuclear energy

  12. Energy and sustainable development in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bravo Hidalgo, Debrayan

    2015-01-01

    Employment and enhancing the use of renewable energy sources could be considered as the beginning of a third ¨Industrial Revolution¨. The transition to a low carbon dioxide emission permits to a momentous turning point in the fight against climate change, improve energy security, and last but not least, significantly reduce the geopolitical intentions of this.The increase in renewable sources constitutes a guideline for energy policy in Cuba. Thus, programs for the construction of small hydropower plants, plant cells and photovoltaic panels, solar thermal energy systems for various services are developed; and the use of other primary sources such as wind and biomass.This work shows the implementation of these practices in the nation, the present results and future aspirations facing the demands of sustainable and steady development of generation and power consumption. (author)

  13. Nuclear energy for sustainable energy growth in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvao, R.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear energy is a tool to eliminate poverty in developing countries and there is a need for training and expertise. The international community is asked to support the development of generation IV reactors and fusion reactors. No policy is yet established for a wide range international collaboration. A mechanism for secondary participation in major international nuclear energy projects should be established and less expensive projects complementary to the main stream ones should be developed. IGNITOR Project is not established as a broad international collaboration. However its cost, approximately one tenth of ITER, time to construct, estimated around five years, and main physical objective, i.e, a burning-plasma experiment, makes it very attractive for participation of developing countries. Remote operation and data analysis: ITER GRID: real time interactions of large, geographically extended teams; real time interactions between small specialized groups; requirement of fast between-pulse analysis; simulations producing very large data sets (GB → TB → PB); grid can be assembled with many small computers clusters; suitable for participation of low-budget groups; expertise available from high-energy physics

  14. Nuclear energy and Ecuadorian agriculture development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molineros Andrade, J.

    1979-09-01

    The Ecuadorian Atomic Energy Commission has elaborated a plan for development of nuclear energy, the construction of a 1-3 MW Nuclear Reactor for Research and production of radioisotopes and of the related laboratories. Agriculture is a very important part of this plan, in the following areas: genetics, irrigation, plant and animal nutrition and metabolisms, and pest and disease control. Ecuadorian agriculture institutions have also been considered in this plan. (Author)

  15. Renewable Energy Policies and Market Developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dijk, A.L.; Beurskens, L.W.M.; Boots, M.G.; Kaal, M.B.T.; De Lange, T.J.; Van Sambeek, E.J.W.; Uyterlinde, M.A.

    2003-03-01

    Reviews and an analysis of the policy support for the stimulation of renewable electricity in the current energy market are presented, and an overview is given of the main new developments influencing the renewable energy market. The report is part of the analysis phase of the project REMAC 2000, which has led to the publication of a roadmap for the acceleration of the RE market. REMAC 2000 aims to promote a sustainable growth of the renewable energy market. For such a sustainable growth, important success factors are not only effectiveness of policy, but also security for investors, which is essential for building up a sector and developing the renewable energy market. Consistency of regulations and policies at different levels and between policy fields form a condition for security, as does the active involvement of market stakeholders. Further, the increasing role of trade within the energy and renewable energy sector leads to a priority for international coherence of policies and markets. To guarantee a sustainable growth of the renewable energy sector, a broad perspective of policy makers and planners is required- to include a long time frame, a comprehensive view of related policy fields and authorities involved, and an orientation that looks beyond national borders

  16. Bringing developing countries into the energy equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombier, M.; Loup, J.; Laponche, Bernard; Martin-Amouroux, Jean-Marie; Chateau, Bertrand; Heller, Thomas C.; Kieken, Hubert; Kleiche, Mustapha; Mathy, Sandrine; Hourcade, Jean-Charles; Goldemberg, Jose; Pizer, William A.

    2006-01-01

    This compilation of articles on energy and climate change is a selection of contributions to the first edition of Regards sur la Terre, an annual reference in French on the international dimension of sustainable development, launched on the initiative of the French development agency, AFD (Agence francaise de developpement) and the institute for sustainable development and international relations, IDDRI (Institut du developpement durable et des relations internationales), and published by Presses de Sciences Po (Paris) in November 2006. Regards sur la terre includes an analysis of the most important international meetings and events of the last 12 months in the field of sustainable development, along with a thematic report, which focuses this year on energy and climate change. For almost two hundred years, the economic development of industrialized countries has gone hand in hand with growing consumption of fossil fuels, first coal, then oil and gas. The oil shocks of the 1970's had already revealed the fragility of this model, without however generating any major changes. The disconnection observed in the 1980's between a rapid return to economic growth and stagnating energy consumption was only provisional, and energy demand in the richest countries has again been rising since the 1990's; the development of alternative energy sources (nuclear power and renewables) has remained marginal and has failed to dethrone fossil fuels on which, paradoxically, the economies of industrialized countries are even more dependent today than they were 20 years ago. But with the turn of the century came major developments in the global energy landscape following the emergence of new and hitherto marginal actors: the rapid economic development of emerging countries is also dependent on an increasing supply of energy. Today this growing demand adds to tension on the oil and gas market, where the poorest countries are also the first victims. It could give new impetus to the

  17. Development of technologies for solar energy utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    With relation to the development of photovoltaic power systems for practical use, studies were made on thin-substrate polycrystalline solar cells and thin-film solar cells as manufacturing technology for solar cells for practical use. The technological development for super-high efficiency solar cells was also being advanced. Besides, the research and development have been conducted of evaluation technology for photovoltaic power systems and systems to utilize the photovoltaic power generation and peripheral technologies. The demonstrative research on photovoltaic power systems was continued. The international cooperative research on photovoltaic power systems was also made. The development of a manufacturing system for compound semiconductors for solar cells was carried out. As to the development of solar energy system technologies for industrial use, a study of elemental technologies was first made, and next the development of an advanced heat process type solar energy system was commenced. In addition, the research on passive solar systems was made. An investigational study was carried out of technologies for solar cities and solar energy snow melting systems. As international joint projects, studies were made of solar heat timber/cacao drying plants, etc. The paper also commented on projects for international cooperation for the technological development of solar energy utilization systems. 26 figs., 15 tabs.

  18. Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brad G. Stevens, P.E.; Troy K. Simonsen; Kerryanne M. Leroux

    2012-06-09

    In fiscal year 2005, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) received funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake a broad array of tasks to either directly or indirectly address the barriers that faced much of the Great Plains states and their efforts to produce and transmit wind energy at the time. This program, entitled Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project, was focused on the central goal of stimulating wind energy development through expansion of new transmission capacity or development of new wind energy capacity through alternative market development. The original task structure was as follows: Task 1 - Regional Renewable Credit Tracking System (later rescoped to Small Wind Turbine Training Center); Task 2 - Multistate Transmission Collaborative; Task 3 - Wind Energy Forecasting System; and Task 4 - Analysis of the Long-Term Role of Hydrogen in the Region. As carried out, Task 1 involved the creation of the Small Wind Turbine Training Center (SWTTC). The SWTTC, located Grand Forks, North Dakota, consists of a single wind turbine, the Endurance S-250, on a 105-foot tilt-up guyed tower. The S-250 is connected to the electrical grid on the 'load side' of the electric meter, and the power produced by the wind turbine is consumed locally on the property. Establishment of the SWTTC will allow EERC personnel to provide educational opportunities to a wide range of participants, including grade school through college-level students and the general public. In addition, the facility will allow the EERC to provide technical training workshops related to the installation, operation, and maintenance of small wind turbines. In addition, under Task 1, the EERC hosted two small wind turbine workshops on May 18, 2010, and March 8, 2011, at the EERC in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Task 2 involved the EERC cosponsoring and aiding in the planning of three transmission workshops in the midwest and western regions. Under Task

  19. Energy and durable development: the place of the renewable energies; Energie et developpement durable: la place des energies renouvelables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The 29 may 2000, took place at the UNESCO, a colloquium on the place of the renewable energies facing the economic development. This document presents the opening presentation of A. Antolini and L. Jospin and the colloquium papers and debates in the following four domains: the energy challenges of the durable development, the renewable energies sources facing the european directive, the thermal renewable energies (solar, geothermics and biomass) and the greenhouse effect, the world market of the renewable energies. (A.L.B.)

  20. Journal of Renewable Energy and Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Gaber Dessouky

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Energy is one of the basic needs of humanity and, for ages, the sun seemed to be the main source ofall energy in the universe and that is why the ancient Egyptians used to venerate it. Many wastes andcorpses – under pressure and heat – have been converted throughout the years inside the earth intothe oil on which recent development is totally based to support humans’ life, particularly intransportation and power generation. As time passes, it has been proven that oil will vanish. For thefirst moment, it seemed like mankind will certainly suffer due to such a hard situation and some peoplethought that we will get back to stone ages when oil no longer exists. Thanks for the Renewable Energy scientist who has looked at the issue from a different prospective,that is, even if oil vanishes, the main reason of its existence is still there, that is the sun . The sun has the capability to still make people enjoy their life not only by enjoying the sunny weatherin many places of the world and having good times on the beach for those who live by the sea but alsothe sun can still provide man with required energy and cause the wind to blow, the waves to raise, theplants to be converted to biomass, and the earth to store its geothermal energy. As long as life goes on, the sun will always rise and will always grant its energy to mankind. It is theclean, renewable and sustainable energy, which guarantees sustainable development. Because of the high correlation between renewable energy and sustainable development, the editorialteam of this journal thought of offering a hub to researchers interested in these two important fields topresent their work and share it with others who have the same interest in such a wide area ofresearch . Thanks to the Academy Publishing Center, ‘APC’ owned by the Arab Academy for Science,Technology and Maritime Transport ‘AASTMT’ for hosting this international journal .

  1. Using Renewable Energy for a Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurel Gabriel SIMIONESCU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Regarding energy, the greatest global challenges is ensuring growing demand to provide access to energy and to substantially reduce the sector's contribution to climate change. The aim of this article is to analyze the current situation of renewable in the EU and Member States' targets for sustainable and ecological development in context of Europe 2020. Wind power was proposed a significant increase to 494.7 TWh in 2020, for photovoltaic to 83.3 TWh and 370.3 TWh for hydropower. Sustainable development by promoting the use of renewable resources may be limited by constraints of infrastructure integration but also by economic factors and technologies.

  2. The state of development of wave energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duckers, L.J.

    1991-01-01

    Wave energy converters are being developed and tested in as many as ten countries. The author believes that the shore mounted converters will be economically attractive in many locations around the world. These devices are simple and easily maintained. In order to harvest the greater offshore resource floating devices such as the Clam, Duck and Whale will be needed. Urgent research and development is needed to bring these to the prototype stage. Future deployment of large arrays of these floating systems could be quickly and easily achieved in many parts of the world and they would provide considerable quantities of environmentally benign, reasonably cheap energy. (author) 6 figs., 5 refs

  3. Acceptance of nuclear energy in developed countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobajima, Makoto

    1999-03-01

    This paper focuses on the presence of problems, governmental efforts and the state of each people's awareness in accepting nuclear energy especially in developed countries and reviews the past circumstances and recent activities. Significant differences among countries in the popularity of nuclear power depend largely on the environment of the particular country such as energy circumstances and also on the execution of the energy policy. Also it is pointed out that the difference comes from the consciousness of the execution of the people in such a policy they establish and decide whether they accept or not. The analysis, that the French people traditionally believe they cannot control risks and give high degree of trust to their government and specialists, whereas Americans conversely intervene in administration to control risks by themselves and try to change specialist's Judgment, explains one side of polarization in popularity of nuclear energy in the world. Japanese have tended to not to believe the administration probably due to recent continuous scandals of officials and motivation to require disclosure of information and to dispute, which lays on the background of retard of nuclear energy. For resolving the global issues such as warming, it is becoming more important that at least specialists of nuclear technology recover the loosing trust owing to the accidents and scandals through steady activities, show the whole view of trust worthy development plan of nuclear energy and regain the confidence by the people. (author)

  4. Healthcare Energy Efficiency Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Douglas R.; Lai, Judy; Lanzisera, Steven M; Parrish, Kristen D.; Singer, Brett C.

    2011-01-31

    Hospitals are known to be among the most energy intensive commercial buildings in California. Estimates of energy end-uses (e.g. for heating, cooling, lighting, etc.) in hospitals are uncertain for lack of information about hospital-specific mechanical system operations and process loads. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory developed and demonstrated a benchmarking system designed specifically for hospitals. Version 1.0 featured metrics to assess energy performance for the broad variety of ventilation and thermal systems that are present in California hospitals. It required moderate to extensive sub-metering or supplemental monitoring. In this new project, we developed a companion handbook with detailed equations that can be used toconvert data from energy and other sensors that may be added to or already part of hospital heating, ventilation and cooling systems into metrics described in the benchmarking document.This report additionally includes a case study and guidance on including metering into designs for new hospitals, renovations and retrofits. Despite widespread concern that this end-use is large and growing, there is limited reliable information about energy use by distributed medical equipment and other miscellaneouselectrical loads in hospitals. This report proposes a framework for quantifying aggregate energy use of medical equipment and miscellaneous loads. Novel approaches are suggested and tried in an attempt to obtain data to support this framework.

  5. No sustainable development without an energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhras, G.

    2000-01-01

    The energy crisis of 1973, and again during the 1980s, prompted industrialized countries to adopt measures to reduce energy usage and to encourage conservation practices. Energy consumption in the transportation field was particularly high. However, after a while, some of the measures were either dropped or not enforced and our energy utilization continued to intensify. It soon became apparent that a different approach was required. At the Rio Conference in 1992, the idea of sustainable development was introduced with the objective to reduce global warming. The utilization of fossil fuels amplifies the emissions of greenhouse gases resulting in global warming which threatens the entire environment and also the health of citizens, particularly those living in cities. In 1997, 160 countries signed the Kyoto Protocol. Canada committed to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases by 6 per cent compared to 1990 levels, and this between 2008 and 2012. It is obvious that drastic steps are needed in order for Canada to meet this commitment. After an extensive analysis of the situation by various committees, it was concluded that activities related to the transportation of people in particular contribute greatly to the emission of greenhouse gases. The results also indicate that solutions need to be found to reduce energy consumption. The author recommended the adoption of intelligent structures and materials which imitate biological systems in a predictable manner to optimize certain functions. He also recommended a better integration of energy policy with the basic principles of sustainable development. 10 refs., 4 tabs

  6. Nuclear energy for a sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrini, B.; Oriolo, F.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear power currently produces over 628 M tep of the generated energy in 1997 avoiding about 1978 Mt of CO 2 emission and gives a significant contribution to reducing greenhouse gas emission. The competitive position of nuclear power might be strengthened, if market forces or government policy were able to give energy security and to control greenhouse gas, relying upon market mechanism and including environmental costs in economic analysis. In this case, taking into account the entire up-stream and down-stream chains for electricity generation, it can be seen that the greenhouse emission from nuclear plants, is lower than that of renewable energy chains. This paper investigates the potential role of nuclear power in global energy supply up to 2020 and analyzes the opportunities and the challenges for research, governments and nuclear industries of a broad nuclear power development in response to environmental concerns. The authors think that nuclear energy will have to compete in the same framework and under the same conditions as all other energy sources and so analyze the possibility of re-launching nuclear energy: it will have to couple nuclear safety and economic competitiveness [it

  7. Overview of Energy Development Opportunities for Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Demick

    2012-11-01

    An important opportunity exists for the energy future of Wyoming that will • Maintain its coal industry • Add substantive value to its indigenous coal and natural gas resources • Improve dramatically the environmental impact of its energy production capability • Increase its Gross Domestic Product These can be achieved through development of a carbon conversion industry that transforms coal and natural gas to synthetic transportation fuels, chemical feedstocks, and chemicals that are the building blocks for the chemical industry. Over the longer term, environmentally clean nuclear energy can provide the substantial energy needs of a carbon conversion industry and be part of the mix of replacement technologies for the current fleet of aging coal-fired electric power generating stations.

  8. Interactions of energy technology development and new energy exploitation with water technology development in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Sai; Zhang, Tianzhu

    2011-01-01

    Interactions of energy policies with water technology development in China are investigated using a hybrid input-output model and scenario analysis. The implementation of energy policies and water technology development can produce co-benefits for each other. Water saving potential of energy technology development is much larger than that of new energy exploitation. From the viewpoint of proportions of water saving co-benefits of energy policies, energy sectors benefit the most. From the viewpoint of proportions of energy saving and CO 2 mitigation co-benefits of water technology development, water sector benefits the most. Moreover, economic sectors are classified into four categories concerning co-benefits on water saving, energy saving and CO 2 mitigation. Sectors in categories 1 and 2 have big direct co-benefits. Thus, they can take additional responsibility for water and energy saving and CO 2 mitigation. If China implements life cycle materials management, sectors in category 3 can also take additional responsibility for water and energy saving and CO 2 mitigation. Sectors in category 4 have few co-benefits from both direct and accumulative perspectives. Thus, putting additional responsibility on sectors in category 4 might produce pressure for their economic development. -- Highlights: ► Energy policies and water technology development can produce co-benefits for each other. ► For proportions of water saving co-benefits of energy policies, energy sectors benefit the most. ► For proportions of energy saving and CO 2 mitigation co-benefits of water policy, water sector benefits the most. ► China’s economic sectors are classified into four categories for policy implementation at sector scale.

  9. The energy-development-environment nexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Bertrand

    1992-01-01

    Energy is the key factor in tackling two of the major problems now facing humanity: the environment and development. Adequate and appropriate energy supplies are essential to economic and social development, especially for Third World countries, but at the same time energy production and utilization are responsible for much of the damage being done to the environment. As everyone now knows, the combustion of fossil fuels is the main source of greenhouse gases and of the threat to the stability of world climate. Nuclear power, which once seemed an answer to the constantly increasing demand for energy, is now challenged by public opinion in many countries as a result of various nuclear accidents and the problems of processing and storing nuclear waste. So how do we extricate ourselves from the energy environment-development tangle? Clearly, advanced countries have an interest in transferring environment-friendly technologies to developing countries in order to reduce the pollution which puts the global as well as the local environment at risk. The North is, by and large, becoming aware of the choices involved in protecting the environment versus industrial growth and unlimited use of motor vehicles. For the South, these choices are a luxury they can ill afford, given the imperative of rapid development. The solution must be for greater international co-operation, with the North assisting the South (and the former Communist bloc) financially and through transfer of appropriate technologies at affordable cost. Reconciling the environment and development with respect to the energy cycle is a task of fundamental importance for the future. The prime responsibility for this task obviously lies with industries, but action is also required from governments, to enable them to play their part effectively. Advanced countries must demonstrate that development is fully compatible with protecting the environment. They can do so by using market forces, provided that the appropriate

  10. Trends in Wind Energy Technology Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Flemming; Madsen, Peter Hauge; Tande, John O.

    2011-01-01

    . The huge potential of wind, the rapid development of the technology and the impressive growth of the industry justify the perception that wind energy is changing its role to become the future backbone of a secure global energy supply. Between the mid-1980s, when the wind industry took off, and 2005 wind......Text Over the past 25 years global wind energy capacity has doubled every three years, corresponding to a tenfold expansion every decade. By the end of 2010 global installed wind capacity was approximately 200 GW and in 2011 is expected to produce about 2% of global electricity consumption...... turbine technology has seen rapid development, leading to impressive increases in the size of turbines, with corresponding cost reductions. From 2005 to 2009 the industry’s focus seems to have been on increasing manufacturing capacity, meeting market demand and making wind turbines more reliable...

  11. Federal role in energy research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    The appropriateness of the federal role in each of DOE's major energy R and D programs was evaluated. Several subcriteria were identified by which each program would be judged: (1) the current and expected future scope and amount of private-sector funding relative to requirements for an orderly R and D program; (2) amount of development time to first commercial payoff; (3) degree of market, technical, and policy risks of R and D to private sector development; (4) need for federal energy R and D involvement to support regulatory, environmental, or policy responsibilities. Appropriate primary, complementary, or minimal roles were assigned in each of the energy technology programs: electric-related supply, liquids and gas related supply, conservation and improved end-use utilization, and technology base

  12. Learning in renewable energy technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junginger, M.

    2005-01-01

    The main objectives of this thesis are: to investigate technological change and cost reduction for a number of renewable electricity technologies by means of the experience curve approach; to address related methodological issues in the experience curve approach, and, based on these insights; and to analyze the implications for achieving the Dutch renewable electricity targets for the year 2020 within a European context. In order to meet these objectives, a number of research questions have been formulated: What are the most promising renewable electricity technologies for the Netherlands until 2020 under different technological, economic and environmental conditions?; To what extent is the current use of the experience curve approach to investigate renewable energy technology development sound, what are differences in the utilization of this approach and what are possible pitfalls?; How can the experience curve approach be used to describe the potential development of partially new energy technologies, such as offshore wind energy? Is it possible to describe biomass fuel supply chains with experience curves? What are the possibilities and limits of the experience curve approach when describing non-modular technologies such as large (biomass) energy plants?; What are the main learning mechanisms behind the cost reduction of the investigated technologies?; and How can differences in the technological progress of renewable electricity options influence the market diffusion of renewable electricity technologies, and what implications can varying technological development and policy have on the implementation of renewable electricity technologies in the Netherlands? The development of different renewable energy technologies is investigated by means of some case studies. The possible effects of varying technological development in combination with different policy backgrounds are illustrated for the Netherlands. The thesis focuses mainly on the development of investment

  13. Renewable energy markets in developing countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinot, E.; Chaurey, A.; Lew, D.

    2002-01-01

    Renewable energy is shifting from the fringe to the mainstream of sustainable development. Past donor efforts achieved modest results but often were not sustained or replicated, which leads now to greater market orientation. Markets for rural household lighting with solar home systems, biogas...

  14. Prognostication of regional energy system development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoriy Borisovich Korovin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes practice and development of new methodological approaches to forecasting the development of regional energy systems. It is shown that the energy complex is involved in a variety of forward and backward linkages as an element of socio-economic systems, and the quality and availability of energy resources largely determines the structure and pace of economic, social and environmental development of the region. Analysis of existing current practice of territorial and sectoral forecasting implemented in Russia and abroad, suggests that such practice is inadequate in its theoretical and methodological elaboration. This is confirmed by the frequent discrepancy between actual results and plans, as well as their regular revision. The methods are mostly based on extrapolation of existing tendencies and not taking into account many factors and emerging trends related to the complexity and openness of the social and economic systems. Post-industrial level of civilization is characterized by fast development of technology; knowledge, information, technological and institutional innovation become the main resources. The greatest importance is attached to such development properties as instability, various orderliness, nonlinearity, interactions etc. Current approaches to forecasting the future are described by a number of theories that are generally called self-organization theory, taking into account these singularities. These concepts should be included in the theoretical basis for the development and implementation of regional development forecasts. Using the synergetic approach assumes that, along with organizational processes, processes of self-organization and self-development are very important in the system, they are characterized by spontaneous, unexpected formations and emerging structures. The development of such systems can generate stable and efficient new structure. The presence of crisis is an integral feature of complex

  15. Rural energy and poverty in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fall, L.M.

    2000-01-01

    The study from which this article is drawn was carried out under the auspices of the World Energy Council, in collaboration with the FAO, and under the supervision of a steering committee made up of experts in which the author played an active role. The article begins with an in-depth analysis of the energy crisis in rural areas of developing countries and their economic implications, which contribute to increasing poverty among rural populations. It then assesses the limits and problems related to intervention and the solutions attempted in the past, with the aim of drawing lessons from the various experiments undertaken. From these, we see an edifying and worrying factor emerging as despite a great deal of well-intentioned effort, rural energy poverty still remains at an unacceptable level today in the so-called modern world of the third millennium. Indeed 2 billion people (accounting for a third of the world population and almost all living in developing countries) do not have access to modern forms of energy and still depend on firewood, leftovers from the harvest and animal waste in order to meet their energy needs. It therefore appears necessary and urgent if we intend to take up the challenge of meeting energy requirements in rural areas, to fundamentally change the attitudes and mentalities of decision-makers at a political and other levels (planners, consultants, donors etc). It also means changing direction in research to find solutions. The author then presents a range of 'solutions' advices and recommendations aimed at ensuring that future energy provision in rural areas is more stable and sustainable, enabling rural populations to live the decent life that they should be entitled to expect today. (author)

  16. Developing business in emerging biomass energy markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadyszewski, J.

    2005-01-01

    Global market trends for forest products were reviewed in this PowerPoint presentation. The status of biomass energy products in relation to climate change and renewable energy portfolio standards was also examined. It was noted that China has increased investment in processing capacity and has increased imports of raw logs. India has doubled its imports of raw logs. Details of major tropical log producers and consumers were presented. Details of the biomass industry in the United States were presented, as well as data on fuel use at biomass energy plants and biomass energy capacity. An overview of biomass energy in the Russian far east and Siberia was presented, as well as details of activities and opportunities in Brazil and Indonesia. An economic analysis for small dry kilns was presented. Issues concerning boiler capacity in Russian companies for 2001-2005 were discussed. A case study of a biomass project from Congo was presented. It was noted that projects that replace fossil fuels can obtain revenues from the sale of carbon benefits, and that biomass energy offers the most attractive current option for the removal of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from the atmosphere. Details of a district heating project in Siberia were presented, and it was noted that in remote regions, costs for heat and power from biomass can be lower than costs from diesel and coal. It was concluded that there will be significant growth for biomass energy systems in the developing world, and that climate change will be an increasingly important element in advancing biomass energy. tabs., figs

  17. The industrial development of atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowarski, L.

    1955-01-01

    Countries with large stock of fissile material and producing large quantity of nuclear pure 235 U and 239 Pu are able to allocate part of the stock to non military research. For countries with low stock of fissile material, all the stock is allocated to military research. An economical and technical solution has to be find to dedicate a part of fissile material to non military research and develop the atomic energy industry. It stated the industrial and economical problems and in particular the choice between the use of enriched fuel with high refining cost or depleted fuel with low production cost. It discusses of four possible utilizations of the natural resources: reactors functioning with pure fissile material ( 235 U or 239 Pu) or concentrated material ( 235 U mixed with small quantities of 238 U after an incomplete isotopic separation), breeder reactors functioning with enriched material mixed with 238 U or Thorium placed in an appropriate spatial distribution to allow neutrons beam to activate 238 U or Thorium with the regeneration of fissile material in 239 Pu, reactors using natural uranium or low enriched uranium can also produce Plutonium with less efficiency than breeder reactors and the last solution being the use of natural uranium with the only scope of energy production and no production of secondary fissile material. The first class using pure fissile material has a low energy efficiency and is used only by large fissile material stock countries to accumulate energy in small size fuel for nuclear engines researches for submarines and warships. The advantage of the second class of reactors, breeder reactors, is that they produce energy and plutonium. Two type of breeder reactor are considered: breeder reactor using pure fissile material and 238 U or breeder reactor using the promising mixture of pure fissile material and Thorium. Different projects are in phase of development in United States, England and Scotland. The third class of reactor using

  18. Energy statistics: A manual for developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Considerable advances have been made by developing countries during the last 20 years in the collection and compilation of energy statistics. the present Manual is a guide, which it is hoped will be used in countries whose system of statistics is less advanced to identify the main areas that should be developed and how this might be achieved. The generally accepted aim is for countries to be able to compile statistics annually on the main characteristics shown for each fuel, and for energy in total. These characteristics are mainly concerned with production, supply and consumption, but others relating to the size and capabilities of the different energy industries may also be of considerable importance. The initial task of collecting data from the energy industries (mines, oil producers, refineries and distributors, electrical power stations, etc.) may well fall to a number of organizations. ''Energy'' from a statistical point of view is the sum of the component fuels, and good energy statistics are therefore dependent on good fuel statistics. For this reason a considerable part of this Manual is devoted to the production of regular, comprehensive and reliable statistics relating to individual fuels. Chapters V to IX of this Manual are concerned with identifying the flows of energy, from production to final consumption, for each individual fuel, and how data on these flows might be expected to be obtained. The very different problems concerned with the collection of data on the flows for biomass fuels are covered in chapter X. The data needed to complete the picture of the national scene for each individual fuel, more concerned with describing the size, capabilities and efficiency of the industries related to that fuel, are discussed in chapter XI. Annex I sets out the relationships between the classifications of the various types of fuels. The compilation of energy balances from the data obtained for individual fuels is covered in chapter XIII. Finally, chapter

  19. Novel combustion concepts for sustainable energy development

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Avinash K; Gupta, Ashwani K; Aggarwal, Suresh K; Kushari, Abhijit

    2014-01-01

    This book comprises research studies of novel work on combustion for sustainable energy development. It offers an insight into a few viable novel technologies for improved, efficient and sustainable utilization of combustion-based energy production using both fossil and bio fuels. Special emphasis is placed on micro-scale combustion systems that offer new challenges and opportunities. The book is divided into five sections, with chapters from 3-4 leading experts forming the core of each section. The book should prove useful to a variety of readers, including students, researchers, and professionals.

  20. Nuclear energy and sustainable development: recent trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.P.

    2012-01-01

    During the last 50 years or so there is enormous development in various fields like agriculture, industry, medicine, etc. Further, the population on this globe has increased many folds. In order to cater to the needs of the present population there is an increasing demand of electricity in the society. Per capita electricity consumption also is an index of development in the country. Considering the facts like green house effect and global warming, nuclear energy is the better option. But at the same time there are some critical issues like nuclear waste management globally and availability of fissile material in the context of our country. Research and development are going on to take care of these issues where scientists and engineers are working on alternative fuel cycle and new reactor types, for example Accelerator Driven Subcritical (ADS) System is one of them. Since, ADS reactor is a subcritical system, safety related issues are in fact of low concern relative to existing critical reactors. As a matter of fact, the ADS system is the combination of a particle accelerator and a nuclear reactor. In this talk, a detailed description of the need of energy in our country, which can only be met if nuclear energy contributes a substantial energy requirement, will be presented. Further, how the nuclear waste management issues may be addressed, with the new ADS system will also be presented. (author)

  1. Renewable energy education in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bara, M.F.

    2006-01-01

    The global call for more and more penetration of renewable energy sources in the energy mix for several countries driven by various different motives including the desire for attaining sustainable development through the use of these renewable sources, for decreasing pollution, trying to decrease dependency on imported fuels or to exploit the locally available renewable resources, this call has not been satisfactorily responded to, partially, it is believed here, due to the lack of awareness and adequate manpower qualifications in these sources at the different levels of decision making. Energy education in many countries is still not so dynamic to coup with the ever changing circumstances and developments related to the demand, supply, technologies, economics policies as well as environmental aspects this is more noticed in the world developing countries, with other related obstacles facing the desired and needed wider application of renewable energy sources. The paper will try to handle this situation, analyzing its components, citing some examples of good fruitful practice in this connection, and drawing some recommendations that may help in improving the same

  2. Perspectives of Nuclear Energy for Human Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouyer, Jean-Loup

    2002-01-01

    In this period of expectation and short term viewing, everyone has difficulties to draw long term perspectives. A positive global world vision of sustainable development gives confidence in the preparation of energy future in a moving international context. This presentation proposes to share such a long term vision inside which energy scenarios for nuclear development take their right place. It is founded on a specific analysis of an index of countries global development which is representative of a country efficiency. Human Development Index (HDI) is a composite international index recommended and calculated every year since 1990 by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP). This index is still very dependent of GNP, which ignores the disparities of revenues inside the country. That is why a Country Efficiency Index (CEI) has been defined to better represent the capacity of a country to utilize its resources for welfare of its inhabitants. CEI is a ratio of health and education levels to the capacity of the country to satisfy this welfare. CEI has been calculated for the 70 more populated countries of the world for the year 1997. CEI calculation has been also performed for European Countries, the United States, China and India on the period from 1965 to 1997. It is observed a growth of CEI. for France from 0.6 to 0.78, and from 0.7 to 0.85 for USA. In 1997, CEI of China was 0.46, and 0.38 for India. This index is a good tool to measure the progression of development of the countries and the related energy needs. Comparison of the evolutions of CEI of these different countries shows a similar positive trend with some delay between OECD countries and China or India. A positive scenario for the future is based on a similar curve for these developing countries with learning effect which produces development with less energy consumption. This simulation results however in energy needs that exceed fossil fuel today available resources in 2070. Ultimate fossil

  3. Exergy energy, environment and sustainable development

    CERN Document Server

    Dincer, Ibrahim; Rosen, Marc A

    2007-01-01

    This book deals with exergy and its applications to various energy systems and applications as a potential tool for design, analysis and optimization, and its role in minimizing and/or eliminating environmental impacts and providing sustainable development. In this regard, several key topics ranging from the basics of the thermodynamic concepts to advanced exergy analysis techniques in a wide range of applications are covered as outlined in the contents. - Comprehensive coverage of exergy and its applications - Connects exergy with three essential areas in terms of energy, environment and sustainable development - Presents the most up-to-date information in the area with recent developments - Provides a number of illustrative examples, practical applications, and case studies - Easy to follow style, starting from the basics to the advanced systems.

  4. Long term planning for wind energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinick, M.

    1995-01-01

    In a planning system intended to be governed primarily by policies in statutory plans a reasonable horizon for long term planning is 10 years or longer. Because of statutory requirements, developers have no option but to pay due regard to, and take a full part in, long term planning. The paper examines the type of policies which have emerged in the last few years to cater for wind energy development. It canvasses the merits of different types of policies. Finally, it discusses the policy framework which may emerge to cater for development outside NFFO. (Author)

  5. Alaska: a guide to geothermal energy development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Justus, D.; Simpson, S.

    1980-06-01

    A brief overview is given of the geological characteristics of each region of the state as they relate to potential geothermal development. Those exploration methods which can lead to the siting of a deep exploration well are described. Requirements and techniques needed for drilling deeper higher temperature exploration and production wells are presented. Electrical generation, direct utilization, and indirect utilization are reviewed. Economic factors of direct use projects are presented. A general guide to the regulatory framework affecting geothermal energy development is provided. The general steps necessary to gain access to explore, develop, distribute, and use geothermal resources are outlined. (MHR)

  6. Washington: a guide to geothermal energy development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloomquist, R.G.; Basescu, N.; Higbee, C.; Justus, D.; Simpson, S.

    1980-01-01

    A brief overview is given of the geological characteristics of each region of the state as they relate to potential geothermal development. Those exploration methods which can lead to the siting of a deep exploration well are described. Requirements and techniques needed for drilling deeper higher temperature exploration and production wells are presented. Electrical generation, direct utilization, and indirect utilization are reviewed. Economic factors of direct use projects are presented. A general guide to the regulatory framework affecting geothermal energy development is provided. The general steps necessary to gain access to explore, develop, distribute, and use geothermal resources are outlined. (MHR)

  7. Nuclear energy and the developing world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafa, A.

    1982-01-01

    The importance of cooperation between the developed and developing countries with regard to nuclear power is discussed. Moves towards global interdependence were strengthened when OAPEC was set up with proposals for cooperation and depletion of world reserves of gas and oil will encourage this. Developing countries will increasingly look to nuclear power to meet their energy needs, particularly in the light of depleting oil and gas reserves, their increasing cost and the possible 'greenhouse effect' produced by fossil fuels. International cooperation concerning uranium reserves, reprocessing and technology transfer may need World Bank funding. (U.K.)

  8. The renewable energy development framework - II. The foundations of renewable energy development: Economic foundations of renewable energies; International foundations of renewable energies; European foundations of renewable energy development; Foundations of renewable energy development in internal law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combes Motel, Pascale; Thebaut, Matthieu; Loic Grard; Michallet, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    A first article analysis the reasons for the development of renewable energies (economic and environmental reasons, European commitments in terms of production objectives), how these renewable energies can be developed (acceptation by the population, administrative, technological, and financial constraints, political instruments related to market, taxes and purchase prices). A second article proposes a discussion about the way international law deals with renewable energies as far as texts as well as actors are concerned. The third article describes the European ambitions regarding renewable energies as a product of national perspectives (national action plans and projects) as well as of European perspectives (financing, integrated actions). The last article presents and comments various legal texts dealing with the development of renewable energies in France (texts concerning the right to energy, the environment law, planning tools, incentive measures)

  9. Sustainable energy issues in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munasinghe, M [Environmental Policy Division, The World Bank, Washington D.C. (US)

    1991-07-01

    Increased energy use is a vital pre-requisite for economic development, and less developing countries (LDCs) are struggeling to meet energy needs at acceptable costs. LDC decision-makers share the worldwide environmental concerns, but also face other urgent issues like poverty. The industrialised countries can afford to substitute environmental protection for further material growth, but the LDCs will need concessional funding to participate in addressing global environmental problems. Global financing issues may be analysed and resolved through tradeoffs among several criteria including affordability/additionality, fairness/equity, and economic efficiency. The short-term LDC response to sustainable energy issues will be limited mainly to conventional technologies in efficiency improvements, conservation and resource development. The industrialised nations should provide financial resources to LDCs and develop the technology to be used in the 21st century. Pilot international funds like the Global Environmental Facility and the Ozone Fund will help LDCs participate in the effort to solve global environmental issues. (author) 16 refs.

  10. The Development of Cloud Energy Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Chi Cheng

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The energy management service (EMS has been utilized for saving energy since 1982 by managing the energy usage of site or facilities through the microprocessor, computer, Ethernet, internet, and wireless sensor network. The development and represented function groups of EMS are illustrated in the supplementary file of this paper. Along with this tendency, a cloud EMS, named the intelligent energy management network (iEN, was launched by Chunghwa Telecom in 2011 and tested during a pilot run from 2012 to 2013. The cloud EMS integrated three service modes together, including infrastructure as a service (IaaS, platform as a service (PaaS, and software as a service (SaaS. This cloud EMS could reduce the facility cost and enable a continuously improved service for energy conservation. From the literature review, 32 selected EMS cases of whole site and single facility were chosen for calculating the energy savings and payback rate. According to the literature, the average energy savings by applying EMS are 11.6% and 21.4% for the whole site and single facility, respectively. The iEN was applied on 55 demo sites with the similar scale, the same kind of machines and approaching conditions. The testing sites include a factory, a complex building, and a residual building, 12 lighting systems and 8 air conditioning systems. According to the testing results, the average energy savings by applying iEN are 10% and 23.5% for the whole site and single facility, respectively. Comparing with the reported EMS cases, it was found that the energy savings by adopting the cloud EMS were only 70%–80% compared with those using the traditional EMS. Although the cloud EMS presented less energy savings, it revolutionized the traditional EMS by its innovative business model. Compared with the averaged 1.7 years payback period of the traditional EMS, more than 70% of the cloud EMS cases could pay back immediately for the service fees and without the equipment investment.

  11. The development of nuclear energy in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavardes, D.

    2001-01-01

    In China the consumption of coal has been steadily decreasing for a few years while the economic growth rate is being maintained at 10% a year. Today the production of electricity relies on coal for 81%, on hydraulics for 17% and on nuclear energy for 0.4%. The demand for electric power increases by 7.5% a year, and at this rate the demand will double in a decade. The resort to only coal or hydraulics to sustain such a development, would have too substantial impacts on the environment (CO 2 emission, climate changing, flooding of entire regions) to be viable, so the way is paved for nuclear energy. The new 10. five-year plan supports the development of nuclear energy and Chinese authorities might agree to build 4 power plant units in the eastern and southern coastal zones. France has a valuable history of cooperation with China concerning nuclear energy. 2 reactors are successfully operating at Daya-bay and Framatome is building 2 other units on the Ling-Ao site. Framatome has succeeded in the Chinese demand for localizing a part of the manufacturing work in China. (A.C.)

  12. Development of fuel and energy storage technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Development of fuel cell power plants is intended of high-efficiency power generation using such fuels with less air pollution as natural gas, methanol and coal gas. The closest to commercialization is phosphoric acid fuel cells, and the high in efficiency and rich in fuel diversity is molten carbonate fuel cells. The development is intended to cover a wide scope from solid electrolyte fuel cells to solid polymer electrolyte fuel cells. For new battery power storage systems, development is focused on discrete battery energy storage technologies of fixed type and mobile type (such as electric vehicles). The ceramic gas turbine technology development is purposed for improving thermal efficiency and reducing pollutants. Small-scale gas turbines for cogeneration will also be developed. Development of superconduction power application technologies is intended to serve for efficient and stable power supply by dealing with capacity increase and increase in power distribution distance due to increase in power demand. In the operations to improve the spread and general promotion systems for electric vehicles, load leveling is expected by utilizing and storing nighttime electric power. Descriptions are given also on economical city systems which utilize wide-area energy. 30 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Additional gleaning of fusion energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kenzo; Koizumi, Koichi

    2002-09-01

    This report summarizes the major topics in the history of fusion energy development in Japan from its dawn to the tokamak fusion experimental reactor, ITER. The domestic circumstances and situation in foreign countries in those days, and the details of each decision and discussion, are described. Since my previous writing, 'Forty years for Nuclear Fusion Energy Development - Big Science in Japan (1997, ERC Press. Co. Ltd.)', was a book which briefly summarize a large quantity of documents on the history, there are many points, which require additional detail explanation. This time, I selected and extracted major topics in the fusion research history, and added additional descriptions and my comments so as to supplement my previous writing. (author)

  14. Solar energy and rural development in Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    Photovoltaic systems have already been present in Vietnam for numerous years. Since 1994 the projects intensified with the launch of the Energy-Solidarity-Vietnam program which has just been concluded in 1999. This paper deals with the different stages of this project: choice of photovoltaic power, the partners engagement, obstacles overcome and the help of the electricity for the economic development. (A.L.B.)

  15. Research and development in alternative energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamptey, J.; Moo-Young, M.; Sullivan, H.F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper comprehensively discusses the various bioconversion and thermochemical processes. It recommends that the most urgent research and development issues should relate to direct microbial conversion systems for starch and cellulosic material and to basic biomass combustion rates and mechanisms. An overview of some of the major renewable energy resources and conversion technologies along with the potentials and problems associated with these are also presented.(author). 235 refs., 2 tabs

  16. Nuclear Energy Development and New Build Expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stosic, Z. V.

    2012-01-01

    Early afternoon on March 11th, 2011, a devastating earthquake hit Japan, causing a powerful tsunami which had catastrophic consequences in the Tohoku District. A nuclear accident followed with core meltdowns at the Fukushima Daiichi NPPs (Nuclear Power Plants) at an unprecedented scale and over a lengthy period of time. The findings so far suggest that the insufficient design for tsunamis of the reactor units was responsible for the accident that occurred in the Japanese Fukushima Daiichi NPP. Thus the accident does not fall into the category of residual risk; rather it was due to the fact that the basic design for external impact was insufficient in this case. This is why the design and the safety concept of NPPs around the world had to be reviewed with respect to possible improvement potential. The impact of the Tohoku natural disaster is present not only in Japan but world-wide. The context post-Fukushima creates new challenges, but nuclear perspectives remain solid despite shaken public acceptance and the fundamentals driving nuclear role in sustainable energy mix remain. These are: GROWING DEMAND: Need for new capacity is unchanged to meet growing energy demand (multiplied by two in overall consumption and an 80% increase in global electricity consumption by 2050); REDUCTION OF CO 2 EMISSIONS: Although 50% of world electricity today is generated from burning coal, combating climate change remains a priority and greenhouse gas emissions are to be cut by half by 2050; SECURITY OF SUPPLY: Need for an increased security of supply in a changing geopolitical environment; FOSSIL ENERGY: Fossil resources are dwindling, remain uncertain and are volatile in prices; COMPETITIVENESS: Nuclear remains one of the most competitive low-carbon energy sources and will remain an important option for many countries for a sustainable energy mix. To supply seven billion people (nine billion in 2030) with secure energy needs infrastructure development. This means huge investments

  17. Development of an Integrated Global Energy Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective of this research was to develop a forefront analysis tool for application to enhance understanding of long-term, global, nuclear-energy and nuclear-material futures. To this end, an existing economics-energy-environmental (E 3 ) model was adopted, modified, and elaborated to examine this problem in a multi-regional (13), long-term (approximately2,100) context. The E 3 model so developed was applied to create a Los Alamos presence in this E 3 area through ''niche analyses'' that provide input to the formulation of policies dealing with and shaping of nuclear-energy and nuclear-materials futures. Results from analyses using the E 3 model have been presented at a variety of national and international conferences and workshops. Through use of the E 3 model Los Alamos was afforded the opportunity to participate in a multi-national E 3 study team that is examining a range of global, long-term nuclear issues under the auspices of the IAEA during the 1998-99 period . Finally, the E 3 model developed under this LDRD project is being used as an important component in more recent Nuclear Material Management Systems (NMMS) project

  18. Energy Choices. Choices for future technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billfalk, Lennart; Haegermark, Harald

    2009-03-01

    In the next few years political decisions lie ahead in Sweden and the EU regarding the detailed formulation of the EU's so-called 20-20-20 targets and accompanying EU directives. Talks on a new international post-2012 climate agreement are imminent. The EU targets involve reducing emissions of greenhouse gases by 20 per cent, increasing the proportion of renewable energy by 20 per cent and improving energy efficiency by 20 per cent - all by the year 2020. According to the analysis of the consequences of the targets that the Technology Development Group has commissioned, the reduction in carbon dioxide in the stationary energy system in the Nordic region will be 40 per cent, not 20 per cent, if all the EU targets are to be achieved. The biggest socio-economic cost is associated with achieving the efficiency target, followed by the costs associated with achieving the renewable energy target and the CO 2 target. On the basis of this analysis and compilations about technology development, we want to highlight the following important key issues: Does Sweden want to have the option of nuclear power in the future or not? How to choose good policy instruments for new electricity production and networks? How best to reduce the carbon dioxide emissions of the transport sector and how to develop control and incentive measures that promote such a development? We are proposing the following: Carry out a more in-depth analysis of the consequences of the EU targets, so that the policy instruments produce the best combination as regards climate, economy and security of supply. To achieve the EU targets would require large investments in electricity production, particularly renewable energy, and in electricity networks. Internationally harmonized policy instruments and other incentive measures are required in order for the necessary investments to take place. The policy instruments have to provide a level playing field for all players in the energy sector. The large investments

  19. Photovoltaic module energy rating methodology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroposki, B.; Myers, D.; Emery, K.; Mrig, L. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Whitaker, C.; Newmiller, J. [Endecon Engineering, San Ramon, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    A consensus-based methodology to calculate the energy output of a PV module will be described in this paper. The methodology develops a simple measure of PV module performance that provides for a realistic estimate of how a module will perform in specific applications. The approach makes use of the weather data profiles that describe conditions throughout the United States and emphasizes performance differences between various module types. An industry-representative Technical Review Committee has been assembled to provide feedback and guidance on the strawman and final approach used in developing the methodology.

  20. Nuclear energy development and Kondratiev cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brissaud, I.

    2001-01-01

    Searchers from IIASA (international institute for applied system analysis) have considered the spreading of an idea or an innovation among human societies similar to the evolution of an epidemic. This study shows a correlation between the birth of a major invention and the rise of a new source of energy. The invention of computers and nuclear energy seem to be linked in that way. The time interval between 2 major innovations is about 55 years, this value also corresponds to the length of crisis cycles that were discovered by the soviet economist N.D.Kondratiev in 1926. According to Kondratiev capitalist economies have undergone or will undergo cycles between the following dates: 1830, 1885, 1940, 1995 and 2050. After a period of expansion where jobs, wages and prices increase, a crisis happens where unemployment, social trouble and international conflicts develop. The crisis ends with the surge of innovations that feed the system by creating new markets in a modified social context. We are at the beginning of a new cycle, this cycle will see the expansion of nuclear energy, then its predominance and the emergence of a new source of energy in 50 years. (A.C.)

  1. Energy, environment and development in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohmann, J.

    1990-01-01

    Mexico is a country at the crossroads. It has huge potentials in energy, in natural resources and in human resources. It is currently experiencing one of the most serious crises in its history - economic, ecological, political - and it is making efforts to overcome the problems behind these crises, which may affect us all because of Mexico's importance as energy producer and energy consumer. Mexico is one of the developing countries which has participated actively in finding solutions to the worlds environmental problems not least the problem of climatic changes as a result of increasing energy consumption. Mexico is seeing the consequences at local and national level, and is taking steps to change course. At the same time, it has also expressed interest in participating in international initiatives and cooperation to solve these problem. But Mexico finds itself in a situation not unlike that of many East European countries after the fall of the communist regimes. The old system is tumbling, the will to change is present, but there is a lack of resources. 123 refs., 45 tabs

  2. Financing energy development in the 1990s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollio, G.

    1993-01-01

    Energy finance has resurfaced as a major issue in energy and energy policy debates. These concerns arise from the recent dismal performance of the private oil industry, and the growing financial demands of the former Soviet Union and other emerging markets. These growing financial imbalances are seen as jeopardizing the continued smooth growth of the world's petroleum industry. However, this paper stresses that the financial difficulties being experienced by publicly held oil companies are due, primarily, to the current economic recession. As economic growth recovers, and owing to recent substantial cost reductions, the balance sheets of the private oil industry will improve. Among state energy companies, recent structural and financial reforms mean that such companies will be able to retain more cash flow than was true historically. Moreover, many national oil companies are again able to access funds on international financial markets and generally at increasingly attractive spreads. And finally, there is the growing importance of financial innovation that is already having a positive impact on the level and pace of petroleum development worldwide. (author)

  3. Policy issues in Ethiopian energy development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    One of the most serious constraints to current survival and future development in Ethiopia is energy. The question of energy for survival is dependent on biomass which is being rapidly depleted;at the current rate of deforestation, Ethiopia will be bare of forests in 20 years. There are several points to emphasize in establishing a forestry policy which include: 1) Accurate costing of per unit of production 2) Selection of appropriate species by ecological zone 3) Land management improvements 4) Suitable Land Tenure Systems It is possible to outline general principles for energy-forestry management, namely: 1) Around densely settled areas, encourage the production of trees as a cash crop 2) In dry areas, encourage agroforestry to enchance total biomass productivity 3) Require state farms and all new settlement as far as possible to be self supporting in fuel through settlement woodlots 4) Enforce 'Green (Energy) Belts' around major urban areas. Without forestry, there will be no fuel. Except for hydroelectricity and geothermal, there are no substantial, really proven indigenous reserves: even the exploitation of hydropower and geothermal potential is totally dependent on foreign technology.

  4. Urbanism and energy in developing regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, R.L.; Berman, S.; Dowell, D.

    1978-03-01

    The pace of urbanization must continue, because in most parts of the world the surplus population in the countryside has nowhere else to go. The world is about 40% urban now and apparently headed for the 80 to 90% share of the total population presently exhibited by the developed countries. Thus, the 1.6 billion urban dwellers in 1978 would become about 3 billion in 1995--if major catastrophes can be avoided. Feasibility assessments for Sao Paulo-Rio de Janeiro, Calcutta, Cairo-Alexandria, Mexico City, and Seoul are presented in the appendices. This analysis-from-a-distance is insufficient to judge how much extra installed electrical generating capacity is required before 1995, the added refining capability for liquid fuels, or the uses for new LNG and coal imports due to be arranged. It is evident that energy (and perhaps also water in most regions) planning is the major determinant of the manner in which these urban areas will adapt to the extraordinary pressures for new settlement. The current round of planning in such metropolitan areas has been addressed to solving traffic-congestion problems, and reorganizing land use in central districts, as the most-pressing issues. Since energy sources and distribution systems now affect the largest and most crucial investments in urban growth it is to be expected that future metropolitan planning may concentrate upon energy efficiency. Energy supplies must be planned to meet requirements set by locally dominant values regarding human services and the environment.

  5. Project finance and international energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollio, G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper explores the preference for and the features unique to project finance, one of the favoured vehicles for funding energy development. Our main focus is on the interests of project sponsors, commercial banks and host governments. Inclusion of the latter reflects the fact host governments are often leading participants in primary energy and energy-related projects; more recently, they have come to use limited recourse structures to finance local infrastructure development. Traditional analyses, whilst providing useful insights into the interests of leading project participants, are incapable of isolation a single motive or set of motives that can comprehensively account for all of the features common to this form of debt. Within an options-theoretic framework, most of these ambiguities are resolved. Risk management, long recognised as one of the primary reasons for choosing project finance over rival debt structures, is affirmed as a key explanatory factor. One the other hand, options pricing theory provides a radically different perspective on how to project finance contributes to the realisation of these objectives. (author)

  6. Renewable Energy for Rural Economic Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, Cathy L. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Stafford, Edwin R. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)

    2013-09-30

    When Renewable Energy for Rural Economic Development (RERED) began in 2005, Utah had no commercial wind power projects in operation. Today, the state hosts two commercial wind power plants, the Spanish Fork Wind Project and the Milford Wind Corridor Project, totaling 324 megawatts (MW) of wind capacity. Another project in San Juan County is expected to break ground very soon, and two others, also in San Juan County, are in the approval process. RERED has played a direct role in advancing wind power (and other renewable energy and clean technology innovations) in Utah through its education outreach and research/publication initiatives. RERED has also witnessed and studied some of the persistent barriers facing wind power development in communities across Utah and the West, and its research expanded to examine the diffusion of other energy efficiency and clean technology innovations. RERED leaves a legacy of publications, government reports, and documentary films and educational videos (archived at www.cleantech.usu.edu) to provide important insights for entrepreneurs, policymakers, students, and citizens about the road ahead for transitioning society onto a cleaner, more sustainable future.

  7. Energy Storage Technology Development for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Jankovsky, Amy L.; Reid, Concha M.; Miller, Thomas B.; Hoberecht, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is developing battery and fuel cell technology to meet the expected energy storage needs of human exploration systems. Improving battery performance and safety for human missions enhances a number of exploration systems, including un-tethered extravehicular activity suits and transportation systems including landers and rovers. Similarly, improved fuel cell and electrolyzer systems can reduce mass and increase the reliability of electrical power, oxygen, and water generation for crewed vehicles, depots and outposts. To achieve this, NASA is developing non-flow-through proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell stacks, and electrolyzers coupled with low permeability membranes for high pressure operation. The primary advantage of this technology set is the reduction of ancillary parts in the balance-of-plant fewer pumps, separators and related components should result in fewer failure modes and hence a higher probability of achieving very reliable operation, and reduced parasitic power losses enable smaller reactant tanks and therefore systems with lower mass and volume. Key accomplishments over the past year include the fabrication and testing of several robust, small-scale non-flow-through fuel cell stacks that have demonstrated proof-of-concept. NASA is also developing advanced lithium-ion battery cells, targeting cell-level safety and very high specific energy and energy density. Key accomplishments include the development of silicon composite anodes, lithiatedmixed- metal-oxide cathodes, low-flammability electrolytes, and cell-incorporated safety devices that promise to substantially improve battery performance while providing a high level of safety.

  8. Energy and economic development (environmental implications)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorzoli, G.B.

    1992-01-01

    An examination, for developed countries, of significant correlations among economic growth, electric energy intensity and elasticity, per capita values of gross national product and greenhouse gas emissions, indicates notable possibilities for a healthier global environment with increased world-wide diffusion of clean and rational energy use technologies coupled with substantial economic growth. This scenario, however, is contrasted by worrisome doubts as to the chances for a successful outcome of recently proposed tenable growth policies when it is pointed out that forecasts, based on current demographic trends, call for a doubling of the world population in the near future. The foreseen unrestrained population explosion, leading to an unprecedented proliferation in the use of fossil fuels, now appears to represent the most serious threat to the global environment

  9. Energy Analytics for Development : Big Data for Energy Access, Energy Efficiency, and Renewable Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Energy Sector Management Assistance Program

    2017-01-01

    With unprecedented speed and scale, digital transformation is affecting multiple industries, including energy. A combination of technologies, and a more complex world demanding greater agility and new competences impact all aspects of the energy sector and manifest themselves in changing patterns of consumption, new ways of asset optimization, and cross-industry partnerships. 'Smart soluti...

  10. Energy sustainable development through energy efficient heating devices and buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojic, M.

    2006-01-01

    Energy devices and buildings are sustainable if, when they operate, they use sustainable (renewable and refuse) energy and generate nega-energy. This paper covers three research examples of this type of sustainability: (1) use of air-to-earth heat exchangers, (2) computer control of heating and cooling of the building (via heat pumps and heat-recovery devices), and (3) design control of energy consumption in a house. (author)

  11. The energy in developing countries and the role of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldemberg, J.

    1985-01-01

    The author analyses energy in general for developing countries and also nuclear energy. He concludes that the future of energy in these countries has better alternatives than to depend on nuclear energy. (C.M.)

  12. Renewable energy sources for tenable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manazza, G.

    1992-01-01

    Planning criteria for feasible tenable development strategies for industrialized and developing countries are discussed. Attention is given to the role to be played by industrial countries in renewable energy source development and technology transfer to curb the onslaught of global greenhouse effects related environmental problems. The paper cautions against the use of the expression 'tenable' in combination with 'growth'. It recommends, instead, the substitution of the expression, 'tenable growth', which implies the indefinite growth of something which is physical, with 'tenable development', a preferred term, since it denotes the realization of an optimum strategy, compatible with environmental ecosystems, for the betterment of living conditions. An assessment is made of the overall social-economic impacts of such a strategy on the proposed European free trade market and on developing countries struggling to survive in a fiercely competitive world. Here, the paper notes that, for the effective implementation of a tenable development strategy, it is of prime importance to make optimum use of the education system to instil a new set of social values and modify individual behaviour relative to the development and use of natural resources

  13. Energy Planning - a Tool for Sustainable Energy Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning Gulbrandsen, T.

    2006-01-01

    Working with energy and environment policy development in industry and local communities proves the importance of a systematic approach to management and handling of technology- and economical issues for a successful outcome. Raising awareness and competence is one the most important ways to fight poverty and raise prosperity. The industrial sectors need to improve their capacity to increase the cost efficiency and to meet the future competition from other countries and other domestic competitors, and the municipalities have to be more service-minded and efficient in their efforts to develop an agenda for delivering cost efficient services to the public sector. Lessons learned show that a comprehensive information service has to be set up for keeping all partners involved updated and informed about the progress of the different steps in the policy scheme. Information can be delivered on different levels depending of the partner status. Normally information meeting has to be arranged during the project execution and supplied with flyers with basic information concerning the progress, investment and expected results.(author)

  14. Energy systems Diagnosis in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girod, J.

    1991-01-01

    Energy systems diagnosis is necessary to allow evaluation of energy balance by administration and political authorities of a country. First, the author describes the principle stages of energetic diagnosis. Then this work is divided into three parts: First part: Energy consumption diagnosis in several districts (families, utilities, agriculture, transport, industry) Second part: Energy supplies diagnosis (energy markets). Third part: Interactions between energy consumption and energy supply. 28 figs.; 52 tabs.; 107 refs

  15. Development perspectives of nuclear energy in Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekki-Berrada, A.

    1987-01-01

    Morocco is on the way to developing and gaining access to advanced technologies which will allow it to take good advantage of its natural resources. Most of the fuels necessary for electricity production have to be imported. Nuclear energy appears a better alternative to imported oil or coal, mainly due to kWh price competitivness, great potential of uranium in phosphates and to the limitations placed on the coal option by harbour and transport infrastructure. The first nuclear power plant is planned to go into operation in the year 2000

  16. Nuclear energy research and development in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patarin, L.

    1981-02-01

    Having described the general organization and main participants in charge of nuclear energy development in France, headed by the C.E.A. since the start of this activity at the end of World War II, the author gives a glimpse of the programmes shared out between four main headings: fundamental research, reactors, fuel cycle and nuclear safety. Two tables sum up the financial means of the C.E.A. in 1981 on the one hand and the personnel strengths on the other. A graph also shows the operational framework of the C.E.A. and its main subsidiaries and participations [fr

  17. Nuclear energy - overview of development trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Proceeding from the organizational structure of the IAEA selected activities of the IAEA in connection with power reactor safety are dealt with. Based on the IAEA's computerized Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) a survey is presented of the most recent statistical data concerning status and trends of nuclear power plant development throughout the world. The central role of the IAEA in assisting Member States in the utilization of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes is underscored. Finally, a brief account of the state-of-the-art of the USSR's nuclear power programme is given

  18. Development of coal energy utilization technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Coal liquefaction produces new and clean energy by performing hydrogenation, decomposition and liquefaction on coal under high temperatures and pressures. NEDO has been developing bituminous coal liquefaction technologies by using a 150-t/d pilot plant. It has also developed quality improving and utilization technologies for liquefied coal, whose practical use is expected. For developing coal gasification technologies, construction is in progress for a 200-t/d pilot plant for spouted bed gasification power generation. NEDO intends to develop coal gasification composite cycle power generation with high efficiency and of environment harmonious type. This paper summarizes the results obtained during fiscal 1994. It also dwells on technologies to manufacture hydrogen from coal. It further describes development of technologies to manufacture methane and substituting natural gas (SNG) by hydrogenating and gasifying coal. The ARCH process can select three operation modes depending on which of SNG yield, thermal efficiency or BTX yield is targeted. With respect to promotion of coal utilization technologies, description is given on surveys on development of next generation technologies for coal utilization, and clean coal technology promotion projects. International coal utilization and application projects are also described. 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Energy and sustainable development in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The U.N. World Summit on Environment and Development in Rio de Janeiro in June 1992 was the origin of the international framework for sustainable development. As a basis for joint, sustainable action by governments, organizations, industries, and the public, the participating countries signed the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development, and drafted the associated action program, Agenda 21. Sustainable development comprises these three determinant factors: - Economy. - Ecology. - Social aspects. This is where entrepreneurial responsibility for society comes in. If industries want to generate overall positive effects, they must be efficient, competitive, and profitable on a long-term basis. Power supply systems meeting the criteria of sustainable development must be reliable, economically viable, socially acceptable, and environmentally compatible. The power supply in Finland is meeting these sustainability requirements in many ways. Finland's electricity supply is decentralized, using a variety of energy sources. Electricity can be generated and made available at low cost. The Finnish power industry is an important employer and a major factor in the economy. Moreover, electricity is generated in advanced types of power plants. In this way, the structure of the Finnish power supply system incorporates important factors of sustainable development. (orig.)

  20. Comprehensive evaluation of global energy interconnection development index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Zhang, Yi

    2018-04-01

    Under the background of building global energy interconnection and realizing green and low-carbon development, this article constructed the global energy interconnection development index system which based on the current situation of global energy interconnection development. Through using the entropy method for the weight analysis of global energy interconnection development index, and then using gray correlation method to analyze the selected countries, this article got the global energy interconnection development index ranking and level classification.

  1. Human development and sustainability of energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This seminar on human development and sustainability was jointly organized by the French agency of environment and energy mastery (Ademe) and Enerdata company. This document summarises the content of the different presentations and of the minutes of the discussions that took place at the end of each topic. The different themes discussed were: 1 - Political and methodological issues related to sustainability (sustainability concept in government policy, sustainability and back-casting: lessons from EST); 2 - towards a socially viable world: thematic discussions (demography and peoples' migration; time budget and life style change - equal sex access to instruction and labour - geopolitical regional and inter-regional universal cultural acceptability; welfare, poverty and social link and economics); 3 - building up an environmentally sustainable energy world, keeping resources for future generations and preventing geopolitical ruptures (CO{sub 2} emissions; nuclear issues; land-use, noise, and other industrial risks). The memorandum on sustainability issues in view of very long term energy studies is reprinted in the appendix. The transparencies of seven presentations are attached to this document. (J.S.)

  2. Human development and sustainability of energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This seminar on human development and sustainability was jointly organized by the French agency of environment and energy mastery (Ademe) and Enerdata company. This document summarises the content of the different presentations and of the minutes of the discussions that took place at the end of each topic. The different themes discussed were: 1 - Political and methodological issues related to sustainability (sustainability concept in government policy, sustainability and back-casting: lessons from EST); 2 - towards a socially viable world: thematic discussions (demography and peoples' migration; time budget and life style change - equal sex access to instruction and labour - geopolitical regional and inter-regional universal cultural acceptability; welfare, poverty and social link and economics); 3 - building up an environmentally sustainable energy world, keeping resources for future generations and preventing geopolitical ruptures (CO{sub 2} emissions; nuclear issues; land-use, noise, and other industrial risks). The memorandum on sustainability issues in view of very long term energy studies is reprinted in the appendix. The transparencies of seven presentations are attached to this document. (J.S.)

  3. Indirect Effects of Energy Development in Grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquette, Cameron Albert

    Grassland landscapes in North America are undergoing rapid industrialization due to energy development facilitated by the growing popularity of fracking and horizontal drilling technology. Each year over 3 million hectares are lost from grassland and shrubland habitats to well infrastructure. Direct footprints from energy infrastructure cause impacts to vegetation cover, available cattle forage, carbon sequestration potential, and usable space for wildlife. However, legacy effects from well construction and noise pollution, light pollution, and altered viewsheds have the potential to impact areas beyond this direct footprint, causing additive and persistent changes to nearby grassland function. While these additional areas may be small on a well pad basis, they may have substantial cumulative impacts over time. To investigate these effects via a diversity of mechanisms, we studied the seasonal habitat selection of northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus, hereafter bobwhite) in an energy-producing landscape to evaluate space use patterns relative to energy infrastructure. Habitat selection was modeled in the breeding and nonbreeding season using resource Utilization functions (RUFs). We then investigated patterns of vegetation, arthropod, and soil characteristics surrounding well pads to assess small scale environmental gradients extending away from drilling pads via a combination of multivariate and univariate techniques (i.e., Nonmetric dimensional scaling and ANOVA). We found minimal avoidance of energy structures by quail, suggesting a tolerance of moderate development levels. All small-scale effects studied except for soil moisture were impacted at the pad itself (P < 0.01). Off-pad impacts to arthropod abundance and biomass were spatially limited to areas close to pads, while vegetation cover was typically lower than the surrounding habitat beyond 10 m of pads. Soil surface temperature was higher at distances close to well pads, and soil moisture was not

  4. Identifying blocks to boost industrial development indispensable to energy transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-11-01

    For different sectors (biomass energy, fossil and geothermal energies, nuclear energies, solar energy, marine, hydraulic and wind energies, energies in transports, construction, industries and agriculture, prospective and education, grids and storage), this report gives a brief overview of the present status and problematic, and briefly presents the main issues to be solved to develop these sectors within the perspective of energy transition and sustainable development

  5. A review of building energy regulation and policy for energy conservation in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwaro, Joseph; Mwasha, Abraham

    2010-01-01

    The rapid growth of energy use, worldwide, hfs raised concerns over problems of energy supply and exhaustion of energy resources. Most of the developed countries are implementing building energy regulations such as energy standards, codes etc., to reduce building energy consumption. The position of developing countries with respect to energy regulations implementation and enforcement is either poorly documented or not documented at all. In addition, there is a lack of consistent data, which makes it difficult to understand the underlying changes that affect energy regulation implementation in developing countries. In that respect, this paper investigates the progress of building energy regulations in developing countries and its implication for energy conservation and efficiency. The present status of building energy regulations in 60 developing countries around the world was analysed through a survey of building energy regulations using online survey. The study revealed the present progress made on building energy regulations in relation to implementation, development and compliance; at the same time the study recommends possible solutions to the barriers facing building energy regulation implementation in the developing world. - Research Highlights: →Progress and implications of energy regulations in developing countries. →Investigation assessed the progress made on energy regulations using online survey. →Energy regulation activities is progressively increasing in developing countries. →The study identified 25 developing countries without energy regulatory standards. →The study shows relationship between energy regulation and energy consumption.

  6. Nuclear energy development and national economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukami, Hiroaki

    1982-01-01

    The utilization and development of nuclear power in Japan are now advanced on the basis of a fact that nuclear power generation has taken root in the country. The scale of nuclear power generation is currently a total of 22 power plants with aggregate capacity over 15,500 MW, 16% of the total power generation. There are still two alternate arguments: i.e. whether nuclear energy can be a complete substitute of petroleum or not, because the consumption of petroleum is necessary for the fuel cycle. Due to the rise of petroleum price, the nuclear power generation is now positively economical. On the other hand, the promotion of nuclear power can lead to the saving in foreign currency. While the economy in nuclear power is through the use of LWRs presently, the research and development efforts in ATRs, FBRs, etc. are essential for the future. (Mori, K.)

  7. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; Murphy, H.D.; Wilson, M.G.

    1989-12-01

    During Fiscal Year 1987, emphasis in the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program was on preparations for a Long-Term Flow Test'' of the Phase II'' or Engineering'' hot dry rock energy system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. A successful 30-day flow test of the system during FY86 indicated that such a system would produce heat at a temperature and rate that could support operation of a commercial electrical power plant. However, it did not answer certain questions basic to the economics of long-term operation, including the rate of depletion of the thermal reservoir, the rate of water loss from the system, and the possibility of operating problems during extended continuous operation. Preparations for a one-year flow test of the system to answer these and more fundamental questions concerning hot dry rock systems were made in FY87: design of the required surface facilities; procurement and installation of some of their components; development and testing of slimline logging tools for use through small-diameter production tubing; research on temperature-sensitive reactive chemical tracers to monitor thermal depletion of the reservoir; and computer simulations of the 30-day test, extended to modeling the planned Long-Term Flow Test. 45 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. The renewable energy development framework - I. The challenge of renewable energy development. Territorial challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, Mauricette; Grison, Jean-Baptiste; Rieutort, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    The authors comment the evolutions of renewable energy production in the world during the last thirty years and notice how the geography of this production and of the associated consumption has changed while still displaying contrasts. They also notice the diversification of actors (big companies as well as small and medium sized companies and local communities). Then, they highlight the challenges of renewable energies at the local level: these energies can be tools for local development and competitiveness, but are also matters of either cooperation or conflict (they comment factors related to social acceptance or non-acceptance of wind farm projects in France)

  9. Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal project, Magma Gulf-Technadril/DOE Amoco fee. Volume III. Final report. Annual report, February 1982-March 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, C.O. Jr.; O' Brien, F.D.; Rodgers, R.W. (eds.)

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the results of the testing of Sand 3 (15,245 to 15,280 feet in depth) which occurred from November 1983 to March 1984 and evaluates these new data in comparison to results from the testing of Sand 5 (15,385 to 15,415 feet in depth) which occurred from June 1981 to February 1982. It also describes the reworking of the production and salt water disposal wells preparatory to the Sand 3 testing as well as the plug and abandon procedures requested to terminate the project. The volume contains two parts: Part 1 includes the text and accompanying plates, figures and tables; Part 2 consists of the appendixes including auxiliary reports and tabulations.

  10. Geopressured-geothermal test of the EDNA Delcambre No. 1 well, Tigre Lagoon Field, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana: analysis of water an dissolved natural gas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hankins, B.E.; Karkalits, O.C.

    1978-09-01

    The Edna Delcambre et al. No. 1 gas well, shut-in since June 1975, was made available for the project. Two geopressured sand-bed aquifers were tested: sand No. 3 at a depth of 12,900 feet and sand No. 1 at a depth of 12,600 feet. Each aquifer was subjected to flow tests which lasted approximately three weeks in each case. Water samples were obtained during flow testing of the two geopressured aquifers. The water contained 11.3 to 13.3% dissolved solids. Several radioactive species were measured. Radium-226 was found to be approximately 10 times more concentrated than the average amount observed in surface waters. No appreciable amount of heavy metals was detected. Recombination studies at bottom-hole conditions indicate the solubility of natural gas per barrel of water to be about 24 SCF. The methane content was 93 to 95%, and the gas had a heating value in the range of 1020 to 1070 Btu/cu.ft. During the flow tests, the gas/water ratio at the well-head was observed to be 45 to 88 SCF/Bbl water produced. (MHR)

  11. 76 FR 57956 - Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Executive Business Development Mission; Clarification and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency... the Notice of the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Executive Business Development Mission, 76 FR... for Recruitment and Applications section of the Notice of the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency...

  12. Developing an Energy Performance Modeling Startup Kit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-10-01

    In 2011, the NAHB Research Center began assessing the needs and motivations of residential remodelers regarding energy performance remodeling. This report outlines: the current remodeling industry and the role of energy efficiency; gaps and barriers to adding energy efficiency into remodeling; and support needs of professional remodelers to increase sales and projects involving improving home energy efficiency.

  13. Renewable energies for Amapa's sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Ana Claudia S.; Di Lascio, Marco Alfredo; Freitas, Marcos Aurelio V.

    1999-01-01

    The generation of energy requires huge quantities of fuels which produce significant amounts of waste that are given back to the environment, causing remarkable damage. In order to avoid or at least reduce this damage, society is devoting research to other means of energy generation, free from that king of consequences - renewable energies. The article overviews of Amapa, Brazilian state, energy renewable sources

  14. Standards to develop energy control and energy efficiency in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plazy, J.L.; Moutet, C.

    2007-01-01

    Since the late nineties, an energy control standardisation steering body was set up at the AFNOR, prompted by the French administration and ADEME which is chairing it. That body, which became a forum in 2006 brings together stakeholders in various areas concerned by that issue (industries, construction, transport, environment, services,...) as well as the representatives of main companies, professional organisations and standardisation operators acting in the area / of energy in France. Its purpose is to help exchange information and express needs in terms of standardisation in the area of energy and energy efficiency. On its initiative, the European standardisation committees CEN and CENELEC set up in 2002 an equivalent body responsible for the strategic coordination of their energy management programmes and entrusted the steering to our country (ADEME chairing, AFNOR secretariat). In order to better serve the interests of its members, the French forum is now working towards the leadership, in partnership with China, of the strategic standardisation group being set up at the ISO (International Standardisation Organisation) on energy efficiency and renewable energy sources. (authors)

  15. Ecological economics, energy, and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peet, J.

    1991-01-01

    Conventional techniques of economics, in different countries, do not normally take proper account of increases in the cost of energy (especially oil) that are expected in the next twenty years, or the rapidly declining ability of the environment to absorb wastes and pollutants, especially those resulting from the use of fossil fuels. Unless these factors are included in political-economic decision-making, and paths for future development adjusted to take account of them, many future development options will be severely damaged. In this paper, it is argued that new decision-making principles are urgently needed, in which societies accept that the physics of the environment are dominant, and the desires of people are subject to physical constraints. When future development options are considered, there is therefore a hierarchy of decision-making. Primary decisions depend upon the physics and ecology of the environment, of development, and of resource utilization. These have to be made before secondary decisions which are mainly ethical, and depend upon social and community values. These are best expressed by people, through adult education and the political process. Only then is it possible to make tertiary decisions, which relate to the allocation of resources. These decisions will depend heavily upon the use of economic tools. Several approaches have been proposed for improving political-economic decision-making. Some concentrate on modifications to markets, so they can incorporate ''externalities''. In other approaches, physical understandings are introduced into policy analyses, in order to indicate the constraints that limit development options. Some important techniques are reviewed, and suggestions are made about better methods of decision-making in the future. (author)

  16. Energy Sector Development for 2010-2050 using Message Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, M.; Muhammed Zulfakar Mohd Zolkaffly; Alawiah Musa; Aisha Raihan Abdul Kadir

    2011-01-01

    Strengthening a country's energy supply security is vital in ensuring a long term electricity supply to fulfil the growing energy demand. With the increase of number and resiliency of energy supply options to create a balance energy mix, Malaysia can overcome the national energy security, environmental and sustainable development issues. Introducing nuclear power would increase the diversity of energy supplies as well as increases the efficient use of natural resources in energy sector. This paper presents the use of IAEA energy planning tool, MESSAGE to analyse, simulate and compare energy mix and nuclear option in Malaysia taking into account the national energy policies. (author)

  17. Energy Reforms in The Developing World: Sustainable Development Compromised?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Mbogo Abdallah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Energy sector reforms with an emphasis on electricity growth have been taking place extensively and rapidly worldwide Particularly, motivated chiefly by classical economics’ standpoint of efficiency and market considerations, reforms have been made in the developed North. Models of reforms in the North have in turn been replicated in developing countries. However, questions arise as to whether the models used are suitable for the mostly rural and socioeconomically disadvantaged economies in the South. It is argued in this paper that a sustainability focused mode of reforms guided by futures studies is needed for such economies. Reforms taking place in Kenya and neighbouring countries are in particular examined from a sustainable future perspective; and appropriate improvements and further research are recommended.

  18. Development of the Medium Energy Linac Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Ji Ho; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Kim, Dae Il; Kim, Han Sung; Park, Bum Sik; Seol, Kyung Tae; Song, Young Gi; Yun, Sang Pil; Cho, Yong Sub; Hong, In Seok

    2008-05-01

    The main purpose of this project is developing 100-MeV proton linear accelerator (linac) for proton engineering frontier project (PEFP). In the first phase of the PEFP, the development of the 20-MeV linac has successfully finished. Hence the work scope of this project is designing the linac to accelerate proton beams from 20-MeV up to 100-MeV, fabricating the linac up to 45 MeV, fabricating one set of the medium energy beam transport (MEBT) tank, and developing the low level radio frequency (LLRF) system and the control system. The basic role of the new proton accelerator is accelerating 20-mA proton beams from 20 MeV up to 100 MeV. The first step of the design procedure is optimizing and determining the accelerator parameters. The beam loss is also main concern in the design stage. The drift tube (DT) and the quadrupole magnets are designed to be optimized to the new linac design. The other purpose is confirming the new design by fabricating and tuning the drift tube linac (DTL). The 20MeV proton beam divided into two directions. One is supplying the beams to user group by turning on the 45-degree bending magnet. The other is guided into the 100-MeV DTL by tuning off the dipole magnet. That is why the PEFP MEBT located after 20-MeV DTL. The MEBT is realized as two small DTL tanks with three cells and a 45-degree bending magnet. The fabrication of one MEBT tank is another purpose of this project. The other purposes of this project is developing the LLRF system to control the RF signal and control system to monitor and control the vacuum system, magnet power supply, etc

  19. Challenges in energy supply and infrastructural development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On the overall, developing countries must address the eminent energy challenges and invest more towards energy security as the key to industrialization and economic development. National energy mix must also be diversified to cover alternative fuels and renewable energy sources to ensure sustainability. Keywords: ...

  20. Solar Energy: A Necessary Investment in a Developing Economy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electrical Energy is the pivot of all developmental efforts in both the developed and the developing nations. Due to the fact that sources or conventional means of energy generation arc finite and fast depleting, most industrialized countries have started research on solar energy as a renewable sources or energy. This paper ...

  1. Building capacity for energy and electricity planning for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-09-01

    The IAEA, through its Planning and Economic Studies Section (PESS), assists Member States to build their capacities to perform analyses for developing alternative strategies for sustainable energy development, evaluate the energy-economic-environmental implications and assess the potential contribution of nuclear energy in securing affordable and clean supplies of energy

  2. Energy solutions for sustainable development. Proceedings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    production technologies such as fuel cells, hydrogen, bio-energy and wind energy • Centralized energy technologies such as clean coal technologies • Providing renewable energy for the transport sector • Systems aspects, differences between the various major regions throughout the world • End-use technologies......, efficiency improvements and supply links • Security of supply with regard to resources, conflicts, black-outs, natural disasters and terrorism...

  3. Development of generation IV nuclear energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Kazuaki; Oka, Yoshiaki; Ogawa, Masuro; Ichimiya, Masakazu; Noda, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    The fifth 'Generation IV International Forum (GIF), Policy Group Meetings' was held at the Zen-Nikku Hotel in Tokyo, on September 19-20, 2002, under participations of Abraham, Secretary of DOE in U.S.A., Columbani, Secretary of CEA in France, Fujiie, Chairman of CAE in Japan, Kano, Parliamental Minister of MIS in Japan, and so on. Ten nations entering GIF (Argentina, Brazil, Canada, France, Japan, Korea, South Africa, Switzerland, U.K., and U.S.A.) selected six next generation nuclear energy concepts for objects of international cooperative research and development aiming at its practice by 2030. These concepts applicable to not only power generation, but also hydrogen production, sea water purification, and so on, are sodium liquid metal cooled reactor (Japan), high temperature gas cooled reactor (France), Super-critical pressure water cooled reactor (SCWR: Canada), Lead metal cooled reactor (Switzerland), Gas cooled fast reactor (U.S.A.), and molten salts reactor. On the generation IV nuclear reactor systems aiming to further upgrade their sustainability, safety, economical efficiency, and nuclear non proliferation, the 'Plans on Technical Development' (Road-map) to decide priority of their R and Ds has been cooperatively discussed under frameworks of international research cooperation by the GIF members nations. Here were shared descriptions on nuclear fuel cycle as a remise of technical evaluation and adopted concepts by Japanese participants contributing to making up the Road-map. (G.K.)

  4. Accelerated plan to develop magnetic fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1986-01-01

    We have shown that, despite funding delays since the passage of the Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980, fusion development could still be carried to the point of a demonstration plant by the year 2000 as called for in the Act if funding, now about $365 million per year, were increased to the $1 billion range over the next few years (see Table I). We have also suggested that there may be an economic incentive for the private sector to become in accelerating fusion development on account of the greater stability of energy production costs from fusion. Namely, whereas fossil fuel prices will surely escalate in the course of time, fusion fuel will always be abundantly available at low cost; and fusion technology poses less future risk to the public and the investor compared to conventional nuclear power. In short, once a fusion plant is built, the cost of generating electricity mainly the amortization of the plant capital cost - would be relatively fixed for the life of the plant. In Sec. V, we found that the projected capital cost of fusion plants ($2000 to $4000 per KW/sub e/) would probably be acceptable if fusion plants were available today

  5. Energy status and ovarian follicular development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meng, Li

    2016-01-01

    Female reproduction is tightly linked to body energy status and it has become increasingly clear that disturbed energy metabolism can negatively affect reproductive performance. Nevertheless, the way how a disturbed energy status affects ovarian follicular reserve as well as follicular

  6. Transportation energy strategy: Project {number_sign}5 of the Hawaii Energy Strategy Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This study was prepared for the State Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT) as part of the Hawaii Energy Strategy program. Authority and responsibility for energy planning activities, such as the Hawaii Energy Strategy, rests with the State Energy Resources Coordinator, who is the Director of DBEDT. Hawaii Energy Strategy Study No. 5, Transportation Energy Strategy Development, was prepared to: collect and synthesize information on the present and future use of energy in Hawaii`s transportation sector, examine the potential of energy conservation to affect future energy demand; analyze the possibility of satisfying a portion of the state`s future transportation energy demand through alternative fuels; and recommend a program targeting energy use in the state`s transportation sector to help achieve state goals. The analyses and conclusions of this report should be assessed in relation to the other Hawaii Energy Strategy Studies in developing a comprehensive state energy program. 56 figs., 87 tabs.

  7. Present trends in nuclear energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, Ioan

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents the current trends of nuclear energy in Europe, the issue of radioactive waste management, the modern technical solutions for building new nuclear power plants and, also, the nuclear power long term prospects. The following trends and methods of reducing costs are addressed: - upgrading the availability of nuclear power units; since 1990 till now in Europe the availability factor has risen from 74 % to 84%; - extending the operation life of nuclear power plants from 30 - 40 years to 60 years; - stable reduction of the duration of annual planned outages necessary for maintenance and nuclear fuel re-loading; it is noteworthy the performance of Unit 2 Olkiluoto NPP, Finland, that was shutdown for annual outage and fuel re-loading for a 7 days only; - stable cuts of nuclear fuel cost by using advanced nuclear fuel and by increasing the fuel burnup; over the last years, nuclear fuel cost share in the operation costs has constantly decreased to values of about 0.5 USD cent/KWh e; - increase of the rated capacity of the existing in Europe nuclear power units, through upgrading programs that contribute to enhancing their efficiency. In the year 2002 Generation IV International Forum (GIF) finalized the technological strategy in the field, identifying the most promising nuclear power systems for which the research will continue. This strategy also identifies the main objectives that must by pursued within the research-development programs out of which one mentions the following: - identifying sustainable solution for generating electricity; - minimizing the radioactive waste and its management; - optimization of operation costs; - reducing the financial risk comparable to other energy solutions; - excellence in nuclear safety and reliability; - increasing resistance to proliferation; - ruling out the emergency solutions. Finally, the paper mentions the international engagement, representing a new approach in nuclear power, namely the transition to the use

  8. Water Resources Management for Shale Energy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoxtheimer, D.

    2015-12-01

    The increase in the exploration and extraction of hydrocarbons, especially natural gas, from shale formations has been facilitated by advents in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies. Shale energy resources are very promising as an abundant energy source, though environmental challenges exist with their development, including potential adverse impacts to water quality. The well drilling and construction process itself has the potential to impact groundwater quality, however if proper protocols are followed and well integrity is established then impacts such as methane migration or drilling fluids releases can be minimized. Once a shale well has been drilled and hydraulically fractured, approximately 10-50% of the volume of injected fluids (flowback fluids) may flow out of the well initially with continued generation of fluids (produced fluids) throughout the well's productive life. Produced fluid TDS concentrations often exceed 200,000 mg/L, with elevated levels of strontium (Sr), bromide (Br), sodium (Na), calcium (Ca), barium (Ba), chloride (Cl), radionuclides originating from the shale formation as well as fracturing additives. Storing, managing and properly disposisng of these fluids is critical to ensure water resources are not impacted by unintended releases. The most recent data in Pennsylvania suggests an estimated 85% of the produced fluids were being recycled for hydraulic fracturing operations, while many other states reuse less than 50% of these fluids and rely moreso on underground injection wells for disposal. Over the last few years there has been a shift to reuse more produced fluids during well fracturing operations in shale plays around the U.S., which has a combination of economic, regulatory, environmental, and technological drivers. The reuse of water is cost-competitive with sourcing of fresh water and disposal of flowback, especially when considering the costs of advanced treatment to or disposal well injection and lessens

  9. Development and sustainability issues - energy scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakodkar, Anil

    2000-01-01

    The 20th century has seen an unprecedented rise in the rate of consumption of material and energy resources. These patterns of growth and consumption have caused enormous strains on the available natural resources and the environment. Further, the benefits of available natural resources have been shared in a highly inequitable manner with a small fraction of mankind using up a large fraction of resources to a level that environmental concerns have become a global matter and are threatening to jeopardize the development of the larger fraction of humanity on grounds of global sustainability. While it has been seen that major achievements in almost all areas of human endeavour in recent times, enabling improvements in quality of life and better control over environmental degradation, there is a new challenge now of sustainability of the development process for the majority of human population. The environment with its large inertia, flexibility and stabilising mechanisms has so far some how copped up at least on a global scale with the unprecedented consumption. However, the recent trends indicate that most of the environment related cycles may not be able to take the continued abuse without disastrous global consequences. Piloting and sustaining the legitimate development of societies particularly those which are left far behind in the march towards better quality of life has, therefore, become a matter which needs very urgent consideration and action. There is thus a strong need for charting of a well deliberated goal oriented action plan with a vision that ensures due attention to the interests of all sections of society on the basis of their justifiable needs

  10. Trees for energy and rural development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    A special commemorative issue of 14 papers is presented to mark the centenary of forestry education in India. Most of the papers discuss the current status and future potential of Indian energy forestry in general terms, and are listed below. The remaining 4 papers are noticed elsewhere. Kaul, R.N.; Gurumurti, K. Forest energy in India: the state of the art. 737-743. (Refs. 11). Revelle, R. Energy use in rural India. 744-757 (Refs. 25 reprinted from Science, USA (1976) 192,969-975). Oka, A.G. Energy plantations in India - prospects and perspectives. 758-766 (Refs. 3). Srivastava, B.P. High-density short rotation forestry for mitigating the energy crisis in India. 767-770. Ghosh, R.C. Energy problems and energy crops. 771-776. Pant, M.M. Wood to alleviate India's energy crisis. 795-803 (Refs. 14). The paper includes a table of the density and calorific value of 19 species. Choudhury, J.M. Energy plantations in Arunachal Pradesh. 804-807. Sarma, B.S.K. Forests for fuel. 808-812 (Refs. 1). Reddy, C.V.K. Meeting the challenge of energy. 813-817. Das, M.C. Planting for energy in Orissa. 823-829 (Refs. 11).

  11. Sustainable Energy Development in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounir Belloumi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research is to study the role of energy consumption in economic growth in Saudi Arabia over the period of 1971–2012 using the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL cointegration procedure, and based on neoclassical growth, endogenous growth, and ecological-economics viewpoints. Our empirical results show the existence of a cointegrating relationship between the different variables investigated. In addition, all the inputs (conventional and non-conventional Granger cause economic growth in both the short and long runs. Our findings confirm the energy-led growth hypothesis in the case of Saudi Arabia. Hence, energy conservation policies may deteriorate economic growth in Saudi Arabia if they are not followed by measures that improve energy efficiency, energy saving technologies and encourage the investment and use of renewable energy sources such as solar and wind energies that can participate in the attenuation of climate changes.

  12. Countermeasures for Developing New Energy Bus Standards in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xin

    2018-01-01

    With the rapid development of new energy vehicle technology, new energy bus has become more and more popular in China, and the relevant standards and policy are urgently needed to guide the market. According to the assessment of the development situation on new energy vehicle technology and new energy bus, combing with traffic policy guidance and the development trend of new energy vehicles, this paper aims to put forward the countermeasures of the new energy bus standard in China, including standard system, key standards and relevant recommendations. Research result is expected to provide decision support for the wide application of new energy bus in China.

  13. Modular, Reconfigurable, High-Energy Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, Connie; Howell, Joe

    2006-01-01

    The Modular, Reconfigurable High-Energy (MRHE) Technology Demonstrator project was to have been a series of ground-based demonstrations to mature critical technologies needed for in-space assembly of a highpower high-voltage modular spacecraft in low Earth orbit, enabling the development of future modular solar-powered exploration cargo-transport vehicles and infrastructure. MRHE was a project in the High Energy Space Systems (HESS) Program, within NASA's Exploration Systems Research and Technology (ESR&T) Program. NASA participants included Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and Glenn Research Center (GRC). Contractor participants were the Boeing Phantom Works in Huntsville, AL, Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center in Palo Alto, CA, ENTECH, Inc. in Keller, TX, and the University of AL Huntsville (UAH). MRHE's technical objectives were to mature: (a) lightweight, efficient, high-voltage, radiation-resistant solar power generation (SPG) technologies; (b) innovative, lightweight, efficient thermal management systems; (c) efficient, 100kW-class, high-voltage power delivery systems from an SPG to an electric thruster system; (d) autonomous rendezvous and docking technology for in-space assembly of modular, reconfigurable spacecraft; (e) robotic assembly of modular space systems; and (f) modular, reconfigurable distributed avionics technologies. Maturation of these technologies was to be implemented through a series of increasingly-inclusive laboratory demonstrations that would have integrated and demonstrated two systems-of-systems: (a) the autonomous rendezvous and docking of modular spacecraft with deployable structures, robotic assembly, reconfiguration both during assembly and (b) the development and integration of an advanced thermal heat pipe and a high-voltage power delivery system with a representative lightweight high-voltage SPG array. In addition, an integrated simulation testbed would have been developed

  14. Development of wind energy in Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enzili, M.

    2008-01-01

    Morocco's national energy policy includes the use of renewable energy sources to lessen its reliance on fossil fuels such as coal and oil. Legislation was recently passed to increase the threshold of electrical power from 10 MW to 50 MW. Solar and wind energy are the most abundant renewable energy resources in the country and are recommended for exploitation on a large scale. Feasibility studies conducted by the Centre de Developpement des Energies Renouvelables have shown that Morocco has enough wind energy to produce electricity on a large scale and interconnect it with the national power grid. Wind energy in the country could also be used for on-site power generation in remote villages or for desalination of seawater, particularly in the southern regions of Morocco which are most affected by drought. Essaouira, Tangier, Tetouan, Tarfaya, Dakhla, Laayoune and Taza were among the regions identified with significant wind resources. The total wind energy potential for Morocco is estimated to be 2,650 GW, while the technical wind energy potential is estimated to be 1,600 GW. Several projects have been realized in the areas of electricity production, interconnection to the national power grid, decentralized rural electrification and eventually the introduction of water pumping. It was concluded that exporting green energy to Europe, via the Morocco-Spain route after the restructuring of Morocco's electricity sector will create a viable market for the medium and long-term. 3 figs

  15. Modeling Energy and Development : An Evaluation of Models and Concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijven, Bas van; Urban, Frauke; Benders, René M.J.; Moll, Henri C.; Sluijs, Jeroen P. van der; Vries, Bert de; Vuuren, Detlef P. van

    2008-01-01

    Most global energy models are developed by institutes from developed countries focusing primarily oil issues that are important in industrialized countries. Evaluation of the results for Asia of the IPCC/SRES models shows that broad concepts of energy and development. the energy ladder and the

  16. Towards sustainable development in Austria. Renewable energy contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faninger, G.

    2003-01-01

    Besides energy conservation, the exploration of renewable energy sources, in particular biomass and solar energy, are central aspects of the Austrian energy policy, regarded as an optimal option for achieving CO2-emission reduction objectives. The market penetration of Renewable Energy Technologies in the last twenty years was supported by the Austrian Energy Research Programme. The result of successful developments of biomass heating, solar thermal, solar electrical and wind energy technologies is the key for the market development of these renewable energy technologies. With the market penetration of renewable energy technologies new business areas were established and employment created. Today, some renewable energy technologies in Austria have reached economic competitiveness. Some technologies not reached commercialisation, and need more development to improve efficiency, reliability and cost to become commercial. This would include material and system development, pilot plants or field experiments to clarify technical problems, and demonstration plants to illustrate performance capabilities and to clarify problems for commercialisation

  17. Designing an energy planning concept for enhancing the dissemination of renewable energy technologies in developing countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lybæk, Rikke; Andersen, Jan; Lund, Søren

    2014-01-01

    This paper stresses the need for adapting a sustainable energy planning concept, which can support the implementation of renewable energy in developing countries; exemplified by a Vietnamese case. Many developing countries heavily rely on fossil fuel resources and will face energy supply security...... countries, while relevant policies, tools and plans etc. simultaneously are being deployed, enhancing the framework conditions for renewable energy implementation...

  18. Sustainable Development Strategies of Biomass Energy in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H. Z.; Huang, B. R.

    2017-10-01

    The development of biomass energy industry can effectively improve the rural environment and alleviate the shortage of living energy in rural areas, especially in mountain areas. In order to make clear the current situation of biomass energy industry development in Beijing, this paper analyzed the status of biomass resources and biomass energy utilization and discussed the factors hindering the development of biomass energy industry in Beijing. Based on the analysis, suggestions for promoting sustainable development of Biomass Energy Industry in Beijing are put forward.

  19. The status and role of nuclear energy in the sustainable energy development strategy in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Ziqiang; Wang Yongping; Zhao Shoufeng; Zheng Yuhui

    2005-01-01

    The status and role of nuclear energy in the sustainable energy development strategy in China are discussed in this research report. Specifically, the role of nuclear energy in meeting the requirements of energy and electricity supply, environment protection and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission-reduction is focused on. The report is mainly composed of three component parts. The serious situation and challenges concerning the national energy security and energy sustainable development, and major tasks proposed to carry out the strategy of energy sustainable development are expounded in the first part. In the second part, the position and role of nuclear energy in China are elaborated and analyzed in detail. Firstly, it is indicated that the development of nuclear energy is the objective requirement for optimizing national energy structure. From the viewpoint of climate and environment protection, energy mix is required to transit from conventional fossil fuels to clean and high-quality energy sources. The potential role of nuclear energy in energy structure optimization in China is compared with that of hydro and other renewable energy sources. Secondly, it is proposed that the development of nuclear energy is the important security option for safely supplying the national energy and electricity in the future, mainly from the point of nuclear power providing stable and reliable power supply, relieving the burden of coal exploitation and transportation and reducing the risk of energy security caused by dependence on oil and natural gas. Thirdly, it is elaborated that the development of nuclear energy is the inevitable selection for carrying out the national energy and electricity sustainable development. It is given further details that nuclear energy is a clean and economical energy option, a preference coinciding with the principles of the circular economy, a feasible technical choice to greatly reduce emission of greenhouse gases, a selection contributing to

  20. From developing region to energy powerhouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, F. [ed.] [Power in Asia, London (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    Western prospectors are poised to go east, lured by the lucrative ore of electricity infrastructure. But increasingly, Asia is sending the message: Not For Sale. China, for example, has placed limits on the profits Western companies can squeeze out of their investments. As a result, they have adopted a strategy of {open_quotes}build, operate, and transfer,{close_quotes} says Frank Gray, editor of Power in Asia, a Financial Times energy publication based in London, England. {open_quotes}A key provision of the arrangement is that the company investing in the project owns that project for only a predetermined time, usually 15 to 20 years. After the term expires, project ownership reverts to the host nation,{close_quotes} Gray says. But the developing countries of Asia need an infusion of foreign capital, and Western utilities need to expand into that market to compensate for a relatively flat growth rate at home. {open_quotes}Central planning, in fact, is part of the legacy of colonial rule. Now, however, it will be national politicians, not foreign diplomats, who will call the shots,{close_quotes} Gray says.

  1. Development of the High Energy Linac Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Sub; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Kim, Han Sung; Chung, Byung Chul; Jang, Ji Ho; Gao, Changgi; Li, Yingmin; Sun, An; Tang, Yazhe; Zhang, Lipoing; Hwang, Yong Seok

    2008-05-01

    The main purpose of this project is studying the extension plan of the proton engineering frontier project (PEFP) 100-MeV Linac. It includes three categories. One is studying operation plan of the PEFP linac and its extended accelerators, and developing a distribution system of 100-MeV proton beams with a laser striping. Other is designing superconducting RF (SRF) modules and fabricating and testing a copper cavity model. The other is designing a rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS). The operation scheme of the PEFP linac is related to the optimization in the operation of the 100-MeV linac, 200-MeV SRF, and RCS. We studied several operational method to increase the validity of the accelerators. The beam distribution system has two roles. One is supplying proton beams of 100 MeV to the user group. The laser stripping of the negative hydrogen atoms is used in this case. The other beams are directed to the next high energy accelerators. This study contributes to increase the availability of the proton beams. The SRF is one of candidates to extend the PEFP linac system. Since the accelerating gradient of the SRF is much higher than the normal conducting accelerator, a lot of institutes over the world are developing the SRF structure. Main purposes are designing an SRF module, fabricating and testing an copper model which has similar material properties as Nb of the usual SRF cavity material. The RCS is a synchrotron whose injector is the PEFP 100-MeV linac. Main purposes are determining the lattice structure, studying the fast and slow extraction system, simulating beam behavior in the designed synchrotron. The RCS will be used as the spallation neutron source and tools in the basic and applied science including medical application

  2. Communication helps development of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopriva, A.

    2007-01-01

    In mid-February more than 170 nuclear energy sector communicators from 24 countries all over the world met in Milan, Italy. This year, the whole agenda dealt with the already known phenomenon of nuclear energy sector renaissance and the need for construction of new nuclear power plants, as a clean source of electricity generation without greenhouse emissions, which forms inseparable part of the energy mix in the world. (author)

  3. Development and utilization of new energy in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu Shiyuan (Academia Sinica, Beijing (CN). Energy Research Inst.)

    1990-01-01

    Since the foundation of the People's Republic of China, the Chinese Government has paid great attention to the development and utilization of new energy resources. Besides the development of biomass gas to provide energy for daily life in rural areas, China has also done much research and development in solar, wind, geothermal and marine energy to substitute alternative energy supplies, especially in the remote regions. Although China has abundant conventional energy resources the average energy resource per capita is low due to the large population. In recent years, the gap between energy consumption and supply has become larger and China will have to develop actively new energy industries at the same time as developing conventional energy. (author).

  4. Financing the alternative: renewable energy in developing and transition countries

    OpenAIRE

    Brunnschweiler, Christa N.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the determinants of credit allocation to renewable energy firms in developing and transition countries. Using a simple en- dogenous growth model, we show that the development of the renewable energy sector, i.e. the diversification of renewable energy resources used in primary energy production, depends on the quality of financial intermedia- tion, debtor information costs to banks, and financing needs of renewable energy firms. Policies should aim at increasing financial ...

  5. The role of women in sustainable energy development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecelski, E.

    2000-07-13

    This paper explores the question of how sustainable energy development--specifically, decentralized renewable energy technologies--can complement and benefit from the goal of increasing women's role in development. It is based on a paper that was originally presented at the World Renewable Energy Congress-V held in Florence, Italy, in September 1998, as a contribution to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's program on gender and energy.

  6. On some Issues of the Energy Policy and Sustainable Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotsiridze, A.

    2003-01-01

    Some aspects of the energy resources world commerce problems are considered in the article. East-West and North-South energy transport corridors functioning significance and the importance of energy resources transit legal regime creation in the limits of the Energy Charter Theaty are mentioned. World Community great interest to the energy security strengthening and energy sustainable development problems is underscored in the work. (authors)

  7. Energy research and development in Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hultberg, S.; Lindstroem Thomsen, P.

    1996-06-01

    The document describes some of the most important results produced during the last twenty years under the Danish government`s Energy Research Programme (ERP). Some of the involved research groups, and their current research projects, are described. The aim is to invite international cooperation on research in this field. Research areas are divided under the main headings of energy policy, energy supply and energy end-use. The document is illustrated with coloured photographs, diagrams and graphs. The names of contact persons, firms and institutions relevant to the described projects are listed. (AB)

  8. Trends of development for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posner, E.

    1977-01-01

    The IAEA organized an 'International conference on nuclear power and its fuel cycle' from May 2-13, 1977 in Salzburg. It was attended by some 2000 participants from more than 60 IAEA member states as well as by delegates from numerous international organizations (EC Commission, COMECON, UNO Economy Commission for Europe, International Energy Agency, and others). The conference was to present a survey of 'Status and potential of nuclear energy with special emphasis on present and future limits and obstacles' and to demonstrate the future contribution of nuclear energy to assuring the world energy supply. (orig.) [de

  9. Sustainable energy landscapes : designing, planning, and development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stremke, S.; Dobbelsteen, van den A.

    2013-01-01

    In the near future the appearance and spatial organization of urban and rural landscapes will be strongly influenced by the generation of renewable energy. One of the critical tasks will be the re-integration of these sustainable energy landscapes into the existing environment—which people value and

  10. Learning in renewable energy technology development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junginger, H.M.

    2005-01-01

    Dutch energy policy is directed at 17 percent of electricity demand being covered by renewable energy sources by 2020. Martin Junginger has demonstrated that this can be achieved at considerably lower costs than is the case now. He also found that it might be more financially advantageous to realize

  11. Developing a retail energy service business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleckaitis, A.J.

    1998-01-01

    Opportunities in the retail energy market and some of the steps that Consumersfirst Ltd. plans to take to carve out an appropriate niche for itself in what is expected to be a fiercely competitive deregulated energy market in Ontario are discussed. The major components of Consumersfirst Ltd's (Canadian division of IPLE's retail energy services), are a multi-faceted energy strategy, featuring unbundling Consumers Gas, acquisition of complementary enterprises such as e.g. HVAC contractors, investigation of green energy opportunities, and alliances and joint ventures with companies providing complementary services, such as e.g. Hydro-Quebec. The critical success factors, as always, are understanding customer needs, defining clear and differentiated value propositions, delivering on promises, selecting the right people for the job, and taking the longer-term view. Most important of all is to realize that there is no proven or single 'end state' model as markets are constantly evolving. figs

  12. Global energy scenarios, climate change and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakicenovic, Nebojsa

    2003-01-01

    Energy scenarios provide a framework for exploring future energy perspectives, including various combinations of technology options and their implications. Many scenarios in the literature illustrate how energy system developments may affect global change. Examples are the new emissions scenarios by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the energy scenarios by the World Energy Assessment (WEA). Some of these scenarios describe energy futures that are compatible with sustainable development goals; such as improved energy efficiencies and the adoption of advanced energy supply technologies. Sustainable development scenarios are also characterized by low environmental impacts (at local, regional and global scales) and equitable allocation of resources and wealth. They can help explore different transitions toward sustainable development paths and alternative energy perspectives in general. The considerable differences in expected total energy requirements among the scenarios reflect the varying approaches used to address the need for energy services in the future and demonstrate effects of different policy frameworks, changes in human behavior and investments in the future, as well as alternative unfolding of the main scenario driving forces such as demographic transitions, economic development and technological change. Increases in research, development and deployment efforts for new energy technologies are a prerequisite for achieving further social and economic development in the world. Significant technological advances will be required, as well as incremental improvements in conventional energy technologies. In general, significant policy and behavioral changes will be needed during the next few decades to achieve more sustainable development paths and mitigate climate change toward the end of the century. (au)

  13. Recent development of energy supply and demand in China, and energy sector prospects through 2030

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yanjia; Gu Alun; Zhang Aling

    2011-01-01

    Facing multiple pressures, including its commitment to energy efficiency improvement, the current worldwide recession, and global warming concerns, China is making great efforts to maintain its continuous economic growth and reduce pollutant emissions. Many policies to encourage investing in energy efficiency and renewable energy have been issued. This article provides insights into the latest development of energy production, energy consumption and energy strategic planning and policies in China, and also describes the analysis, carried out by the authors as part of the Asian Energy Security project using the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) modeling tool, of the impacts of implementing new and expected energy and environmental policies.

  14. current status and outlook of renewable energy development in nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents a critical review of the available renewable energy resources in Nigeria, namely; biomass, hydropower, solar and wind energy. It examines the current energy situation in the country and equally discusses the various energy policy documents developed by the government. Using the scenario-based ...

  15. Energy conservation-problems and perspectives for developing nations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, P. R. [National Productivity Council, New Delhi, India; Padrmanabhan, S.

    1980-03-15

    While studies of the past indicated a tight coupling of energy consumption and GNP, longer range indications are that they can be mutually decoupled. Developing nations can move forward towards achieving significant energy savings in their economics without fear of economic stagnation. Conservation policies at the national level are difficult to enunciate and the implementation mechanisms have to be strengthened. Macro-level economics may not be easily apparent as unit level economics. If energy conservation is not practiced, we would require the development of additional energy supply capacity with all of its economic implications. The role of science and technology inputs in industrial processes for minimizing energy consumption is significant. Sufficient funds should be allocated for pursuance of R and D activities in energy conservation and in developing alternative energy resources to supplement and later replace the existing costly transient fuels. A climate to promote conservation of energy should formulate policies which lays emphasis on energy conservation strategies rather than soley on energy growth issues. The effort should be directed towards energy programs that are a judicious mix up of energy and energy conservation strategies for achieving economic growth and a reasonable standard of living commensurate with the aspirations of the people. In capital-scarce economies, an account of the fact that energy conservation requires far less investment than energy capital supplies, conservation policies must play a central role in the overall framework of developing nation's national energy policies.

  16. Development of wind energy in Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, P. [Danske Elvaerkers Forenings Udredningsafdeling (DEFU), Lyngby (Denmark)

    1994-12-31

    In Denmark, wind energy has for centuries been used for many purposes, among these water pumping, milling of grain, and electricity generation. This paper discusses the development of grid-connected wind turbines on a large-scale sponsored by the national government, the Commission of the European Communities and the Danish electric utilities, and small-scale grid-connected wind turbines both privately and utility owned. Siting investigations have shown that it is possible to find sites of reasonable quality for a potential electricity production of at least 10 percent of the expected electricity consumption in 2005 which corresponds to about 1500 MW of installed capacity. Regulations were introduced in 1991 limiting the owners of wind turbines to noise levels from the wind turbines to the existing levels of 45 dB in rural areas, and 40 dB in residential areas and other noise sensitive areas. Studies of the effects of wind turbines on birds found that compared with other human activities, such as farming and car driving, a wind turbine in a bird sanctuary does not have a particular impact on bird life, although there were some effects such as birds moving away from the turbine to breed, forage etc. The Danish Government`s aim to establish 1500 MW of wind power by the year 2005 has some problems. Funding for research, a combination of agreements with the utilities, and production subsidies to private persons and co-operative societies is contributing to the resolution of these problems. 1 tab., 2 figs.

  17. The status and role of nuclear energy in the sustainable energy development strategy in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongping; Zhao Shoufeng; Zheng Yuhui; Yuan Yujun; Rao Shuang; Liu Qun; Ding Ruijie

    2006-03-01

    The status and role of nuclear energy in the energy security and sustainable energy development strategy in China are discussed. Specifically, the role of nuclear energy in meeting the requirements of energy and electricity supply, environment protection and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission-reduction is focused on. The report is mainly composed of three component parts. The serious situation and challenges concerning the national energy security and energy sustainable development are expounded. It is indicated that the development of nuclear energy is the objective requirement for optimizing national energy structure. It is proposed that the development of nuclear energy is the important security option for safely supplying the national energy and electricity in the future. It is elaborated that the development of nuclear energy is the inevitable selection for carrying out the national energy and electricity sustainable development. Nuclear energy is a preference coinciding with the principles of the circular economy, a selection contributing to improvement of ecological environment and an inexhaustible resource in the long term. Some suggestions are put forward to the nuclear energy development in China. (authors)

  18. Developing an Energy Performance Modeling Startup Kit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, A.

    2012-10-01

    In 2011, the NAHB Research Center began the first part of the multi-year effort by assessing the needs and motivations of residential remodelers regarding energy performance remodeling. The scope is multifaceted - all perspectives will be sought related to remodeling firms ranging in size from small-scale, sole proprietor to national. This will allow the Research Center to gain a deeper understanding of the remodeling and energy retrofit business and the needs of contractors when offering energy upgrade services. To determine the gaps and the motivation for energy performance remodeling, the NAHB Research Center conducted (1) an initial series of focus groups with remodelers at the 2011 International Builders' Show, (2) a second series of focus groups with remodelers at the NAHB Research Center in conjunction with the NAHB Spring Board meeting in DC, and (3) quantitative market research with remodelers based on the findings from the focus groups. The goal was threefold, to: Understand the current remodeling industry and the role of energy efficiency; Identify the gaps and barriers to adding energy efficiency into remodeling; and Quantify and prioritize the support needs of professional remodelers to increase sales and projects involving improving home energy efficiency. This report outlines all three of these tasks with remodelers.

  19. Sustainable development in Pemex: energy management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, C.E.R.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the author reviewed the energy management activities, over the last two years, of Petroleos Mexicanos, also known as Pemex. These activities generated substantial savings. A brief overview of Pemex was provided. The State Oil Company of Mexico, Pemex occupies the third rank of the world oil producers, and is in seventh place in terms of proven reserves. The gas production has earned the company the ninth spot, and it is in tenth place as far as its refining capacity is concerned. Pemex has annual revenues of 50, 000 million American dollars and operates in excess of 1,000 facilities. The energy management program implemented covered an experts network, training, campaigns, and information and monitoring system. Each of the components of the energy management system were reviewed. Linking each facility, the experts network was created to enhance the efficient use of energy. The Energy Saving and Environmental Protection campaign was held over the period 1999-2000 and involved the participation of 209 work sites. For its part, the Energy Efficient Use and Savings campaign took place in 2000-2001, involving 205 work sites. Both resulted in substantial savings. An internal carbon dioxide trading system was also implemented to improve air quality, and was designed to provide a cap and trade carbon dioxide emissions. The next phase involved the implementation of an information and monitoring system, which defined an Energy Consumption Index used in monthly reports. The next steps in the process were briefly outlined. 5 figs

  20. Development of the low energy linac systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Sub; Kwon, H. J.; Kim, Y. H.

    2005-08-01

    The project 'Development of the Low Energy Linac System' is aiming to develop the 20 MeV proton linac system. This consists of a 50 keV proton injector, a 3 MeV RFQ, and a 20 MeV DTL. We obtained the first beam signal after the 20 MeV linac. The high power switch installed in the ion source supplies the pulsed beam into the following LEBT. The pulse operation was successfully tested. The main role of the LEBT is to match the beam into the 3 MeV RFQ. The total length of the four-vane type RFQ is about 3.26m. For the field stabilization, we used the resonant coupling scheme and dipole stabilizer rods. An 1 MW klystron supplies the RF power into the RFQ. After tuning, the field deviation of the quadrupole mode is less than 2% of the design value and the dipole fraction is less than 5% of the operating mode. The following accelerating structure is DTL which accelerate 20 mA proton beams up to 20 MeV. It consists of 4 tanks and the length of each tank is less than 5 m. The lattice is FFDD type and the integrated fields of the quadrupole magnets are 1.75 T. The inner walls of the tanks are copper-plated by PR plating method. The thickness is 100m with the roughness of 0.3m. Each drift tube consists of 6 parts and assembled by e-beam welding. The tanks and drift tubes are aligned under the installation limit of 50m by using the laser-tracker. The tuning by the slug tuners and post couplers results in the field uniformity of 2% and field sensitivity of 100%/MHz. In order to detect the beam signal, we installed the Faraday cup after the RFQ or the DTL. For the RFQ, we observed the beam of 12 A under the forward RF power of 450 kW. The beam current after DTL is about 0.5 A when RF power of 150 kW was fed into each tank

  1. Development of energy law in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakken, Stein Arne

    2000-01-01

    In Norway, energy law is still in its infancy, nine years after the deregulation of the energy market. But on the year 2000 budget 1,5 million NOK have been made available for research and teaching of energy law at Nordic Institute for Maritime Law, University of Oslo. This institute has for many years been working on judicial matters in connection with the offshore petroleum activities and has extended their research into problems faced by the electric power sector after the deregulation of the market

  2. Promoting energy efficiency in developing countries: The role of NGOs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojtaszek, E.I.

    1993-06-01

    Developing countries need energy growth to spur economic growth. Yet energy activities contribute significantly to local water pollution and global greenhouse gas emissions. Energy efficiency offers the means to achieve the twin goals of sustainable economic/social development and environmental protection. Energy efficiency increases industrial competitiveness and frees up capital so it can be applied to other uses, such as health and education. The key to improving energy efficiency in developing countries will be acquiring and applying Western technologies, practices, and policies and building national institutions for promoting energy efficiency. Relevant energy-efficient technologies include the use of better electric motors, adjustable speed controls, combined cycle power cogeneration, improved lighting, better refrigeration technologies, and improved electric power transmission and distribution systems. Western countries can best help developing countries by providing guidance and resources to support nongovernmental organizations (NGOS) staffed by local experts; these institutions can capture the energy efficiency potential and ensure environmental protection in developing countries

  3. sustainable development of national energy resources

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAYAN_

    293, noting its coverage of investment in energy projects, particularly in oil ..... Exportation of Various Raw Materials – Appellate Body Report (30 January 2012) ..... 61 Investigation Report: Ghana: West African Gas Pipeline Project, World Bank.

  4. Development of Optimal Stressor Scenarios for New Operational Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    OPTIMAL STRESSOR SCENARIOS FOR NEW OPERATIONAL ENERGY SYSTEMS by Geoffrey E. Fastabend December 2017 Thesis Advisor: Alejandro S... ENERGY SYSTEMS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Geoffrey E. Fastabend 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School...developed and tested simulation model for operational energy related systems in order to develop better stressor scenarios for acceptance testing

  5. World energy needs and their impact on nuclear reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foell, W.K.

    1977-01-01

    This presentation will place primary emphasis upon energy demand. The presentation will cover the following areas: energy reserves and resources; energy demand: past and future (mid-and long-term); industrialized regions of the world; developing countries: Mexico and Iran as examples; and potential impact on nuclear development

  6. The United Nations development programme initiative for sustainable energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurry, S.

    1997-12-01

    Energy is central to current concerns about sustainable human development, affecting economic and social development; economic growth, the local, national, regional, and global environment; the global climate; a host of social concerns, including poverty, population, and health, the balance of payments, and the prospects for peace. Energy is not an end in itself, but rather the means to achieve the goals of sustainable human development. The energy systems of most developing countries are in serious crisis involving insufficient levels of energy services, environmental degradation, inequity, poor technical and financial performance, and capital scarcity. Approximately 2.5 billion people in the developing countries have little access to commercial energy supplies. Yet the global demand for energy continues to grow: total primary energy is projected to grow from 378 exajoules (EJ) per year in 1990 to 571 EJ in 2020, and 832 EJ in 2050. If this increase occurs using conventional approaches and energy sources, already serious local (e.g., indoor and urban air pollution), regional (eg., acidification and land degradation), and global (e.g., climate change) environmental problems will be critically aggravated. There is likely to be inadequate capital available for the needed investments in conventional energy sources. Current approaches to energy are thus not sustainable and will, in fact, make energy a barrier to socio-economic development. What is needed now is a new approach in which energy becomes an instrument for sustainable development. The two major components of a sustainable energy strategy are (1) more efficient energy use, especially at the point of end-use, and (2) increased use of renewable sources of energy. The UNDP Initiative for Sustainable Energy (UNISE) is designed to harness opportunities in these areas to build upon UNDP`s existing energy activities to help move the world toward a more sustainable energy strategy by helping program countries.

  7. Energy in the strategy to Sahel development : Situation- Perspectives- Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-10-01

    Energy plays an important role in the development of the Sahel Countries. For instance, in these countries, the use of wood fire is essential as a source of energy. However, the increase in the wood supply leads to environmental problems; hence the necessity for the states to promote alternative source of energy to replace the wood. Used in the field of agriculture, transport, industry and construction, energy in Sahel countries hurts to financial problems such as difficulties in the funding of oil import and supply security. It is then indispensable to develop energy resources in the Sahel countries. Energy policies must emphasize on hydroelectric energy, nuclear energy and also better reorganize certain sources of energy such as gas, oil, and coal. Thus this political assumption of responsibility through a comprehensive approach will contribute to generate the development of the Sahel countries [fr

  8. The Renewable Energy In Vietnam Potential Development Orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Van Vang Le; Danh Chan Nguyen; Van Huong Dong

    2017-01-01

    Up to 2014 the development of renewable energy in Vietnam has undergone a process of nearly three decades with many ups and downs. This change depends on the concern of the state Ministries in research development project implementation and financial support for renewable energy development. It is easy to see that only when the development of renewable energy has the attention and direction of the state through a policy system a unified program the proper funding of the budget and Internation...

  9. Renewable energy for rural development to protect environmental pollution from energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, A.N.

    2001-01-01

    Energy is the key input for technological industrial, social and economical development of a nation. The present energy scenario is heavily biased towards the conventional energy sources, such as petroleum products, coal, atomic energy, etc., which are finite in nature and causes environmental pollution. The energy utilization pattern is also meant for the energy requirement in urban areas. To meet the growing energy requirement of rural areas through the conventional energy sources will cause serious harmful effect on the environmental pollution. The man's thurst to use more energy after about 150 thousand years ago, invention of wheel, use of petroleum products for power generation and invention of steam and coal has brought him to use the energy sources for his comfort irrespective of the environmental consideration. The extensive use of energy operated devices in domestic, industrial, transport and for agriculture sectors in urban and rural areas have resulted in economical development of the society

  10. Facilitating new and renewable energy development in the ASEAN region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balce, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    This report briefly discussed the following subjects - why new and renewable energy (NRE) ?, where does ASEAN centre of energy (ACE) stand ?, ASEAN plan of action on NRE, Innovative approaches of the NRE development programme

  11. adaptation of plastic waste to energy development in lagos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Keywords: Plastic wastes, Energy, Sustainable development, Environment, ... countries to be rationalising energy supply to their people. .... Managing waste in Lagos is may be a herculean task in ..... uncertainties in a life cycle perspective.

  12. Nuclear energy. Choice for GHG emission reduction and sustainable energy development in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Rui; Zou Lin; Wang Yongping

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the sustainability of China's energy development and the major challenges in four energy priorities are discussed by establishing and applying of Indicators of Sustainable Energy Development (ISED) with consideration of nuclear power as one viable option. On this basis, China's Energy Strategy to 2020 is discussed in detail. On the other hand, the crucial role that nuclear energy will play in the fields of emission reduction and climate change is discussed by analyzing illustrative models under different energy development scenarios. An assessment on what could look like in a fast developing country like China when an equivalent fund was invested in five different energy options of hydro-power, coal-fired power, nuclear power, wind power and gas-fired power would be presented with a discussion about possible future international climate protection regimes and the methodologies to evaluate the potential roles of those energy options, especially, the nuclear energy. (author)

  13. Nuclear energy - an option for Croatian sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikulicic, V.; Skanata, D.; Simic, Z.

    1996-01-01

    The uncertainties of growth in Croatian future energy, particularly electricity demand, together with growing environmental considerations and protection constraints, are such that Croatia needs to have flexibility to respond by having the option of expanding the nuclear sector. The paper deals with nuclear energy as an option for croatian sustainable economic development. The conclusion is that there is a necessity for extended use of nuclear energy in Croatia because most certainly nuclear energy can provide energy necessary to sustain progress. (author)

  14. The development of geothermal energy constraints and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronicki, L.Y.; Doron, B.

    1990-01-01

    No single resource can meet the world energy demand. What is under consideration is the possible contribution of geothermal energy in the future. According to World Energy Council (WEC) perspectives, by 2020 the new energy resources will contribute 170 to 365 MTOE, of which the share of hydropower will be very significant. This is a realistic view based on the actual state of the market. This paper reports on the competitive advantages and economics of geothermal energy development

  15. Tribal Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-09-01

    This 12-page brochure provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tribal Energy Program and describes the financial, technical, and educational assistance it provides to help tribes develop their renewable energy resources and reduce their energy consumption.

  16. Optimization Models and Methods Developed at the Energy Systems Institute

    OpenAIRE

    N.I. Voropai; V.I. Zorkaltsev

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents shortly some optimization models of energy system operation and expansion that have been created at the Energy Systems Institute of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Consideration is given to the optimization models of energy development in Russia, a software package intended for analysis of power system reliability, and model of flow distribution in hydraulic systems. A general idea of the optimization methods developed at the Energy Systems Institute...

  17. The role of sustainable energy issues in development cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, J.C.; Buskens, V.W.

    1994-01-01

    The author discusses the need to reduce primary energy resource requirements to provide more affordable basic energy services to the developing countries. The relationship between energy supply and environment/developing issues (such as climate change, deforestation, poverty, health etc.) is discussed. The Bruntland Report and two UNCED agreements the Framework Convention on Climate Change, and Agenda 21 are summarised and a brief assessment made of their coverage of sustainable energy issues. 27 refs

  18. Energy and nuclear power planning in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    In this publication of the IAEA, after the introduction, four substantive parts follow. Part I, Energy demand and rational energy supply, deals with the needs for energy, primary energy resources and reserves, energy transport, storage, distribution and conservation, including the environmental effects on energy development. Part II, Economic aspects of energy development, presents an integrated view of the basic concepts of energy economics, evaluation of alternative energy projects with an in-depth comparison of electricity generation costs of nuclear and fossil-fuelled power plants. Part III, World energy development status and trends, begins with an overview of the world energy status and trends and continues with a presentation of the energy situation in industrialized countries and in developing countries. Part IV, Energy planning, deals with the optimization techniques, energy planning concepts and computerized models. The launching conditions and implementation of a nuclear power programme are described in detail. 582 references are given in the text and a bibliographical list of 356 titles has been added

  19. The development and utilization of biomass energy resources in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Lin [Energy Research Institute of the State Planning Commission, Beijing (China)

    1995-12-01

    Biomass energy resources are abundant in China and have reached 730 million tonnes of coal equivalent, representing about 70% of the energy consumed by households. China has attached great importance to the development and utilization of its biomass energy resources and has implemented programmes for biogas unit manufacture, more efficient stoves, fuelwood development and thermal gasification to meet new demands for energy as the economy grows. The conclusion is that the increased use of low-carbon and non-carbon energy sources instead of fossil fuels is an important option for energy and environment strategy and has bright prospects in China. (author) 4 refs, 2 figs, 4 tabs

  20. Perspectives of development of the nuclear energy in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-04-01

    The coal is the main primary energy source in China. In spite of the economic development, the coal consumption decreases regularly since the last years. It is the consequences of the energy policy of China which closed little coal mines of poor productivity. The today energy balance of China lays on two supplying sources: 70 % coal and 24 % hydro energy. To face the increasing economic development China will need a complementary electric power production source. In this context, this document presents the today nuclear energy situation in the chinese energy policy, the perspectives for the french nuclear industry and the possible chinese-french collaboration. (A.L.B.)

  1. The development and utilization of biomass energy resources in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Dai

    1995-01-01

    Biomass energy resources are abundant in China and have reached 730 million tonnes of coal equivalent, representing about 70% of the energy consumed by households. China has attached great importance to the development and utilization of its biomass energy resources and has implemented programmes for biogas unit manufacture, more efficient stoves, fuelwood development and thermal gasification to meet new demands for energy as the economy grows. The conclusion is that the increased use of low-carbon and non-carbon energy sources instead of fossil fuels is an important option for energy and environment strategy and has bright prospects in China. (author)

  2. German nuclear energy development and international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt-Kuster, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    The author gives a brief survey on the short, but relatively successful story of nuclear energy in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). Like many other countries, FRG had to go through a very difficult period of political indecision and violent opposition from antinuclear groups, supported by large parts of the media. The licensing procedures have been streamlined, nuclear power plants are being built without major interference, and the FRG is making good progress in closing the fuel cycle. This means that nuclear power will play an important role in the energy supply system, although on a lower level than originally anticipated

  3. Technology assessment of geothermal energy resource development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-04-15

    Geothermal state-of-the-art is described including geothermal resources, technology, and institutional, legal, and environmental considerations. The way geothermal energy may evolve in the United States is described; a series of plausible scenarios and the factors and policies which control the rate of growth of the resource are presented. The potential primary and higher order impacts of geothermal energy are explored, including effects on the economy and society, cities and dwellings, environmental, and on institutions affected by it. Numerical and methodological detail is included in appendices. (MHR)

  4. THE RENEWABLE ENERGY PRODUCTION-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT NEXUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorkemli Kazar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available As renewable energy requirements increases, its relation with development is controversial. In this study, by taking human development index for development level, the relationship between renewable electricity net generation values and development has been searched with panel analysis. Study covers two different time periods: 1980-2010 with 5 year data to analyze long term effects and 2005-2010 yearly data for short term effects. Unlike previous studies, energy generation has been taken into consideration for it is thought to be more related with economic development. It is found that in the long run economic development will be leading to renewable energy production, while in the short run there exists a bidirectional causal relationship between renewable energy production and economic development. In addition, the causal relationship between economic development and renewable energy production varies both in the long run and in the short run due to human development level of the countries.

  5. Technology policy and sustainable development: the case of renewable energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohlgemuth, N.

    2000-01-01

    Policies to address long-term energy concerns include a wide range of initiatives. Taxes can internalise costs; financial mechanisms, including subsidies, can target particularly favourable but otherwise non-competitive investments; regulation can apply standards to raise performance of appliances; information programmes can improve decision making; and R and D can make available new options. The 1987 report of the World Commission on Environment and development, found that 'energy efficiency can only buy for the world to develop 'low-energy-paths' based on renewable sources...'. Although many renewable energy systems are in a relatively early stage of development, they offer the world 'a potentially huge primary energy source, sustainable in perpetuity and available in various forms to every nation on Earth.' It suggested that an R and D programme of renewable energy is required to attain the same level of primary energy that is now obtained from a mix of fossil, nuclear, and renewable energy resources. Since renewable energy contributes to all dimensions of sustainable development, one policy challenge is to ensure that renewable energy has a fair opportunity to complete with other resources required for the provision of energy services, especially on 'liberalised' energy markets. This paper gives an overview of rationales for government intervention in energy-related R and D, and international energy R and D trends. it concludes that the liberalisation of energy markets has an overall negative impact on private sector investments in energy R and D and that without a sustained and diverse programme of energy R and D and implementation, we are crippling our ability to make the necessary improvements in the global energy system, especially in light of sustainable development requirements. (author)

  6. Development potential of wind energy in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmet Akova

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available L’énergie en Turquie est aujourd’hui fournie par l’énergie fossile. De plus, la Turquie est dépendante de l’extérieur en matière d’énergie pour son économie et les secteurs divers qui en ont besoin. En Turquie, parallèlement aux informations ci-dessus, 83% de l’électricité de l’an 2008 provient des sources d’énergie fossile. Les perspectives d'avenir prévoient que la demande d’énergie de la Turquie augmentera et l’effet naturel de cette croissance sera l’augmentation du taux de dépendance énergétique à l'égard des autres pays. Les travaux effectués démontrent que, parmi les sources d’énergies renouvelables de la Turquie, le pouvoir hydraulique et le potentiel d’énergie éolienne sont les plus importants et que chacune de ces deux sources ont des potentiels techniques pour la production de l’électricité. La multiplication des centrales éoliennes au cours de ces dernières années est à relier à des facteurs comme la préparation de l’Atlas d’Energie Eolienne Turc, la disposition des lois afin d’aider les entrepreneurs du secteur privé et l’augmentation des prix du pétrole. Les centrales éoliennes fonctionneront dans la région de Marmara, la région d’Egée et dans la partie de méditerranée orientale de la Turquie où se manifestent plus souvent les vents violents. Il est probable que quelques autres centrales seront construites dans d'autres régions que celles citées précédemment.Covering its energy requirement from fossil energy sources for the most part, Turkey relies on outside sources to procure energy required for its economy and different sectors. Similarly, Turkey had produced 83 pct of the overall electricity in 2008 out of fossil energy sources. Future projectors indicate that the energy requirement of our country would augment and foreign-dependency in energy would thus increase accordingly.  The on-going studies state that especially hydraulic power and wind

  7. History of the Energy Research and Development Administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, A.L.

    1982-03-01

    Congress created the Energy Research and Development Administration on October 11, 1974 in response to the Nation's growing need for additional sources of energy. The new agency would coordinate energy programs formerly scattered among many federal agencies, and serve as the focus point for a major effort by the Federal Government to expand energy research and development efforts. New ways to conserve existing supplies as well as the commercial demonstration of new technologies would hopefully be the fruit of the Government's first significant effort to amalgamate energy resource development programs. This history briefly summarizes the accomplishments of the agency.

  8. Capacity building in renewable energy technologies in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fridleifsson, Ingvar

    2010-09-15

    The renewable energy sources are expected to provide 20-40% of the world primary energy in 2050, depending on scenarios. A key element in the mitigation of climate change is capacity building in renewable energy technologies in the developing countries, where the main energy use growth is expected. An innovative training programme for geothermal energy professionals developed in Iceland is an example of how this can be done effectively. In 1979-2009, 424 scientists/engineers from 44 developing countries have completed the 6 month courses. In many countries in Africa, Asia, C-America, and E-Europe, UNU-GTP Fellows are among the leading geothermal specialists.

  9. ACHP | Energy Development, Transmission, and Historic Preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    with a focus on facilitating and expanding production within our borders, as well as creating the . While technologies vary (solar, wind, geo-thermal, bio-fuels, etc.), the challenges for the management proposing energy and transmission projects on federal land CEQ and ACHP's Handbook on Integrating NEPA and

  10. Geothermal Energy Development annual report 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    This report is an exerpt from Earth Sciences Division Annual Report 1979 (LBL-10686). Progress in thirty-four research projects is reported including the following area: geothermal exploration technology, geothermal energy conversion technology, reservoir engineering, and geothermal environmental research. Separate entries were prepared for each project. (MHR)

  11. Energy development in the Great Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nora Devoe

    2008-01-01

    The United States, with less than 5 percent of the world’s population, consumes 40 percent of the oil and 23 percent of natural gas annual global production. Fluctuating and rising energy prices can be expected to continue with political instability in producing countries and intensifying supply competition from expanding Asian economies. The United States seeks to...

  12. The Water Demand of Energy: Implications for Sustainable Energy Policy Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Madani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available With energy security, climate change mitigation, and sustainable development as three main motives, global energy policies have evolved, now asking for higher shares of renewable energies, shale oil and gas resources in the global energy supply portfolios. Yet, concerns have recently been raised about the environmental impacts of the renewable energy development, supported by many governments around the world. For example, governmental ethanol subsidies and mandates in the U.S. are aimed to increase the biofuel supply while the water footprint of this type of energy might be 70–400 times higher than the water footprint of conventional fossil energy sources. Hydrofracking, as another example, has been recognized as a high water-intensive procedure that impacts the surface and ground water in both quality and quantity. Hence, monitoring the water footprint of the energy mix is significantly important and could have implications for energy policy development. This paper estimates the water footprint of current and projected global energy policies, based on the energy production and consumption scenarios, developed by the International Energy Outlook of the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The outcomes reveal the amount of water required for total energy production in the world will increase by 37%–66% during the next two decades, requiring extensive improvements in water use efficiency of the existing energy production technologies, especially renewables.

  13. Croatian Energy Policy as Function of Regional Development and Employment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potocnik, V.

    2006-01-01

    The Republic of Croatia has modest proven fossil fuels (oil and gas) reserves and relatively abundant renewable energy potential (wind, solar, biomass, geothermal, hydro), distributed mainly in less developed regions of Croatia. The Croatian energy system is excessively dependent on expensive oil and natural gas (80% of primary energy), compared to the European Union (61%), and the world average (58%). Approximately 60% of total energy is imported, which considerably contributes to the country's very high foreign trade deficit and foreign debt. Putting into focus of the Croatian energy policy the improvement of energy efficiency and implementation of renewable energies would significantly increase opportunities for mitigating rather wide regional development disparities and high unemployment rates, at the same time reducing energy import, foreign trade deficit and foreign debt, and contributing to energy security as a part of the national security.(author)

  14. Review of areas of search for renewable energy developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This report addresses planning policy issues related to the development of wind energy, small scale hydro power, energy from waste, landfill gas, and biomass fuels with the aim of improving planning policies in the development plans so that the benefits from renewable energy are recognised in the individual planning applications. The background to the project is traced, and renewable energy technologies and current renewable energy policies are reviewed. The relevance of 'Area of Search' and criteria-based policies, and the renewable energy policies are examined, and key findings relating to the ongoing reviews of planning policies, the national policy guidance, and required targets for renewable energy, the appropriateness of areas of search policies, community benefits and perceptions, local energy strategies, and consistency of renewable energy policies are discussed. (UK)

  15. Implementation of sustainable energy programs in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitalnik, J.

    2001-01-01

    Energy, a major contributor to development, is an essential element for increasing quality of life. During the next decades, the developing world will experience an explosive increase of energy demand, requiring enormous efforts and ingenuity to be fully satisfied. Delays may create public frustration for not achieving paradigm levels of quality of life, giving eventually rise to serious pressures on governments. The concept of sustainable energy options for development cannot be analyzed under the same prism in developed and developing countries. The relative degree of a country development should be introduced when setting up the path to sustainable development. (author)

  16. Energy, economy and development (EED) triangle: Concerns for India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, A.; Samdarshi, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we discuss issues involving energy security with economic growth and development that brings out (i) the dimension of physical security alternative, (ii) framework for a pan South East Asian platform to support energy security and (iii) requirement of promoting regional energy cooperation and specific energy peace initiatives. Sustaining projected economic growth rate coupled with energy security in future is a concern for all developing countries like India. The energy security of these nations is threatened by the disruption of energy supplies by ongoing energy terrorism and geopolitical conflicts in the region. India's geo-strategic position and increasing energy dependence raises concerns for its energy security. We discuss energy security, examine factors and approaches to attempt the energy security in the light of economic growth and development. - Highlights: → India's perspective on evolving energy security concepts and risks analysed. → Model in the form of EED triangle proposed. → New potential energy security alternatives proposed in the light of the model.

  17. Energy, economy and development (EED) triangle: Concerns for India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaturvedi, A. [Department of Energy, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784028, Assam (India); Samdarshi, S.K., E-mail: drsksamdarshi@rediffmail.com [Department of Energy, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784028, Assam (India)

    2011-08-15

    In this paper we discuss issues involving energy security with economic growth and development that brings out (i) the dimension of physical security alternative, (ii) framework for a pan South East Asian platform to support energy security and (iii) requirement of promoting regional energy cooperation and specific energy peace initiatives. Sustaining projected economic growth rate coupled with energy security in future is a concern for all developing countries like India. The energy security of these nations is threatened by the disruption of energy supplies by ongoing energy terrorism and geopolitical conflicts in the region. India's geo-strategic position and increasing energy dependence raises concerns for its energy security. We discuss energy security, examine factors and approaches to attempt the energy security in the light of economic growth and development. - Highlights: > India's perspective on evolving energy security concepts and risks analysed. > Model in the form of EED triangle proposed. > New potential energy security alternatives proposed in the light of the model.

  18. Research and development for the nuclear energy of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, P.

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of the energy demand increase facing the environment protection, the three main objectives of the research and development for the nuclear energy are developed in this document: to support the today nuclear industry, to answer the public anxiety concerning the sanitary and environmental impact of nuclear activities, to design, evaluate and develop new reactors. (A.L.B.)

  19. Policies and legislation driving Taiwan's development of renewable energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liou, Hwa Meei

    2010-01-01

    Under the current wave of international responses to the growing threat of climate change, Taiwan cannot afford to step back from its goal of advancing its renewable energy, strengthening its energy self sufficiency and energy security. This paper will first analyze the high level dependency structure of Taiwan's energy demands; then we will explore Taiwan current situation in terms of renewable energy development; furthermore from an overview of the course of changes and development in Taiwan's energy policy, highlight the commitment to and aims of Taiwan's Renewable Energy Development, made by the government at the Annual National Energy Conference. Fourth, we shall analyse technological R and D, incentives, taxes, market reforms and other related policy tools. Fifth, in light of public announcements and budgets set in recent years for Taiwan's renewable energy research plan, highlight main strategies being given impetus by the government. Sixth, the author will discuss the implications of recent significant legal reforms to the development of renewable energy in Taiwan and from the correlating aspects of industrial structures and energy consumption, take the first steps in emphasizing the urgent need for adjustments to be made to Taiwan's industrial structure. Finally, this paper will conclude by examining current policies, legislation and strategies which are in place to promote this area in Taiwan and discuss the potential competitiveness and future scenarios which the development of Renewable Energy could mean for Taiwan. (author)

  20. Combined generation of electric and heating energy in future development of Yugoslav energy sector until 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djajic, Nenad; Zivanovic, Vladimir

    2000-01-01

    Development of the district heating system in the FR Yugoslavia, beside the combined generation of electric and heating energy presents a necessity for energy, economic and ecological reasons. Although the structure of energy reserves is rather unfavourable considering that the lignite is being predominantly used, available reserves of energy raw material are able to ensure the long-term development of Yugoslav energy sector, and to offer real possibilities for considerable substitution of foreign good quality fuels, especially in district heating systems. Their further development will depend, among other things: on the implementation of new technological solutions for the exploitation of local energy resources; need of reconstruction, revitalisation and transformation of old condensing thermal power plants into the cogeneration plants; installation of remote controlled transmission of heating energy as well as on development of heating plants and smaller co-generation plants based on local energy resources. (Authors)

  1. Sustainable development - the potential contribution of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdier, Jean-Pierre; Barre, Bertrand; Durret, Louis-Francois

    1998-01-01

    Sustainable development combines development, durability and sustainability. Energy is crucial for development: it brings work, nutrition, health, security, community, etc. Electrical energy offers the most possibilities for the consumer, particularly as regards the problems of pollution on the site of consumption. Nuclear generation is one of the best ways of producing electricity. Midway between stock energies and flow energies, it has several advantages: low consumption of resources, safety, compactness and cleanliness. Waste is not a specifically nuclear problem: it should be considered in terms of a life cycle analysis; construction, dismantling and functioning have to be assessed. The size of certain energies' contribution to the greenhouse effect is therefore made clear. Reprocessing represents a saving of energy, without environmental or health damage. It contributes to energy control, and therefore to sustainable development

  2. Model of sustainable development of energy system, case of Hamedan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahabmanesh, Aref; Saboohi, Yadollah

    2017-01-01

    Sustainable economic growth and improvement of the social welfare depend upon the sufficient supply of energy resources, while the utilization of energy resources is one of the main factors of environmental degradation. This research is involved with development of a sustainable energy system model and a new method for sustainability assessment. This model represents the flow of energy from primary resources through processing, conversion, and end-use technologies in an optimization framework where the useful energy demand in various social and economic sectors is met. The impact of energy supply and consumption chain on the environment at each level of energy system is also embedded in the model structure. A multi-criteria analysis of changes is then applied and sustainable development indices of the whole system are concluded. Finally, effects of the energy subsidy policy and high economic growth rate on sustainability of the energy system in three scenarios are analyzed. Results demonstrate that energy subsidy decelerates the improvement rate of the total sustainability index. Also, when a high economic growth is accompanied with the energy subsidy this index reduces considerably. Results show that how penetration of renewable energy potentials changes the sustainability situation of energy systems. - Highlights: • Developing a new model for sustainable energy systems. • Presenting a new method for sustainability assessment of energy systems. • Optimizing the energy flow and capacity expansion of Hamedan energy system. • Utilizing an MCDA approach to obtain sustainability indices of the whole system. • Analysis of energy subsidy and high economic growth on energy sustainability.

  3. The energy situation and its sustainable development strategy in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Na; Lior, Noam; Jin, Hongguang

    2011-01-01

    The paper briefly summarizes China's energy situation and sustainable development strategy as they were by 2009. The energy consumption in 2009 is reported to be 3.1 billion tons standard coal equivalent, 1/7 of the world total, 6.3% higher than in the year 2008, and its share of world CO 2 emissions increased rapidly to 20.3% in 2006. These trends are most likely to continue with China's plan to accomplish its social and economy development goals. To address these problems and also respond to increasing world pressure for reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, the Chinese government plans and has legislated promotion of energy conservation, efficiency, renewable energy technologies and use, and reduction of energy-related environmental impacts to reduce energy intensity by 20% during the 2006-2010 period, and to reduce the CO 2 emission/GDP ratio by 40-45% by 2020 relative to 2005. China is facing severe energy-related challenges that conflict resources shortages with the planned rapid economic development, energy use with the related environmental pollution, and new technology with the old production/consumption patterns. It is recognized that energy development must, however, follow a sustainable path to coordinate economy growth, social development, and environmental protection. -- Highlights: → A brief summary of China's energy situation and plans in 2009; → Energy consumption and CO 2 emissions are likely to continue rising; → China to reduce energy intensity, and the (CO 2 emission)/GDP ratio by 40-45% by 2020; → Energy-related challenges and desired sustainable development strategy are discussed; → The strategy core is energy conservation and non-fossil fuel energy development.

  4. Some policy aspects of energy development in Tanzania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mwandosya, M J [Ministry of Water, Energy and Minerals and Univ. of Dar es Salaam (TZ)

    1991-01-01

    Tanzania's energy policy goals must reconcile the need to ensure continuity and security of oil supplies on one hand and the need to reduce the burden on the economy of imports of petroleum on the other. Petroleum imports account for 40% of the value of the country's export earnings, having risen from 5% in 1964. Therefore, the national energy policy goals, must have the immediate task of overcoming problems caused by this total dependence on imported petroleum. Another immediate goal of the national energy policy should be the minimisation of biomass energy use in order to reduce deforestation and its ecological and social consequences. Although not articulated in a concise form, the development of the energy sector in Tanzania over the last two decades has followed a consistent pattern based on the following principles: the need to exploit the abundant hydroelectric energy sources; the need to develop and utilise other indigenous energy sources such as coal and natural gas; the need to step up petroleum exploration activities; the need to arrest the depletion of wood through the evolution of more appropriate land management practices, wood plantation and woodlot development and use of more efficient woodfuel technologies; the need to minimise energy price fluctuations through strengthening and rationalisation of energy supply sources and infrastructure and a rational energy pricing structure; the need to develop the human resource potential; and the need to develop an indigenous capacity for research and development in energy systems technologies.

  5. Energy technology transfer to developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldemberg, J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper gives some examples of how technology transfer can successfully be given to third world countries to allow them to benefit in their quest for economic growth and better standards of living through reduced energy consumption and environmental pollution. It also suggests methods by which obstacles such as high investment costs, lack of information, market demand, etc., can be overcome in order to motivate technological transfer by industrialized countries

  6. Magnetic fusion energy research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    This report on the Department of Energy's Magnetic Fusion Program was requested by the Secretary of Energy. The Panel finds that substantial progress has been made in the three years since the previous ERAB review, although budget constraints have precluded the engineering initiatives recommended in that review and authorized in the Magnetic Fusion Energy Engineering Act of 1980 (the Act). Recognizing that the goals of the Act cannot now be met, the Panel recommends that the engineering phase be further postponed in favor of a strong base program in physics and technology, including immediate commitment to a major new tokamak-based device for the investigation of an ignited long-pulse plasma designated in this report as the Burning Core Experiment or BCX. Resources to design such a device could be obtained from within the existing program by redirecting work toward to BCX. At this time it is not possible to assess accurately the potential economic viability of fusion power in the future. The Panel strongly recommends expansion of international collaboration, particularly the joint construction and operation of major new unique facilities, such as the proposed BCX

  7. Tools for tracking progress. Indicators for sustainable energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.; Rogner, H.H.; Aslanian, G.

    2000-01-01

    A project on 'Indicators for Sustainable Energy Development (ISED)' was introduced by the IAEA as a part of its work programme on Comparative Assessment of Energy Sources for the biennium 1999-2000. It is being pursued by the Planning and Economic Studies Section of the Department of Nuclear Energy. The envisaged tasks are to: (1) identify the main components of sustainable energy development and derive a consistent set of appropriate indicators, keeping in view the indicators for Agenda 21, (2) establish relationship of ISED with those of the Agenda 21, and (3) review the Agency's databases and tools to determine the modifications required to apply the ISED. The first two tasks are being pursued with the help of experts from various international organizations and Member States. In this connection two expert group meetings were held, one in May 1999 and the other in November 1999. The following nine topics were identified as the key issues: social development; economic development; environmental congeniality and waste management; resource depletion; adequate provision of energy and disparities; energy efficiency; energy security; energy supply options; and energy pricing. A new conceptual framework model specifically tuned to the energy sector was developed, drawing upon work by other organizations in the environmental area. Within the framework of this conceptual model, two provisional lists of ISED - a full list and a core list - have been prepared. They cover indicators for the following energy related themes and sub-themes under the economic, social and environmental dimensions of sustainable energy development: Economic dimension: Economic activity levels; End-use energy intensities of selected sectors and different manufacturing industries; energy supply efficiency; energy security; and energy pricing. Social dimension: Energy accessibility and disparities. Environmental dimension: Air pollution (urban air quality; global climate change concern); water

  8. Energy consumption and economic development after the energy price increases of 1973

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielewski, J.

    1993-01-01

    The interdependence between energy consumption and economic development are highlighted in this research, which focuses on energy price rises between 1973 and 1989. Three groups of countries are identified, developing and developed market economies and centrally planned economies. Two areas of interdependence are examined, firstly the dynamic relationship between primary energy consumption growth and real economic growth and secondly the static relationship between primary energy consumption and national income. In the period under review, developing market economies reacted most strongly to higher energy prices, with lower energy consumption while maintaining real growth in the Gross Domestic Product. However developing countries and centrally planned economies increased their energy consumption per unit of national income although the rate of increase slowed after 1975. (UK)

  9. Developing Research Capabilities in Energy Biosciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Donald D.

    2008-01-01

    Scientists founded the Life Sciences Research Foundation (LSRF) in 1983 as a non-profit pass through foundation that awards post doctoral fellowships in all areas of the life sciences. LSRF scientists review hundreds of applications each year from PhDs seeking support. For example this year, our 26th, we received 800 applications and our peer review committee will choose about 50 finalists who are eligible for these awards. We have no endowment so we solicit sponsors each year. The fellowships are sponsored by research oriented companies, foundations, philanthropists, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and other organizations who believe in the value of awarding fellowships to the best and the brightest young scientists. Our web site has a complete listing of all details about LSRF (http://www.lsrf.org/). In the late 1980s the Division of Bioscience in the Office of Basic Energy Science, a granting agency of the Department of Energy, joined this partnership. Bioscience's mandate was to support non-medical microbiology and plant sciences. LSRF received a series of 5 year grants from DOE to award fellowships to our top applicants in these fields of research. We began to support DOE-Energy Bioscience post doctoral fellows in 1989. From 1989 through 2004 when DOE funding ended our partnership awarded 41 DOE-Energy Bioscience Fellows of the Life Sciences Research Foundation. Each of these was a three year fellowship. DOE-Energy Biosciences was well matched with LSRF. Our extensive peer review screened applicants in all areas of the life sciences. Most LSRF sponsors are interested in supporting fellows who work on diseases. At the time that we began our partnership with DOE we had no sponsors willing to support plant biology and non medical microbiology. For 15 years DOE played a major role in the training of the very best young scientists in these important fields of research simply through its support of LSRF post doctoral fellows. Young scientists interested in

  10. Non-conventional Energy Sources and Energy Development Strategy of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalea, M.

    2006-01-01

    The distinction between unconventional renewable energy resources is elaborated. Further, general and specific properties of unconventional energy resources are concisely recapitulated; also comparison is made to conventional energy resources. Exact data are brought forth, investment and operative costs are discussed which illustrate some properties of unconventional energy resources. Overview of obligations of different countries is given as well, which derive from the EC directive on renewable energy resources. At the end, a critical view on renewable energy resources in the Strategy of energy development of Croatia is given.(author)

  11. Energy and climate change: the role of nuclear energy for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, A.; Schmid, G.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear energy is an important part of a balanced energy mix. Nuclear energy has the potential to make a significant contribution both to economic development and to a significant cost-effective reduction in carbon emissions, probably the two most salient aspects of sustainable development. Nuclear energy has clearly demonstrated its usefulness and favorable contribution in the past. Continuous development of nuclear technologies is warranted to achieve future sustainable development. Therefore, an open discussion on the potential future role of nuclear can be helpful to remove some political motivated constraints on nuclear power development. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs

  12. Public-Private Partnership for Regional Development of Renewable Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea ZAMFIR

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the public-private partnership as a possible solution for regional development of renewable energy. Firstly, the study reveals the strong connection between renewable energy and sustainable regional development, and secondly, the study discloses some reasons for developing renewable energy through public-private partnerships in Romania’s regions. The findings of this study reveal that there is a strong need for a renewable energy partnership between public authorities, business community and civil society in order to achieve the regional development of renewable energy. The results of this study may be used for upcoming research in the area of implementing renewable energy projects through public-private partnerships in order to achieve sustainable regional development.

  13. Energy and the World Summit on Sustainable Development: what next?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding-Fecher, Randall; Winkler, Harald; Mwakasonda, Stanford

    2005-01-01

    Given the importance of energy issues to sustainable development, energy was a priority issue at the World Summit on Sustainable Development in August 2002. The objective of this paper is to examine the outcomes of the Summit on energy, and to assess them against proposals to address the lack of access to modern energy and the need to move toward a cleaner energy system. We find that lack of political leadership from key countries prevented agreement not only on targets for renewable energy, but also on a programme to promote access. The achievements of the Summit were limited to enabling activities such as capacity building and technology transfer, rather than substantive agreements. While WSSD put energy higher on the agenda than before, no institutional home or programme to take the issues forward has emerged. This therefore remains a critical challenge to be addressed. Achieving this broad goal will require building a coalition to promote cleaner energy, and committing resources to programme for energy access. Based on analysis of proposals and the negotiations, we propose several key areas where progress is still possible and necessary, including: shifting more international public and private energy financing toward access investments and cleaner energy investments, advancing regional approaches to access and renewable energy targets, and a range of mechanisms to strengthen institutional capacity for integrating energy and sustainable development

  14. Developing a regional energy plan for two counties in Ireland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, David; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Lund, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Developing a sustainable energy supply will most likely require a transition from large-scale centralised plants to decentralised distributed generation. Consequently, local planning authorities will play a more important role in energy planning in the coming years, as more decentralised energy f...

  15. Future of cluster developments : lessons from Energy Valley, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manickam, Anu

    2017-01-01

    The research explored how a Dutch energy cluster embedded within a larger context of European and global developments reflected complex dynamics due to changes in its context. The case study explored Energy Valley of the Netherlands, a peripheral region that meets the challenge of energy transition,

  16. Solar energy research and development: program balance. Annex, Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-02-01

    An evaluation of federal research, development, and demonstration options on solar energy is presented. This assessment treats seven groups of solar energy technologies: solar heating and cooling of buildings, agricultural and industrial process heat, biomass, photovoltaics, thermal power, wind, and ocean thermal energy conversion. The evaluation methodology is presented in detail. (MHR)

  17. Renewable energy development in China: policies, practices and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, Jingyi

    2009-01-01

    Energy demand in China has risen rapidly, driven by its massive economic growth. Meanwhile, the energy system in China heavily depends on fossil fuels, which causes serious problems of climate change and air pollution. China started to develop renewable energy about 30 years ago, aiming to alleviate

  18. Renewable and nuclear energy contribution to the electric systems of developed and developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percebois, J.

    1994-01-01

    Economically, the nuclear energy is favourable. The investments to realize in the energy field are substantial. The environmental quality implements the renewable energies which must be more efficient. Energy control frames the largest managing margin for the future energy and for the relations between energy and environment. Few countries can control their nuclear surety. Nowadays, in the developing countries, electrical energy needs are very weak, so the interconnection to the network is not necessary and the access price to electricity is very high

  19. Proceedings of the 8. Brazilian congress on energy: energy policy, regulation and sustainable development. v. 2: energy planning and policy, energy conservation and rational use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The theme energy policy, regulation and sustainable development chosen for the 8. Brazilian congress on energy to be held in Rio de Janeiro from 30 November of 1999 to 02 December of 1999, specifically means the contribution of energy to a satisfactory quality of life for everyone. Within such a context, the congress technical programme theme has been structured around six different divisions: energy, environment and development; energy sector regulation; energy policy and planning; technology innovation; energy conservation; and renewable energy sources and rural areas energy supply

  20. Proceedings of the 8. Brazilian congress on energy: energy policy, regulation and sustainable development. v. 1: energy, environment and energy sector regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The theme energy policy, regulation and sustainable development chosen for the 8. Brazilian congress on energy to be held in Rio de Janeiro from 30 November of 1999 to 02 December of 1999, specifically means the contribution of energy to a satisfactory quality of life for everyone. Within such a context, the congress technical programme theme has been structured around six different divisions: energy, environment and development; energy sector regulation; energy policy and planning; technology innovation; energy conservation; and renewable energy sources and rural areas energy supply

  1. Integrated sustainable development and energy resource planning

    OpenAIRE

    Virgiliu NICULA

    2011-01-01

    Integrated sustainable development of a country cannot be conceived and begun without considering in an intricate tandem environmental protection and economic development. No one can exist without a natural material support of the life he or she enjoys. All economic development plans must include environmental and human civilization’s protection implicitly. Integrated resource planning must be done in an absolutely judicious manner, so we can all leave as a legacy for future generations both ...

  2. Statistical Analysis of Development Trends in Global Renewable Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina D. Simonova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the economic and statistical analysis of industries associated with the use of renewable energy sources in several countries. The dynamic development and implementation of technologies based on renewable energy sources (hereinafter RES is the defining trend of world energy development. The uneven distribution of hydrocarbon reserves, increasing demand of developing countries and environmental risks associated with the production and consumption of fossil resources has led to an increasing interest of many states to this field. Creating low-carbon economies involves the implementation of plans to increase the proportion of clean energy through renewable energy sources, energy efficiency, reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The priority of this sector is a characteristic feature of modern development of developed (USA, EU, Japan and emerging economies (China, India, Brazil, etc., as evidenced by the inclusion of the development of this segment in the state energy strategies and the revision of existing approaches to energy security. The analysis of the use of renewable energy, its contribution to value added of countries-producers is of a particular interest. Over the last decade, the share of energy produced from renewable sources in the energy balances of the world's largest economies increased significantly. Every year the number of power generating capacity based on renewable energy is growing, especially, this trend is apparent in China, USA and European Union countries. There is a significant increase in direct investment in renewable energy. The total investment over the past ten years increased by 5.6 times. The most rapidly developing kinds are solar energy and wind power.

  3. Sustainable energy developments in Europe and North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    Europe and North America account for 70% of world energy consumption; 61% of which is fossil fuels. Energy trends and patterns in this region, if pursued, would have a large impact on region- and world-wide energy and ecosystems. This report addresses the issues of whether projected trends and supply structures would be 'sustainable' i.e. meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs; what adaptations are warranted; and what role could and should be played by regional energy and environmental co-operation: including through the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe. The report is divided into three parts. Part 1 studies the interrelationships between environmental and energy policies in Europe and North America until 2010 and beyond. Part II contains research notes on CO{sub 2} concentration and energy scenarios; investment requirements of the energy supply industries in the ERE region for 1980-2000; energy technologies for the first decades of the 21st century. Scope and conditions for enhancing energy efficiency in the ERE region; CO{sub 2} and climate variation and its impact on energy policy in the USSR and European CMEA countries; the role of new and renewable sources of energy; projected energy developments in the ERE region until 2010, and pollution: synopsis of various international studies on the sustainability of energy developments. Part III describes the energy program of the UN-ECE.

  4. Energy development and CO2 emissions in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiaolin Xi

    1993-03-01

    The objective of this research is to provide a better understanding of future Chinese energy development and CO 2 emissions from burning fossil fuels. This study examines the current Chinese energy system, estimates CO 2 emissions from burning fossil fuels and projects future energy use and resulting CO 2 emissions up to the year of 2050. Based on the results of the study, development strategies are proposed and policy implications are explored. This study first develops a Base scenario projection of the Chinese energy development based upon a sectoral analysis. The Base scenario represents a likely situation of future development, but many alternatives are possible. To explore this range of alternatives, a systematic uncertainty analysis is performed. The Base scenario also represents an extrapolation of current policies and social and economic trends. As such, it is not necessarily the economically optimal future course for Chinese energy development. To explore this issue, an optimization analysis is performed. For further understanding of developing Chinese energy system and reducing CO 2 emissions, a Chinese energy system model with 84 supply and demand technologies has been constructed in MARKAL, a computer LP optimization program for energy systems. Using this model, various technological options and economic aspects of energy development and CO 2 emissions reduction in China during the 1985-2020 period are examined

  5. Renewable energy in Iran: Challenges and opportunities for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atabi, F.

    2004-01-01

    Around the globe, developing countries have reported different cases of successfully implemented renewable energy program supported by bilateral or multilateral funding. In developing countries subsidy has played a big role in renewable energy program marketing and whether this will lead to sustainable development is yet to be determined. The adoption of implementation strategies that will support sustainable development and overcoming barriers that hinder expansion of renewable energy technologies still remains as a big challenge to stake holders involved in promotion of renewable energy resources in developing countries. In this respect, developing countries need to re-examine their environmental policy for promotion of renewable energy technologies in order to define its role in revitalization of their economics. This paper reviews by policy incentives for promotion of renewable energy technologies in the Islamic Republic of Iran. Setting-up international collaborative business ventures between local industry in Iran and companies in developed countries is proposed as an implementation strategy that will appropriate diffusion of renewable energy technologies in the country. An organizational framework that may help to attain this objective is discussed and a structural model for renewable energy business partnership is presented. It is concluded that with appropriate policy formulations and strategies, renewable energy technologies can bring about the required socio-economic development in Iran

  6. RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES IN POLAND - CONDITIONS AND POSSIBILITES OF DEVELOPMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gawlik, L.; Mokrzycki, E.; Ney, R.

    2007-07-01

    The paper describes the state of the art in renewable energy sources development. The obligation resulting from the membership of Poland in the European Union as well as from other international agreements in the scope of renewable energy sources development are described. The production of electricity, heat and biofuels in Poland is given and the perspectives of development of particular renewable energy sources in Poland are discussed in the view of potential reserves and other constrains. The economic aspects of renewable energy technologies are shown. The environmental pros and cons of biomass energy development are described. Arguments for development of renewable energy sources use are stated: the decrease of dependence from primary energy sources, the decrease the emission of green house gases and the recovery of agricultural regions of the country. In conclusion it is stated that the significance of renewable energy sources in Polish conditions is constrained to local societies. Their development should be adjusted to conditions predominating in a given region and that wider consumption of renewable energy sources should develop in conformity with sustainable development, so it is necessary to reach agreement between local societies, institutions dealing with environment protection and representatives of power sector. (auth)

  7. The position, role and development prospects of nuclear energy in China energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yuhui; Yan Jimin

    1996-12-01

    The fundamental features of the present energy system of China are discussed and analyzed. and it is pointed out that since the founding of the People's Republic of China, although the energy construction, including the development and use of nuclear energy, has achieved great success, the average energy resource per capita is still low. The following major issues, such as the transportation pressure raised from the energy structure of taking coal as the main, the increasing seriousness of environmental pollution, large amount of greenhouse gases emission and low 'energy efficiency', etc., have constrained the sustainable development of national economy and society. In accordance with the position of nuclear energy in the strategy of the energy development in south-east coastal areas of China, and the analysis of 'value criteria' and 'decision goal' system for the development and use of nuclear energy, it is thought the development of nuclear energy is an important way and the optimum selection to optimize China's energy system. In accordance with the fundamental policy and technical line, and the technical ability and foundation conditions, the strategic target, scale and overall arrangement for the development of China's nuclear power are proposed and the bright future for the development of China's nuclear power industry is comprehensively discussed and analyzed. (14 refs., 7 figs., 20 tabs.)

  8. Energy development and prospects of the province Guantanamo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Salva, Gustavo; Sotolongo Perez, Jose A; Correa Alvarez, Alfredo; Soto, Aguero; Lopez Martinez, Rafael Raul

    2007-01-01

    In this paper are exposed developed in the field renewable and conventional energy to achieve the sustainability of the most oriental of the Cuban counties. In the work they are exposed the paper of the institutions in as much as to Renewable Energy and sustainable Development refers, is concerned will stand out the topic of administration, environmental and Educational impact. It will also be deepened in the potential, generation, consumption and uses of the energy taken place by renewable sources, compared with energy data taken place by conventional energy. Also you it will expose the experience in hydroelectric, eolic projects, fotovoltaics, of biomass sugar, of coffee and others

  9. Energy Savings Potential and Research & Development Opportunities for Commercial Refrigeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-09-01

    This study documents the energy consumption of commercial refrigeration equipment (CRE) in the U.S. and evaluated the energy savings potential of various technologies and energy efficiency measures that could be applied to such equipment. The study provided an overview of CRE applications, assessed the energy-savings potential of CRE in the U.S., outline key barriers to adoption of energy-savings technologies, and recommended opportunities for advanced energy saving technology research. The study was modeled after an earlier 1996 report by Arthur D. Little, Inc., and updated key information, examined more equipment types, and outlined long-term research and development opportunities.

  10. Developing renewable energy in discontiguous Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carruth, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Infrastructural Urbanism’s advocacy of creating synergies between technological, economical, and ecological processes holds great potential for guiding domestic energy planning in a transforming Greenland. However, the movement has largely been conceived in the context of regional paradigms very...... different from Greenland, and has yet to fully engage with the sociocultural dimensions of infrastructures. This article proposes that for Infrastructural Urbanism to offer real potential in Greenland it must engage with micro-scale, everyday material practices, thereby thickening the scale and the scope...

  11. 1992 developments in Atomic Energy Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manger, R.

    1993-01-01

    The draft legislation amending the German Atomic Energy Act existing since the autumn of 1992 clearly focuses of the back end of the fuel cycle. Spent fuel and waste management is to be opened up, privatized, and paid for. Opening spent fuel and waste management supplement the former priority given to the utilization of radioactive residues by an equivalent option, i.e. the orderly disposal of such waste which, at present, is permitted only under very limited conditions. The draft still needs to be harmonized with other ministries. (orig.) [de

  12. Canadian energy policy and the struggle for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doern, G.B.

    2005-01-01

    This book examined selected energy policy issues and challenges confronting Canadians over the last two decades. The aim of the book was to provide an analysis of how energy policy has evolved. The book presents an overview of energy policy and its relationship to sustainable development. Politico-economic contexts were reviewed, including the changing nature of national and continental energy markets, energy policy and sustainable development. The difficulties in evaluating the environment in energy policy were discussed. Issues concerning electricity restructuring in Canada were reviewed, with reference to Canada-US electricity trade and the climate change agenda. Alberta's oil and gas industry and the Kyoto Protocol were also examined, with reference to voluntary measures to address climate change. Issues concerning stewardship, indigenous peoples and petroleum-based economic development in the north were reviewed, as well as northern gas pipeline policy and sustainable development. Conclusions and recommendations were made concerning the following 6 analytical and practical energy policy and governance challenges facing the current government: Kyoto Protocol implementation challenges; energy security; northern pipelines and concerns with Aboriginal peoples and sustainable northern development; electricity restructuring and the limits of regulatory-market design; energy science and technology and innovation policy links; and prospects for turning the struggle for sustainable development in the energy policy field into something closer to an actual achievement. 37 refs

  13. Development of renewable energies apart from biomass on farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brule, K.; Pindard, A.; Jaujay, J.; Femenias, A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes an overview and a prospective glance at the development of renewable energies in farms, apart those which are based on the production or use of biomass. Some indicators are defined (energy production and consumption). Stake holders are identified. Some retrospective major and emerging trends are discussed. The major trends are: growth and diversification of renewable energy production, calling to renewable energy production in farms. The emerging trends are: a recent increase of renewable energy production in farms apart from biomass, locally stressed land market, economic profitability of photovoltaic installations due to purchase tariffs. Some prospective issues are discussed: technical support, financial support, development of other energy sources, and tax policy on fossil energy used in agriculture. Three development hypotheses are discussed

  14. Renewable energy for rural development in Ethiopia: the case for new energy policies and institutional reform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolde-Ghiorgis, W. [Addis Ababa Univ., Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia)

    2002-09-01

    This article argues the case for introducing new energy policies in Ethiopia that will ensure energy initiatives for rural development meet the desired expectations. A review of the rural energy sector in Ethiopia is presented. Rural communities have for centuries relied solely on traditional biomass energy sources, human and animal power. In addition, sample findings show that the basic stock of traditional biomass energy resources is dwindling fast for two reasons: one, due to rapid population growth; and two, due to the absence of energy substitutes for traditional energy sources. Renewable energy technologies and other modern energy technologies are almost non-existent. In terms of budgetary allocation, rural energy development has not received a fair share of public investment in comparison to education, rural road construction and health. A key policy recommendation made in this article is the need for commitment from concerned authorities to the use of renewables for spurring rural development. This could be done through increasing the budget allocation to rural energy, which is currently negligible. Other policy recommendations include the modification of existing institutional frameworks for rural energy delivery, and the design and implementation of appropriate rural energy initiatives suitable for productive activities and sustainable development. (Author)

  15. Energy political self-sufficiency endangers sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    The world energy council (WEC), in its report, draws attention to questions which, in its opinion, deserve better attention. The decision-makers, to whom this report is mainly aimed, are meant to be encouraged to deal with these subjects. These are: - measures to increase global energy efficiency, - technology transfer, - the prices of energy, -research and development financing, - preventative measures against air pollution, - nuclear energy

  16. Energy Efficiency Policy Developments: September 2011-September 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to highlight energy efficiency policy action and planning in IEA member and key non-member countries over the period from September 2011 to September 2012. The report provides an overview of energy efficiency policy developments across the seven sectors covered by the IEA 25 Energy Efficiency Policy Recommendations (25 EEPR) – Cross-sectoral activities, Buildings, Appliances and Equipment, Lighting, Transport, Industry and Energy Providers.

  17. Energy in the strategy to Sahel Development : Situation - Perspectives - Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Burkina Faso does not have fossil energy source. The problem of energy thus arises with acuity for the rural and urban populations. The energy sources used are primarily the hydrocarbons, electrical energy, the woody fuels as new and renewable energies which are the biomass, the solar energy and the wind energy. The hydrocarbons are 100% imported, which makes the country very depend on over sea with respect to its conventional energy supply. These imports represent, for the years 1987 to 1992, 12 to 29% of the export earnings of the country. In addition to this dependence, there is a great weakness of the electrical communication and the too high cost of energy which led to the development of a strategic planning of the scientific research centered on the energy sector. In this field, research made it possible to undertake a study of the Burkina Faso energy system, to evaluate and exploit solar energy and wind mill, to develop the use of new methods allowing the energy saving in the households and the safeguard of the environment. In addition research shows that an economy is possible in the administrative buildings. Work is undertaken on air-conditioning by evaporation, the technology of the cold and the valorization of nonfood plant oils. There is also a work done on the de-pollution of industrial waste water, the energy valorization of the biomass as well as the improvement of the technology of the dolo, local beer containing sorghum. All these scientific research activities aim at the definition of a development policy on the energetic sector which takes into account the reduction of the cost of energy, the access of the populations to this resource, the reduction in the invoice of oil products imports as well as the promotion of environmental protection, the industrial development and that of the new methods of local technology as regards energy in Burkina Faso [fr

  18. A worldwide perspective on energy, environment and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dincer, Ibrahim; Rosen, Marc A.

    1998-01-01

    Problems with energy supply and use are related not only to global warming, but also to such environmental concerns as air pollution, ozone depletion forest destruction and emission of radioactive substances. These issues must be taken into consideration simultaneously if humanity is to achieve a bright energy future with minimal environmental impacts. Much evidence exists which suggests that the future will be negatively impacted if humans keep degrading the environment. There is an intimate connection between energy, the environment and sustainable development. A society seeking sustainable development ideally must utilise only energy resources which cause no environmental impact (e.g. which release no emissions to the environment). However, since all energy resources lead to some environmental impact, it is reasonable to suggest that some (not all) of the concerns regarding the limitations imposed on sustainable development by environmental emissions and their negative impacts can be part overcome through increased energy efficiency. A strong relation clearly exists between energy efficiency and environmental impact since, for the same services or products, less resource utilisation and pollution is normally associated with higher efficiency processes. Anticipated patterns of future energy use and consequent environmental impact (Focusing on acid precipitation, stratospheric ozone depletion and the greenhouse effect) are comprehensively discussed in this paper. Also, some solutions to current environmental issues in terms of energy conservation and renewable energy technologies are identified and some theoretical and practical limitations on increased energy efficiency are explained. The relations between energy and sustainable development, and between the environment and sustainable development, are described, and in illustrative example is presented. Throughout the paper several issues relating to energy, environment and sustainable development are examined

  19. Renewable energies for the South. New support for clean energy investment in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, W; Schmitz-Borchert, H P [eds.

    2001-07-01

    At the beginning of the 21st century there are still more than two billion people in the world without access to electricity and basic energy services. 'Energy poverty' impedes sustainable economic, social and environmental development of rural areas in developing countries. Large-scale diffusion of renewable energy technologies can help to overcome this situation. Major barriers are now beginning to be removed. This volume is the result of an international symposium on 'Renewable Energies for the South', held at the Science Park Gelsenkirchen, Gelsenkirchen/Germany. In took place on June 5-6, 2000 with more than 200 participants from 27 countries. The conference aimed at enhancing the dialogue between the multiple groups and actors involved in the development, transfer and application of renewable energy technologies. The following issues are covered in this book: - technology needs and framework conditions in developing countries - appropriate renewable energy technologies - financing renewable energy investment - capacity building and training programmes. (orig.)

  20. Oil substitution and energy saving - A research and development strategy of the International Energy Agency /IEA/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath-Nagel, S.

    1981-03-01

    Systems analyses were carried out by the International Energy Agency for the participating 15 countries in order to work out strategies and scenarios for lessening the dependence on imported oil and for developing new energy technologies. MARKAL model computations show the technology and energy mixes necessary for achieving a reduction of oil imports by two thirds over the next 40 years. The scenario 'high social security' examines the projected rise in energy consumption, the development of oil substitutes, the increase in alternative heating sources, the development of markets for liquid energy products, the demand for gas, and the relative usage of various energy generation methods. The recommended strategy involves as the most important points an increase in coal consumption, greater nuclear energy reliance and development of alternative technologies.

  1. Energy autarky: A conceptual framework for sustainable regional development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Matthias Otto; Staempfli, Adrian; Dold, Ursula; Hammer, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Energy autarky is presented as a conceptual framework for implementing sustainable regional development based on the transformation of the energy subsystem. It is conceptualized as a situation in which the energy services used for sustaining local consumption, local production and the export of goods and services are derived from locally renewable energy resources. Technically, the implementation of higher degrees of energy autarky rests on increasing energy efficiency, realizing the potential of renewable energy resources and relying on a decentralized energy system. Practically, a transition towards regional energy autarky requires administrations and civil society actors to initialize and develop projects at the local level, ensure their acceptance and support by the regional population and implement the project in collaboration with relevant actors. Besides the description of the concept and the benefits its implementation brings, this article provides a process for implementation, and some examples from Austria, Germany and Switzerland. - Highlights: → We introduce energy autarky as a conceptual framework for sustainable development. → Transforming the energy subsystem creates various benefits for communities. → Local participation should lead to social acceptance of renewables. → We review and discuss projects implementing energy autarky. → Further research needs to compare successful implementations with failures.

  2. Do we Need a Sociology of Energy Development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheodorou, Photini; Spathopoulos, Fivos

    2016-04-01

    The presentation discusses the need of developing a new area of scientific study, namely the "Sociology of Energy Development". It presents our knowledge gaps, regarding the reaction of societies towards energy projects. The presentation proposes that the first steps will be to study the "ethnography" of the energy companies and acquire a clear understanding of their specific cultures. In particular, the presentation argues for a need to raise meaningful questions about the values and attitudes of energy companies in areas such as environmental awareness; gender; cultural differences and other issues of conflict. It will also propose that a new conceptual framework is developed for the specific analysis of the relationship between society and energy companies, in the fields of public perception and trust. Finally, the presentation will conclude with an exploration of key principles, which may guide the development of new ethical practices in the field of energy.

  3. Renewable energies and the challenge for a sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    After a presentation of some basic definitions and data (locations, assessment, utilisation), this collective report proposes a first set of contributions about perspectives for renewable energies: their role in middle- and long-term world scenarios, their relationship with greenhouse effect, the relentless technological pursuit through the example of hydrogen. A second set of contributions deals with the relationship between renewable energies and sustainable development: in northern countries (an environmental responsibility and a society issue), in southern countries (the challenge of access to energy), the promotion of renewable energies in the North-South cooperation, the chaotic decentralized electrification program in South Africa, the relationship between energy and struggle against poverty, the search for instruments to stimulate renewable electricity development, the sociological constraints to renewable energy development, the sustainable development at the service of new industries in countries of the North

  4. Sustainable Development of Sewage Sludge-to-Energy in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Jingzheng; Liang, Hanwei; Dong, Liang

    2017-01-01

    ) to identify the critical barriers that hinder the sustainable development of sludge-to-energy industry in China and to investigate the cause-effect relationships among these barriers. Accordingly, some policy implications for promoting the sustainable development of sludge-to-energy industry in China were......In order to promote the sustainable development of sludge-to-energy industry and help the decision-makers/stakeholders to select the most sustainable technology for achieving the sludge-to-energy target, this study aims at using grey Decision Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL...

  5. Renewable Energy Contract Development Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page provides information on how available resources can help organizations effectively navigate the solar contract development process with the goal of RFP and contract transparency, completeness, and accountability of all involved parties.

  6. Condition of nuclear energy policy development in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudyma, A.; Piriashvili, B.; Khakimov, Y.; Khrushtchov, D.

    2000-01-01

    The preservation and strengthening of economic and political stability of the state depends first of all on the situation in the main branches of economy. One of such branches is the energy sector, whose level of development defines the place and the role of the state in the world community. On the other hand, the status of the energy sector, one of the major elements ensuring political and economic stability, determines energy security as well. Besides, the concept of energy sector development in general and nuclear energy in particular should be based on the real geopolitical situation, which Ukraine has faced after USSR disintegration. Therefore, the energy policy development is the most important link in the development of the state itself, for importance of this policy goes far beyond the frameworks of the energy sector. Besides, it is necessary to note, that the new geopolitical conditions have abruptly changed the course of economic and social development of the country. Frist of all, it was reflected in the significant drop of its energy security that resulted in: first sharp fall own fuel resources production and electric power generation; second significant reduction in inflow of energy resources to Ukraine. Such situation is stipulated by the general drop in the demand for power resources due to general fall in industrial and agricultural production, as well as by the sharp decrease in own energy resources production and absence of sufficient financial means for the acquisition of the deficient power resources import

  7. Present state and future of new energy technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, N

    1976-08-01

    The Sunshine Project was begun in 1973 by the Japanese Ministry of Industry to investigate all alternative energy sources other than nuclear. The project is subdivided into four separate areas, those being solar energy, geothermal energy, liquefaction and gasification of coal, and hydrogen fuel. This article describes the present state of these technologies and their probable future development. Although hydrogen fuel and coal liquefaction/gasification are still in the basic research stage solar and geothermal technologies are already well developed.

  8. Energy strategy in the national strategy of economy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop-Jordanov, Jordan; Boshevski, Tome; Hadzi-Mishev, Dimitar

    1997-01-01

    This paper is based on the sectorial study on energy, prepared by authors within the project 'National Strategy of Economic Development of Republic of Macedonia', carried out by the Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts. The aim is to define the basic lines for the development of energy sector in Macedonia until 2020. The main topics discussed comprise: fuel resources, thermal energy, electric power, price policy, forms of ownership and the environmental impacts. (author)

  9. Sustainable development of new energy vehicle industry in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingyang; Li, Lingzhi

    2018-03-01

    The new energy vehicle industry in China has developed rapidly in recent years, but there is still a gap in core technology. Some problems are brought the adverse effect on it, such as imperfect infrastructures, imperfect systems in market access and regulatory, single channels for marketing and low acceptance among consumer. Based on the development of new energy vehicle industry home and abroad, this paper puts forward some problems of new energy vehicles industry in China, then offers some feasible suggestions.

  10. Energy and development: a purpose for socialization of involved aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monestier, Alberto Tisnes.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis over the relationship between energy, the environment, the man and animals is developed, emphasizing social impacts and economic growth due to the use of energy. The sustainable development concept is evidenced by this analysis. Finally, the power generation by wind, solar and biomass is suggested as an option to improve the harmonic relations between man and environment. 10 refs., 2 tabs

  11. 78 FR 26394 - Renewable Energy and Related Services: Recent Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 332-534] Renewable Energy and Related Services: Recent Developments AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Extension of date for... USTR in investigation No. 332-534, Renewable Energy and Related Services: Recent Developments. DATES...

  12. Local energy developments based on spatial and systemic approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manickam, Anu

    Local energy developments from a spatial and systemic approach are highlighted using examples from a Dutch case study. Developments in energy systems included interconnectedness of contextual factors and systems responses. The need to explore both the contextual factors and systemic aspects are

  13. 75 FR 29706 - Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) for Energy Audits and Renewable Energy Development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-27

    ...) Identified need; (D) Target audience; (E) Timeline and type of activities/action plan; and (F) Marketing... is required; (ix) Outreach activities/marketing efforts specific to conducting energy audit and... marketing of the energy audit and renewable energy development assistance activities, including associated...

  14. Development of technologies for utilizing geothermal energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    In verifying the effectiveness of the deep geothermal resource exploration technology, development is being carried out on a fracture-type reservoir exploration method. The seismic exploration method investigates detailed structures of underground fracture systems by using seismic waves generated on the ground surface. Verification experiments for fiscal 1994 were carried out by selecting the Kakkonda area in which small fracture networks form reservoir beds. Geothermal resources in deep sections (deeper than 2000 m with temperatures higher than 350{degree}C) are promising in terms of amount of the resources, but anticipated with difficulty in exploration and impediments in drilling. To avoid these risks, studies are being progressed on the availability of resources in deep sections, their utilization possibility, and technologies of effective exploration and drilling. This paper summarizes the results of deep resource investigations during fiscal 1994. It also describes such technological development as hot water utilizing power generation. Development is performed on a binary cycle power generation plant which pumps and utilizes hot water of 150 to 200{degree}C by using a downhole pump. The paper also reports development on element technologies for hot rock power generation systems. It also dwells on development of safe and effective drilling and production technologies for deep geothermal resources.

  15. Enabling optimal energy options under the Clean Development Mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilau, Asmerom M.; Van Buskirk, Robert; Small, Mitchell J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper addresses the cost effectiveness of renewable energy technologies in achieving low abatement costs and promoting sustainable developments under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). According to the results of our optimal energy option's analysis, at project scale, compared with a diesel-only energy option, photovoltaic (PV)-diesel (PVDB), wind-diesel (WDB) and PV-wind-diesel (PVWDB) hybrids are very cost-effective energy options. Moreover, energy options with high levels of renewable energy, including 100% renewables, have the lowest net present cost and they are already cost effective without CDM. On the other hand, while the removal of about 87% carbon dioxide emissions could be achieved at negative cost, initial investment could increase by a factor of 40, which is one of the primary barriers hindering wider renewable energy applications in developing countries, among others. Thus, in order to increase developing countries' participation in the carbon market, CDM policy should shift from a purely market-oriented approach to investigating how to facilitate renewable energy projects through barrier removal. Thus, we recommend that further research should focus on how to efficiently remove renewable energy implementation barriers as a means to improve developing countries' participation in meaningful emission reduction while at the same time meeting the needs of sustainable economic development

  16. Renewable Energy Development in Indian Country: A Handbook for Tribes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacCourt, D. C.

    2010-06-01

    This handbook is designed to be an accessible reference for those who are new to tribal energy project development or seek a refresher on key development issues as they navigate the project development process. It builds upon the wealth of feedback and experiences shared by tribal and other participants in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's tribal energy training sessions to provide tribal leaders, tribal economic and energy enterprises, and those supporting them with a general overview of the renewable energy project development process as well as detailed guidance on the following: how to structure a renewable energy project transaction to protect tribal interests, with an emphasis on joint project development efforts undertaken with nontribal parties; key energy development agreements, including power sale agreements, transmission and interconnection agreements, and land leases; and ways tribes can finance renewable energy projects, including the sources of funding or financing that may be available, the types of investors that may be available, and federal tax incentives for renewable energy projects.

  17. Road map for renewable energy research and development in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel K. Khalil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Egypt possesses excellent potential for renewable energy (RE including solar, wind and biomass energy. Renewable energy technologies (RETs and systems have different needs for support in terms of research and development, demonstration and market development. For this purpose, the Energy Research Center (ERC at Cairo University has carried out a study with the ultimate goal of formulating a national development strategy and action plan for the local manufacture of renewable energy systems (RESs and components. The present study positions the different RETs and RESs and identifies the research and development needs for each technology. The study also suggests how to establish a competitive market for RET. For this purpose it builds and analyses a set of likely scenarios, and proposes a practical development strategy and a detailed action plan for achieving it.

  18. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Technology Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David J. Hill

    2007-07-01

    This plan describes the GNEP Technology Demonstration Program (GNEP-TDP). It has been prepared to guide the development of integrated plans and budgets for realizing the domestic portion of the GNEP vision as well as providing the basis for developing international cooperation. Beginning with the GNEP overall goals, it describes the basic technical objectives for each element of the program, summarizes the technology status and identifies the areas of greatest technical risk. On this basis a proposed technology demonstration program is described that can deliver the required information for a Secretarial decision in the summer of 2008 and support construction of facilities.

  19. Developing finance to meet energy industry challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morphett, C.

    1994-01-01

    The role of commercial financial institutions in the development of the world's oil and gas industry are charted in this article. Banks and other institutions have been lending money to the oil industry since the late 1920s. In the early days loans were short-term, but as the oil and gas industries have developed, using deeper wells and more complex technology, financial needs too have expanded. Better forecasting of future recovery levels, and a better understanding of reservoir characteristics has meant that lending institutions have advanced funds against projected oil revenues, with repayments due only as oil production comes on-line. (UK)

  20. Development, energy, environment: changing the paradigm; Developpement, Energie, Environnement: changer de paradigme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    A first set of contributions comments the various risks and challenges which are to be faced in terms of energy, climate and environment: the deadlock of present 'laisser-faire' policies, recent findings in climate science in 2005, oil as the reason of a possible economic crisis in developing countries, recent evolution of energy systems. The next set of contributions discusses the possible solutions and their limits: CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration in coal plants, nuclear renaissance, renewable energies, hydro-electricity, CO{sub 2} capture by biomass, energy sobriety, urban morphology and transports in emerging cities, integration of service demand with energy supply, energy decentralized production

  1. Nuclear energy role and potential for global sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujita, H.; Matsui, K.

    2006-01-01

    The long-term energy supply simulation that optimizes the energy system cost until 2100 for the world is being performed, by using the energy module of GRAPE model, where energy demand under the C02 emission constraint etc. is assumed. The model has been taken up for the trial calculation in I PCC the third report . Role and potential of nuclear energy system in the energy options is discussed here from the viewpoint of sustainable development with protecting from global warming. Taking the effort for energy conservation as major premise, carbon-sequestration for fossil fuel, renewable energy and nuclear energy should be altogether developed under the C02 constraint. Especially, fast breeder reactor will be attached importance to, as the 22nd century is approaching, due to its carbon free and resource limitless features when the nuclear generation cost is cheap as a current light water reactor level. It takes time around 30 years in order for breeding of Pu, a fast breeder reactor will begin to be introduced from around 2030. If the period for the technology establish of nuclear fuel cycle is assumed to be 30 years, it is necessary to start technical development right now. If the Kyoto Protocol, the emission constraint on only the developed countries, is extended in 21st century, it will promote the growth of nuclear power in the developed countries in the first half of the century. After 2050, the developing countries will face the shortage of uranium and plutonium. Carbon emission constraint should be covered all countries in the World not only for the developed countries but also for the developing countries. Therefore, it is important that the developing countries will use nuclear power effectively from the viewpoint of harmonization of energy growth and global environment. The policy that nuclear power is considered as Clean Development Mechanism would mitigate such global warming problems

  2. Large Energy Development Projects: Lessons Learned from Space and Politics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, Harrison H.

    2005-01-01

    The challenge to global energy future lies in meeting the needs and aspirations of the ten to twelve billion earthlings that will be on this planet by 2050. At least an eight-fold increase in annual production will be required by the middle of this century. The energy sources that can be considered developed and 'in the box' for consideration as sources for major increases in supply over the next half century are fossil fuels, nuclear fission, and, to a lesser degree, various forms of direct and stored solar energy and conservation. None of these near-term sources of energy will provide an eight-fold or more increase in energy supply for various technical, environmental and political reasons.Only a few potential energy sources that fall 'out of the box' appear worthy of additional consideration as possible contributors to energy demand in 2050 and beyond. These particular candidates are deuterium-tritium fusion, space solar energy, and lunar helium-3 fusion. The primary advantage that lunar helium-3 fusion will have over other 'out of the box' energy sources in the pre-2050 timeframe is a clear path into the private capital markets. The development and demonstration of new energy sources will require several development paths, each of Apollo-like complexity and each with sub-paths of parallel development for critical functions and components

  3. Renewable energies, development, and environment: discourses, realities, and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    After two contributions describing the context of renewable energies and their different objectives and roles in the North and in the South, a set of contributions discusses some controversies and generally accepted ideas about renewable energies: fossil energy appraisal and the greenhouse effect of presently used fuels, the issue of irregularity and climate hazards, photovoltaic energy as a development key for South countries, vulnerability of energy systems, renewable energies and energy market privatisation. The next set of contributions deals with different examples: renewable energies in Africa, electricity and high dams, small hydro developments in China, wind energy in Morocco, solar water-heaters in Tunisia, bio-energies and food security, second generation bio-fuels, biomass energy in Cambodia. Sheets are then proposed with a brief historical overview, a description of the state of the art, an indication of the installed power, of market shares, and a brief discussion of perspectives for the different renewable energy sources: large and small hydro, photovoltaic, thermodynamic solar, wind, geothermal, thermal solar, bio-fuels, biomass, and biogas

  4. Nuclear energy consumption and economic growth in nine developed countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolde-Rufael, Yemane; Menyah, Kojo

    2010-01-01

    This article attempts to test the causal relationship between nuclear energy consumption and real GDP for nine developed countries for the period 1971-2005 by including capital and labour as additional variables. Using a modified version of the Granger causality test developed by Toda and Yamamoto (1995), we found a unidirectional causality running from nuclear energy consumption to economic growth in Japan, Netherlands and Switzerland; the opposite uni-directional causality running from economic growth to nuclear energy consumption in Canada and Sweden; and a bi-directional causality running between economic growth and nuclear energy consumption in France, Spain, the United Kingdom and the United States. In Spain, the United Kingdom and the USA, increases in nuclear energy consumption caused increases in economic growth implying that conservation measures taken that reduce nuclear energy consumption may negatively affect economic growth. In France, Japan, Netherlands and Switzerland increases in nuclear energy consumption caused decreases in economic growth, suggesting that energy conservation measure taken that reduce nuclear energy consumption may help to mitigate the adverse effects of nuclear energy consumption on economic growth. In Canada and Sweden energy conservation measures affecting nuclear energy consumption may not harm economic growth.

  5. Development of the world energy requirement until 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, D.

    1977-01-01

    In its final report entitled 'Energy Global Prospects 1985 - 2000' and in three technical reports the Workshop on Alternative Energy Strategies (WAES), which was attended by 70 experts from 15 countries, in the summer of this year published the first worldwide forecast of the energy requirement up to the year 2000. The uncertainties affecting the long term development caused the WAES to employ a scenario in which the variables were economic growth, price levels of energy (and oil, respectively), and energy policy. Additional variables included to describe the long term problems arising in meeting the energy requirement are the coal vs. nuclear power alternative, the gross additions to the oil reserves, and assumptions about OPEC production limits. In view of the long lead times of technological developments and the extraordinarily high capital investments involved, rethinking is necessary right now, according to the WAES study, to find a possibility to change to other sources of fossil energy, nuclear power and, finally, renewable sources of energy, in view of the impending scarcity of the most important present source of energy, i.e., oil. Since the chances to meet a growing energy requirement by natural gas are viewed sceptically and a major contribution of new sources of energy is not expected to come forth before the next century, coal and nuclear power will be the main sources of energy supply for a foreseeable period of time to come. (orig.) [de

  6. Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meister, F.

    2001-01-01

    This chapter of the environmental control report deals with the environmental impact of energy production, energy conversion, atomic energy and renewable energy. The development of the energy consumption in Austria for the years 1993 to 1999 is given for the different energy types. The development of the use of renewable energy sources in Austria is given, different domestic heat-systems are compared, life cycles and environmental balance are outlined. (a.n.)

  7. Energy modelling towards low carbon development of Beijing in 2030

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Guangling; Guerrero, Josep M.; Jiang, Kejun

    2017-01-01

    Beijing, as the capacity capital of China, is under the pressure of climate change and pollution. Nonrenewable energy generation and consumption is one of the most important sources of CO2 emissions, which cause climate changes. This paper presents a study on the energy system modeling towards...... scenario 2030, (ii) BAU (business as usual) scenario 2030 and (iii) RES (renewable energies) scenario 2030. The results shows that the share of renewables can increase to 100% of electricity and heat production in the RE scenario. The primary fuel consumption is reduced to 155.9 TWh, which is 72 % of fuel...... renewable energy and low carbon development for the city of Beijing. The analysis of energy system modeling is organized in two steps to explore the potential renewable energy alternative in Beijing. Firstly, a reference energy system of Beijing is created based on the available data in 2014. The Energy...

  8. Wind energy in ''Basse Normandie'': the energies of the sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This paper brings together the main topics discussed during the 4. colloquium on the wind energy: the french lateness concerning the wind energy development, the regulatory framework concerning the wind turbines implementation sites, the wind energy situation in ''Basse Normandie'', the offshore wind energy, the site of Sortosville-en-Beaumont, the public relations, the employment and an analysis of some rumors and prejudices. (A.L.B.)

  9. The Danish energy crop research and development project - main conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gylling, Morten

    2003-01-01

    Production of energy crops in Denmark is more or less non-existent in Denmark at the time being. However, the need for biomass on the other side of year 2005 exceeds the existing biomass resources and a substantial amount of energy crops will be necessary in order to fulfil the goals in Energy 21. The targeted share of the use of renewable energy sources by year 2030 is approximately 30%. Energy crops are seen as the most important new resource in order to create a balanced input mix of renewable in the energy system. The energy crops are mainly seen as fuel in small and medium sized CHP plants and in the big power plants. The Danish energy crop project consists of three main parts: a demonstration part, a research and development part, and an overall assessment part. Based on the results from the project the following overall conclusions can be made: Seen from a strictly market and production economic point of view energy crops will not be competitive in a foreseeable future, neither as a production for farmers nor as a fuel at the utility companies; The costs per GJ of energy crops are still higher than a GJ of straw; The cost difference between annual and perennial energy crops are slightly in favour of perennials, however the conditions on the individual farms should govern the choice between annual and perennial energy crops; Energy crops must be seen as part of an overall environmental scheme covering both agriculture and the energy sector; Given the right production scheme energy crops can be grown on environmental sensitive areas and on most ground water protection areas; Adding the potential sustainability benefits like reduced nutrient leakage and reduced CO 2 emissions energy crops seem to be a sensible and sustainable solution; Due to different handling, storage and fuel characteristics an all year delivery scheme of energy crops should include a mix of different energy crops to keep overall cost down. (BA)

  10. FOREN 2004. Sustainable Energy Development and European Integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iancu Iulian

    2004-01-01

    The 7th Regional Energy Forum- FOREN 2004 with the main topic 'Sustainable Energy Development and European Integration' took place in Neptun-Olimp, on 13th to 17th June 2004. The event was organized by WEC Romanian National Committee, under the auspices of the World Energy Council (WEC). The event was accompanied by several related manifestation as: An up to date Technical Programme designed to explore key issues concerning the ability of the Romanian energy industry to integrate in the European Union; An Exhibition providing first hand access to service and equipment providers; A Partnership Programme, to present the achievements and developments of power companies in round tables, film projections, technical visits and advertising; Social events giving to participants the opportunity to establish direct connections with the Romanian colleagues. The Forum was open to members of the World Energy Council, energy industry leaders, government ministers and officials, heads of international organizations like: UNECE, EC, IEA, Eurelectric, IGU, EUROgas, USAID, academics, media, individual and corporate members interested in sustainable energy development. For further details concerning the agenda and registration. Forum 2004 was structured on five sections each containing a key issue a panel session, communication session and poster presentation on the following items: 1. Energy legislation and institutional framework; 2. The technological dimension of sustainable energy; 3. The ecological dimension of sustainable development; 4. The social dimension of sustainable development; 5. The power equipment manufacturing industry

  11. Efficient integration of renewable energy into future energy systems. Development of European energy infrastructures in the period 2030 to 2050

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, Carolin; Uhlig, Jeanette; Zoch, Immo (eds.)

    2011-10-15

    In consideration of strategic climate mitigation, energy security and economic competitiveness goals, the EU passed the Directive 2009/28/EC, including a binding target of 20 per cent renewable energy consumption in the EU by 2020. This target is comprehensive and includes energy generation, transport, heating and cooling sectors. In 2008, renewable energy consumption in the EU was about 10 per cent. So meeting the 20 per cent renewable energy objective will require massive changes in energy production, transmission and consumption in the EU. Furthermore, it is obvious that the development of the energy system will not stop in 2020, but that it will continue towards 2050 and beyond. Over the past century, the European electricity system was developed in line with a national utilit y perspective which heavily emphasised large, centralised conventional power production. Investment decisions for new energy infrastructure and technology were typically made at the national level. In the future, much more energy production will be based on local or regional renewable energy sources (RES). Many consumers may also become energy producers feeding into the infrastructures. Transnational energy transfers will gain in importance. These changes will require very different electricity and gas infrastructures and decision-making processes from today. Lack of infrastructure capacity is already a barrier for the further deployment of RES-based energy production in some regions in Europe. (orig.)

  12. Theoretical Developments in QCD Jet Energy Loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehtar-Tani, Yacine

    2016-12-15

    We review the recent developments in the theory of jet-quenching. First, we analyze the coherent vacuum cascade and incoherent medium-induced cascade separately. We then discuss the interplay between the two kinds of cascade and the resulting partial decoherence of the inner jet structure. Finally, we report on recent calculations of higher-order corrections. In particular, the dominant radiative corrections to jet observables that yield the renormalization of the jet-quenching parameter are addressed.

  13. Seasonal Solar Thermal Absorption Energy Storage Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daguenet-Frick, Xavier; Gantenbein, Paul; Rommel, Mathias; Fumey, Benjamin; Weber, Robert; Gooneseker, Kanishka; Williamson, Tommy

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a thermochemical seasonal storage with emphasis on the development of a reaction zone for an absorption/desorption unit. The heat and mass exchanges are modelled and the design of a suitable reaction zone is explained. A tube bundle concept is retained for the heat and mass exchangers and the units are manufactured and commissioned. Furthermore, experimental results of both absorption and desorption processes are presented and the exchanged power is compared to the results of the simulations.

  14. Update of geothermal energy development in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutroupis, N.

    1992-01-01

    Following the completion of the Geothermal Reconnaissance Study in Greece and the successful drilling of seven deep geothermal wells in the Aegean islands of Milos and Nisyros, PPC started the first step towards geothermal development for electricity production as follows: A geothermal electric pilot plant of 2 MW e nominal capacity was installed on the Zephyria plain in Milos island (1985). During a nine month operation of the plant, problems connected with its long term operation were solved (hot reinjection of the high salinity brine, turbine washing etc). A feasibility study regarding exploitation of the Nisyros geothermal resources was completed and PPC connected Nisyros island electrically to Kos island via submarine cables. As consequence of the reaction against geothermal development by the people of Milos in early 1989, the power plant is still out of operation and the feasibility study planned for Milos has been postponed. For similar reasons the Nisyros drilling contract for five new geothermal deep wells has not come into force as yet. This paper summarizes the main PPC geothermal activities to date, the problems caused by the reactions of the Milos and Nisyros population and the relevant PPC countermeasures, as well as outlining the PPC development program for the near future

  15. Renewable Energy Development In Africa - Challenges, Opportunities, Way Forward

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ram, Babu

    2010-09-15

    The unexploited potential of renewable energy in Sub-Saharan Africa can be traced back to national energy policies, which concentrate on the conventional electricity sector while the support for renewable resources remains on the fringes. This Paper reviews public policies and funding instruments to exploit renewable energy resources for increasing electricity and energy access rate in Africa. Estimates indicate that 8,500 MW renewable energy projects could be developed in short-term. Way forward, conclusions and recommendations are presented in this regard in the paper.

  16. Energy transition: development of the new French model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2014-01-01

    Many times postponed, the 'programming bill for a new French energy model', commitment of the President of the Republic Francois Hollande, will finally be presented at the Parliament in September with the hope that it will be passed on next spring. Developed on two-pillar approach - energy savings and renewable energies -, this bill should allow France to reduce half of its energy consumption between 2012 and 2050 and to increase the share of renewable energy sources of 14% by 2012 to 32% by 2030 in the power mix. (O.M.)

  17. Pascua Yaqui Tribe Renewable Energy Development and Deployment Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvayo, Maria

    2014-05-30

    In 2012, PYT was awarded a grant from the Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program to conduct a Renewable Energy Development and Deployment Feasibility Study that would define the technical and economic viability of renewable energy on tribal lands. Red Mountain Energy Partners (RMEP) was hired by PYT to complete the study. Through this study, Red Mountain concluded that there are viable opportunities for solar at Tortuga Ranch, the Casino del Sol and a third site near the Justice Center on Camino de Oeste.

  18. Low energy beam transport system developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudnikov, V., E-mail: vadim@muonsinc.com [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Han, B.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R. [ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Dudnikova, G. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 3261 (United States); Institute of Computational Technologies SBRAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-08

    For high brightness beam production it is important to preserve the brightness in the low energy beam transport system (LEBT) used to transport and match the ion beams to the next stage of acceleration, usually an RFQ. While electrostatic focusing can be problematic for high current beam transport, reliable electrostatic LEBT operation has been demonstrated with H{sup −} beams up to 60 mA. Now, however, it is commonly accepted that an optimal LEBT for high current accelerator applications consists of focusing solenoids with space charge compensation. Two-solenoid LEBTs are successfully used for high current (>100 mA) proton beam transport. Preservation of low emittances (~0.15 π mm-mrad) requires the addition of a heavy gas (Xe, Kr), which causes ~5% of proton loss in a 1 m long LEBT. Similar Xe densities would be required to preserve low emittances of H{sup −} beams, but such gas densities cause unacceptably high H{sup −} beam losses. A short LEBT with only one short solenoid, movable for RFQ matching, can be used for reduced negative ion stripping. A strong electrostatic-focusing LEBT has been successfully adopted for transport of high current H{sup −} beams in the SNS Front End. Some modifications of such electrostatic LEBTs are expected to improve the reliable transport of intense positive and negative ion beams without greatly degrading their low emittances. We concentrate on processes that determine the beam brightness degradation and on their prevention. Proposed improvements to the SNS electrostatic LEBT are discussed.

  19. Solar thermal power and photovoltaic energy are both developing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Jannic, N.; Houot, G.

    2010-01-01

    Thermodynamic solar energy and photovoltaic energy are expected to reach together a quarter of the world electricity production by 2050. In France the development of thermodynamic solar plants is hampered by the high cost of land in the sunny regions. As for photovoltaic energy, France has the potentiality to become an important producer. Since 2006, the French government has supported photovoltaic energy by proposing incentive electricity purchase prices guaranteed for 20 years. In 2006, the Ines research institute was founded, one of its research fields is the development of high yield silicon cells. (A.C.)

  20. Technologies for sustainable energy development in the long term. Proceedings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderberg Petersen, Leif; Larsen, Hans Hvidtfeldt

    2005-01-01

    The Risø International Energy Conference took place 23 - 25 May 2005 and the aim of the conference was to present and discuss new developments and trends in energy technologies which may make major contributions to sustainable energy developments in thecoming decades. The conference addressed R......&D related to the individual technologies as well as their integration into the local, regional and global energy systems. The proceedings are prepared from papers presented at the conference and received withcorrections, if any, until the final deadline on 15 June 2005....

  1. Sustainable Energy in Remote Indonesian Grids. Accelerating Project Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, Brian [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burman, Kari [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Davidson, Carolyn [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Elchinger, Michael [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hardison, R. [Winrock International, Little Rock, AR (United States); Karsiwulan, D. [Winrock International, Little Rock, AR (United States); Castermans, B. [Winrock International, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2015-06-30

    Sustainable Energy for Remote Indonesian Grids (SERIG) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded initiative to support Indonesia’s efforts to develop clean energy and increase access to electricity in remote locations throughout the country. With DOE support, the SERIG implementation team consists of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Winrock International’s Jakarta, Indonesia office. Through technical assistance that includes techno-economic feasibility evaluation for selected projects, government-to-government coordination, infrastructure assessment, stakeholder outreach, and policy analysis, SERIG seeks to provide opportunities for individual project development and a collective framework for national replication office.

  2. Energy indicators for tracking sustainability in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemmler, Andreas; Spreng, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Due to the fact that human activities and most sustainability issues are closely related to energy use, the energy system is a sound framework for providing lead indicators for sustainable development. Common energy-economic models enable the estimation of future states of the energy system. An energy system-based lead indicator set can be used to develop consistent and coherent future indicator estimates and to track sustainability, a clear advantage over existing sets. In developed countries, the sustainability discussion is focused on environmental topics, while in developing countries the issues of poverty and equity are equally important. Consequently, for measuring sustainable development in a developing country, the inclusion of a poverty indicator in a set of lead indicators is essential. By correlation and descriptive analysis, it is shown that reliable energy-based indicators of poverty can be created. Although no one-dimensional indicator is a comprehensive measure of poverty, the explanatory power of energy poverty indicators is comparable to that of other poverty indicators. Thus, the use of energy indicators is not restricted to environmental and economic issues but is also relevant for social issues

  3. Ensuring ecology safety, furthering the development of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Zhaorong; Chen Xiaoqiu; Tang Senming

    2008-01-01

    Ecology safety is as important as political safety, national defense safety, economy safety, food safety, etc. The nuclear power development is an important step for the national energy structure optimization, ecology caring, and implementing sustainable development. The aquatic ecology is important on disposal of low-level liquid waste and cooling water from NPPs and nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and people pay more attention to ecology impact and human threat from the nuclear energy. The author describes relevant ecology problems correlated with nuclear energy such as impact of thermal discharge, ecology sensitive zone, ecology restoration, etc. in order to emphasis that development of nuclear energy should guarantee ecology safety for the sustainable development of nuclear energy. (authors)

  4. Sustainable energy development and climate change in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin Ren; Lei Zeng; Dadi Zhou

    2005-07-01

    This article analyses the national circumstances and major factors underpinning China's energy demand and supply, energy-related emissions, and consequently China's sustainable development. These factors include the huge, still growing, and aging population, rapid economic growth, ongoing industrialization and urbanization, environmental and health concerns at local, regional and global level. Against such background analysis, the article explores the potential and constraints of non-fossil fuel, fuel-switching to natural gas, economy restructuring and clean coal technology in mitigating emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) and ensuring energy supply in China. The authors reiterate the importance of improving energy efficiency in China and discuss how to integrate renewable energy into rural development. The article concludes with an in-depth discussion about redefining development goals, the equity issue in climate change process, and the linkage with sustainable development. (author)

  5. Sustainable energy development and climate change in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, X.; Zeng, L.; Zhou, D.D. [UNFCCC Secretariat, Bonn (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    This article analyses the national circumstances and major factors underpinning China's energy demand and supply, energy-related emissions, and consequently China's sustainable development. These factors include the huge, still growing, and aging population, rapid economic growth, ongoing industrialization and urbanization, environmental and health concerns at local, regional and global level. Against such background analysis, the article explores the potential and constraints of non-fossil fuel, fuel-switching to natural gas, economy restructuring and clean coal technology in mitigating emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) and ensuring energy supply in China. The authors reiterate the importance of improving energy efficiency in China and discuss how to integrate renewable energy into rural development. The article concludes with an in-depth discussion about redefining development goals, the equity issue in climate change process, and the linkage with sustainable development.

  6. Energy development of the USSR from 1917 to 1950

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Amouroux, Jean-Marie

    2015-10-01

    The author proposes an historical overview of energy policy and energy development in the USSR, from its creation to 1950. He outlines that these policy and development were based on a huge stock of coal. Thus, the main efforts have been focused on the development of coal extraction to support an industrial development. The author comments how the political structure and organisation resulted in a public, monolithic and planned industry. He also comments energy needs to be satisfied during the three first five-year plans, the level of energy and electricity productions (comparison with other countries). He outlines that coal has been preferred for a long time to hydrocarbon for energy production, comments the emergence of new mineral fields beside Donbass, and shows that coal has also been the main basis for electrification

  7. Energy technology transfer to developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butera, F.; Farinelli, U.

    1992-01-01

    With the use of critical analyses of some examples of technology transfer by industrialized to third world countries, this paper illustrates the importance, in technology transfer, of giving due consideration to the specific social and marketing contexts of the targeted developing country and its physical and financial capability to acquire all the technology necessary to make the total realization of a desired industrial scheme feasible from the economic, technical and social points of view. It also indicates that the most effective transfers are those in which efforts are made to optimize local work force learning levels, process scheme efficiency and cost through the careful integration of innovative with conventional technologies

  8. Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory | Energy Systems Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facility | NREL Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory The Energy System Integration Facility's Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory supports fuel cell research and development projects through in-situ fuel cell testing. Photo of a researcher running

  9. Sustainable energy for the future. Modelling transitions to renewable and clean energy in rapidly developing countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urban, Frauke

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is first to adapt energy models for the use in developing countries and second to model sustainable energy transitions and their effects in rapidly developing countries like China and India. The focus of this thesis is three-fold: a) to elaborate the differences

  10. Potential contribution of biomass to the sustainable energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirbas, M. Fatih; Balat, Mustafa; Balat, Havva

    2009-01-01

    Biomass is a renewable energy source and its importance will increase as national energy policy and strategy focuses more heavily on renewable sources and conservation. Biomass is considered the renewable energy source with the highest potential to contribute to the energy needs of modern society for both the industrialized and developing countries worldwide. The most important biomass energy sources are wood and wood wastes, agricultural crops and their waste byproducts, municipal solid waste, animal wastes, waste from food processing, and aquatic plants and algae. Biomass is one potential source of renewable energy and the conversion of plant material into a suitable form of energy, usually electricity or as a fuel for an internal combustion engine, can be achieved using a number of different routes, each with specific pros and cons. Currently, much research has been focused on sustainable and environmental friendly energy from biomass to replace conventional fossil fuels. The main objective of the present study is to investigate global potential and use of biomass energy and its contribution to the sustainable energy development by presenting its historical development.

  11. A SES (sustainable energy security) index for developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narula, Kapil; Reddy, B. Sudhakara

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the performance of the energy system of a country is a prerequisite for framing good energy polices. However, the existing indices which claim to measure energy security have limited applicability for developing countries. Energy sustainability is also increasingly gaining importance and countries are keen to measure it to tailor their energy policies. Therefore, the concept of SES (sustainable energy security) has been proposed as the goal for a developing country. This paper presents an analytical framework for the assessment of SES of an energy system and the methodology for constructing an SES index. A hierarchical structure has been proposed and the energy system has been divided into 'supply', 'conversion & distribution' and 'demand' sub-systems. Each subsystem is further divided into its components which are evaluated for four dimensions of SES, Availability, Affordability, Efficiency and (Environmental) Acceptability using quantitative metrics. Energy indices are constructed using 'scores' (objective values), and 'weights' (subjective values representing tradeoffs) which are then aggregated, bottom-up, to obtain an overall SES Index for a country. The proposed SES Index is multidimensional, quantitative, modular, systemic and flexible. Such a SES Index can be used to design policy interventions for transitioning to a sustainable and a secure energy future. - Highlights: • A SES (sustainable energy security) index is proposed for developing countries. • A hierarchical structure includes the entire energy system from supply to end use. • The performance of all energy sources, energy carriers and sectors is assessed. • Availability, affordability, efficiency and acceptability dimensions are evaluated. • The SES index is multidimensional, quantitative, modular, systemic and flexible.

  12. Total-factor energy efficiency in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xingping; Cheng Xiaomei; Yuan Jiahai; Gao Xiaojun

    2011-01-01

    This paper uses a total-factor framework to investigate energy efficiency in 23 developing countries during the period of 1980-2005. We explore the total-factor energy efficiency and change trends by applying data envelopment analysis (DEA) window, which is capable of measuring efficiency in cross-sectional and time-varying data. The empirical results indicate that Botswana, Mexico and Panama perform the best in terms of energy efficiency, whereas Kenya, Sri Lanka, Syria and the Philippines perform the worst during the entire research period. Seven countries show little change in energy efficiency over time. Eleven countries experienced continuous decreases in energy efficiency. Among five countries witnessing continuous increase in total-factor energy efficiency, China experienced the most rapid rise. Practice in China indicates that effective energy policies play a crucial role in improving energy efficiency. Tobit regression analysis indicates that a U-shaped relationship exists between total-factor energy efficiency and income per capita. - Research Highlights: → To measure the total-factor energy efficiency using DEA window analysis. → Focus on an application area of developing countries in the period of 1980-2005. → A U-shaped relationship was found between total-factor energy efficiency and income.

  13. Grameen Bank`s experience with energy related microenterprise development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barua, D.C.

    1997-12-01

    Increased population and growth of industry have resulted in greater demand for energy worldwide. Most of this energy is derived from fossil fuel (coal, gas, oil and nuclear) which will soon be depleted. In this context the need for developing renewable sources of energy has taken on a greater sense of importance and urgency. Over the years significant technological advances have been made in the area of renewable energies especially in the field of solar photovoltaics (PV), wind energy and bio-gas technology. In addition, for remote rural areas where there exists no infrastructure for conventional energy supply, these forms of decentralized alternative energy systems will be far more adaptable and well suited. Grameen Shakti (Energy) is an addition to the family of companies of Grameen Bank, to promote and supply renewable energy sources to rural households. GS, a not-for-profit company, expects not only to supply renewable energy services, but also to create employment and income generation opportunities in rural Bangladesh. GS will focus on supply, marketing, sales, testing and development of renewable energy systems of solar pv, biogas, wind turbines and windpumps.

  14. Coping with climate change and China's wind energy sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Xin He

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Greenhouse gas emissions are the main cause of today's climate change. To address this problem, the world is in an era of new round energy transformation, and the existing energy structure is being reformed. In this paper, according to the Chinese government's action plan for coping with climate change, the China's wind energy sustainable development goals and development route are discussed, and the countermeasures and suggestions are put forward. Wind energy is currently a kind of important renewable energy with matured technology which can be scale-up developed and put into commercial application, and in this transformation, wind energy will play a key role with other non-fossil energy sources. The development and utilization of wind energy is a systematic project, which needs to be solved from the aspects of policy, technology and management. At present, China is in the stage of transferring from “large wind power country” to “strong wind power country”, opportunities and challenges coexist, and the advantages of China's socialist system could be fully used, which can concentrate power to do big things and make contribution in the process of realizing global energy transformation.

  15. Do urbanization and industrialization affect energy intensity in developing countries?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadorsky, Perry

    2013-01-01

    Against a backdrop of concerns about climate change, peak oil, and energy security issues, reducing energy intensity is often advocated as a way to at least partially mitigate these impacts. This study uses recently developed heterogeneous panel regression techniques like mean group estimators and common correlated effects estimators to model the impact that income, urbanization and industrialization has on energy intensity for a panel of 76 developing countries. In the long-run, a 1% increase in income reduces energy intensity by − 0.45% to − 0.35%. Long-run industrialization elasticities are in the range 0.07 to 0.12. The impact of urbanization on energy intensity is mixed. In specifications where the estimated coefficient on urbanization is statistically significant, it is slightly larger than unity. The implications of these results for energy policy are discussed. - Highlights: ► The impact of urbanization and industrialization on energy intensity is modeled. ► Use recently developed heterogeneous panel regression techniques ► The model is tested on a panel of developing countries. ► Income has a negative impact on energy intensity. ► Industrialization has a positive impact on energy intensity

  16. Renewable energy and environment ally sustainable development in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harijan, K.; Memon, M.; Uqaili, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    In Pakistan, about two-thirds of the primary energy requirements are met through conventional sources while traditional biomass accounts the remaining one-third The primary commercial energy is largely based on fossil fuels. Indigenous reserves of oil and gas are limited and the coal available in the country is of poor quality. Environmental pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from energy use are becoming significant environmental issues in the country. Achieving solutions to these environmental problems requires long-term potential actions for sustainable development. In this regard, renewable energy resources appear to be one of the most efficient and effective solutions. Pakistan's geographical location has several advantages for extensive use of most of these renewable energy sources. This paper presents review of the present energy situation and environmental sustainability, and assesses the potential of renewable energy sources in Pakistan. Also, potential solutions to current environmental problems are identified along with renewable energy technologies. Several problems relating to renewable energy sources, environmentally sustainable development are discussed from both current and future perspectives. The present study shows that there is substantial potential of renewables in Pakistan. For achieving environmentally sustainable development, renewables must be developed and utilized. (author)

  17. Research and development: widening the energy horizon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darmstadter, J.; Landsberg, H.H.; Morton, H.C.

    1984-04-01

    Research and Development (R and D) is not a recent phenomenon. Only the name is new; the substance is old. Such scientists as Alessandro Volta, James Watt, or Thomas Edison would have been surprised to be told that they were in the R and D business, but, of course, they were. In fact, Edison was in the RDD and D business, the extra two D's standing for Demonstration and Deployment. In their lifetime such people were generally called inventors. Today, there are not only multitudes of individuals who engage in R and D, in small or large commercial groups, in government laboratories, or in universities, but there is also a substantial literature on just what R and D is and how it functions. In this article the authors try to identify current trends and where they might lead us and what policies are either in place or are desirable to draw the greatest benefit from R and D endeavors.

  18. Long term plan of atomic energy development and utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The atomic energy utilization and development in Japan have progressed remarkably, and already nuclear power generation has borne an important part in electric power supply, while radiation has been utilized in the fields of industry, agriculture, medicine and so on. Now, atomic energy is indispensable for national life and industrial activity. The former long term plan was decided in September, 1978, and the new long term plan should be established since the situation has changed largely. The energy substituting for petroleum has been demanded, and the expectation to nuclear power generation has heightened because it enables stable and economical power supply. The independently developed technology related to atomic energy must be put in practical use. The peaceful utilization of atomic energy must be promoted, while contributing to the nuclear non-proliferation policy. The Atomic Energy Commission of Japan decided the new long term plan to clearly show the outline of the important measures related to atomic energy development and utilization in 10 years hereafter, and the method of its promotion. The basic concept of atomic energy development and utilization, the long term prospect and the concept on the promotion, the method of promoting the development and utilization, and the problems of funds, engineers and location are described. (kako, I.)

  19. SWOT analyses of the national energy sector for sustainable energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovska, N.; Taseska, V.; Pop-Jordanov, J.

    2009-01-01

    A holistic perspective of various energy stakeholders regarding the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOTs) of the energy sector in Macedonia is utilized as baseline to diagnose the current state and to sketch future action lines towards sustainable energy development. The resulting SWOT analyses pointed to the progressive adoption of European Union (EU) standards in energy policy and regulation as the most important achievement in the energy sector. The most important problems the national energy sector faces are scarce domestic resources and unfavorable energy mix, low electricity prices, a high degree of inefficiency in energy production and use, as well as insufficient institutional and human capacities. The formulated portfolio of actions towards enabling sustainable energy development urges the adoption of a comprehensive energy strategy built upon sustainability principles, intensified utilization of the natural gas, economic prices of electricity, structural changes in industry, promotion of energy efficiency and renewables, including Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) projects, enforcement of EU environmental standards and meeting the environmental requirements, as well as institutional and human capacity building.

  20. Development of alternative/renewable sources of energy in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharif, M.

    2005-01-01

    The depleting Conventional Energy Resources and highly raised prices of fuel oil, coal, firewood and such other fossil fuels, have forced the mankind to think about the utilization of Alternative / Renewable Sources of Energy. Alternative / Renewable Energy is very attractive, reliable and cost competitive energy. Sun is readily available to provide a clean, abundant and virtually infinite energy to meet the significant portion of mankind's energy-needs. The possible use of renewable-energy sources is discussed in this paper, in order to fill the estimated gap between the available energy-sources and energy-needs of our country in the near future. Designing, Fabrication and Installation of different renewable-energy devices by PCSIR are also discussed in this paper. Different renewable-energy devices such as, solar water heaters, solar cookers, solar dehydrators, solar water-desalination plants, solar heating and cooling of buildings, solar operated absorption-type chiller, solar furnace, solar architecture, developed by PCSIR are discussed in some detail so that the role of renewable-energy sources for their direct use (as heat and power) can be determined. Various technical aspects are discussed to reduce the unit cost with improved efficiency. (author)