WorldWideScience

Sample records for geophysical survey work

  1. Karoo airborne geophysical survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, D.J.; Stettler, E.H.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty four uranium anomalies were selected for ground follow-up from the analogue spectrometer records of Block 4 of the Karoo Airborne Geophysical Survey. The anomalies were plotted on 1:50 000 scale topographic maps and to 1:250 000 scale maps which are included in this report. The anomaly co-ordinates are tabulated together with the farms on which they occur. Results of the ground follow-up of the aerial anomalies are described. Twenty two anomalies are related to uranium mineralisation of which seventeen occur over baked mudstone adjacent to a dolerite intrusion. Five are located over fluvial channel sandstone of the Beaufort Group and subsurface mineralised sandstone may be present. The other twelve anomalies are spurious. Of the anomalies located over baked mudstone, fifteen emanate from ferruginous mudstone of the Whitehill Formation west of longitude 21 degrees 15 minutes. One of the two remaining anomalies over baked mudstone occurs over the Prince Albert Formation and the other anomaly is over baked mudstone and calcareous nodules of the Beaufort Group. The general low uranium values (less than 355 ppm eU3O8) render the occurrences uneconomic

  2. Geophysical survey work plan for White Wing Scrap Yard (Waste Area Grouping 11) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The White Wing Scrap Yard, located on the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation, served as an aboveground storage and disposal area for contaminated debris and scrap from the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, and the Oak Ridge National laboratory. The site is believed to have been active from the early 1950s until the mid-1960s. A variety of materials were disposed of at the site, including contaminated steel tanks and vehicles. As an interim corrective action, a surface debris removal effort was initiated in November 1993 to reduce the potential threat to human health and the environment from the radionuclide-contaminated debris. Following this removal effort, a geophysical survey will be conducted across the site to locate and determine the lateral extent of buried nonindigenous materials. This survey will provide the data necessary to prepare a map showing areas of conductivity and magnetic intensity that vary from measured background values. These anomalies represent potential buried materials and therefore can be targeted for further evaluation. This work plan outlines the activities necessary to conduct the geophysical survey

  3. A positioning and data logging system for surface geophysical surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyquist, J.E.; Blair, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS) developed at ORNL is being adapted to work with two commercially available geophysical instruments: a magnetometer and an EM31 terrain conductivity meter. Geophysical surveys have proven an important preliminary step in investigating hazardous waste sites. Magnetometers and terrain conductivity meters are used to locate buried drums, trenches, conductive contaminant plumes and map regional changes in geology. About half the field time of a typical geophysical investigation is spent surveying the position of the grid points at which the measurements will be made. Additional time is lost and errors may be made recording instrument values in field notebooks and transcribing the data to a computer. Developed for gamma radiation surveys, the USRAD system keeps track of the surveyor's position automatically by triangulating on an ultrasonic transmitter carried in a backpack. The backpack also contains a radio transmitter that sends the instrument's reading coincident with the ultrasonic pulse. The surveyor's position and the instrument's reading are recorded by a portable computer which can plot the data to check the survey's progress. Electronic files are stored in a form compatible with AutoCAD to speed report writing. 7 refs., 3 figs

  4. Geophysical survey at Tell Barri (Syria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, Giovanni; Cella, Federico; Pierobon, Raffaella; Castaldo, Raffaele; Castiello, Gabriella; Fedi, Maurizio

    2010-05-01

    A geophysical survey at the archaeological site of Tell Barri (Northeasterm Syria) was carried out. The Tell (Arab word for "hill") is 32 m high with a whole covered area of 37 hectares. The Tell, with its huge dimensions and with a great amount of pottery on the surface, is a precious area to study the regional history from IV mill. BC to Islamic and Medieval period. The geophysical study consisted in magnetic and electromagnetic measurements in the lower town area. The aim of this survey was to provide evidence of the presence of buried archaeological structures around an already excavated area. The wall structures in the Tell Barri are made by backed or crude clay bricks. The instrument used for the magnetic survey was an Overhauser-effect proton magnetometer (Gem GSM-19GF), in gradiometric configuration. The electromagnetic instrument used, Geonics Ltd. EM31, implements a Frequency Domain Electromagnetic Method (FDEM). It was used in vertical coils configuration, and this choice should grant a maximum theoretical investigation depth of about 6 m. Before starting the measurements on a larger scale, we conducted a magnetic and EM test profile on some already excavated, outcropping, baked bricks walls. Results were encouraging, because clear and strong magnetic and EM anomalies were recorded over the outcropping walls. However, in the survey area these structures are covered by 3 to 4 meters of clay material and the increased sensors-structures distance will reduce the anomalies amplitude. Moreover, the cover material is disseminated with bricks, basalt blocks and ceramics, all of which have relevant magnetic properties. After magnetic surveying some 50 m side square areas, we verified that unfortunately their effect resulted to be dominant with respect to the deeper wall structures, degrading too much the signal-to-noise ratio. The processing and analysis of magnetic data is however currently underway and will determine decisions about further use of this method

  5. Geophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Bolt, Bruce

    1973-01-01

    Methods in Computational Physics, Volume 13: Geophysics is a 10-chapter text that focuses with the theoretical solid-earth geophysics. This volume specifically covers the general topics of terrestrial magnetism and electricity, the Earth's gravity field, tidal deformations, dynamics of global spin, spin processing, and convective models for the deep interior. This volume surveys first the construction of mathematical models, such as the representation of the geomagnetic field by assuming arrangements of multipole sources in the core and the fast computer evaluation of two- and three-dimensiona

  6. Rožňava ore field - geophysical works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Géczy Július

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The article prowides a review of geophysical works in the ore field Rožňava conducted up to date. Magnetometric and geoelectric methods and gravimetric measurements have been used. Geophysical works were focused to the solving regional problems whose contribution to the prospecting of vein deposits is not essential.

  7. Geophysical survey aimed at selecting the radioactive waste repository site (Czech republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Dostál

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available G IMPULS Praha has been executing a set of geophysical measurements for the Radioactive Waste Repository Authority of the Czech Republic from 2001 (the work continues to be carried out. The measurements are aimed at studying the behaviour of the rock massif, focusing on the Excavation Damaged or Disturbed Zone (EDZ and on selecting an appropriate area for the radioactive material repository site. The geophysical studies use a complex of methods as follows: Airborne geophysical measurement (regional studies, Seismic measurement (detailed studies, G.P.R. (detailed studies, Resistivity tomography (detailed studies, Geoelectric measurement and magnetic survey (stray earth currents. The paper informs about first results and conclusions. The airborne work was executed as a part of the complex study of „GEOBARIERA“ the group and the geophysical measurements of EDZ were executed in co-operation with the Czech Geological Survey.

  8. Geophysical Surveys in Archaeology: Guidance for Surveyors and Sponsors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Somers, Lewis

    2003-01-01

    The last few years have seen a significant increase in the use of geophysical techniques by archaeologists in the United States working in both academic settings and Cultural Resources Management (CRM). Since 1995...

  9. An automated locating and data logging system for geophysical surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyquist, J.E.; Blair, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed an Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS) and interfaced the system with a Geonics EM31 terrain conductivity meter. USRADS keeps track of a surveyor's position by measuring the time-of-flight of ultrasonic pulses from an transducer carried by the surveyor in a backpack to stationary receivers arrayed over the survey area. Also built into the backpack is a radio transmitter that sends the EM31 data to a base station (van or truck) where the surveyor's position and the EM31 quadrature and inphase data are automatically recorded once a second on a portable computer. We surveyed a 13-acre landfill at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory with three people, in three days, collecting over 25,000 EM31 quadrature and inphase readings. At a normal walking pace the average distance between measurement points along the surveyor's path was about 2 ft, with an overall positioning precision of about 0.5 ft for each point. USRADS offers several advantages over conventional EM31 surveys: (1) time and money are saved because it does not require a civil survey to lay a grid before the geophysical survey begins, (2) data are directly recorded by a portable computer and are available for analysis in the field, and (3) refining or expanding the grid about an anomaly does not require civil surveying to add extra grid points. USRADS can also be used with a gamma scintillometer for radiation surveys. Currently, we are working to interface USRADS with a portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer for detecting heavy metals in soil

  10. Integrated geophysical surveys for searching of podiform chromite in Albania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kospiri, Aleksander; Zajmi, Asim [Geophysical and Geochemical Center, Tirana (Albania)

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the application of geophysical methods to the search for chromite in Albania. Albania is well known for its chromite resources and ranks third amongst world producers of high-quality chromite. The ultramafic massif of Bulqiza, is the most important chromite bearing one. Surveying a surface of about 120 square kilometers (30% of massifs area) in that massif with integrated geophysical methods a considerable number of targets has been discovered, from which some are already objects under mine activity. In the integrated methods for chromite exploration in Bulqiza ultramafic massif are included: geological, gravity, magnetic and electrical mapping of the scale 1:2000 with survey grids 40x20m, 20x5m. Based on the interpretations of geophysical exploration were projected drilling which led to the discovery of some big ore deposits. (author). 12 refs., 3 figs

  11. The value of DCIP geophysical surveys for contaminated site investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balbarini, Nicola; Rønde, Vinni Kampman; Maurya, Pradip Kumar

    an old factory site by combining traditional geological, hydrological, and contaminant concentration data with DCIP surveys. The plume consisted of xenobiotic organic compounds and inorganics. The study assesses benefits and limitations of DCIP geophysics for contaminated site investigations. A 3D......Geophysical methods are increasingly being used in contaminant hydrogeology to map lithology, hydraulic properties, and contaminant plumes with a high ionic strength. Advances in the Direct Current resistivity and Induced Polarization (DCIP) method allow the collection of high resolution three...... water and below the streambed. Surface DCIP surveys supported the characterization of the spatial variability in geology, hydraulic conductivity and contaminant concentration. Though DCIP data interpretation required additional borehole data, the DCIP survey reduced the number of boreholes required...

  12. Cost-effective geophysical survey systems for uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasbrouck, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    When planning a uranium exploration survey the question always arises as to how to take advantage of the different exploration methods and equipment for maximum probability of success. Discussed here are the choice of radiometric geophysical equipment, its effectiveness in identifying targets, its limitations, and the criteria for selection. Particular attention is given to systems that are suitable for the exploration programmes of small size and on a small budget, that are common in Latin America. (author)

  13. Geophysical survey at archaeological sites in northeastern Syria

    OpenAIRE

    Mateiciucová, Inna; Milo, Peter; Tencer, Tomáš; Vlach, Marek

    2011-01-01

    From August 25 to September 4, 2008, geophysical surveys were carried out at the Neolithic, Chalcolithic, Bronze and Iron Age tell- and non-tell settlements in the Khabur region in Northeastern Syria (Syrian-Polish-Czech expedition) (Fig. 1). Four sites were prospected: Tell Arbid Abyad, Tell Arbid (West-hill), Khirbet Shane, Khirbet Bezi. The Scintrex Navmag SM-5 – Caesium Magnetometer was used for the measurement of the vertical gradient of the local magnetic field. The measurement resoluti...

  14. Geophysical surveys at the UMTRA project Shiprock, New Mexico site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wightman, E.; Smith, B.; Newlin, B.

    1996-03-01

    Geophysical surveys were performed at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Shiprock site in New Mexico during February 1996. The surveys were designed to locate areas of ground water contamination, consisting largely of sulfate and nitrate salts and uranium. Electrical geophysical methods were used to locate areas of sulfate and nitrate concentrations since these products, when present in ground water, increase its electrical conductivity. These contaminants also increase the density of water, making the water with the highest concentrations of these salts sink to the bottom of the water column. At the Shiprock site, where alluvium is underlain by the impervious Mancos Shale, the saline water will tend to rest in depressions on the shale surface. Seismic refraction surveys were conducted on the floodplain. The site comprises two areas, the terrace and the floodplain, separated by a steep scarp of some 70 feet (ft) (20 meters [m]). Measurements of electrical conductivity were taken over these two areas, searching for possible pockets of saline ground water resting on top of the bedrock. Conductivity surveys were also run to identify fractures within the bedrock that may act as conduits for ground water movement. Several areas of higher than normal conductivity were found on the terrace, including halos of higher conductivities on three sides of the tailings cell. The conductivity measurements searching for fractures found only a small number of minor fracture-like anomalies. These are not considered important. On the floodplain, both conductivity and seismic refraction measurements were taken. The conductivity measurements clearly show areas of high conductivity interpreted to result from ground water contamination. The seismic refraction measurements identified bedrock depressions that may contain denser, and more saline ground water lenses. Generally, the areas of high conductivity coincide with the bedrock depressions

  15. Airborne geophysical survey, Wind River Basin area, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    Results are reported of AEC-sponsored, high sensitivity, reconnaisance airborne gamma-ray survey of the Wind River Basin area, Wyoming. The objective of the survey was to define those areas showing surface indications of a generally higher uranium content (uraniferous provinces) and where detailed exploration for uranium would most likely be successful. For the data collection tasks, a TI high sensitivity gamma-ray system consisting of seven large-volume NaI detectors, two 400-channel analyzers, and ancillary geophysical and electronic equipment was used. Gamma-ray spectrometric data were processed to correct for variations in atmospheric and flight conditions and statistically evaluated to remove the effect of surface geologic variations. Data were then compared to regional geomorphic lineaments derived from ERTS-1 imagery. Aeromagnetic data were collected simultaneously with the airborne gamma-ray survey and interpreted in terms of regional structure. Ten major anomalous uranium areas and ten less strong anomalous areas were defined within the region surveyed. These anomalies and the known mining districts and uranium occurrences demonstrated good correlation with the ERTS lineaments. The basins were defined by the aeromagnetic data. It is suggested that gamma-ray spectrometer data be supplemented by both the ERTS and aeromagnetic data to best define the targets of greatest potential for further exploration. (U.S.)

  16. Oman Drilling Project Phase I Borehole Geophysical Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, J. M.; Pezard, P. A.; Henry, G.; Brun, L.; Célérier, B.; Lods, G.; Robert, P.; Benchikh, A. M.; Al Shukaili, M.; Al Qassabi, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Oman Drilling Project (OmanDP) drilled six holes at six sites in the Samail ophiolite in the southern Samail and Tayin massifs. 1500-m of igneous and metamorphic rocks were recovered at four sites (GT1, GT2, GT3 and BT1) using wireline diamond core drilling and drill cuttings at two sites (BA1, BA2) using air rotary drilling, respectively. OmanDP is an international collaboration supported by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program, the Deep Carbon Observatory, NSF, NASA, IODP, JAMSTEC, and the European, Japanese, German and Swiss Science Foundations, and with in-kind support in Oman from Ministry of Regional Municipalities and Water Resources, Public Authority of Mining, Sultan Qaboos University and the German University of Technology. A comprehensive borehole geophysical survey was conducted in all the OmanDP Phase I boreholes shortly after drilling in April 2017. Following geophysical wireline logs, using slim-hole borehole logging equipment provided and run by the Centre National De La Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the Université de Montpellier/ Géosciences Montpellier, and logging trucks from the Ministry of Regional Municipalities and Water Resources, were collected in most of the holes: electrical resistivity (dual laterolog resistivity, LLd and LLs), spectral gamma ray (K, U, and Th contents), magnetic susceptibility, total natural gamma ray, full waveform sonic (Vp and Vs), acoustic borehole wall imaging, optical borehole wall imaging, borehole fluid parameters (pressure, temperature, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen, pH, redox potential, non-polarized spontaneous electrical potential), and caliper (borehole diameter). In addition, spinner flowmeter (downhole fluid flow rate along borehole axis) and heatpulse flow meter logs (dowhole fluid flow rate along borehole axis) were collected in BA1 to characterize downhole fluid flow rates along borehole axis. Unfortuantely, only incomplete wireline logs are available for

  17. Adobe Illustrator drawing showing geophysical and topographical survey data and interpretations

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, Lacey; Ferraby, Rose

    2016-01-01

    Adobe Illustrator drawing at 1:2000 that shows the rasters and interpretations of the geophysics, the topographical contours, and the survey areas, with British National Grid coordinates and Ordnance Survey Master Map data included.

  18. GPR survey, as one of the best geophysical methods for social and industrial needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, Anatolii

    2016-04-01

    This paper is about ways and methods of applying non-invasive geophysical method - Ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey in different spheres of science, industry, social life and culture. Author would like to show that geological methods could be widely used for solving great variety of industrial, human safety and other problems. In that article, we take GPR survey as an example of such useful geophysical methods. It is a fact that investigation of near surface underground medium is important process, which influence on development of different spheres of science and social life: investigation of near surface geology (layering, spreading of rock types, identification of voids, etc.), hydrogeology (depth to water horizons, their thickness), preparation step for construction of roads and buildings (civil geology, engineering geology), investigation of cultural heritage (burial places, building remains,...), ecological investigations (land slides, variation in underground water level, etc.), glaciology. These tasks can be solved by geological methods, but as usual, geophysical survey takes a lot of time and energy (especially electric current and resistivity methods, seismic survey). Author claims that GPR survey can be performed faster than other geophysical surveys and results of GPR survey are informative enough to make proper conclusions. Some problems even cannot be solved without GPR. For example, identification of burial place (one of author's research objects): results of magnetic and electric resistivity tomography survey do not contain enough information to identify burial place, but according to anomalies on GPR survey radarograms, presence of burial place can be proven. Identification of voids and non-magnetic objects also hardly can be done by another non-invasive geophysics surveys and GPR is applicable for that purpose. GPR can be applied for monitoring of dangerous processes in geological medium under roads, buildings, parks and other places of human

  19. Geophysical survey of two rural sites in Mallorca (Balearic Islands, Spain): Unveiling Roman villae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas Florit, Catalina; Cau Ontiveros, Miguel Ángel; Goossens, Lise; Meyer, Cornelius; Sala, Roger; Ortiz, Helena

    2018-03-01

    Two rural sites on the island of Mallorca (Balearic Islands, Spain) have been investigated with geophysical methods. A previous archaeological field survey provided surface ceramics that allowed for a first classification of the sites as possible Roman rural settlements, possibly villae. The objective of the investigation was to work towards the identification of architectural remains to better understand the true nature of the sites. Using the 7-probe fluxgate gradiometer array LEA MAX, magnetic measurements were executed on a large area on each site. GPR measurements were subsequently carried out to examine selected areas of interest in detail by means of the IDS GPR system based on the Fast-Wave module. The investigated areas demonstrated excellent surface conditions with a negligible number of sources of disturbance, permitting a detailed interpretation of the geophysical data. The results helped to reveal the presence of architectural remains beneath the soil at both sites.

  20. 76 FR 68720 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Low-Energy Marine Geophysical Survey...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Low- Energy Marine Geophysical Survey in the Western... conducting a low-energy marine geophysical (i.e., seismic) survey in the western tropical Pacific Ocean... Science Foundation (NSF), and ``Environmental Assessment of a Low-Energy Marine Geophysical Survey by the...

  1. Integrated application of the database for airborne geophysical survey achievement information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Zengxian; Zhang Junwei

    2006-01-01

    The paper briefly introduces the database of information for airborne geophysical survey achievements. This database was developed on the platform of Microsoft Windows System with the technical methods of Visual C++ 6.0 and MapGIS. It is an information management system concerning airborne geophysical surveying achievements with perfect functions in graphic display, graphic cutting and output, query of data, printing of documents and reports, maintenance of database, etc. All information of airborne geophysical survey achievements in nuclear industry from 1972 to 2003 was embedded in. Based on regional geological map and Meso-Cenozoic basin map, the detailed statistical information of each airborne survey area, each airborne radioactive anomalous point and high field point can be presented visually by combining geological or basin research result. The successful development of this system will provide a fairly good base and platform for management of archives and data of airborne geophysical survey achievements in nuclear industry. (authors)

  2. 2012 Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (DGGS) Lidar: Whittier, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In support of geologic mapping and hazards evaluation in and near Whittier, Alaska, the Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (DGGS) acquired, and is making...

  3. Analysis and interpretation of geophysical surveys in archaeological sites employing different integrated approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piro, Salvatore; Papale, Enrico; Kucukdemirci, Melda; Zamuner, Daniela

    2017-04-01

    Non-destructive ground surface geophysical prospecting methods are frequently used for the investigation of archaeological sites, where a detailed physical and geometrical reconstructions of hidden volumes is required prior to any excavation work. All methods measure the variations of single physical parameters, therefore if these are used singularly, they could not permit a complete location and characterization of anomalous bodies. The probability of a successful result rapidly increases if a multhimethodological approach is adopted, according to the logic of objective complementarity of information and of global convergence toward a high quality multiparametric imaging of the buried structures. The representation of the static configuration of the bodies in the subsoil and of the space-time evolution of the interaction processes between targets and hosting materials have to be actually considered fundamental elements of primary knowledge in archaeological prospecting. The main effort in geophysical prospecting for archaeology is therefore the integration of different, absolutely non-invasive techniques, especially if managed in view of a ultra-high resolution three-dimensional (3D) tomographic representation mode. Following the above outlined approach, we have integrated geophysical methods which measure the variations of potential field (gradiometric methods) with active methods which measure the variations of physical properties due to the body's geometry and volume (GPR and ERT). In this work, the results obtained during the surveys of three archaeological sites, employing Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and Fluxgate Differential Magnetic (FDM) to obtain precise and detailed maps of subsurface bodies, are presented and discussed. The first site, situated in a suburban area between Itri and Fondi, in the Aurunci Natural Regional Park (Central Italy), is characterized by the presence of remains of past human activity

  4. Investigations into near-real-time surveying for geophysical data collection using an autonomous ground vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Geoffrey A.; Ippolito, C.; Lee, R.; Spritzer, R.; Yeh, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration are cooperatively investigating the utility of unmanned vehicles for near-real-time autonomous surveys of geophysical data collection. Initially focused on unmanned ground vehicle collection of magnetic data, this cooperative effort has brought unmanned surveying, precision guidance, near-real-time communication, on-the-fly data processing, and near-real-time data interpretation into the realm of ground geophysical surveying, all of which offer advantages over current methods of manned collection of ground magnetic data. An unmanned ground vehicle mission has demonstrated that these vehicles can successfully complete missions to collect geophysical data, and add advantages in data collection, processing, and interpretation. We view the current experiment as an initial phase in further unmanned vehicle data-collection missions, including aerial surveying.

  5. Three decades of BGR airborne geophysical surveys over the polar regions - a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaske, Detlef

    2013-04-01

    The Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) has been conducting geological polar research since 1979. A few years later BGR engaged in airborne geophysical projects. Investigation of the lithosphere of the continent and the continental margins was one of the key issues for BGR. Right from the beginning geophysical research was closely associated with the geological activities. The GANOVEX (German Antarctic North Victoria Land Expedition) program combined geological research with geophysical (mainly airborne) investigations. This proved to be a fruitful approach to many of the open questions regarding the tectonic development of the Ross Sea region. Aeromagnetic surveys evolved into a powerful tool for identifying geological structures and following them underneath the ice covered areas - not accessible to direct geological investigations. To achieve this aim it was essential to lay out these surveys with a relatively closely spaced line separation on the expense of covering large areas at the same time. Nevertheless, over many years of continues research areas of more than a just regional extent could be covered. This was, however, only possible through international collaboration. During the first years, working in the Ross Sea area, the cooperation with the US and Italian programs played a significant role, especially the GITARA (German-Italian Aeromagnetic Research in Antarctica) program has to be mentioned. GEOMAUD (Geoscientific Expedition to Dronning Maud Land) and the German-Australian joint venture PCMEGA (Prince Charles Mountains Expedition of Germany & Australia) expanded research activities to the East Antarctic shield area. In the International Polar Year (IPY), BGR played a leading role in the international project AGAP (Antarctica's GAmburtsev Province) as part of the main topic "Venture into Unknown Regions". AGAP was jointly conducted by the USA, Great Britain, Australia, China and Germany. While in the Ross Sea area even

  6. A multi-method high-resolution geophysical survey in the Machado de Castro museum, central Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grangeia, Carlos; Matias, Manuel; Hermozilha, Hélder; Figueiredo, Fernando; Carvalho, Pedro; Silva, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Restoration of historical buildings is a delicate operation as they are often built over more ancient and important structures. The Machado de Castro Museum, Coimbra, Central Portugal, has suffered several interventions in historical times and lies over the ancient Roman forum of Coimbra. This building went through a restoration project. These works were preceded by an extensive geophysical survey that aimed at investigating subsurface stratigraphy, including archeological remains, and the internal structure of the actual walls. Owing to the needs of the project, geophysical data interpretation required not only integration but also high resolution. The study consisted of data acquisition over perpendicular planes and different levels that required detailed survey planning and integration of data from different locations that complement images of the surveyed area. Therefore a multi-method, resistivity imaging and a 3D ground probing radar (GPR), high-resolution geophysical survey was done inside the museum. Herein, radargrams are compared with the revealed stratigraphy so that signatures are interpreted, characterized and assigned to archeological structures. Although resistivity and GPR have different resolution capabilities, their data are overlapped and compared, bearing in mind the specific characteristics of this survey. It was also possible to unravel the inner structure of the actual walls, to establish connections between walls, foundations and to find older remains with the combined use and spatial integration of the GPR and resistivity imaging data

  7. Karoo airborne geophysical survey: preliminary report on airborne radiometric data from block 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, R.W.; Wright, O.M.

    1980-02-01

    The analogue gamma-ray spectrometer records of block 12 of the Karoo airborne geophysical survey were studied and significant uranium anomalies were selected and graded. The anomalies were plotted on 1:50 000 scale maps and the co-ordinates of the anomalies were tabulated. The anomalies were transferred to 1:250 000 scale maps which are included in this report. The geological setting of the anomalies has been studied. Ground follow-up work has been recommended for anomalies which occur over mineralized pans and drainage channels, and the Lower Beaufort Stage. Other anomalies which occur over the Ecca Series, the Middle Beaufort Stage, the Upper Beaufort Stage and the Stormberg Series have also been recommended for ground investigation

  8. Airborne geophysical surveys conducted in western Nebraska, 2010: contractor reports and data

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2014-01-01

    This report contains three contractor reports and data files for an airborne electromagnetic survey flown from June 28 to July 7, 2010. The first report; “SkyTEM Survey: Nebraska, USA, Data” describes data aquisition and processing from a time-domain electromagnetic and magnetic survey performed by SkyTEM Canada, Inc. (the North American SkyTEM subsidiary), in western Nebraska, USA. Digital data for this report are given in Appendix 1. The airborne geophysical data from the SkyTEM survey subsequently were processed and inverted by Aarhus Geophysics ApS, Aarhus, Denmark, to produce resistivity depth sections along each flight line. The result of that processing is described in two reports presented in Appendix 2, “Processing and inversion of SkyTEM data from USGS Area UTM–13” and “Processing and inversion of SkyTEM data from USGS Area UTM–14.” Funding for these surveys was provided by the North Platte Natural Resources District, the South Platte Natural Resources District, and the Twin Platte Natural Resources District, in Scottsbluff, Sidney, and North Platte, Nebraska, respectively. Any additional information concerning the geophysical data may be obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center, Denver Colorado.

  9. Geophysical Surveys of the Hydrologic Basin Underlying Yosemite Valley, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, E. L.; Shaw, K. A.; Carey, C.; Dunn, M. E.; Whitman, S.; Bourdeau, J.; Eckert, E.; Louie, J. N.; Stock, G. M.

    2017-12-01

    UNR students in an Applied Geophysics course conducted geophysical investigations in Yosemite Valley during the months of March and August 2017. The goal of the study is to understand better the depth to bedrock, the geometry of the bedrock basin, and the properties of stratigraphy- below the valley floor. Gutenberg and others published the only prior geophysical investigation in 1956, to constrain the depth to bedrock. We employed gravity, resistivity, and refraction microtremor(ReMi) methods to investigate the interface between valley fill and bedrock, as well as shallow contrasts. Resistivity and ReMi arrays along three north-south transects investigated the top 50-60m of the basin fill. Gravity results constrained by shallow measurements suggest a maximum depth of 1000 m to bedrock. ReMi and resistivity techniques identified shallow contrasts in shear velocity and electrical resistivity that yielded information about the location of the unconfined water table, the thickness of the soil zone, and spatial variation in shallow sediment composition. The upper several meters of sediment commonly showed shear velocities below 200 m/s, while biomass-rich areas and sandy river banks could be below 150 m/s. Vs30 values consistently increased towards the edge of the basin. The general pattern for resistivity profiles was a zone of relatively high resistivity, >100 ohm-m, in the top 4 meters, followed by one or more layers with decreased resistivity. According to gravity measurements, assuming either -0.5 g/cc or -0.7 g/cc density contrast between bedrock and basin sediments, a maximum depth to bedrock is found south of El Capitan at respectively, 1145 ± 215 m or 818 ± 150 m. Longitudinal basin geometry coincides with the basin depth geometry discussed by Gutenberg in 1956. Their results describe a "double camel" shape where the deepest points are near El Capitan and the Ahwahnee Hotel and is shallowest near Yosemite Falls, in a wider part of the valley. An August Deep

  10. Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to reduce exploration risk at glass buttes, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Patrick [Ormat Nevada, Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Fercho, Steven [Ormat Nevada, Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Perkin, Doug [Ormat Nevada, Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Martini, Brigette [Corescan Inc., Ascot (Australia); Boshmann, Darrick [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The engineering and studies phase of the Glass Buttes project was aimed at reducing risk during the early stages of geothermal project development. The project’s inclusion of high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys allowed Ormat to evaluate the value of these surveys both independently and in combination to quantify the most valuable course of action for exploration in an area where structure, permeability, and temperature are the most pressing questions. The sizes of the thermal anomalies at Glass Buttes are unusually large. Over the course of Phase I Ormat acquired high resolution LIDAR data to accurately map fault manifestations at the surface and collected detailed gravity and aeromagnetic surveys to map subsurface structural features. In addition, Ormat collected airborne hyperspectral data to assist with mapping the rock petrology and mineral alteration assemblages along Glass Buttes faults and magnetotelluric (MT) survey to try to better constrain the structures at depth. Direct and indirect identification of alteration assemblages reveal not only the geochemical character and temperature of the causative hydrothermal fluids but can also constrain areas of upflow along specific fault segments. All five datasets were merged along with subsurface lithologies and temperatures to predict the most likely locations for high permeability and hot fluids. The Glass Buttes temperature anomalies include 2 areas, totaling 60 km2 (23 mi2) of measured temperature gradients over 165° C/km (10° F/100ft). The Midnight Point temperature anomaly includes the Strat-1 well with 90°C (194 °F) at 603 m (1981 ft) with a 164 °C/km (10°F/100ft) temperature gradient at bottom hole and the GB-18 well with 71°C (160 °F) at 396 m (1300 ft) with a 182°C/km (11°F/100ft) gradient. The primary area of alteration and elevated temperature occurs near major fault intersections associated with Brothers Fault Zone and Basin and Range systems. Evidence for faulting is

  11. 76 FR 18167 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ..., many marine animals may need to remain in areas where they are exposed to chronic stimuli (Richardson... Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the Central Gulf of Alaska, June, 2011 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

  12. 76 FR 77782 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ..., 1963), but because of ecological or physiological requirements, many marine animals may need to remain... Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, February to March 2012 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National...

  13. 77 FR 4765 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    ... physiological requirements, many marine animals may need to remain in areas where they are exposed to chronic... readily audible to the animals based on measured received levels and the hearing sensitivity of the marine... Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the Northwest Pacific...

  14. 78 FR 17359 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ..., 1963), but because of ecological or physiological requirements, many marine animals may need to remain... Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean, June to July, 2013 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and...

  15. 76 FR 33246 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... ecological or physiological requirements, many marine animals may need to remain in areas where they are... Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the Central-Western Bering Sea, August 2011 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and...

  16. 75 FR 8652 - Incidental Takes of Marine Mammals During Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... for marine animals before and during airgun operations. NMFS believes that the realistic possibility... Takes of Marine Mammals During Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, April to June 2010 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS...

  17. 77 FR 25966 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Three Marine Geophysical Surveys in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    ..., 1963), but because of ecological or physiological requirements, many marine animals may need to remain... Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Three Marine Geophysical Surveys in the Northeast Pacific Ocean, June Through July 2012 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and...

  18. 76 FR 6430 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-04

    ..., many marine animals may need to remain in areas where they are exposed to chronic stimuli (Richardson... Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the Pacific Ocean off Costa Rica, April Through May, 2011 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic...

  19. 76 FR 57959 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ..., many marine animals may need to remain in areas where they are exposed to chronic stimuli (Richardson... Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the Central Pacific Ocean, November, 2011 Through January, 2012 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and...

  20. 77 FR 58255 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey off the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... requirements, many marine animals may need to remain in areas where they are exposed to chronic stimuli... Vol. 77 Wednesday, No. 182 September 19, 2012 Part III Department of Commerce Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey off the Central Coast of California...

  1. Characteristics of Sounds Emitted During High-Resolution Marine Geophysical Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-24

    Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no person shall be...marine transportation , oil and gas, marine mineral, and renewable energy projects. In particular, geophysical surveys support infrastructure siting...sand resource delineation, geomorphic characterization, environmental monitoring, archaeological resource identification, and mapping of shallow

  2. Geophysical surveying in the Sacramento Delta for earthquake hazard assessment and measurement of peat thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, M. S.; Kundariya, N.; Hayashi, K.; Srinivas, A.; Burnham, M.; Oikawa, P.

    2017-12-01

    Near surface geophysical surveys were conducted in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta for earthquake hazard assessment and to provide estimates of peat thickness for use in carbon models. Delta islands have experienced 3-8 meters of subsidence during the past century due to oxidation and compaction of peat. Projected sea level rise over the next century will contribute to an ongoing landward shift of the freshwater-saltwater interface, and increase the risk of flooding due to levee failure or overtopping. Seismic shear wave velocity (VS) was measured in the upper 30 meters to determine Uniform Building Code (UBC)/ National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP) site class. Both seismic and ground penetrating radar (GPR) methods were employed to estimate peat thickness. Seismic surface wave surveys were conducted at eight sites on three islands and GPR surveys were conducted at two of the sites. Combined with sites surveyed in 2015, the new work brings the total number of sites surveyed in the Delta to twenty.Soil boreholes were made at several locations using a hand auger, and peat thickness ranged from 2.1 to 5.5 meters. Seismic surveys were conducted using the multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method and the microtremor array method (MAM). On Bouldin Island, VS of the surficial peat layer was 32 m/s at a site with pure peat and 63 m/s at a site peat with higher clay and silt content. Velocities at these sites reached a similar value, about 125 m/s, at a depth of 10 m. GPR surveys were performed at two sites on Sherman Island using 100 MHz antennas, and indicated the base of the peat layer at a depth of about 4 meters, consistent with nearby auger holes.The results of this work include VS depth profiles and UBC/NEHRP site classifications. Seismic and GPR methods may be used in a complementary fashion to estimate peat thickness. The seismic surface wave method is a relatively robust method and more effective than GPR in many areas with high clay

  3. Integrated geophysical interpretation of the Valhall 4C OBS survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, Leon A.; Barkved, Olav I; Mueller, Michael C.; Haggard, Bill W.; Kommedal, Jan H.; Rosland, Boerge O.

    1998-12-31

    This presentation gives a brief classic example of a North Sea reservoir which cannot be imaged by conventional P-wave techniques. In two-dimensional P-wave sections, extending across the crest of the structure, the top of the chalk reservoir is depressed in time, and has low amplitude and coherency so that even its identification is uncertain. The classical interpretation of these effects is that, over geologic time, gas has leaked from the reservoir into the overburden, in the zone above the reservoir. This gas, while present in uneconomic concentrations, has the effect of lowering seismic velocities and increasing seismic attenuation. Efficient methods of seismic surveying were used for oil prediction in the reservoir. 6 refs.

  4. Data and records management plan for the White Wing Scrap Yard (Waste Area Grouping 11) geophysical survey at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    A geophysical survey is being conducted across the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 11 site to locate buried nonindigenous materials. The survey team will collect data manually in field logbooks and on field forms using two types of instrumentation. This Data and Records Management Plan will describe the process necessary to record and track the geophysical data in a manner that will comply with the data quality objectives (DQOs) described in the WAG 11 Geophysical Survey Work Plan and with Environmental Restoration (ER) regulations concerning project records. This plan provides guidance on handling documentation within CDM Federal Programs Corporation (CDM Federal) and by the survey team in the field. An initial (Phase 1) survey will be performed in established areas (referred to as known target areas) using both 10-ft and 20-ft grid spacing. The results of the Phase 1 survey will be evaluated to determine the appropriate grid spacing to be used for the subsequent survey phase. The second phase (Phase 2) will then cover the remainder of the WAG 11 area using the grid spacing determined in Phase 1. The objective of the Phase 2 survey will be to estimate the horizontal and vertical extent of nonindigenous materials in the subsurface that are man-made, ferrous, highly resistive, and/or possess conductivity above background, based on the survey grid established in Phase 1

  5. Systemic Approach to Elevation Data Acquisition for Geophysical Survey Alignments in Hilly Terrains Using UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, M. A. M.; Kumar, N. S.; Abidin, M. H. Z.; Madun, A.

    2018-04-01

    This study is about systematic approach to photogrammetric survey that is applicable in the extraction of elevation data for geophysical surveys in hilly terrains using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). The outcome will be to acquire high-quality geophysical data from areas where elevations vary by locating the best survey lines. The study area is located at the proposed construction site for the development of a water reservoir and related infrastructure in Kampus Pauh Putra, Universiti Malaysia Perlis. Seismic refraction surveys were carried out for the modelling of the subsurface for detailed site investigations. Study were carried out to identify the accuracy of the digital elevation model (DEM) produced from an UAV. At 100 m altitude (flying height), over 135 overlapping images were acquired using a DJI Phantom 3 quadcopter. All acquired images were processed for automatic 3D photo-reconstruction using Agisoft PhotoScan digital photogrammetric software, which was applied to all photogrammetric stages. The products generated included a 3D model, dense point cloud, mesh surface, digital orthophoto, and DEM. In validating the accuracy of the produced DEM, the coordinates of the selected ground control point (GCP) of the survey line in the imaging area were extracted from the generated DEM with the aid of Global Mapper software. These coordinates were compared with the GCPs obtained using a real-time kinematic global positioning system. The maximum percentage of difference between GCP’s and photogrammetry survey is 13.3 %. UAVs are suitable for acquiring elevation data for geophysical surveys which can save time and cost.

  6. Capability assessment and challenges for quantum technology gravity sensors for near surface terrestrial geophysical surveying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddice, Daniel; Metje, Nicole; Tuckwell, George

    2017-11-01

    Geophysical surveying is widely used for the location of subsurface features. Current technology is limited in terms of its resolution (thus size of features it can detect) and penetration depth and a suitable technique is needed to bridge the gap between shallow near surface investigation using techniques such as EM conductivity mapping and GPR commonly used to map the upper 5 m below ground surface, and large features at greater depths detectable using conventional microgravity (> 5 m below ground surface). This will minimise the risks from unknown features buried in and conditions of the ground during civil engineering work. Quantum technology (QT) gravity sensors potentially offer a step-change in technology for locating features which lie outside of the currently detectable range in terms of size and depth, but that potential is currently unknown as field instruments have not been developed. To overcome this, a novel computer simulation was developed for a large range of different targets of interest. The simulation included realistic noise modelling of instrumental, environmental and location sources of noise which limit the accuracy of current microgravity measurements, in order to assess the potential capability of the new QT instruments in realistic situations and determine some of the likely limitations on their implementation. The results of the simulations for near surface features showed that the new technology is best employed in a gradiometer configuration as opposed to the traditional single sensor gravimeter used by current instruments due to the ability to suppress vibrational environmental noise effects due to common mode rejection between the sensors. A significant improvement in detection capability of 1.5-2 times was observed, putting targets such as mineshafts into the detectability zone which would be a major advantage for subsurface surveying. Thus this research, for the first time, has demonstrated clearly the benefits of QT gravity

  7. Alternative analysis of airborne laser data collected within conventional multi-parameter airborne geophysical surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahl, Andreas; Supper, R.; Motschka, K.; Schattauer, I.

    2010-05-01

    For the interpretation of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry as well as airborne electromagnetics it is of great importance to determine the distance between the geophysical sensor and the ground surface. Since radar altimeters do not penetrate vegetation, laser altimeters became popular in airborne geophysics over the past years. Currently the airborne geophysical platform of the Geological Survey of Austria (GBA) is equipped with a Riegl LD90-3800VHS-FLP high resolution laser altimeter, measuring the distances according to the first and the last reflected pulse. The goal of the presented study was to explore the possibilities of deriving additional information about the survey area from the laser data and to determine the accuracy of such results. On one hand the difference between the arrival time of the first and the last reflected pulse can be used to determine the height of the vegetation. This parameter is for example important for the correction of damping effects on airborne gamma-ray measurements caused by vegetation. Moreover especially for groundwater studies at catchment scale, this parameter can also be applied to support the spatial assessment of evapotranspiration. In combination with the altitude above geoid, determined by a GPS receiver, a rough digital elevation model of the survey area can be derived from the laser altimetry. Based on a data set from a survey area in the northern part of Austria, close to the border with the Czech Republic, the reliability of such a digital elevation model and the calculated vegetation height was tested. In this study a mean deviation of -1.4m, with a standard deviation of ±3.4m, between the digital elevation model from Upper Austria (25m spatial resolution) and the determined elevation model was determined. We also found an obvious correlation between the calculated vegetation heights greater 15m and the mapped forest published by the ‘Department of Forest Inventory' of the ‘Federal Forest Office' of Austria

  8. Geostatistical methods for rock mass quality prediction using borehole and geophysical survey data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Rubin, Y.; Sege, J. E.; Li, X.; Hehua, Z.

    2015-12-01

    For long, deep tunnels, the number of geotechnical borehole investigations during the preconstruction stage is generally limited. Yet tunnels are often constructed in geological structures with complex geometries, and in which the rock mass is fragmented from past structural deformations. Tunnel Geology Prediction (TGP) is a geophysical technique widely used during tunnel construction in China to ensure safety during construction and to prevent geological disasters. In this paper, geostatistical techniques were applied in order to integrate seismic velocity from TGP and borehole information into spatial predictions of RMR (Rock Mass Rating) in unexcavated areas. This approach is intended to apply conditional probability methods to transform seismic velocities to directly observed RMR values. The initial spatial distribution of RMR, inferred from the boreholes, was updated by including geophysical survey data in a co-kriging approach. The method applied to a real tunnel project shows significant improvements in rock mass quality predictions after including geophysical survey data, leading to better decision-making for construction safety design.

  9. Helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic geophysical survey data, Hunton anticline, south-central Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bruce D.; Smith, David V.; Deszcz-Pan, Maryla; Blome, Charles D.; Hill, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    This report is a digital data release for multiple geophysical surveys conducted in the Hunton anticline area of south-central Oklahoma. The helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic surveys were flown on March 16–17, 2007, in four areas of the Hunton anticline in south-central Oklahoma. The objective of this project is to improve the understanding of the geohydrologic framework of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer. The electromagnetic sensor for the helicopter electromagnetic survey consisted of six different transmitter-receiver orientations that measured the earth's electrical response at six distinct frequencies from approximately 500 Hertz to approximately 115,000 Hertz. The electromagnetic measurements were converted to electrical resistivity values, which were gridded and plotted on georeferenced maps. The map from each frequency represents a different depth of investigation for each area. The range of subsurface investigation is comparable to the depth of shallow groundwater. The four areas selected for the helicopter electromagnetic study, blocks A–D, have different geologic and hydrologic settings. Geophysical and hydrologic information from U.S. Geological Survey studies are being used by modelers and resource managers to develop groundwater resource plans for the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer.

  10. Preliminary Geophysical Survey for Assessing the Geotechnical Conditions and Geohazards at Huaca de La Luna, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, G. J.; Lopez, S.; Ebinger, C. J.; Pando, M. A.; Lambert, C.; Morales, R.; Uceda, S.; Perucchio, R.; Castaneda, B.; Aguilar, R.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents results of near surface geophysical tests to help assess the geotechnical conditions of the archaeological complex of Huaca de la Luna located near the coastal city of Trujillo, Peru. This area of Peru has experienced damaging earthquakes and tsunamis in historic time. The huaca complex is a massive adobe temple progressively built by the Moche civilization from 100 AD to 650 AD. The geophysical tests carried out included Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), magnetic gradiometer, and Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) to help assess geotechnical conditions such as buried cavities and hallways, thickness and elastic properties of sand sediments, and the depth to the underlying granitic bedrock. The tests were performed to help with the investigation of structural damage observed along a massive adobe wall (north façade) which has shown signs of distress including fissures, settlements, and other damage. The geophysical results together with detailed Lidar surveying are being used as part of this investigation and highlight the usefulness of these non-destructive techniques for archaeological and historical sites.

  11. Integrated geophysical surveys to assess the structural conditions of a karstic cave of archaeological importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Leucci

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An integrated geophysical survey using both the electrical resistivity tomography (ERT and ground-penetrating radar (GPR methods was undertaken over a cave of great archaeological interest in southern Italy. The survey was performed to assess the stability of the carbonate rock roof of the cave. A geophysical survey was preferred to boreholes and geotechnical tests, in order to avoid the risk of mass movements. The interpretation of integrated data from ERT and GPR resulted in an evaluation of some of the electromagnetic (EM characteristics (such as the EM wave velocity and the detection of discontinuities (fractures in the carbonate rock. It is well known that rock fractures constitute a serious problem in cave maintenance, and progressive cracking within the bed rock is considered to be one of the main causes of collapse. An analysis of the back-scattered energy was also required for the GPR data interpretation. Cracks within the bedrock were detected to a depth of about 2 m by using GPR, which allowed for the identification of the loosened zone around the cave.

  12. Helicopter-borne magnetic, electromagnetic and radiometric geophysical survey in Mauken, Maalselv, Troms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodionov, Alexei; Koziel, Janusz; Lynum, Rolf

    2012-07-01

    NGU conducted an airborne geophysical survey in Mauken area in June 2011 as a part of MINN project. This report describes and documents the acquisition, processing and visualization of recorded datasets. The geophysical survey results reported herein are 3680 line km. The modified Geotech Ltd. Hummingbird frequency domain system supplemented by optically pumped cesium magnetometer and 1024 channels RSX-5 spectrometer was used for data acquisition. The survey was flown with 200 m line spacing, line direction of 33 degrees NE and average speed 88km/h. The average terrain clearance of the bird was 45m. Collected data were processed in NGU using Geosoft Oasis Montaj software. Raw total magnetic field data were corrected for diurnal variation and levelled using standard micro levelling algorithm. EM data were filtered and levelled using both -automated and manual levelling procedure. Apparent resistivity was calculated from in-phase and quadrature data for each of the five frequencies separately using a homogeneous half space model. Apparent resistivity dataset was filtered and levelled. Radiometric data were processed using standard procedures recommended by International Atomic Energy Association. All data were gridded with the cell size of 50 m and presented as a shaded relief maps at the scale of 1:50 000. (Author)

  13. Helicopter-borne magnetic, electromagnetic and radiometric geophysical survey at Vanna, Karlsoey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodionov, Alexei; Ofstad, Frode

    2012-07-01

    NGU conducted an airborne geophysical survey in Vanna area in June 2011 as a part of MINN project. This report describes and documents the acquisition, processing and visualization of recorded datasets. The geophysical survey results reported herein are 1336 line km. The modified Geotech Ltd. Hummingbird frequency domain system supplemented by optically pumped cesium magnetometer and 1024 channels RSX-5 spectrometer was used for data acquisition. The survey was flown with 200 m line spacing, line direction of 27 degrees NW and average speed 106 km/h. The average terrain clearance of the bird was 59 m. Collected data were processed in NGU using Geosoft Oasis Montaj software. Raw total magnetic field data were corrected for diurnal variation and levelled using standard micro levelling algorithm. EM data were filtered and levelled using both -automated and manual levelling procedure. Apparent resistivity was calculated from in-phase and quadrature data for four frequencies separately using a homogeneous half space model. Apparent resistivity dataset was filtered and levelled. Radiometric data were processed using standard procedures recommended by International Atomic Energy Association. All data were gridded with the cell size of 50 m and presented as a shaded relief maps at the scale of 1:50 000. (Author)

  14. Helicopter-borne magnetic, electromagnetic and radiometric geophysical survey in Finnsnes area, Lenvik, Troms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodionov, Alexei; Ofstad, Frode; Tassis, Georgios

    2012-07-01

    NGU conducted an airborne geophysical survey in Finnsnes area in July - August 2012. This report describes and documents the acquisition, processing and visualization of recorded datasets. The geophysical survey results reported herein are 2715 line km. The Geotech Ltd. Hummingbird frequency domain EM system supplemented by optically pumped cesium magnetometer and 1024 channels RSX-5 spectrometer was used for data acquisition. The survey was flown with 200 m line spacing, line direction of 120 degrees NW-SE with the average speed 89 km/h. The average terrain clearance of the bird was 55 m. Collected data were processed in NGU using Geosoft Oasis Montaj software. Raw total magnetic field data were corrected for diurnal variation and levelled using standard micro levelling algorithm. EM data were filtered and levelled using both automated and manual levelling procedure. Apparent resistivity was calculated from in-phase and quadrature data for each of the five frequencies separately using a homogeneous half space model. Apparent resistivity dataset was levelled and filtered. Radiometric data were processed using standard procedures recommended by International Atomic Energy Association. All data were gridded with the cell size of 50 m and presented as a shaded relief maps at the scale of 1:50 000.(Author)

  15. Helicopter-borne magnetic, electromagnetic and radiometric geophysical survey in the Storforshei area, Rana, Nordland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodionov, Alexei; Ofstad, Frode; Tassis, Georgios

    2012-07-01

    NGU conducted an airborne geophysical survey in Mo i Rana area in July 2012. This report describes and documents the aquisition, processing and visualization of recorded datasets. The geophysical survey results reported herein are 1414 line km. The Geotech Ltd. Hummingbird frequency domain system supplemented by optically pumped cesium magnetometer and 1024 channels RSX-5 spectrometer was used for data aquisition. The survey was flown with 100 m line spacing, line direction of 180 deg North-South (in the west) and 150 deg NorthWest-SouthEast (in the east) with the average speed 96 km/h. The average terrain clearance of the bird was 55 m. Collected data were processed by AR GeoConsulting using Geosoft Oasis Montaj software. Raw total magnetic field data were corrected for diurnal variation and levelled using standard micro levelling algorithm. EM data were filtered and levelled using both automated and manual levelling procedure. Apparent resistivity was calculated from in-phase and quadrature data for each of the five frequencies separately using a homogeneous half space model. Apparent resistivity dataset was levelled and filtered. Radiometric data were processed using standard procedures recommended by International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA). All data were gridded with the cell size of 25 m and presented as shaded relief maps at the scale of 1:25 000.(Author)

  16. Helicopter-borne magnetic, electromagnetic and radiometric geophysical survey in Rombaken area, Narvik, Nordland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodionov, Alexei; Ofstad, Frode; Koziel, Janusz

    2012-07-01

    NGU conducted an airborne geophysical survey in Rombaken area in August - September 2011 as a part of MINN project. This report describes and documents the acquisition, processing and visualization of recorded datasets. The geophysical survey results reported herein are 5218 line km. The modified Geotech Ltd. Hummingbird frequency domain system supplemented by optically pumped cesium magnetometer and 1024 channels RSX-5 spectrometer was used for data acquisition. The survey was flown with 200 m line spacing, line direction of 90 degrees East West and average speed 98 km/h. The average terrain clearance of the bird was 64 m. Collected data were processed in NGU using Geosoft Oasis Montaj software. Raw total magnetic field data were corrected for diurnal variation and levelled using standard micro levelling algorithm. EM data were filtered and levelled using both automated and manual levelling procedure. Apparent resistivity was calculated from in-phase and quadrature data for each of the five frequencies separately using a homogeneous half space model. Apparent resistivity dataset was filtered and levelled. Radiometric data were processed using standard procedures recommended by International Atomic Energy Association.All data were gridded with the cell size of 50 m and presented as a shaded relief maps at the scale of 1:50 000.(Author)

  17. Geophysical surveys for buried waste detection at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandness, G.A.; Rising, J.L.; Kimbrough, J.R.

    1979-12-01

    This report describes a series of geophysical surveys performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The main purpose of the surveys was to evaluate techniques, principally ground-penetrating radar, for detecting and mapping radioactive wastes buried in shallow trenches and pits. A second purpose was to determine the feasibility of using ground-penetrating radar to measure the depth of basalt bedrock. A prototype geophyscal survey system developed by the US Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest Laboratory was used for this study. Radar, magnetometer, and metal detector measurements were made at three sites in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at INEL. Radar measurements were made at fourth site adjacent to the RWMC. The combination of three geophysical methods was shown to provide considerable information about the distribution of buried waste materials. The tests confirmed the potential effectiveness of the radar method, but they also pointed out the need for continued research and development in ground-penetrating radar technology. The radar system tested in this study appears to be capable of measuring the depth to basalt in the vicinity of the RWMC

  18. Helicopter-borne magnetic, electromagnetic and radiometric geophysical survey in Kviteseid area, Lenvik, Troms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranwal, Vikas C.; Rodionov, Alexei; Ofstad, Frode

    2012-01-01

    In cooperation with the geologist for Buskerud, Telemark and Vestfold, the NGU conducted an airborne geophysical survey in Kviteseid area in May 2012. This report describes and documents the acquisition, processing and visualization of recorded datasets. The geophysical survey results reported herein are 3514 line km. The optically pumped cesium magnetometer and 1024 channels RSX-5 spectrometer was used for data acquisition. The survey was flown with 100 m line spacing, line direction of 130 degrees - 210 degrees and average speed of 98 km/h. A smaller area was also flown at 100 m line spacing 50 m away from larger flight lines so that smaller area could be covered with 50 m line spacing. The average terrain clearance of the helicopter was 65 m. Collected data were processed in NGU using Geosoft Oasis Montaj software. Raw total magnetic field data were corrected for diurnal variation and also for International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). Finally, some along-line noises were removed using standard micro-leveling algorithm. Radiometric data were processed using standard procedures recommended by International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA). Final processed data were gridded with the cell size of 25 m and 12 m for 100 m and 50 m line spacing, respectively. They are presented as a shaded relief maps at the scale of 1:20 000 and 1:10 000, respectively.(Author)

  19. Helicopter-borne magnetic, electromagnetic and radiometric geophysical survey in Mauken, Maalselv, Troms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodionov, Alexei; Koziel, Janusz; Lynum, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    NGU conducted an airborne geophysical survey in Mauken area in June 2011 as a part of MINN project. This report describes and documents the acquisition, processing and visualization of recorded datasets. The geophysical survey results reported herein are 3680 line km. The modified Geotech Ltd. Hummingbird frequency domain system supplemented by optically pumped cesium magnetometer and 1024 channels RSX-5 spectrometer was used for data acquisition. The survey was flown with 200 m line spacing, line direction of 33 degrees NE and average speed 88km/h. The average terrain clearance of the bird was 45m. Collected data were processed in NGU using Geosoft Oasis Montaj software. Raw total magnetic field data were corrected for diurnal variation and levelled using standard micro levelling algorithm. EM data were filtered and levelled using both -automated and manual levelling procedure. Apparent resistivity was calculated from in-phase and quadrature data for each of the five frequencies separately using a homogeneous half space model. Apparent resistivity dataset was filtered and levelled. Radiometric data were processed using standard procedures recommended by International Atomic Energy Association. All data were gridded with the cell size of 50 m and presented as a shaded relief maps at the scale of 1:50 000. (Author)

  20. Helicopter-borne magnetic, electromagnetic and radiometric geophysical survey in the Storforshei area, Rana, Nordland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodionov, Alexei; Ofstad, Frode; Tassis, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    NGU conducted an airborne geophysical survey in Mo i Rana area in July 2012. This report describes and documents the aquisition, processing and visualization of recorded datasets. The geophysical survey results reported herein are 1414 line km. The Geotech Ltd. Hummingbird frequency domain system supplemented by optically pumped cesium magnetometer and 1024 channels RSX-5 spectrometer was used for data aquisition. The survey was flown with 100 m line spacing, line direction of 180 deg North-South (in the west) and 150 deg NorthWest-SouthEast (in the east) with the average speed 96 km/h. The average terrain clearance of the bird was 55 m. Collected data were processed by AR GeoConsulting using Geosoft Oasis Montaj software. Raw total magnetic field data were corrected for diurnal variation and levelled using standard micro levelling algorithm. EM data were filtered and levelled using both automated and manual levelling procedure. Apparent resistivity was calculated from in-phase and quadrature data for each of the five frequencies separately using a homogeneous half space model. Apparent resistivity dataset was levelled and filtered. Radiometric data were processed using standard procedures recommended by International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA). All data were gridded with the cell size of 25 m and presented as shaded relief maps at the scale of 1:25 000.(Author)

  1. Helicopter-borne magnetic, electromagnetic and radiometric geophysical survey at Vanna, Karlsoey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodionov, Alexei; Ofstad, Frode

    2012-01-01

    NGU conducted an airborne geophysical survey in Vanna area in June 2011 as a part of MINN project. This report describes and documents the acquisition, processing and visualization of recorded datasets. The geophysical survey results reported herein are 1336 line km. The modified Geotech Ltd. Hummingbird frequency domain system supplemented by optically pumped cesium magnetometer and 1024 channels RSX-5 spectrometer was used for data acquisition. The survey was flown with 200 m line spacing, line direction of 27 degrees NW and average speed 106 km/h. The average terrain clearance of the bird was 59 m. Collected data were processed in NGU using Geosoft Oasis Montaj software. Raw total magnetic field data were corrected for diurnal variation and levelled using standard micro levelling algorithm. EM data were filtered and levelled using both -automated and manual levelling procedure. Apparent resistivity was calculated from in-phase and quadrature data for four frequencies separately using a homogeneous half space model. Apparent resistivity dataset was filtered and levelled. Radiometric data were processed using standard procedures recommended by International Atomic Energy Association. All data were gridded with the cell size of 50 m and presented as a shaded relief maps at the scale of 1:50 000. (Author)

  2. Helicopter-borne magnetic, electromagnetic and radiometric geophysical survey in Finnsnes area, Lenvik, Troms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodionov, Alexei; Ofstad, Frode; Tassis, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    NGU conducted an airborne geophysical survey in Finnsnes area in July - August 2012. This report describes and documents the acquisition, processing and visualization of recorded datasets. The geophysical survey results reported herein are 2715 line km. The Geotech Ltd. Hummingbird frequency domain EM system supplemented by optically pumped cesium magnetometer and 1024 channels RSX-5 spectrometer was used for data acquisition. The survey was flown with 200 m line spacing, line direction of 120 degrees NW-SE with the average speed 89 km/h. The average terrain clearance of the bird was 55 m. Collected data were processed in NGU using Geosoft Oasis Montaj software. Raw total magnetic field data were corrected for diurnal variation and levelled using standard micro levelling algorithm. EM data were filtered and levelled using both automated and manual levelling procedure. Apparent resistivity was calculated from in-phase and quadrature data for each of the five frequencies separately using a homogeneous half space model. Apparent resistivity dataset was levelled and filtered. Radiometric data were processed using standard procedures recommended by International Atomic Energy Association. All data were gridded with the cell size of 50 m and presented as a shaded relief maps at the scale of 1:50 000.(Author)

  3. Helicopter-borne magnetic, electromagnetic and radiometric geophysical survey in Rombaken area, Narvik, Nordland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodionov, Alexei; Ofstad, Frode; Koziel, Janusz

    2012-01-01

    NGU conducted an airborne geophysical survey in Rombaken area in August - September 2011 as a part of MINN project. This report describes and documents the acquisition, processing and visualization of recorded datasets. The geophysical survey results reported herein are 5218 line km. The modified Geotech Ltd. Hummingbird frequency domain system supplemented by optically pumped cesium magnetometer and 1024 channels RSX-5 spectrometer was used for data acquisition. The survey was flown with 200 m line spacing, line direction of 90 degrees East West and average speed 98 km/h. The average terrain clearance of the bird was 64 m. Collected data were processed in NGU using Geosoft Oasis Montaj software. Raw total magnetic field data were corrected for diurnal variation and levelled using standard micro levelling algorithm. EM data were filtered and levelled using both automated and manual levelling procedure. Apparent resistivity was calculated from in-phase and quadrature data for each of the five frequencies separately using a homogeneous half space model. Apparent resistivity dataset was filtered and levelled. Radiometric data were processed using standard procedures recommended by International Atomic Energy Association.All data were gridded with the cell size of 50 m and presented as a shaded relief maps at the scale of 1:50 000.(Author)

  4. Preliminary report on geophysics ground follow-up of the 1977 airborne survey in the Wadi Bidah District, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanigan, V.J.; Wynn, J.C.; Worl, R.G.; Smith, C.W.

    1981-01-01

    Reconnaissance geologic and geochemical sampling was made during the 1978 field season at most of the 50 or so electromagnetic anomalies detected in the 1977 airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey of the Wadi Bidah district. These Phase 1 studies also included reconnaissance geophysical traverses of nine of the AEM conductors. In addition the AEM anomalies were classified on the basis of this reconnaissance work into a list of priority targets for use in economic studies, and six AEM anomalies were selected for further studies.

  5. Survey of subsurface geophysical exploration technologies adaptable to an airborne platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, K.A.

    1992-12-01

    This report has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of a Research Development Demonstration Testing and Evaluation (RDDT ampersand E) project by EG ampersand G Energy Measurement's (EG ampersand G/EM) Remote Sensing Laboratory. It examines geophysical detection techniques which may be used in Environmental Restoration/Waste Management (ER/WM) surveys to locate buried waste, waste containers, potential waste migratory paths, and aquifer depths. Because of the Remote Sensing Laboratory's unique survey capabilities, only those technologies which have been adapted or are capable of being adapted to an airborne platform were studied. This survey describes several of the available subsurface survey technologies and discusses the basic capabilities of each: the target detectability, required geologic conditions, and associated survey methods. Because the airborne capabilities of these survey techniques have not been fully developed, the chapters deal mostly with the ground-based capabilities of each of the technologies, with reference made to the airborne capabilities where applicable. The information about each survey technique came from various contractors whose companies employ these specific technologies. EG ampersand G/EM cannot guarantee or verify the accuracy of the contractor information; however, the data given is an indication of the technologies that are available

  6. Geological, geochemical, and geophysical survey of the geothermal resources at Hot Springs Bay Valley, Akutan Island, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motyka, R.J.; Wescott, E.M.; Turner, D.L.; Swanson, S.E.; Romick, J.D.; Moorman, M.A.; Poreda, R.J.; Witte, W.; Petzinger, B.; Allely, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    An extensive survey was conducted of the geothermal resource potential of Hot Springs Bay Valley on Akutan Island. A topographic base map was constructed, geologic mapping, geophysical and geochemical surveys were conducted, and the thermal waters and fumarolic gases were analyzed for major and minor element species and stable isotope composition. (ACR)

  7. TESTING GROUND BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES TO REFINE ELECTROMAGNETIC SURVEYS NORTH OF THE 300 AREA, HANFORD, WASHINGTON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, S.W.

    2010-01-01

    Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys were flown during fiscal year (FY) 2008 within the 600 Area in an attempt to characterize the underlying subsurface and to aid in the closure and remediation design study goals for the 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU). The rationale for using the AEM surveys was that airborne surveys can cover large areas rapidly at relatively low costs with minimal cultural impact, and observed geo-electrical anomalies could be correlated with important subsurface geologic and hydrogeologic features. Initial interpretation of the AEM surveys indicated a tenuous correlation with the underlying geology, from which several anomalous zones likely associated with channels/erosional features incised into the Ringold units were identified near the River Corridor. Preliminary modeling resulted in a slightly improved correlation but revealed that more information was required to constrain the modeling (SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site). Both time-and frequency domain AEM surveys were collected with the densest coverage occurring adjacent to the Columbia River Corridor. Time domain surveys targeted deeper subsurface features (e.g., top-of-basalt) and were acquired using the HeliGEOTEM(reg s ign) system along north-south flight lines with a nominal 400 m (1,312 ft) spacing. The frequency domain RESOLVE system acquired electromagnetic (EM) data along tighter spaced (100 m (328 ft) and 200 m (656 ft)) north-south profiles in the eastern fifth of the 200-PO-1 Groundwater OU (immediately adjacent to the River Corridor). The overall goal of this study is to provide further quantification of the AEM survey results, using ground based geophysical methods, and to link results to the underlying geology and/or hydrogeology. Specific goals of this project are as follows: (1) Test ground based geophysical techniques for the efficacy in delineating underlying geology; (2) Use ground

  8. TESTING GROUND BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES TO REFINE ELECTROMAGNETIC SURVEYS NORTH OF THE 300 AREA HANFORD WASHINGTON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW

    2010-12-02

    Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys were flown during fiscal year (FY) 2008 within the 600 Area in an attempt to characterize the underlying subsurface and to aid in the closure and remediation design study goals for the 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU). The rationale for using the AEM surveys was that airborne surveys can cover large areas rapidly at relatively low costs with minimal cultural impact, and observed geo-electrical anomalies could be correlated with important subsurface geologic and hydrogeologic features. Initial interpretation of the AEM surveys indicated a tenuous correlation with the underlying geology, from which several anomalous zones likely associated with channels/erosional features incised into the Ringold units were identified near the River Corridor. Preliminary modeling resulted in a slightly improved correlation but revealed that more information was required to constrain the modeling (SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site). Both time-and frequency domain AEM surveys were collected with the densest coverage occurring adjacent to the Columbia River Corridor. Time domain surveys targeted deeper subsurface features (e.g., top-of-basalt) and were acquired using the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} system along north-south flight lines with a nominal 400 m (1,312 ft) spacing. The frequency domain RESOLVE system acquired electromagnetic (EM) data along tighter spaced (100 m [328 ft] and 200 m [656 ft]) north-south profiles in the eastern fifth of the 200-PO-1 Groundwater OU (immediately adjacent to the River Corridor). The overall goal of this study is to provide further quantification of the AEM survey results, using ground based geophysical methods, and to link results to the underlying geology and/or hydrogeology. Specific goals of this project are as follows: (1) Test ground based geophysical techniques for the efficacy in delineating underlying geology; (2) Use ground

  9. Helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic geophysical survey data, Swedeburg and Sprague study areas, eastern Nebraska, May 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B.D.; Abraham, J.D.; Cannia, J.C.; Minsley, B.J.; Ball, L.B.; Steele, G.V.; Deszcz-Pan, M.

    2011-01-01

    This report is a release of digital data from a helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic survey conducted by Fugro Airborne Surveys in areas of eastern Nebraska as part of a joint hydrologic study by the Lower Platte North and Lower Platte South Natural Resources Districts, and the U.S. Geological Survey. The survey flight lines covered 1,418.6 line km (882 line mile). The survey was flown from April 22 to May 2, 2009. The objective of the contracted survey was to improve the understanding of the relation between surface water and groundwater systems critical to developing groundwater models used in management programs for water resources. The electromagnetic equipment consisted of six different coil-pair orientations that measured resistivity at separate frequencies from about 400 hertz to about 140,000 hertz. The electromagnetic data were converted to georeferenced electrical resistivity grids and maps for each frequency that represent different approximate depths of investigation for each survey area. The electrical resistivity data were input into a numerical inversion to estimate resistivity variations with depth. In addition to the electromagnetic data, total field magnetic data and digital elevation data were collected. Data released in this report consist of flight line data, digital grids, digital databases of the inverted electrical resistivity with depth, and digital maps of the apparent resistivity and total magnetic field. The range of subsurface investigation is comparable to the depth of shallow aquifers. The survey areas, Swedeburg and Sprague, were chosen based on results from test flights in 2007 in eastern Nebraska and needs of local water managers. The geophysical and hydrologic information from U.S. Geological Survey studies are being used by resource managers to develop groundwater resource plans for the area.

  10. Subsurface Characterization using Geophysical Seismic Refraction Survey for Slope Stabilization Design with Soil Nailing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf Mohamad Ismail, Mohd; Ng, Soon Min; Hazreek Zainal Abidin, Mohd; Madun, Aziman

    2018-04-01

    The application of geophysical seismic refraction for slope stabilization design using soil nailing method was demonstrated in this study. The potential weak layer of the study area is first identify prior to determining the appropriate length and location of the soil nail. A total of 7 seismic refraction survey lines were conducted at the study area with standard procedures. The refraction data were then analyzed by using the Pickwin and Plotrefa computer software package to obtain the seismic velocity profiles distribution. These results were correlated with the complementary borehole data to interpret the subsurface profile of the study area. It has been identified that layer 1 to 3 is the potential weak zone susceptible to slope failure. Hence, soil nails should be installed to transfer the tensile load from the less stable layer 3 to the more stable layer 4. The soil-nail interaction will provide a reinforcing action to the soil mass thereby increasing the stability of the slope.

  11. 77 FR 19242 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Low-Energy Marine Geophysical Survey...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ...., 1995; Thorpe, 1963), but because of ecological or physiological requirements, many marine animals may... Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Low- Energy Marine Geophysical Survey in the Central Pacific Ocean, May Through June, 2012 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic...

  12. 78 FR 33369 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Low-Energy Marine Geophysical Survey...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... information on the study, their modeling process of the experiment in shallow, intermediate, and deep water... element operation and that it uses shallow-water sound propagation as a proxy for deep water propagation... geophysical (i.e., seismic) survey in the deep water of the Gulf of Mexico, April to May 2013. DATES...

  13. An Analysis of Wind Power Development in the Town of Hull, MA_Appendix 4_Geophysical Survey Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Christopher

    2013-06-30

    CR Environmental, Inc. (CR) was contracted by GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. (GZA) to perform hydrographic and geophysical surveys of an approximately 3.35 square mile area off the eastern shore of Hull, Massachusetts. Survey components included: • Single-beam bathymetry; • 100-kHz and 500-kHz side scan sonar; • Magnetometry; and • Low to mid-frequency sub-bottom profiling.

  14. Aerial remote sensing surveys progress report: Helicopter geophysical survey of the Oak Ridge Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, W.E.; Nyquist, J.E.; King, A.D.; Bell, D.T.; Holladay, J.S.; Labson, V.F.; Pellerin, L.

    1993-03-01

    The 35,252 acre Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in the western portion of the Appalachian Valley and Ridge Province in Tennessee, has been a nuclear production and development facility for50 years. Contaminants in the many waste sites on the ORR include a wide variety of radioactive isotopes as well as many organic and inorganic compounds. The locations, geometry, and contents of many of these waste sites are reasonably well known, while others are poorly known or unknown. To better characterize the reasonably well known sites and search for additional potentially environmentally hazardous sites, a two-phase aerial survey of the ORR was developed. Phase I began in March 1992 and consisted of aerial radiation, multispectral scanner, and photographic (natural color and color infrared) surveys. Phase II began in November 1992 and is described in this report. Phase II consisted of helicopter electromagnetic (HEM), magnetic, and gamma radiation surveys. Targets of the survey included both man-made (drums, trench boundaries, burn pits, well heads) and geologic (fractures, faults, karst features, geologic contacts) features. The Phase II survey has three components: testing, reconnaissance, and high-resolution data acquisition. To date, the testing and reconnaissance data acquisition have been completed, and some of the data have been processed. They indicate that: (1) magnetic and HEM data are complementary and do not always highlight the same anomaly; (2) under favorable circumstances, helicopter magnetometer systems are capable of detecting groups of four or more 55-gal drums at detector altitudes of 15 m or less; (3) HEM data provide data that compare favorably with surface data collected over burial trenches, (4) well casings may be related to magnetic monopole anomalies, as would be expected; and (5) changes in HEM and magnetic anomaly character are related to lithologic changes and may be used to track contacts between known outcrops

  15. Classroom-sized geophysical experiments: magnetic surveying using modern smartphone devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronicke, Jens; Trauth, Martin H.

    2018-05-01

    Modern mobile devices (i.e. smartphones and tablet computers) are widespread, everyday tools, which are equipped with a variety of sensors including three-axis magnetometers. Here, we investigate the feasibility and the potential of using such mobile devices to mimic geophysical experiments in the classroom in a table-top setup. We focus on magnetic surveying and present a basic setup of a table-top experiment for collecting three-component magnetic data across well-defined source bodies and structures. Our results demonstrate that the quality of the recorded data is sufficient to address a number of important basic concepts in the magnetic method. The shown examples cover the analysis of magnetic data recorded across different kinds of dipole sources, thus illustrating the complexity of magnetic anomalies. In addition, we analyze the horizontal resolution capabilities using a pair of dipole sources placed at different horizontal distances to each other. Furthermore, we demonstrate that magnetic data recorded with a mobile device can even be used to introduce filtering, transformation, and inversion approaches as they are typically used when processing magnetic data sets recorded for real-world field applications. Thus, we conclude that such table-top experiments represent an easy-to-implement experimental procedure (as student exercise or classroom demonstration) and can provide first hands-on experience in the basic principles of magnetic surveying including the fundamentals of data acquisition, analysis and processing, as well as data evaluation and interpretation.

  16. Geophysical Surveying of Shallow Magnetic Anomalies Using the iPhone Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opdyke, P.; Dudley, C.; Louie, J. N.

    2012-12-01

    This investigation examined whether the 3-axis Hall-effect magnetometer in the Apple iPhone 3GS can function as an effective shallow magnetic survey instrument. The xSensor Pro app from Crossbow Systems allows recoding of all three sensor components along with the GPS location, at a frequency of 1.0, 4.0, 16.0, and 32.0 Hz. If the iPhone proves successful in collecting useful magnetic data, then geophysicists and especially educators would have a new tool for high-density geophysical mapping. No-contract iPhones that can connect with WiFi can be obtained for about $400, allowing deployment of large numbers of instruments. iPhones with the xSensor Pro app surveyed in parallel with an Overhauser GEM system magnetometer (1 nT sensitivity) to test this idea. Anderson Bay, located on the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation, provided a rural survey location free from cultural interference. xSensor Pro, logged each component's intensity and the GPS location at a frequency of four measurements per second. Two Overhauser units functioned as a base unit and a roving unit. The roving unit collected total field at set points located with a handheld GPS. Comparing the total field computed from the iPhone components against that collected by the Overhauser establishes the level of anomalies that the iPhone can detect. iPhone total-field measurements commonly vary by 200 nT from point to point, so a spatial-temporal average over 25 seconds produces a smoothed signal for comparison. Preliminary analysis of the iPhone results show that the data do not accurately correlate to the total field collected by the Overhauser for any anomaly of less than 200 nT.

  17. Results of detailed ground geophysical surveys for locating and differentiating waste structures in waste management area 'A' at Chalk River Laboratories, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomsons, D.K.; Street, P.J.; Lodha, G.S.

    1999-01-01

    Waste Management Area 'A' (WMA 'A'), located in the outer area of the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) was in use as a waste burial site from 1946 to 1955. Waste management structures include debris-filled trenches, concrete bunkers and miscellaneous contaminated solid materials, and ditches and pits used for liquid dispersal. In order to update historical records, it was proposed to conduct detailed ground geophysical surveys to define the locations of waste management structures in WMA 'A', assist in planning of the drilling and sampling program to provide ground truth for the geophysics investigation and to predict the nature and locations of unknown/undefined shallow structures. A detailed ground geophysical survey grid was established with a total of 127 grid lines, oriented NNE and spaced one metre apart. The geophysical surveys were carried out during August and September, 1996. The combination of geophysical tools used included the Geonics EM61 metal detector, the GSM-19 magnetometer/gradiometer and a RAMAC high frequency ground penetrating radar system. The geophysical surveys were successful in identifying waste management structures and in characterizing to some extent, the composition of the waste. The geophysical surveys are able to determine the presence of most of the known waste management structures, especially in the western and central portions of the grid which contain the majority of the metallic waste. The eastern portion of the grid has a completely different geophysical character. While historical records show that trenches were dug, they are far less evident in the geophysical record. There is clear evidence for a trench running between lines 30E and 63E at 70 m. There are indications from the radar survey of other trench-like structures in the eastern portion. EM61 data clearly show that there is far less metallic debris in the eastern portion. The geophysical surveys were also successful in identifying previously unknown locations of waste

  18. Integrated geophysical survey in defining subsidence features on a golf course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.

    2007-01-01

    Subsidence was observed at several places on the Salina Municipal Golf Course in areas known to be built over a landfill in Salina, Kansas. High-resolution magnetic survey (???5400 m2), multi-channel electrical resistivity profiling (three 154 m lines) and microgravity profiling (23 gravity-station values) were performed on a subsidence site (Green 16) to aid in determining boundaries and density deficiency of the landfill in the vicinity of the subsidence. Horizontal boundaries of the landfill were confidently defined by both magnetic anomalies and the pseudo-vertical gradient of total field magnetic anomalies. Furthermore, the pseudo-vertical gradient of magnetic anomalies presented a unique anomaly at Green 16, which provided a criterion for predicting other spots with subsidence potential using the same gradient property. Results of multi-channel electrical resistivity profiling (ERP) suggested the bottom limit of the landfill at Green 16 was around 21 m below the ground surface based on the vertical gradient of electric resistivity and a priori information on the depth of the landfill. ERP results also outlined several possible landfill bodies based on their low resistivity values. Microgravity results suggested a -0.14 g cm-3 density deficiency at Green 16 that could equate to future surface subsidence of as much as 1.5 m due to gradual compaction. ?? 2007 Nanjing Institute of Geophysical Prospecting.

  19. Geological, geochemical, and geophysical studies by the U.S. Geological Survey in Big Bend National Park, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, W.R.; Turner, K.J.; Bohannon, R.G.; Berry, M.E.; Williams, V.S.; Miggins, D.P.; Ren, M.; Anthony, E.Y.; Morgan, L.A.; Shanks, P.W.C.; Gray, J. E.; Theodorakos, P.M.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Manning, A.H.; Gemery-Hill, P. A.; Hellgren, E.C.; Stricker, C.A.; Onorato, D.P.; Finn, C.A.; Anderson, E.; Gray, J. E.; Page, W.R.

    2008-01-01

    Big Bend National Park (BBNP), Tex., covers 801,163 acres (3,242 km2) and was established in 1944 through a transfer of land from the State of Texas to the United States. The park is located along a 118-mile (190-km) stretch of the Rio Grande at the United States-Mexico border. The park is in the Chihuahuan Desert, an ecosystem with high mountain ranges and basin environments containing a wide variety of native plants and animals, including more than 1,200 species of plants, more than 450 species of birds, 56 species of reptiles, and 75 species of mammals. In addition, the geology of BBNP, which varies widely from high mountains to broad open lowland basins, also enhances the beauty of the park. For example, the park contains the Chisos Mountains, which are dominantly composed of thick outcrops of Tertiary extrusive and intrusive igneous rocks that reach an altitude of 7,832 ft (2,387 m) and are considered the southernmost mountain range in the United States. Geologic features in BBNP provide opportunities to study the formation of mineral deposits and their environmental effects; the origin and formation of sedimentary and igneous rocks; Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic fossils; and surface and ground water resources. Mineral deposits in and around BBNP contain commodities such as mercury (Hg), uranium (U), and fluorine (F), but of these, the only significant mining has been for Hg. Because of the biological and geological diversity of BBNP, more than 350,000 tourists visit the park each year. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been investigating a number of broad and diverse geologic, geochemical, and geophysical topics in BBNP to provide fundamental information needed by the National Park Service (NPS) to address resource management goals in this park. Scientists from the USGS Mineral Resources and National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Programs have been working cooperatively with the NPS and several universities on several research studies within BBNP

  20. Determination of Cenozoic sedimentary structures using integrated geophysical surveys: A case study in the Barkol Basin, Xinjiang, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Chen, Chao; Du, Jinsong; Wang, Limin; Lei, Binhua

    2018-01-01

    Thickness estimation of sedimentary basin is a complex geological problem, especially in an orogenic environment. Intense and multiple tectonic movements and climate changes result in inhomogeneity of sedimentary layers and basement configurations, which making sedimentary structure modelling difficult. In this study, integrated geophysical methods, including gravity, magnetotelluric (MT) sounding and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), were used to estimate basement relief to understand the geological structure and evolution of the eastern Barkol Basin in China. This basin formed with the uplift of the eastern Tianshan during the Cenozoic. Gravity anomaly map revealed the framework of the entire area, and ERT as well as MT sections reflected the geoelectric features of the Cenozoic two-layer distribution. Therefore, gravity data, constrained by MT, ERT and boreholes, were utilized to estimate the spatial distribution of the Quaternary layer. The gravity effect of the Quaternary layer related to the Tertiary layer was later subtracted to obtain the residual anomaly for inversion. For the Tertiary layer, the study area was divided into several parts because of lateral difference of density contrasts. Gravity data were interpreted to determine the density contrast constrained by the MT results. The basement relief can be verified by geological investigation, including the uplift process and regional tectonic setting. The agreement between geophysical survey and prior information from geology emphasizes the importance of integrated geophysical survey as a complementary means of geological studies in this region.

  1. Survey of geophysical techniques for site characterization in basalt, salt and tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.M.; Blackey, M.E.; Rice, J.E.; Murphy, V.J.; Levine, E.N.; Fisk, P.S.; Bromery, R.W.

    1987-07-01

    Geophysical techniques may help determine the nature and extent of faulting in the target areas, along with structural information that would be relevant to questions concerning the future integrity of a high-level-waste repository. Chapters focus on particular geophysical applications to four rock types - basalt, bedded salt, domal salt and tuff - characteristic of the sites originally proposed for site characterization. No one geophysical method can adequately characterize the geological structure beneath any site. The seismic reflection method, which is generally considered to be the most incisive of the geophysical techniques, has to date provided only marginal information on structure at the depth of the proposed repository at the Hanford, Washington, site, and no useful results at all at the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site. This result is partially due to geological complexity beneath these sites, but may also be partially attributed to the use of inappropriate acquisition and processing parameters. To adequately characterize a site using geophysics, modifications will have to be made to standard techniques to emphasize structural details at the depths of interest. 137 refs., 43 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Using FOSM-Based Data Worth Analyses to Design Geophysical Surveys to Reduce Uncertainty in a Regional Groundwater Model Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B. D.; White, J.; Kress, W. H.; Clark, B. R.; Barlow, J.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogeophysical surveys have become an integral part of understanding hydrogeological frameworks used in groundwater models. Regional models cover a large area where water well data is, at best, scattered and irregular. Since budgets are finite, priorities must be assigned to select optimal areas for geophysical surveys. For airborne electromagnetic (AEM) geophysical surveys, optimization of mapping depth and line spacing needs to take in account the objectives of the groundwater models. The approach discussed here uses a first-order, second-moment (FOSM) uncertainty analyses which assumes an approximate linear relation between model parameters and observations. This assumption allows FOSM analyses to be applied to estimate the value of increased parameter knowledge to reduce forecast uncertainty. FOSM is used to facilitate optimization of yet-to-be-completed geophysical surveying to reduce model forecast uncertainty. The main objective of geophysical surveying is assumed to estimate values and spatial variation in hydrologic parameters (i.e. hydraulic conductivity) as well as map lower permeability layers that influence the spatial distribution of recharge flux. The proposed data worth analysis was applied to Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study (MERAS) which is being updated. The objective of MERAS is to assess the ground-water availability (status and trends) of the Mississippi embayment aquifer system. The study area covers portions of eight states including Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee. The active model grid covers approximately 70,000 square miles, and incorporates some 6,000 miles of major rivers and over 100,000 water wells. In the FOSM analysis, a dense network of pilot points was used to capture uncertainty in hydraulic conductivity and recharge. To simulate the effect of AEM flight lines, the prior uncertainty for hydraulic conductivity and recharge pilots along potential flight lines was

  3. Geophysical Surveys of a Known Karst Feature, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, W.E.; Nyquist, J.E.; Carpenter, P.J.; Kaufmann, R.D.; Carr, B.J.

    1998-01-01

    Geophysical data were acquired at a site on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee to determine the characteristics of a mud-filled void and to evaluate the effectiveness of a suite of geophysical methods at the site. Methods that were used included microgravity, electrical resistivity, and seismic refraction. Both microgravity and resistivity were able to detect the void as well as overlying structural features. The seismic data provide bedrock depth control for the other two methods, and show other effects that are caused by the void

  4. Deep-tow geophysical survey above large exhumed mantle domains of the eastern Southwest Indian ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronner, A.; Munschy, M.; Sauter, D.; Carlut, J.; Searle, R.; Cannat, M.

    2012-04-01

    The recent discovery of a new type of seafloor, the "smooth seafloor", formed with no or very little volcanic activity along the easternmost part of the ultra-slow spreading Southwest Indian ridge (SWIR) shows an unexpected complexity in processes of generation of the oceanic lithosphere. There, detachment faulting is thought to be a mechanism for efficient exhumation of deep-seated mantle rocks. We present here a deep-tow geological-geophysical survey over smooth seafloor at the eastern SWIR (62-64°N) combining multibeam bathymetric data, magnetic data, geology mapping from sidescan sonar (TOBI) images and results from dredge sampling. We introduce a new type of calibration approach for deep-tow fluxgate magnetometer. We show that magnetic data can be corrected from the magnetic effect of the vehicle with no recourse to its attitude (pitch, roll and heading) but only using the 3 components recorded by the magnetometer and an approximation of the scalar intensity of the Earth magnetic field. The collected dredge samples as well as the sidescan sonar images confirm the presence of large areas of exhumed mantle-derived peridodites surrounded by a few volcanic constructions. We investigate the possibility that magnetic anomalies are either caused by serpentinized peridotites and/or magmatic intrusions. We show that the magnetic signature of the smooth seafloor is clearly weaker than the surrounding volcanic areas. Moreover, the calculated magnetization of a source layer as well as the comparison between deep-tow and sea-surface magnetic data argue for strong East-West variability in the distribution of the magnetized sources. This variability may result from fluid-rock interactions along the detachment faults as well as from the occurrence of small sized and thin volcanic patches and thus questions the seafloor spreading origin of the corresponding magnetic anomalies. Finally, we provide magnetic arguments, as calculation of block rotation or spreading asymmetry in

  5. Survey of how staff commute to work

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    A survey was initiated by the Canton of Geneva (Direction Générale des Transports) and the Swiss Permanent Mission to the United Nations, and is aimed at better understanding how staff in International Organisations commute to/from work so as to better plan future works (road access, public transport, etc.). The ILO, WHO, UNAIDs, Global Fund, IFRC, CERN and UNOG are taking part in this important survey.   People living in Switzerland or France are invited to respond to this survey. The purpose of this survey is to better understand: - your commuting habits, - your willingness to explore alternative commuting options, - your expectations and needs. All data provided to this external company (www.mobilidee.ch) will be kept confidential and will only be used for this particular study. CERN has received all guarantees of confidentiality from this company. Many thanks for your collaboration! GS Department

  6. Integrated geophysical survey for the geological structural and hydrogeothermal study of the North-western Gargano promontory (Southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Schiavone

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A multimethodological geophysical survey was performed in the north-western part of the Gargano promontory to study the geological structural setting and the underground fluid flow characteristics. The area has a complex tectonics with some magmatic outcrops and shallow low-enthalpy waters. Electrical, seismic reflection, gravimetric and magnetic surveys were carried out to reconstruct the geological structures; and in order to delineate the hydrogeothermal characteristics of the area, the self-potential survey was mainly used. Moreover magnetic and self-potential measurements were also performed in the Lesina lake. The joint three-dimensional interpretation of the geophysical data disclosed a large horst and graben structure covering a large part of the area. In the central part of the horst a large ramified volcanic body was modelled. The models show some intrusions rising from it to or near to the surface. The main structures are well deep-seated in the Crust and along them deep warm fluids rise as the SP data interpretation indicates.

  7. Work site stress management: national survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, J E

    1989-12-01

    The National Survey of Work Site Health Promotion Activities established baseline data on the frequency of nine types of health promotion activity at private work sites with more than 50 employees in the United States. Stress management activities were provided at 26.6% of work sites. Types of activities at those work sites with some stress management activity included group counseling (58.5%), individual counseling (39.3%), follow-up counseling (25.9%), special events (11.5%), providing information about stress (80.7%), providing a place to relax (64.8%), and making organizational changes to reduce employee stress (81.2%). Frequency of activities varied by industry type and by region of the country. Incidence of most types of activities did not increase as work site size increased, although the likelihood of having any of these activities did increase with work site size. Stress management activities were more likely to be present at work sites with a medical staff or health educator. An increase in output, productivity, or quality was the most frequently cited benefit (46.5%). Negative effects were reported at 2.6% of the work sites. Other health promotion activities found at the work sites surveyed included smoking cessation (61.8%), treatment and control of high blood pressure (36.7%), and weight control (34.7%). Employee Assistance Programs were responsible for stress management at 62% of the work sites with an Employee Assistance Program.

  8. Results of detailed ground geophysical surveys for locating and differentiating waste structures in waste management area 'A' at Chalk River Laboratories, Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomsons, D.K.; Street, P.J.; Lodha, G.S

    1999-07-01

    Waste Management Area 'A' (WMA 'A'), located in the outer area of the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) was in use as a waste burial site from 1946 to 1955. Waste management structures include debris-filled trenches, concrete bunkers and miscellaneous contaminated solid materials, and ditches and pits used for liquid dispersal. In order to update historical records, it was proposed to conduct detailed ground geophysical surveys to define the locations of waste management structures in WMA 'A', assist in planning of the drilling and sampling program to provide ground truth for the geophysics investigation and to predict the nature and locations of unknown/undefined shallow structures. A detailed ground geophysical survey grid was established with a total of 127 grid lines, oriented NNE and spaced one metre apart. The geophysical surveys were carried out during August and September, 1996. The combination of geophysical tools used included the Geonics EM61 metal detector, the GSM-19 magnetometer/gradiometer and a RAMAC high frequency ground penetrating radar system. The geophysical surveys were successful in identifying waste management structures and in characterizing to some extent, the composition of the waste. The geophysical surveys are able to determine the presence of most of the known waste management structures, especially in the western and central portions of the grid which contain the majority of the metallic waste. The eastern portion of the grid has a completely different geophysical character. While historical records show that trenches were dug, they are far less evident in the geophysical record. There is clear evidence for a trench running between lines 30E and 63E at 70 m. There are indications from the radar survey of other trench-like structures in the eastern portion. EM61 data clearly show that there is far less metallic debris in the eastern portion. The geophysical surveys were also successful in identifying

  9. Geophysical survey for proposed borehole 199-K-107A, 100-K Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, T.H.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the survey was to locate subsurface obstructions that may affect the drilling of proposed borehole, 199-K-107A, located about 100 ft northwest of the 105 KW Building, 100-K Area. Based upon the results of the survey, possible drill sites within the zone, with the least likelihood of encountering identified obstructions, were identified. The ground-penetrating radar (GPR) system used for this work utilized a 300-megahertz antenna to transmit the electromagnetic (EM) energy into the ground. The transmitted energy is reflected back to a receiving antenna where variations in the return signal are recorded. Common reflectors include natural geologic conditions such as bedding, cementation, moisture, and clay, or man-made objects such as pipes, barrels, foundations, and buried wires. Several isolated anomalies, at various depths, are observed in the data. Additionally, two areas that appear disturbed, with perplexing character, are plotted. Because of the uncertain nature of these two areas, they were avoided when recommending a borehole location. Initially, the proposed borehole was staked at N130/E122. The new proposed borehole location is N139/E176. This location appears free of anomalies and is over 10 ft from interpreted linear anomalies/pipe-like features

  10. Utilization of Point Clouds Characteristics in Interpretation and Evaluation Geophysical Resistivity Surveying of Unstable Running Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Brejcha

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Close to human residences the places often abound where anthropogenic activity and external factors cause their changes. The changes can often influence their inhabitants’ life thanks to incipient dangerous places. The project of successful design of measures to ensure stability of unstable running blocks depends on chosen approaches and primary resource preparation. Utilization of modern technologies in their taking and processing is required nowadays. The paper describes the taking and processing of data for project of solution „Stabilization of unstable running block“ in a municipal settled part with efficient utilization of unusual method of processing of geophysical resistivity method.

  11. The Unicorn Cave, Southern Harz Mountains, Germany: From known passages to unknown extensions with the help of geophysical surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Georg; Nielbock, Ralf; Romanov, Douchko

    2015-12-01

    In soluble rocks (limestone, dolomite, anhydrite, gypsum, …), fissures and bedding partings can be enlarged with time by both physical and chemical dissolution of the host rock. With time, larger cavities evolve, and a network of cave passages can evolve. If the enlarged cave voids are not too deep under the surface, geophysical measurements can be used to detect, identify and trace these karst structures, e.g.: (i) gravity revealing air- and sediment-filled cave voids through negative Bouguer anomalies, (ii) electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) mapping different infillings of cavities either as high resistivities from air-filled voids or dry soft sediments, or low resistivities from saturated sediments, and (iii) groundwater flow through electrical potential differences (SP) arising from dislocated ionic charges from the walls of the underground flow paths. We have used gravity, ERI, and SP methods both in and above the Unicorn Cave located in the southern Harz Mountains in Germany. The Unicorn Cave is a show cave developed in the Werra dolomite formation of the Permian Zechstein sequence, characterised by large trunk passages interrupted by larger rooms. The overburden of the cave is only around 15 m, and passages are filled with sediments reaching infill thicknesses up to 40 m. We present results from our geophysical surveys above the known cave and its northern and southern extension, and from the cave interior. We identify the cave geometry and its infill from gravity and ERI measurements, predict previously unknown parts of the cave, and subsequently confirm the existence of these new passages through drilling. From the wealth of geophysical data acquired we derive a three-dimensional structural model of the Unicorn Cave and its surrounding, especially the cave infill.

  12. Sustainable urban development and geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lanbo; Chan, L. S.

    2007-09-01

    investigated [2]. The first objective of urban geophysics is to study systematically the geophysical fields in cities, searching for principles and processes governing the intensity and patterns of variation of the geophysical properties, as well as the potential consequences on the biosphere. Secondly, geophysics has already been found to be a useful tool for subsurface detection and investigation, hazard mitigation, and assessment of environmental contamination. Geophysicists have documented numerous cases of successful applications of geophysical techniques to solve problems related to hazard mitigation, safeguarding of lifeline infrastructure and urban gateways (air- and sea-ports, railway and highway terminals), archaeological and heritage surveys, homeland security, urban noise control, water supplies, sanitation and solid waste management etc. In contrast to conventional geophysical exploration, the undertaking of geophysical surveys in an urban setting faces many new challenges and difficulties. First of all, the ambient cultural noise in cities caused by traffic, electromagnetic radiation and electrical currents often produce undesirably strong interference with geophysical measurements. Secondly, subsurface surveys in an urban area are often targeted at the uppermost several metres of the ground, which are the most heterogeneous layers with many man-made objects. Thirdly, unlike conventional geophysical exploration which requires resolution in the order of metres, many urban geophysical surveys demand a resolution and precision in the order of centimetres or even millimetres. Finally restricted site access and limited time for conducting geophysical surveys, regulatory constraints, requirements for traffic management and special logistical arrangements impose additional difficulties. All of these factors point to the need for developing innovative research methods and geophysical instruments suitable for use in urban settings. This special issue on 'Sustainable urban

  13. Fluid circulation and structural system of Cerritos Colorados geothermal field in La Primavera volcanic caldera (Mexico) inferred from geophysical surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolós, X.; Cifuentes-Nava, G.; Macias, J. L.; Sosa-Ceballos, G.; García-Tenorio, F.; Albor, M., III; Juarez, M.; Gamez, V.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrothermal activity in volcanic calderas is the consequence of energy transfer between deep magmatic chambers and subsurface layers saturated in water. This hydrothermal system is generated by convection of the groundwater supplied by meteoric water recharged and the ascent of hot volcanic gasses exsolved from deep magma reservoirs. Calderas are heterogeneous geological structures that due to their formation and evolution produced a complex stratigraphy. All of these heterogeneities can be affected by deformation and also by the presence of fractures and faults which constitute the main pathways whereby hydrothermal fluids can move easily through the surface as spring discharges and fumarolic activity. Geophysical methods have been used in the last decades to investigate the relationship between structural geology and hydrothermal systems in different volcanic areas around the world. In this work, we have focused on the role of subsurface structures to understand and localize the pathways of fluids related to the hydrothermal system of the Cerritos Colorados geothermal field. We focused in the central area of the caldera (P12 well and Cerritos Colorados graben), where active hydrothermal activity is evidenced by fumaroles, thermal anomalies, CO2 diffuse emission, and sulfur precipitation. We have applied a self-potential method (SP) that combined with temperature measurements that allowed to identify the main infiltration and ascending fluid zones in the area, and their specific surface temperature coinciding with fumarolic activity. From this data we an applied Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) survey in two selected places. One ERT profile (1.2 km in length) was located in the P12 well area. A 3D resistivity model used with the equatorial method was carried out on the Cerritos Colorados graben area. Combining the results of the SP, TºC, and ERT data with a detailed structural map we identified the main degassing zones (i.e. fumaroles) that correspond to

  14. Comprehensive geophysical survey technique in exploration for deep-buried hydrothermal type uranium deposits in Xiangshan volcanic basin, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke, D.

    2014-01-01

    According to recent drilling results, uranium mineralization has been found underground more than 1000 m deep in the Xiangshan volcanic basin, in where uranium exploration has been carried out for over 50 years. This paper presents a comprehensive geophysical survey technique, including audio magnetotelluric method (AMT), high resolution ground magnetic and radon survey, which aim to prospect deep-buried and concealed uranium deposits in Xiangshan volcanic basin. Based on research and application, a comprehensive geophysical technique consisting of data acquisition, processing and interpretation has been established. Concealed rock and ore-controlling structure buried deeper than 1000 m can be detected by using this technique. Moreover, one kind of anti-interference technique of AMT survey is presented, which can eliminate the interference induced by the high-voltage power lines. Result of AMT in Xiangshan volcanic basin is demonstrated as high-low-high mode, which indicates there are three layers in geology. The upper layer with high resistivity is mainly the react of porphyroclastic lava. The middle layer with low resistivity is metamorphic schists or dellenite whereas the lower layer with high resistivity is inferred as granite. The interface between middle and lower layer is recognized as the potential zone for occurrence of uranium deposits. According to the corresponding relation of the resistivity and magnetic anomaly with uranium ore bodies, the tracing model of faults and interfaces between the different rocks, and the forecasting model of advantageous area for uranium deposits have been established. In terms of the forecasting model, some significant sections for uranium deposits were delineated in the west of the Xiangshan volcanic basin. As a result, some achievements on uranium prospecting have been acquired. High grade economic uranium ore bodies have been found in several boreholes, which are located in the forecasted zones. (author)

  15. Young Geophysicists: `Know How' Tips to Nourish Them from Lectures and Seminars to Field Work and Conferences (Geology and Geophysics Department, Novosibirsk State University, GGD, NSU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhmenkulova, I. F.

    2016-12-01

    How to nourish young brilliant geophysicists? Here are the tips: We teach them as physicists (at the Department of Physics, together with students majoring in physics). Students have special facilities in field work, using most modern geophysical equipment. They can participate in real projects on applied geophysics during their studies. They attend special seminars and conferences for both young professionals and full-fledged scientists. Their English Language Program is focused on geophysical terminology. There are four specialties at Geology and Geophysics Department of Novosibirsk State University: Geophysics, Geochemistry, Geology, and Geochemistry of Oil and Gas. However, the curriculum for geophysicists is absolutely different from other specialties. Mathematics, physics and laboratory work are given at the Department of Physics (together with students majoring in physics). All the necessary geological subjects are also studied (including field work). During all period of their study the students work part time at many geophysical institutions. The equipment is both traditional and most modern, created at the Institute of Oil and Gas Geophysics. The students present the result of their field work and laboratory experiments in many seminars and conferences. For example, there is a traditional annual conference in Shira, Khakassia, for young professionals. Every year the Seminar in Geodynamics, Geophysics and Geomechanics is held in the Altay Mountains (Denisova Cave Camp). This Seminar was organized by the late Sergey Goldin, the Director of the Institute of Geophysics, the Head of the Chair of Geophysics, a Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences. In July 2016 this Seminar was devoted to 80's birth anniversary of Sergey Goldin. Several students of geophysics presented the results of their work there. Next year the seminar is supposed to be international. A special attention is given to the English course lasting for 5 years. The students learn general

  16. A slingram survey on the Nevada Test Site: part of an integrated geologic geophysical study of site evaluation for nuclear waste disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanigan, Vincent J.

    1979-01-01

    A slingram geophysical survey was made in early 1978 as part of the integrated geologlcal-geophysical study aimed at evaluating the Eleana Formation as a possible repository for nuclear waste. The slingram data were taken over an alluvial fan and pediments along the eastern flank of Syncline Ridge about 45 km north of Mercury, Nevada, on the Nevada Test Site. The data show that the more conductive argillaceous Eleana Formation varies in depth from 40 to 85 m from west to east along traverse lines. Northeast-trending linear anomalies suggest rather abrupt changes in subsurface geology that may be associated with faults and fractures. The results of the slingram survey will, when interpreted in the light of other geologic and geophysical evidence, assist in understanding the shallow parts of the geologic setting of the Eleana Formation.

  17. Helicopter Electromagnetic and Magnetic Geophysical Survey Data for Portions of the North Platte River and Lodgepole Creek, Nebraska, June 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bruce D.; Abraham, Jared D.; Cannia, James C.; Hill, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    apparent resistivity and total magnetic field. The depth range of the subsurface investigation for the electromagnetic survey (estimated as deep as 60 m) is comparable to the depth of shallow aquifers. The geophysical data and hydrologic information from U.S. Geological Survey and cooperator studies are being used by resource managers to develop groundwater resource plans for the area. In addition, data will be used to refine hydrologic models in western Nebraska.

  18. Remote Sensing of a Roman Pottery Workshop. Report on a Geophysical Survey Carried out in Crikvenica (Ancient Ad Turres, Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welc Fabian

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of a geophysical survey conducted in Crikvenica, a town located at the north-eastern Adriatic Sea coast in Croatia. The main aim was to identify extent of a Roman pottery workshop discovered to the north of the present town, at the site known as “Igralište”. The performed magnetic and GPR surveys within the area of the modern playground in Crikvenica revealed a large number of anomalies that may be connected with anthropogenic activity during different periods, both in modern and ancient times. The first group consists of anomalies generated by remnants of the modern underground infrastructure. Magnetic and ground-penetrating radar maps revealed anomalies in the north-western part of the modern playground that can be very likely interpreted as remains of a large ceramic kiln dated back to the Roman Period, similar to the kiln discovered during the excavations located further to the north. Finally, the survey performed within the Crikvenica football stadium clearly indicates that the integration of different Ground Penetrating Radar and magnetic methods allows for a detailed and effective identification of buried archaeological structures in large areas.

  19. Feasibility study of geophysical survey in Uruguay 07.05 - 02.06.1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberle, D.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this report has been carried out an airborne magnetic and radiometric survey that would be followed by an interpretation stage to delineate and area of increased mineral potential where an airborne electromagnetic survey might be held in further stage.

  20. Geophysical survey, Paso Robles geothermal area, California, part of the resource assessment of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal resource areas in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.; Youngs, L.G.

    1980-11-10

    Some general background information concerning the geology and geothermal occurrences in the Southern Coast Ranges is included, as well as the more detailed information dealing with the Paso Robles area proper. Results for two geophysical methods that have been used in the area: the ground magnetic and gravity surveys, are discussed and interpreted.

  1. LiDAR, geophysical and field surveys at Ancient Epomanduodurum site and its surrounding country (Doubs, Eastern France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laplaige, Clement; Bossuet, Gilles; Thivet, Matthieu

    2010-05-01

    Integrated geophysical studies were carried out over several years, at Mandeure-Mathay (Franche-Comté Region, Eastern France) for the archaeological evaluation of ancient Epomanduodurum. The site is of major scientific interest to understand the territorial structure of earlier agglomerations in Eastern Gaul at the end of the Iron Age and during the Roman period. As regards its size, urban equipment, monuments and function, the ancient town is considered rating second behind the civitas capital of Sequani, Besançon-Vesontio. It is located in the Doubs valley, where the plain of Alsace opens into the marches of Burgundy, in a traffic zone between the Vosges and the Jura. This location allows transit between the Rhône valley and the Rhein plain, through the Saône and Doubs valleys. This geographical situation was a significant factor in the creation of the late Iron Age settlement, later to turn into a major Gallo-roman town. The whole site of the Ancient town includes urban centre and two artisan suburbs. The buried ruins stretch on more than 500 hectares outside and inside a meander of the Doubs River. From the beginning of the survey, in 2001, high resolution and non invasive geophysical methods (magnetic mapping and Automatic Restivity Profiling (ARP) were performed on large scale, both on the terrace and in the floodplain). Excavations associated to geophysical prospection allow to produce a general plan of the Gallo roman structures and to reconstruct the settlement evolution. While human occupation on open land is certified by a lot of indications, on the contrary, the forest-covered zones on table-land appear as less documented areas. The explanation is that some of the classic methods (such as aerial reconnaissance and field walking) are less efficient in the archaeological prospection of table-lands and hills, naturally marked by omnipresent forest. In our new research program (LIEPPEC and PCR Mandeure, 2008-2010), it appears necessary to better

  2. 76 FR 26255 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ..., whose earthquake recurrence interval is 50 to 75 years and which last ruptured in 1938. The survey will... sequence such that the source level of the array will increase in steps not exceeding six dB per five min...

  3. Assessing subaqueous mudslide hazard on the Mississippi River delta front, Part 2: Insights revealed through high-resolution geophysical surveying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obelcz, J.; Xu, K.; Bentley, S. J.; Georgiou, I. Y.; Maloney, J. M.; Miner, M. D.; Hanegan, K.; Keller, G.

    2014-12-01

    The northern Gulf of Mexico, including the subaqueous Mississippi River delta front (MRDF), has been productive for oil and gas development since the early 1900s. In 1969 cyclic seafloor wave loading associated with the passage of Hurricane Camille triggered subaqueous mudflows across the MRDF, destroying several offshore oil platforms. This incident spurred geophysical and geotechnical studies of the MRDF, which found that the delta front is prone to mass failures on gentle gradients (gas production, and (3) the frequent passage of tropical cyclones. In June 2014, a geophysical pilot study was conducted 8 km southwest of Southwest Pass, the distributary that currently receives the largest fraction of Mississippi River sediment supply. The resultant dataset encompasses 216 km of subbottom Chirp seismic profiles and a 60 km2 grid of bathymetry and sidescan data. Preliminary interpretation of these data shows the survey area can be classified into four primary sedimentary facies: mudflow gullies, mudflow lobes, undisturbed prodelta, and undisturbed delta front. Subbottom profiles reveal extensive biogenic gas from 20 to about 80 m water depths on the delta front; sidescan data show a variety of bottleneck slides, mudflow gullies and mudflow noses. Previous studies have attempted to constrain the periodicity and magnitude of subaqueous mudslides on the MRDF. However, large age gaps and varied resolution between datasets result in ambiguity regarding the cause and magnitude of observed bathymetric changes. We present high-temporal resolution MRDF bathymetric variations from 2005 (post Hurricane Katrina), 2009 (relatively quiescent storm period), and 2014 (post 2011 Mississippi River flood). These data yield better magnitude and timing estimates of mass movements. This exercise represents a first step towards (1) assembling a comprehensive geologic dataset upon which future MRDF geohazard assessments can be founded, and (2) understanding the dynamics of a massive

  4. Geophysical survey of the proposed Tsenkher impact structure, Gobi Altai, Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormö, Jens; Gomez-Ortiz, David; Komatsu, Goro; Bayaraa, Togookhuu; Tserendug, Shoovdor

    2010-03-01

    We have performed forward magnetic and gravity modeling of data obtained during the 2007 expedition to the 3.7km in diameter, circular, Tsenkher structure, Mongolia, in order to evaluate the cause of its formation. Extensive occurrences of brecciated rocks, mainly in the form of an ejecta blanket outside the elevated rim of the structure, support an explosive origin (e.g., cosmic impact, explosive volcanism). The host rocks in the area are mainly weakly magnetic, silica-rich sandstones, and siltstones. A near absence of surface exposures of volcanic rocks makes any major volcanic structures (e.g., caldera) unlikely. Likewise, the magnetic models exclude any large, subsurface, intrusive body. This is supported by an 8mGal gravity low over the structure indicating a subsurface low density body. Instead, the best fit is achieved for a bowl-shaped structure with a slight central rise as expected for an impact crater of this size in mainly sedimentary target. The structure can be either root-less (i.e., impact crater) or rooted with a narrow feeder dyke with relatively higher magnetic susceptibility and density (i.e., volcanic maar crater). The geophysical signature, the solitary appearance, the predominantly sedimentary setting, and the comparably large size of the Tsenkher structure favor the impact crater alternative. However, until mineralogical/geochemical evidence for an impact is presented, the maar alternative remains plausible although exceptional as it would make the Tsenkher structure one of the largest in the world in an unusual setting for maar craters.

  5. Instrument specifications and geophysical records for airborne electromagnetic survey of parts of Iron, Baraga, and Dickson Counties, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heran, William D.; Smith, Bruce D.

    1980-01-01

    The data presented herein is from an airborne electromagnetic INPUT* survey conducted by Geoterrex Limited of Canada for the U.S. Geological Survey. The survey area is located in the central part of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, within parts of Iron, Baraga, and Dickinson Counties. The general area covered is between 46°00' and 46°30' latitude and 88°00' and 88°30' longitude (fig. 1).The INPUT survey was flown as part of a U.S. Geological Survey CUSMAP (Conterminous United States Mineral Appraisal Program) project focusing on the Iron River 2° quadrangle. The survey was flown in order to provide geophysical information which will aid in an integrated geological assessment of mineral potentials of this part of the Iron River 2° quadrangle. The flight line spacing was chosen to maximize the areal coverage without a loss of resolution of major lithologic and structural features.East-west flight lines were flown 400 feet above ground at 1/2 mile intervals. Aerial photos were used for navigation, and the flight path was recorded on continuous-strip film. A continuously recording total field ground magnetic station was used to monitor variations in the Earth's magnetic field. One north-south line was flown to provide a tie for the magnetic data, which was recorded simultaneously with the electromagnetic data by a sensor mounted in the tail of the aircraft. This report is one of two open-file reports. The map in the other report Heran and Smith (1980) shows locations of the fiducial points, the flight lines, preliminary locations of anomalies and conductive zones; all plotted on an air photomosaic. The latitude and longitude ticks marked on this map are only approximate due to distortion in air photos used to recover the flight line position. This map is preliminary and is not to be considered a final interpretation. The present report contains a description of the instrument specifications, a copy of the ground station magnetic data, and a record of the

  6. 78 FR 34069 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... mammals incidental to conducting a marine seismic survey on the high seas (i.e., International Waters) and... to the west of Spain. The cruise will be in International Waters (i.e., high seas) and in the... infinite homogeneous water column, not bounded by a seafloor). Because the L-DEO model assumes a...

  7. Petroleum geophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-07-01

    The book is compiled from a series of e-learning modules. GeoCLASS is an e-learning system with contents from petroleum geophysics. It is the result of collaboration between professors at the University of Bergen and the University of Oslo, and its material has been used as curriculum in master program courses at these universities for several years. Using a unique feature to GeoCLASS, these advanced scientific topics are presented on multiple levels. The introductions open the door to this vast pool of knowledge, accessible even for high school students. Enter the door, and you enter the modules. Various levels of content are presented, and the more advanced levels can be shielded from the regular user, and only accessed by those with particular interest. The chapters in the book are: Elastic waves; Survey planning; Seismic acquisition; Basic seismic signal theory and processing; Seismic imaging; Seismic attributes; Rock physics; Reservoir monitoring. (AG)

  8. Use of Geodetic Surveys of Leveling Lines and Dry Tilt Arrays to Study Faults and Volcanoes in Undergraduate Field Geophysics Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polet, J.; Alvarez, K.; Elizondo, K.

    2017-12-01

    In the early 1980's and 1990's numerous leveling lines and dry tilt arrays were installed throughout Central and Southern California by United States Geological Survey scientists and other researchers (e.g. Sylvester, 1985). These lines or triangular arrays of geodetic monuments commonly straddle faults or have been installed close to volcanic areas, where significant motion is expected over relatively short time periods. Over the past year, we have incorporated geodetic surveys of these arrays as part of our field exercises in undergraduate and graduate level classes on topics such as shallow subsurface geophysics and field geophysics. In some cases, the monuments themselves first had to be located based on only limited information, testing students' Brunton use and map reading skills. Monuments were then surveyed using total stations and global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers, using a variety of experimental procedures. The surveys were documented with tables, photos, maps and graphs in field reports, as well as in wiki pages created by student groups for a geophysics field class this June. The measurements were processed by the students and compared with similar data from surveys conducted soon after installation of the arrays, to analyze the deformation that occurred over the last few decades. The different geodetic techniques were also compared and an error analysis was conducted. The analysis and processing of these data challenged and enhanced students' quantitative literacy and technology skills. The final geodetic measurements are being incorporated into several senior and MSc thesis projects. Further surveys are planned for additional classes, in topics that could include seismology, geodesy, volcanology and global geophysics. We are also considering additional technologies, such as structure from motion (SfM) photogrammetry.

  9. Geophysical surveys combined with laboratory soil column experiments to identify and explore risk areas for soil and water pollution in feedlots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo-Pérez, Antonio Jesus; Sainato, Claudia Mabel; Jairo Márquez-Molina, John; Giráldez, Juan Vicente; Vanderlinden, Karl

    2014-05-01

    Changes of land use without a correct planning may produce its deterioration with their social, economical and environmental irreversible consequences over short to medium time range. In Argentina, the expansion of soybean fields induced a reduction of the area of pastures dedicated to stockbreeding. As cattle activity is being progressively concentrated on small pens, at feedlots farms, problems of soil and water pollution, mainly by nitrate, have been detected. The characterization of the spatial and temporal variability of soil water content is very important because the mostly advective transport of solutes. To avoid intensive soil samplings, very expensive, one has to recur to geophysical exploration methods. The objective of this work was to identify risk areas within a feedlot of the NW zone of Buenos Aires Province, in Argentina through geophysical methods. The surveys were carried out with an electromagnetic induction profiler EMI-400 (GSSI) and a Time domain Reflectometry (TDR) survey of depth 0-0.10 m with soil sampling and measurement of moisture content with gravimetric method (0-1.0 m). Several trenches were dug inside the pens and also at a test site, where texture, apparent density, saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), electrical conductivity of the saturation paste extract and organic matter content (OM) were measured. The water retention curves for these soils were also determined. At one of the pens undisturbed soil columns were extracted at 3 locations. Laboratory analysis for 0-1.0 m indicated that soil texture was classified as sandy loam, average organic matter content (OM) was greater than 2.3% with low values of apparent density in the first 10 cm. The range of spatial dependence of data suggested that the number of soil samples could be reduced. Soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) and soil moisture were well correlated and indicated a clear spatial pattern in the corrals. TDR performance was acceptable to identify the spatial

  10. Geodetic and geophysical results from a Taiwan airborne gravity survey: Data reduction and accuracy assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, C.W.; Hsiao, Y.S.; Shih, H.C.

    2007-01-01

    [ 1] An airborne gravity survey was conducted over Taiwan using a LaCoste and Romberg (LCR) System II air-sea gravimeter with gravity and global positioning system (GPS) data sampled at 1 Hz. The aircraft trajectories were determined using a GPS network kinematic adjustment relative to eight GPS ...... using airborne and surface gravity data and the other using surface data only, and the former yields a better agreement with the GPS-derived geoidal heights. Bouguer anomalies derived from airborne gravity by a rigorous numerical integration reveal important tectonic features....

  11. Combined GPR and ERT exploratory geophysical survey of the Medieval Village of Pancorbo Castle (Burgos, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Álvarez, José-Paulino; Rubio-Melendi, David; Quirós Castillo, Juan Antonio; González-Quirós, Andrés; Cimadevilla-Fuente, David

    2017-09-01

    Ground-penetrating Radar (GPR) and Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) have been fruitfully employed for archaeological purposes. An area at the Pancorbo medieval site in Burgos (Spain) has been jointly explored by GPR and ERT in the search for the buried remains of the Pancorbo medieval village. After data collection, quality control and merging, a shallow depth of interest was identified and studied in detail. 3D resistivity simulation, considering sensible geometrical structures of the targets helped discover anomalies present in the area. On the other hand, visual GPR inspection was considerably enhanced by trace energy attribute analysis which provided a plan view of the existing anomalies. Two posterior archaeological excavations have a very good correlation between the identified anomalies and the excavated remains. The survey also provides hints for the continuation of the excavation.

  12. The geologic investigation of the bedrock and the tectonic and geophysical surveys at Kynnefjaell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlbom, K.; Ahlin, S.; Eriksson, L.; Samuelsson, L.

    1980-05-01

    The geologic survey took place at a selected area of Kynnefjaell. The result is given on geologic and tectonic maps. Two kinds of rock dominate, namely (a) sedimentary veined gneiss and (b) gneissic granite. The strike is in the N-S direction. A symmetric folds dip to the last. The fissure zones are oriented in the N-S and NE-SW directions. The latter zones are considered to be Precambrian shear zones with a dip to the NW. The dip of the fissure zones with the direction N-S is difficult to ascertain. The frequency of fissures is the same for granite and gneiss. The length of fissures is longer in the gneissic granite than in the sedimentary veined gneiss. The measurement of stress shows its main direction to be WNW-NW to ESE-SE. The fissure zones are at right or blunt-ended angles to the main stress direction. (G.B.)

  13. Non-invasive Geophysical Surveys in Search of the Roman Temple of Augustus Under the Cathedral of Tarragona (Catalonia, Spain): A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Albert; Cosentino, Pietro L.; Fiandaca, Gianluca; Himi, Mahjoub; Macias, Josep M.; Martorana, Raffaele; Muñoz, Andreu; Rivero, Lluís; Sala, Roger; Teixell, Imma

    2018-04-01

    An integrated geophysical survey has been conducted at the Tarragona's Cathedral (Catalonia, NE Spain) with the aim to confirm the potential occurrence of archaeological remains of the Roman Temple dedicated to the Emperor Augustus. Many hypotheses have been proposed about its possible location, the last ones regarding the inner part of the Cathedral, which is one of the most renowned temples of Spain (twelfth century) evolving from Romanesque to Gothic styles. A geophysical project including electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and ground probing radar (GPR) was planned over 1 year considering the administrative and logistic difficulties of such a project inside a cathedral of religious veneration. Finally, both ERT and GPR have been conducted during a week of intensive overnight surveys that provided detailed information on subsurface existing structures. The ERT method has been applied using different techniques and arrays, ranging from standard Wenner-Schlumberger 2D sections to full 3D electrical imaging with the advanced Maximum Yield Grid array. Electrical resistivity data were recorded extensively, making available many thousands of apparent resistivity data to obtain a complete 3D image after a full inversion. In conclusion, some significant buried structures have been revealed providing conclusive information for archaeologists. GPR results provided additional information about shallowest structures. The geophysical results were clear enough to persuade religious authorities and archaeologists to conduct selected excavations in the most promising areas that confirmed the interpretation of geophysical data. In conclusion, the significant buried structures revealed by geophysical methods under the cathedral were confirmed by archaeological digging as the basement of the impressive Roman Temple that headed the Provincial Forum of Tarraco, seat of the Concilium of Hispania Citerior Province.

  14. Geophysical survey of the Eggvin Bank and Logi Ridge - Greenland Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, A. J.; Mjelde, R.; Rai, A. K.; Frassetto, A.

    2012-12-01

    The northern Greenland Sea has a number of features associated with excess volcanism. These include the Jan Mayen island, the Jan Mayen Plateau north of, and the Eggvin Bank west of Jan Mayen, and the Vesteris Seamount far to the north. In the summer of 2011, we colleced an Ocean Bottom Seismometer (OBS) profile across the Eggvin Bank, returning four good data sets. We also collected single-channel reflection seismic (SCS) data along the OBS line. The profile crosses the transform part of the West Jan Mayen Fracture Zone (WJMFZ), which connects seafloor spreading between the Kolbeinsey and Mohn ridges. Between the WJMFZ and the Vesteris Seamount there is a narrow ridge 170-180 km long, ending in a few seamounts in the east. It disturbs the magnetic seafloor anomalies, and has no conjugate on the Norwegian margin. It thus appears to be younger than the Eocene seafloor it lies on. Trend and position points to Traill Ø in East Greenland, which had magmatism at ~36 Ma. We name it the Logi Ridge after Norse mythology, where Logi is the master of fire, brother of Aegir, master of the sea. We have collected five SCS profiles across this ridge in order to study the surrounding sedimentation pattern. We also collected gravity and magnetic data along all profiles. Initial results show two flat-topped seamounts on the Eggvin Bank, and a flat-topped Logi Ridge, indicating that these have been at sealevel. The sedimentary strata show recent vertical movement north of the WJMFZ near the Jan Mayen Plateau, and compression around the Logi Ridge. Sailing line of R/V Håkon Mosby of Bergen. Survey lines are in bold, and OBS positions are marked by circles.

  15. An integrated geophysical survey of Kilbourne Hole, southern New Mexico: Implications for near surface exploration of Mars and the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksim, Nisa

    Features such as the Home Plate plateau on Mars, a suspected remnant of an ancient phreatomagmatic eruption, can reveal important information about paleohydrologic conditions. The eruption intensity of a phreatomagmatic volcano is controlled mainly by the quantity of water and magma, the internal geometry of the volcano, and the depth of the interaction zone between magma and water. In order to understand the paleohydrologic conditions at the time of eruption, we must understand all the factors that influenced the phreatomagmatic event. I conducted an integrated geophysical survey, which are magnetic and gravity surveys, and a ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys at Kilbourne Hole, a phreatomagmatic crater in southern New Mexico. These investigations serve an analog paleo-hydrogeological study that could be conducted on Mars and the Moon with an implication for planetary exploration. These geophysical surveys are designed to delineate the internal structure of a phreatomagmatic volcano and to define the volumes and masses of volcanic dikes and excavation unit, the depth of feeder dikes, and impacted velocity of the volcanic blocks. For the gravity and magnetic surveys at Kilbourne Hole, I collected data at a total of 171 gravity survey stations and 166 magnetics survey stations. A 2D gravity and magnetic inverse model was developed jointly to map the body of the magma intrusions and the internal structure of Kilbourne Hole. A total of 6 GPR surveys lines were also completed at Kilbourne Hole to image and to define locations of pyroclastic deposits, volcanic sags and blocks, the sizes distribution of volcanic blocks, and the impact velocity of the volcanic blocks. Using the size distribution and impact velocity of volcanic blocks from our GPR data, I derived the initial gas expansion velocity and the time duration of the gas expansion phase of the Kilbourne Hole eruption. These obtained parameters (volumes, masses, and depths of the feeder dikes and the excavation

  16. Periglacial morphogenesis in the Paris basin: insight from geophysical survey and consequences for the fate of soil pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiry, Médard; van Oort, Folkert; Thiesson, Julien; Van Vliet-Lanoe, Brigitte

    2013-09-01

    Geophysical survey by Automatic Resistivity Profiling (ARP©) system of the Pierrelaye-Bessancourt area revealed remarkable conductive polygon patterns of 20- to 30-m diameter detected between 0.5- and 1.7-m depth. Trenches dug down to the limestone substrate allowed detailing of the pedological and lithological units that compose such polygonal features. The patterns are formed by greenish glauconite and carbonated sand hollows where clay-rich pedological horizons bend downward, forming narrow tongs extending up to 2- to 3-m depth. Such structures were interpreted as a buried polygonal ice-wedge network (thermokarst depressions). Geometrical relationships between the lithological units and consecutive erosional surfaces allowed the identification of successive landscape events and a landscape chronology. The sequence started during the Saalian glaciation with (1) the development of patterned grounds by thermokarstic cryoturbation; (2) the consecutive deflation/erosion during post-permafrost aridity; (3) the loess and eolian sand deposits; (4) the weathering of the former deposits with development of pedogenic horizons during the Eemian interglacial; (5) the recurrent cryoturbation and thermal cracking leading to infolding of the pedogenic horizons during the Pleniglacial optimum (Weichselian); and finally (5) the erosion that levelled the periglacial microreliefs, most probably during the last glacial stage (Weichselian), leading to the modern landscape. In this agricultural area, urban waste water has been spread for more than 100 years by flooding irrigation for food crop production and has led to high levels of metal pollution in the surface horizons of the soils. The polygonal cryogenic structures have major impacts on soil hydrology and dispersion/distribution of heavy metals toward the geological substrate. Such structures are essential to consider when conceiving proposals for future soil management of this polluted area.

  17. Integrated geophysical characterisation of Sunyani municipal solid waste disposal site using magnetic gradiometry, magnetic susceptibility survey and electrical resistivity tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appiah, Isaac; Wemegah, David Dotse; Asare, Van-Dycke Sarpong; Danuor, Sylvester K.; Forson, Eric Dominic

    2018-06-01

    Non-invasive geophysical investigation using magnetic gradiometry, magnetic susceptibility survey and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was carried out on the Sunyani Municipal Assembly (SMA) solid waste disposal (SWD) site. The study was aimed at delineating the physical boundaries and the area extent of the waste deposit, mapping the distribution of the waste at the site, detecting and delineating zones of leachate contamination and its preferential migration pathways beneath the waste deposit and its surroundings. The results of both magnetic susceptibility and gradiometric methods displayed in anomaly maps clearly delineated the physical boundaries of the waste deposit with an approximate area extent of 82,650 m2 that are characterised by high magnetic susceptibilities between 426 × 10-5 SI and 9890 × 10-5 SI. They also revealed high magnetic anomalies erratically distributed within the waste deposit attributable to its heterogeneous and uncontrolled nature. The high magnetic anomalies outside the designated waste boundaries were also attributed to indiscriminate deposition of the waste. Similarly, the ERT sections delineated and characterised zones of leachate contamination beneath the waste body and its close surroundings as well as pathways for leachate migration with low resistivity signatures up to 43.9 Ωm. In spite of the successes reported herein using the ERT, this research also revealed that the ERT is less effective in estimating the thickness of the waste deposit in unlined SWD sites due to leachate infiltration into the ground beneath it that masks the resistivities of the top level ground and makes it indistinguishable from the waste body.

  18. Exploring Scientists' Working Timetable: A Global Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xianwen; Peng, Lian; Zhang, Chunbo; Xu, Shenmeng; Wang, Zhi; Wang, Chuanli; Wang, Xianbing

    2013-01-01

    In our previous study (Wang et al., 2012), we analyzed scientists' working timetable of 3 countries, using realtime downloading data of scientific literatures. In this paper, we make a through analysis about global scientists' working habits. Top 30 countries/territories from Europe, Asia, Australia, North America, Latin America and Africa are selected as representatives and analyzed in detail. Regional differences for scientists' working habits exists in different countries. Besides differen...

  19. Asymmetrical structure, hydrothermal system and edifice stability: The case of Ubinas volcano, Peru, revealed by geophysical surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Katherine; Finizola, Anthony; Lénat, Jean-François; Macedo, Orlando; Ramos, Domingo; Thouret, Jean-Claude; Fournier, Nicolas; Cruz, Vicentina; Pistre, Karine

    2014-04-01

    Ubinas volcano, the historically most active volcano in Peru straddles a low-relief high plateau and the flank of a steep valley. A multidisciplinary geophysical study has been performed to investigate the internal structure and the fluids flow within the edifice. We conducted 10 self-potential (SP) radial (from summit to base) profiles, 15 audio magnetotelluric (AMT) soundings on the west flank and a detailed survey of SP and soil temperature measurements on the summit caldera floor. The typical “V” shape of the SP radial profiles has been interpreted as the result of a hydrothermal zone superimposed on a hydrogeological zone in the upper parts of the edifice, and depicts a sub-circular SP positive anomaly, about 6 km in diameter. The latter is centred on the summit, and is characterised by a larger extension on the western flank located on the low-relief high plateau. The AMT resistivity model shows the presence of a conductive body beneath the summit at a depth comparable to that of the bottom of the inner south crater in the present-day caldera, where intense hydrothermal manifestations occur. The lack of SP and temperature anomalies on the present caldera floor suggests a self-sealed hydrothermal system, where the inner south crater acts as a pressure release valve. Although no resistivity data exists on the eastern flank, we presume, based on the asymmetry of the basement topography, and the amplitude of SP anomalies on the east flank, which are approximately five fold that on the west flank, that gravitational flow of hydrothermal fluids may occur towards the deep valley of Ubinas. This hypothesis, supported by the presence of hot springs and faults on the eastern foot of the edifice, reinforces the idea that a large part of the southeast flank of the Ubinas volcano may be altered by hydrothermal activity and will tend to be less stable. One of the major findings that stems from this study is that the slope of the basement on which a volcano has grown

  20. Integrated geophysical survey to recognize ancient Picentia’s buried walls, in the Archaeological Park of Pontecagnano – Faiano (Southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rossi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available There is no information on previous geophysical prospections carried out in the Archaeological Park of Pontecagnano- Faiano, in order to reconstruct the ancient settlement of Picentia, an Etrusco-Campanian and Roman settlement near Salerno (Southern Italy. Therefore, an integrated geophysical survey based on magnetic, geoelectric and ground-penetrating radar (GPR prospections was executed in the Park. The methods provided a basic map of buried ancient structures at depth from 0.1-0.2 to about 1.5 meters. Magnetic data were processed analyzing the analytical signal of the vertical derivative of the measured gradient and this substantially reduced a strong fence effect. The results of the geophysical prospections showed archaeological structures located close to those discovered in the excavated areas. The shape of the anomalies are usually elongated with well-defined geometrical characteristics. Many anomalies are arranged along orthogonal directions and they are very coherent with the excavated structures, namely the quarters structures of the ancient Picentia.

  1. Natural gas in 1942: Petroleum in 1942: Gravimetric and magnetic geophysical surveys in the gas fields of southwestern Ontario, 1941 and 1942. Annual publication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crozier, A R; Brant, A A

    1946-12-31

    Part V of this annual report consists of three separate reports: Natural gas; petroleum; and gravimetric and magnetic geophysical surveys in the gas fields of southwestern Ontario. The natural gas report discusses production and distribution; changes and improvements; consumption and rates; and gas wells and their production. The petroleum report presents information on production and drilling by township; expansion; and petroleum importation and refining operations. The final report discusses causes of anomalies; a discussion of the gravitational results and a discussion of the magnetic results.

  2. The Chicxulub Multiring Impact Crater and the Cretaceous/Paleogene Boundary: Results From Geophysical Surveys and Drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Perez-Cruz, Ligia

    2010-03-01

    The Chicxulub crater has attracted considerable attention as one of the three largest terrestrial impact structures and its association with the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary (K/Pg). Chicxulub is a 200 km-diameter multi-ring structure formed 65.5 Ma ago in the Yucatan carbonate platform in the southern Gulf of Mexico and which has since been buried by Paleogene and Neogene carbonates. Chicxulub is one of few large craters with preserved ejecta deposits, which include the world-wide K/Pg boundary clay layer. The impact has been related to the global major environmental and climatic effects and the organism mass extinction that mark the K/Pg boundary, which affected more than 70 % of organisms, including the dinosaurs, marine and flying reptiles, ammonites and a large part of the marine microorganisms. The impact and crater formation occur instantaneously, with excavation of the crust down to 25 km depths in fractions of second and lower crust uplift and crater formation in a few hundreds of seconds. Energy released by impact and crustal deformation generates seismic waves traveling the whole Earth, and resulting in intense fracturing and deformation at the target site. Understanding of the physics of impacts on planetary surfaces and modeling of processes of crustal deformation, rheological behavior of materials at high temperatures and pressures remain a major challenge in geosciences. Study of the Chicxulub crater and the global effects and mass extinction requires inter- and multidisciplinary approaches, with researchers from many diverse fields beyond the geosciences. With no surface exposures, geophysical surveys and drilling are required to study the crater. Differential compaction between the impact breccias and the surrounding carbonate rocks has produced a ring-fracture structure that at the surface reflects in a small topographic depression and the karstic cenote ring. The crater structure, located half offshore and half on-land, has been imaged by

  3. Application of surface geophysics to ground-water investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohdy, Adel A.R.; Eaton, Gordon P.; Mabey, Don R.

    1974-01-01

    This manual reviews the standard methods of surface geophysics applicable to ground-water investigations. It covers electrical methods, seismic and gravity methods, and magnetic methods. The general physical principles underlying each method and its capabilities and limitations are described. Possibilities for non-uniqueness of interpretation of geophysical results are noted. Examples of actual use of the methods are given to illustrate applications and interpretation in selected geohydrologic environments. The objective of the manual is to provide the hydrogeologist with a sufficient understanding of the capabilities, imitations, and relative cost of geophysical methods to make sound decisions as to when to use of these methods is desirable. The manual also provides enough information for the hydrogeologist to work with a geophysicist in designing geophysical surveys that differentiate significant hydrogeologic changes.

  4. Environmental Assessment for a Marine Geophysical Survey of Parts of the Arctic Ocean, August-September 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Beth; Ireland, Darren; Childs, Jonathan R.

    2010-01-01

    /details-eng.cfm?pid=38185 (2008) and http://www.ceaa.gc.ca/052/details-eng.cfm?pid=46518 (2009). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) are undertaking a similar partnership again for 2010 in a limited area of U.S. waters during the period between ~10 and 16 August. The survey vessels will then proceed to international or Canadian waters where surveying will proceed until ~3 September, when the two icebreakers will separate to conduct independent work. The survey area of the joint work will be bounded approximately by 145? to 158? W longitude and 71? to 84? N latitude in water depths ranging from ~2,000 to 4,000 m (fig. 1). Ice conditions are expected to range from open water to 10/10 ice cover. The Louis S. St. Laurent will join accompanying vessel Healy in or near the survey area around 10 August to begin the joint survey work. As its energy source, the seismic system aboard Louis S. St. Laurent will employ a 3-airgun array consisting of three Sercel G-airguns. Two guns will have a discharge volume of 500 in3 and the third a discharge volume of 150 in3 for a total array discharge volume of 1,150 in3. The seismic survey will take place in water depths 2,000?4,000 m. This airgun array is identical to the system used in the 2008 and 2009 field programs by the Geological Survey of Canada. The USGS requested that the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) issue an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to authorize the incidental, that is, not intentional, harassment of small numbers of cetaceans and seals should this occur during the seismic survey in U.S. waters. USGS is also consulting with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) regarding concerns about disturbance to walruses and polar bears. Through informal consultation with the Office of Protected Resources with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), USGS proposes that no ESA-listed marine species?bowhead, fin, humpback or sperm whale?w

  5. Rapid Geophysical Surveyor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roybal, L.G.; Carpenter, G.S.; Josten, N.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Rapid Geophysical Surveyor (RGS) is a system designed to rapidly and economically collect closely-spaced geophysical data used for characterization of US Department of Energy waste sites. Geophysical surveys of waste sites are an important first step in the remediation and closure of these sites; especially older sites where historical records are inaccurate and survey benchmarks have changed because of refinements in coordinate controls and datum changes. Closely-spaced data are required to adequately differentiate pits, trenches, and soil vault rows whose edges may be only a few feet from each other. A prototype vehicle designed to collect magnetic field data was built at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during the summer of 1992. The RGS was funded by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration program. This vehicle was demonstrated at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL in September 1992. Magnetic data were collected over two areas in the SDA, with a total survey area of about 1.7 acres. Data were collected at a nominal density of 2 1/2 in. along survey lines spaced 1-ft apart. Over 350,000 data points were collected over a 6 day period corresponding to about 185 worker-days using conventional ground survey techniques

  6. Helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic geophysical survey data, portions of the North Platte and South Platte Natural Resources Districts, western Nebraska, May 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B.D.; Abraham, J.D.; Cannia, J.C.; Minsley, B.J.; Deszcz-Pan, M.; Ball, L.B.

    2010-01-01

    This report is a release of digital data from a helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic survey that was conducted during June 2009 in areas of western Nebraska as part of a joint hydrologic study by the North Platte Natural Resource District (NRD), South Platte NRD, and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Flight lines for the survey totaled 937 line kilometers (582 line miles). The objective of the contracted survey, conducted by Fugro Airborne, Ltd., is to improve the understanding of the relation between surface-water and groundwater systems critical to developing groundwater models used in management programs for water resources. A unique aspect of the survey is the flight line layout. One set of flight lines was flown in a zig-zag pattern extending along the length of the previously collected airborne data. The success of this survey design depended on a well-understood regional hydrogeologic framework and model developed by the Cooperative Hydrologic Study of the Platte River Basin and the airborne geophysical data collected in 2008. Resistivity variations along lines could be related to this framework. In addition to these lines, more traditional surveys consisting of parallel flight lines, separated by about 400 meters were carried out for three blocks in the North Platte NRD, the South Platte NRD and in the area of Crescent Lakes. These surveys helped to establish the spatial variations of the resistivity of hydrostratigraphic units. An additional survey was flown over the Crescent Lake area. The objective of this survey, funded by the USGS Office of Groundwater, was to map shallow hydrogeologic features of the southwestern part of the Sand Hills that contain a mix of fresh to saline lakes.

  7. Children's Work Under Market Conditions. (Findings of a Sociological Survey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivashchenko, G. M.; Plotkin, M. M.; Shirinskii, V. I.

    1997-01-01

    Reports on the results of a survey of more than 1200 Russian adolescents concerning the conflict between work and education commitments. Reveals that almost one in four students work parttime, mainly in unskilled jobs, to purchase fashionable goods. Discusses implications and possible responses to this situation. (MJP)

  8. Work-related stress: A survey of Indian anesthesiologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumitra Ganesh Bakshi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The majority of participants rated their stress as moderate-extreme and was higher in anesthesiologists working long hours, over the weekend and those handling high-risk patients. A majority of participants felt the survey made them think about work-related stress and expressed their willingness to participate in stress management programs.

  9. Life and Work Values of Counselor Trainees: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busacca, Louis A.; Beebe, Ronald S.; Toman, Sarah M.

    2010-01-01

    This national web-based study used the Schwartz Value Survey (Schwartz, 1994) and Super's Work Values Inventory-Revised (Zytowski, n.d.) to identify general life and work value orientations of 674 female and male entry-level counselor trainees residing in 27 states. In general, trainees emphasized benevolence, self-direction, and achievement and…

  10. Gender and the Intensification of Work: Evidence from the European Working Conditions Surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Brendan Burchell; Colette Fagan

    2004-01-01

    This paper uses the European Working Conditions Surveys to examine the intensity of work for male and female employees. The first section gives an overview of the usefulness of the survey for examining European Union (EU) working conditions and shows how women's intensity of work has been increasing faster than that of men, so that by the year 2000 there was little gender difference in the speed of work. Section two demonstrates that the intensity of work has a negative effect on health and w...

  11. HMF-Geophysics - An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, N.; Knight, R.; Robinson, D.

    2007-12-01

    There is growing recognition of the challenges we face, in many parts of the world, in finding and maintaining clean sources of water for human consumption and agricultural use, while balancing the needs of the natural world. Advancements in hydrologic sciences are needed in order to develop an improved understanding of the controls on the quantity, movement, and quality of water, thus enhancing our ability to better protect and manage our water resources. Geophysical methods can play a central role in these investigations. CUAHSI (Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences) is developing, with the support of the National Science Foundation, a Hydrologic Measurement Facility (HMF), which contains a Geophysics module, referred to as HMF-Geophysics. The Geophysics module will support and advance the use of geophysics for hydrologic applications. Currently in second year of a 3 year pilot study, the main aim of HMF-Geophysics is to develop the infrastructure necessary to provide geophysical techniques and the expertise to apply them correctly for the hydrological community. The current working model consists of a central HMF-Geophysics facility and a number of volunteer nodes. The latter consists of individuals at universities who have volunteered to be part of HMF-Geophysics by using their equipment, and/or software, and expertise, in research partnerships with hydrologists. In response to an inquiry the central facility takes on the evaluation of the potential of geophysics to the area of research/watershed. The central facility can then undertake a feasibility study to determine how/if geophysical methods could be of use, and to evaluate the "value-added" by geophysics to the science. Once it is clear that the geophysics can contribute in a significant way to addressing the science questions the central facility works with the hydrologist to set up the next step. Our assumption is that at this point, the hydrologist (perhaps with a

  12. Work-related stress: A survey of Indian anesthesiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Sumitra Ganesh; Divatia, Jigeeshu Vasishtha; Kannan, Sadhana; Myatra, Sheila Nainan

    2017-01-01

    Work-related stress is common among medical caregivers and concerns all perioperative care providers. Although anesthesiologists are known to experience stress, there are limited Indian data addressing this issue. This survey was conducted among Indian anesthesiologists to determine their awareness about work stress and views regarding prevention programs. A survey questionnaire was distributed to delegates visiting the exhibits at the national anesthesiology conference in 2011. The questionnaire had ten questions on the work pattern, five on work-related stress, nine on opinion regarding the need and willingness to participate in stress-related programs. There were 1178 responders. Forty-three percent were faculty in medical institutions, 26% were residents and 25% were in free-lance practice. Ninety-one percent of participants rated their stress as moderate-extreme. There was a significant correlation between the amount of stress and working for more than 8 h ( P working on weekends ( P = 0.002), and carrying work back home ( P work stress. Eighty-four percent of participants felt the need for stress management programs and 69% expressed their willingness to participate in the same. The majority of participants rated their stress as moderate-extreme and was higher in anesthesiologists working long hours, over the weekend and those handling high-risk patients. A majority of participants felt the survey made them think about work-related stress and expressed their willingness to participate in stress management programs.

  13. Remote Operated Vehicle geophysical surveys on land (underground), air and submarine archaeology: General peculiarities of processing and interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppelbaum, Lev

    2016-04-01

    The last Remote Operation Vehicles (ROV) generation - small and maneuvering vehicles with different geophysical sensors - can fly at levels of a few meters (and even tens of centimeters) over the earth's surface, to move on the earth's surface and in the inaccessible underground areas and to explore in underwater investigations (e.g., Mindel and Bingham, 2001; Rowlands and Sarris, 2006; Wilson et al., 2006; Rigaud, 2007; Eppelbaum, 2008; Patterson and Brescia, 2008; Sarris, 2008; Wang et al., 2009; Wu and Tian, 2010; Stall, 2011; Tezkan et al., 2011; Winn et al., 2012; El-Nahhas, 2013; Hadjimitsis et al., 2013; Hajiyev and Vural, 2013; Hugenholtz et al., 2013; Petzke et al., 2013; Pourier et al., 2013; Casana et al., 2014; Silverberg and Bieber, 2014). Such geophysical investigations should have an extremely low exploitation cost and can observe surface practically inaccessible archaeological sites (swampy areas, dense vegetation, rugged relief, over the areas of world recognized religious and cultural artifacts (Eppelbaum, 2010), etc.). Finally, measurements of geophysical fields at different observation levels could provide a new unique geological-geophysical information (Eppelbaum and Mishne, 2011). Let's consider ROV airborne magnetic measurements as example. The modern magnetometric equipment enables to carry out magnetic measurements with a frequency of 50 times per second (and more) that taking into account the low ROV flight speed provides a necessary density of observations. For instance, frequency of observation of 50 times per second by ROV velocity of 40 km/hour gives density of observation about 0.2 m. It is obvious that the calculated step between observation points is more than sufficient one. Such observations will allow not only reduce the influence of some small artificial sources of noise, but also to obtain some additional data necessary for quantitative analysis (some interpretation methodologies need to have observations at two levels; upward

  14. Multi-method Near-surface Geophysical Surveys for Site Response and Earthquake Damage Assessments at School Sites in Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, R.; Walsh, T. J.; Norman, D. K.

    2017-12-01

    We, Washington Geological Survey (WGS), have been performing multi-method near surface geophysical surveys to help assess potential earthquake damage at public schools in Washington. We have been conducting active and passive seismic surveys, and estimating Shear-wave velocity (Vs) profiles, then determining the NEHRP soil classifications based on Vs30m values at school sites in Washington. The survey methods we have used: 1D and 2D MASW and MAM, P- and S-wave refraction, horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (H/V), and 2ST-SPAC to measure Vs and Vp at shallow (0-70m) and greater depths at the sites. We have also run Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) surveys at the sites to check possible horizontal subsurface variations along and between the seismic survey lines and the actual locations of the school buildings. The seismic survey results were then used to calculate Vs30m for determining the NEHRP soil classifications at school sites, thus soil amplification effects on the ground motions. Resulting shear-wave velocity profiles generated from these studies can also be used for site response and liquefaction potential studies, as well as for improvement efforts of the national Vs30m database, essential information for ShakeMap and ground motion modeling efforts in Washington and Pacific Northwest. To estimate casualties, nonstructural, and structural losses caused by the potential earthquakes in the region, we used these seismic site characterization results associated with structural engineering evaluations based on ASCE41 or FEMA 154 (Rapid Visual Screening) as inputs in FEMA Hazus-Advanced Engineering Building Module (AEBM) analysis. Compelling example surveys will be presented for the school sites in western and eastern Washington.

  15. Nurses who work in general medical practices: a Victorian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonawit, V; Watson, L

    1996-01-01

    A questionnaire survey of 452 general medical practices in Victoria attracted responses from 277 practices, many of which did not employ nurses. The 93 respondents from 85 practices who were nurses reported that they enjoyed flexible working hours and stable employment. While their main reason for working in GPs' rooms was convenience, the most important aspect of their work was interaction with patients and fellow workers. Sixtyseven percent of nurses thought continuing education in specific skills was necessary for their work, 43% thought a post-registration qualification in community health nursing would be desirable and 47% thought a special interest group of nurses working in medical practices would be useful.

  16. The implementation of multi-task geophysical survey to locate Cleopatra Tomb at Tap-Osiris Magna, Borg El-Arab, Alexandria, Egypt “Phase II”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas M. Abbas

    2012-06-01

    VLF-EM data were collected along parallel lines covering the investigated site with a line-to-line spacing of 1 m. The point-to-point distance of 1 m along the same line was employed. The data were qualitatively interpreted by Fraser filtering process and quantitatively by 2-D VLF inversion of tipper data and forward modeling. Results obtained from VLF-EM interpretation are correlated with 2-D resistivity imaging and drilling information. Findings showed a highly resistive zone at a depth extended from about 25–45 m buried beneath Osiris temple, which could be indicated as the tomb of Cleopatra and Anthony. This result is supported by Fraser filtering and forward modeling results. The depth of archeological findings as indicated from the geophysical survey is correlated well with the depth expected by archeologists, as well as, the depth of discovered tombs outside Tap-Osiris Magna temple. This depth level has not been reached by drilling in this site. We hope that the site can be excavated in the future based on these geophysical results.

  17. Literature survey on the advance detection of dykes in underground coal mine workings.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fourie, GA

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available .1. Magnetic susceptibility 40 8.2. Magnetic method theory 41 8.3. Magnetic survey techniques 41 8.4. Instrumentation and survey methods 42 8.5. Application in mining 43 8.6. Reference list 44 9... tomography : theory and practice. Ed. H M Iyer, Published by Chapman & Hall, London 1993. Jackson, M.J. & Tweeton, D.R. MIGRATOM - Geophysical tomography using wavefront migration and fuzzy constraints. USBM Report RI 9497. Jordaan, J. 1986. Highveld...

  18. A survey of work engagement and psychological capital levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Lynda

    2016-08-11

    To evaluate the relationship between work engagement and psychological capital (PsyCap) levels reported by registered nurses. PsyCap is a developable human resource. Research on PsyCap as an antecedent to work engagement in nurses is needed. A convenience sample of 137 registered nurses participated in this quantitative cross-sectional survey. Questionnaires measured self-reported levels of work engagement and psychological capital. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for data analysis. There was a statistically significant correlation between work engagement and PsyCap scores (r=0.633, pworking at band 5 level reported statistically significantly lower PsyCap scores compared with nurses working at band 6 and 7 levels. Nurses reporting high levels of work engagement also reported high levels of PsyCap. Band 5 nurses might benefit most from interventions to increase their PsyCap. This study supports PsyCap as an antecedent to work engagement.

  19. Geophysical survey, Paso Robles Geothermal area, California: Part of the Resource Assessment of Low- and Moderate-Temperature Geothermal Resource Areas in California; Part of the Second year Report, 1979-80 of the US Department of Energy-California State-Coupled Program for Reservoir Assessment and Confirmation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Rodger H.; Chase, Gordon W.; Youngs, Les G.

    1980-11-10

    This report presents the details of new geophysical work for the Paso Robles geothermal area, California performed under terms of the second year contract, 1979-80 between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the California Division of Mines and Geology (CDMG). The report contains two sections. The first section is to provide background for the reader and consists of a reprint from CDMG's first year report (1979-80) to DOE. It describes only the Paso Robles studies performed by CDMG in its first year effort. The second section provides new information developed by CDMG in its 1979-80 studies concerning the geophysical survey of the Paso Robles geothermal area. Included in the first section is some general background information concerning the geology and geothermal occurrences in the Southern Coast Ranges, as well as the more detailed information dealing with the Paso Robles area proper. The second section is concerned only with discussion and interpretation of results for two geophysical methods that have so far been used by CDMG in the area: the ground magnetic and gravity surveys. The CDMG studies of the Paso Robles area are not yet complete and additional studies using newly acquired resistivity equipment are planned for the near future, as are more complete surveys of existing wells and new studies of the geothermal aquifers present in the area. A final report to DOE on the Paso Robles area is planned following completion of those studies.

  20. Survey of survivors' perspective on return to work after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartke, Robert J; Trierweiler, Robert

    2015-10-01

    To describe the development and results of a detailed survey on return to work (RTW) after stroke completed by survivors at various stages of recovery. This study used a multi-method qualitative and quantitative research strategy to design and implement a 39-item survey for stroke survivors. Individual interviews, focus groups, and working committees were used to conceptualize the issues and translate them into a survey format. Surveys were distributed in regular and electronic mail. Groups of rehabilitation professionals, employers, and stroke survivors were assembled to review findings and obtain feedback to aide in interpretation. Overall 715 surveys were completed. The respondents were on average 54 years of age, mostly white, well-educated, urban dwelling, and in skilled occupations. Results are described in seven areas: financial, stroke impairments, organizational, work and psychological issues, interpersonal support, and therapy. Several salient findings are described including the role of fatigue, under utilization of vocational rehabilitation (VR) services, and motivational factors related to finances, self-esteem, work, and workplace relationships. Although earning an income is a strong motivation to RTW, salary decreases in importance when compared with other psychological benefits. Fatigue was rated as the second highest impairment barrier to RTW and persisted as a relevant impediment over time. Attitudes of co-workers and flexibility in work schedule were viewed as most helpful to the RTW process, whereas work stress was viewed as the greatest impediment to return. Only 24% of the sample received VR counseling with more respondents receiving counseling if they returned 6 months or longer after their stroke. Other trends and clinical and research implications are discussed.

  1. Long Working Hours in Korea: Based on the 2014 Korean Working Conditions Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jungsun; Kim, Yangho; Han, Boyoung

    2017-01-01

    Background: Long working hours adversely affect worker safety and health. In 2004, Korea passed legislation that limited the work week to 40 hours, in an effort to improve quality-of-life and increase business competitiveness. This regulation was implemented in stages, first for large businesses and then for small businesses, from 2004 to 2011. We previously reported that average weekly working hours decreased from 2006 to 2010, based on the Korean Working Conditions Survey. Methods: In the p...

  2. Rapid geophysical surveyor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roybal, L.G.; Carpenter, G.S.; Josten, N.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Rapid Geophysical Surveyor (RGS) is a system designed to rapidly and economically collect closely-spaced geophysical data used for characterization of Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. Geophysical surveys of waste sites are an important first step in the remediation and closure of these sites; especially older sties where historical records are inaccurate and survey benchmarks have changed due to refinements in coordinate controls and datum changes. Closely-spaced data are required to adequately differentiate pits, trenches, and soil vault rows whose edges may be only a few feet from each other. A prototype vehicle designed to collect magnetic field data was built at the Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during the summer of 1992. The RGS was one of several projects funded by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. This vehicle was demonstrated at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the INEL in September of 1992. Magnetic data were collected over two areas in the SDA, with a total survey area of about 1.7 acres. Data were collected at a nominal density of 2 1/2 inches along survey lines spaced 1 foot apart. Over 350,000 data points were collected over a 6 day period corresponding to about 185 man-days using conventional ground survey techniques. This report documents the design and demonstration of the RGS concept including the presentation of magnetic data collected at the SDA. The surveys were able to show pit and trench boundaries and determine details of their spatial orientation never before achieved

  3. Shallow Depth Geophysical Investigation Through the Application of Magnetic and Electric Resistance Techniques: AN Evaluation Study of the Responses of Magnetic and Electric Resistance Techniques to Archaeogeophysical Prospection Surveys in Greece and Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Apostolos

    The response characteristics of total intensity and vertical gradient magnetic techniques have been investigated in detail and compared with electric resistivity and other geophysical techniques. Four case studies from archaeological sites of Greece and Cyprus have been used as the experimental basis of this research project. Data from shallow depth geophysical investigations in these sites were collected over a period of four years. Interpretation of the geophysical results was based on the integration of the various prospecting methods. The results of the comparative study between the different techniques showed a strong correlation among all methods allowing the detection of certain features and the determination of their dimensions. The application of a large range of geophysical prospecting techniques in the surveyed archaeological sites has been able to detect the approximate position of the subsurface remains and to compare the different techniques in terms of the information that they reveal. Each one of these techniques has been used to examine the characteristic response of each method to the geophysical anomalies associated with the surveyed sites. Magnetic susceptibility measurements at two frequencies have identified areas and levels of intense human activity. A number of processing techniques such as low, high and band pass filtering in the spatial and frequency domain, computation of the residuals and fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of the magnetic potential data have been applied to the geophysical measurements. The subsequent convolution with filters representing apparent susceptibility, reduction to pole and equator, Gaussian and Butterworth regional and residual distributions, and inverse filtering in terms of spiking deconvolution have revealed a wealth of information necessary to obtain a more accurate picture of the concealed features. Inverse modelling of isolated magnetic anomalies has further enriched the information database of the

  4. Glacitectonic rafting and associated deformation of mid-Pleistocene glacigenic sediments, near Central Graben, central North Sea; results of a 2D High-Resolution Geophysical Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan-Hirsch, David

    2013-04-01

    Glacitectonic rafts are defined as dislocated slabs of bedrock or unconsolidated sediments, transported from their original position by glacial action. These relatively thin, slab-like bodies feature transport distances ranging from tens of meters to hundreds of kilometers. They occur as either single rafts, or multiple stacked bodies associated with a variety of ice-pushed landforms. Internally, rafts frequently appear undeformed although at a larger scale, they may be folded or cut by shear zones and brittle faults. However, the processes leading to the detachment, transport and subsequent emplacement of the rafts remain uncertain. This work describes the results of a geophysical 2D seismic survey of thrust-bound glacitectonic rafts and associated deformation structures, occurring within mid-Pleistocene glacigenic sediments of the Central Graben, central North Sea. The total shortened length of the rafted section is 2.4km, comprising a series of nine discrete rafts which individually range from 235m to 1018m in length. The principle basal detachment occurs at the erosive contact between Aberdeen Ground Formation and overlying Ling Bank Formation. The ice-proximal (northern) limit of rafting is defined by the presence of a large-scale palaeo-channel oriented perpendicular to the direction of rafting, composed of sediments of the Ling Bank Formation and the Forth Formation. The observed deformation structures infer a mean tectonic direction of 178°, indicating that they are associated with an active glacial advance from the north. The resulting deformation creates a minimum lateral shortening throughout the observed sequence of 35%, typifying a strongly compressional regieme associated with rafting. Throughout the surveyed area, structurally younger rafts are found to be emplaced towards the south, compared to the structurally older rafts which are emplaced towards the south-east. This distinction is suggested to be caused by early rafts creating an obstacle to

  5. Geophysical Exploration. New site exploration method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imai, Tsuneo; Otomo, Hideo; Sakayama, Toshihiko

    1988-07-25

    Geophysical exploration is used for geologic survey to serve purposes in civil engineering. New methods are being developed inside and outside Japan and are used to serve various purposes. This paper discusses recently developed techniques based on the measurement of seismic waves and electric potential. It also explains seismic tomography, radar tomography, and resistivity tomography which are included in the category of geotomography. At present, effort is being made to apply geophysical exploration technology to problems which were considered to be unsuitable for conventional exploration techniques. When such effort proceeds successfully, it is necessary to develop technology for presenting results quickly and exploration equipment which can work in various conditions. (10 figs, 15 refs)

  6. Results of geophysical surveys of glacial deposits near a former waste-disposal site, Nashua, New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayotte, Joseph D.; Dorgan, Tracy H.

    1995-01-01

    Geophysical investigations were done near a former waste-disposal site in Nashua, New Hampshire to determine the thickness and infer hydraulic characteristics of the glacial sediments that underlie the area. Approximately 5 miles of ground- penetrating radar (GPR) data were collected in the study area by use of dual-80 Megahertz antennas. Three distinct radar-reflection signatures were evident from the data and are interpreted to represent (1) glacial lake-bottom sediments, (2) coarse sand and gravel and (or) sandy glacial till, and (3) bedrock. The GPR signal penetrated as much as 70 feet of sediment in coarse-grained areas, but penetration depth was generally less than 40 feet in extensive areas of fine-grained deposits. Geologic features were evident in many of the profiles. Glacial-lake-bottom sediments were the most common features identified. Other features include deltas deposited in glacial Lake Nashua and lobate fans of sediment deposited subaqueously at the distal end of deltaic sediments. Cross-bedded sands were often identifiable in the deltaic sediments. Seismic-refraction data were also collected at five of the GPR data sites. In most cases, depths to the water table and to the till and (or) bedrock surface indicated by the seismic-refraction data compared favorably with depths calculated from the GPR data. Test holes were drilled at three locations to determine the true depths to radar reflectors and to determine the types of geologic material represented by the various reflectors.

  7. 78 FR 10137 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey on the Mid...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... desirable acoustic environment; and Cessation of feeding or social interaction. The onset of behavioral... Observatory completes the proposed seismic survey, an acoustic signal would trigger the release of each of the...

  8. A German survey of the abdominal transplantation surgical work force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael N; Nadalin, Silvio; Schemmer, Peter; Pascher, Andreas; Kaiser, Gernot M; Braun, Felix; Becker, Thomas; Nashan, Björn; Guba, Markus

    2015-07-01

    This manuscript reports the results of a nationwide survey of transplant surgeons in Germany, including the demographics, training, position, individual case loads, center volumes, program structure, professional practice, grade of specialization, workload, work hours, salary, and career expectations. We contacted all 32 German transplant centers that perform liver, kidney, and pancreas transplantation. Surgeons engaged in transplantation were asked to reply to the survey. Eighty-five surgeons responded, with a mean age of 44 ± 8 years, 13% of whom were female. The median transplant frequency per active transplant surgeon was relatively low, with 16 liver transplants, 15 kidney transplants, and three pancreas transplants. The median reported center volumes were 45 liver transplants, 90 kidney transplants, and five pancreas transplants per year. Most of the surgeons reported a primary focus on hepato-pancreato-biliary surgery, and only 10% of effective work time was actually dedicated to perform transplant surgeries. The majority of respondents estimated their weekly work hours to be between 55 and 66 h. When asked about their career satisfaction and expectations, most respondents characterized their salaries as inappropriately low and their career prospects as inadequate. This survey provides a first impression of the transplant surgery work force in Germany. © 2015 Steunstichting ESOT.

  9. Long working hours in Korea: results of the 2010 Working Conditions Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungsun; Kwon, Oh Jun; Kim, Yangho

    2012-01-01

    Long working hours adversely affect workers' safety and health. In 2004, Korea passed legislation limiting the working week to 40 h, to improve quality-of-life and to increase business competitiveness. In the present study, we explored the characteristics of work in Korea and compared our data of the second Korean Working Conditions Survey (KWCS) with those of the first KWCS. We found that the average number of hours worked weekly has been reduced but the proportions of workers who work for more than 48 h per week has increased over the 4 yr between the two Korean surveys in all categories studied (male, female, employee, self-employed, and employer). We also found that self-employed and employers work much longer hours than do employees, who are protected by the Labor Standards Act. This was particularly true in the accommodation and food service sectors. In conclusion, Korean workers work longer than do workers of EU countries. The use of average figures masks differences in the numbers of working hours among those engaged in various types of employment, or in certain work sectors. Therefore, the Korean government should not simply monitor reductions in average weekly working hours, but should identify employees working for over 60 h weekly, and reduce their working time.

  10. Mitigating the consequences of future earthquakes in historical centres: what perspectives from the joined use of past information and geological-geophysical surveys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terenzio Gizzi, Fabrizio; Moscatelli, Massimiliano; Potenza, Maria Rosaria; Zotta, Cinzia; Simionato, Maurizio; Pileggi, Domenico; Castenetto, Sergio

    2015-04-01

    To mitigate the damage effects of earthquakes in urban areas and particularly in historical centres prone to high seismic hazard is an important task to be pursued. As a matter of fact, seismic history throughout the world informs us that earthquakes have caused deep changes in the ancient urban conglomerations due to their high building vulnerability. Furthermore, some quarters can be exposed to an increase of seismic actions if compared with adjacent areas due to the geological and/or topographical features of the site on which the historical centres lie. Usually, the strategies aimed to estimate the local seismic hazard make only use of the geological-geophysical surveys. Thorough this approach we do not draw any lesson from what happened as a consequences of past earthquakes. With this in mind, we present the results of a joined use of historical data and traditional geological-geophysical approach to analyse the effects of possible future earthquakes in historical centres. The research activity discussed here is arranged into a joint collaboration between the Department of Civil Protection of the Presidency of Council of Ministers, the Institute of Environmental Geology and Geoengineering and the Institute of Archaeological and Monumental Heritage of the National (Italian) Research Council. In order to show the results, we discuss the preliminary achievements of the integrated study carried out on two historical towns located in Southern Apennines, a portion of the Italian peninsula exposed to high seismic hazard. Taking advantage from these two test sites, we also discuss some methodological implications that could be taken as a reference in the seismic microzonation studies.

  11. Restricted working hours in Austrian residency programs : Survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmeister, Konstantin D; Aman, Martin; Podesser, Bruno K

    2018-04-27

    New regulations for working hours of medical doctors have been implemented in Austria based on the European directive 2003/88/EG, limiting on-duty working hours to 48 h per week. Clinical work is, therefore, substantially reduced compared to previous decades, and little is known on physician and students' opinions on this matter. We illustrate survey results concerning on-job training, its difficulties, and implications for restricted working hours. We conducted an internal survey among M.D. and Ph.D. students and medical staff members at the Medical University of Vienna using the MedCampus system (CAMPUSOnline, Graz, Austria) and SPSS (V.21, IBM Corp, Armonk, NY, USA). Participants were 36.5% staff members and 63.5% students. Students rated continuous education of physicians high at 9.19 ± 1.76 and staff members at 8.90 ± 2.48 on a 1-10 (1 unimportant, 10 most important) scale. Students rated limited time resources, while staff considered financial resources as the greatest challenge for in-hospital education. Overall, 28.85% thought that restricted working hours can positively influence education, while 19.04% thought the opposite and 52.11% were undecided. Considering the limited available time and financial resources, education of tomorrow's medical doctors remains an important but difficult task. While participants of our survey rated education as very important despite its many challenges, the opinions towards limited working hours were not as clear. Given that over 50% are still undecided whether reduced work hours may also positively influence medical education, it clearly presents an opportunity to include the next generations of physicians in this undertaking.

  12. Nationwide Survey of Work Environment, Work-Life Balance and Burnout among Psychiatrists in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Umene-Nakano, Wakako; Kato, Takahiro A.; Kikuchi, Saya; Tateno, Masaru; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hoshuyama, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Jun

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psychiatry has been consistently shown to be a profession characterised by 'high-burnout'; however, no nationwide surveys on this topic have been conducted in Japan. AIMS: The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of burnout and to ascertain the relationship between work environment satisfaction, work-life balance satisfaction and burnout among psychiatrists working in medical schools in Japan. METHOD: We mailed anonymous questionnaires to all 80 psychiatry depart...

  13. Predictive geophysics: geochemical simulations to geophysical targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopping, R. G.; Cleverley, J.

    2017-12-01

    With an increasing focus on deep exploration for covered targets, new methods are required to target mineral systems under cover. Geophysical responses are driven by physical property contrasts; for example, density contrasts provide a gravity signal, acoustic impedance contrasts provide a seismic reflection signal. In turn, the physical properties for basement, crystalline rocks which host the vast majority of mineral systems are determined almost wholly by the mineralogy of the rocks in question. Mineral systems, through the transport of heat and reactive fluids, will serve to modify the physical properties of country rock as they chemically alter the hosting strata. To understand these changes, we have performed 2D reactive transport modelling that simulates the formation of Archean gold deposits of the Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia. From this, we derive a model of mineralogy that we can use to predict the density, magnetic susceptibility and seismic reflection changes associated with ore formation. It is then possible to predict the gravity, magnetic and seismic reflection responses associated with these deposits. Scenario mapping, such as testing the ability to resolve buried ore bodies or the geophysical survey spacing required to resolve the mineral system, can be performed to produce geophysical targets from these geochemical simulations. We find that there is a gravity response of around 9% of the unaltered response for deposits even buried by 1km of cover, and there is a magnetic spike associated with proximal alteration of the ore system. Finally, seismic reflection response is mostly characterised by additional reflections along faults that plumb the alteration system.

  14. Heterogeneity of groundwater storage properties in the critical zone of Irish metamorphic basement from geophysical surveys and petrographic analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comte, Jean-Christophe; Cassidy, Rachel; Caulfield, John; Nitsche, Janka; Ofterdinger, Ulrich; Wilson, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Weathered/fractured bedrock aquifers contain groundwater resources that are crucial in hard rock basement regions for rural water supply and maintaining river flow and ecosystem resilience. Groundwater storage in metamorphic rocks is subject to high spatial variations due to the large degree of heterogeneity in fracture occurrence and weathering patterns. Point measurements such as borehole testing are, in most cases, insufficient to characterise and quantify those storage variations because borehole sampling density is usually much lower than the scale of heterogeneities. A suite of geophysical and petrographic investigations was implemented in the weathered/fractured micaschist basement of Donegal, NW Ireland. Electrical Resistivity Tomography provided a high resolution 2D distribution of subsurface resistivities. Resistivity variations were transferred into storage properties (i.e. porosities) in the saturated critical zone of the aquifer through application of a petrophysical model derived from Archie's Law. The petrophysical model was calibrated using complementary borehole gamma logging and clay petrographic analysis at multi-depth well clusters distributed along a hillslope transect at the site. The resulting distribution of porosities shows large spatial variations along the studied transect. With depth, porosities rapidly decrease from about a few % in the uppermost, highly weathered basement to less than 0.5% in the deep unweathered basement, which is encountered at depths of between 10 and 50m below the ground surface. Along the hillslope, porosities decrease with distance from the river in the valley floor, ranging between 5% at the river to less than 1% at the top of the hill. Local traces of regional fault zones that intersect the transect are responsible for local increases in porosity in relation to deeper fracturing and weathering. Such degrees of spatial variation in porosity are expected to have a major impact on the modality of the response of

  15. Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawai’i and Maui

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fercho, Steven [Ormat Nevada, Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Owens, Lara [Ormat Nevada, Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Walsh, Patrick [Ormat Nevada, Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Drakos, Peter [Ormat Nevada, Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Martini, Brigette [Corescan Inc., Ascot (Australia); Lewicki, Jennifer L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kennedy, Burton M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Suites of new geophysical and geochemical exploration surveys were conducted to provide evidence for geothermal resource at the Haleakala Southwest Rift Zone (HSWRZ) on Maui Island, Hawai’i. Ground-based gravity (~400 stations) coupled with heli-bourne magnetics (~1500 line kilometers) define both deep and shallow fractures/faults, while also delineating potentially widespread subsurface hydrothermal alteration on the lower flanks (below approximately 1800 feet a.s.l.). Multi-level, upward continuation calculations and 2-D gravity and magnetic modeling provide information on source depths, but lack of lithologic information leaves ambiguity in the estimates. Additionally, several well-defined gravity lows (possibly vent zones) lie coincident with magnetic highs suggesting the presence of dike intrusions at depth which may represent a potentially young source of heat. Soil CO2 fluxes were measured along transects across geophysically-defined faults and fractures as well as young cinder cones along the HSWRZ. This survey generally did not detect CO2 levels above background, with the exception of a weak anomalous flux signal over one young cinder cone. The general lack of observed CO2 flux signals on the HSWRZ is likely due to a combination of lower magmatic CO2 fluxes and relatively high biogenic surface CO2 fluxes which mix with the magmatic signal. Similar surveys at the Puna geothermal field on the Kilauea Lower East Rift Zone (KLERZ) also showed a lack of surface CO2 flux signals, however aqueous geochemistry indicated contribution of magmatic CO2 and He to shallow groundwater here. As magma has been intercepted in geothermal drilling at the Puna field, the lack of measured surface CO2 flux indicative of upflow of magmatic fluids here is likely due to effective “scrubbing” by high groundwater and a mature hydrothermal system. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations, δ13C compositions and 3He/4He values were sampled at Maui from several shallow

  16. Combined geophysical surveys and coring data to investigate the pattern of the Watukosek fault system around the Lusi eruption site, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husein, Alwi; Mazzini, Adriano; Lupi, Matteo; Mauri, Guillaume; Kemna, Andreas; Hadi, Soffian; Santosa, Bagus

    2016-04-01

    The Lusi mud eruption is located in the Sidoarjo area, Indonesia and is continuously erupting hot mud since its birth in May 2006. The Watukosek fault system originates from the neighboring Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex extending towards the NE of Java. After the 27-06-2006 M 6.3 earthquake this fault system was reactivated and hosted numerous hot mud eruptions in the Sidoarjo area. Until now, no targeted investigations have been conducted to understand the geometry of the faults system crossing the Lusi eruption site. A comprehensive combined electrical resistivity and self-potential (SP) survey was performed in the 7 km2 area inside the Lusi embankment that had been built to contain the erupted mud and to prevent flooding of the surrounding roads and settlements. The goal of the geophysical survey is to map the near-surface occurrence of the Watukosek fault system upon which Lusi resides, delineate its spatial pattern, and monitor its development. We completed six lines of resistivity measurements using Wenner configuration and SP measurements using roll-along technique. Three subparallel lines were located to the north and to the south of the main crater. Each line was approximately W-E oriented extending for ~1.26 km. The surveyed regions consist of mud breccia (containing clayey-silty-sandy mixture with clast up to ~10 cm in size). The geophysical data have been complemented with a N-S oriented profile consisting of 6 cores (~30m long) drilled in the dry area inside the Lusi embankment. The resistivity data were inverted into 2-D resistivity images with a maximum penetration depth of almost 200 m. These images consistently reveal a region of about 300 m in width (between 30-90 m depth) characterized by anomalous resistivities, which are lower than the values observed in the surrounding area. The results of the SP data correspond well with the resistivity profiles in the anomalous parts, which suggests that their origin is related to fluid flow paths in the

  17. Three-Dimensional Surface Geophysical Exploration of the 200-Series Tanks at the 241-C Tank Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crook, N. [HydroGEOPHYSICS, Inc., Tuscon, AZ (United States); McNeill, M. [HydroGEOPHYSICS, Inc., Tuscon, AZ (United States); Dunham, Ralph [Columbia Energy and Environmental Services, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Glaser, Danney R. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-02-26

    A surface geophysical exploration (SGE) survey using direct current electrical resistivity was conducted within the C Tank Farm in the vicinity of the 200-Series tanks at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. This survey was the second successful SGE survey to utilize the GeotectionTM-180 Resistivity Monitoring System which facilitated a much larger survey size and faster data acquisition rate. The primary objective of the C Tank Farm SGE survey was to provide geophysical data and subsurface imaging results to support the Phase 2 RCRA Facility Investigation, as outlined in the Phase 2 RCRA Facility Investigation/Corrective Measures work plan RPP-PLAN-39114.

  18. Three-Dimensional Surface Geophysical Exploration of the 200-Series Tanks at the 241-C Tank Farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crook, N.; McNeill, M.; Dunham, Ralph; Glaser, Danney R.

    2014-01-01

    A surface geophysical exploration (SGE) survey using direct current electrical resistivity was conducted within the C Tank Farm in the vicinity of the 200-Series tanks at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. This survey was the second successful SGE survey to utilize the Geotection(TM)-180 Resistivity Monitoring System which facilitated a much larger survey size and faster data acquisition rate. The primary objective of the C Tank Farm SGE survey was to provide geophysical data and subsurface imaging results to support the Phase 2 RCRA Facility Investigation, as outlined in the Phase 2 RCRA Facility Investigation / Corrective Measures work plan RPP-PLAN-39114

  19. 2005 AdvanceVT Work/Life Survey Leadership Report

    OpenAIRE

    Glass, Valerie Q.

    2005-01-01

    The AdvanceVT Faculty Work-Life Survey, distributed to all teaching and research faculty in January 2005, addressed, among other things, leadership issues at Virginia Tech. This report presents findings from tenured and tenure- track faculty members (N=816) about items on the questionnaire related to leadership including: aspirations of Virginia Tech faculty members towards leadership positions, their views about the possibility of maintaining a balance between leadership and other responsibi...

  20. A review of nuclear geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, C.G.; Schweitzer, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development of nuclear geophysics in scientific and technological content and in range from its beginnings early in this century to the present day. We note that the early work in nuclear geophysics was originally referred to under the umbrella of open-quotes isotope applicationsclose quotes and the origin of the term open-quotes nuclear geophysicsclose quotes (which is seen to clarify and to focus work in this area) is exposed in this paper. The current expansion of nuclear geophysics front its original concern with oil well logging is an important trend because much of the underlying science, technology, and instrumentation is common ground. A review of nuclear geophysics would be a barren document without reference to long-term and, in some cases, short-term commercial and economic as well as to technological considerations, since these factors are the principal motivation for further development

  1. Long Working Hours in Korea: Based on the 2014 Korean Working Conditions Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungsun Park

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Long working hours adversely affect worker safety and health. In 2004, Korea passed legislation that limited the work week to 40 hours, in an effort to improve quality-of-life and increase business competitiveness. This regulation was implemented in stages, first for large businesses and then for small businesses, from 2004 to 2011. We previously reported that average weekly working hours decreased from 2006 to 2010, based on the Korean Working Conditions Survey. Methods: In the present study, we examine whether average weekly working hours continued to decrease in 2014 based on the 2014 Korean Working Conditions Survey. Results: The results show that average weekly working hours among all groups of workers decreased in 2014 relative to previous years; however, self-employed individuals and employers (who are not covered by the new legislation in the specific service sectors worked > 60 h/wk in 2014. Conclusion: The Korean government should prohibit employees from working excessive hours and should also attempt to achieve social and public consensus regarding work time reduction to improve the safety, health, and quality-of-life of all citizens, including those who are employers and self-employed. Keywords: employee, employer, Korea, self-employed, working hours

  2. Geophysical and geochemical regional evaluation and geophysical model for uranium exploration in the western part of Yanliao region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tengyao; Cui Huanmin; Chen Guoliang; Zhai Yugui

    1992-01-01

    The western part of Yanliao region is an important uranium metallogenic region. This paper summarizes the regional geophysical model for uranium exploration composed of prediction model for favourable area of mineralization and evaluation model for anomalies on the basis of aeromagnetic and aeroradiometric data interpretation and analysis of the data from carborane and ground gamma spectrometric survey, high accurate magnetic survey, VLF survey and α-collected film survey in mult-displiary research work. The prospective prediction for uranium metallogenesis in this region was also conducted

  3. 77 FR 19321 - Geological and Geophysical Exploration on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Geological and Geophysical... Statement (PEIS) to evaluate potential environmental effects of multiple Geological and Geophysical (G&G... limited to, seismic surveys, sidescan-sonar surveys, electromagnetic surveys, geological and geochemical...

  4. 78 FR 11821 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Low-Energy Marine Geophysical Survey...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... engines and an 80 horsepower (hp) Schottel bowthruster. Electrical power is provided by two Caterpillar... (ms). The sub-bottom profiler is operated continuously during survey operations. Power levels of the... receiving animals (hearing, motivation, experience, demography) and is also difficult to predict (Richardson...

  5. 78 FR 57354 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Low-Energy Marine Geophysical Survey...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ... incorrect. In intermediate water depth, a correction factor of 1.5 is applied to the deep-water model... reasonably likely to, adversely affect the species or stock through effects on annual rates of recruitment or... signals and transfer the data to the onboard processing system. Straight survey lines will be collected in...

  6. Long Working Hours in Korea: Based on the 2014 Korean Working Conditions Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungsun; Kim, Yangho; Han, Boyoung

    2017-12-01

    Long working hours adversely affect worker safety and health. In 2004, Korea passed legislation that limited the work week to 40 hours, in an effort to improve quality-of-life and increase business competitiveness. This regulation was implemented in stages, first for large businesses and then for small businesses, from 2004 to 2011. We previously reported that average weekly working hours decreased from 2006 to 2010, based on the Korean Working Conditions Survey. In the present study, we examine whether average weekly working hours continued to decrease in 2014 based on the 2014 Korean Working Conditions Survey. The results show that average weekly working hours among all groups of workers decreased in 2014 relative to previous years; however, self-employed individuals and employers (who are not covered by the new legislation) in the specific service sectors worked > 60 h/wk in 2014. The Korean government should prohibit employees from working excessive hours and should also attempt to achieve social and public consensus regarding work time reduction to improve the safety, health, and quality-of-life of all citizens, including those who are employers and self-employed.

  7. Helicopter-borne geophysical survey over the areas struck by the tsunami of March 11, 2011, in northeast Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuma, S.; Ueda, T.; Mitsuhata, Y.; Uchida, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Geological Survey of Japan, AIST conducted a helicopter-borne EM and magnetic survey over tsunami invaded areas in northeast Japan 15 months after the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake. The purpose of the survey is to map the electrical resistivity of the ground intruded by seawater during the tsunami on March 11, 2011 for its reutilization as farming lands and water assessment of the area. The survey was flown in June 2012 at an altitude of 60m above ground with a speed of 50km/h along survey and traverse lines spaced 100m and 1,000m apart, respectively. The airborne EM system (Fuguro Airborne Surveys' RESOLVE system) was installed in a bird and towed 30m below the helicopter. This is a frequency-domain system operated at five frequencies (340, 1,500, 6,900, 31,000, 140,000 Hz) in a horizontal coplanar configuration and at a frequency (3,300 Hz) in a coaxial configuration. The survey area is located at the border of Miyagi and Fukushima Prefectures along the Pacific coast in the southern part of the Sendai Plain and is divided into two sub-areas: Watari-Yamamoto-Shinchi area (area A) and Matsukawa-ura Bay area (area B). The area A is known for its production of high-quality strawberries on beach ridges and much fresh groundwater has been used for irrigation of strawberries and warming of strawberry greenhouses by water curtain. However, the salinity of groundwater from shallow irrigation wells in this area increased dramatically after the tsunami (Mori et al., 2012). Since it still remains at high level, there is an urgent need to find new water resources. Whereas, the area B is characterized by a beautiful lagoon called the Matsukawa-ura which is preserved as one of prefectural parks of Fukushima Prefecture. Rice fields occupy the areas west of the Matsukawa-ura and most of them were covered by seawater during the attack of the tsunami. Desalinization of the rice fields is being conducted intensively to resume rice farming in these fields. The

  8. Geophysical considerations of geothermics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, M

    1967-01-01

    The development and utilization of geothermal energy is described from the standpoint of geophysics. The internal temperature of the Earth and the history and composition of magmas are described. Methods of exploration such as gravity, magnetic, thermal and electrical surveys are discussed, as are geochemical and infrared photogrammetric techniques. Examples are provided of how these techniques have been used in Italy and at the Matsukawa geothermal field in Japan. Drilling considerations such as muds, casings and cementing materials are discussed. Solutions are proposed for problems of environmental pollution and plant expansion.

  9. Automated entry technologies for confined space work activities: A survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Lucia; Ferrari, Emilio; Mora, Cristina

    2017-04-01

    Work in confined spaces poses a significant risk to workers and rescuers involved in the emergency response when an accident occurs. Despite several standards and regulations define the safety requirements for such activities, injuries, and fatalities still occur. Furthermore, the on-site inspections after accidents often reveal that both employers and employees fail to implement safe entry procedures. Removing the risk is possible by avoiding the worker entry, but many activities require the presence of the operator inside the confined space to perform manual tasks. The following study investigates the available technologies for hazardous confined space work activities, e.g., cleaning, inspecting, and maintenance tasks. The aim is to provide a systematic review of the automated solutions for high-risk activities in confined spaces, considering the non-man entry as the most effective confined space safety strategy. Second, this survey aims to provide suggestions for future research addressing the design of new technologies. The survey consists of about 60 papers concerning innovative technologies for confined space work activities. The document review shows that several solutions have been developed and automation can replace the workers for a limited number of hazardous tasks. Several activities still require the manual intervention due to the complex characteristics of confined spaces, e.g., to remove the remains of the automatic cleaning process from the bottom of a tank. The results show that available technologies require more flexibility to adapt to such occupational environments and further research is needed.

  10. Site suitability evaluation of an old operating landfill using AHP and GIS techniques and integrated hydrogeological and geophysical surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatsaz, Masoud; Monsef, Iman; Rahmani, Mostafa; Ghods, Abdolreza

    2018-02-16

    Because of the outdated methods of common landfill selection, it is imperative to reevaluate the usage suitability. To assess the suitability of the existing waste landfill in Zanjan, Iran, we have used a combination of the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) and GIS techniques, along with fieldwork surveys. Four major criteria and 12 subcriteria were considered, and the AHP was applied to assign the relative importance weights of criteria and subcriteria to each other. Finally, a landfill suitability map was generated and ranked based on the final suitability scores. The results show that the unsuitable areas are around Zanjan, in the middle parts of the plain. By contrast, the most suitable areas are uncultivated areas, located mostly in the west, north, and south. The results also indicate that the present landfill is a highly suitable site. After desk studies, geoelectrical surveys and infiltration measurements were conducted to make the final decision. Double-ring permeability tests confirm the landfill is an acceptable site. The electrical sounding shows that the leachate plume has a width of about ~ 450 m, spreads to a depth of about ~ 55 m, and migrates towards the northeast. Considering the groundwater depth, dry climate, and a low infiltration rate of the landfill soils, it can be concluded that leachate plumes will not contaminate groundwater within this decade. The proposed method can be implemented to reevaluate the suitability of any old operating reservoir such as oil reservoirs, petrol filling stations, heavy industrial tanks, and landfills, containing liquid hazardous materials.

  11. Implementation Of Carlson Survey Software2009 In Survey Works And Comparison With CDS Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Faraj EL Megrahi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The automation surveying is one of the most influential changes to surveying concept and profession has had to go through, this has taken effect in two major courses, hardware (instrumentation used in data collection and presentation, and the software (the applications used in data processing and manipulation. Automation is majorly computer based and just like all such systems is subject to improvement often; this is manifested in the new kinds of instrumentation models every few years such as total station and newer versions of software’s. The software that has the potential to completely affect survey automation is Carlson Surveying Software. This when coupled with total station as data processing and collection methods respectively; is capable of greatly improving productivity while reducing time and cost required in the long run. However, it is only natural for users to desire a competent software and be able to choose from what is available on the market based on guided research and credible information from previous researches. Such studies not only help in choice of software but are also handy when it comes to testing approaches and recommending improvements based on advantages and disadvantages to the manufacturers to help in advancement in the software industry for better and more comfortable use. The expected outcome of the research is a successful implementation of Carlson survey 2009 software in survey works and a comparison with other existing software like Civil Design Software (CDS was highlighted its advantages and disadvantages.

  12. Field Geophysics at SAGE: Strategies for Effective Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braile, L. W.; Baldridge, W. S.; Jiracek, G. R.; Biehler, S.; Ferguson, J. F.; Pellerin, L.; McPhee, D. K.; Bedrosian, P. A.; Snelson, C. M.; Hasterok, D. P.

    2011-12-01

    issues - safety, constraints, data quality/quantity, research objective, educational experience, survey parameters, why multidisciplinary?, etc.; 6. knowledge of multiple geophysical field methods (each student works with all methods); 7. information on geophysics careers and networking provided by industry visitors; 8. measures of success of the program include high rate of continuation to graduate school and careers in geophysics, support and feedback from industry participants and visitors, student evaluations at end of program, presentations at professional meetings, publications, and faculty evaluation of student work.

  13. Nationwide survey of work environment, work-life balance and burnout among psychiatrists in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umene-Nakano, Wakako; Kato, Takahiro A; Kikuchi, Saya; Tateno, Masaru; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hoshuyama, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Psychiatry has been consistently shown to be a profession characterised by 'high-burnout'; however, no nationwide surveys on this topic have been conducted in Japan. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of burnout and to ascertain the relationship between work environment satisfaction, work-life balance satisfaction and burnout among psychiatrists working in medical schools in Japan. We mailed anonymous questionnaires to all 80 psychiatry departments in medical schools throughout Japan. Work-life satisfaction, work-environment satisfaction and social support assessments, as well as the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), were used. Sixty psychiatric departments (75.0%) responded, and 704 psychiatrists provided answers to the assessments and MBI. Half of the respondents (n = 311, 46.0%) experienced difficulty with their work-life balance. Based on the responses to the MBI, 21.0% of the respondents had a high level of emotional exhaustion, 12.0% had a high level of depersonalisation, and 72.0% had a low level of personal accomplishment. Receiving little support, experiencing difficulty with work-life balance, and having less work-environment satisfaction were significantly associated with higher emotional exhaustion. A higher number of nights worked per month was significantly associated with higher depersonalisation. A low level of personal accomplishment was quite prevalent among Japanese psychiatrists compared with the results of previous studies. Poor work-life balance was related to burnout, and social support was noted to mitigate the impact of burnout.

  14. Modelling tectonic features of the Kissamos and Paleohora areas, Western Crete (Greece): combining geological and geophysical surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moisidi, M; Vallianatos, F; Soupios, P [Laboratory of Geophysics and Seismology, Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, 3 Romanou Str., Halepa, Chania, Crete 73133 (Greece); Kershaw, S [Institute for the Environment, Brunel University, Uxbridge, Middlesex, UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Rust, D [Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Burnary Road, Portsmouth, PO1 3QL,UK (United Kingdom); Piscitelli, S [Istituto di Metodologie per I' Analisi Ambientale IMAA-CNR, C/da S Loja, 85050, Tito Scalo (PZ) (Italy)

    2013-04-15

    The purpose of this survey is the fault zone determination in Kissamos (NW Crete) and Paleohora (SW Crete) basins. The study area is located within the central forearc of the Hellenic subduction zone. 2D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has been applied to reveal fault zones. Ground-truthed fault evidence in the coast northwest of Kastelli-Kissamou and northeast of Paleohora is incorporated into the ERT data. Thirteen ERT profiles were obtained at several sites. Seven of the eight ERT profiles intersect fault zones in Kissamos. Five ERT profiles were conducted in Paleohora and three significant faults were identified. The results indicated the continuation of previously mapped faults as well as revealing unreported faults. The coastline of Paleohora and Grammeno can be associated with a system of fault zone striking almost E-W. We propose that the ERT method is a reliable and economic method at identifying buried fault zones in populated areas. Considering the proximity of the revealed fault zones in densely populated areas and the high seismic activity of the region the determination of the identified fault zones could contribute in earthquake hazard assessment studies for future seismic mitigation and urban planning strategies in the two areas for western Crete. (paper)

  15. Unleashing Geophysics Data with Modern Formats and Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Alex; Brodie, Ross C.; Druken, Kelsey; Bastrakova, Irina; Evans, Ben; Kemp, Carina; Richardson, Murray; Trenham, Claire; Wang, Jingbo; Wyborn, Lesley

    2016-04-01

    Geoscience Australia (GA) is the national steward of large volumes of geophysical data extending over the entire Australasian region and spanning many decades. The volume and variety of data which must be managed, coupled with the increasing need to support machine-to-machine data access, mean that the old "click-and-ship" model delivering data as downloadable files for local analysis is rapidly becoming unviable - a "big data" problem not unique to geophysics. The Australian Government, through the Research Data Services (RDS) Project, recently funded the Australian National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) to organize a wide range of Earth Systems data from diverse collections including geoscience, geophysics, environment, climate, weather, and water resources onto a single High Performance Data (HPD) Node. This platform, which now contains over 10 petabytes of data, is called the National Environmental Research Data Interoperability Platform (NERDIP), and is designed to facilitate broad user access, maximise reuse, and enable integration. GA has contributed several hundred terabytes of geophysical data to the NERDIP. Historically, geophysical datasets have been stored in a range of formats, with metadata of varying quality and accessibility, and without standardised vocabularies. This has made it extremely difficult to aggregate original data from multiple surveys (particularly un-gridded geophysics point/line data) into standard formats suited to High Performance Computing (HPC) environments. To address this, it was decided to use the NERDIP-preferred Hierarchical Data Format (HDF) 5, which is a proven, standard, open, self-describing and high-performance format supported by extensive software tools, libraries and data services. The Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) 4 API facilitates the use of data in HDF5, whilst the NetCDF Climate & Forecasting conventions (NetCDF-CF) further constrain NetCDF4/HDF5 data so as to provide greater inherent interoperability

  16. rights reserved Geophysical Identification of Hydrothermally Altered

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Geophysical Identification of Hydrothermally Altered Structures That Favour .... aircraft. Total line kilometers of 36,500 were covered in the survey. Magnetic ... tie lines occur at about 2000 metres interval in the ... visual inspection of the map.

  17. A geological and geophysical data collection system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sudhakar, T.; Afzulpurkar, S.

    A geological and geophysical data collection system using a Personal Computer is described below. The system stores data obtained from various survey systems typically installed in a charter vessel and can be used for similar applications on any...

  18. Measuring Work Ability with Its Antecedents: Evaluation of the Work Ability Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltmer, Jan-Bennet; Deller, Jürgen

    2017-07-24

    Purpose The revised version of the Work Ability Survey (WAS-R) assesses work ability on several sub-scales at the intersection of personal and organizational capacity, thus adding to the measurement of work ability by integrating the holistic model. It, therefore, improves on two features of the current standard measurement tool of work ability, the Work Ability Index (WAI): (1) a ceiling effect and (2) limited detail due to a focus on physical health and personal capacity. Method In two samples (n 1  = 1093, n 2  = 359), psychometric properties and the structure of the WAS-R were analyzed. To evaluate construct validity, inter-correlations of the WAS-R and WAI, sickness absence, expected and desired retirement age, and post-retirement work intention were calculated. Results The WAS-R was found to be distributed closer to normality than the WAI. The structural analyses yielded acceptable results for the hypothesized model. The WAS-R was adequately correlated with the WAI, negatively with sickness absence, and positively with desired retirement age. Conclusions The WAS-R extends the measurement of work ability, reflecting organizations' work demands. Its broad sub-scales lead to high acceptance of the results within the participating companies. In particular, the organizational capacity scales can be used to guide interventions aiming at organizational characteristics to improve work ability.

  19. Presenteeism among self-employed workers: Korean working conditions survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Su; Park, Jae Bum; Min, Kyoung-Bok; Lee, Kyung-Jong; Kwon, Kimin

    2014-01-01

    Presenteeism has become a public concern recently. Thus, we aimed to understand the relationship between self-employed workers and presenteeism using a nationally representative sample of Korean workers. Using data from the Korean Working Conditions Survey conducted in 2011, a total of 43,392 workers including paid employees and self-employed workers were analyzed. The effect of employment status on presenteeism was analyzed using logistic regression analysis. The independent variables were socioeconomic characteristics, working conditions, and working environments. Among the 43,392 workers, 34,783 were paid and 8,609 were self-employed. Self-employed workers were more likely to exhibit presenteeism than were paid workers. An elevated odds ratio of 1.27 (95% CI 1.19-1.36) was found for presenteeism among self-employed workers. Being self-employed was significantly related with exhibiting presenteeism. Additional research should investigate whether other factors mediate the relationship between employment status and presenteeism as well as ways to reduce presenteeism among self-employed workers.

  20. Synthesis of the works of geophysical (electrical soundings) carried out in the region of the anomalies of Yerba Sola (Cerro Largo) Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin, J.

    1983-01-01

    In this report has been studied geographical localization, geology, geophysics prospection, equipment and methods used and their results in Yerba Sola anomalies Province Cerro Largo and Fraile Muerto formation

  1. Nationwide survey of work environment, work-life balance and burnout among psychiatrists in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakako Umene-Nakano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Psychiatry has been consistently shown to be a profession characterised by 'high-burnout'; however, no nationwide surveys on this topic have been conducted in Japan. AIMS: The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of burnout and to ascertain the relationship between work environment satisfaction, work-life balance satisfaction and burnout among psychiatrists working in medical schools in Japan. METHOD: We mailed anonymous questionnaires to all 80 psychiatry departments in medical schools throughout Japan. Work-life satisfaction, work-environment satisfaction and social support assessments, as well as the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI, were used. RESULTS: Sixty psychiatric departments (75.0% responded, and 704 psychiatrists provided answers to the assessments and MBI. Half of the respondents (n = 311, 46.0% experienced difficulty with their work-life balance. Based on the responses to the MBI, 21.0% of the respondents had a high level of emotional exhaustion, 12.0% had a high level of depersonalisation, and 72.0% had a low level of personal accomplishment. Receiving little support, experiencing difficulty with work-life balance, and having less work-environment satisfaction were significantly associated with higher emotional exhaustion. A higher number of nights worked per month was significantly associated with higher depersonalisation. CONCLUSIONS: A low level of personal accomplishment was quite prevalent among Japanese psychiatrists compared with the results of previous studies. Poor work-life balance was related to burnout, and social support was noted to mitigate the impact of burnout.

  2. Nationwide Survey of Work Environment, Work-Life Balance and Burnout among Psychiatrists in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umene-Nakano, Wakako; Kato, Takahiro A.; Kikuchi, Saya; Tateno, Masaru; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hoshuyama, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background Psychiatry has been consistently shown to be a profession characterised by ‘high-burnout’; however, no nationwide surveys on this topic have been conducted in Japan. Aims The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of burnout and to ascertain the relationship between work environment satisfaction, work-life balance satisfaction and burnout among psychiatrists working in medical schools in Japan. Method We mailed anonymous questionnaires to all 80 psychiatry departments in medical schools throughout Japan. Work-life satisfaction, work-environment satisfaction and social support assessments, as well as the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), were used. Results Sixty psychiatric departments (75.0%) responded, and 704 psychiatrists provided answers to the assessments and MBI. Half of the respondents (n = 311, 46.0%) experienced difficulty with their work-life balance. Based on the responses to the MBI, 21.0% of the respondents had a high level of emotional exhaustion, 12.0% had a high level of depersonalisation, and 72.0% had a low level of personal accomplishment. Receiving little support, experiencing difficulty with work-life balance, and having less work-environment satisfaction were significantly associated with higher emotional exhaustion. A higher number of nights worked per month was significantly associated with higher depersonalisation. Conclusions A low level of personal accomplishment was quite prevalent among Japanese psychiatrists compared with the results of previous studies. Poor work-life balance was related to burnout, and social support was noted to mitigate the impact of burnout. PMID:23418435

  3. Application of the geophysical techniques in the environmental pollution in Montevideo - Piriapolis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, L.; Bautista, F.; Aguilar, B; Gogichaishvili, A.

    2012-01-01

    This work is about the geophysical survey carried out on tree leaves , urban soils and the dust from differents part of Montevideo and Piriapolis cities in Uruguay. The analysis of the magnetic properties enable to measure the environmental pollution and the population health effects

  4. Radiological survey of the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, St. Louis, Missouri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, W.A.; Leggett, R.W.; Haywood, F.F.

    1981-12-01

    The results of a radiological survey of part of the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works (former Destrehan and Broadway Street plants), St. Louis, Missouri, are presented. During the period 1942 through 1957, this site was used for various projects involving the production of purified uranium from pitchblende concentrates. The survey included measurements of the following: residual alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels in the existing buildings that were used in the uranium projects; external gamma radiation levels at 1 m above the surface in these buildings and outdoors around these buildings; radon and radon daughter concentrations in the air in these buildings; uranium, radium, actinium, and thorium concentrations in surface and subsurface soil on the site; concentrations of radionuclides in water and sediment found in drains both inside and outside the buildings; and concentrations of radionuclides in ground and surface water on the site and in river water taken near the site. Alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels inside and outside some of the buildings were above limits set by current federal guidelines concerning the release of property for unrestricted use. Elevated external gamma radiation levels were measured at some outdoor locations and in some of the buildings. Licensable concentrations of uranium were found in soil at some places, and the concentration of uranium in a water sample taken from a core hole between Buildings 100 and 101 was in excess of limits set by current federal standards. Radon and radon daughter concentrations in three buildings were in excess of current federal guidelines for nonoccupational radiation exposure

  5. Radiological survey of the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, St. Louis, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, W A; Leggett, R W; Haywood, F F

    1981-12-01

    The results of a radiological survey of part of the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works (former Destrehan and Broadway Street plants), St. Louis, Missouri, are presented. During the period 1942 through 1957, this site was used for various projects involving the production of purified uranium from pitchblende concentrates. The survey included measurements of the following: residual alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels in the existing buildings that were used in the uranium projects; external gamma radiation levels at 1 m above the surface in these buildings and outdoors around these buildings; radon and radon daughter concentrations in the air in these buildings; uranium, radium, actinium, and thorium concentrations in surface and subsurface soil on the site; concentrations of radionuclides in water and sediment found in drains both inside and outside the buildings; and concentrations of radionuclides in ground and surface water on the site and in river water taken near the site. Alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels inside and outside some of the buildings were above limits set by current federal guidelines concerning the release of property for unrestricted use. Elevated external gamma radiation levels were measured at some outdoor locations and in some of the buildings. Licensable concentrations of uranium were found in soil at some places, and the concentration of uranium in a water sample taken from a core hole between Buildings 100 and 101 was in excess of limits set by current federal standards. Radon and radon daughter concentrations in three buildings were in excess of current federal guidelines for nonoccupational radiation exposure.

  6. The contribution of work and non-work stressors to common mental disorders in the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, C.; Pike, C.; McManus, S.; Harris, J.; Bebbington, P.; Brugha, T.; Jenkins, R.; Meltzer, H.; Weich, S.; Stansfeld, S.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence for an effect of work stressors on common mental disorders (CMD) has increased over the past decade. However, studies have not considered whether the effects of work stressors on CMD remain after taking co-occurring non-work stressors into account.\\ud \\ud Method. Data were from the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey, a national population survey of participants\\ud >= 16 years living in private households in England. This paper analyses data from employed working age\\ud participa...

  7. Airborne geophysical survey of the catastrophic landslide at Stože, Log pod Mangrtom, as a test of an innovative approach for landslide mapping in steep alpine terrains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Baroň

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Airborne geophysics is a promising method for investigating landslides. Here we present a case study of multisensor airborne geophysical survey at the catastrophic landslide Stože near Log pod Mangrtom in Slovenia, which was conducted in the framework of the European FP7th Project "SafeLand". Based on the survey itself and achieved results, we discuss applicability, limits, and benefits and costs of the method for investigating landslides in steep alpine terrains. Despite of several operational constraints, the airborne electromagnetic survey of the area well presented the lithological pattern and water saturation. The high resistivity regions mostly indicated drained slope scree and landslide mass, drained and loosened material of the moraine deposit in the tension zone of the landslide with present cracks and cavities. The minima of the resistivity pattern were attributed to the outcrop of marls rich in clay, to water-saturated moraine deposit above impermeable marls in the tension zone, and to water-saturated porous alluvial gravel and landslide scree along the Koritnica River. The magnetic survey proved to be inapplicable for such a small and rough area. The Potassium and Thorium maps, on the other hand, both well identified the regions of tension inside the landslide zone, outcrops of marls and dolomite, clay-rich colluvium, weathered zones along a regional tectonic fault, and alluvial deposits and deposits of debris flows, and the minima of the 137Cs clearly revealed the zones of material removal due to recent mass movements.

  8. Patient-reported impact of spondyloarthritis on work disability and working life: the ATLANTIS survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramonda, Roberta; Marchesoni, Antonio; Carletto, Antonio; Bianchi, Gerolamo; Cutolo, Maurizio; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Fusaro, Enrico; De Vita, Salvatore; Galeazzi, Mauro; Gerli, Roberto; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Minisola, Giovanni; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio; Pellerito, Raffaele; Salaffi, Fausto; Paolazzi, Giuseppe; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Scarpa, Raffaele; Bagnato, Gianfilippo; Triolo, Giovanni; Valesini, Guido; Punzi, Leonardo; Olivieri, Ignazio

    2016-04-01

    The aim was to establish how patients experience the impact of spondyloarthritis (SpA) on work disability and working life. The survey was performed in 17/20 regions in Italy (1 January to 31 March 2013). A multiple-choice questionnaire was published on the official website of the sponsor - the National Association of Rheumatic Patients (ANMAR) - and hard-copies were distributed at outpatient clinics for rheumatic patients. Respondents (n = 770) were of both sexes (56 % men), educated (62 % at high school or more), of working age (75 % aged ≤60 years), and affected by SpA. The most common types diagnosed were ankylosing spondylitis (AS) (39 %) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) (36 %). Respondents were working full-time (45 %), part-time (8 %) or had retired (22 %); 15 % were unemployed (for reasons linked to the disease or for other reasons, students or housewives). Patients reported disability (39 %), were receiving disability benefits (34 %), were experiencing important limitations that were hindering their professional development/career (36 %) and some had to change/leave their job or lost it because of SpA (21 %). Employed respondents (n = 383) had worked on average 32.2 h in the last 7 days. More hours of work were lost over the last 7 days due to SpA (2.39 h vs 1.67 h). The indirect costs of the disease amounted to €106/week for patients reporting well-being/good physical conditions/improvement and €216/week for those reporting permanent impairment. Most patients were in the midst of their productive years and were experiencing considerable difficulties in carrying out their job because of the disease: half of them reported disability and one third were experiencing important limitations in their career perspective.

  9. Airborne geophysical radon hazard mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, P.

    1993-01-01

    Shales containing uranium pose a radon health hazard even when covered by several meters of overburden. Such an alum shale in southern Norway has been mapped with a joint helicopter borne electromagnetic (HEM) and radiometric survey. Results are compared with ground spectrometer, radon emanometer and radon gas measurements in dwellings, and a model to predict radon gas concentrations from the airborne data is developed. Since the shale is conductive, combining the HEM data with the radiometric channel allows the shale to be mapped with greater reliability than if the radiometric channel were used alone. Radiometrically more active areas which do not pose a radon gas hazard can thus be separated from the shales which do. The ground follow-up work consisted of spectrometer and radon emanometer measurements over a uranium anomaly coinciding with a conductor. The correlation between the airborne uranium channel, the ground uranium channel and emanometry is extremely good, indicating that airborne geophysics can, in this case, be used to predict areas having a high radon potential. Contingency tables comparing both radon exhalation and concentration in dwellings with the airborne uranium data show a strong relationship exists between exhalation and the airborne data and while a relationship between concentration and the airborne data is present, but weaker

  10. Geophysical investigations in the Syyry area, Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkinen, E.; Kurimo, M.

    1992-12-01

    Investigations were carried out at the Syyry site at Sievi using geological, geophysical, geohydrological and geochemical methods in 1987-1991 to determine the suitability of the bedrock for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. In this survey airborne, ground and borehole geophysical methods were used to study the rock type distribution, fracturing and hydraulic conductivity of the bedrock to a depth of one kilometre

  11. Geophysical investigations in the Olkiluoto area, Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkinen, E.; Paananen, M.

    1992-12-01

    Investigations were carried out at the Olkiluoto site at Eurajoki using geological, geophysical, geohydrological and geochemical methods in 1987-1992 to determine the suitability of the bedrock for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. In this survey airborne, ground and borehole geophysical methods were used to study the rock type distribution, fracturing and hydraulic conductivity of the bedrock to a depth of one kilometre

  12. uranium and thorium exploration by geophysical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yueksel, F.A.; Kanli, A.I.

    1997-01-01

    Radioactivity is often measured from the ground in mineral exploration. If large areas have to be investigated, it is often unsuitable to carry out the measurements with ground-bound expeditions. A geophysical method of gamma-ray spectrometry is generally applied for uranium exploration. Exploration of uranium surveys were stopped after the year of 1990 in Turkey. Therefore the real potential of uranium in Turkey have to be investigated by using the geophysical techniques

  13. Geophysical methods for evaluation of plutonic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibb, R.A.; Scott, J.S.

    1986-04-01

    Geophysical methods are systematically described according to the physical principle and operational mode of each method, the type of information produced, limitations of a technical and/or economic nature, and the applicability of the method to rock-mass evaluation at Research Areas of the Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. The geophysical methods fall into three categories: (1) airborne and other reconnaissance surveys, (2) detailed or surface (ground) surveys, and (3) borehole or subsurface surveys. The possible roles of each method in the site-screening and site-evaluation processes of disposal vault site selection are summarized

  14. Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course Offered by The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, D.; Davis, M. B.; Allison, M. A.; Gulick, S. P.; Goff, J. A.; Saustrup, S.

    2012-12-01

    The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics, part of the Jackson School of Geosciences, annually offers an intensive three-week marine geology and geophysics field course during the spring-summer intersession. Now in year six, the course provides hands-on instruction and training for graduate and upper-level undergraduate students in data acquisition, processing, interpretation, and visualization. Techniques covered include high-resolution seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, several types of sediment coring, grab sampling, and the sedimentology of resulting seabed samples (e.g., core description, grain size analysis, x-radiography, etc.). Students participate in an initial period of classroom instruction designed to communicate geological context of the field area (which changes each year) along with theoretical and technical background on each field method. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of at-sea field work. Our field sites at Port Aransas and Galveston, Texas, and Grand Isle, Louisiana, have provided ideal locations for students to investigate coastal and sedimentary processes of the Gulf Coast and continental shelf through application of geophysical techniques. In the field, students rotate between two research vessels: one vessel, the 22' aluminum-hulled R/V Lake Itasca, owned and operated by UTIG, is used principally for multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, and sediment sampling; the other, NOAA's R/V Manta or the R/V Acadiana, operated by the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, and is used primarily for high-resolution seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, gravity coring, and vibrocoring. While at sea, students assist with survey design, learn instrumentation set up, acquisition parameters, data quality control, and safe instrument deployment and retrieval. In teams of three, students work in onshore field labs preparing sediment samples for

  15. Geophysical study in waste landfill localized above fractured rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariveltom Cosme da Silva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical survey is an important method for investigation of contaminated areas used in the characterization of contrasting physical properties in the presence of pollutants. This work applied the geophysical methods of Electrical Resistivity and Self Potential in waste landfill, located in Caçapava do Sul city, RS. The landfill is located over fractured metamorphic rocks. Eight lines of electrical profiling with 288 measures of self potential were done. In addition, 83 measurements of direction and dip of fractures were taken. The application of spontaneous potential method permitted to detect the direction of groundwater flow. The electrical resistivity measurements allowed the identification of low-intensity anomalies associated with the presence of leachate. There is a relationship between anomalous zones and the directions of fractures.

  16. Underwater and Dive Station Work-Site Noise Surveys

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wolgemuth, Keith S; Cudahy, Edward A; Schwaller, Derek W

    2008-01-01

    Previous work performed by the Naval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory (NSMRL) had developed in-water permissible continuous noise exposure guidance Work performed by the Navy Experimental Diving Unit...

  17. Surveys on Work-life balance and productivity (in Japanese)

    OpenAIRE

    Ryo Yamada; Miyuki Yoshida

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, developed countries are increasing their focus on policies that improve the balance between work and life. Japan established a "work-life balance" charter at the end of 2007; the Japanese government, workers, and employers have agreed to collaborate in the belief that creating a society that balances work and life for all generations is desirable. Behind the trend is the fact that long working hours are a big reason for Japan's falling birthrate, which has threatened the sust...

  18. Advances in geophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Haruo

    2013-01-01

    The critically acclaimed serialized review journal for over 50 years, Advances in Geophysics is a highly respected publication in the field of geophysics. Since 1952, each volume has been eagerly awaited, frequently consulted, and praised by researchers and reviewers alike. Now in its 54th volume, it contains much material still relevant today--truly an essential publication for researchers in all fields of geophysics.Key features: * Contributions from leading authorities * Informs and updates on all the latest developments in the field

  19. New evidence on the spatial organisation of the Valencina de la Concepción Copper Age settlement: geophysical survey between La Pastora and Montelirio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wheatley, David

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The major Copper Age settlement of Valencina de la Concepción has been the subject of research interest over more than a century. The history of previous investigations at the site has resulted in a heterogeneous archaeological record that is particularly difficult and that displays significant gaps and problems. In this paper, we present the results of a geophysical survey carried out in December 2004 between the La Pastora and Montelirio sectors of this site in response to a proposed road development that was never put into practice, and which revealed several previously unknown features. These data are assessed in the light of the results obtained from the excavation carried out between 2007 and 2008 at the immediately adjacent sector of PP4-Montelirio, currently under study by us, where several dozen prehistoric features (both, non-megalithic and megalithic, funerary and non-funerary, were found. Altogether, this new evidence makes a significant contribution to the spatial interpretation of the Valencina de la Concepción site, particularly as they convey the first-ever cartography of a large area of this settlement. From this evidence, a discussion is made concerning the density and diversity of the features identified both between La Pastora and Montelirio as well as at the PP4-Montelirio sector, their potential patterns and sequence. This raises questions regarding the traditional separation of the site into ‘settlement’ and ‘necropolis’ areas and contributes more generally to a better understanding of the spatial organisation of this large prehistoric settlement.

    El gran asentamiento de la Edad del Cobre de Valencina de la Concepción ha sido objeto de numerosas investigaciones a lo largo de más de un siglo. Estas investigaciones han dado lugar a un registro arqueológico heterogéneo particularmente difícil de interpretar, y que presenta importantes vacíos y problemas. En este artículo se exponen los

  20. Review of geophysical characterization methods used at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GV Last; DG Horton

    2000-03-23

    This paper presents a review of geophysical methods used at Hanford in two parts: (1) shallow surface-based geophysical methods and (2) borehole geophysical methods. This review was not intended to be ``all encompassing'' but should represent the vast majority (>90% complete) of geophysical work conducted onsite and aimed at hazardous waste investigations in the vadose zone and/or uppermost groundwater aquifers. This review did not cover geophysical methods aimed at large-scale geologic structures or seismicity and, in particular, did not include those efforts conducted in support of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program. This review focused primarily on the more recent efforts.

  1. Review of geophysical characterization methods used at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GV Last; DG Horton

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a review of geophysical methods used at Hanford in two parts: (1) shallow surface-based geophysical methods and (2) borehole geophysical methods. This review was not intended to be ''all encompassing'' but should represent the vast majority (>90% complete) of geophysical work conducted onsite and aimed at hazardous waste investigations in the vadose zone and/or uppermost groundwater aquifers. This review did not cover geophysical methods aimed at large-scale geologic structures or seismicity and, in particular, did not include those efforts conducted in support of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program. This review focused primarily on the more recent efforts

  2. Working towards residential Radon survey in South America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, Jan M.; University of Ottawa, ON; Canoba, Analia C.; Shilnikova, Natalia S.; Veiga, Lene H. S.

    2008-01-01

    Information about residential radon levels in low and middle income countries is very sparse. In response to the World Health Organization initiative in the International Radon Project, we propose a research project that will address this knowledge gap in South America by conducting a residential radon survey. Following initial in vitro and in vivo studies of radon and studies of uranium miners exposed to radon, over twenty large case-control studies of lung cancer risk from exposure to residential radon have been completed worldwide by year 2004. Recently pooled data from these individual studies have been analyzed. These collaborative analyses of the indoor studies in Europe, North America, and China provide strong direct evidence that radon is causing a substantial number of lung cancers in the general population. To reduce radon lung cancer risk, national authorities must have methods and tools based on solid scientific evidence to develop sound public health policies. We propose to conduct a survey in ten South American countries using the distribution and analysis of passive alpha tracking detectors in houses selected at random in pre-selected cities in each participating country. We also present an approach to estimate the cost of carrying out such a survey and the radon laboratory infrastructure needed. The results of the proposed survey will allow to conduct assessment of the exposure to residential radon in the populations of South American countries and to assess the health impact of this exposure. The results of the project will also help national health authorities in developing national residential radon action levels and regulations, as well as provide public health guidance for radon awareness and mitigation. (author)

  3. Monkeying around: Use of Survey Monkey as a Tool for School Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massat, Carol Rippey; McKay, Cassandra; Moses, Helene

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the use of an online survey tool called Survey Monkey, which can be used by school social workers and school social work educators for evaluation of practice, needs assessment, and program evaluation. Examples of questions are given. Principles of writing good survey questions are described. (Contains 2 tables and 1…

  4. Sustainable Geophysical Observatory Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemann, R. J.; Lerner-Lam, A.; Aster, R.; Beck, S.; Ekstrom, G.; Nyblade, A.; Sandvol, E.

    2007-05-01

    Geophysical networks are defined not only by their technical specifications, but also by the characteristics and needs of the communities that use them. Growing populations supported by more elaborate urban infrastructure with its fine-grained socio-economic interdependencies and relying on global and regional connections for sustainability make new demands for natural hazard risk management. Taking advantage of advances in the underlying science to provide society with accurate risk assessments often requires higher fidelity measurements, entirely new types of observations, and an evolutionary sense of data products and information management. Engineering a high-tech system to address stakeholder needs is difficult, and designing for unpredictable developments requires an emphasis on adaptation. Thus, it is essential to promote formation of organizations or communities that can support evolution of a technological system, imagine new uses, and develop the societal relationships that sustain operations and provide capital for improvement. The owners must have a deep understanding of why the system works in particular ways and how to manage data products for the benefits of stakeholders. To be effective, community promotion must be sustained over a longer period of time than required to build a network and should be aimed at integrating the community into worldwide partnerships. Practices that can promote community formation if they are sustained include repeated training and scientific exchange workshops, extended visits by experts and staff at all levels to and from countries where networks are installed, mechanisms that make timely upgrades realistically possible, and routine exchange and wide dissemination of data in all directions. The combination of international research and educational collaborations, supported by open data exchange, with regionalized and specific assessments of local stakeholder needs and concerns, provides a sustainable model for

  5. Program software for the automated processing of gravity and magnetic survey data for the Mir computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyubimov, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    A presentation is made of the content of program software for the automated processing of gravity and magnetic survey data for the small Mir-1 and Mir-2 computers as worked out on the Voronezh geophysical expedition.

  6. Introduction to the JEEG Agricultural Geophysics Special Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Barry J.; Smith, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    Near-surface geophysical methods have become increasingly important tools in applied agricultural practices and studies. The great advantage of geophysical methods is their potential rapidity, low cost, and spatial continuity when compared to more traditional methods of assessing agricultural land, such as sample collection and laboratory analysis. Agricultural geophysics investigations commonly focus on obtaining information within the soil profile, which generally does not extend much beyond 2 meters beneath the ground surface. Although the depth of interest oftentimes is rather shallow, the area covered by an agricultural geophysics survey can vary widely in scale, from experimental plots (10 s to 100 s of square meters), to farm fields (10 s to 100 s of hectares), up to the size of watersheds (10 s to 100 s of square kilometers). To date, three predominant methods—resistivity, electromagnetic induction (EMI), and ground-penetrating radar (GPR)—have been used to obtain surface-based geophysical measurements within agricultural settings. However, a recent conference on agricultural geophysics (Bouyoucos Conference on Agricultural Geophysics, September 8–10, 2009, Albuquerque, New Mexico; www.ag-geophysics.org) illustrated that other geophysical methods are being applied or developed. These include airborne electromagnetic induction, magnetometry, seismic, and self-potential methods. Agricultural geophysical studies are also being linked to ground water studies that utilize deeper penetrating geophysical methods than normally used.

  7. The Expanding Marketplace for Applied Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, N.; Sirles, P.

    2012-12-01

    While the image of geophysics for the proverbial "layman" often seems limited to volcanoes and earthquakes, and to the geoscientist this image enlarges to include oil or minerals exploration and whole earth studies, there has been a steady increase in the application of geophysics into the realm of "daily life", such as real estate deals, highway infrastructure, and flood protection. This expansion of applications can be attributed to the improved economics from advances in equipment and interpretation. Traditional geophysical methods that at one time often only fit within the budgets of oil, gas, and minerals exploration programs can now be economically applied to much smaller scale needs like contaminant mapping, landfill delineation, and levee investigations. A real-world, economic example of this expanding marketplace is our company, which began very small and was aimed almost exclusively at the minerals exploration market. Most of our growth has been in the last 10 years, when we have expanded to five offices and a staff with almost 40 geoscientist degrees (21 in geophysics); much of this growth has been in the non-oil, non-minerals arenas. While much of our work still includes minerals exploration, other projects this year include wind-farm foundation studies, cavity detection above underground nuclear tests, landfill studies, acid mine drainage problems, and leaks in evaporation ponds. A methodology example of this expanding market is the induced polarization (IP) survey, once primarily used for minerals exploration, particularly large porphyry copper deposits, but now efficient enough to also use in environmental studies. The IP method has been particularly useful in delineating and characterizing old, poorly documented landfills, and recent research suggests it may also be useful in monitoring the accelerated biodegradation processes used in some cases to rehabilitate the sites. Compared to temperature monitoring systems, IP may be more useful in providing

  8. Underwater and Dive Station Work-Site Noise Surveys

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wolgemuth, Keith S; Cudahy, Edward A; Schwaller, Derek W

    2008-01-01

    ...) data This study extends this previous work by obtaining in-water and in-air noise measurements and a total noise dose for Navy divers during actual diving operations using a portable sound level...

  9. Informal work in the United States: evidence from survey responses

    OpenAIRE

    Bracha, Anat; Burke, Mary A.

    2014-01-01

    "Informal" work refers to temporary or occasional side jobs from which earnings are presumably not reported in full to the Internal Revenue Service and which typically do not constitute a dominant or complete source of income. Perhaps the most important reason for undertaking informal work is to offset negative income and employment shocks, such as reduced hours in a formal job, stagnant wages, or involuntary unemployment. Such negative shocks affected many Americans during the Great Recessio...

  10. Mathematics applied to nuclear geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, E.B.; Nordemann, D.J.R.

    1987-01-01

    One of the powerful auxiliary to nuclear geophysics is the obtention and interpretation of the alpha and gamma radiation spectra. This work discuss, qualitative and quantitative, the lost information problem, motivated by the noise in the process of information codification. The decodification process must be suppield by the appropriate mathematical model on the measure system to recovery the information from nuclear source. (C.D.G.) [pt

  11. Geophysical Field Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eloranta, E.

    2003-11-01

    The geophysical field theory includes the basic principles of electromagnetism, continuum mechanics, and potential theory upon which the computational modelling of geophysical phenomena is based on. Vector analysis is the main mathematical tool in the field analyses. Electrostatics, stationary electric current, magnetostatics, and electrodynamics form a central part of electromagnetism in geophysical field theory. Potential theory concerns especially gravity, but also electrostatics and magnetostatics. Solid state mechanics and fluid mechanics are central parts in continuum mechanics. Also the theories of elastic waves and rock mechanics belong to geophysical solid state mechanics. The theories of geohydrology and mass transport form one central field theory in geophysical fluid mechanics. Also heat transfer is included in continuum mechanics. (orig.)

  12. Fundamentals of Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrie, William

    1997-10-01

    This unique textbook presents a comprehensive overview of the fundamental principles of geophysics. Unlike most geophysics textbooks, it combines both the applied and theoretical aspects to the subject. The author explains complex geophysical concepts using abundant diagrams, a simplified mathematical treatment, and easy-to-follow equations. After placing the Earth in the context of the solar system, he describes each major branch of geophysics: gravitation, seismology, dating, thermal and electrical properties, geomagnetism, paleomagnetism and geodynamics. Each chapter begins with a summary of the basic physical principles, and a brief account of each topic's historical evolution. The book will satisfy the needs of intermediate-level earth science students from a variety of backgrounds, while at the same time preparing geophysics majors for continued study at a higher level.

  13. A Survey of Job Satisfaction among Midwives Working in Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Khavayet

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Job satisfaction is one of the important factors enhancing organizational efficiency and employees' performance. This study aimed to evaluate job satisfaction among midwives working in hospitals. Methods: This cross-sectional study included all midwives (N=100 working in hospitals affiliated to Abadan School of Medical Sciences, Abadan, Iran in 2016. To obtain data, we used a demographic as well as Herzberg's Job Satisfaction Questionnaire with α=0.96 in Iran. To analyze the data, independent t-test, Chi-square test, and Pearson correlation coefficient were run in SPSS, version 22. Results: The mean age and work experience of the subjects were 35.37±7.3 and 11.23±7.8 years, respectively. The mean job satisfaction score of the midwives was 302.41±19. The results showed that the subjects had moderate job satisfaction in the eight domains of occupational nature and position (48%, job security (46%, salary and benefits (61%, occupational and environmental conditions (90%, relationship with colleagues (87%, supervision (91%, management policy-making (80%, and personal relationships (85%. There was a significant correlation between work experience and job satisfaction, while there was no significant relationship between job satisfaction and other demographic variables. Conclusion: Considering the moderate level of job satisfaction among the midwives working in the hospitals affiliated to Abadan School of Medical Sciences, authorities should take effective steps to address job dissatisfaction by promoting occupational security, creating professional standards, and using midwives’ capabilities in building appropriate relationships with colleagues.

  14. Nurses' work demands and work-family conflict: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Dilek; Aycan, Zeynep

    2008-09-01

    Work-family conflict is a type of interrole conflict that occurs as a result of incompatible role pressures from the work and family domains. Work role characteristics that are associated with work demands refer to pressures arising from excessive workload and time pressures. Literature suggests that work demands such as number of hours worked, workload, shift work are positively associated with work-family conflict, which, in turn is related to poor mental health and negative organizational attitudes. The role of social support has been an issue of debate in the literature. This study examined social support both as a moderator and a main effect in the relationship among work demands, work-to-family conflict, and satisfaction with job and life. This study examined the extent to which work demands (i.e., work overload, irregular work schedules, long hours of work, and overtime work) were related to work-to-family conflict as well as life and job satisfaction of nurses in Turkey. The role of supervisory support in the relationship among work demands, work-to-family conflict, and satisfaction with job and life was also investigated. The sample was comprised of 243 participants: 106 academic nurses (43.6%) and 137 clinical nurses (56.4%). All of the respondents were female. The research instrument was a questionnaire comprising nine parts. The variables were measured under four categories: work demands, work support (i.e., supervisory support), work-to-family conflict and its outcomes (i.e., life and job satisfaction). The structural equation modeling results showed that work overload and irregular work schedules were the significant predictors of work-to-family conflict and that work-to-family conflict was associated with lower job and life satisfaction. Moderated multiple regression analyses showed that social support from the supervisor did not moderate the relationships among work demands, work-to-family conflict, and satisfaction with job and life. Exploratory

  15. Work plan for the radiological survey for the David Witherspoon, Incorporated, Landfill-1630 site, Knoxville, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    This work plan establishes the methods and requirements for performing a radiological survey at the David Witherspoon, Incorporated, Landfill-1630 Site, Knoxville, Tennessee (DWI 1630 Site) in accordance with requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The radiological survey will identify the radiological contamination level of the equipment and debris stored at the DWI 1630 Site. The data generated from the survey activities will support the decisions for characterization of the equipment/debris and aid in subsequent disposition and waste handling. The survey activities to be performed under this work plan include an equipment radiological survey, a walkover survey, and an immunoassay testing for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). This work plan includes a quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC) project plan, a health and safety (H ampersand S) plan, and a waste management plan

  16. Jesuit Geophysical Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udias, Agustin; Stauder, William

    Jesuits have had ah interest in observing and explaining geophysical phenomena since this religious order, the Society of Jesus, was founded by Ignatius of Loyola in 1540. Three principal factors contributed to this interest: their educational work in colleges and universities, their missionary endeavors to remote lands where they observed interesting and often as yet undocumented natural phenomena, and a network of communication that brought research of other Jesuits readily to their awareness.One of the first and most important Jesuit colleges was the Roman College (today the Gregorian University) founded in 1551 in Rome, which served as a model for many other universities throughout the world. By 1572, Christopher Clavius (1537-1612), professor of mathematics at the Roman College, had already initiated an important tradition of Jesuit research by emphasizing applied mathematics and insisting on the need of serious study of mathematics in the program of studies in the humanities. In 1547 he directed a publication of Euclid's work with commentaries, and published several treatises on mathematics, including Arithmetica Practica [1585], Gnomonicae [1581], and Geometrica Practica [1606]. Clavius was also a Copernican and supported his friend Galileo when he announced the discovery of the satellites of Jupiter.

  17. Comparison study of selected geophysical and geotechnical parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Randi Warncke; Poulsen, Søren Erbs

    Successful foundation of constructions relies on accurate characterization of the geotechnical properties of the subsurface. By implementing data from geophysical surveys, the placement of geotechnical drillings can be significantly improved, potentially reducing the number of required drillings....... This case study is mainly to compare geophysical investigations (MEP/IP) with existing PACES data and information from geotechnical drillings....

  18. WORK RELATED MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS: A SURVEY OF PHYSIOTHERAPISTS IN TRICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Maheshwari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Musculoskeletal system disorders are common among health care workers worldwide. They are common causes of severe long-term pain and physical disability. Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs are defined as “regional impairments of the muscles, tendons, nerves and joints. Physiotherapy can lead to WRMSDs in physiotherapist because of the nature of their profession. Despite of having expert knowledge of musculoskeletal injuries and injury prevention strategies they still report a high incidence of work-related injuries during their professional practice due to their training and continuous professional development Methods: A total of 100 Physiotherapists which included 78 females and 22 males in the age group of 21 to 40 years were recruited in the study. The subjects were taken as per the inclusion and exclusion criteria from Tricity. Results: Pearson’s correlation and Chi square analysis was used to determine correlation and the association of prevalence of self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms with personal characteristics, job risk factors and coping strategies. The data obtained from this study documents that majority of Physiotherapists have experienced WRMSDs at some time. The prevalence of WRMSDs among Physiotherapists in Tricity is high (91%. The most common risk factors identified in the present study were dealing with an excessive number of patients in one day; continuing to work while injured or hurt; lifting or transferring dependent patients and work scheduling. In present study, the low back and neck regions were the most commonly affected site among physiotherapists (72.5% each followed by upper back (28.6 %, shoulder (20.9%, wrist and hand (17.6%, knee (12.1%, ankle and foot (12.1% and hip (7.70% Conclusions: Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are an important health risk within the physiotherapy profession. The prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among the Physiotherapists in Tricity is high that

  19. Survey of attitudes of nurses working with AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenfield, M; Smith, P J; Milazzo, J; Seropian, S; Wormser, G P

    1987-01-01

    This article reports the results of a ten-question anonymous survey given to nurses at Westchester County Medical Center in July 1983 and January 1984 concerning attitudes about caring for AIDS patients. Two-thirds of the responding nurses reported that they had friends or family express concern about associating with hospital personnel who have contact with AIDS patients. Other questions showed that between one fourth and one half of nurses have a fear of caring for homosexual men and male prisoners because of their awareness about AIDS. One half of the nurses believe that AIDS can be transmitted to hospital personnel because of contact with patients despite precautions. The fear of caring for patients with AIDS as compared to caring for patients with hepatitis, a more contagious but less serious disease than AIDS, was highest in the intensive care unit staff. Eighty-five percent of the health care personnel responding believed that pregnant nurses should not care for AIDS patients and one half of the nurses responding indicated that they would ask for a transfer if they had to care for AIDS patients on a regular basis. The implication of these findings for future treatment programs, medical and nursing education and psychologic support for staff are discussed.

  20. Geophysical borehole logging and optical imaging of the pilot hole ONK-PH2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahti, M.; Heikkinen, E.

    2005-01-01

    Suomen Malmi Oy conducted geophysical borehole logging and optical imaging surveys of pilot hole ONK-PH2 in ONKALO tunnel at the Olkiluoto site in December 2004. The survey is a part of Posiva Oy's detailed investigation program for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The methods applied are magnetic susceptibility, natural gamma radiation, gamma-gamma density, single point resistance, Wenner-resistivity, borehole radar, full waveform sonic and optical imaging. The assignment included the field work of all the surveys, integration of the data as well as interpretation of the acoustic and borehole radar data. The report describes the field operation, equipment, processing procedures, interpretation results and shows the obtained geophysical and image data. The data as well as the interpretation results are delivered digitally in WellCAD and Excel format. (orig.)

  1. Geophysical borehole logging and optical imaging of the pilot hole ONK-PH2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahti, M. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland); Heikkinen, E. [JP-Fintact Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    2005-01-15

    Suomen Malmi Oy conducted geophysical borehole logging and optical imaging surveys of pilot hole ONK-PH2 in ONKALO tunnel at the Olkiluoto site in December 2004. The survey is a part of Posiva Oy's detailed investigation program for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The methods applied are magnetic susceptibility, natural gamma radiation, gamma-gamma density, single point resistance, Wenner-resistivity, borehole radar, full waveform sonic and optical imaging. The assignment included the field work of all the surveys, integration of the data as well as interpretation of the acoustic and borehole radar data. The report describes the field operation, equipment, processing procedures, interpretation results and shows the obtained geophysical and image data. The data as well as the interpretation results are delivered digitally in WellCAD and Excel format. (orig.)

  2. Market survey of forest work tools and heating devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutikainen, A.

    2002-01-01

    The TTS Institute has published internet pages where information has been 'gathered on the work tools, equipment, devices and machines needed by forest owners and people who use wood heating. The contact information of manufacturers and merchants for such tools and devices has also been provided. A link to the pages can be found at http://www.tts.fi. The pages are meant to be an aid for product buyers and also for advisory and research use. So far the pages are in trial use and are free of charge. They will be developed on the basis of feedback received. The TTS Institute internet pages operate primarily as a contact list where different product groups and contact information for product manufacturers and merchants can be found. The pages present limited information on the product since updating detailed product information would require intensive market monitoring and great work input. Furthermore, the objective is not to compete in the advertising market, but to publish independent information where the beneficiary is primarily the buyer. The contents of the pages are mainly limited to the products concerned with private forest owners and people who heat detached houses with wood, and information on those products. Information is collected and updated from public sources and also partly direct from the manufacturers and merchants. For clarity, the source of information will be mentioned. (orig.)

  3. Fluxgate vector magnetometers: Compensated multi-sensor devices for ground, UAV and airborne magnetic survey for various application in near surface geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavazzi, Bruno; Le Maire, Pauline; Munschy, Marc; Dechamp, Aline

    2017-04-01

    Fluxgate 3-components magnetometer is the kind of magnetometer which offers the lightest weight and lowest power consumption for the measurement of the intensity of the magnetic field. Moreover, vector measurements make it the only kind of magnetometer allowing compensation of magnetic perturbations due to the equipment carried with it. Unfortunately, Fluxgate magnetometers are quite uncommon in near surface geophysics due to the difficulty to calibrate them precisely. The recent advances in calibration of the sensors and magnetic compensation of the devices from a simple process on the field led Institut de Physique du Globe de Strasbourg to develop instruments for georeferenced magnetic measurements at different scales - from submetric measurements on the ground to aircraft-conducted acquisition through the wide range offered by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) - with a precision in the order of 1 nT. Such equipment is used for different kind of application: structural geology, pipes and UXO detection, archaeology.

  4. The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, D.; Davis, M. B.; Goff, J. A.; Gulick, S. P. S.; McIntosh, K. D.; Saustrup, S., Sr.

    2014-12-01

    The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics, part of the Jackson School of Geosciences, annually offers a three-week marine geology and geophysics field course during the spring-summer intersession. The course provides hands-on instruction and training for graduate and upper-level undergraduate students in high-resolution seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, several types of sediment coring, grab sampling, and the sedimentology of resulting seabed samples. Students participate in an initial three days of classroom instruction designed to communicate geological context of the field area along with theoretical and technical background on each field method. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of at-sea field work. Our field sites at Port Aransas, and Galveston, TX, and Grand Isle, LA, provide ideal locations for students to investigate coastal processes of the Gulf Coast and continental shelf through application of geophysical techniques in an exploratory mode. At sea, students assist with survey design and instrumentation set up while learning about acquisition parameters, data quality control, trouble-shooting, and safe instrument deployment and retrieval. In teams of four, students work in onshore field labs preparing sediment samples for particle size analysis and data processing. During the course's final week, teams return to the classroom where they integrate, interpret, and visualize data in a final project using industry-standard software such as Echos, Landmark, Caris, and Fledermaus. The course concludes with a series of final presentations and discussions in which students examine geologic history and/or sedimentary processes represented by the Gulf Coast continental shelf with academic and industry supporters. Students report a greater understanding of marine geology and geophysics through the course's intensive, hands-on, team approach and low instructor to student ratio (sixteen

  5. The contribution of work and non-work stressors to common mental disorders in the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, C.; Pike, C.; McManus, S.; Harris, J.; Bebbington, P.; Brugha, T.; Jenkins, R.; Meltzer, H.; Weich, S.; Stansfeld, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Evidence for an effect of work stressors on common mental disorders (CMD) has increased over the past decade. However, studies have not considered whether the effects of work stressors on CMD remain after taking co-occurring non-work stressors into account. Method Data were from the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey, a national population survey of participants ⩾16 years living in private households in England. This paper analyses data from employed working age participants (N=3383: 1804 males; 1579 females). ICD-10 diagnoses for depressive episode, generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, agoraphobia, social phobia, panic or mixed anxiety and depression in the past week were derived using a structured diagnostic interview. Questionnaires assessed self-reported work stressors and non-work stressors. Results The effects of work stressors on CMD were not explained by co-existing non-work stressors. We found independent effects of work and non-work stressors on CMD. Job stress, whether conceptualized as job strain or effort–reward imbalance, together with lower levels of social support at work, recent stressful life events, domestic violence, caring responsibilities, lower levels of non-work social support, debt and poor housing quality were all independently associated with CMD. Social support at home and debt did not influence the effect of work stressors on CMD. Conclusions Non-work stressors do not appear to make people more susceptible to work stressors; both contribute to CMD. Tackling workplace stress is likely to benefit employee psychological health even if the employee's home life is stressful but interventions incorporating non-work stressors may also be effective. PMID:21896237

  6. The contribution of work and non-work stressors to common mental disorders in the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, C; Pike, C; McManus, S; Harris, J; Bebbington, P; Brugha, T; Jenkins, R; Meltzer, H; Weich, S; Stansfeld, S

    2012-04-01

    Evidence for an effect of work stressors on common mental disorders (CMD) has increased over the past decade. However, studies have not considered whether the effects of work stressors on CMD remain after taking co-occurring non-work stressors into account. Data were from the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey, a national population survey of participants 6 years living in private households in England. This paper analyses data from employed working age participants (N=3383: 1804 males; 1579 females). ICD-10 diagnoses for depressive episode, generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, agoraphobia, social phobia, panic or mixed anxiety and depression in the past week were derived using a structured diagnostic interview. Questionnaires assessed self-reported work stressors and non-work stressors. The effects of work stressors on CMD were not explained by co-existing non-work stressors. We found independent effects of work and non-work stressors on CMD. Job stress, whether conceptualized as job strain or effort-reward imbalance, together with lower levels of social support at work, recent stressful life events, domestic violence, caring responsibilities, lower levels of non-work social support, debt and poor housing quality were all independently associated with CMD. Social support at home and debt did not influence the effect of work stressors on CMD. Non-work stressors do not appear to make people more susceptible to work stressors; both contribute to CMD. Tackling workplace stress is likely to benefit employee psychological health even if the employee's home life is stressful but interventions incorporating non-work stressors may also be effective.

  7. Applying geophysical surveys for studying subsurface geology of monogenetic volcanic fields: the example of La Garrotxa Volcanic Field (NE of Iberian Peninsula)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolós, Xavier; Barde-Cabusson, Stéphanie; Pedrazzi, Dario; Martí, Joan; Casas, Albert; Lovera, Raúl; Nadal-Sala, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Improving knowledge of the shallowest part of the feeding system of monogenetic volcanoes and the relationship with the subsurface geology is an important task. We applied high-precision geophysical techniques that are self-potential and electrical resistivity tomography, for the exploration of the uppermost part of the substrate of La Garrotxa Volcanic Field, which is part of the European Cenozoic Rift System. Previous geophysical studies carried out in the same area at a less detailed scale were aimed at identifying deeper structures, and together constitute the basis to establish volcanic susceptibility in La Garrotxa. Self-potential study allowed identifying key areas where electrical resistivity tomography could be conducted. Dykes and faults associated with several monogenetic cones were identified through the generation of resistivity models. The combined results confirm that shallow tectonics controlling the distribution of the foci of eruptive activity in this volcanic zone mainly correspond to NNW-SSE and accessorily by NNE-SSW Neogene extensional fissures and faults and concretely show the associated magmatic intrusions. These studies show that previous alpine tectonic structures played no apparent role in controlling the loci of this volcanism. Furthermore, the results obtained show that the changes in eruption dynamics occurring at different vents located at relatively short distances in this volcanic area can be controlled by shallow stratigraphical, structural, and hydrogeological features underneath these monogenetic volcanoes. This study was partially funded by the Beca Ciutat d'Olot en Ciències Naturals and the European Commission (FT7 Theme: ENV.2011.1.3.3-1; Grant 282759: "VUELCO").

  8. Applied Geophysics Opportunities in the Petroleum Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olgaard, D. L.; Tikku, A.; Roberts, J. C.; Martinez, A.

    2012-12-01

    Meeting the increasing global demand for energy over the next several decades presents daunting challenges to engineers and scientists, including geoscientists of all disciplines. Many opportunities exist for geophysicists to find and produce oil and gas in a safe, environmentally responsible and affordable manner. Successful oil and gas exploration involves a 'Plates to Pores' approach that integrates multi-scale data from satellites, marine and land seismic and non-seismic field surveys, lab experiments, and even electron microscopy. The petroleum industry is at the forefront of using high performance computing to develop innovative methods to process and analyze large volumes of seismic data and perform realistic numerical modeling, such as finite element fluid flow and rock deformation simulations. Challenging and rewarding jobs in exploration, production and research exist for students with BS/BA, MS and PhD degrees. Geophysics students interested in careers in the petroleum industry should have a broad foundation in science, math and fundamental geosciences at the BS/BA level, as well as mastery of the scientific method, usually gained through thesis work at MS and PhD levels. Field geology or geophysics experience is also valuable. Other personal attributes typical for geoscientists to be successful in industry include a passion for solving complex geoscience problems, the flexibility to work on a variety of assignments throughout a career and skills such as teamwork, communication, integration and leadership. In this presentation we will give examples of research, exploration and production opportunities for geophysicists in petroleum companies and compare and contrast careers in academia vs. industry.

  9. Psychological career resources of working adults: A South African survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinde Coetzee

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to explore broad trends regarding how individuals from various age, educational, marital, race and gender groups in the South African organisational context differ in terms of their psychological career resources, as measured by the Psychological Career Resources Inventory. A sample of 2 997 working adults registered as students at a South African higher distance education institution participated in this study. The results indicate significant differences between the various biographical variables and the participants’ psychological career resources. In the context of employment equity, and with more women entering the workplace, this study is expected to contribute important knowledge that will inform career development practices concerned with enhancing employees’ career meta-competencies as an important element of their general employability.

  10. Proceedings of a workshop on geophysical and related geoscientific research at Chalk River, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, M.D.; Dixon, D.F.

    1989-10-01

    A large part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is geoscience research and development aimed at obtaining information to quantify the transport of radionuclides through the geosphere and at determining the geotechnical properties required for disposal vault design. The geosphere at potential disposal sites is characterized in part by the use of remote sensing (geophysical) methods. In 1977 public concern about the disposal of radioactive waste resulted in field work being restricted to the site of Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, which was used to develop, evaluate and compare various techniques in order to optimize the methods for obtaining geoscience information. Methods tested at Chalk River are to be applied at other research sites. Most investigations have been carried out around Maskinonge Lake, using about thirty boreholes sink into bedrock. The boreholes provide subsurface geological information that can be used as a reference to compare the responses of various geophysical methods and equipment. Regional studies, including airborne geophysical surveys, have also been conducted. The 25 papers presented at this workshop provide comprehensive documentation of the most significant results of geophysical studies. The workshop also provided an evaluation of geophysical techniques and their utility to the Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program

  11. Geophysical prospecting in archaeology: investigations in Santa Venera, south suburb of Poseidonia-Paestum, Campania, southern Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loperte, A; Satriani, A; Bavusi, M; Lapenna, V; Del Lungo, S; Gizzi, F T; Sabelli, R

    2011-01-01

    This paper is the result of a joint work between geophysicists and archaeologists in which the authors have used geophysical techniques to investigate the Greek and Roman settlement of Paestum, southern Italy for preventive archaeological research (commonly termed 'rescue archaeology') on an area of the ancient settlement affected by new building work and infrastructure. Starting from a background analysis of the archaeological and geological features of the site, an integrated geophysical approach based on magnetic, GPR and geoelectrical surveys was carried out on the Santa Venera area, a site selected to build a car parking. High-density and high-resolution cross-correlated geophysical surveys were carried out in different parts of the area to better resolve the structures. Systematic excavations confirmed the clues suggested by geophysical prospecting about the presence of archaeological remains such as walls, canals and tombs. By the use of non-destructive geophysical techniques a two-fold aim was reached: to properly plan the building of the infrastructure and preserve the ancient artefacts according to the advanced European guidelines on the protection of archaeological heritage

  12. Radioactivity and geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radvanyi, P.

    1992-01-01

    The paper recalls a few steps of the introduction of radioactivity in geophysics and astrophysics: contribution of radioelements to energy balance of the Earth, age of the Earth based on radioactive disintegration and the discovery of cosmic radiations

  13. Geophysical Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Geophysical Research Facility (GRF) is a 60 ft long × 22 ft wide × 7 ft deep concrete basin at CRREL for fresh or saltwater investigations and can be temperature...

  14. Radiation survey and management on the reconstructed radioactive work-site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Tao; Liang Shiqiang; Wang Youmei

    2004-12-01

    The experiences of radiation survey and administration in the prophase on reconstructed radioactive work-site are summarized. The advance works are to investigate the reconstructed work-site, settle working plans, devise inspecting flow charts, deal with something in time in the local and train the staffers. The works about prophasic decontaminating, removing and cleaning up the site have been finished, which have established the deep foundation to develop later task. (authors)

  15. Hydro geophysical Investigation for Groundwater Development at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Environ. Manage. May. 2017. Vol. 21 (3) 527-535. Full-text Available Online at ... is of equal importance with the air we breathe in ... numerical modeling solutions. The electrical geophysical survey method is the .... VES data at twelve (12) sounding points as shown in figure 2; five along traverse one; two along traverse two,.

  16. Evaluation of geophysical borehole studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brotzen, O.; Duran, O.; Magnusson, K.Aa.

    Four studies concerning geophysical investigations and TV inspection in boreholes in connection with KBS studies at Finnsjoe, Karlshamn, Kraakemaala and Stripa and PRAV's studies at Studsvik have been evaluated. This has led to proposals concerning the choice of instruments and methods for future studies and a review of future work required. The evaluation has shown that the following borehole measurements are of primary interest in the continued work: Determinations of temperature and resistivity of the borehole liquid, resistance and resistivity measurements, SP, Sonic, Caliper and VLF. TV inspection, IP and gamma-gamma should also be included in the arsenal of available test methods.(author)

  17. The 3R-WL working level survey meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiager, K.J.

    1977-01-01

    The design and operation of a direct-reading sampler for airborne radon progeny are described. The instrument was designed for use by ventilation personnel in uranium mines and is small, rugged, light-weight and easily carried and operated. Direct readout of the radon progeny concentration in units of working levels, in the range 0.01 - 10 WL, is accomplished by counting the alpha particles from 218 Po and 214 Po with a single detector and two energy discrimination channels. Unique features include a fixed-volume, gravity-operated pump requiring no power source and minimal calibration; automatic delay, counting and display sequencing; capacity for more than 50 samples on a single roll of membrane filter; and provisions for recording all data directly on the filter tape. For the prototype as built, calibration against the 2-count alpha spectroscopy method of measuring WL indicated an average error of less than 1% in the range from 0.25 to 25 WL. However, the standard deviation of measurements made with the 3R-WL meter increased from 7% above 10 WL to 71% at 0.25 WL. Sources of error and variability are analyzed and suggestions for improving the precision of the measurements are included. (author)

  18. Geophysical images of basement rocks. Geophysical images in the Guianese basement. Airborne geophysical campaign in French Guiana - 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delor, C.; Perrin, J.; Truffert, C.; Asfirane, F.; Rossi, Ph.; Bonjoly, D.; Dubreuihl, J.; Chardon, D.

    1998-01-01

    The French Office for Geological and Mining Research (BRGM) has carried out a high sensitivity airborne geophysical survey of northern French Guiana during the second half of 1996. The aim was to realize a high resolution magnetic and gamma spectrometric mapping for future prospecting, land use and environment management. This paper describes in details the geophysical campaign, the material used, the navigation techniques, the processing of magnetic data, the gamma radiation sources used, the spectrometric calibrations and the geologic interpretation of the results. (J.S.)

  19. Geophysical borehole logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCann, D.; Barton, K.J.; Hearn, K.

    1981-08-01

    Most of the available literature on geophysical borehole logging refers to studies carried out in sedimentary rocks. It is only in recent years that any great interest has been shown in geophysical logging in boreholes in metamorphic and igneous rocks following the development of research programmes associated with geothermal energy and nuclear waste disposal. This report is concerned with the programme of geophysical logging carried out on the three deep boreholes at Altnabreac, Caithness, to examine the effectiveness of these methods in crystalline rock. Of particular importance is the assessment of the performance of the various geophysical sondes run in the boreholes in relation to the rock mass properties. The geophysical data can be used to provide additional in-situ information on the geological, hydrogeological and engineering properties of the rock mass. Fracturing and weathering in the rock mass have a considerable effect on both the design parameters for an engineering structure and the flow of water through the rock mass; hence, the relation between the geophysical properties and the degree of fracturing and weathering is examined in some detail. (author)

  20. Work-life balance of German gynecologists: a web-based survey on satisfaction with work and private life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancke, Katharina; Igl, Wilmar; Toth, Bettina; Bühren, Astrid; Ditsch, Nina; Kreienberg, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Work-life balance is an upcoming issue for physicians. The working group "Family and Career" of the German Society for Gynecology and Obstetrics (DGGG) designed a survey to reflect the present work-life balance of female and male gynecologists in Germany. The 74-item, web-based survey "Profession-Family-Career" was sent to all members of the DGGG (n = 4,564). In total, there were 1,036 replies (23%) from 75% female gynecologists (n = 775) aged 38 ± 7 (mean ± standard deviation [SD]) years and 25% male (n = 261) gynecologists aged 48 ± 11 years. Statistical analyses were performed using the mean and SD for descriptive analysis. Regression models were performed considering an effect of p ≤ 0.05 as statistically significant. 47% women and 46% men reported satisfaction with their current work-life balance independent of gender (p(gender) = 0.15). 70% women and 75 % men answered that work life and private life were equally important to them (p(gender) = 0.12). While 39% women versus 11% men worked part-time (p gender work than women (p(gender) Work life affected private life of men and women in a similar way (all p(gender) > 0.05). At least 37% women and men neglected both their partner and their children very often due to their work. Female physicians often described their work situation similar to male physicians, although important differences regarding total work time, overtime work and appreciation by supervisors were reported. Work life affected private life of women and men in a similar way.

  1. TOMO-ETNA MED-SUV.ISES an active seismic and passive seismic experiment at Mt. Etna volcano. An integrated marine and onland geophysical survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Jesus. M.; Patane, Domenico; Puglisi, Guisseppe; Zuccarello, Lucciano; Bianco, Francesca; Luehr, Birger; Diaz-Moreno, Alejandro; Prudencio, Janire; Koulakov, Ivan; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Cocina, Ornella; Coltelli, Mauro; Scarfi, Lucciano; De Gori, Pascuale; Carrion, Francisco

    2014-05-01

    An active seismic experiment to study the internal structure of Etna Volcano is going to carried out on Sicily and Aeolian islands. The main objective of the TOMO-ETNA MED-SUV.ISES experiment, beginning in summer 2014, is to perform a high resolution seismic tomography, in velocity and attenuation, in Southern Italy, by using active and passive seismic data, in an area encompassing outstanding volcanoes as Mt. Etna, and Aeolian volcanoes. The achievement of this objective is based on the integration and sharing of the in-situ marine and land experiments and observations and on the implementation of new instruments and monitoring systems. For the purpose, onshore and offshore seismic stations and passive and active seismic data generated both in marine and terrestrial environment will be used. Additionally, other geophysical data, mainly magnetic and gravimetric data will be considered to obtain a joint Upper Mantle-Crust structure that could permit to make progress in the understanding of the dynamic of the region. This multinational experiment which involves institutions from Spain, Italy, Germany, United Kingdom, Ireland, France, Malta, Portugal, Russia, USA and Mexico. During the experiment more than 6.600 air gun shots performed by the Spanish Oceanographic vessel "Sarmiento de Gamboa" will be recorder on a dense local seismic network consisting of 100 on land non-permanent stations, 70 on land permanent stations and 20-25 OBSs. Contemporaneously other marine geophysical measures will be performed using a marine Gravimeter LaCoste&Romberg Air-Sea Gravity System II and a Marine Magnetometer SeaSPY. The experiments will provide a unique data set in terms of data quantity and quality, and it will provide a detailed velocity and attenuation structural image of volcano edifice. The results will be essential in the development and interpretation of future volcanic models. It is noteworthy that this project is fully transversal, multidisciplinary and crosses several

  2. Daily sleep, weekly working hours, and risk of work-related injury: US National Health Interview Survey (2004-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, David A; Folkard, Simon; Willetts, Joanna L; Smith, Gordon S

    2010-07-01

    The impact on health and safety of the combination of chronic sleep deficits and extended working hours has received worldwide attention. Using the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), an in-person household survey using a multistage, stratified, clustered sample design representing the US civilian, non-institutionalized population, the authors estimated the effect of total daily self-reported sleep time and weekly working hours on the risk of a work-related injury. During the survey period 2004-2008, 177,576 persons (ages 18-74) sampled within households reported that they worked at a paid job the previous week and reported their total weekly work hours. A randomly selected adult in each household (n = 75,718) was asked to report his/her usual (average) total daily sleep hours the prior week; complete responses were obtained for 74,415 (98.3%) workers. Weighted annualized work-related injury rates were then estimated across a priori defined categories of both average total daily sleep hours and weekly working hours. To account for the complex sampling design, weighted multiple logistic regression was used to independently estimate the risk of a work-related injury for categories of usual daily sleep duration and weekly working hours, controlling for important covariates and potential confounders of age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, type of pay, industry, occupation (proxy for job risk), body mass index, and the interaction between sleep duration and work hours. Based on the inclusion criteria, there were an estimated 129,950,376 workers annually at risk and 3,634,446 work-related medically treated injury episodes (overall injury rate 2.80/100 workers). Unadjusted annualized injury rates/100 workers across weekly work hours were 2.03 (60 h). With regards to self-reported daily sleep time, the estimated annualized injury rates/100 workers were 7.89 (10 h). After controlling for weekly work hours, and aforementioned covariates, significant increases in risk/1

  3. A Comparison between the Second Korean Working Conditions Survey (KWCS and the First KWCS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Sun Kim

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: KWCS data included many aspects of working conditions as a nationwide sample. In addition, because this is a periodic nationwide survey, the labor force, working hours, harmful factor exposure, and the change in health problems characteristics according to the flow of time could be investigated. The information comparing the main results of the first survey conducted in 2006 and the second survey conducted in 2010 obtained through this study can be used as an important base material for the establishment of the national policy.

  4. Geophysical Survey in Sub-Saharan Africa: magnetic and Electromagnetic Investigation of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Songo Mnara, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Welham, Kate; Fleisher, J.; Cheetham, Paul; Manley, Harry; Steele, C.; Wynne-Jones, S.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetometry and Slingram electromagnetic surveys were\\ud conducted at the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Songo Mnara, Tanzania, as part of a multi-national programme of investigation to examine the uses of space within and outside of this stonetown. The town was a major Islamic trading port during the 14th and 15th centuries.The surveys detected significant evidence for the containment of activities within the town walls, and previously unknown anthropogenic activity was revealed between the ...

  5. A fractured rock geophysical toolbox method selection tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Johnson, C.D.; Slater, L.D.; Robinson, J.L.; Williams, J.H.; Boyden, C.L.; Werkema, D.D.; Lane, J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Geophysical technologies have the potential to improve site characterization and monitoring in fractured rock, but the appropriate and effective application of geophysics at a particular site strongly depends on project goals (e.g., identifying discrete fractures) and site characteristics (e.g., lithology). No method works at every site or for every goal. New approaches are needed to identify a set of geophysical methods appropriate to specific project goals and site conditions while considering budget constraints. To this end, we present the Excel-based Fractured-Rock Geophysical Toolbox Method Selection Tool (FRGT-MST). We envision the FRGT-MST (1) equipping remediation professionals with a tool to understand what is likely to be realistic and cost-effective when contracting geophysical services, and (2) reducing applications of geophysics with unrealistic objectives or where methods are likely to fail.

  6. Relationship between concealment of emotions at work and musculoskeletal symptoms: results from the third Korean Working Conditions Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyungyong; Kim, Dae Hwan; Ryu, Ji Young

    2018-05-11

    In this study, we explored the relationship between concealing emotions at work and musculoskeletal symptoms in Korean workers using data from a national, population-based survey. Data were obtained from the third Korean Working Conditions Survey in 2011. We investigated the prevalence of three musculoskeletal symptoms ("back pain", "pain in the upper extremities", and "pain in the lower extremities"). Multiple logistic regression analysis was also performed to determine odds ratios (ORs) for musculoskeletal symptoms according to concealing emotions at work, adjusting for socioeconomic factors. In both sexes, the emotion-concealing group showed a significantly higher prevalence of "pain in the upper extremities" and "pain in the lower extremities" than the non-emotion-concealing group. For back pain, male - but not female - workers who concealed their emotions showed a higher prevalence than their non-emotion-concealing counterparts; the difference was statistically significant. Adjusted ORs for musculoskeletal symptoms (excluding "back pain" for female workers) in the emotion-concealing group were significantly higher. Our study suggests that concealment of emotions is closely associated with musculoskeletal symptoms, and the work environment should operate in consideration not only of the physical health work condition of workers but also of their emotional efforts including concealing emotion at work.

  7. Aspects of the working life of women in the nursing profession in South Africa: survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, B J; Brevis, T

    2005-05-01

    This article reports on a survey done among nurses registered with the South African Nursing Council. The survey was carried out in the last quarter of 2003. The purpose of the survey was to investigate aspects of the working life of women in the nursing profession in South Africa and to make recommendations on how their working environment could be improved. The important findings were that pay-related issues dominate as the main problem at work. Improving pay scales and being paid according to extra experience, responsibilities and qualifications could improve the nurses' working environment. Furthermore, training opportunities, medical insurance and equal opportunities should be addressed as a matter of urgency. In general, respondents had a positive attitude towards their job, which leaves the impression that nurses still regard their jobs as something they do for the sake of a service to the community and not only for the money they earn.

  8. Aspects of the working life of women in the nursing profession in South Africa: survey results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BJ Erasmus

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a survey done among nurses registered with the South African Nursing Council. The survey was carried out in the last quarter of 2003. The purpose of the survey was to investigate aspects of the working life of women in the nursing profession in South Africa and to make recommendations on how their working environment could be improved. The important findings were that pay-related issues dominate as the main problem at work. Improving pay scales and being paid according to extra experience, responsibilities and qualifications could improve the nurses’ working environment. Furthermore, training opportunities, medical insurance and equal opportunities should be addressed as a matter of urgency. In general, respondents had a positive attitude towards their job, which leaves the impression that nurses still regard their jobs as something they do for the sake of a service to the community and not only for the money they earn.

  9. Brief overview of geophysical probing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Lytle, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    An evaluation of high-resolution geophysical techniques which can be used to characterize a nulcear waste disposal site is being conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commisson (NRC). LLNL is involved in research work aimed at evaluating the current capabilities and limitations of geophysical methods used for site selection. This report provides a brief overview of the capabilities and limitations associated with this technology and explains how our work addresses some of the present limitations. We are examining both seismic and electromagnetic techniques to obtain high-resolution information. We are also assessing the usefulness of geotomography in mapping fracture zones remotely. Finally, we are collecting core samples from a site in an effort to assess the capability of correlating such geophysical data with parameters of interest such as fracture continuity, orientation, and fracture density

  10. Results of geophysical survey on Hanaore-fault in the Kyoto urban area; Butsuri tansa ni yoru Kyoto shigaichi ni okeru Hanaore danso chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshioka, T. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan); Echigo, T. [Osaka Soil Test, Osaka (Japan); Toshioka, T.; Matsubara, Y. [Oyo Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    This paper reports results of gravity survey and seismic survey using the shallow bed reflection method to identify distribution of the Hanaore fault in the Kyoto urban area. In the gravity survey, level differential structure caused by the fault was identified as an abrupt change in Bouger anomalous values. The continuity therefrom made the estimation possible on existence and positions of such faults as the Hanaore fault belonging to the Hanaore fault system, the Shishigaya fault, the Kaguraoka fault, and the Okazaki fault. The estimation as a result of the gravity survey include the following findings: the Hanaore fault runs from south of the Yoshidayama in the south-north direction; the distribution of the Okazaki fault has a level differential structure falling on the east side; the structure shows low Bouger anomaly distribution; and this area forms a rift valley belt. In the seismic survey using the shallow bed reflection method, no distinct reflection plane considered as the basement was verified because of influence from urban area noise. However, it was possible to estimate such an underground structure as a monoclinal fold from shapes of the reflection plane and the distribution depths. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Discovery of source fault in the region without obvious active fault. Geophysical survey in the source area of the 1984 western Nagano prefecture earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyagi, Yasuhira; Abe, Shintaro

    2009-01-01

    The 1984 Western Nagano Prefecture Earthquake (MJ6.8) occurred at shallow part of the southern foot of Mt. Ontake volcano, central Japan. Despite the large magnitude neither clear surface rupture nor active fault has been found around the source area. Therefore the earthquake is an issue for seismic assessment based on active fault survey. The purpose of this study is to find any tectonic geomorphologic features in the source area and to elucidate its relation to the source fault. In order to achieve it, an integrated survey with (1) micro earthquake observation, (2) airborne LIDAR, and (3) seismic reflection survey was demonstrated in the source area from 2006 to 2008. The survey area of airborne LIDAR (18 km x 4 km) covers main part of the aftershock distribution just after the mainshock. A linear zone with abrupt change of topographic roughness was found in ENE-WSW direction at the center of the LIDAR target area. River valleys flowing down to SSE direction change their directions and widths abruptly across the linear zone. Seismic reflection survey across the source region detect deformation zone just beneath the linear zone. These features of topographic and crustal deformation coincide well with the aftershock distribution. Therefore they indicate an active structure formed by the cumulative displacement of the source fault. (author)

  12. Psychosocial Working Conditions and Suicide Ideation: Evidence From a Cross-Sectional Survey of Working Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Allison; Page, Kathryn; Witt, Katrina; LaMontagne, Anthony

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the relationship between psychosocial working factors such as job control, job demands, job insecurity, supervisor support, and workplace bullying as risk factors for suicide ideation. We used a logistic analytic approach to assess risk factors for thoughts of suicide in a cross-sectional sample of working Australians. Potential predictors included psychosocial job stressors (described above); we also controlled for age, gender, occupational skill level, and psychological distress. We found that workplace bullying or harassment was associated with 1.54 greater odds of suicide ideation (95% confidence interval 1.64 to 2.05) in the model including psychological distress. Results also suggest that higher job control and security were associated with lower odds of suicide ideation. These results suggest the need for organizational level intervention to address psychosocial job stressors, including bullying.

  13. Role of working conditions in the explanation of occupational inequalities in work injury: findings from the national French SUMER survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedhammer, Isabelle; Lesuffleur, Thomas; Labarthe, Géraldine; Chastang, Jean-François

    2018-03-12

    Social inequalities in work injury have been observed but explanations are still missing. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the contribution of working conditions in the explanation of social inequalities in work injury in a national representative sample of employees. The study was based on the cross-sectional sample of the national French survey SUMER 2010 including 46,962 employees, 26,883 men and 20,079 women. The number of work injuries within the last 12 months was studied as the outcome. Occupation was used as a marker of social position. Psychosocial work factors included various variables related to the classical job strain model, psychological demands, decision latitude, social support, and other understudied variables related to reward, job insecurity, job promotion, esteem, working time and hours and workplace violence. Occupational exposures of chemical, biological, physical and biomechanical nature were also studied. Weighted age-adjusted Poisson regression analyses were performed. Occupational gradients were observed in the exposure of most psychosocial work factors and occupational exposures. Strong occupational differences in work injury were found, blue-collar workers being more likely to have work injury. Chemical, biological, physical and biomechanical exposures contributed to explain the occupational differences in work injury substantially. Noise, thermic constraints, manual materials handling, postural/articular constraints and vibrations had significant contributions. Psychosocial work factors also contributed to explain the differences especially among women. Prevention policies oriented toward chemical, biological, physical, biomechanical and psychosocial work exposures may contribute to reduce the magnitude of occupational differences in work injury.

  14. The application of integrated geophysical methods composed of AMT and high-precision ground magnetic survey to the exploration of granite uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Yong; Shen Jingbang; Wu Yong; Wang Zexia

    2014-01-01

    Introduced two methods composed of AMT and high-precision ground magnetic survey were used to the exploration of granite uranium deposits in the Yin gongshan areas middle part of the Nei Monggol. Through experiment of methods and analysis of applicated results, think that AMT have good vertical resolution and could preferably survey thickness of rockmass, position of fracture and deep conditions, space distribution features of fracture zone ect, but it is not clear for rockmass, xenolith of reflection. And high-precision ground magnetic survey could delineate rockmass, xenolith of distribution range and identify the rock contact zone, fracture ect, but it generally measure position and it is not clear for occurrence, extension. That can resolve some geological structures by using the integrated methods and on the basis of sharing their complementary advantages. Effective technological measures are provided to the exploration of deep buried uranium bodies in the granite uranium deposits and outskirt extension of the deposit. (authors)

  15. Geophysical investigations at ORNL solid waste storage area 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothschild, E.R.; Switek, J.; Llopis, J.L.; Farmer, C.D.

    1985-07-01

    Geophysical investigations at ORNL solid waste storage area 3 have been carried out. The investigations included very-low-frequency-electromagnetic resistivity (VLF-EM), electrical resistivity, and seismic refraction surveys. The surveys resulted in the measurement of basic geophysical rock properties, as well as information on the depth of weathering and the configuration of the bedrock surface beneath the study area. Survey results also indicate that a number of geophysical anomalies occur in the shallow subsurface at the site. In particular, a linear feature running across the geologic strike in the western half of the waste disposal facility has been identified. This feature may conduct water in the subsurface. The geophysical investigations are part of an ongoing effort to characterize the site's hydrogeology, and the data presented will be valuable in directing future drilling and investigations at the site. 10 refs., 6 figs

  16. Association among Working Hours, Occupational Stress, and Presenteeism among Wage Workers: Results from the Second Korean Working Conditions Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sung-Hwan; Leem, Jong-Han; Park, Shin-Goo; Heo, Yong-Seok; Lee, Bum-Joon; Moon, So-Hyun; Jung, Dal-Young; Kim, Hwan-Cheol

    2014-03-24

    The purpose of the present study was to identify the association between presenteeism and long working hours, shiftwork, and occupational stress using representative national survey data on Korean workers. We analyzed data from the second Korean Working Conditions Survey (KWCS), which was conducted in 2010, in which a total of 6,220 wage workers were analyzed. The study population included the economically active population aged above 15 years, and living in the Republic of Korea. We used the chi-squared test and multivariate logistic regression to test the statistical association between presenteeism and working hours, shiftwork, and occupational stress. Approximately 19% of the workers experienced presenteeism during the previous 12 months. Women had higher rates of presenteeism than men. We found a statistically significant dose-response relationship between working hours and presenteeism. Shift workers had a slightly higher rate of presenteeism than non-shift workers, but the difference was not statistically significant. Occupational stress, such as high job demand, lack of rewards, and inadequate social support, had a significant association with presenteeism. The present study suggests that long working hours and occupational stress are significantly related to presenteeism.

  17. Association among Working Hours, Occupational Stress, and Presenteeism among Wage Workers: Results from the Second Korean Working Conditions Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the present study was to identify the association between presenteeism and long working hours, shiftwork, and occupational stress using representative national survey data on Korean workers. Methods We analyzed data from the second Korean Working Conditions Survey (KWCS), which was conducted in 2010, in which a total of 6,220 wage workers were analyzed. The study population included the economically active population aged above 15 years, and living in the Republic of Korea. We used the chi-squared test and multivariate logistic regression to test the statistical association between presenteeism and working hours, shiftwork, and occupational stress. Results Approximately 19% of the workers experienced presenteeism during the previous 12 months. Women had higher rates of presenteeism than men. We found a statistically significant dose–response relationship between working hours and presenteeism. Shift workers had a slightly higher rate of presenteeism than non-shift workers, but the difference was not statistically significant. Occupational stress, such as high job demand, lack of rewards, and inadequate social support, had a significant association with presenteeism. Conclusions The present study suggests that long working hours and occupational stress are significantly related to presenteeism. PMID:24661575

  18. Geophysical survey for proposed boreholes, 199-K-109A, 199-K-110A, and 199-K-111A, 100K Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, T.H.

    1995-01-01

    A survey was conducted to locate subsurface obstructions that may affect the drilling of three proposed boreholes in the 100K Area. Drill sites with the least likelihood of encountering obstructions were identified by the method of ground-penetrating radar. These results are presented in this document

  19. Methodological Developments in Geophysical Assimilation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakos, George

    2005-06-01

    This work presents recent methodological developments in geophysical assimilation research. We revisit the meaning of the term "solution" of a mathematical model representing a geophysical system, and we examine its operational formulations. We argue that an assimilation solution based on epistemic cognition (which assumes that the model describes incomplete knowledge about nature and focuses on conceptual mechanisms of scientific thinking) could lead to more realistic representations of the geophysical situation than a conventional ontologic assimilation solution (which assumes that the model describes nature as is and focuses on form manipulations). Conceptually, the two approaches are fundamentally different. Unlike the reasoning structure of conventional assimilation modeling that is based mainly on ad hoc technical schemes, the epistemic cognition approach is based on teleologic criteria and stochastic adaptation principles. In this way some key ideas are introduced that could open new areas of geophysical assimilation to detailed understanding in an integrated manner. A knowledge synthesis framework can provide the rational means for assimilating a variety of knowledge bases (general and site specific) that are relevant to the geophysical system of interest. Epistemic cognition-based assimilation techniques can produce a realistic representation of the geophysical system, provide a rigorous assessment of the uncertainty sources, and generate informative predictions across space-time. The mathematics of epistemic assimilation involves a powerful and versatile spatiotemporal random field theory that imposes no restriction on the shape of the probability distributions or the form of the predictors (non-Gaussian distributions, multiple-point statistics, and nonlinear models are automatically incorporated) and accounts rigorously for the uncertainty features of the geophysical system. In the epistemic cognition context the assimilation concept may be used to

  20. Released geophysical and geological reports : Newfoundland offshore area September 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-09-01

    This two-part publication contains a list of geophysical and geological data acquired by the Canada-Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Board (C-NOPB). It is made available to the public in accordance with a subsection of the Canada-Newfoundland Atlantic Accord Implementation Act which states that such data can be released five years after the date of completion of a program. The programs for which the data has been released are listed in chronological order by completion date. A list of wells drilled within the C-NOPB's jurisdictional area is also included along with a map showing the area of jurisdiction. The well data includes category 1 information from exploratory wells, delineation wells, and development wells. It includes factual data obtained directly from well drilling which must be made available for public examination 2 years after well completion. Category 1 data refers to drill cuttings, well fluid samples, open-hole logs, formation stimulation data, petroleum analyses, drill mud reports, and well site survey information. The interpretive geological and geophysical reports are based on industry data from exploratory programs conducted in the Newfoundland offshore area. They include information from synthetic seismograms, velocity surveys, vertical seismic profiles, petrological reports, geochemical reports, and cyberlook logs. The jurisdictional areas include Western Newfoundland, South Grand Banks, North Grand Banks, the Northeast Newfoundland Shelf, and the Labrador Shelf. Program numbers are coded to contain the geographic region to which the program relates, the type of proposed geophysical or geological work, the company operating the program, and the sequential number of that type of program operated by each company. 8 tabs

  1. Practices to enable the geophysical research spectrum: from fundamentals to applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S.; Cockett, R.; Heagy, L. J.; Oldenburg, D.

    2016-12-01

    In a geophysical survey, a source injects energy into the earth and a response is measured. These physical systems are governed by partial differential equations and their numerical solutions are obtained by discretizing the earth. Geophysical simulations and inversions are tools for understanding physical responses and constructing models of the subsurface given a finite amount of data. SimPEG (http://simpeg.xyz) is our effort to synthesize geophysical forward and inverse methodologies into a consistent framework. The primary focus of our initial development has been on the electromagnetics (EM) package, with recent extensions to magnetotelluric, direct current (DC), and induced polarization. Across these methods, and applied geophysics in general, we require tools to explore and build an understanding of the physics (behaviour of fields, fluxes), and work with data to produce models through reproducible inversions. If we consider DC or EM experiments, with the aim of understanding responses from subsurface conductors, we require resources that provide multiple "entry points" into the geophysical problem. To understand the physical responses and measured data, we must simulate the physical system and visualize electric fields, currents, and charges. Performing an inversion requires that many moving pieces be brought together: simulation, physics, linear algebra, data processing, optimization, etc. Each component must be trusted, accessible to interrogation and manipulation, and readily combined in order to enable investigation into inversion methodologies. To support such research, we not only require "entry points" into the software, but also extensibility to new situations. In our development of SimPEG, we have sought to use leading practices in software development with the aim of supporting and promoting collaborations across a spectrum of geophysical research: from fundamentals to applications. Designing software to enable this spectrum puts unique

  2. Inverse problems of geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanovskaya, T.B.

    2003-07-01

    This report gives an overview and the mathematical formulation of geophysical inverse problems. General principles of statistical estimation are explained. The maximum likelihood and least square fit methods, the Backus-Gilbert method and general approaches for solving inverse problems are discussed. General formulations of linearized inverse problems, singular value decomposition and properties of pseudo-inverse solutions are given

  3. Are parental leaves considered as work interruptions by survey respondents? A methodological note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Le Bourdais

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Parental leaves and family-related work interruptions are linked to a variety of issues, such as children’s well-being or women’s work trajectories. Yet, the measurement of periods of absence from the labour market might be imprecise, especially in retrospective surveys. To evaluate the quality of the collected information, we examine whether women who reported taking a parental leave longer than six months also mentioned a corresponding work interruption, using the 2008 Living in Canada Survey (LCS – Pilot. Our analysis shows that nearly half of women failed to do so. We investigate the sources of the discrepancy and suggest possible avenues of change for future surveys.

  4. Halley's Legacy: The Selfless Genius Who Founded Geophysics, Led the Science Community to Solve the Problem of Finding Longitude at Sea, and Whose Work in Areas from Geomagnetism to Planetology Still Has Meaning For Today's Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, J.

    2005-12-01

    2005 marks the 300th anniversary of Edmond Halley's publication of his infamous synopsis predicting the accurate return of the comet that would come to bear his name. On this occasion, it is time to remember him not only as the founder of geophysics but for his contributions to the world of science beyond his comet work. Halley's comet-transformed by the first triumph of the Newtonian revolution from a dire supernatural omen to a predictable element of the universe's clockwork-remains a recurring symbol of the scientific age of the Enlightenment. His comet is hurtling through space at some 20,000 miles per hour and won't be back until 2061. But it can remind us of past epochs and everlastingly of Halley's contributions to geophysics and the world of science writ large. For a start, Halley completed a series of little known sea voyages in his effort to solve one of his life-long quests: the problem of determining longitude at sea. On the basis of his earlier theories on magnetism, his approach entailed mapping the magnetic deviation across the test-bed of the Atlantic Ocean. In this paper, his findings from the voyages, which technically comprised the first science mission funded by a government and stand as the forerunner of all big science projects, will be reconsidered and put into the context of today's notions about terrestrial magnetism, including the geodynamo. To this day, scientists remain perplexed about exactly how core's dynamo regenerates its energy. When Halley was sailing his vessel, the Paramore, across the North Atlantic and making the first charts of geomagnetism, little did he ever imagine magnetism would underpin today's stunning advances in information technology and electromagnetic engineering. Magnetism also offers ways to study phase transitions, random disorder, and physics in low dimensions, which looks at particle interactions at ever higher energies in order to essentially study matter at smaller and smaller size scales. The presentation

  5. Do spouses coordinate their work exits? A combined survey and register analysis from Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syse, Astri; Solem, Per Erik; Ugreninov, Elisabeth; Mykletun, Reidar; Furunes, Trude

    2014-09-01

    Research on spouses' joint work exits is scarce, although household factors such as spouses' work status, marital quality, and caregiving burdens are likely to affect seniors' work engagement. We therefore examine whether the work exit probability of one spouse affects that of the other. Discrete-time hazard regression analyses of survey data linked to later registry information including all gainfully employed married respondents aged 50-74 with a working spouse (N = 1,764) were used to assess subsequent work exits. A spouse's work exit is a strong predictor of a respondent's work exit (hazard ratio 3.1, 95% confidence interval [2.5, 4.0]). Educational attainment, poor marital quality, and spouses' health and care needs do not predict work exits. Surprisingly, no gender differences are observed. Research on larger survey samples to distinguish different work exit routes and reasons for spouses' joint work exits appears warranted. To account for cultural and welfare state characteristics, cross-national studies ought to be undertaken. © The Author(s) 2013.

  6. GIS of selected geophysical and core data in the northern Gulf of Mexico continental slope collected by the U.S. Geological Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twichell, David C.; Cross, VeeAnn A.; Paskevich, Valerie F.; Hutchinson, Deborah R.; Winters, William J.; Hart, Patrick E.

    2006-01-01

    Since 1982 the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) has collected a large amount of surficial and shallow subsurface geologic information in the deep-water parts of the US EEZ in the northern Gulf of Mexico. These data include digital sidescan sonar imagery, digital seismic-reflection data, and descriptions and analyses of piston and gravity cores. The data were collected during several different projects that addressed surficial and shallow subsurface geologic processes. Some of these datasets have already been published, but the growing interest in the occurrence and distribution of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico warrants integrating these existing USGS datasets and associated interpretations into a Geographic Information System (GIS) to provide regional background information for ongoing and future gas hydrate research. This GIS is organized into five different components that contain (1) information needed to develop an assessment of gas hydrates, (2) background information for the Gulf of Mexico, (3) cores collected by the USGS, (4) seismic surveys conducted by the USGS, and (5) sidescan sonar surveys conducted by the USGS. A brief summary of the goals and findings of the USGS field programs in the Gulf of Mexico is given in the Geologic Findings section, and then the contents of each of the five data categories are described in greater detail in the GIS Data Catalog section.

  7. Site Effect Assessment of the Gros-Morne Hill Area in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Part A: Geophysical-Seismological Survey Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Ulysse

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available After the M = 7.0 Haiti earthquake in 2010, many teams completed seismic risk studies in Port-au-Prince to better understand why this not extraordinarily strong event had induced one of the most severe earthquake disasters in history (at least in the Western World. Most highlighted the low construction quality as the main cause for the disaster, but some also pointed to possible soil and topographic amplification effects, especially in the lower and central parts of Port-au-Prince (e.g., close to the harbor. However, very detailed local studies of such site effects have not been completed yet. A Belgian-Haitian collaboration project was established in order to develop a detailed local seismic hazard study for Gros-Morne hill located in the district of Pétion-Ville, southeast of Port-au-Prince. In order to have a better understanding of the amplification on the Gros-Morne hill, in the southeastern part of Port-au-Prince, site effects were investigated by using near surface geophysical methods. The horizontal to vertical spectral ratio technique was applied to ambient vibrations and earthquake data, and multichannel analysis of surface waves and P-wave refraction tomography calculation were applied to seismic data. Standard spectral ratios were computed for the S-wave windows of the earthquake data recorded by a small temporary seismic network. Electrical resistivity tomography profiles were also performed in order to image the structure of the subsurface and detect the presence of water, if any. The spectral ratio results generally show low to medium (1.5–6 resonance amplitudes at one or several different resonance frequencies (for the same site, between 0.5 and 25 Hz. At most of the investigated sites, the fundamental resonance frequency varies between 7 and 10 Hz. By using the multichannel surface wave analyses of the seismic data, we were able to determine shear wave velocities ranging between 200 and 850 m/s, up to a depth of about 15–20

  8. The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics' Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course: A Hand-On Education Approach to Applied Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M. B.; Goff, J.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Fernandez, R.; Duncan, D.; Saustrup, S.

    2016-12-01

    The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics, Jackson School of Geosciences, offers a 3-week marine geology and geophysics field course. The course provides hands-on instruction and training for graduate and upper-level undergraduate students in high-resolution seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, and sediment sampling and analysis. Students first participate in 3 days of classroom instruction designed to communicate geological context of the field area along with theoretical and technical background on each field method. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of at-sea field work at locations that provide an opportunity to investigate coastal and continental shelf processes. Teams of students rotate between UTIG's 26' R/V Scott Petty and NOAA's 82' R/V Manta. They assist with survey design, instrumentation set up, and learn about acquisition, quality control, and safe instrument deployment. Teams also process data and analyze samples in onshore field labs. During the final week teams integrate, interpret, and visualize data in a final project using industry-standard software. The course concludes with team presentations on their interpretations with academic and industry supporters. Students report a greater understanding of marine geology and geophysics through the course's intensive, hands-on, team approach and high instructor/student ratio (sixteen students, three faculty, and three teaching assistants). Post-class, students may incorporate course data in senior honors or graduate thesis and are encouraged to publish and present results at national meetings. This course (to our knowledge) remains the only one of its kind, satisfies field experience requirements for some degree programs, and provides an alternative to land-based field courses. Alumni note the course's applicability to energy, environmental, and geotechnical industries as well as coastal restoration/management fields.

  9. Evaluation of some Geophysical and Physicochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF HORSFALL

    2018-04-18

    Apr 18, 2018 ... spill point parallel to the pipeline right of way. A research work carried ... of soils has been known to affect soil physio-chemical properties, which in .... The results of the geophysical analysis from the study area are presented ...

  10. Geological and geophysical characterization of the Rio das Velhas greenstone belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo Vieira, Marcelo de; Silva, Sergio Lima da

    1995-01-01

    In order to obtain larger information about the high potentiality of the Greenstone belt Rio das Velhas, it has been, nowadays, the object of various geological research works, among then, the Detailed Geophysical Airborne Survey of the Rio das Velhas Project (DNPM/Mining Companies Partnership) and the Geological Mapping in the scale of 1:25.000 (DNPM/CPRM). Such initiatives have brought, by themselves, valuable contributions for better knowledge of the region. In this context, this study shows a proposal of integration of geological and geophysical data, as much quantitative as qualitative, with the aim at the maximum advantage of the obtained data for the next prospecting and geological mapping works. (author). 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  11. Occupational burnout and work engagement: a national survey of dentists in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, D A; Newton, J T; Bower, E J

    2008-10-11

    To determine the levels of burnout and work engagement among dentists in the United Kingdom.Study design Postal survey of 500 dentists selected at random from the General Dental Council register. Respondents completed a questionnaire pack comprising the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES-17) and the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS), together with questions on demographic characteristics. Approximately 8% of respondents had scores suggestive of burnout on all three scales of the MBI-HSS and a further 18.5% had high scores in two of the domains. Eighty-three percent of respondents had work engagement scores suggestive of moderate or high work engagement. Dentists with postgraduate qualifications and those who work in larger teams had lower burnout scores and more positive work engagement scores. Dentists who spend a greater proportion of their time in NHS practice showed lower work engagement and higher levels of burnout. Burnout affects a small but significant proportion of dental practitioners in the United Kingdom. A larger proportion of practitioners show low work engagement, suggesting a negative attitude to their work. Higher burnout scores and lower work engagement scores were found in dentists without postgraduate qualifications, those in small teams and in those who spend a greater proportion of their time in NHS practice.

  12. Site characterization at the Rabbit Valley Geophysical Performance Evaluation Range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppenjan, S.; Martinez, M.

    1994-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) is developing a Geophysical Performance Evaluation Range (GPER) at Rabbit Valley located 30 miles west of Grand Junction, Colorado. The purpose of the range is to provide a test area for geophysical instruments and survey procedures. Assessment of equipment accuracy and resolution is accomplished through the use of static and dynamic physical models. These models include targets with fixed configurations and targets that can be re-configured to simulate specific specifications. Initial testing (1991) combined with the current tests at the Rabbit Valley GPER will establish baseline data and will provide performance criteria for the development of geophysical technologies and techniques. The US DOE's Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) staff has conducted a Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) survey of the site with its stepped FM-CW GPR. Additionally, STL contracted several other geophysical tests. These include an airborne GPR survey incorporating a ''chirped'' FM-CW GPR system and a magnetic survey with a surfaced-towed magnetometer array unit Ground-based and aerial video and still frame pictures were also acquired. STL compiled and analyzed all of the geophysical maps and created a site characterization database. This paper discusses the results of the multi-sensor geophysical studies performed at Rabbit Valley and the future plans for the site

  13. Is working in culturally diverse working environment associated with physicians' work-related well-being? A cross-sectional survey study among Finnish physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto, Anna-Mari; Heponiemi, Tarja; Väänänen, Ari; Bergbom, Barbara; Sinervo, Timo; Elovainio, Marko

    2014-08-01

    International mobility of health care professionals is increasing, though little is known about how working in a culturally diverse team affects the native physicians' psychosocial work environment. We examined Finnish physicians' perceptions of work-related wellbeing according to whether they had foreign-born colleagues (FBCs) in their work unit. We also examined whether work-related resources moderate the potential association between work-related wellbeing and working alongside FBCs. A cross-sectional survey was conducted for a random sample of physicians in Finland in 2010 (3826 respondents, response rate 55%). Analyses were restricted to native Finnish physicians working in public health care. The results were analyzed by ANCOVA. In unadjusted analyses, having FBCs was related to poor team climate (pwork unit (p=0.007 for interaction between FBCs and procedural justice and pculturally diverse work units face challenges related to team climate and job satisfaction. The results also show that leadership plays an important role in culturally diverse work units. The potential challenges of culturally diverse teams for native physicians may be reduced by fair decision-making and by increasing physicians' job control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Geophysical surveys and velocimetric measures in the Cerreto di Spoleto (Perugia) area, aiming at a seismic microzoning; Indagini geofisiche e misure velocimetriche finalizzate alla microzonazione sismica dell'area di Cerreto di Spoleto (Perugia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bongiovanni, G.; Martino, S.; Paciello, A.; Verrubbi, V. [ENEA, Div. Caratterizzazione dell' Ambiente e del Territorio, Centro Ricerche Csaccia, S. Maria di Galeria, Rome (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    Geophysical prospectings and velocimetric measures, aiming at the seismic microzoning of Cerreto di Spoleto area, are presented. Starting from the data obtained by previous geological-geomechanical surveys, seismic-refraction prospectings were carried on in order to obtain a dynamic characterisation and a geometrical description both of soil and rock materials. The velocimetric measures were performed by temporary free-field arrays, recording both environmental noise and small-magnitude seismic events. The analysis of the obtained records is still in progress, in order to evaluate the local seismic wave amplification. [Italian] Vengono illustrate le indagini geofisiche e le misure velocimetriche condotte nell'area di Cerreto di Spoleto (PG) per la microzonazione sismica. In particolare, sulla base dei dati geologici e geomeccanici precedentemente acquisiti, sono state effettuate indagini di sismica a rifrazione che hanno portato alla caratterizzazione dinamica dei litotipi ed alla definizione delle loro geometrie. Le misure velometriche sono state condotte installando array temporanei in free-field per la registrazione di rumore ambientale ed eventi sismici di piccola magnitudo. E' in corso l'elaborazione delle registrazioni ottenute, finalizzata all'analisi degli effetti di amplificazione sismica locale.

  15. Productive and Reproductive Choices.Report of a Pilot Survey of Urban Working Women in Karachi

    OpenAIRE

    SHAHNAZ KAZI; ZEBA A SATHAR

    1986-01-01

    The primary objective of the survey was to collect information on women's productive and reproductive choices within the broader context of the conditions in their household. Since women bear the main responsibility of domestic work and child care, their employment outside the house is closely interrelated with household decisions pertaining to fertility, division of domestic duties, etc. Hence, to clearly understand the linkages between work status and domestic roles of women, it is necessar...

  16. Geophysical logging of the Harwell boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brightman, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    A comprehensive geophysical borehole logging survey was carried out on each of three deep boreholes drilled at the Harwell research site. KOALA and PETRA computer programs were used to analyse and interpret the logs to obtain continuous quantitative estimates of the geological and hydrogeological properties of the sequences penetrated at the Harwell site. Quantitative estimates of the mineral composition and porosity of the cores samples were made. (UK)

  17. Geophysical methods as a tool for improving our knowledge of ornamental rock deposits and their exploitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espín de Gea, A.; Reyes Urquiza, M.; Gil Abellán, A.

    2017-01-01

    The ornamental rock sector, particularly the investigation of deposits, is not readily given to the incorporation of new technologies. The Marble Technology Center (CTM) has made advances in this sector with the implementation of geophysical techniques able to obtain subsurface information. There are still a few outcrops and active quarries where joint geophysical techniques have been applied sufficiently to obtain a three-dimensional model of the study area. The application of geophysics and more specifically, ground penetrating radar, electrical tomography and seismic refraction, when conducting research of a reservoir or outcrop, is only slightly aggressive to the environment, allowing a real knowledge of the characteristics before beginning the more aggressive work, as is the case when conducting surveys and test pits which can subsequently complement the data obtained. This makes it possible to gain a good idea of the quality of the reservoir thus allowing optimization of resources, both financial and environmental beforehand. Several studies conducted by the CTM illustrate the benefits brought by the application of these geophysical techniques as well as the weaknesses within the characteristics of the extraction sites and ornamental rock outcrops. [es

  18. 1998 survey of cardiac pacing in South Africa report of the working ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1998 survey of cardiac pacing in South Africa report of the working group on registries of the Cardiac Arrhythmia Society of South Africa (CASSA). RN Scott Millar. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals ...

  19. Cooperative Work-Study Programs in Vocational Rehabilitation: Results of a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullis, Michael; Foss, Gilbert

    1983-01-01

    Conducted a national survey of vocational rehabilitation agencies (N=42) to determine the present status of cooperative work study programs serving mentally retarded secondary students. Results documented a decrease both in formal programs and number of students served. (Author/JAC)

  20. Personalized Learning Instructional Staff Survey Results (Spring 2014). Working Paper WR-1062-BMGF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siler-Evans, Kyle; Steiner, Elizabeth D.; Hamilton, Laura S.; Pane, John F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to descriptively summarize instructional staff responses to a survey administered by RAND in 23 personalized learning (PL) schools in Spring 2014. This work was performed at the request of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), as part of a multi-year evaluation contract. The 23 schools were selected from a…

  1. Work health and safety in cotton ginning industry: a survey of practices in australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soomro, N.

    2015-01-01

    This survey focuses on the WH and S (Work Health and Safety) practices in Australia and relates them with those in Pakistan. It also highlights the planned areas of work required on WH and S in cotton ginning industry of Pakistan. This article is one a series of research studies that will inform a broader approach development. The aim of the survey was to design a standardized health and safety Act for cotton ginning industry of Pakistan and to help ginners meet their due industry obligations under the model WH and S Act. The first component of the research study survey was to review the relevant Australian work and safety model as this provides a framework to protect the health, safety and welfare of all employees at work and of other people who might be affected by the job. The second aspect of the research study survey concerned site visits to cotton gins with the support of Australian Centre for Agricultural Health and Safety, Moree, NSW. During these visits the existing ginning process in terms of WH and S were reviewed. Informal interviews were also conducted with Gin Managers and Ginning Experts regarding WH and S in the Australian cotton ginning industry. (author)

  2. Fundamentals of Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohlich, Cliff

    Choosing an intermediate-level geophysics text is always problematic: What should we teach students after they have had introductory courses in geology, math, and physics, but little else? Fundamentals of Geophysics is aimed specifically at these intermediate-level students, and the author's stated approach is to construct a text “using abundant diagrams, a simplified mathematical treatment, and equations in which the student can follow each derivation step-by-step.” Moreover, for Lowrie, the Earth is round, not flat—the “fundamentals of geophysics” here are the essential properties of our Earth the planet, rather than useful techniques for finding oil and minerals. Thus this book is comparable in both level and approach to C. M. R. Fowler's The Solid Earth (Cambridge University Press, 1990).

  3. Geophysical investigations in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, R.L.; Andreasen, G.E.; Gettings, M.E.; El-Kaysi, K.

    1990-01-01

    A number of geophysical investigations have been undertaken in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan to provide data for understanding the tectonic framework, the pattern of seismicity, earthquake hazards and geothermal resources of the country. Both the historical seismic record and the observed recent seismicity point to the dominance of the Dead Sea Rift as the main locus of seismic activity but significant branching trends and gaps in the seismicity pattern are also seen. A wide variety of focal plane solutions are observed emphasizing the complex pattern of fault activity in the vicinity of the rift zone. Geophysical investigations directed towards the geothermal assessment of the prominent thermal springs of Zerga Ma'in and Zara are not supportive of the presence of a crustal magmatic source. ?? 1990.

  4. An integrated program of geophysical survey, coring, and test excavations to study a 4th millennium bc-cal ditch at Alt del Punxó (Muro de L’alcoi, Alacant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Puchol, Otero

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The potentially long and interesting archaeological sequence revealed by systematic survey at the site of Alt Del Punxó (Muro de l’Alcoi, Alacant was the basis for initiating a study of the locality’s subsurface structures using new methods of remote sensing. Geophysical survey (magnetometry and tomography and systematic augering revealed buried structures, including monumental earthworks, and guided subsequent excavations to collect more detailed data about the nature and age of these prehistoric features. The information recovered, including new radiocarbon dates, offers a new perspective on the organization of prehistoric populations in this region of south-central Valencia since the beginning of the Holocene and is especially important for understanding the Neolithic IIB from the 4th through the early 3rd Millennium BC.

    La amplia e interesante secuencia arqueológica sugerida por los materiales de superficie del yacimiento de Alt del Punxó (Muro de l’Alcoi, Alacant ha supuesto el punto de partida para la práctica de una serie de métodos de detección de las estructuras conservadas en el lugar. La prospección geofísica (magnetometría y tomografía, y los microsondeos (augers han dirigido la planificación de la excavación con el fin de obtener nuevos datos a propósito de la naturaleza y cronología del gran foso prehistórico, así como de las diversas estructuras localizadas. La información obtenida, junto a la serie radiocarbónica disponible, abre nuevas perspectivas para el estudio del poblamiento prehistórico al aire libre en las comarcas centro-meridionales valencianas desde los inicios del Holoceno, y de un modo particular en el IV e inicios del III milenio cal AC –Neolítico IIB.

  5. Views of senior UK doctors about working in medicine: questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Trevor W; Smith, Fay; Goldacre, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    We surveyed the UK medical qualifiers of 1993. We asked closed questions about their careers; and invited them to give us comments, if they wished, about any aspect of their work. Our aim in this paper is to report on the topics that this senior cohort of UK-trained doctors who work in UK medicine raised with us. Questionnaire survey. 3479 contactable UK-trained medical graduates of 1993. UK. Comments made by doctors about their work, and their views about medical careers and training in the UK. Postal and email questionnaires. Response rate was 72% (2507); 2252 were working in UK medicine, 816 (36%) of whom provided comments. Positive comments outweighed negative in the areas of their own job satisfaction and satisfaction with their training. However, 23% of doctors who commented expressed dissatisfaction with aspects of junior doctors' training, the impact of working time regulations, and with the requirement for doctors to make earlier career decisions than in the past about their choice of specialty. Some doctors were concerned about government health service policy; others were dissatisfied with the availability of family-friendly/part-time work, and we are concerned about attitudes to gender and work-life balance. Though satisfied with their own training and their current position, many senior doctors felt that changes to working hours and postgraduate training had reduced the level of experience gained by newer graduates. They were also concerned about government policy interventions.

  6. Work-family conflict and employee psychiatric disorders: the National Comorbidity Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frone, M R

    2000-12-01

    This study examined the relation between work-family conflict and several types of psychiatric disorders: mood, anxiety, substance dependence, and substance abuse. Survey data were obtained from a representative national sample of 2,700 employed adults who were either married or the parent of a child 18 years old or younger. Hierarchical logistic regression analyses revealed that both work-to-family and family-to-work conflict were positively related to having a mood, anxiety, and substance dependence disorder. Depending on the type of work-family conflict and type of disorder, employees who reported experiencing work-family conflict often were 1.99-29.66 times more likely than were employees who reported no work-family conflict to experience a clinically significant mental health problem. No support was found for gender differences.

  7. The relationship between hospital work environment and nurse outcomes in Guangdong, China: a nurse questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ke; You, Li-Ming; Chen, Shao-Xian; Hao, Yuan-Tao; Zhu, Xiao-Wen; Zhang, Li-Feng; Aiken, Linda H

    2012-05-01

    This study examines the relationship between hospital work environments and job satisfaction, job-related burnout and intention to leave among nurses in Guangdong province, China. The nursing shortage is an urgent global problem and also of concern in China. Studies in Western countries have shown that better work environments are associated with higher nurse satisfaction and lower burnout, thereby improving retention and lowering turnover rates. However, there is little research on the relationship between nurse work environments and nurse outcomes in China. This is a cross-sectional study. Survey data were collected from 1104 bedside nurses in 89 medical, surgical and intensive care units in 21 hospitals across the Guangdong province in China. Stratified convenience sampling was used to select hospitals, and systematic sampling was used to select units. All staff nurses working on participating units were surveyed. The China Hospital Nurse Survey, including the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index and Maslach Burnout Inventory, was employed to collect data from nurses. Statistical significance level was set at 0·05. Thirty-seven per cent of the nurses experienced high burnout, and 54% were dissatisfied with their jobs. Improving nurses' work environments from poor to better was associated with a 50% decrease in job dissatisfaction and a 33% decrease in job-related burnout among nurses. Burnout and job dissatisfaction are high among hospital nurses in Guangdong province, China. Better work environments for nurses were associated with decreased job dissatisfaction and job-related burnout, which may successfully address the nursing shortage in China. The findings of this study indicate that improving work environments is essential to deal with the nursing shortage; the findings provide motivation for nurse managers and policy makers to improve work environments of hospital nurses in China. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. A Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) Survey of KIilbourne Hole, Southern New Mexico: Implication for Paleohydrology and Near Surface Geophysical Exploration of Mars and the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, N.; Hurtado, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    Features such as the Home Plate plateau on Mars, a suspected remnant of a phreatomagmatic eruption, can reveal important information about paleohydrologic conditions. The types and sizes of pyroclastic rocks produced by a phreatomagmatic eruption are indicative of the behavior of the explosion and the characteristics of the groundwater reservoir. Analysis of the pyroclast size distribution can be used to determine magma volatile content. We conduct an analysis of pyroclast size distribution using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) to make a quantitative estimate of the presence of past groundwater at Kilbourne Hole, a well-known phreatomagmatic crater located in southern Dona Ana County, New Mexico. As basaltic magma intruded the groundwater reservoir in the mid-Pleistocene, the water vaporized and caused a phreatomagmatic explosion that excavated the 2-km wide and 200-m deep depression. The pyroclastic units produced during a phreatomagmatic explosion are proportional to the size and the duration of the explosion and the size of the groundwater reservoir such that the wetter the eruption, the stronger the explosion. In a violent volcanic eruption, magma changes from a liquid into solid fragments and the explosion releases kinetic energy (Ek) by ejecting liquid water, vapor water (with mass Mw) and solid fragments (with mass Mf) at an ejection velocity (Ve). In order to determine Mw, we must know Ve. The relationship between Ve and the distance from center of the eruption (R) is such that Ve exponentially decreases with time (t) and R. A numerical model relating pyroclast size and Ve for material ejected in Hawaiian and Plinian eruptions shows that clast size also exponentially decreases with decreasing Ve. Based on these relationships, we use GPR to map the ejected clast size distribution as a function of distance from the edge of Kilbourne Hole in an effort to determine Ve and Mw. GPR surveys were performed in January 2012 and January 2013 using a Noggins 250 MHz

  9. Prevalence and Work-Relatedness of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in the Working Population, United States, 2010 National Health Interview Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckhaupt, Sara E.; Dahlhamer, James M.; Ward, Brian W.; Sweeney, Marie H.; Sestito, John P.; Calvert, Geoffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patterns of prevalence and work-relatedness of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) among workers offer clues about risk factors and targets for prevention. Methods Data from an occupational health supplement to the 2010 National Health Interview Survey were used to estimate the prevalence of self-reported clinician-diagnosed CTS overall and by demographic characteristics. The proportion of these cases self-reported to have been attributed to work by clinicians was also examined overall and by demographic characteristics. In addition, the distribution of industry and occupation (I&O) categories to which work-related cases of CTS were attributed was compared to the distribution of I&O categories of employment among current/recent workers. Results Data were available for 27,157 adults, including 17,524 current/recent workers. The overall lifetime prevalence of clinician-diagnosed CTS among current/recent workers was 6.7%. The 12-month prevalence was 3.1%, representing approximately 4.8 million workers with current CTS; 67.1% of these cases were attributed to work by clinicians, with overrepresentation of certain I&O categories. Conclusions CTS affected almost 5 million U.S. workers in 2010, with prevalence varying by demographic characteristics and I&O. PMID:22495886

  10. Risk and resilience: health inequalities, working conditions and sickness benefit arrangements: an analysis of the 2010 European Working Conditions survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wel, Kjetil A; Bambra, Clare; Dragano, Nico; Eikemo, Terje A; Lunau, Thorsten

    2015-11-01

    In this article we ask whether the level of sickness benefit provision protects the health of employees, particularly those who are most exposed to hazardous working conditions or who have a little education. The study uses the European Working Condition Survey that includes information on 20,626 individuals from 28 countries. Health was measured by self-reported mental wellbeing and self-rated general health. Country-level sickness benefit provision was constructed using spending data from Eurostat. Group-specific associations were fitted using cross-level interaction terms between sickness benefit provision and physical and psychosocial working conditions respectively, as well as those with little education. The mental wellbeing of employees exposed to psychosocial job strain and physical hazards, or who had little education, was better in countries that offer more generous sickness benefit. These results were found in both men and women and were robust to the inclusion of GDP and country fixed effects. In the analyses of self-reported general health, few group-specific associations were found. This article concludes that generous sickness benefit provision may strengthen employee's resilience against mental health risks at work and risks associated with little education. Consequently, in countries with a generous provision of sickness benefit, social inequalities in mental health are smaller. © 2015 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  11. Attitudes towards disability management: A survey of employees returning to work and their supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Jason W; Dolinschi, Roman; Clarke, Andrew; Scott, Liz; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Amick, Benjamin C; Rivilis, Irina; Cole, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Return to work after a leave on disability is a common phenomenon, but little is known about the attitudes of employees or their supervisors towards the disability management process. We report on employee and supervisor feedback from one disability management experience. 389 consecutive employees from the Ontario offices of a single private Canadian insurance company returning to work from short-term disability, and their supervisors. We surveyed employees and their supervisors about their experience with, and attitudes towards, the disability management process. Of those surveyed, 88 employees and 75 supervisors provided data (response rates of 22.6% and 19.3% respectively). The majority of respondents (79.1% of employees and supervisors) endorsed positive attitudes towards their disability management experience. More than 25% of employees disagreed with the following three items: case managers contributed to recovery, case managers removed barriers to recovery, and sufficient support was provided in the return to work process. More than 25% of employees and managers reported that a commitment to modify an unhelpful work situation was not followed through. The majority of participating employees returning to work from short-term disability, and their supervisors, reported a high level of satisfaction with the disability management process. Areas that may benefit from attention include some aspects of case manager-employee interaction and ensuring that support during the return to work process is provided, including modification to work situations when appropriate.

  12. Psychosocial work factors and sleep problems: findings from the French national SIP survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazelle, Emilie; Chastang, Jean-François; Niedhammer, Isabelle

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed at exploring the cross-sectional and prospective associations between psychosocial work factors and sleep problems. The study population consisted of a national representative sample of the French working population (SIP survey). The sample sizes were 7506 and 3555 for the cross-sectional and prospective analyses. Sleep problems were defined by either sleep disturbances or insufficient sleep duration at least several times a week. Psychosocial work factors included classical (job strain model factors) and emergent factors (recognition, insecurity, role/ethical conflict, emotional demands, work-life imbalance, etc.). Occupational factors related to working time/hours and physical work environment were also included as well as covariates related to factors outside work. Statistical analyses were performed using weighted Poisson regression analysis. In the cross-sectional analyses, psychological demands, low social support, low recognition, emotional demands, perception of danger, work-life imbalance and night work were found to be associated with sleep problems. In the prospective analyses, psychological demands and night work were predictive of sleep problems. Using a less conservative method, more factors were found to be associated with sleep problems. Dose-response associations were observed, showing that the more frequent the exposure to these factors, the higher the risk of sleep problems. No effect of repeated exposure was found on sleep problems. Classical and emergent psychosocial work factors were associated with sleep problems. More prospective studies and prevention policies may be needed.

  13. Questionnaire survey of working relationships between nurses and doctors in University Teaching Hospitals in Southern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebamowo Clement A

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smooth working relationships between nurses and doctors are necessary for efficient health care delivery. However, previous studies have shown that this is often absent with negative impact on the quality of health care delivery. In 2002, we studied factors that affect nurse-doctor working relationships in University Teaching Hospitals (UTH in Southern Nigeria in order to characterize it and identify managerial and training needs that might be used to improve it. Method Questionnaire survey of doctors and nurses working in four UTH in Southern Nigeria was done in 2002. The setting and subjects were selected by random sampling procedures. Information on factors in domains of work, union activities, personnel and hospital management were studied using closed and open-ended questionnaires. Results Nurse-doctor working relationships were statistically significantly affected by poor after-work social interaction, staff shortages, activist unionism, disregard for one's profession, and hospital management and government policies. In general, nurses had better opinion of doctors' work than doctors had about nurses' work. Conclusion Working relationships between doctors and nurses need to be improved through improved training and better working conditions, creation of better working environment, use of alternative methods of conflict resolution and balanced hospital management and government policies. This will improve the retention of staff, job satisfaction and efficiency of health care delivery in Nigeria.

  14. Borderline personality symptoms and work performance: a population-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juurlink, Trees T; Ten Have, Margreet; Lamers, Femke; van Marle, Hein J F; Anema, Johannes R; de Graaf, Ron; Beekman, Aartjan T F

    2018-06-19

    This study aims to elucidate the interplay between borderline personality symptoms and working conditions as a pathway for impaired work performance among workers in the general population. Cross-sectional data from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study-2 (NEMESIS-2) were used, including 3672 workers. Borderline personality symptoms were measured with the International Personality Disorder Examination (IPDE) questionnaire. Working conditions (decision latitude, psychological job demands, job security and co-worker support) were assessed with the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ). Impaired work performance was assessed as total work loss days per month, defined as the sum of days of three types of impaired work performance (inability to work, cut-down to work, and diminished quality at work). These were assessed with the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule (WHO-DAS). Common mental disorders (CMD) were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Number of borderline personality symptoms was consistently associated with impaired work performance, even after controlling for type or number of adverse working conditions and co-occurrence of CMD. Borderline personality symptoms were associated with low decision latitude, job insecurity and low co-worker support. The relationship between borderline personality symptoms and work performance diminished slightly after controlling for type or number of working conditions. The current study shows that having borderline personality symptoms is a unique determinant of work performance. This association seems partially explained through the impact of borderline personality symptoms on working conditions. Future studies are warranted to study causality and should aim at diminishing borderline personality symptoms and coping with working conditions.

  15. Geophysical investigation, Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    Geophysical surveys were conducted in 1992 and 1993 on 21 sites at the Salmon Site (SS) located in Lamar County, Mississippi. The studies are part of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) being conducted by IT Corporation for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). During the 1960s, two nuclear devices and two chemical tests were detonated 826 meters (in) (2710 feet [ft]) below the ground surface in the salt dome underlying the SS. These tests were part of the Vela Uniform Program conducted to improve the United States capability to detect, identify, and locate underground nuclear detonations. The RI/FS is being conducted to determine if any contamination is migrating from the underground shot cavity in the salt dome and if there is any residual contamination in the near surface mud and debris disposal pits used during the testing activities. The objective of the surface geophysical surveys was to locate buried debris, disposal pits, and abandoned mud pits that may be present at the site. This information will then be used to identify the locations for test pits, cone penetrometer tests, and drill hole/monitor well installation. The disposal pits were used during the operation of the test site in the 1960s. Vertical magnetic gradient (magnetic gradient), electromagnetic (EM) conductivity, and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys were used to accomplish these objectives. A description of the equipment used and a theoretical discussion of the geophysical methods are presented Appendix A. Because of the large number of figures relative to the number of pages of text, the geophysical grid-location maps, the contour maps of the magnetic-gradient data, the contour maps of the EM conductivity data, and the GPR traverse location maps are located in Appendix B, Tabs I through 22. In addition, selected GPR records are located in Appendix C

  16. How many hours do you usually work? An analysis of the working hours questions in 26 large-scale surveys in 6 countries and the European Union.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dragstra, A.; Tijdens, K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews how working hours are asked in 26 large-scale surveys in 6 countries plus the European Union. Four dimensions of working time were investigated, notably number of working hours, timing of work, predictability and control over hours, and commuting time. Although almost all

  17. How many hours do you usually work? An analysis of the working hours questions in 26 large-scale surveys in six countries and the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijdens, K.; Dragstra, A.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews how working hours are asked for in 26 large-scale surveys in six countries plus the European Union. Four dimensions of working time were investigated, notably number of working hours, timing of work, predictability and control over hours, and commuting time. Although almost all

  18. Staff - Kenneth R. Papp | Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surveys Home About Us Director's Office Alaska Statutes Annual Reports Employment Staff Directory and Facilities Staff Seismic and Well Data Data Reports Contact Us Frequently Asked Questions Ask a Facebook DGGS News Natural Resources Geological & Geophysical Surveys Staff - Kenneth R. Papp main

  19. Personality and professional commitment of students in nursing, social work, and teaching: A comparative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesje, Kjersti

    2016-01-01

    Nurses are often portrayed as possessing specific traits and dispositions associated with care and empathy. The assumption has been that possessing these traits makes nurses competent, engaged, and well suited to their job. This proposition has been mostly normative, and few studies have investigated how this plays out empirically. The aims of this study were to investigate (a) whether possessing a personality trait related to empathy and care was more common among nursing students than students in teaching and social work programs and (b) whether nursing students possessing an affirming personality trait judged themselves to be more suited to their future work - understood as commitment to the profession - than students in teaching and social work. A cross-sectional survey design was used. All first-year students attending seven Norwegian universities and university colleges were invited to participate in the study. Of the 1675 students who participated in the survey, 527 were nursing students, 668 were students in teaching, and 480 were social work students. A response rate of 65 percent was achieved. The survey was conducted by Oslo and Akershus University College in the autumn of 2012. Data collection methods included both a paper-and-pencil questionnaire and an online survey. Instruments used included Blau's Career Commitment Scale and Orlinsky and Rønnestad's Interpersonal Adjective Scale. Analysis of variance and regression analysis were performed on the data. Nursing students did not differ from students in teaching and social work programs in terms of the degree of affirming personality trait. Furthermore, the regression analysis revealed an equally strong association between having an affirming personality trait and being committed to the profession among all these student groups. The results of this study indicate that the narrative of nursing students as individuals who possess a special personality characteristic does not entirely reflect reality

  20. Working with childhood sexual abuse: a survey of mental health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Andrew; Thurlow, Katie; Woolliscroft, Jessica

    2003-02-01

    This study aimed to establish the views of a group of mental health professionals from various disciplines working in mental health service in a British hospital about the needs of clients who had experienced childhood sexual abuse. Staff members were asked to complete an anonymous survey which asked questions relating to knowledge of sexual abuse and its effects, and the needs of clients and staff in working with this client group. A total of 54 people responded to the survey, 42 were female, 11 male. Most (72%) reported having over 10 years experience working in mental health, working in both in-patient and out-patient settings. While respondents were reasonably knowledgeable about childhood sexual abuse, they were not very comfortable, competent or supported in their work with this client group. There were no differences in responses according to the age or gender of respondents, but less experienced staff were more likely to feel supported. Those that had received training and/or supervision felt significantly more capable in working with this client group. The study offers some support for the development of specialist training, consultancy and supervision programs for mental health staff in the area of child sexual abuse.

  1. Work-time sun behaviours among Canadian outdoor workers: results from the 2006 National Sun Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrett, Loraine D; Pichora, Erin C; Costa, Michelle L

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to describe summer work-related sun behaviours among Canadian outdoor workers. Information on time in the sun and sun protection practices at work during the summer of 2006 were collected from 1,337 outdoor workers aged 16-64 years as part of the Second National Sun Survey. Proportions (and 95% confidence intervals) were estimated using procedures appropriate for complex survey designs. Twenty-six percent of all Canadians, 39% of males and 33% of those aged 16-24 years work outdoors during the summer. Although 41% spend four or more hours daily in the sun at work, just over half always or often protect themselves by covering their heads (58%), wearing protective clothing (56%) or wearing sunglasses (54%), and only 29% use sunscreen. Males and those aged 16-24 spend the most work time in the sun but are the least likely to use protection. The prevalence of outdoor work and sun behaviours varies among regions. Study findings confirm the need for strategies to reduce time in the sun and increase the use of sun protection among outdoor workers. In order to be effective, these strategies must include both enhanced workplace policies and practice, and increased individual use of sun protection.

  2. A social survey on the noise impact in open-plan working environments in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mei; Kang, Jian; Jiao, Fenglei

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to reveal noise impact in open-plan working environments in China, through a series of questionnaire surveys and acoustic measurements in typical open-plan working environments. It has been found that compared to other physical environmental factors in open-plan working environments, people are much less satisfied with the acoustic environment. The noise impact in the surveyed working environments is rather significant, in terms of sound level inside the office, understanding of colleagues' conversation, and the use of background music such as music players. About 30-50% of the interviewees think that various noise sources inside and outside offices are 'very disturbing' and 'disturbing', and the most annoying sounds include noises from outside, ventilation systems, office equipment, and keyboard typing. Using higher panels to separate work space, or working in enclosed offices, are regarded as effective improvement measures, whereas introducing natural sounds to mask unwanted sounds seems to be not preferable. There are significant correlations between the evaluation of acoustic environment and office symptoms, including hypersensitivity to loud sounds, easily getting tired and depression. There are also significant correlations between evaluation of various acoustics-related factors and certain statements relating to job satisfaction, including sensitivity to noise, as well as whether conversations could be heard by colleagues. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. How many hours do you usually work? An analysis of the working hours questions in 26 large-scale surveys in six countries and the European Union

    OpenAIRE

    Tijdens, K.; Dragstra, A.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews how working hours are asked for in 26 large-scale surveys in six countries plus the European Union. Four dimensions of working time were investigated, notably number of working hours, timing of work, predictability and control over hours, and commuting time. Although almost all questionnaires ask for hours worked, the terminology varies greatly. In only half of the cases a reference period is taken into account and in half the reasons for working more/less in the survey w...

  4. How many hours do you usually work? An analysis of the working hours questions in 26 large-scale surveys in 6 countries and the European Union.

    OpenAIRE

    Dragstra, A.; Tijdens, K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews how working hours are asked in 26 large-scale surveys in 6 countries plus the European Union. Four dimensions of working time were investigated, notably number of working hours, timing of work, predictability and control over hours, and commuting time. Although almost all questionnaires ask for hours worked, the terminology varies largely. In only half of the cases a reference period is taken into account and in half the reasons for working more/less in the survey week than...

  5. Geophysical Signitures From Hydrocarbon Contaminated Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M.; Jardani, A.

    2015-12-01

    The task of delineating the contamination plumes as well as studying their impact on the soil and groundwater biogeochemical properties is needed to support the remediation efforts and plans. Geophysical methods including electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), induced polarization (IP), ground penetrating radar (GPR), and self-potential (SP) have been previously used to characterize contaminant plumes and investigate their impact on soil and groundwater properties (Atekwana et al., 2002, 2004; Benson et al., 1997; Campbell et al., 1996; Cassidy et al., 2001; Revil et al., 2003; Werkema et al., 2000). Our objective was to: estimate the hydrocarbon contamination extent in a contaminated site in northern France, and to adverse the effects of the oil spill on the groundwater properties. We aim to find a good combination of non-intrusive and low cost methods which we can use to follow the bio-remediation process, which is planned to proceed next year. We used four geophysical methods including electrical resistivity tomography, IP, GPR, and SP. The geophysical data was compared to geochemical ones obtained from 30 boreholes installed in the site during the geophysical surveys. Our results have shown: low electrical resistivity values; high chargeability values; negative SP anomalies; and attenuated GPR reflections coincident with groundwater contamination. Laboratory and field geochemical measurements have demonstrated increased groundwater electrical conductivity and increased microbial activity associated with hydrocarbon contamination of groundwater. Our study results support the conductive model suggested by studies such as Sauck (2000) and Atekwana et al., (2004), who suggest that biological alterations of hydrocarbon contamination can substantially modify the chemical and physical properties of the subsurface, producing a dramatic shift in the geo-electrical signature from resistive to conductive. The next stage of the research will include time lapse borehole

  6. Working time of neurosurgical residents in Europe--results of a multinational survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stienen, Martin N; Netuka, David; Demetriades, Andreas K; Ringel, Florian; Gautschi, Oliver P; Gempt, Jens; Kuhlen, Dominique; Schaller, Karl

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of the European Working Time directive 2003/88/EC has led to a reduction of the working hours with distinct impact on the clinical and surgical activity of neurosurgical residents in training. A survey was performed among European neurosurgical residents between 06/2014 and 03/2015. Multiple logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between responder-specific variables (e.g., age, gender, country, postgraduate year (PGY)) and outcome (e.g., working time). A total of 652 responses were collected, of which n = 532 responses were taken into consideration. In total, 17.5, 22.1, 29.5, 19.5, 5.9, and 5.5 % of European residents indicated to work 80 h/week, respectively. Residents from France and Turkey (OR 4.72, 95 % CI 1.29-17.17, p = 0.019) and Germany (OR 2.06, 95 % CI 1.15-3.67, p = 0.014) were more likely to work >60 h/week than residents from other European countries. In total, 29 % of European residents were satisfied with their current working time, 11.3 % indicated to prefer reduced working time. More than half (55 %) would prefer to work more hours/week if this would improve their clinical education. Residents that rated their operative exposure as insufficient were 2.3 times as likely as others to be willing to work more hours (OR 2.32, 95 % CI 1.47-3.70, p 50 % of his/her working time in the operating room. By contrast, 77.4 % indicate to devote >25 % of their daily working time to administrative work. For every advanced PGY, the likelihood to spend >50 % of the working time in the OR increases by 19 % (OR 1.19, 95 % CI 1.02-1.40, p = 0.024) and the likelihood to spend >50 % of the working time with administrative work decreases by 18 % (OR 0.84, 95 % CI 0.76-0.94, p = 0.002). The results of this survey on >500 European neurosurgical residents clearly prove that less than 40 % conform with the 48-h week as claimed by the WTD2003/88/EC. Still, more than half of them would chose to work

  7. Training, Research, and Working Conditions for Urology Residents in Germany: A Contemporary Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgmann, Hendrik; Arnold, Hannah K; Meyer, Christian P; Bründl, Johannes; König, Justus; Nestler, Tim; Ruf, Christian; Struck, Julian; Salem, Johannes

    2016-12-16

    Excellent uniform training of urology residents is crucial to secure both high-quality patient care and the future of our specialty. Residency training has come under scrutiny following the demands of subspecialized care, economical aspects, and working hour regulations. To comprehensively assess the surgical training, research opportunities, and working conditions among urology residents in Germany. We sent a 29-item online survey via email to 721 members of the German Society of Residents in Urology. Descriptive analyses were conducted to describe the surveys' four domains: (1) baseline characteristics, (2) surgical training (cumulative completed case volume for all minor-, medium-, and major-complexity surgeries), (3) research opportunities, and (4) working conditions. Four hundred and seventy-two residents completed the online survey (response rate 65%). Surgical training: the median number of cumulative completed cases for postgraduate yr (PGY)-5 residents was 113 (interquartile range: 76-178). Minor surgeries comprised 57% of all surgeries and were performed by residents in all PGYs. Medium-complexity surgeries comprised 39% of all surgeries and were mostly performed by residents in PGYs 2-5. Major surgeries comprised 4% of all surgeries and were occasionally performed by residents in PGYs 3-5. Research opportunities: some 44% have attained a medical thesis (Dr. med.), and 39% are currently pursuing research. Working conditions: psychosocial work-related stress was high and for 82% of residents their effort exceeded their rewards. Some 44% were satisfied, 32% were undecided, and 24% were dissatisfied with their current working situation. Limitations include self-reported survey answers and a lack of validated assessment tools. Surgical exposure among German urology residents is low and comprises minor and medium-complex surgeries. Psychosocial work-related stress is high for the vast majority of residents indicating the need for structural improvements in

  8. Mobbing, stress, and work ability index among physicians in Bosnia and Herzegovina: survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranjić, Nurka; Males-Bilić, Ljiljana; Beganlić, Azijada; Mustajbegović, Jadranka

    2006-10-01

    To assess the frequency of reported mobbing and the association among mobbing, working environment factors, stress, health outcome, personality type, and work ability index in a sample of physicians in Bosnia and Herzegovina. We conducted a questionnaire survey using a validated self-reported questionnaire among 511 physicians in national health sector of Bosnia and Herzegovina. The questions covered five major categories of mobbing behavior. Characteristics of the work, perceived work environment and its effects, stress, health, and satisfaction with work and life were assessed by the standardized abridged form of Occupational Stress Questionnaire (OSQ). A standardized questionnaire Work Ability Index (WAI) was used to determine the relation between mobbing and work ability. Of 511 surveyed physicians, 387 (76%) physicians self-reported mobbing behavior in the working environment and 136 (26%) was exposed to persistent mobbing. More than a half of the physicians experienced threats to their professional status and almost a half felt isolated. Logistic regression analysis showed that lack of motivation, loss of self-esteem, loss of confidence, fatigue, and depressiveness were significantly associated with lack of support from colleagues. Intention to leave work was associated with lack of support from colleagues (OR 2.3, 95% CI, 1.065-3.535; t =4.296, P =0.003) and lack of support from superiors (OR 1.526, 95% CI, 0.976-2.076; t =5.753; P =0.001). Isolation or exclusion and threats to professional status were predictors for mental health symptoms. Persistent mobbing experience was a significant predictor for sick leave. Exposure to persistent threat to professional status and isolation or exclusion as forms of mobbing are associated with mental health disturbances and lack of self-esteem and confidence. Setting up a system of support for physicians exposed to mobbing may have important benefits.

  9. Psychosocial work factors and first depressive episode: retrospective results from the French national SIP survey

    OpenAIRE

    Niedhammer , Isabelle; Chastang , Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Objectives : The objective was to explore the associations between psychosocial work factors and first depressive episode. Additional objectives included the study of the frequency and duration of exposure, and the evaluation of the induction period between exposures and outcome and of the reversibility of the effects.Methods : The study was based on a sample of 13,648 men and women from the 2006 national representative French SIP survey. Retrospective evaluation was p...

  10. Cochrane Rehabilitation Methodology Committee: an international survey of priorities for future work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levack, William M; Meyer, Thorsten; Negrini, Stefano; Malmivaara, Antti

    2017-10-01

    Cochrane Rehabilitation aims to improve the application of evidence-based practice in rehabilitation. It also aims to support Cochrane in the production of reliable, clinically meaningful syntheses of evidence related to the practice of rehabilitation, while accommodating the many methodological challenges facing the field. To this end, Cochrane Rehabilitation established a Methodology Committee to examine, explore and find solutions for the methodological challenges related to evidence synthesis and knowledge translation in rehabilitation. We conducted an international online survey via Cochrane Rehabilitation networks to canvass opinions regarding the future work priorities for this committee and to seek information on people's current capabilities to assist with this work. The survey findings indicated strongest interest in work on how reviewers have interpreted and applied Cochrane methods in reviews on rehabilitation topics in the past, and on gathering a collection of existing publications on review methods for undertaking systematic reviews relevant to rehabilitation. Many people are already interested in contributing to the work of the Methodology Committee and there is a large amount of expertise for this work in the extended Cochrane Rehabilitation network already.

  11. SURVEYS ON THE EXPECTATIONS AND ALTERNATIVES FOR THE FUTURE OF THE EXECUTIVE WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Degani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Many cultural and behavioral changes have occurred in society in recent years, but with little consequence in the corporate labor relations. Despite the great technological evolution, we work mostly in the same way as a century ago. This study conducts surveys about the expectations and alternatives for the future of executive work and aims to assess the benefits and prerequisites for the adoption of differentiated working relationships to reconcile the interests of professionals, organizations and society. The methods used were a quantitative survey with executives and in-depth interviews with experts. The main conclusions were that the executive work will undergo profound changes in the near future, being the main difference the flexibility of times and places to work, creating greater autonomy and demanding from professionals and companies a new level of motivation, discipline, communication skills where there is no physical presence, clarity of purpose and values. This transformation will be gradual and the companies that come forward in the adoption of processes and competences that support differentiated relationships will gain competitive advantage.

  12. Geophysical data fusion for subsurface imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoekstra, P.; Vandergraft, J.; Blohm, M.; Porter, D.

    1993-08-01

    A geophysical data fusion methodology is under development to combine data from complementary geophysical sensors and incorporate geophysical understanding to obtain three dimensional images of the subsurface. The research reported here is the first phase of a three phase project. The project focuses on the characterization of thin clay lenses (aquitards) in a highly stratified sand and clay coastal geology to depths of up to 300 feet. The sensor suite used in this work includes time-domain electromagnetic induction (TDEM) and near surface seismic techniques. During this first phase of the project, enhancements to the acquisition and processing of TDEM data were studied, by use of simulated data, to assess improvements for the detection of thin clay layers. Secondly, studies were made of the use of compressional wave and shear wave seismic reflection data by using state-of-the-art high frequency vibrator technology. Finally, a newly developed processing technique, called ''data fusion,'' was implemented to process the geophysical data, and to incorporate a mathematical model of the subsurface strata. Examples are given of the results when applied to real seismic data collected at Hanford, WA, and for simulated data based on the geology of the Savannah River Site

  13. Airborne geophysics in Australia: the government contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denham, D.

    1997-01-01

    Airborne geophysical data sets provide important cost-effective information for resource exploration and land management. Improved techniques, developed recently, now enable high-resolution aeromagnetic and gamma-ray surveys to be used extensively by the resource industries to improve the cost effectiveness of exploration and by governments to encourage resource development and sustainable management of natural resources. Although airborne geophysical techniques have been used extensively and are now used almost routinely by mineral explorers, it is only in the last few years that governments have been involved as major players in the acquisition of data. The exploration industry pioneered the imaging of high-resolution airborne geophysical data sets in the early 1980s and, at the same time, the Northern Territory Government started a modest program of flying the Northern Territory, at 500 m flight-line spacing, to attract mineral exploration. After the start of the National Geoscience Mapping Accord in 1990, the then BMR and its State/Territory counterparts used the new high-resolution data as an essential ingredient to underpin mapping programs. These new data sets proved so valuable that, starting in 1992/93, the annual expenditure by the Commonwealth and States/Northern Territory increased from roughly $2 million per year to a massive $10 million per year. These investments by governments, although unlikely to be permanently sustainable, have been made to encourage and expand exploration activity by providing new high-quality data sets in industry at very low cost. There are now approximately 11 million line-km of airborne geophysical data available in databases held by the Commonwealth, States and Northern Territory. The results so far have seen a significant increase in exploration activity in States that have embarked on this course (e.g. South Australia and Victoria), and the information provided from these surveys is proving crucial to understanding the

  14. Geophysical fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pedlosky, Joseph

    1982-01-01

    The content of this book is based, largely, on the core curriculum in geophys­ ical fluid dynamics which land my colleagues in the Department of Geophysical Sciences at The University of Chicago have taught for the past decade. Our purpose in developing a core curriculum was to provide to advanced undergraduates and entering graduate students a coherent and systematic introduction to the theory of geophysical fluid dynamics. The curriculum and the outline of this book were devised to form a sequence of courses of roughly one and a half academic years (five academic quarters) in length. The goal of the sequence is to help the student rapidly advance to the point where independent study and research are practical expectations. It quickly became apparent that several topics (e. g. , some aspects of potential theory) usually thought of as forming the foundations of a fluid-dynamics curriculum were merely classical rather than essential and could be, however sadly, dispensed with for our purposes. At the same tim...

  15. Geophysical fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pedlosky, Joseph

    1979-01-01

    The content of this book is based, largely, on the core curriculum in geophys­ ical fluid dynamics which I and my colleagues in the Department of Geophysical Sciences at The University of Chicago have taught for the past decade. Our purpose in developing a core curriculum was to provide to advanced undergraduates and entering graduate students a coherent and systematic introduction to the theory of geophysical fluid dynamics. The curriculum and the outline of this book were devised to form a sequence of courses of roughly one and a half academic years (five academic quarters) in length. The goal of the sequence is to help the student rapidly advance to the point where independent study and research are practical expectations. It quickly became apparent that several topics (e. g. , some aspects of potential theory) usually thought of as forming the foundations of a fluid-dynamics curriculum were merely classical rather than essential and could be, however sadly, dispensed with for our purposes. At the same ti...

  16. At Work..., and Poor? A Look at the Czech Working Poor Population in the Living Conditions Survey (EU-SILC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarka Sustova

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the article is to analyse the working poor employees and their household's social situation in the national income and living conditions survey (EU-SILC. The analysis starts with the definition of the two main groups of employees according to the number of months spent in the full-time employment - those working whole year and those employed for 6 to 11 months. Poverty in earned income concept is used to evaluate poverty at individual level, confronting employee's income with single person household poverty line benchmark. The study then moves to the household level poverty measure based on household's disposable equivalised income. When shifting from the individual income to the household's one the economies of scale represented by an implicit or explicit equivalence scale used in the construction of the household poverty measure play a crucial role. Therefore, attention is paid to the comparison of poverty level based on equivalised disposable income using equivalence scales and per-capita income. At the end, material deprivation of different subgroups of employees according to their poverty status is examined.

  17. Measuring excessive hours of work, low hourly pay, and informal employment through a labour force survey a pilot survey in the Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    Mehran, Farhad

    2005-01-01

    Using 2004 data of the Philippines' labour force survey, evaluates the hours of work at all jobs, hourly pay among time-rated wage and salary workers, informal employment etc., with the aim to quantify a decent-work situation (i.e. acceptable productive employment, social protection, social dialogue, and rights at work).

  18. Shift work, night work and sleep disorders among pastry cookers and shopkeepers in France: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Emilie; Gillet, Pascal; Sauvet, Fabien; Gomez-Merino, Danielle; Thaon, Isabelle; Chennaoui, Mounir; Leger, Damien

    2018-05-09

    Most research on night and shift work focuses on employee health in large companies, primarily in the healthcare and transportation sectors. However, many night workers work on their own or in small businesses related to services or food. This survey focuses on sleep habits and disorders concerning night work in pastry production and sales. An epidemiological telephone cross-sectional survey of night shift workers and their sleep habits was proposed to all employers and employees in the French pastry industry via their insurance health prevention company. Sleep logs allow us to estimate the total sleep time (TST) on workdays and enquire on napping episodes and length. In order to estimate the ideal TST, we added a question on the ideal amount of sleep the subjects need to be in good shape in the morning. We also define sleep debt as the difference between the ideal TST and TST on workdays, and considered a sleep debt when the difference was above 60 min and severe sleep debt above 90 min. Finally we retained subjects as long sleepers for those with a TSTof more than 7 hours and short sleepers when TST was under 5 hours. Insomnia, sleepiness and sleep apnoea have been defined based on the International Classification of Sleep Disorders-Third Edition and the classification of mental disorders (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition). Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models were applied to investigate the association with short TST, long TST, sleep debt and napping. We analysed 2622 complete questionnaires from 1313 men and 1309 women aged 22-50 years old. 1397 workers began work before 07:00, whereas 1225 began later. The 24-hour TST was 6.7±1.4 hours, whereas the ideal TST was 7.0±1.2 hours. Severe sleep debt (>90 min) was reported by 6% women versus 5% men, whereas moderate sleep debt (>60 min) was reported by 11.5% women versus 9.3% men. Napping is one way to improve 24-hour TST for 58% of pastry

  19. Working after a tornado: a survey of hospital personnel in Joplin, Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charney, Rachel; Rebmann, Terri; Flood, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, an EF5 tornado hit Joplin, MO, requiring complete evacuation of 1 hospital and a patient surge to another. We sought to assess the resilience of healthcare workers in these hospitals as measured by number reporting to work, willingness to work, personal disaster preparedness, and childcare responsibilities following the disaster. In May 2013, a survey was distributed to healthcare workers at both Joplin hospitals that asked them to report their willingness to work and personal disaster preparedness following various disaster scenarios. For those with childcare responsibilities, scheduling, costs, and impact of hypothetical alternative childcare programs were considered in the analyses. A total of 1,234 healthcare workers completed the survey (response rate: 23.4%). Most (87.8%) worked the week following the Joplin tornado. Healthcare workers report more willingness to work during a future earthquake or tornado compared to their pre-Joplin tornado attitudes (86.2 vs 88.4%, t=-4.3, ptornado personal disaster preparedness, but only preevent preparedness was a significant predictor of postevent preparedness. Nearly half (48.5%, n=598) had childcare responsibilities; 61% (n=366) had childcare needs the week of the tornado, and 54% (n=198) required the use of alternative childcare. If their hospital had provided alternative childcare, 51% would have used it and 42% felt they would have been more willing to report to work. Most healthcare workers reported to work following this disaster, demonstrating true resilience. Disaster planners should be aware of these perceptions as they formulate their own emergency operation plans.

  20. Application of the geophysical and geochemical methods to the research for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangloff, A.M.; Collin, C.R.; Grimbert, A.; Sanselme, H.

    1958-01-01

    Since 1954, at the Commissariat a l'energie atomique, geophysics and geochemistry have been added to routine geological surveying and radiometric observations. Geophysical prospecting reveals the tectonic structures linked with French uranium deposits and gives an idea of favorable zones. Geochemistry adds to the geophysical indirect methods further details on the distribution of uranium traces in the soils. This method is direct and specific. Uranium assay in waters and alluvial deposits find its use in preliminary exploration. (author) [fr

  1. [Psychosocial work factors and self-reported health in the French national SUMER survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesuffleur, Thomas; Chastang, Jean-François; Cavet, Marine; Niedhammer, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the associations between psychosocial work factors, using well-known theoretical models and emerging concepts, and self-reported health in the national population of French employees. This study was based on the data of the French national representative SUMER 2010 survey. The sample included 46,962 employees, 26,883 men and 20,079 women, with an 87% participation rate. Self-reported health was measured by means of a single question and was analysed as a binary variable. Psychosocial work factors included factors related to job strain and effort-reward imbalance models, workplace violence and working hours. Associations between psychosocial work factors and self-reported health were studied using weighted logistic regression models adjusted for covariates (age, occupation, economic activity, and other types of occupational exposure). Low decision latitude (skill discretion and decision authority), high psychological demands, low social support (from supervisors for men), low reward (low esteem and low job promotion for both genders and job insecurity for men), bullying and verbal abuse for both genders were associated with self-reported health. This study emphasizes the role of psychosocial work factors as risk factors for poor self-reported health and suggests that the implementation of preventive measures to reduce exposure to psychosocial work factors should be an objective for the improvement of health at work.

  2. Occupational physical activities, working hours and outcome of pregnancy: findings from the Southampton Women's Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonzini, M; Coggon, D; Godfrey, K; Inskip, H; Crozier, S; Palmer, K T

    2009-10-01

    To investigate risks of physical activity at work by pregnancy trimester, including the effects on head and abdominal circumference. At 34 weeks of gestation we interviewed 1327 mothers from the prospective Southampton Women's Survey (SWS); we asked about their activities (working hours, standing/walking, kneeling/squatting, trunk bending, lifting and night shifts) in jobs held at each of 11, 19 and 34 weeks of gestation, and subsequently ascertained four birth outcomes (preterm delivery, small for gestational age (SGA) and reduced head or abdominal circumference) blinded to employment history. Risk of preterm delivery was elevated nearly threefold in women whose work at 34 weeks entailed trunk bending for >1 h/day. Small head circumference was more common in babies born to women who worked for >40 h/week. However, no statistically significant associations were found with SGA or small abdominal circumference, and preterm delivery showed little association with long working hours, lifting, standing or shift work. There is a need for more research on trunk bending late in pregnancy, and on the relationship of work to reduced head circumference. Our findings on several other occupational exposures common among pregnant workers are reassuring.

  3. [Polish adaptation of swing questionnaire (Survey Work-home Interaction - Nijmegen)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mościcka-Teske, Agnieszka; Merecz, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to present the Polish adaptation of Survey Work-Home Interaction - Nijmegen (SWING). The analyses were based on the survey results from two groups of subjects, a sample of workers, representative in terms of sex and age, living in urban areas (N = 600) and a group of 59 employees examined twice with a help of SWING to assess the stability of the obtained results over a month time. The analyses performed proved that the Polish version of SWING is a reliable tool for studying work-home interactions. Correlation coefficients of items with total result of negative work-home interaction (WHI) subscale varied from 0.51 to 0.74, with positive WHI subscale from 0.26 to 0.60, negative home-work interaction (HWI) subscale, from 0.54 to 0.68 and positive HWI subscale from 0.31 to 0.59. Cronbach's alpha for the whole survey was 0.79, and for subscales varied from 0.73 to 0.89. The results of factorial analysis confirmed a our-factor structure of SWING. Factors I, items had loading from 0.58 to 0.81; II, from 0.29 to 0.78; III, from 0.60 to 0.80; and IV, from 0.28 to 0.74. The values of fit index for a four-factor model, were 0.91 (NNFI), 0.06 (RMSEA), and 0.92 (CFI), which means that this model is characterized by a good fit to empirical data. The correlation coefficient between two measurements at one month interval were also high and reached the range of 0.63 to 0.84. The results obtained are comparable to the psychometric characteristic of the English version of SWING.

  4. Geophysical investigations of the Romuvaara area, Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saksa, P.; Paananen, M.

    1991-06-01

    In the study area of Romuvaara, investigations have been carried out during 1987 - 90 with the aim of finding out whether the polyphasically deformed Precambrian gneiss complex is suitable for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The bedrock has been studied by geological, geophysical, geohydrological and geochemical methods. Airborne, ground and borehole geophysical surveys were used in studying the rock type distribution, fracturing and hydraulic conductivity of the bedrock to a depth of one kilometre. Airborne surveys (magnetic, radiometric and two electromagnetic methods) and ground surveys (VLF and VLF-R, magnetic and soil radar methods) were useful in distinguishing the metadiabases, amphibolites and granodiorites from the less magnetized migmatites. The electromagnetic and seismic refraction surveys were used in locating crushed and fractured zones. The rock type distribution was studied by single-hole logging of susceptibility, natural γ radiation and radiometric γ-γ -density. Electrical and acoustic logging served the mapping of fractures and the interpretation of water injection tests. The flow conditions in the boreholes were studied by fluid logging and tube-wave sounding. The rock volume surrounding the boreholes was mapped by borehole radar with a frequency of 22 MHz. The upper parts of the boreholes were also studied by vertical radar profiling (VRP). Larger volumes of rock were mapped by vertical seismic profiling (VSP) using 4 - 5 transmitter shotholes per borehole

  5. Distal and proximal predictors of snacking at work: A daily-survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnentag, Sabine; Pundt, Alexander; Venz, Laura

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed at examining predictors of healthy and unhealthy snacking at work. As proximal predictors we looked at food-choice motives (health motive, affect-regulation motive); as distal predictors we included organizational eating climate, emotional eating, and self-control demands at work. We collected daily survey data from 247 employees, over a period of 2 workweeks. Multilevel structural equation modeling showed that organizational eating climate predicted health as food-choice motive, whereas emotional eating and self-control demands predicted affect regulation as food-choice motive. The health motive, in turn, predicted consuming more fruits and more cereal bars and less sweet snacks; the affect-regulation motive predicted consuming more sweet snacks. Findings highlight the importance of a health-promoting eating climate within the organization and point to the potential harm of high self-control demands at work. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Is caseload midwifery a healthy work-form? - A survey of burnout among midwives in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Ingrid; Juul, Svend; Foureur, Maralyn

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the level of burnout among midwives working in caseloading practices compared to other models of midwifery care. Study design and setting: In this survey the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory was used to measure burnout among midwives working in a tertiary maternity unit...... Denmark. Main outcome measures: Mean burnout scores and the proportion of midwives with high burnout scores (a score >= 50). Results: The response rate was 82.0% as 50 out of 61 midwives answered the questionnaire. In caseload midwifery the burnout scores in personal, work-related and client......-related burnout were significantly lower when compared to ‘‘other models of care”. Among caseloading midwives, none had high scores of burnout in any of the measured domains. The proportions of high burnout scores among all of the participating midwives were 22% (95% CI: 12%–36%) in personal burnout, 20% (95% CI...

  7. Geophysical monitoring in a hydrocarbon reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffagni, Enrico; Bokelmann, Goetz

    2016-04-01

    Extraction of hydrocarbons from reservoirs demands ever-increasing technological effort, and there is need for geophysical monitoring to better understand phenomena occurring within the reservoir. Significant deformation processes happen when man-made stimulation is performed, in combination with effects deriving from the existing natural conditions such as stress regime in situ or pre-existing fracturing. Keeping track of such changes in the reservoir is important, on one hand for improving recovery of hydrocarbons, and on the other hand to assure a safe and proper mode of operation. Monitoring becomes particularly important when hydraulic-fracturing (HF) is used, especially in the form of the much-discussed "fracking". HF is a sophisticated technique that is widely applied in low-porosity geological formations to enhance the production of natural hydrocarbons. In principle, similar HF techniques have been applied in Europe for a long time in conventional reservoirs, and they will probably be intensified in the near future; this suggests an increasing demand in technological development, also for updating and adapting the existing monitoring techniques in applied geophysics. We review currently available geophysical techniques for reservoir monitoring, which appear in the different fields of analysis in reservoirs. First, the properties of the hydrocarbon reservoir are identified; here we consider geophysical monitoring exclusively. The second step is to define the quantities that can be monitored, associated to the properties. We then describe the geophysical monitoring techniques including the oldest ones, namely those in practical usage from 40-50 years ago, and the most recent developments in technology, within distinct groups, according to the application field of analysis in reservoir. This work is performed as part of the FracRisk consortium (www.fracrisk.eu); this project, funded by the Horizon2020 research programme, aims at helping minimize the

  8. Long working hours and pregnancy complications: women physicians survey in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Masumi; Rahman, Mahbubur; Ishiguro, Aya; Nomura, Kyoko

    2014-07-23

    Previous studies have investigated the impact of occupational risk factors on health outcomes among physicians. However, few studies have investigated the effects on pregnancy outcomes among physicians. In this study, we examined the association between working hours during pregnancy and pregnancy complications among physicians. A cross-sectional study was based on a survey conducted in 2009-2011 of 1,684 alumnae (mean age, 44 ± 8 years) who had graduated from 13 private medical schools in Japan. Data on threatened abortion (TA), preterm birth (PTB), and the number of working hours during the first trimester of pregnancy were obtained via retrospective assessments. Of the 939 physicians with a first pregnancy, 15% experienced TA and 12% experienced PTB. Women who experienced TA (mean weekly working hours: 62 h vs. 50 h, P working hours during the first trimester than did those without pregnancy complications. Compared with women who worked 40 hours or less per week, women who worked 71 hours or more per week had a three-fold higher risk of experiencing TA (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.7-6.0) even after adjusting for medical specialty, maternal age, and current household income. The risk of experiencing PTB was 2.5 times higher (95% CI:1.2-5.2) in women who worked 51-70 hours and 4.2 times higher (95% CI: 1.9-9.2) in women who worked 71 hours or more even after adjusting for specialty, maternal age, and current household income. The trend in the P statistic reflecting the effect of the quartile of hours worked per week (40 hours, 41-50 hours, 51-70 hours, ≥ 71 hours) on TA or PTB was 0.0001 in the multivariate logistic regression models. These results suggest that working long hours during the first trimester of pregnancy is associated with TA and PTB.

  9. The working practices and job satisfaction of dental therapists: findings of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, D E; Corrigan, M; Newton, J T

    2000-10-28

    To describe the working practices and level of job satisfaction of dental therapists in the United Kingdom. Postal questionnaire survey of 380 dental therapists registered with the General Dental Council. Only 13% of dental therapists are also qualified as dental hygienists. Around 75% of those registered with the GDC are currently employed as dental therapists. Of those not currently working as dental therapists most were either working as hygienists or caring for their children at home. Over 90% of those working as therapists are employed within the Community Dental Service. About half work part-time. Part-time working is more common among respondents with childcare responsibilities. Most dental therapists are employed in clinical roles, and perform a limited range of treatments. A small proportion appear to have been asked to undertake duties which are not currently legal for them to perform. Three-quarters of those who were currently working as dental therapists had taken career breaks at some point, the most common reasons for such a break being a change in career and/or child rearing. The respondents expressed a high level of job satisfaction, particularly among older dental therapists. Dental therapy offers a potentially rewarding career in terms of job satisfaction. Any planned increase in the numbers of training places for dental therapists should their role be expanded, for example to include working in general dental practice, would need to take cognisance of the high rate of part-time working and the proportion who could be expected to take career breaks at some point in their working lives, as is the case with female dental practitioners.

  10. Do patient surveys work? The influence of a national survey programme on local quality-improvement initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, R; Seccombe, I

    2008-12-01

    To assess current attitudes towards the national patient survey programme in England, establish the extent to which survey results are used and identify barriers and incentives for using them. Qualitative interviews with hospital staff responsible for implementing the patient surveys (survey leads). National Health Service (NHS) hospital organisations (trusts) in England. Twenty-four patient survey leads for NHS trusts. Perceptions of the patient surveys were mainly positive and were reported to be improving. Interviewees welcomed the surveys' regular repetition and thought the questionnaires, survey methods and reporting of results, particularly inter-organisational benchmark charts, were of a good standard. The survey results were widely used in action planning and were thought to support organisational patient-centredness. There was variation in the extent to which trusts disseminated survey findings to patients, the public, staff and their board members. The most common barrier to using results was difficulty engaging clinicians because survey findings were not sufficiently specific to specialties, departments or wards. Limited statistical expertise and concerns that the surveys only covered a short time frame also contributed to some scepticism. Other perceived barriers included a lack of knowledge of effective interventions, and limited time and resources. Actual and potential incentives for using survey findings included giving the results higher weightings in the performance management system, financial targets, Payment by Results (PbR), Patient Choice, a patient-centred culture, leadership by senior members of the organisation, and boosting staff morale by disseminating positive survey findings. The national patient surveys are viewed positively, their repetition being an important factor in their success. The results could be used more effectively if they were more specific to smaller units.

  11. Integrated, flexible, and rapid geophysical surveying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, S.F.; McGinnis, L.D.; Thompson, M.D.; Tome, C.

    1993-01-01

    Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), in the state of Maryland (Figure 1), is currently managing a comprehensive Installation Restoration Program involving more than 360 solid-waste managing units contained within 13 study areas. The Edgewood area and two landfills in the Aberdeen area appear on the National Priority List under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Therefore, APG has entered into an interagency agreement with the US Environmental Protection Agency to address the listed areas. The West Branch of the Canal Creek area (Figure 1), located within the Edgewood area, is one of the areas that requires a Source Definition Study because there is an ongoing release of volatile organic compounds into the creek. A report prepared by EAI Corporation (1989) included a list of 29 potentially contaminated buildings in the Edgewood area. Sixteen of the buildings contain known contaminants, nine buildings contain unknown contaminants, and four of the buildings are potentially clean. The EAI report recommended that a sampling and monitoring program be established to verify contamination levels in and around each building. Thirteen of the potentially contaminated buildings are in the West Branch of the Canal Creek area and are potential sources of volatile organic compounds. Operations have ceased and the buildings have been abandoned, but processing equipment, sumps, drains, ventilation systems, and underground storage tanks remain. These appurtenances may contain liquid, solid, or vapor contaminants of unknown nature

  12. Geological and geophysical surveys of Visakhapatnam coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, T.C.S.; Rao, K.M.; Lakshminarayana, S.

    Continuous records of the total earth's magnetic field and the surface sediment samples from the ocean bottom have been collected off Ramakrishna Beach and Lawsons Bay along the Visakhapatnam Coast. The magnetic data has recorded significant...

  13. Application of geophysical methods for fracture characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.H.; Majer, E.L.; McEvilly, T.V.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA; Morrison, H.F.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA

    1990-01-01

    One of the most crucial needs in the design and implementation of an underground waste isolation facility is a reliable method for the detection and characterization of fractures in zones away from boreholes or subsurface workings. Geophysical methods may represent a solution to this problem. If fractures represent anomalies in the elastic properties or conductive properties of the rocks, then the seismic and electrical techniques may be useful in detecting and characterizing fracture properties. 7 refs., 3 figs

  14. Developments in geophysical exploration methods

    CERN Document Server

    1982-01-01

    One of the themes in current geophysical development is the bringing together of the results of observations made on the surface and those made in the subsurface. Several benefits result from this association. The detailed geological knowledge obtained in the subsurface can be extrapolated for short distances with more confidence when the geologi­ cal detail has been related to well-integrated subsurface and surface geophysical data. This is of value when assessing the characteristics of a partially developed petroleum reservoir. Interpretation of geophysical data is generally improved by the experience of seeing the surface and subsurface geophysical expression of a known geological configuration. On the theoretical side, the understanding of the geophysical processes themselves is furthered by the study of the phenomena in depth. As an example, the study of the progress of seismic wave trains downwards and upwards within the earth has proved most instructive. This set of original papers deals with some of ...

  15. HIV/AIDS Course Content in CSWE-Accredited Social Work Programs: A Survey of Current Curricular Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Diana; Shears, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    The authors surveyed program directors at all bachelor of social work and master of social work programs accredited by the Council on Social Work Education using an online tool that assessed whether and how their respective social work programs are covering content related to HIV/AIDS. Of the 650 program directors, 153 (24%) participated in the…

  16. Survey on medical information education for radiologic technologists working at hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Ryuji; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko; Okuda, Yasuo; Konishi, Yasuhiko; Ohoba, Hisateru; Hoshino, Shuhei; Hosoba, Minoru

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the importance of medical information for radiologic technologists has increased. The purpose of this questionnaire survey was to clarify the method of acquiring skill in medical information for radiologic technologists from the point of view of the managers of radiology departments. The questionnaire was sent to 260 hospitals that had introduced picture archiving and communication systems (PACSs) for the person responsible for medical information in the radiology department. The response rate was 35.4% (92 hospitals). The results of this survey clarified that few hospital have staff for medical information in the radiology department. Nevertheless, the excellent staff who have the skills to troubleshoot and develop systems are earnestly needed in radiology departments. To solve this problem, many technologists should understand the content, work load, and necessity of medical information. In addition, cooperation between radiologic technologist schools and hospitals is important in the field of medical information education. (author)

  17. Survey of Hospital Employees' Personal Preparedness and Willingness to Work Following a Disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Jane H; Gregg, David; Sawyer, Dalton; Cyr, Julianne M

    2017-08-01

    Little is known about the personal readiness of hospital staff for disasters. As many as 30% of hospital staff say that they plan not to report for work during a large-scale disaster. We sought to understand the personal disaster preparedness for hospital staff. Surveys were distributed to the staff of a large academic tertiary-care hospital by either a paper-based version distributed through the departmental safety coordinators or a Web-based version distributed through employee e-mail services, depending on employee familiarity with and access to computer services. Surveys assessed the demographic variables and characteristics of personal readiness for disaster. Of the individuals who accessed the survey, 1334 (95.9%) enrolled in it. Women made up 75% of the respondents, with a mean age of 43 years. Respondents had worked at the hospital an average of 9 years, with the majority (90%) being full-time employees. Most households (93%) reported ≤4 members, 6% supported a person with special medical needs, and 17% were headed by a single parent. A small number (24%) of respondents reported an established meeting place for reuniting households during a disaster. Many reported stockpiling a 3-day supply of food (86%) and a 3-day supply of water (51%). Eighteen percent of respondents were not aware of workplace evacuation plans. Most respondents were willing to report to work for natural disasters (eg, tornado, snowstorm; all categories >65%), but fewer respondents were willing to report during events such as an influenza epidemic (54%), a biological outbreak (41%), a chemical exposure, (40%), or a radiation exposure (39%). Multivariate analysis revealed being female, having a child in the household younger than 6 years old, and having a child in school lowered the likelihood of being willing to report to work in two or more event types, whereas pet ownership, being a clinical healthcare worker, and being familiar with the work emergency plan increased the likelihood

  18. Plastic surgeons' satisfaction with work-life balance: results from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streu, Rachel; McGrath, Mary H; Gay, Ashley; Salem, Barbara; Abrahamse, Paul; Alderman, Amy K

    2011-04-01

    Plastic surgery demographics are transforming, with a greater proportion of women and younger physicians who desire balance between their career and personal lives compared with previous generations. The authors' purpose was to describe the patterns and correlates of satisfaction with work-life balance among U.S. plastic surgeons. A self-administered survey was mailed to a random sample of American Society of Plastic Surgeons members (n = 708; 71 percent response rate). The primary outcome was satisfaction with work-life balance. Independent variables consisted of surgeon sociodemographic and professional characteristics. Logistic regression was used to evaluate correlates of satisfaction with work-life balance. Overall, over three-fourths of respondents were satisfied with their career; however, only half were satisfied with their time management between career and personal responsibilities. Factors independently associated with diminished satisfaction with work-life balance were being female (odds ratio = 0.63; 95 percent CI, 0.42 to 0.95), working more than 60 hours per week (versus work-life balance.

  19. A Hands-on Approach to Teaching Geophysics through the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course in the Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, D.; Davis, M. B.; Goff, J.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Fernandez-Vasquez, R. A.; Saustrup, S.

    2017-12-01

    The three week field course is offered to graduate and upper-level undergraduate students as hands-on instruction and training for marine geology and geophysics applications. Instructors provide theoretical and technical background of high-resolution seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, sediment coring, grab sampling, and the sedimentology of resulting seabed samples in the initial phase of the course. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of at-sea field work. Over the last 10 years, field sites at Freeport, Port Aransas, and Galveston, TX, and Grand Isle, LA, have provided ideal locations for students to explore and investigate coastal and continental shelf processes through the application of geophysical techniques. Students with various backgrounds work in teams of four and rotate between two marine vessels: the R/V Scott Petty, a 26' vessel owned and operated by UTIG, and the R/V Manta, an 82' vessel owned and operated by NOAA. They assist with survey design, instrumentation setup and breakdown, data acquisition, trouble-shooting, data quality control, and safe instrumentation deployment and recovery. Teams also process data and sediment samples in an onshore field lab. During the final week, students visualize, integrate and interpret data for a final project using industry software. The course concludes with final presentations and discussions wherein students examine Gulf Coast geological history and sedimentary processes with academic and industry supporters. Students report a greater understanding of marine geology and geophysics through the course's intensive, hands-on, team approach and low instructor to student ratio (sixteen students, three faculty, and three teaching assistants). Post-class, students may incorporate course data in senior honors or graduate thesis and are encouraged to publish and present results at national meetings. This course satisfies field experience requirements for

  20. Noninvasive characterization of the Trecate (Italy) crude-oil contaminated site: links between contamination and geophysical signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiani, Giorgio; Binley, Andrew; Kemna, Andreas; Wehrer, Markus; Orozco, Adrian Flores; Deiana, Rita; Boaga, Jacopo; Rossi, Matteo; Dietrich, Peter; Werban, Ulrike; Zschornack, Ludwig; Godio, Alberto; JafarGandomi, Arash; Deidda, Gian Piero

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of contaminated sites can benefit from the supplementation of direct investigations with a set of less invasive and more extensive measurements. A combination of geophysical methods and direct push techniques for contaminated land characterization has been proposed within the EU FP7 project ModelPROBE and the affiliated project SoilCAM. In this paper, we present results of the investigations conducted at the Trecate field site (NW Italy), which was affected in 1994 by crude oil contamination. The less invasive investigations include ground-penetrating radar (GPR), electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and electromagnetic induction (EMI) surveys, together with direct push sampling and soil electrical conductivity (EC) logs. Many of the geophysical measurements were conducted in time-lapse mode in order to separate static and dynamic signals, the latter being linked to strong seasonal changes in water table elevations. The main challenge was to extract significant geophysical signals linked to contamination from the mix of geological and hydrological signals present at the site. The most significant aspects of this characterization are: (a) the geometrical link between the distribution of contamination and the site's heterogeneity, with particular regard to the presence of less permeable layers, as evidenced by the extensive surface geophysical measurements; and (b) the link between contamination and specific geophysical signals, particularly evident from cross-hole measurements. The extensive work conducted at the Trecate site shows how a combination of direct (e.g., chemical) and indirect (e.g., geophysical) investigations can lead to a comprehensive and solid understanding of a contaminated site's mechanisms.

  1. Are Canadian general surgery residents ready for the 80-hour work week? A nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarshan, Monisha; Hanna, Wael C; Jamal, Mohammed H; Nguyen, Lily H P; Fraser, Shannon A

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe Canadian general surgery residents' perceptions regarding potential implementation of work-hour restrictions. An ethics review board-approved, Web-based survey was submitted to all Canadian general surgery residency programs between April and July 2009. Questions evaluated the perceived effects of an 80-hour work week on length of training, operative exposure, learning and lifestyle. We used the Fisher exact test to compare senior and junior residents' responses. Of 360 residents, 158 responded (70 seniors and 88 juniors). Among them, 79% reported working 75-100 hours per week. About 74% of seniors believed that limiting their work hours would decrease their operative exposure; 43% of juniors agreed (p seniors and juniors thought limiting their work hours would improve their lifestyle (86% v. 96%, p = 0.12). Overall, 60% of residents did not believe limiting work hours would extend the length of their training. Regarding 24-hour call, 60% of juniors thought it was hazardous to their health; 30% of seniors agreed (p = 0.001). Both senior and junior residents thought abolishing 24-hour call would decrease their operative exposure (84% v. 70%, p = 0.21). Overall, 31% of residents supported abolishing 24-hour call. About 47% of residents (41% seniors, 51%juniors, p = 0.26) agreed with the adoption of the 80-hour work week. There is a training-level based dichotomy of opinion among general surgery residents in Canada regarding the perceived effects of work hour restrictions. Both groups have voted against abolishing 24-hour call, and neither group strongly supports the implementation of the 80-hour work week.

  2. Serious games for Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Valerio; Rubbia, Giuliana

    2015-04-01

    Childhood stage is indispensable in the education of human beings and especially critical to arise scientific interest in children. We discuss the participatory design of a didactic videogame, i.e. a "serious" game to teach geophysics and Earth sciences to high and low-school students. Geophysics is the application of the laws and techniques of physics to uncover knowledge about the earth's dynamic processes and subsurface structure. It explores phenomena such as earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis to improve our understanding of the earth's physical processes and our ability to predict reoccurrences. Effective mitigation of risks from catastrophic geologic hazards requires knowledge and understanding of local geology and geologic processes. Scientific outreach can be defined as discourse activity, whose main objective is to communicate some knowledge previously produced in scientific contexts to a non-expert massive audience. One of the difficulties science educators need to overcome is to explain specific concepts from a given discipline in a language simple and understandable for their audience. Digital games today play a large role in young people's lives. Games are directly connected to the life of today's adolescents. Therefore, digital games should be included and broached as a subject in the classroom. The ardor and enthusiasm that digital games evoke in teenagers has indeed brought many researchers, school leaders and teachers to the question "how video games" can be used to engage young people and support their learning inside the classroom. Additionally, studies have shown that digital games can enhance various skills such as the ability to concentrate, stamina, tactical aptness, anticipatory thinking, orientation in virtual spaces, and deductive reasoning. Thus, videogames become an effective didactic mechanism and should have a place in the classroom. The project aims to explore the potentials of entertainment technologies in educational processes

  3. [Staying and working at home or considering migrating: Survey-based study of African ophthalmologists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nentwich, M M; Klauss, V; Wilhelm, F

    2015-05-01

    The shortage of ophthalmologists is a major obstacle in the struggle of fighting preventable blindness in sub-Saharan Africa. However, to date reasons affecting migration of ophthalmologists have not been completely understood. Evaluation of reasons reported by ophthalmologists for staying in their current work setting/country, of potential reasons for migration as well as of effects of German-African partnerships. In the years 2009-2011 and 2013 participants of continuous medical education courses in Ethiopia, Cameroon and Kenya were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. A total of 106 ophthalmologists participated in this survey. In the years 2009/2010 participants were mainly board certified ophthalmologists, while the 2011/2013 surveys were answered mainly by residents. The main reasons for staying in their current region/country were good working conditions, commitment to help/patriotism, possibility of further training, good income and familial ties. Professional development elsewhere and better income abroad were named as the main reasons for considering migration followed by better technical equipment elsewhere and insecurity in the home country. Good working conditions and the possibility of further training were named as the top reasons for staying in the current region/country apart from commitment to help and familial ties. Therefore, international cooperation programs aiming at improving training of ophthalmologists and establishing an ophthalmic infrastructure may have a role in promoting ophthalmic care in Africa.

  4. Detailed Geophysical Fault Characterization in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodore H. Asch; Donald Sweetkind; Bethany L. Burton; Erin L. Wallin

    2009-02-10

    Yucca Flat is a topographic and structural basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada. Between the years 1951 and 1992, 659 underground nuclear tests took place in Yucca Flat; most were conducted in large, vertical excavations that penetrated alluvium and the underlying Cenozoic volcanic rocks. Radioactive and other potential chemical contaminants at the NTS are the subject of a long-term program of investigation and remediation by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office, under its Environmental Restoration Program. As part of the program, the DOE seeks to assess the extent of contamination and to evaluate the potential risks to humans and the environment from byproducts of weapons testing. To accomplish this objective, the DOE Environmental Restoration Program is constructing and calibrating a ground-water flow model to predict hydrologic flow in Yucca Flat as part of an effort to quantify the subsurface hydrology of the Nevada Test Site. A necessary part of calibrating and evaluating a model of the flow system is an understanding of the location and characteristics of faults that may influence ground-water flow. In addition, knowledge of fault-zone architecture and physical properties is a fundamental component of the containment of the contamination from underground nuclear tests, should such testing ever resume at the Nevada Test Site. The goal of the present investigation is to develop a detailed understanding of the geometry and physical properties of fault zones in Yucca Flat. This study was designed to investigate faults in greater detail and to characterize fault geometry, the presence of fault splays, and the fault-zone width. Integrated geological and geophysical studies have been designed and implemented to work toward this goal. This report describes the geophysical surveys conducted near two drill holes in Yucca Flat, the data analyses performed, and the

  5. Work-related musculoskeletal symptoms among otolaryngologists by subspecialty: A national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Thuy-Van Tina; Hamill, Chelsea S; Sykes, Kevin J; Kraft, Shannon M

    2018-03-01

    Given the high prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal symptoms, increased appreciation for workplace ergonomics is critical. The purpose of this study is to assess work-related musculoskeletal symptoms and injury among otolaryngologists across subspecialties, as well as to quantify the understanding and application of ergonomic principles in the operating room. Cross-sectional study. An online REDCap survey was distributed electronically to University of Kansas faculty, alumni, and residents; members of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery; and residency program coordinators for distribution to residents and faculty between August 2016 and March 2017. The survey assessed caseload, ergonomic practices, and associated musculoskeletal symptoms by type of procedure and impact of symptoms on surgeon practice. The survey was distributed to 3,006 individuals. We received 377 responses (12.5%), with 63.9% reporting symptoms. The majority of respondents began to experience symptoms in residency or fellowship. Neck and shoulder were the most affected body areas across all types of surgeries. One-third of surgeons were formally taught or actively sought information on ergonomics principles. Among those who applied ergonomics in practice, 69.6% observed improvement in their symptoms. Although musculoskeletal issues are prevalent among otolaryngologists, awareness of surgical ergonomics principles among otolaryngologists remains limited. Early instruction in ergonomic principles is important because work-related musculoskeletal symptoms commonly present in residency. Most respondents reporting the application of ergonomic principles also acknowledge symptom improvement. NA. Laryngoscope, 128:632-640, 2018. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. Working and training conditions of residents in pediatric surgery: a nationwide survey in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reismann, M; Ellerkamp, V; Dingemann, J

    2010-09-01

    As in other surgical specialties, increasing concern has been expressed worldwide about the shortage of trainees in pediatric surgery training programs. We performed a nationwide survey to investigate the current situation in Germany. An internet-based nationwide survey comprising 36 questions on training conditions in pediatric surgery was linked to the homepage of the German Society of Pediatric Surgery from June to September 2008. Statements on the following aspects were evaluated by responding residents using a scale from 1 (I do not agree at all) to 5 (I fully agree): workplace, cooperation with colleagues, head of the department, cooperation with other specialties, training and research conditions. A median value of 3 indicated an unsatisfactory assessment, with at least 50% of respondents giving an indifferent or negative response. 70 questionnaires were completed. Some of the evaluations revealed problematic areas. In particular, statements regarding working hours revealed dissatisfaction among the responding doctors. The median value accorded the statement "I am satisfied with the current working time regulation" was 2.9. With regard to departmental heads, some criticisms were directed against a perceived lack of soft skills. According to the respondents, their involvement in decision-making processes was insufficient ("We are involved in decision-making processes affecting our working conditions" - median value 2.4). Residents were also dissatisfied with the feedback they received for their work ("I get enough feedback regarding my achievement" - median value 2.6). Another problem area was career development ("I will finish my specialist training in time" - median value 2.9). However, these points did not affect overall satisfaction. Trainee satisfaction with regulations on working hours is low. Despite a general satisfaction with all fields appraised, improvements in various individual areas, e. g., the attitude of departmental heads and strategies of

  7. Working with the American Community Survey in R a guide to using the acs package

    CERN Document Server

    Glenn, Ezra Haber

    2016-01-01

    This book serves as a hands-on guide to the "acs" R package for demographers, planners, and other researchers who work with American Community Survey (ACS) data. It gathers the most common problems associated with using ACS data and implements functions as a package in the R statistical programming language. The package defines a new "acs" class object (containing estimates, standard errors, and metadata for tables from the ACS) with methods to deal appropriately with common tasks (e.g., creating and combining subgroups or geographies, automatic fetching of data via the Census API, mathematical operations on estimates, tests of significance, plots of confidence intervals).

  8. Job satisfaction and the work situation of physicians: a survey at a German university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubach, Wilfried; Fischbeck, Sabine

    2007-01-01

    Job demands and workload of hospital physicians are increasing. The object of this survey was to examine the factors that constitute job satisfaction and to analyse physicians' work situation in the area of in-patient care. 447 physicians at a German University Hospital received questionnaires with regard to work situation, job satisfaction and personal health. Data were analysed by MANOVA and multiple regression models. A first regression model explained 53% of the variance in satisfaction with "work and profession". Among the explanatory variables "superiors and hierarchy" showed the highest beta-weight (beta = -0.49). "Personal health" also determined job satisfaction, for female physicians stronger (beta = -0.31) than for male physicians (beta = -0.11). In a second regression model on satisfaction with "Financial situation" only 18% of the variance was explained, whereby "work condition on the ward", "personal health" and "collaboration between occupational groups" showed the highest beta-weights. Among resident physicians, work conditions, superiors, hierarchy, transparency and participation in decisions are very important variables for job satisfaction. Improvements in these aspects may improve job satisfaction and help to reduce physician shortage in hospitals.

  9. Occupational burnout and work factors in community and hospital midwives: a survey analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yukiko; Sandall, Jane

    2013-08-01

    community-based midwifery practice has been promoted in the UK maternity policy over the last decade as a means of increasing continuity of care. However, there have been growing concerns to suggest that the community-based continuity model may not be sustainable due to the high levels of occupational burnout in midwives resulted by increased on-call work. this paper attempted to identify work factors associated with the levels of burnout in community midwives as compared to hospital midwives, aiming at contributing to the debate of organising sustainable midwifery care. a statistical analysis was conducted drawing on data from a survey of all midwives working at one Hospital Trust in England (n=238). Occupational burnout was measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). the sample midwives (n=128, 54%) had significantly higher levels of burnout compared to the reference groups. Multiple regression analysis identified as follows: (1) high levels of occupational autonomy were a key protective factor of burnout, and more prevalent in the community, (2) working hours were positively associated with burnout, and community midwives were more likely to have higher levels of stress recognition, and (3) support for work-life-balance from the Trust had a significant protective effect on the levels of burnout. the results should be taken into account in the maternity policy in order to incorporate continuity of care and sustainable organisation of midwifery care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Nurse teachers' working lives: a questionnaire survey of nursing schools in Mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, L; While, A E; Chen, G; Barriball, K L; Gu, S

    2011-12-01

    The study aimed to explore Chinese nurse teachers' views and experience regarding different components of their working lives. A cross-sectional survey of 18 schools of nursing offering nationally accredited baccalaureate nursing programmes across Mainland China was conducted. A total of 227 nurse teachers completed questionnaires yielding a response rate of 72%. The sample comprised mainly female, married lecturers younger than 44 years with an average teaching experience of about 10 years. The respondents were satisfied with their overall job, work, supervision and co-workers, but dissatisfied with their pay and promotion opportunities. There were statistically significant differences in several facets of job satisfaction across the respondents of different age groups, education levels, job titles and those working in the schools of different sizes. The respondents perceived their work environment to be only somewhat empowering. Their average level of professional identification was relatively high, but their overall role conflict, role ambiguity and sense of coherence were relatively low. Chinese nurse teachers had a positive feeling towards their working lives, but strategies should be developed to enhance their sense of coherence and professional commitment. It is worth noting that there is still much adjustment to be made towards the new higher education roles, but the findings may only be generalizable to similar settings. © 2011 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  11. ANNALS OF GEOPHYSICS: AD MAJORA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Florindo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Annals of Geophysics is a bimonthly international journal, which publishes scientific papers in the field of geophysics sensu lato. It derives from Annali di Geofisica, which commenced publication in January 1948 as a quarterly periodical devoted to general geophysics, seismology, earth magnetism, and atmospheric studies. The journal was published regularly for a quarter of a century until 1982 when it merged with the French journal Annales de Géophysique to become Annales Geophysicae under the aegis of the European Geophysical Society. In 1981, this journal ceased publication of the section on solid earth geophysics, ending the legacy of Annali di Geofisica. In 1993, the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica (ING, founder of the journal, decided to resume publication of its own journal under the same name, Annali di Geofisica. To ensure continuity, the first volume of the new series was assigned the volume number XXXVI (following the last issue published in 1982. In 2002, with volume XLV, the name of the journal was translated into English to become Annals of Geophysics and in consequence the journal impact factor counter was restarted. Starting in 2010, in order to improve its status and better serve the science community, Annals of Geophysics has instituted a number of editorial changes including full electronic open access, freely accessible online, the possibility to comment on and discuss papers online, and a board of editors representing Asia and the Americas as well as Europe. [...

  12. Electronic Self-report Assessment--Cancer (ESRA-C): Working towards an integrated survey system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karras, Bryant T; Wolpin, Seth; Lober, William B; Bush, Nigel; Fann, Jesse R; Berry, Donna L

    2006-01-01

    The Clinical Informatics Research Group and Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems at the University of Washington are working with interdisciplinary teams to improve patient care and tracking of patient-reported symptoms and outcomes by creating an extensible web-based survey and intervention platform. The findings and cumulative experience from these processes have led to incremental improvements and variations in each new implementation of the platform. This paper presents progress in the first year of a three-year NIH study entitled Electronic Self Report Assessment--Cancer (ESRA-C). The project's goals are to enhance and evaluate the web-based computerized patient self-reporting and assessment system at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. Preliminary work and lessons learned in the modification of the platform and enhancements to the system will be described.

  13. Geophysical logging for mineral exploration and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plouffe, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    It is possible to retrieve from small-diameter holes geophysical data for qualitative interpretation in exploration and quantitative interpretation in the development of orebodies. The primary objectives in the exploration stage are to identify where, within a hole, economic minerals are, and to help in lithological interpretations. Other aspects, which are more quantitative, are the interpretation of downhole logs for parameters which can be used in surface geophysical methods (i.e. density for gravity surveys, acoustic velocities for seismic surveys, and magnetic susceptibility for airborne and ground magnetic surveys). Recent advances in equipment design, portability and durability have made downhole logging in exploration more inexpensive and reliable. This new equipment is being used to generate very precise quantitative results. This is especially true on uranium development projects. The interpretation of gamma logs for eU 3 O 8 values has finally become precise enough that they have begun to replace chemical values in reserve calculations. Another part of development data is density and equilibrium information, which, with today's technology, is being derived from downhole probing. In the years to come, the trends for many metals are toward neutron activation techniques, or in-situ assaying, and the use of multiple logs for better lithological and physical rock property determinations. (auth)

  14. Work, family and daily mobility: a new approach to the problem through a mobility survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabarria, Marta; Pérez, Katherine; Santamariña-Rubio, Elena; Aragay, Josep Maria; Capdet, Mayte; Peiró, Rosana; Rodríguez-Sanz, Maica; Artazcoz, Lucía; Borrell, Carme

    2013-01-01

    To analyze gender inequalities in socioeconomic factors affecting the amount of time spent travelling for work-related and home-related reasons among working individuals aged between 30 and 44 years old during a weekday in Catalonia (Spain). A cross-sectional study was conducted. Data were obtained from employed individuals aged between 30 and 44 years of age who reported travelling on the day prior to the interview in the Catalan Mobility Survey 2006 (N = 23,424). Multivariate logistic regression models were adjusted to determine the factors associated with longer time spent travelling according to the reason for travelling (work- or home-related journeys). Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals are presented. A higher proportion of men travelled and spent more time travelling for work-related reasons, while a higher proportion of women travelled and spend more time travelling for home-related reasons. A higher educational level was associated with greater time spent travelling for work-related reasons in both men and women but was related to an increase in travelling time for home-related reasons only in men. In women, a larger household was associated with greater travel time for home-related reasons and with less travel time for work-related reasons. This study confirms the different mobility patterns in men and women, related to their distinct positions in the occupational, family and domestic spheres. Gender inequalities in mobility within the working population are largely determined by the greater responsibility of women in the domestic and family sphere. This finding should be taken into account in the design of future transport policies. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Integrated working between residential care homes and primary care: a survey of care homes in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gage Heather

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Older people living in care homes in England have complex health needs due to a range of medical conditions, mental health needs and frailty. Despite an increasing policy expectation that professionals should operate in an integrated way across organisational boundaries, there is a lack of understanding between care homes and the National Health Service (NHS about how the two sectors should work together, meaning that residents can experience a poor "fit" between their needs, and services they can access. This paper describes a survey to establish the current extent of integrated working that exists between care homes and primary and community health and social services. Methods A self-completion, online questionnaire was designed by the research team. Items on the different dimensions of integration (funding, administrative, organisational, service delivery, clinical care were included. The survey was sent to a random sample of residential care homes with more than 25 beds (n = 621 in England in 2009. Responses were analysed using quantitative and qualitative methods. Results The survey achieved an overall response rate of 15.8%. Most care homes (78.7% worked with more than one general practice. Respondents indicated that a mean of 14.1 professionals/ services (other than GPs had visited the care homes in the last six months (SD 5.11, median 14; a mean of .39 (SD.163 professionals/services per bed. The most frequent services visiting were district nursing, chiropody and community psychiatric nurses. Many (60% managers considered that they worked with the NHS in an integrated way, including sharing documents, engaging in integrated care planning and joint learning and training. However, some care home managers cited working practices dictated by NHS methods of service delivery and priorities for care, rather than those of the care home or residents, a lack of willingness by NHS professionals to share information, and low

  16. Multidisciplinary team working across different tumour types: analysis of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, B W; Sevdalis, N; Taylor, C; Vincent, C; Green, J S A

    2012-05-01

    Using data from a national survey, this study aimed to address whether the current model for multidisciplinary team (MDT) working is appropriate for all tumour types. Responses to the 2009 National Cancer Action Team national survey were analysed by tumour type. Differences indicate lack of consensus between MDT members in different tumour types. One thousand one hundred and forty-one respondents from breast, gynaecological, colorectal, upper gastrointestinal, urological, head and neck, haematological and lung MDTs were included. One hundred and sixteen of 136 statements demonstrated consensus between respondents in different tumour types. There were no differences regarding the infrastructure for meetings and team governance. Significant consensus was seen for team characteristics, and respondents disagreed regarding certain aspects of meeting organisations and logistics, and patient-centred decision making. Haematology MDT members were outliers in relation to the clinical decision-making process, and lung MDT members disagreed with other tumour types regarding treating patients with advanced disease. This analysis reveals strong consensus between MDT members from different tumour types, while also identifying areas that require a more tailored approach, such as the clinical decision-making process, and preparation for and the organisation of MDT meetings. Policymakers should remain sensitive to the needs of health care teams working in individual tumour types.

  17. Working to Increase Vaccination for Human Papillomavirus: A Survey of Wisconsin Stakeholders, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Sarah; Zhang, Xiao; Williams, Mercedes; Conlon, Amy; LoConte, Noelle K

    2017-09-28

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is common and can progress to various types of cancer. HPV infection can be prevented through vaccination; however, vaccination rates among adolescents are low. The objective of this study was to assess efforts among Wisconsin stakeholders in HPV vaccination and organizational capacity for future collaborative work. We conducted a cross-sectional online survey of 277 stakeholders in HPV vaccination activities, from April 30, 2015, through June 30, 2015. Stakeholders were public health professionals, health care providers, educators, quality improvement professionals, researchers, and advocates identified as engaged in HPV vaccination work. Of the 277 invited stakeholders, 117 (42%) responded to the survey. Findings showed that most current HPV vaccination activities targeted 3 groups: adolescents and parents, clinical and health professionals, and communities and health systems. The main activities directed at these groups were providing printed educational materials, professional education, and media campaigns to raise awareness. Common barriers reported were lack of understanding about the link between HPV and cancer, requests to delay vaccination, difficulty completing the 3-dose vaccine series, and reluctance to discuss sexuality. HPV vaccination rates are far below those of other vaccinations administered to adolescents in Wisconsin. Our study showed that various local efforts were being made to increase HPV vaccination uptake; however, many barriers exist to initiation and completion of the vaccine series. Future interventions should address barriers and employ evidence-based strategies for increasing HPV vaccination rates.

  18. Questionnaire survey report on measurement of radioactivity in working environment of radioisotopes facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Takao; Nomura, Kiyoshi

    2008-01-01

    To look over the current measurement of radioactivity concentration in working environment of many radioisotopes facilities, a questionnaire survey was carried out under the auspices of the Planning Committee of the Japan Society of Radiation Safety Management. 64 responses were obtained in 128 radiation facilities, which the questionnaires were sent to. The main results were obtained by aggregate analysis of the answers for questionnaires as the followings. Major nuclides subject to measurement were 3 H, 14 C, 32 P and 125 I Sampling of radioisotopes in air was mainly performed using collectors like dust samplers and HC-collectors. Liquid scintillation counters and gamma counters were used to measure β and γ radioactivity contained in airborne particles or gas samples. Contamination by radioactivity was not detected in 55% facilities surveyed, but in 40% facilities at the same level as or at lower levels than a hundredth part of the regulated concentration limit of each nuclide. Almost all facilities is found to consider that the measurement of radioactivity concentration in working environments is not always necessary. (author)

  19. Hardness survey of cold-worked and heat-treated JBK-75 stainless steel alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, R.J.; Lucas, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The alloy JBK-75, an age-hardenable austenitic stainless steel, is similar to commercial A-286, but has certain chemistry modifications to improve weldability and hydrogen compatibility. The principal changes are an increase in nickel and a decrease in manganese with lower limits on carbon, phosphorus, sulfur, silicon, and boron. In this study, the effects of solutionizing time and temperature, quench rate, cold working, and the effects of cold working on precipitation kinetics were examined. Findings show that the solutionizing temperature has a moderate effect on the as-quenched hardness, while times greater than that required for solutionizing do not significantly affect hardness. Quench rate was found to have a small effect on as-quenched hardness, however, hardness gradients did not develop in small bars. It was found that JBK-75 can be significantly strengthened by cold working. Cold working alone produced hardness increases from Rockwell-A 49 to R/sub A/ 68. A recovery-related hardness change was noted on heat treating at 300 and 400 0 C for both as-quenched and as-worked JBK-75. Significant age-hardening was observed at temperatures as low as 500 0 C for as-worked metal. Aging at 600 0 C resulted in maximum hardness in the 75 percent worked sample at about 6 hours (R/sub A/ 73.5) while the 50 percent worked sample was near maximum hardness (R/sub A 72.5) after seven days. THE 25 and 0 percent worked samples were considerably underaged after seven days. Similar type kinetic data were obtained for worked and nonworked metal at 650, 700, 800, 850, 900, 1000, and 1100 0 C for times from 10 minutes to 10,000 minutes (6.7 days). The overall purpose of the hardness survey was to better define the effects of cold work on the stress-relieving range, coherent precipitation range, incoherent precipitation range, recrystallization range, solutionizing range, and grain-growth range

  20. Common interests bind AGU and geophysical groups around the globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntee, Christine

    2012-02-01

    In continuation of our work to strengthen alliances with key organizations in the Earth and space science community, AGU president Michael McPhaden, president-elect Carol Finn, and I held a series of meetings with leaders from other science societies during the 2011 Fall Meeting. Over the course of 2 days we met with leaders from the Geophysical Society of America, European Geosciences Union, Japan Geosciences Union, Ethiopian Geophysical Union, Asia Oceania Geosciences Society, Chinese Geophysical Society, and Asociación Latinoamericana de Geofísica Espacial. This gave us a valued opportunity to discuss the common interests and challenges we all face and to learn from each other's experience. The meetings allowed AGU to strengthen existing cooperative agreements and reach new levels of understanding between us and other societies. Additionally, we met with representatives from the Korean Ocean Research and Development Institute to discuss their intention to establish a geophysical union modeled after AGU.

  1. History of geophysical studies at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borns, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    A variety of geophysical methods including the spectrum of seismic, electrical, electromagnetic and potential field techniques have supported characterization, monitoring and experimental studies at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The geophysical studies have provided significant understanding of the nature of site deformation, tectonics and stability. Geophysical methods have delineated possible brine reservoirs beneath the underground facility and have defined the disturbed rock zone that forms around underground excavations. The role of geophysics in the WIPP project has evolved with the project. The early uses were for site characterization to satisfy site selection criteria or factors. As the regulatory framework for WIPP grew since 1980, the geophysics program supported experimental and field programs such as Salado hydrogeology and underground room systems and excavations. In summary, the major types of issues that geophysical studies addressed for WIPP are: Site Characterization; Castile Brine Reservoirs; Rustler/Dewey Lake Hydrogeology; Salado Hydrogeology; and Excavation Effects. The nature of geophysics programs for WIPP has been to support investigation rather than being the principal investigation itself. The geophysics program has been used to define conceptual models (e.g., the Disturbed Rock Zone-DRZ) or to test conceptual models (e.g., high transmissivity zones in the Rustler Formation). The geophysics program primarily supported larger characterization and experimental programs. Funding was not available for the complete documentation and interpretation. Therefore, a great deal of the geophysics survey information resides in contractor reports

  2. Reconstructing former urban environments by combining geophysical electrical methods and geotechnical investigations—an example from Chania, Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soupios, P M; Vallianatos, F; Loupasakis, C

    2008-01-01

    Nowadays, geophysical prospecting is implemented in order to resolve a diversity of geological, hydrogeological, environmental and geotechnical problems. Although plenty of applications and a lot of research have been conducted in the countryside, only a few cases have been reported in the literature concerning urban areas, mainly due to high levels of noise present that aggravate most of the geophysical methods or due to spatial limitations that hinder normal method implementation. Among all geophysical methods, electrical resistivity tomography has proven to be a rapid technique and the most robust with regard to urban noise. This work presents a case study in the urban area of Chania (Crete Island, Greece), where electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has been applied for the detection and identification of possible buried ancient ruins or other man-made structures, prior to the construction of a building. The results of the detailed geophysical survey indicated eight areas of interest providing resistivity anomalies. Those anomalies were analysed and interpreted combining the resistivity readings with the geotechnical borehole data and the historical bibliographic reports—referring to the 1940s (Xalkiadakis 1997 Industrial Archaeology in Chania Territory pp 51–62). The collected ERT-data were processed by applying advanced algorithms in order to obtain a 3D-model of the study area that depicts the interesting subsurface structures more clearly and accurately

  3. Improved extraction of hydrologic information from geophysical data through coupled hydrogeophysical inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinnell, A.C.; Ferre, T.P.A.; Vrugt, J.A.; Huisman, J.A.; Moysey, S.; Rings, J.; Kowalsky, M.B.

    2009-11-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of multiple measurement types, including indirect (geophysical) methods, to constrain hydrologic interpretations. To date, most examples integrating geophysical measurements in hydrology have followed a three-step, uncoupled inverse approach. This approach begins with independent geophysical inversion to infer the spatial and/or temporal distribution of a geophysical property (e.g. electrical conductivity). The geophysical property is then converted to a hydrologic property (e.g. water content) through a petrophysical relation. The inferred hydrologic property is then used either independently or together with direct hydrologic observations to constrain a hydrologic inversion. We present an alternative approach, coupled inversion, which relies on direct coupling of hydrologic models and geophysical models during inversion. We compare the abilities of coupled and uncoupled inversion using a synthetic example where surface-based electrical conductivity surveys are used to monitor one-dimensional infiltration and redistribution.

  4. The impact of psoriasis on work-related problems: a multicenter cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, F; Sampogna, F; Romano, G V; Merolla, R; Guida, G; Gualberti, G; Paparatti, U D L; Amerio, P; Balato, N; Potenza, C

    2014-12-01

    Psoriasis can have cumulative physical and psychosocial effects preventing sufferers from achieving their full-life potential. Few studies have addressed the impact of psoriasis on work-related characteristics. To evaluate the impact of psoriasis on education prospects and work limitations in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis. This study was conducted in 29 dermatology centres across Italy. Information was collected by questionnaire during office visits. A total of 787 patients (64% male, aged 50 years) completed the questionnaire. At the time of the survey, mean Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) score and disease duration were 10 and 19 years respectively. Current smokers had higher PASI scores compared to non-smokers (10.8 vs. 9.4, P = 0.02). Plaque psoriasis was the most frequently described (91.2%). Fifty-five percent of patients had limited expectations of career progression. Similarly, in 42% of cases, psoriasis reduced the prospects of improvement in employment status and 35% of patients reported having reduced earning potential. Approximately 60% of patients reported that psoriasis localized to their hands or feet caused work limitations, whilst in about 25%, it caused them to quit their job. Approximately 37% of patients reported having lost between 3-10 work days in the past 3 months due to clinical assessment or treatment. Logistic regression revealed that gender, low standard of education, number of localizations, shame, anger and self-esteem were predictors significantly associated with limitations in work. Moderate-to-severe psoriasis has a profound negative impact on the employment capacity of patients in Italy. Psoriasis also contributes to days lost from work, affects job opportunity, career prospects and revenue potential. © 2013 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  5. A survey of exercise professionals' barriers and facilitators to working with stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condon, Marie; Guidon, Marie

    2018-03-01

    Stroke survivors (SSs) are largely inactive despite the benefits of exercise. Exercise professionals (EPs), skilled in exercise prescription and motivation, may have a role in promoting exercise among SSs. However, the number of EPs working with SSs is estimated to be low. This study aimed to investigate EPs' opinions on working with SSs by rating their agreement of barriers and facilitators to working with SSs. The study also investigated EPs skills, interest and experience working with SSs and the relationship between EPs' barriers and facilitators with their training on stroke. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using a researcher-designed online survey between October and December 2015. Purposive sampling was used to survey EPs on the Register of Exercise Professionals in Ireland (n = 277). The response rate was 31% (87/277). Only 22% (19/86) of EPs had experience working with SSs. The primary barriers rated by EPs included insufficient training on psychological problems post-stroke (84%; 61/73), unsuitable equipment for SSs (69%; 50/73) and the level of supervision SSs require (56%; 41/73). The primary facilitators rated included access to suitable equipment (97%; 69/71), practical (100%; 71/71) and theoretical training (93%; 66/71) on stroke. Respondents with no training on stroke were significantly more likely to agree that insufficient training on psychological problems post-stroke and lack of experience were barriers. Seventy-six per cent of EPs (58/76) were interested in one-to-one exercise sessions with SSs but only 53% (40/76) were interested in group sessions. Eighty-two per cent of EPs (62/76) rated their motivational skills as good or very good but 42% (32/76) indicated having only acceptable skills dealing with psychological problems. Results indicate that EPs are interested in working with SSs despite limited experience and practical barriers. Training opportunities on stroke need to be developed; taking into account EPs' barriers

  6. Work environment and health in the fishing fleet: results from a survey amongst Norwegian fishers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sønvisen, Signe Annie; Thorvaldsen, Trine; Holmen, Ingunn M; Øren, Anita

    Fishery is an important industry in Norway. Compared to other industries the number of occupational accidents is high. Fishers are exposed to a range of unfavourable working conditions, but there is limited research-based knowledge about the interaction between working conditions and health. The aim of the article is to study fishers' 1) work-related exposures and health complaints, 2) sickness absence, 3) subjective perception of health status and 3) level of job satisfaction. Data was gathered through a telephone survey. The survey included questions about exposure, health complaints, health status and job satisfaction. Methods for analysis were descriptive statistics and relative risk (RR). A total of 830 full-time fishers were interviewed. Coastal fishers are more exposed to factors such as climatic (RR = 1.546, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.311-1.823), ergonomic (RR = 1.539, 95% CI 1.293-1.833) and processing (RR = 2.119, 95% CI 1.847-2.431), compared to other groups of fishers. Coastal fishers are also more likely to experience musculoskeletal problems (RR = 1.623, 95% CI 1.139-2.314), sickness absence (RR = 1.337, 95% CI 1.081-1.655) and to perceive their own health as poor (RR = 2.155, 95% CI 1.119-4.152). Purse sein fishers are less exposed to climatic (RR = 0.777, 95% CI 0.633-0.953), ergonomic (RR = 0.617, 95% CI 0.487-0.783) and processing (RR = 0.292, 95% CI 0.221-0.385) factors and are less likely to experience sickness absence (RR = 0.635, 95% CI 0.479-0.840). In terms of job satisfaction, 99% if our respondents enjoy their work. Norwegian fishers have a high degree of job satisfaction and overall good health. Challenges regarding health complaints and exposures in the working environment were identified. This may be helpful for the industry, showing where measures should be implemented to prevent exposure, illness and sickness absence. Findings may also serve as a basis for future intervention studies aimed at promoting healthy working environments

  7. Measuring employment precariousness in the European Working Conditions Survey: the social distribution in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig-Barrachina, Vanessa; Vanroelen, Christophe; Vives, Alejandra; Martínez, José Miguel; Muntaner, Carles; Levecque, Katia; Benach, Joan; Louckx, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Precarious employment is becoming an increasingly important social determinant of health inequalities among workers. The way in which contemporary employment arrangements and their health consequences are addressed in empirical research is mostly based on the contract-related or employment instability dimension. A broader conceptual approach including various important characteristics of the degrading of employment conditions and relations is needed. The general objective of this paper is to empirically test a new multidimensional construct for measuring precarious employment in an existing database. Special focus is on the social distribution of precarious employment. A subsample of 21,415 participants in the EU-27 from the Fourth European Working Conditions Survey-2005 was analysed. A cross-sectional study of the social distribution of precarious employment was conducted through the analysis of proportional differences according to gender, social class and credentials for the European Union as a whole and within each country. The 8 dimensions of the employment precariousness construct were represented by 11 indicators. In general, women, workers without supervisory authority, those with fewer credentials, and those living in Eastern and Southern European countries suffer the highest levels of precarious employment. Exceptionally, men, workers with supervisory authority and those with the highest credentials suffer the highest levels of long working hours, schedule unpredictability and uncompensated flexible working times. This article offers the first validation for an innovative multidimensional conceptualisation of employment precariousness applied to the analysis of existing survey data, showing the unequal distribution of precarious employment across the European labour force. This set of indicators can be useful for monitoring precarious employment.

  8. A ''model'' geophysics program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyquist, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    In 1993, I tested a radio-controlled airplane designed by Jim Walker of Brigham Young University for low-elevation aerial photography. Model-air photography retains most of the advantages of standard aerial photography --- the photographs can be used to detect lineaments, to map roads and buildings, and to construct stereo pairs to measure topography --- and it is far less expensive. Proven applications on the Oak Ridge Reservation include: updating older aerial records to document new construction; using repeated overflights of the same area to capture seasonal changes in vegetation and the effects of major storms; and detecting waste trench boundaries from the color and character of the overlying grass. Aerial photography is only one of many possible applications of radio-controlled aircraft. Currently, I am funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development to review the state of the art in microavionics, both military and civilian, to determine ways this emerging technology can be used for environmental site characterization. Being particularly interested in geophysical applications, I am also collaborating with electrical engineers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to design a model plane that will carry a 3-component flux-gate magnetometer and a global positioning system, which I hope to test in the spring of 1994

  9. GEOPHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SOILS

    KAUST Repository

    Santamarina, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    Low energy perturbations used in geophysical methods provide insightful information about constant-fabric soil properties and their spatial variability. There are causal links between soil type, index properties, elastic wave velocity, electromagnetic wave parameters and thermal properties. Soil type relates to the stress-dependent S-wave velocity, thermal and electrical conductivity and permittivity. The small strain stiffness reflects the state of stress, the extent of diagenetic cementation and/or freezing. Pore fluid chemistry, fluid phase and changes in either fluid chemistry or phase manifest through electromagnetic measurements. The volumetric water content measured with electromagnetic techniques is the best predictor of porosity if the water saturation is 100%. Changes in water saturation alter the P-wave velocity when Srà100%, the S-wave velocity at intermediate saturations, and the thermal conductivity when the saturation is low Srà0%. Finally, tabulated values suffice to estimate heat capacity and latent heat for engineering design, however thermal conductivity requires measurements under proper field conditions.

  10. Review of Thomas G. Bever, "A Survey of Some Recent Work in Psycholinguistics." Linguistic Notes from La Jolla, No. 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Paul G.

    This review of Bever's psycholinguistics survey is for the most part favorable. Commentary is centered on sections 1, 2, 4, and 6 of the report. The survey's first part is judged significant in that Wundt's pioneering work in psycholinguistics is discussed. The second section, on grammar as a psychological process, is found obscure in its…

  11. Directional filtering for linear feature enhancement in geophysical maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sykes, M.P.; Das, U.C.

    2000-01-01

    Geophysical maps of data acquired in ground and airborne surveys are extensively used for mineral, groundwater, and petroleum exploration. Lineaments in these maps are often indicative of contacts, basement faulting, and other tectonic features of interest. To aid the interpretation of these maps, a

  12. [Compatibility of Work and Family Life: Survey of Physicians in the Munich Metropolitan Area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauchart, Meike; Ascher, Philipp; Kesel, Karin; Weber, Sabine; Grabein, Beatrice; Schneeweiss, Bertram; Fischer-Truestedt, Cordula; Schoenberg, Michael; Rogler, Gudrun; Borelli, Claudia

    2017-05-15

    Aim Investigation of the compatibility of work and family life for physicians in the Munich metropolitan area. Methods Survey of a representative sample of 1,800 physicians using a questionnaire. Results Men were less satisfied (7% very satisfied vs. 21%) with compatibility between work and family life than women. The group least satisfied overall was hospital-based physicians (p=0.000, chi-square=122.75). Women rather than men cut back their career due to children, perceived their professional advancement as impaired, desisted from establishing private practice or quit hospital employment altogether. Respondents strove for flexible childcare and makeshift solution if the established service failed. Most did not have that at their disposal. Hospital-based physicians wished for predictable working hours, and would like to have a say in the structure of their schedule. For the majority this was not the case. While for 80% it would be important to participate in the definition of their working hours, this was only possible in 17%. 86% found the opportunity to work part-time important, but many doctors (more than 30%) did not have that option. The biggest help for office-based physicians would be an expedited procedure by the Bavarian Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians (KVB) when applying for a proxy. The second most important would be the ability to hand over on-call duties. 36% of respondents felt that compatibility of work and family life was best achieved outside of patient care, during residency 42% believed this to be the case. Only 6% of physicians felt the best compatibility to be achieved in a hospital. Among the physician owners of practices, 34% considered their model to be the best way to reconcile both aspects of life. Conclusion More flexible options for childcare and more influence on the definition of working hours are necessary in order to better reconcile work and family life. For office-based physicians it must be made easier to

  13. Association between employment status and self-rated health: Korean working conditions survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kimin; Park, Jae Bum; Lee, Kyung-Jong; Cho, Yoon-Sik

    2016-01-01

    This research was conducted with an aim of determining the association between employment status and self-rated health. Using the data from the Third Korean Working Conditions Survey conducted in 2011, We included data from 34,783 respondents, excluding employers, self-employed workers, unpaid family workers, others. Self-rated health was compared according to employment status and a logistic regression analysis was performed. Among the 34,783 workers, the number of permanent and non-permanent workers was 27,564 (79.2 %) and 7,219 (20.8 %). The risk that the self-rated health of non-permanent workers was poor was 1.20 times higher when both socio-demographic factors, work environment and work hazards were corrected. In this study, perceived health was found to be worse in the non-permanent workers than permanent workers. Additional research should investigate whether other factors mediate the relationship between employment status and perceived health.

  14. Nurses' expert opinions of workplace interventions for a healthy working environment: a Delphi survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Diane; Clarke, Sean; Hayes, Laureen; Nincic, Vera

    2014-09-01

    Much has been written about interventions to improve the nursing work environment, yet little is known about their effectiveness. A Delphi survey of nurse experts was conducted to explore perceptions about workplace interventions in terms of feasibility and likelihood of positive impact on nurse outcomes such as job satisfaction and nurse retention. The interventions that received the highest ratings for likelihood of positive impact included: bedside handover to improve communication at shift report and promote patient-centred care; training program for nurses in dealing with violent or aggressive behaviour; development of charge nurse leadership team; training program focused on creating peer-supportive atmospheres and group cohesion; and schedule that recognizes work balance and family demands. The overall findings are consistent with the literature that highlights the importance of communication and teamwork, nurse health and safety, staffing and scheduling practices, professional development and leadership and mentorship. Nursing researchers and decision-makers should work in collaboration to implement and evaluate interventions for promoting practice environments characterized by effective communication and teamwork, professional growth and adequate support for the health and well-being of nurses.

  15. Sleep Characteristics of the Staff Working in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Based on a Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Puerta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to evaluate the sleep characteristics of the staff working in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU. They were asked to complete an anonymous survey concerning the characteristics and quality of their sleep, as well as the impact of sleep disturbances on their work and social life, assessed by Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ-10 questionnaire. The response rate was 84.6% (85% females: 17% were doctors, 57% nurses, 23% nursing assistants, and 3% porters. 83.8% of them worked on fix shifts and 16.2% did 24-h shifts. 39.8% of workers considered that they had a good sleep quality and 39.8% considered it to be poor or bad. The score was good in 18.2% of the staff and bad in 81.8%. Night shift workers showed significantly worse sleep quality on both the objective and subjective evaluation. There was a weak concordance (kappa 0.267; p = 0.004 between the perceived quality of sleep and the FOSQ-10 evaluation. Sleep disorders affected their emotional state (30.2% of workers and relationships or social life (22.6%. In conclusion, this study finds that a high percentage of health professionals from PICU suffer from sleep disorders that affect their personal and social life. This negative impact is significantly higher in night shift workers. Many health workers are not aware of their bad sleep quality.

  16. Sleep Characteristics of the Staff Working in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Based on a Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerta, Yolanda; García, Mirian; Heras, Elena; López-Herce, Jesús; Fernández, Sarah N; Mencía, Santiago

    2017-01-01

    The objective is to evaluate the sleep characteristics of the staff working in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). They were asked to complete an anonymous survey concerning the characteristics and quality of their sleep, as well as the impact of sleep disturbances on their work and social life, assessed by Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ)-10 questionnaire. The response rate was 84.6% (85% females): 17% were doctors, 57% nurses, 23% nursing assistants, and 3% porters. 83.8% of them worked on fix shifts and 16.2% did 24-h shifts. 39.8% of workers considered that they had a good sleep quality and 39.8% considered it to be poor or bad. The score was good in 18.2% of the staff and bad in 81.8%. Night shift workers showed significantly worse sleep quality on both the objective and subjective evaluation. There was a weak concordance (kappa 0.267; p  = 0.004) between the perceived quality of sleep and the FOSQ-10 evaluation. Sleep disorders affected their emotional state (30.2% of workers) and relationships or social life (22.6%). In conclusion, this study finds that a high percentage of health professionals from PICU suffer from sleep disorders that affect their personal and social life. This negative impact is significantly higher in night shift workers. Many health workers are not aware of their bad sleep quality.

  17. Workplace mistreatment and sickness absenteeism from work: results from the 2010 National Health Interview survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfaw, Abay G; Chang, Chia C; Ray, Tapas K

    2014-02-01

    This study examined the association between workplace mistreatment and occurrence, duration, and costs of sickness absenteeism. We used the 2010 National Health Interview Survey and considered 13,807 employed adult respondents. We used a zero-inflated negative binomial (zinb) model to examine the association between exposure to workplace mistreatment and the occurrence and number of workdays missed due to illness/injury in the preceding 12 months. In 2010, 7.6% of US workers employed at the time of the survey reported having been mistreated at their workplace. Both occurrence and duration of sickness absence were higher for mistreated than for non-mistreated workers. The zinb results showed that being mistreated was associated with a 42% increase in the number of missed workdays, controlling for covariates. The marginal effect analysis showed that lost workdays differed by 2.45 days between mistreated and non-mistreated workers. This implies that workplace mistreatment was associated with $4.1 billion, or 5.5%, of sickness absenteeism costs in 2010. Workplace mistreatment is associated with sickness absence in the United States. While a causal relationship could not be established due to the cross-sectional design of the study, this study reveals the economic importance of developing workplace mistreatment prevention strategies. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. What people believe about how memory works: a representative survey of the U.S. population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Simons

    Full Text Available Incorrect beliefs about the properties of memory have broad implications: the media conflate normal forgetting and inadvertent memory distortion with intentional deceit, juries issue verdicts based on flawed intuitions about the accuracy and confidence of testimony, and students misunderstand the role of memory in learning. We conducted a large representative telephone survey of the U.S. population to assess common beliefs about the properties of memory. Substantial numbers of respondents agreed with propositions that conflict with expert consensus: Amnesia results in the inability to remember one's own identity (83% of respondents agreed, unexpected objects generally grab attention (78%, memory works like a video camera (63%, memory can be enhanced through hypnosis (55%, memory is permanent (48%, and the testimony of a single confident eyewitness should be enough to convict a criminal defendant (37%. This discrepancy between popular belief and scientific consensus has implications from the classroom to the courtroom.

  19. Work productivity among adults with varied Body Mass Index: Results from a Canadian population-based survey

    OpenAIRE

    Arnaldo Sanchez Bustillos; Kris Gregory Vargas, III; Raul Gomero-Cuadra

    2015-01-01

    Background: The relationship between Body Mass Index (BMI) and work productivity, including absenteeism and presenteeism remains unclear. The objective of this study was to examine work productivity among adults with varied BMI using population-based data. Methods: Data source was the 2009–2010 Canadian Community Health Survey. The outcomes reflected work absence (absenteeism) and reduced activities at work (presenteeism). The key explanatory variable was BMI in six categories. Logistic re...

  20. FY 1998 basic survey for coal resource development. Data collection of the joint research of new technology in the geophysical exploration of coal resources (land area shallow seam survey); 1998 nendo sekitan shigen kaihatsu kiso chosa shiryoshu. Shintansa gijutsu chosa kaihatsu (rikuiki senso tansa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This is a compilation of the data on the coal resource land area shallow seam survey conducted in FY 1998 as the basic survey for coal resource development. The trend survey was made from July 26 to August 6, 1998. The purposes of the survey are to study the image analysis method, examples of application of the reflection seismic survey to coal, and inversion technology. The data compilation includes the following: 1. Minutes of the proceedings of the FY 1998 Japan-Australia steering committee (in English). 2. Data/proceedings of the FY 1998 Japan-Australia technical study committee (in English). 3. Results of the GPS measurement of reflection seismic survey traverse lines in Caroona district. 4. List of parameters in the FY 1998 reflection seismic survey data processing. 5. Report on the work of inspection/repair of seismic pulse generator. 6. List of the data on diameter of the test boring conducted in FY 1998. 7. NEDO-DMR CAROONA DDH borehole core pictures. 8. Estimated curves. 9. Report on the trend survey of the FY 1998 coal resource development basic survey (land area shallow seam survey). 10. Pictures. 11. Data on the 1st (FY 1998) new exploration technology study committee. (NEDO)

  1. Recent achievements and trends of research for geophysical prospection of archaeological sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubry, L.; Benech, C.; Hesse, A.

    2001-01-01

    Our times are characterized by an increasing need for prospection particularly within the context of rescue archaeology. Geophysics has an important part to play due to its ability to identify some well defined targets as well as to investigate large areas. Several recent surveys, using carefully selected methods chosen in accordance with the type of expected remain or a combination of methods in order to refine or confirm the interpretation, have demonstrated the expertise of several organisations in a wide variety of archaeological contexts. However, important improvements are still to be expected from the laboratories. Our team, working within the framework of three dissertations, is investigating several original subjects, for which the initial results are presented and discussed here: (1) The use of magnetic susceptibility measurements on wide mesh grids in order to survey extensive areas immediately prior to their occupation or destruction by large modern equipment; (2) Experiments to test a new survey device (Slingram - CS150) able to measure the magnetic susceptibility of the ground; (3) Interpretation of a series of geophysical measurements integrated with other types of data into a G.I.S. (author)

  2. Notes on the history of geophysics in the Ottoman Empire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcep, F.; Ozcep, T.

    2014-09-01

    In Anatolia, the history of geophysical sciences may go back to antiquity (600 BC), namely the period when Thales lived in Magnesia (Asia Minor). In the modern sense, geophysics started with geomagnetic works in the 1600s. The period between 1600 and 1800 includes the measurement of magnetic declination, inclination and magnetic field strength. Before these years, there is a little information, such as how to use a compass, in the Kitab-i Bahriye (the Book of Navigation) of Piri Reis, who is one of the most important mariners of the Ottoman Empire. However, this may not mean that magnetic declination was generally understood. The first scientific book relating to geophysics is the book Fuyuzat-i Miknatissiye that was translated by Ibrahim Müteferrika and printed in 1731. The subject of this book is earth's magnetism. There is also information concerning geophysics in the book Cihannuma (Universal Geography) that was written by Katip Celebi and in the book Marifetname written by Ibrahim Hakki Erzurumlu, but these books are only partly geophysical books. In Istanbul the year 1868 is one of the most important for geophysical sciences because an observatory called Rasathane-i Amire was installed in the Pera region of this city. At this observatory the first systematic geophysical observations such as meteorological, seismological and even gravimetrical were made. There have been meteorological records in Anatolia since 1839. These are records of atmospheric temperature, pressure and humidity. In the Ottoman Empire, the science of geophysics is considered as one of the natural sciences along with astronomy, mineralogy, geology, etc., and these sciences are included as a part of physics and chemistry.

  3. Development of Geophysical Ideas and Institutions in Ottoman Empire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcep, Ferhat; Ozcep, Tazegul

    2015-04-01

    In Anatolia, the history of geophysical sciences may go back to antiquity (600 BC), namely the period when Thales lived in Magnesia (Asia Minor). In the modern sense, geophysics started with geomagnetic works in the 1600s. The period between 1600 and 1800 includes the measurement of magnetic declination, inclination and magnetic field strength. Before these years, there is a little information, such as how to use a compass, in the Kitab-i Bahriye (the Book of Navigation) of Piri Reis, who is one of the most important mariners of the Ottoman Empire. However, this may not mean that magnetic declination was generally understood. The first scientific book relating to geophysics is the book Fuyuzat-i Miknatissiye that was translated by Ibrahim Müteferrika and printed in 1731. The subject of this book is earth's magnetism. There is also information concerning geophysics in the book Cihannuma (Universal Geography) that was written by Katip Celebi and in the book Marifetname written by Ibrahim Hakki Erzurumlu, but these books are only partly geophysical books. In Istanbul the year 1868 is one of the most important for geophysical sciences because an observatory called Rasathane-i Amire was installed in the Pera region of this city. At this observatory the first systematic geophysical observations such as meteorological, seismological and even gravimetrical were made. There have been meteorological records in Anatolia since 1839. These are records of atmospheric temperature, pressure and humidity. In the Ottoman Empire, the science of geophysics is considered as one of the natural sciences along with astronomy, mineralogy, geology, etc., and these sciences are included as a part of physics and chemistry.

  4. The relationship of positive work environments and workplace injury: evidence from the National Nursing Assistant Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughey, Deirdre; McGhan, Gwen; Walsh, Erin M; Rathert, Cheryl; Belue, Rhonda

    2014-01-01

    With estimates of a 51% growth in the number of nursing assistants needed by 2016, there is a critical need to examine workplace factors that negatively contribute to the recruitment and retention of nursing assistants. Studies have shown that high demands, physical stress, and chronic workforce shortages contribute to a working environment that fosters one of the highest workforce injury rates in the United States. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between nursing assistant injury rates and key outcomes, such as job satisfaction and turnover intent, while exploring workplace environment factors, such as injury prevention training, supervisor support, and employee engagement, that can decrease the rates of workplace injury. Data from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey were used to examine the negative effects of workplace injury on nursing assistants and the workplace environment factors that are related to the rate of worker injury. Nursing assistants who experience job-related injuries have lower levels of job satisfaction, increased turnover intentions, and are less likely to recommend their facility as a place to work or seek care services. It was also found that nursing assistant injury rates are related to employee ratings of injury prevention training, supervisor support, and employee engagement. NAs with multiple injuries (>2) were 1.3-1.6 times more likely to report being injured at work than NAs who had not been injured when supervisor support, employee engagement, and training ratings were low. Evidence that health care organizations can use to better understand how workplace injuries occur and insight into ways to reduce the current staggering rate of on-the-job injuries occurring in health care workplaces were offered in this study. The findings also offer empirical support for an extension of the National Institute for Occupational Health and Safety/National Occupational Research Agenda Work Organization Framework for

  5. Psychosocial work factors and first depressive episode: retrospective results from the French national SIP survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedhammer, Isabelle; Chastang, Jean-François

    2015-10-01

    The objective was to explore the associations between psychosocial work factors and first depressive episode. Additional objectives included the study of the frequency and duration of exposure, and the evaluation of the induction period between exposures and outcome and of the reversibility of the effects. The study was based on a sample of 13,648 men and women from the 2006 national representative French SIP survey. Retrospective evaluation was performed for depressive episode for the whole life history, for psychological demands, skill discretion, social support, tension with the public, reward and work-life imbalance for each job, and within each job before and after each major change, and for time-varying covariates. The outcome was the first depressive episode. Statistical analysis was performed using weighted discrete time logistic regression model. High psychological demands and low social support were risk factors for first depressive episode for both genders. The risk increased with the frequency of exposure to these factors. Associations were found with the frequency of exposure to tension with the public among women and to work-life imbalance among men. The risk increased with the duration of exposure to psychological demands and low social support for both genders, however, these associations become non-significant when recent exposure was taken into account. Past exposure older than 2 years was not associated with the outcome. Associations between psychosocial work factors and first depressive episode were observed, including dose-response associations. However, after removal of the exposure, the risk may be reduced after 2 years.

  6. An Exploration Geophysics Course With an Environmental Focus for an Urban Minority Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, P. M.

    2004-12-01

    A hands-on exploration geophysics field course with an environmental focus has been developed with NSF support for use at the City College of New York in Manhattan. To maximize access for the students, no prerequisites beyond introductory earth science and physics are required. The course is taught for three hours on Saturday mornings. This has resulted in it attracting not only regular City College students, but also earth science teachers studying for alternate certification or Master's degrees. After a brief introduction to the nature of geophysics and to concepts in data processing, the course is taught in four three-week modules, one each on seismology, resistivity surveying, electromagnetic ground conductivity, and magnetic measurements. Each module contains one week of theory, a field experience, computer data analysis, and a final report. Field exercises are planned to emphasize teamwork and include realistic urban applications of the techniques. Student surveys done in conjunction with this course provide insights into the motivations and needs of the mostly minority students taking it. In general, these students come to the course already comfortable with teamwork and with working in the field. The questionnaires indicate that their greatest need is increased knowledge of the methods of geophysics and of the problems that can be attacked using it. Most of the students gave high ratings to the course, citing the fieldwork as the part that they most enjoyed. The results of these surveys will be presented, along with examples of the field exercises used. The computer analysis assignments written for this course will also be available.

  7. Digital Underground (Shh. It's really Applied Geophysics!)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdoo, B. G.

    2003-12-01

    Digital Underground (Geology/Physics 241) at Vassar College is an applied geophysics course designed for a liberal arts curriculum, and has nothing to do with Shock G and Tupac Shakur. Applied geophysics courses have a history of using geophysical methods on environmental contamination-type applications (underground storage tanks, leach fields, etc.). Inspired in large part by the Keck Geology Consortium project run by Franklin and Marshall College geophysicist (Robert Sternberg) and archaeologist (James Delle) in an old slave village in Jamaica in 1999, this class examines the history of slavery in New York's Hudson Valley region by way of its forgotten African-American graveyards. This multidisciplinary approach to an issue draws students from across the curriculum- we have had our compliments of geologists and physicists, along with students from sociology, environmental studies, history, and Africana studies. The name of the class and content are designed to attract a non-traditional student of geophysics.- The project-based nature of the class appeals to student yearning for an out-of-classroom experience. The uncontrolled nature of the class demonstrates the complications that occur in real-word situations. The class has in the past broken itself into two teams- a surveying team and an archival research team. Archival research is done (usually by the social scientists in the class) to add a human dimension to the geophysical. The surveying equipment used in delineating these forgotten graveyards includes a Total Station surveyor, an electrical resistivity meter, a magnetometer, and a ground penetrating radar. All students must have a rudimentary understanding of the physics behind the equipment (to the level of where they can explain it to the general public), and the methods used by those studying the archives. This is a project-based class, where the instructor acts as a project manager, and the students make the decisions regarding the survey itself. Every

  8. Geophysical observations at cavity collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jousset, Philippe; Bazargan-Sabet, Behrooz; Lebert, François; Bernardie, Séverine; Gourry, Jean-Christophe

    2010-05-01

    In Lorraine region (France) salt layers at about 200 meters depth are exploited by Solvay using solution mining methodology which consists in extracting the salt by dissolution, collapsing the cavern overburden during the exploitation phase and finally reclaiming the landscape by creating a water area. In this process, one of the main challenges for the exploiting company is to control the initial 120-m diameter collapse so as to minimize possible damages. In order to detect potential precursors and understand processes associated with such collapses, a wide series of monitoring techniques including micro seismics, broad-band seismology, hydro-acoustic, electromagnetism, gas probing, automatic leveling, continuous GPS, continuous gravity and borehole extensometry was set-up in the frame of an in-situ study carried out by the "Research Group for the Impact and Safety of Underground Works" (GISOS, France). Equipments were set-up well before the final collapse, giving a unique opportunity to analyze a great deal of information prior to and during the collapse process which has been successfully achieved on February the 13th, 2009 by controlling the cavity internal pressure. In this work, we present the results of data recorded by a network of 3 broadband seismometers, 2 accelerometers, 2 tilt-meters and a continuously gravity meter. We relate the variations of the brine pumping rate with the evolutions of the induced geophysical signals and finally we propose a first mechanical model for describing the controlled collapse. Beyond the studied case, extrapolation of the results obtained might contribute to the understanding of uncontrolled cavity collapses, such as pit-craters or calderas at volcanoes.

  9. Geophysical characterization of contaminated muddy sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, I. R.; English, G. E.

    1997-01-01

    A non-intrusive, seismic subbottom profile survey of pond sediments was conducted on a former U.S.Naval Facility at Argentia, Newfoundland, to characterize the nature and extent of contamination. An IKB Seistec boomer was used in conjunction with C-CORE's HI-DAPT digital data acquisition and processing system and differential GPS system. The survey was successful in locating regions of soft muddy sediments and in determining the thickness of these deposits. Subsurface buried objects, which are potential sources of pollution, were also identified. Intrusive profiling of the sediment was done with a new tool, the Soil Stiffness Probe, which combines two geophysical measurement systems to determine bulk density and shear stiffness. The muddy sediments were found to be highly 'fluidized', indicating that they could be easily removed with a suction dredge. 4 refs., 5 figs

  10. Do Japanese Work Shorter Hours than before?: Measuring Trends in Market Work and Leisure Using 1976-2006 Japanese Time-Use Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Kuroda, Sachiko

    2009-01-01

    Using Japanese time-use data from the Survey on Time Use and Leisure Activities (STULA), this paper measures trends in average hours worked (market work) and leisure for Japanese over the past three decades. OECD reports at least a 15 percent decline in market work for Japan since the 1970s. However, holding demographic changes constant, we found that market work per week increased from the 1970s until mid 1980s, and has been relatively stable for the last two decades for both male and female...

  11. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Hearing Loss Using the Korean Working Conditions Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Oh Jun

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives The hearing loss of workers can occur when they are affected by age, otologic disease, and work-related risks such as noise and chemicals. Based on the Korean Working Conditions Survey (KWCS) in 2010, this research aimed to estimate the prevalence rate of hearing loss and to identify the risk factors affecting its occurrence. Subjects and Methods The subjects were 10019 employees who completed an interview conducted as part of KWCS in 2010. The prevalence rate of hearing loss according to sex, age, education, income, smoking, drinking, hypertension, industrial type, occupations, employment status, working period, and hazards at the workplace were assessed. The factors that could affect the occurrence of hearing loss were investigated based on a logistic regression analysis. Results The prevalence rate of hearing loss was 2.7%. In a logistic multivariate analysis, sex, age, occupations, working period, noise, and exposure to chemicals showed statistically significant correlations to the occurrence of hearing loss. The adjusted odd ratios were as follows: 1.74 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-2.96] for males, 2.11 (95% CI, 1.14-3.89) for those in their 40s, 2.24 (95% CI, 1.19-4.20) for those in their 50s, 2.21 (95% CI, 1.18-4.15) for manage/professional works, 2.73 (95% CI, 1.69-4.41) for manufacturing, 2.07 (95% CI, 1.36-3.15) for those who have worked for more than 20 years, 1.72 (95% CI, 1.14-2.58) for noise exposure, 1.53 (95% CI, 1.02-2.30) for vibration exposure and 1.58 (95% CI, 1.11-2.24) for chemical exposure. Conclusions The overall occupational and non-occupational risk factors related to employees' hearing loss were reviewed. In addition to the exposure to noise, occupational risks of hearing loss, such as isolated exposure to vibration and chemicals, and combined exposure to noise and these hazards, were identified. Multiple exposure to hazards, along with prolonged noise exposure increased the risk of hearing loss. PMID

  12. Mapping Dual-Degree Programs in Social Work and Public Health: Results From a National Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dory Ziperstein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dramatic changes in the health system due to national health reform are raising important questions regarding the educational preparation of social workers for the new health arena. While dual-degree programs in public health and social work can be an important response to what is needed educationally, little is known about them. The National MSW/MPH Programs Study surveyed MSW/MPH program administrators to better understand the prevalence, models, structure, and challenges of these dual-degree programs. Forty-two programs were identified, and 97.6% of those contacted participated (n=41. Findings indicate that MSW/MPH programs are popular, increasing, geographically dispersed, and drawing talented students interested in trans-disciplinary public health social work practice. Challenges for these programs include the need for greater institutional support, particularly funding, and a general lack of best practices for MSW/MPH education. While findings from this study suggest graduates appear especially well-prepared for leadership and practice in the new health environment, additional research is needed to assess their particular contributions and career trajectories.

  13. The work of physical education professionals in Family Health Support Centers (NASF: a national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sueyla Ferreira da Silva dos Santos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2015v17n6p693   This is a descriptive and quantitative national survey aimed at presenting Health Education practices (HE developed by Physical Education professionals working at NASF in Brazil. Overall, 296 professionals participated in this study, stratified by Brazilian regions and NASF groupings. Electronic interviews were conducted regarding the activities developed at the unity where each NASF professional worked. The main activities reported were gymnastics (40.1%, and walking (29.4%, having as their priority public elderly people (68.8%, groups of hypertensive and diabetic patients (30.9% and young people (48.3%, respectively. The most discussed topics in lectures and orientations was the importance of physical activity (51.4% and the second most cited was the prevention/treatment of comorbities (32.3%. The community spaces most utilized by Physical Education professionals to develop activities were: public squares, community centers and schools in the southeastern and southern regions of Brazil, and religious entities in the northeastern and Midwestern regions. In conclusion, in spite of the diversity of activities developed in different regions of Brazil, there is predominance of traditional Physical Education contents, which reflect the need of permanent education of such professionals to improve the quality of services offered to the community.

  14. [How do residents in urology evaluate their daily routine at work-a survey analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necknig, U; Borowitz, R; Wöhr, M; Leyh, H; Weckermann, D

    2018-05-28

    The changing conditions in German hospitals is causing a shortage of young people. In order to identify starting point for improvements, the Bavarian association of urologists in collaboration with the German Society of Residents in Urology (GeSRU) conducted an online survey among residents in urology in summer of 2017. A standardised survey composed of 38 questions was distributed to participants through a mailing list of the GeSRU. Most questions were closed-ended; however, some did allow participants to respond by means of an open-ended answer. A total of 218 participants provided a total of 11,764 responses: 58% were female and 42% were male. Over 70% were aged between 31 and 35 years. In all, 29% of participants responded negatively to the question asking whether they feel like their medical studies at university prepared them well for the daily routine in their workplace. Participants particularly demanded a higher degree of practical experience during their studies, as well as more teaching of soft skills. In relation to choosing their specialisation, participants considered the intern year and their clinical traineeships as crucial factors. Participants did express appreciation of their field of specialization in relation to the broad range of available treatments, the opportunity of further specialising, the clientele of patients, the opportunity of working in a small team, innovations, and the high possibilities of opening their own medical practice. On a personal level, participants specifically wished for a more structured plan relating to their further internship, involving regular meetings. They also expressed the wish for more personalised career plans, more flexible work hours, and improved advanced training, both internally and externally. With the aim of making urology even more attractive, participants' wishes and suggestions should be taken into consideration. These, in general, involve a more structured training plan, better working

  15. New production concepts in the clothing industry : new ways of work for unpredictable markets : results from a European survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhondt, S.; Peeters, M.H.H.

    1994-01-01

    This brochure summarises the results of a survey carried out among 86 clothing companies representing eight different West European countries. The research examined the effect of new ways of work in clothing companies on personnel policy, on the organisation of work and on the effectiveness of the

  16. Security and health protection while working with a computer. Survey into the knowledge of users about legal and other requirements.

    OpenAIRE

    Šmejkalová, Petra

    2005-01-01

    This bachelor thesis is aimed at the knowledge of general computer users with regards to work security and health protection. It summarizes the relevant legislation and recommendations of ergonomic specialists. The practical part analyses results of a survey, which examined the computer workplaces and user habits when working with a computer.

  17. Work satisfaction, burnout and gender-based inequalities among ophthalmologists in India: A survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Jain, Pooja; Agarwal, Aniruddha; Jain, Vandana

    2017-01-01

    Ophthalmology is a rapidly evolving branch of medicine and advancing technology has raised the bar of patient expectations and outcomes. However, studies that assess physician stress and satisfaction especially in developing countries are limited in literature. This index study aims at looking at the levels of job satisfaction, burnout and perception of gender disparity among ophthalmologists in India. An Internet-based survey was sent out to ophthalmologists. 297 respondents replied with responses, which were anonymized and analyzed. Of the 297 respondents, 101 were female and 196 were male ophthalmologists. The mean duration of practice of the respondents was 14.66 years. 54.21% (161/297) responded affirmatively when asked if they were satisfied with their careers. 19% (56/297) were not satisfied. 26.94% (80/297) replied that although they were satisfied, they wished they had more time for family. A quarter (25.2%; 63 out of 250) of the respondents felt burnt-out at that stage of their careers. 68.35% (203/297) of the respondents felt that being a woman ophthalmologist in India was more challenging than being a male ophthalmologist. This perception was significantly more amongst women respondents (p working hours, and having to work harder were the challenges faced by female ophthalmologists. There was a significant difference in perception between male and female ophthalmologists regarding the presence of disparity in earnings given equal qualifications and experience with more women responding in the affirmative. Indian ophthalmologists have personally and professionally satisfying careers with low rates of burnout. While good family support and an understanding partner help ophthalmologists achieve good work-life balance, women ophthalmologists perceive a gender-based disparity when it comes to proving their worth and getting suitably remunerated.

  18. Immersive, hands-on, team-based geophysical education at the University of Texas Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saustrup, S.; Gulick, S. P.; Goff, J. A.; Davis, M. B.; Duncan, D.; Reece, R.

    2013-12-01

    The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG), part of the Jackson School of Geosciences, annually offers a unique and intensive three-week marine geology and geophysics field course during the spring/summer semester intersession. Now entering its seventh year, the course transitions students from a classroom environment through real-world, hands-on field acquisition, on to team-oriented data interpretation, culminating in a professional presentation before academic and industry employer representatives. The course is available to graduate students and select upper-division undergraduates, preparing them for direct entry into the geoscience workforce or for further academic study. Geophysical techniques used include high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, sediment coring, grab sampling, data processing, and laboratory analysis of sediments. Industry-standard equipment, methods, software packages, and visualization techniques are used throughout the course, putting students ahead of many of their peers in this respect. The course begins with a 3-day classroom introduction to the field area geology, geophysical methods, and computing resources used. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of hands-on field and lab work aboard two research vessels: UTIG's 22-foot, aluminum hulled Lake Itasca; and NOAA's 82-foot high-speed catamaran R/V Manta. The smaller vessel handles primarily shallow, inshore targets using multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, and grab sampling. The larger vessel is used both inshore and offshore for multichannel seismic, CHIRP profiling, multibeam bathymetry, gravity coring, and vibracoring. Field areas to date have included Galveston and Port Aransas, Texas, and Grand Isle, Louisiana, with further work in Grand Isle scheduled for 2014. In the field, students work in teams of three, participating in survey design, instrument set-up, field deployment

  19. “Do the Germans Really Work Six Weeks More than the French?” – Measuring Working Time with the Labour Force Survey in France and Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Körner Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Measuring working time is not only an important objective of the EU Labour Force Survey (LFS, but also a highly demanding task in terms of methodology. Against the background of a recent debate on the comparability of working time estimates in France and Germany, this article presents a comparative assessment of the measurement of working time in the Labour Force Survey obtained in both countries. It focuses on the measurement of the hours actually worked, the key working-time concept for short-term economic analysis and the National Accounts. The contribution systematically analyses the differences in the measurement approaches used in France and Germany in order to identify the methodological effects that hinder comparability. It comes to the conclusion that the LFS overstates the difference in hours actually worked in France and Germany and identifies question comprehension, rounding, editing effects, as well as certain aspects of the sampling design, as crucial factors of a reliable measurement in particular of absences from work during the reference week. We recommend continuing the work started in the European Statistical System towards the development of a model questionnaire in order to improve cross-national harmonisation of key variables such as hours actually worked.

  20. Methodology of Detailed Geophysical Examination of the Areas of World Recognized Religious and Cultural Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppelbaum, Lev

    2010-05-01

    the low altitudes (3-5 meters) will help geophysical cover all the studied area with a regular observation step (Eppelbaum, 2008). At the final step all these measurements (including results of the previous works) could be compiled to 4D models of different geophysical parameters (Eppelbaum and Ben-Avraham, 2002; Eppelbaum et al., 2010). Analysis of temperature field in the boreholes drilled in the vicinity of the studied site will permit to estimate the temperature (e.g., Eppelbaum et al., 2006c) in the historical period when this artifact was constructed and, correspondingly, utilize this characteristic for investigation of mechanical and other properties of the ancient building material. Studying of temporal variations of magnetic (e.g., Finkelstein and Eppelbaum) and VLF fields can be also used for determination of nature of some buried ancient remains. The geophysical investigations must be combined with geochemical, paleostructural, paleobiogeographical, paleomorphological and other methods (Eppelbaum et al., 2010). Application of informational parameters (Khesin et al., 1996; Eppelbaum et al., 2003b) will permit to present all available data by the use of integral convolution units. REFERENCES Eppelbaum, L.V., 1999. Quantitative interpretation of resistivity anomalies using advanced methods developed in magnetic prospecting. Trans. of the XXIV General Assembly of the Europ. Geoph. Soc., Strasburg 1 (1), p.166. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2000. Applicability of geophysical methods for localization of archaeological targets: An introduction. Geoinformatics, 11, No.1, 19-28. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2005. Multilevel observations of magnetic field at archaeological sites as additional interpreting tool. Proceed. of the 6th Conference of Archaeological Prospection, Roma, Italy, 4 pp. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2008. Remote operated vehicle geophysical survey using magnetic and VLF methods: proposed schemes for data processing and interpretation. Proceed. of the Symp. on the Application of

  1. Geophysical background and as-built target characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, J.W.

    1994-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) has provided a facility for DOE, other Government agencies, and the private sector to evaluate and document the utility of specific geophysical measurement techniques for detecting and defining cultural and environmental targets. This facility is the Rabbit Valley Geophysics Performance Evaluation Range (GPER). Geophysical surveys prior to the fiscal year (FY) 1994 construction of new test cells showed the primary test area to be relatively homogeneous and free from natural or man-made artifacts, which would generate spurious responses in performance evaluation data. Construction of nine new cell areas in Rabbit Valley was completed in June 1994 and resulted in the emplacement of approximately 150 discrete targets selected for their physical and electrical properties. These targets and their geophysical environment provide a broad range of performance evaluation parameters from ''very easy to detect'' to ''challenging to the most advanced systems.'' Use of nonintrusive investigative techniques represents a significant improvement over intrusive characterization methods, such as drilling or excavation, because there is no danger of exposing personnel to possible hazardous materials and no risk of releasing or spreading contamination through the characterization activity. Nonintrusive geophysical techniques provide the ability to infer near-surface structure and waste characteristics from measurements of physical properties associated with those targets

  2. Geophysical methods in protected environments. Electrical resistivity tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio Sánchez-Aguililla, F.M.; Ramiro-Camacho, A.; Ibarra Torre, P.

    2017-01-01

    There is a strong interest in protecting the environment with the aim of its long term preservation. Sometimes the heritage value of these natural areas is related to their biodiversity as there are restricted ecosystems that depend directly on them. In other cases there a singular geological record might exist, essential for the understanding of certain processes affecting the planet, such as volcanic events or glacial periods. To achieve the protection and conservation of these areas it is necessary to generate knowledge about the distribution of geological materials and groundwater masses, to study the parameters that dominate the behaviour of these systems and then define those elements that require special protection or attention. In these protected environments, research methods with a minimal environmental impact should be used. Therefore, indirect methods, such as geophysical techniques, are reliable and complementary tools with a minimum environmental impact and are therefore useful for research these unique areas. The IGME has conducted several geophysical surveys in different protected environments in Spain with the aim of achieving a better understanding, and thus facilitate their preservation and exploitation in a sustainable manner. In this paper we present a review of some case studies where geophysical methods have been used. In all the cases electrical resistivity tomography has been the axis of the geophysical research and stands out due to its great effectiveness. The main objective of this communication is to divulgate and increase awareness of the important role that these geophysical methods can play in the sustainable study of these unique places. [es

  3. A Survey to Determine Decision-Making Styles of Working Paramedics and Student Paramedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, J L; Bienkowski, A; Travers, A H; Calder, L A; Walker, M; Tavares, W; Croskerry, P

    2016-05-01

    Two major processes underlie human decision-making: experiential (intuitive) and rational (conscious) thinking. The predominant thinking process used by working paramedics and student paramedics to make clinical decisions is unknown. A survey was administered to ground ambulance paramedics and to primary care paramedic students. The survey included demographic questions and the Rational Experiential Inventory-40, a validated psychometric tool involving 40 questions. Twenty questions evaluated each thinking style: 10 assessed preference and 10 assessed ability to use that style. Responses were provided on a five-point Likert scale, with higher scores indicating higher affinity for the style in question. Analysis included both descriptive statistics and t tests to evaluate differences in thinking style. The response rate was 88.4% (1172/1326). Paramedics (n=904) had a median age of 36 years (IQR 29-42) and most were male (69.5%) and primary or advanced care paramedics (PCP=55.5%; ACP=32.5%). Paramedic students (n=268) had a median age of 23 years (IQR 21-26), most were male (63.1%) and had completed high school (31.7%) or an undergraduate degree (25.4%) prior to paramedic training. Both groups scored their ability to use and favourability toward rational thinking significantly higher than experiential thinking. The mean score for rational thinking was 3.86/5 among paramedics and 3.97/5 among paramedic students (prational over experiential thinking. This information adds to our current knowledge on paramedic decision-making and is potentially important for developing continuing education and clinical support tools.

  4. Nurses who work in rural and remote communities in Canada: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Martha L P; Stewart, Norma J; Kulig, Judith C; Anguish, Penny; Andrews, Mary Ellen; Banner, Davina; Garraway, Leana; Hanlon, Neil; Karunanayake, Chandima; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Koren, Irene; Kosteniuk, Julie; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Mix, Nadine; Moffitt, Pertice; Olynick, Janna; Penz, Kelly; Sluggett, Larine; Van Pelt, Linda; Wilson, Erin; Zimmer, Lela

    2017-05-23

    In Canada, as in other parts of the world, there is geographic maldistribution of the nursing workforce, and insufficient attention is paid to the strengths and needs of those providing care in rural and remote settings. In order to inform workforce planning, a national study, Nursing Practice in Rural and Remote Canada II, was conducted with the rural and remote regulated nursing workforce (registered nurses, nurse practitioners, licensed or registered practical nurses, and registered psychiatric nurses) with the intent of informing policy and planning about improving nursing services and access to care. In this article, the study methods are described along with an examination of the characteristics of the rural and remote nursing workforce with a focus on important variations among nurse types and regions. A cross-sectional survey used a mailed questionnaire with persistent follow-up to achieve a stratified systematic sample of 3822 regulated nurses from all provinces and territories, living outside of the commuting zones of large urban centers and in the north of Canada. Rural workforce characteristics reported here suggest the persistence of key characteristics noted in a previous Canada-wide survey of rural registered nurses (2001-2002), namely the aging of the rural nursing workforce, the growth in baccalaureate education for registered nurses, and increasing casualization. Two thirds of the nurses grew up in a community of under 10 000 people. While nurses' levels of satisfaction with their nursing practice and community are generally high, significant variations were noted by nurse type. Nurses reported coming to rural communities to work for reasons of location, interest in the practice setting, and income, and staying for similar reasons. Important variations were noted by nurse type and region. The proportion of the rural nursing workforce in Canada is continuing to decline in relation to the proportion of the Canadian population in rural and remote

  5. Geophysical borehole logging, dummy-sonding and optical imaging of the borehole OL-KR24 at Olkiluoto 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majapuro, J.

    2006-03-01

    Suomen Malmi Oy conducted geophysical borehole logging, dummy-sonding and optical imaging surveys of the borehole OL-KR24 at the Olkiluoto site in Eurajoki during 1.10.2005 - 4.10.2005. The survey is a part of Posiva Oy's detailed investigation program for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The methods applied are caliper survey and optical imaging. The assignment included the field work of surveys, interpretation and processing of the data. The report describes the field operation, equipment as well as processing procedures and shows the obtained results and their quality in the appendices. The raw and processed data are delivered digitally in WellCAD and Excel format. (orig.)

  6. The association of work stress with somatic symptoms in Chinese working women: a large cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Ding, Hui; Han, Wei; Jin, Lei; Kong, Ling-Na; Mao, Kang-Na; Wang, Hong; Wu, Jiang-Ping; Wu, Ying; Yang, Liu; Zhou, Yu; Wang, You-Xin; Wang, Wei; Loerbroks, Adrian; Angerer, Peter

    2016-10-01

    It has been suggested that the relationship between work stress and somatic symptoms (e.g., cardiopulmonary, gastrointestinal complaints, general pain, and fatigue) is particularly pronounced in women. As evidence from China is sparse, we used a large sample of Chinese working women to test those potential associations. Data were obtained from a cross-sectional study of 6826 working women in five urban areas in China who were free from major clinical disease. The sample was drawn from five occupations (physicians, nurses, school teachers, bank employees, and industrial workers). The Effort-Reward Imbalance Questionnaire and Patient Health Questionnaire-15 were used to measure work stress and somatic symptoms, respectively. Multivariate ordinal logistic regression was performed to analyze the associations. 52.6% participants reported high work stress in terms of concurrent high effort and low reward. The distribution of severity of somatic symptoms covered the full range from minimal (37.3%) and low (30.6%), to medium (19.7%) and high (12.4%). The adjusted odds ratio of somatic symptoms by high work stress was 2.45 (95% confidence interval=2.24-2.68), and all single psychosocial work factors (effort, reward, and over-commitment) exerted substantial effects on somatic symptoms (odds ratios>2.00). Work stress is strongly associated with somatic symptoms in Chinese working women. Future longitudinal studies and intervention studies are needed to understand and improve women's psychosocial work environment and their psychosomatic health in China and elsewhere. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. National survey of psychotherapy training in psychiatry, psychology, and social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Myrna M; Verdeli, Helen; Gameroff, Marc J; Bledsoe, Sarah E; Betts, Kathryn; Mufson, Laura; Fitterling, Heidi; Wickramaratne, Priya

    2006-08-01

    Approximately 3% of the US population receives psychotherapy each year from psychiatrists, psychologists, or social workers. A modest number of psychotherapies are evidence-based therapy (EBT) in that they have been defined in manuals and found efficacious in at least 2 controlled clinical trials with random assignment that include a control condition of psychotherapy, placebo, pill, or other treatment and samples of sufficient power with well-characterized patients. Few practitioners use EBT. To determine the amount of EBT taught in accredited training programs in psychiatry, psychology (PhD and PsyD), and social work and to note whether the training was elective or required and presented as a didactic (coursework) or clinical supervision. A cross-sectional survey of a probability sample of all accredited training programs in psychiatry, psychology, and social work in the United States. Responders included training directors (or their designates) from 221 programs (73 in psychiatry, 63 in PhD clinical psychology, 21 in PsyD psychology, and 64 in master's-level social work). The overall response rate was 73.7%. Main Outcome Measure Requiring both a didactic and clinical supervision in an EBT. Although programs offered electives in EBT and non-EBT, few required both a didactic and clinical supervision in EBT, and most required training was non-EBT. Psychiatry required coursework and clinical supervision in the largest percentage of EBT (28.1%). Cognitive behavioral therapy was the EBT most frequently offered and required as a didactic in all 3 disciplines. More than 90% of the psychiatry training programs were complying with the new cognitive behavior therapy requirement. The 2 disciplines with the largest number of students and emphasis on clinical training-professional clinical psychology (PsyD) and social work-had the largest percentage of programs (67.3% and 61.7%, respectively) not requiring a didactic and clinical supervision in any EBT. There is a

  8. Basic elements of nuclear geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordemann, D.J.R.; Pereira, E.B.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear Geophysics applies the nuclear radiation detection methodology to the geosciences, specially to study the dynamical processes of the lithosphere, the hydrosphere and the atmosphere as well as some aspects of planetology and astrophysics. Here the main methods are described: alpha-ray and gamma-ray spectrometry, the interaction of alpha and gamma radiation with matter and the detectors used (grid chambers, surface barrier silicon detector for alpha radiation; and sodium iodide thallium activated phosphors, hyperpure and lithium drifted germanium semiconductor detectors for gamma radiation). The principal applications of Nuclear Geophysics are given as examples to ilustrate the use of the methods described. (AUthor) [pt

  9. How social processes distort measurement: the impact of survey nonresponse on estimates of volunteer work in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Katharine G; Presser, Stanley; Helms, Sara

    2009-01-01

    The authors argue that both the large variability in survey estimates of volunteering and the fact that survey estimates do not show the secular decline common to other social capital measures are caused by the greater propensity of those who do volunteer work to respond to surveys. Analyses of the American Time Use Survey (ATUS)--the sample for which is drawn from the Current Population Survey (CPS)--together with the CPS volunteering supplement show that CPS respondents who become ATUS respondents report much more volunteering in the CPS than those who become ATUS nonrespondents. This difference is replicated within subgroups. Consequently, conventional adjustments for nonresponse cannot correct the bias. Although nonresponse leads to estimates of volunteer activity that are too high, it generally does not affect inferences about the characteristics of volunteers.

  10. We’re Working On It: Transferring the Sloan Digital Sky Survey from Laboratory to Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley E. Sands

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on the transfer of a massive scientific dataset from a national laboratory to a university library, and from one kind of workforce to another. We use the transfer of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS archive to examine the emergence of a new workforce for scientific research data management. Many individuals with diverse educational backgrounds and domain experience are involved in SDSS data management: domain scientists, computer scientists, software and systems engineers, programmers, and librarians. These types of positions have been described using terms such as research technologist, data scientist, e-science professional, data curator, and more. The findings reported here are based on semi-structured interviews, ethnographic participant observation, and archival studies from 2011-2013. The library staff conducting the data storage and archiving of the SDSS archive faced two performance problems. The preservation specialist and the system administrator worked together closely to discover and implement solutions to the slow data transfer and verification processes. The team overcame these slow-downs by problem solving, working in a team, and writing code. The library team lacked the astronomy domain knowledge necessary to meet some of their preservation and curation goals. The case study reveals the variety of expertise, experience, and individuals essential to the SDSS data management process. A variety of backgrounds and educational histories emerge in the data managers studied. Teamwork is necessary to bring disparate expertise together, especially between those with technical and domain education. The findings have implications for data management education, policy and relevant stakeholders. This article is part of continuing research on Knowledge Infrastructures.

  11. Australasian emergency nurses' willingness to attend work in a disaster: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbon, Paul; Ranse, Jamie; Cusack, Lynette; Considine, Julie; Shaban, Ramon Z; Woodman, Richard J; Bahnisch, Laura; Kako, Mayumi; Hammad, Karen; Mitchell, Belinda

    2013-05-01

    The type of disaster, individual demographic factors, family factors and workplace factors, have been identified in the international, multidisciplinary literature as factors that influence a person's willingness to attend and assist in their workplace during a disaster. However, it is unknown if these factors are applicable to Australasian emergency nurses. The research aims to determine the extent to which Australasian emergency nurses are willing to attend their workplace in a disaster. This research was exploratory and descriptive study design, using online and paper based surveys as a means of data collection. Australasian emergency nurses from two Australasian emergency nursing colleges and four Australian hospitals were recruited to participate. Data analysis was conducted using both descriptive and inferential statistics. In total, 451 Australasian emergency nurses participated in this research. Participants were more willing to attend their workplace during a conventional disaster (p ≤ 0.001), if they worked full-time (p = 0.01), had received formal education pertaining to disasters (p ≤ 0.001), had a family disaster plan (p = 0.008), did not have children (p = 0.001) and worked in an environment in which they perceived their colleagues, managers and organisation to be prepared. The factors that influenced Australasian emergency nurses to attend their workplace in a disaster were similar to that described in the international multidisciplinary literature. Of particular note, improving disaster knowledge and skills, having a family disaster plan and improving the perceptions of the nurses' workplace preparedness can enhance the nurses' willingness to assist in a disaster. Copyright © 2013 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Investigating the probability of detection of typical cavity shapes through modelling and comparison of geophysical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, P.

    2011-12-01

    With a growing need for housing in the U.K., the government has proposed increased development of brownfield sites. However, old mine workings and natural cavities represent a potential hazard before, during and after construction on such sites, and add further complication to subsurface parameters. Cavities are hence a limitation to certain redevelopment and their detection is an ever important consideration. The current standard technique for cavity detection is a borehole grid, which is intrusive, non-continuous, slow and expensive. A new robust investigation standard in the detection of cavities is sought and geophysical techniques offer an attractive alternative. Geophysical techniques have previously been utilised successfully in the detection of cavities in various geologies, but still has an uncertain reputation in the engineering industry. Engineers are unsure of the techniques and are inclined to rely on well known techniques than utilise new technologies. Bad experiences with geophysics are commonly due to the indiscriminate choice of particular techniques. It is imperative that a geophysical survey is designed with the specific site and target in mind at all times, and the ability and judgement to rule out some, or all, techniques. To this author's knowledge no comparative software exists to aid technique choice. Also, previous modelling software limit the shapes of bodies and hence typical cavity shapes are not represented. Here, we introduce 3D modelling software (Matlab) which computes and compares the response to various cavity targets from a range of techniques (gravity, gravity gradient, magnetic, magnetic gradient and GPR). Typical near surface cavity shapes are modelled including shafts, bellpits, various lining and capping materials, and migrating voids. The probability of cavity detection is assessed in typical subsurface and noise conditions across a range of survey parameters. Techniques can be compared and the limits of detection distance

  13. Nurses' satisfaction with shiftwork and associations with work, home and health characteristics: a survey in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Velibor P J M; de Rijk, Angelique E; Boumans, Nicolle P G

    2009-12-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to determine if satisfaction with irregular working hours that are a form of shiftwork operates as a mediator between work and home characteristics and health problems. Shiftwork contributes to health problems, decreased well-being and poorer health habits. It also affects employees' decisions to leave the healthcare sector. Although many nurses voluntarily work shifts, there have been few studies of their satisfaction with irregular working hours when these are a form of shiftwork. A survey was carried out with 144 nurses working in three nursing homes and one care home in the Netherlands. Questionnaires were distributed in 2003 to 233 nurses who worked shifts (response rate 60%). The questionnaire contained items on work and home characteristics, satisfaction with irregular working hours that are a form of shiftwork and health. A new scale to measure satisfaction with irregular working hours was constructed. All work characteristics, but no home characteristics, were associated with satisfaction with irregular working hours. The work characteristics 'job demands' and the home characteristics 'autonomy at home' and 'home demands' were associated with health. Satisfaction with irregular working hours did not mediate between work/home characteristics and health. Those reporting more social support, lower job demands and more job autonomy were more satisfied with their irregular working times that were a form of shiftwork. Satisfaction with irregular working hours is a useful construct that requires further longitudinal study. The results also underline the importance of considering home characteristics when predicting health outcomes.

  14. A survey investigation of the quality of work and life of China's senior female intellectuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L; Sun, J

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the results of a survey of 122 senior female intellectuals from key national universities. Analyses are conducted on value orientation of work and family life, degree of job satisfaction, mental and physical health, and working conditions, family life, and leisure activities. Findings suggest that these women had high spiritual needs, high job satisfaction, but low levels of material life. The domestic burden at home and the high profile employment create a tremendous burden on these women. 89.3% held a sub-senior title in a special area, and 10.7% had senior titles. 59% were aged 51-60 years, and 35.6% were aged 41-50 years. Most lived in nuclear families. 95% of children received a high education or were enrolled in higher education. 90% of husbands were in teaching or research. 49.6% reported greater satisfaction in career success, and 41.7% reported family happiness. 49.6% believed that women's social status was related to educational level. 46.7% believed that confidence and independence was attainable in an institutional setting. There were 1.62 books and materials written per person, and 4.9 research topics received per person. Women aged 41-50 years reported poorer health evaluations than women aged 50-60 years. 79.6% reported their health as quite good or about average. 78.4% indicated that both parents influenced major decisions affecting their children. The majority of husbands were supportive of wives' senior intellectual standing. 96.7% reported that their careers were more important or equal to their families. 95.9% had a dominant or equal role with regard to their husbands. 85% had the major responsibility for shopping, cooking, laundry, and cleaning. About 50% spent time on managing household finances and tutoring children. 32.5% cared for elderly relatives. The average work day was 12 hours. The average television viewing time was 30 minutes/day. It is suggested that policies be formulated that would be favorable to senior

  15. Marine geophysical data management and presentation system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kunte, P.D.

    ) of the National Institute of Oceanography, Goa, India. GPDMPS is designed for the computerized storage retrieval and presentation of marine geophysical data and information. For the systematic management of geophysical data and information, GPDMPS is subdivided...

  16. Do Working Hours and Type of Work Affect Obesity in South Korean Female Workers? Analysis of the Korean Community Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Chang-Gyo; Kang, Mo-Yeol; Bae, Kyu-Jung; Yoon, Jin-Ha

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of obesity and the female labor participation rate have been rapidly increasing in South Korea. To examine the relationship between these factors, we investigated the association between timing and type of work and obesity in the Korean female working population. Data collected by the 2008 Community Health Survey (CHS) were analyzed using a complex, stratified, multistage, probability cluster sampling method. Descriptive analysis of relevant variables was performed using the chi-square test, and work-related variables by work type were identified using multivariate logistic regression. The relationship between long working hours, night/shift work, and body-mass index in female workers and explanatory, stratifying, and dependent variables and covariates was analyzed using multiple logistic regression models. A total of 42,234 CHS participants were eligible for study inclusion. Among both manual and nonmanual workers, working less than 40 (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07-1.31 and aOR 1.29; 95% CI 1.09-0.52, respectively) or more than 60 (aOR 1.18, 95% CI 1.06-1.30 and aOR 1.28, 95% CI 1.04-1.57, respectively) hours per week was significantly associated with obesity after controlling for covariates. However, working type (day or night/shift) was significantly associated with obesity only in nonmanual workers (aOR 1.20, 95% CI 1.01-1.42). When we controlled working type in the model, manual workers who work more than 60 hours show higher likelihood of being obese (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.02-1.18). Working fewer (60) hours per week is significantly associated with obesity in the Korean female working population, regardless of the type of work. The type of work (day vs. night/shift work) was significantly associated with obesity only in only nonmanual workers.

  17. Conceptual Design of Geophysical Microsatellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matviyenko, S.A.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article covers the issue of Earth gravitational field (EGF parameters measurement from space. The radiophysical method of measurement of gravitational frequency shift of electromagnetic radiation using existent GNSS and its two variants are developed by the author. The designlayout drawing of geophysical microsatellite, which implements the radiophysical method of EGF measurement and provides Earth plasmasphere and magnetosphere monitoring, is offered.

  18. BROADBAND DIGITAL GEOPHYSICAL TELEMETRY SYSTEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Robert L.; Daniels, Jeffrey J.

    1984-01-01

    A system has been developed to simultaneously sample and transmit digital data from five remote geophysical data receiver stations to a control station that processes, displays, and stores the data. A microprocessor in each remote station receives commands from the control station over a single telemetry channel.

  19. Geophysical Institute. Biennial report, 1993-1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The 1993-1994 Geophysical Institute Biennial Report was published in November 1995 by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It contains an overview of the Geophysical Institute, the Director`s Note, and research presentations concerning the following subjects: Scientific Predictions, Space Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, Snow, Ice and Permafrost, Tectonics and Sedimentation, Seismology, Volcanology, Remote Sensing, and other projects.

  20. Geophysical German mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelhardt, W.

    1989-01-01

    This work is about a geological study carried out in the Arroyo Grande region with the proposal to identify a gravimetric anomaly. The sequence of Precambrian quartzite conglomerates determine the auriferous area existence due the surface erosion as well as the heavy minerals in particular the pyrites

  1. Geophysical borehole logging of the boreholes KR23 extension, KR29 and KR29b at Olkiluoto 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahti, M.; Heikkinen, E.

    2005-04-01

    Suomen Malmi Oy conducted geophysical borehole logging of the boreholes KR23 extension, KR25b, KR29 and KR29b at the Olkiluoto site in Eurajoki during October 2004. The survey is a part of Posiva Oy's detailed investigation program for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The assignment included the field work and processing of the acoustic data. The report describes the field operation, equipment as well as processing procedures and shows the obtained results and their quality in the appendices. The raw and processed data are delivered digitally in WellCAD and Excel format. (orig.)

  2. Geophysical borehole logging of the boreholes KR23 extension, KR29 and KR29b at Olkiluoto 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahti, M. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland); Heikkinen, E. [JP-Fintact Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    2005-04-15

    Suomen Malmi Oy conducted geophysical borehole logging of the boreholes KR23 extension, KR25b, KR29 and KR29b at the Olkiluoto site in Eurajoki during October 2004. The survey is a part of Posiva Oy's detailed investigation program for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The assignment included the field work and processing of the acoustic data. The report describes the field operation, equipment as well as processing procedures and shows the obtained results and their quality in the appendices. The raw and processed data are delivered digitally in WellCAD and Excel format. (orig.)

  3. Geophysical borehole logging of the boreholes KR37, KR37B and KR38, at Olkiluoto 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majapuro, J.

    2006-03-01

    Suomen Malmi Oy conducted geophysical borehole logging of the boreholes KR37, KR37b and KR38 at the Olkiluoto site in Eurajoki during September and October 2005. The survey is a part of Posiva Oy's detailed investigation program for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The assignment included the field work and processing of the acoustic data. The report describes the field operation, equipment as well as processing procedures and shows the obtained results and their quality in the appendices. The raw and processed data are delivered digitally in WellCAD and Excel format. (orig.)

  4. Geophysical logging and imaging of shallow drillholes ONK-PP262 and ONK-274 at Olkiluoto in 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarvainen, A.-M.

    2011-11-01

    Suomen Malmi Oy conducted geophysical drillhole logging as well as optical and acoustic imaging of shallow drillholes ONK-PP262 and ONK-PP274 at ONKALO in the investigation niche ONK-TKU-4 (Hydco) in May and in December 2010. The survey is a part of Posiva Oy's detailed investigation program for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The assignment included the field work and data processing. The report describes field operation, equipment as well as processing procedures and shows the obtained results and an analysis of their quality in the appendices. The raw and processed data are delivered digitally in WellCAD, PDF and Excel format. (orig.)

  5. Geophysical logging and imaging of characterisation drillholes ONK-KR13, ONK-KR14 and ONK-KR15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarvainen, A.-M.

    2011-08-01

    Suomen Malmi Oy conducted geophysical drillhole logging as well as optical and acoustic imaging of drillholes ONK-KR13, ONK-KR14 and ONK-KR15 at ONKALO in June-July 2010 and in March 2011. The survey is a part of Posiva Oy's detailed investigation program for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The assignment included the field work and data processing. The report describes field operation, equipment as well as processing procedures and shows the obtained results and an analysis of their quality in the appendices. The raw and processed data are delivered digitally in WellCAD, PDF and Excel format. (orig.)

  6. Work stress, work motivation and their effects on job satisfaction in community health workers: a cross-sectional survey in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Hu, Hongyan; Zhou, Hao; He, Changzhi; Fan, Lihua; Liu, Xinyan; Zhang, Zhong; Li, Heng; Sun, Tao

    2014-06-05

    It is well documented that both work stress and work motivation are key determinants of job satisfaction. The aim of this study was to examine levels of work stress and motivation and their contribution to job satisfaction among community health workers in Heilongjiang Province, China. Cross-sectional survey. Heilongjiang Province, China. The participants were 930 community health workers from six cities in Heilongjiang Province. Multistage sampling procedures were used to measure socioeconomic and demographic status, work stress, work motivation and job satisfaction. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess key determinants of job satisfaction. There were significant differences in some subscales of work stress and work motivation by some of the socioeconomic characteristics. Levels of overall stress perception and scores on all five work stress subscales were higher in dissatisfied workers relative to satisfied workers. However, levels of overall motivation perception and scores on the career development, responsibility and recognition motivation subscales were higher in satisfied respondents relative to dissatisfied respondents. The main determinants of job satisfaction were occupation; age; title; income; the career development, and wages and benefits subscales of work stress; and the recognition, responsibility and financial subscales of work motivation. The findings indicated considerable room for improvement in job satisfaction among community health workers in Heilongjiang Province in China. Healthcare managers and policymakers should take both work stress and motivation into consideration, as two subscales of work stress and one subscale of work motivation negatively influenced job satisfaction and two subscales of work motivation positively influenced job satisfaction. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Work stress, work motivation and their effects on job satisfaction in community health workers: a cross-sectional survey in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Hu, Hongyan; Zhou, Hao; He, Changzhi; Fan, Lihua; Liu, Xinyan; Zhang, Zhong; Li, Heng; Sun, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Objective It is well documented that both work stress and work motivation are key determinants of job satisfaction. The aim of this study was to examine levels of work stress and motivation and their contribution to job satisfaction among community health workers in Heilongjiang Province, China. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Heilongjiang Province, China. Participants The participants were 930 community health workers from six cities in Heilongjiang Province. Primary and secondary outcome measures Multistage sampling procedures were used to measure socioeconomic and demographic status, work stress, work motivation and job satisfaction. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess key determinants of job satisfaction. Results There were significant differences in some subscales of work stress and work motivation by some of the socioeconomic characteristics. Levels of overall stress perception and scores on all five work stress subscales were higher in dissatisfied workers relative to satisfied workers. However, levels of overall motivation perception and scores on the career development, responsibility and recognition motivation subscales were higher in satisfied respondents relative to dissatisfied respondents. The main determinants of job satisfaction were occupation; age; title; income; the career development, and wages and benefits subscales of work stress; and the recognition, responsibility and financial subscales of work motivation. Conclusions The findings indicated considerable room for improvement in job satisfaction among community health workers in Heilongjiang Province in China. Healthcare managers and policymakers should take both work stress and motivation into consideration, as two subscales of work stress and one subscale of work motivation negatively influenced job satisfaction and two subscales of work motivation positively influenced job satisfaction. PMID:24902730

  8. Views of junior doctors about whether their medical school prepared them well for work: questionnaire surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Kathryn

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transition from medical student to junior doctor in postgraduate training is a critical stage in career progression. We report junior doctors' views about the extent to which their medical school prepared them for their work in clinical practice. Methods Postal questionnaires were used to survey the medical graduates of 1999, 2000, 2002 and 2005, from all UK medical schools, one year after graduation, and graduates of 2000, 2002 and 2005 three years after graduation. Summary statistics, chi-squared tests, and binary logistic regression were used to analyse the results. The main outcome measure was the level of agreement that medical school had prepared the responder well for work. Results Response rate was 63.7% (11610/18216 in year one and 60.2% (8427/13997 in year three. One year after graduation, 36.3% (95% CI: 34.6, 38.0 of 1999/2000 graduates, 50.3% (48.5, 52.2 of 2002 graduates, and 58.2% (56.5, 59.9 of 2005 graduates agreed their medical school had prepared them well. Conversely, in year three agreement fell from 48.9% (47.1, 50.7 to 38.0% (36.0, 40.0 to 28.0% (26.2, 29.7. Combining cohorts at year one, percentages who agreed that they had been well prepared ranged from 82% (95% CI: 79-87 at the medical school with the highest level of agreement to 30% (25-35 at the lowest. At year three the range was 70% to 27%. Ethnicity and sex were partial predictors of doctors' level of agreement; following adjustment for them, substantial differences between schools remained. In years one and three, 30% and 34% of doctors specified that feeling unprepared had been a serious or medium-sized problem for them (only 3% in each year regarded it as serious. Conclusions The vast knowledge base of clinical practice makes full preparation impossible. Our statement about feeling prepared is simple yet discriminating and identified some substantial differences between medical schools. Medical schools need feedback from graduates about

  9. An Integral, Multidisciplinary and Global Geophysical Field Experience for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, O.; Carrillo, D. J.; Pérez-Campos, X.

    2007-05-01

    The udergraduate program of Geophysical Engineering at the School of Engineering, of the Univesidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), went through an update process that concluded in 2006. As part of the program, the student takes three geophysical prospecting courses (gravity and magnetics, electric, electromagnetics, and seismic methods). The older program required a three-week field experience for each course in order to gradute. The new program considers only one extended field experience. This work stresses the importance of international academic exchange, where undergraduate students could participate, such as the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE), and interaction with research programs, such as the MesoAmerican Subduction Experiment (MASE). Also, we propose a scheeme for this activity based on those examples; both of them have in common real geophysical problems, from which students could benefit. Our proposal covers academic and logistic aspects to be taken into account, enhancing the relevance of interaction between other academic institutions, industry, and UNAM, in order to obtain a broader view of geophysics.

  10. Working conditions of nurses and absenteeism: is there a relationship? An empirical analysis using National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajbhandary, Sameer; Basu, Kisalaya

    2010-10-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between the working conditions and illness- and injury-related absenteeism of full-time Registered Nurses (RNs) and Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs). We used 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses, which was designed to be representative of nurses employed in nursing in Canada in the fall of 2005. We estimated Negative Binomial regression models separately for RNs and LPNs with health related absenteeism as the dependent variable. The regressors include working conditions, work settings, and shift type/length along with socio-demographic variables. Depression is a significant determinant of absenteeism for both RNs and LPNs. However, workload and lack of respect are significant determinant of absenteeism for LPNs but not for RNs. Both RNs and LPNs working in other setting (physician offices, private nursing educations, educational institutions, governments and associations) will have less absenteeism than those working in hospitals. For LPNs, those working in long-term facility will also have less absenteeism than those working in hospitals. The length and type of shift also has significant effect on absenteeism. Improving working conditions with a resulting reduction in absenteeism might be an economic way to increase the labour supply of nurses without increasing new admissions or new recruits. Crown Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Working Conditions and Lifestyle of Female Surgeons Affiliated to the Japan Neurosurgical Society: Findings of Individual and Institutional Surveys

    OpenAIRE

    FUJIMAKI, Takamitsu; SHIBUI, Soichiro; KATO, Yoko; MATSUMURA, Akira; YAMASAKI, Mami; DATE, Isao; HONGO, Kazuhiro; KURODA, Satoshi; MATSUMAE, Mitsunori; NAKAO, Naoyuki; SAKURADA, Kaori; SHIMOKAWA, Shoko; KAYAMA, Takamasa

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the working conditions of female neurosurgeons in Japan, two surveys were conducted by The Japan Neurosurgical Society: one involving female neurosurgeons themselves and the other involving the chiefs of neurosurgical departments. The responses were received from 224 (43.8%) female neurosurgeons and 496 (61.2%) departmental chiefs. About half (50.2%) of the female neurosurgeons were married and 39.2% had children (average number of children, 1.27). Their work was full-time in 8...

  12. 30 CFR 280.51 - What types of geophysical data and information must I submit to MMS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., shallow and deep subbottom profiles, bathymetry, sidescan sonar, gravity and magnetic surveys, and special... and of a quality suitable for processing; (c) Processed geophysical information derived from seismic... interpretive evaluation, reflecting state-of-the-art processing techniques; and (d) Other geophysical data...

  13. Characteristics and Working Conditions of Moonlighting Teachers: Evidence from the 2011-2012 Schools and Staffing Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitchett, Paul G.; Heafner, Tina L.; Harden, Susan B.

    2016-01-01

    Moonlighting, an employment practice where individuals work outside of their primary job, is popular within the public education sector. Using data from the National Center for Education Statistics Schools and Staffing Survey, this study examined both the characteristics and motivations of public school teachers across moonlighting categories.…

  14. The Development, Validation and Use of the Rural and Remote Teaching, Working, Living and Learning Environment Survey (RRTWLLES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Jeffrey; Kennedy, Joy; Young, Janelle

    2015-01-01

    Research in rural and remote schools and communities of Queensland resulted in the development and validation of the Rural and Remote Teaching, Working, Living and Learning Environment Survey (RRTWLLES). Samples of 252 teachers and 191 community members were used to validate the structure of this questionnaire. It was developed within the standard…

  15. Environmental geophysics and geochemistry for contamination mapping and monitoring 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tai Sup; Lee, Sang Kyu; Hong, Young Kook [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); and others

    1995-12-01

    This study aims to provide the technologies which can be practically used for contamination mapping and monitoring. To accomplish this goal, the geophysical and geochemical expertise and techniques commonly used in the mineral resources exploration are employed. In the first year of the three-year-long project, the purpose of the study is to introduce the optimum methodologies among the geophysical and geochemical techniques to tackle the various cases of environmental contamination. To achieve the purpose, case studies of the developed countries were surveyed and analyzed through the various kinds of literatures. The followings are categorized to be solved by geophysical methods: 1) delineation of water system pollution by acid mine drainage and distributions of waste rocks in the closed mine area, 2) defining boundaries of subsurface contamination due to oil seepage, 3) zoning of sea water intrusion in the seashore or subsurface geology highly containing salt, 4) locating of buried metallic wastes such as pipes and drums which can cause the secondary pollution by corrosion, and 5) outlining of the subsurface area polluted by leachate from the landfill. To experiment the above items, various geophysical methods were applied to the corresponding test sites. From these experiments, the applicabilities of the respective geophysical method were analyzed, and the optimum methods were derived for the various pollution types. Furthermore, electric and electromagnetic surveys data processing software were developed to quantitatively interpret and highly resolve the geology. The environmental assignments which can be solved by geochemical methods include: 1) drainage pollution by coal mine effluents, 2)subsurface contamination of oil-spill, 3) sea water intrusion, 4) dispersion of toxic heavy metallic elements in the metal mines, and 5) radon environmental geochemistry. The appropriate test sites for applying the geochemical methods were selected. (Abstract Truncated)

  16. Public Awareness Survey Recommendations of the NHTSA-GHSA Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) developed a basic set of survey questions including information on seat belt use, impaired driving, and speeding. These core questions can ...

  17. Survey on ground water by gamma-ray measurement in civil engineering works

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochiai, T [Nihon Norin Helicopter Co., Ltd., Tokyo

    1982-01-01

    In the fractured zones where ground water exists, the water permeability is generally large, so that the radioactive elements in the depths of the earth rise relatively easily. The high intensity of the gamma-ray from such elements is thus exhibited in the air. A survey on ground water made possible in this way by the aerial method using a helicopter is described. The method has various advantages including the free setting of courses of traverse, low-speed flying at low altitude, which raises the survey accuracy, communication with those on the ground by easy landing, and reduction in survey time. As actual instances, the following surveys are given: mountainous tunnel and water gushing, the permeability of a dam foundation, fractured zones such as collapse and landslide, and mountainous water sources.

  18. A survey on ground water by gamma-ray measurement in civil engineering works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Toshio

    1982-01-01

    In the fractured zones where ground water exists, the water permeability is generally large, so that the radioactive elements in the depths of the earth rise relatively easily. The high intensity of the gamma-ray from such elements is thus exhibited in the air. A survey on ground water made possible in this way by the aerial method using a helicopter is described. The method has various advantages including the free setting of courses of traverse, low-speed flying at low altitude, which raises the survey accuracy, communication with those on the ground by easy landing, and reduction in survey time. As actual instances, the following surveys are given: mountainous tunnel and water gushing, the permeability of a dam foundation, fractured zones such as colapse and landslide, and mountainous water sources. (J.P.N.)

  19. Survey of secular change for the buildings of nuclear fuel facility in JNC Tokai Works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uryu, Mitsuru; Kyue, Tadashi; Satoko, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Toshihiko

    2002-06-01

    Some nuclear facilities of JNC such as Tokai Reprocessing Plant or Tokai Plutonium Fuel plant have been operating over 20 years since their completion. These facilities' buildings are constructed near the seaside, so we are that, we are surveying the secular change, estimating the tendency and counterplan to operate the facilities stably. In this paper, we report the abstract of the result of the survey, and the maintenance stage of the diagnostic techniques etc. (author)

  20. Time spent in physical activity and sedentary behaviors on the working day: the American time use survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Leonardi, Claudia; Johnson, William D; Katzmarzyk, Peter T

    2011-12-01

    To determine time spent on the working day in sleep, work, sedentary behaviors, and light-, moderate-, and vigorous-intensity behaviors by occupation intensity. Data came from 30,758 working respondents to the 2003 to 2009 American Time Use Survey. Mean ± SEM time spent in work, sedentary behaviors, light-, moderate-, and vigorous-intensity activities, and sleep were computed by occupations classified as sedentary, light, moderate, and vigorous intensity. On average, approximately 32% of the 24-hour day was spent sleeping and approximately 31% was spent at work. Time spent in sedentary behaviors outside of work was higher, and light-intensity time was lower, with higher levels of intensity-defined occupation. Those employed in sedentary occupations were sedentary for approximately 11 hours per day, leaving little time to achieve recommended levels of physical activity for overall health.

  1. Applications of geophysics to LLRW sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olhoeft, G.R.

    1984-01-01

    There are many geophysical techniques which noninvasively acquire information about hazardous waste sites. Waste buried in metal drums can be located using magnetic and electromagnetic methods. Ground penetrating radar can provide detailed cross-sectional imagery of the ground to locate metallic and nonmetallic objects, and to delineate water tables and geologic structure. Complex resistivity can locate clay horizons or clay liners and detect organic reactions that may increase the permeability of the clay. Seismic refraction and reflection techniques can detail hydrology and stratigraphy. Microgravity techniques can find local density anomalies that may indicate voids or future subsidence problems. Radiometric techniques can directly detect near-surface radioisotope migration. Nothing works all the time, however. Magnetics cannot detect a badly corroded drum. Complex resistivity cannot detect clay-organic reactions if there are no clays. Ground penetrating radar cannot penetrate high conductivity or high clay content soils. Seismic cannot penetrate loose fill. Each technique has advantages and disadvantages inherent to the method and equipment as well as limitations imposed by the geohydrology at the site of application. Examples from both the Radioactive Waste and Hazardous Chemical Waste programs illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of geophysical methods

  2. Relationships of work-related psychosocial risks, stress, individual factors and burnout - Questionnaire survey among emergency physicians and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilić, Ivana M; Arandjelović, Mirjana Ž; Jovanović, Jovica M; Nešić, Milkica M

    2017-03-24

    Psychosocial risks represent a great challenge for safety and health protection at work in Europe. The purpose of this study has been to determine the relationships of psychosocial risks arising from work, stress, personal characteristics and burnout among physicians and nurses in the Emergency Medical Service (EMS). We performed a cross-sectional study based on a questionnaire survey which contained the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ) and Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (CBI). A total of 88 physicians and 80 nurses completed the survey. Physicians demonstrated higher emotional (mean (M) ± standard deviation (SD) = 74.57±16.85) and cognitive (M±SD = 75.95±13.74) demands as compared to nurses. Both groups had high sensory demands and responsibilities at work, in spite of the low degree of their autonomy. The meaning of work, commitment to the workplace, and insecurity at work were high for both groups. Among all participants, stressful behavior and reactions were within the limits of low values ( 60). Personal and patient-related burnout was high for both groups, where physicians were significantly affected by work-related burnout. The influence at work, degree of freedom at work, social support, sense of coherence, mental health, and problem-focused coping are negatively related to work-related burnout. Based on personal factors and coping styles, emergency physicians and nurses are representing a self-selective professional group that meets high work demands, great responsibility, strong commitment and insecurity at work. Burnout of physicians and nurses in the EMS tends to be ignored, although it has severe consequences on their mental and general health. Med Pr 2017;68(2):178-178. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  3. Geophysical borehole logging and optical imaging of the boreholes KR34, KR35 and KR36, at Olkiluoto 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majapuro, J. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2005-09-15

    Suomen Malmi Oy conducted geophysical borehole logging and optical imaging surveys of the boreholes KR34, KR35 and KR36 at the Olkiluoto site in Eurajoki during May - June 2005. The survey is a part of Posiva Oy's detailed investigation program for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The methods applied are magnetic susceptibility, natural gamma radiation, gamma-gamma density, single point resistance, Wenner-resistivity, borehole radar, full waveform sonic and optical imaging. The assignment included the field work of all surveys, interpretation and processing of the acoustic and borehole radar data. The report describes the field operation, equipment as well as processing procedures and shows the obtained results and their quality in the appendices. The raw and processed data are delivered digitally in WellCAD and Excel format. (orig.)

  4. Geophysical borehole logging and optical imaging of the boreholes KR34, KR35 and KR36, at Olkiluoto 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majapuro, J.

    2005-09-01

    Suomen Malmi Oy conducted geophysical borehole logging and optical imaging surveys of the boreholes KR34, KR35 and KR36 at the Olkiluoto site in Eurajoki during May - June 2005. The survey is a part of Posiva Oy's detailed investigation program for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The methods applied are magnetic susceptibility, natural gamma radiation, gamma-gamma density, single point resistance, Wenner-resistivity, borehole radar, full waveform sonic and optical imaging. The assignment included the field work of all surveys, interpretation and processing of the acoustic and borehole radar data. The report describes the field operation, equipment as well as processing procedures and shows the obtained results and their quality in the appendices. The raw and processed data are delivered digitally in WellCAD and Excel format. (orig.)

  5. [The relationship of work-related psychosocial risk factors with depressive symptoms among Hungarian workers: preliminary results of the Hungarian Work Stress Survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nistor, Katalin; Nistor, Anikó; Ádám, Szilvia; Szabó, Anita; Konkolÿ Thege, Barna; Stauder, Adrienne

    2015-03-01

    Research has shown that psychosocial stress acts as a risk factor for mental disorders. The present study aims at processing the preliminary results of the Hungarian Survey of Work Stress, concerning the relationship between depressive symptoms and work stress. Cross-sectional survey among Hungarian workers was carried out (n = 1058, 27.5% man, 72.5% woman, age 37.2 years, SD = 11 years). Psychosocial factors were measured using the COPSOQ II questionnaire, while BDI-9 was used for the assessment of depressive symptoms. Statistical analysis was carried out applying Spearman's correlation and logistic regression. A quarter of the workers reported moderate or severe symptoms of depression (BDI≥19). The study confirmed the association between depressive symptoms and work-family conflict (OR = 2.21, CI: 1.82-2.68), possibilities for development (OR = 0.76, CI: 0.59-0.97) meaning of work (OR = 0.69, CI: 0.59-0.89) and commitment (OR = 0.60, CI: 0.47-0.78). The results point toward the need of such organizational measures that allow for the reduction of psychosocial stress.

  6. Geophysical interpretation using integral equations

    CERN Document Server

    Eskola, L

    1992-01-01

    Along with the general development of numerical methods in pure and applied to apply integral equations to geophysical modelling has sciences, the ability improved considerably within the last thirty years or so. This is due to the successful derivation of integral equations that are applicable to the modelling of complex structures, and efficient numerical algorithms for their solution. A significant stimulus for this development has been the advent of fast digital computers. The purpose of this book is to give an idea of the principles by which boundary-value problems describing geophysical models can be converted into integral equations. The end results are the integral formulas and integral equations that form the theoretical framework for practical applications. The details of mathematical analysis have been kept to a minimum. Numerical algorithms are discussed only in connection with some illustrative examples involving well-documented numerical modelling results. The reader is assu­ med to have a back...

  7. Geophysical and solar activity indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossy, L.; Lemaire, J.

    1984-04-01

    A large number of geophysicists try to correlate their observations with one or even a series of different geophysical or solar activity indices. Yet the right choice of the most appropriate index with which to correlate depends mainly on our understanding of the physical cause-effect relationship between the new set of observations and the index chosen. This best choice will therefore depend on our good understanding of the methods of measurement and derivation of the adopted index in such correlative studies. It relies also on our awareness of the range of applicability of the indices presently available as well as on our understanding of their limitations. It was to achieve these goals that a series of general lectures on geophysical and solar activity indices was organized by L. Bossy and J. Lemaire (Institut d'Aeronomie Spatiale de Belgique (IASB), Brussels), March 26-29, 1984 at Han-sur-Lesse, Belgium.

  8. Effects of work-related factors on the breastfeeding behavior of working mothers in a Taiwanese semiconductor manufacturer: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi Chun; Wu, Ya-Chi; Chie, Wei-Chu

    2006-06-21

    In recent years, the creation of supportive environments for encouraging mothers to breastfeed their children has emerged as a key health issue for women and children. The provision of lactation rooms and breast pumping breaks have helped mothers to continue breastfeeding after returning to work, but their effectiveness is uncertain. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of worksite breastfeeding-friendly policies and work-related factors on the behaviour of working mothers. This study was conducted at a large Taiwanese semiconductor manufacturer in August-September 2003. Questionnaires were used to collect data on female employees' breastfeeding behaviour, child rearing and work status when raising their most recently born child. A total of 998 valid questionnaires were collected, giving a response rate of 75.3%. The results showed that 66.9% of survey respondents breastfed initially during their maternity leave, which averaged 56 days. Despite the provision of lactation rooms and breast pumping breaks, only 10.6% mothers continued to breastfeed after returning to work, primarily office workers and those who were aware of their company's breastfeeding-friendly policies. In conclusion, breastfeeding-friendly policies can significantly affect breastfeeding behaviour. However, an unfavourable working environment, especially for fab workers, can make it difficult to implement breastfeeding measures. With health professionals emphasizing that the importance of breastfeeding for infant health, and as only females can perform lactation, it is vital that women's work "productive role" and family "reproductive role" be respected and accommodated by society.

  9. Geophysical applications for oil sand mine tailings management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, D.; Bauman, P. [WorleyParsons, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Geophysical techniques are applied throughout a mine's life cycle to facilitate siting, constructing and monitoring of tailings dumps and ponds. This presentation described 3 case studies from the Athabasca region in northeast Alberta that demonstrated some of the concerns associated with oil sand mine tailings, and the information that geophysical surveys can provide. The objectives of these studies were to determine the lateral and depth extents of elevated conductivities of soil and groundwater that have high salt concentration from the tailings sand pore fluid. Due to high chloride concentrations within the tailings material, salt within the root zone may affect vegetation. A terrain conductivity survey was designed to map the lateral extents of salinity impact, while an electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) survey was used to delineate the tailings sand leachate at depth. The proper management of oil sand tailings facilities is vital to the life cycle of a mine. It was concluded that geophysical techniques can be instrumental in managing several engineering and environmental challenges, from Pleistocene channel mapping, to tailings pond settling characteristics, to reclaiming tailings sands. 1 ref., 7 figs.

  10. Reconsidering Volcanic Ocean Island Hydrology: Recent Geophysical and Drilling Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D. M.; Pierce, H. A.; Lautze, N. C.

    2017-12-01

    Recent results of geophysical surveys and exploratory drilling in Hawaii have suggested that Hawaii's hydrogeology may be more complex than has been generally recognized. Instead of a more-or-less homogeneous pile of highly permeable eruptive basalts that are intermittently punctuated by volcanic dikes confined to calderas and rift zones, we are finding that dike compartmentalization is occurring outside of recognized rift zones, leading to significantly higher volumes of stored groundwater within the island. Analysis of recent geophysical surveys have shown local water table elevations that are substantially higher than can be accounted for by the high hydraulic conductivities of Hawaiian basalts. Recent diamond wireline drilling results have also shown that sub-horizontal variations in permeability, associated with significant changes in eruptive character (e.g. explosive vs effusive activity) are acting as significant perching and confining bodies over significant aerial extents and suggest that these features also contribute to increased storage of recharge. Not only is storage much higher than previously assumed, these features appear to impact subsurface groundwater flow in ways that are not accounted for in traditional methods of computing sustainable yields for near shore aquifers: where buried confining formations extend to depths well below sea level, higher elevation recharge is being intercepted and diverted to deep submarine groundwater discharge well below depths that are typically investigated or quantified. We will provide a summary of the recent geophysical survey results along with a revised conceptual model for groundwater circulation within volcanic ocean islands.

  11. Survey dataset on work-life conflict of women in the construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunji-Olayeni, Patience F; Afolabi, Adedeji O; Adewale, Bukola A; Fagbenle, Ayoola O

    2018-08-01

    Work-life conflict can have a detrimental effect on family life, particularly for women who have to work in order to support their families financially. The data set presents the views of 50 female construction professionals in Lagos, Nigeria through a purposive sampling technique with the aid of questionnaire. Categorical Regression was used to assess the effect of work pressure on family expectations. The features of the respondents in terms of profession, years of experience, office location and household characteristics were presented in bar chart. Analysis of the data can provide information on the work experiences of women in the construction industry particularly work load, hours worked per day, work on weekends and work on holidays. The data can also provide insights on the family expectations that are significantly affected by work pressure.

  12. Geophysical methods in uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, K.

    1989-01-01

    In uranium prospecting, exploration, milling, and mining there is an urgent need to have information on the concentration of uranium at all steps of handling uranium containing materials. To gain this information in an effective way modern geophysical methods have to be applied. Publications of the IAEA and NEA in this field are reviewed in order to characterize the state of the art of these methods. 55 refs

  13. Conflict between work and family roles and satisfaction among nurses in different shift systems in Croatia: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunić, Ana; Gregov, Ljiljana

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the perception of conflict between work and family roles and job, family, and life satisfaction among nurses in Croatia. One hundred and twenty-nine nurses (married mothers) working in hospitals in Zadar, Šibenik, and Split were divided in four groups according to their worktime schedule. The participants completed a survey, which included a set of sociodemographic-type questions, questions about the level and allocation of family responsibilities between spouses, and scales measuring the perceived negative effects of worktime, psychological demands of the work, work-family conflict, and semantic differential scales for measuring the affective and cognitive-evaluative component of job, family, and life satisfaction. This was the first study in Croatia to deal with work-family conflict among nurses or workers with different shift systems.The results of this study indicate that nurses working morning shifts only experienced less conflict between work and family than other groups of nurses, who worked the morning, afternoon, and the night shift. The cognitive-evaluative component of job satisfaction was the highest among morning shift nurses and the lowest in nurses who worked 12-hour shifts, while the affective component of life satisfaction was the lowest in nurses working irregular and backward rotated shifts. These results confirm that shiftwork makes the work-family role conflict even worse. They also support the view that the type of shift rotation matters.

  14. SAGE (Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience): Learning Geophysics by Doing Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiracek, G. R.; Baldridge, W. S.; Biehler, S.; Braile, L. W.; Ferguson, J. F.; Gilpin, B. E.; Pellerin, L.

    2005-12-01

    SAGE, a field-based educational program in applied geophysical methods has been an REU site for 16 years and completed its 23rd year of operation in July 2005. SAGE teaches the major geophysical exploration methods (including seismics, gravity, magnetics, and electromagnetics) and applies them to the solution of specific local and regional geologic problems. These include delineating buried hazardous material; mapping archaeological sites; and studying the structure, tectonics, and water resources of the Rio Grande rift in New Mexico. Nearly 600 graduates, undergraduates, and professionals have attended SAGE since 1983. Since 1990 REU students have numbered 219 coming from dozens of different campuses. There have been 124 underrepresented REU students including 100 women, 14 Hispanics, 7 Native Americans, and 3 African Americans. Tracking of former REU students has revealed that 81% have gone on to graduate school. Keys to the success of SAGE are hands-on immersion in geophysics for one month and a partnership between academia, industry, and a federal laboratory. Successful approaches at SAGE include: 1) application of the latest equipment by all students; 2) continued updating of equipment, computers, and software by organizing universities and industry affiliates; 3) close ties with industry who provide supplemental instruction, furnish new equipment and software, and alert students to the current industry trends and job opportunities; 4) two-team, student data analysis structure that simultaneously addresses specific geophysical techniques and their integration; and 5) oral and written reports patterned after professional meetings and journals. An eight member, 'blue ribbon' advisory panel from academia, industry, and the federal government has been set up to maintain the vitality of SAGE by addressing such issues as funding, new faculty, organization, and vision. SAGE is open to students from any university (or organization) with backgrounds including

  15. Relationships of work-related psychosocial risks, stress, individual factors and burnout – Questionnaire survey among emergency physicians and nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana M. Ilić

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychosocial risks represent a great challenge for safety and health protection at work in Europe. The purpose of this study has been to determine the relationships of psychosocial risks arising from work, stress, personal characteristics and burnout among physicians and nurses in the Emergency Medical Service (EMS. Material and Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study based on a questionnaire survey which contained the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ and Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (CBI. Results: A total of 88 physicians and 80 nurses completed the survey. Physicians demonstrated higher emotional (mean (M ± standard deviation (SD = 74.57±16.85 and cognitive (M±SD = 75.95±13.74 demands as compared to nurses. Both groups had high sensory demands and responsibilities at work, in spite of the low degree of their autonomy. The meaning of work, commitment to the workplace, and insecurity at work were high for both groups. Among all participants, stressful behavior and reactions were within the limits of low values ( 60. Personal and patient-related burnout was high for both groups, where physicians were significantly affected by work-related burnout. The influence at work, degree of freedom at work, social support, sense of coherence, mental health, and problem-focused coping are negatively related to work-related burnout. Conclusions: Based on personal factors and coping styles, emergency physicians and nurses are representing a self-selective professional group that meets high work demands, great responsibility, strong commitment and insecurity at work. Burnout of physicians and nurses in the EMS tends to be ignored, although it has severe consequences on their mental and general health. Med Pr 2017;68(2:167–178

  16. Association Between Unstable Work and Occupational Wellbeing Among Artists in Finland: Results of a Psychosocial Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuisku, Katinka; Houni, Pia; Seppänen, Johanna; Virtanen, Marianna

    2016-06-01

    Although artistic work is in transition, the occupational wellbeing of artists has been less studied than wellbeing among other workers. This study aimed to explore the relationship between work characteristics and occupational (psychosocial) wellbeing of artists. A national questionnaire was sent to all artists (theatre artists, writers, and visual artists) reached by four major labor unions in Finland. Type of employment (permanent full-time work vs other), working field (own field of art vs other), regularity of working hours (regular vs irregular), and control of workload were assessed. The wellbeing outcomes were work engagement, recovery from work, and experience of stress and low mood. Full-time permanent employment, regular working hours, and working in one's own field of art were positively associated with work engagement. Furthermore, regular working hours were positively associated with recovery and negatively associated with subjective report of low mood. Ability to control workload was positively associated with recovery and negatively associated with stress and low mood. Higher age was associated with lower stress and better recovery. Artists with regular working hours, secure employment, ability to control workload, working in one's own field of art, and higher age reported better wellbeing in this study. The late stages of career appear to guarantee more stability and wellbeing than the more insecure beginning of a career.

  17. The work setting of diabetes nursing specialists in the Netherlands: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Tilja I J; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M; Tummers, Gladys; Landeweerd, Jan A; van Merode, Godefridus G

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study is to explore whether the work organisation of diabetes specialist nurses (DSNs) differs significantly from nurses working in hospital and nursing home and if so, does this difference result in positive or negative consequences regarding work and health. In traditional health care settings, nurses exhibit a high level of environmental uncertainty and low decision-making authority, which has a negative effect on psychological reactions towards work. In professional nursing, specialisation, e.g. diabetic nursing, is a current trend in many countries. Therefore, insight into the determinants of the work situation of nursing specialists is becoming increasingly relevant. Comparisons were made between 3 different samples: 1204 nurses employed by 15 hospitals, 1058 nurses employed by 14 nursing homes, and 350 diabetes nurses working in other health care settings throughout the Netherlands. Data concerning organisation, work aspects, and psychological reactions were measured via questionnaires. Variances between the groups were analysed with ANCOVA, besides hierarchical multiple regression analysis was applied. Environmental uncertainty scored lower amongst diabetes nurses when compared to nurses working in the other two types of health care settings. Social support and role conflict scored low for diabetes nursing specialists who simultaneously perceived autonomy and role ambiguity highest. Diabetes nursing specialists also scored highest on intrinsic work motivation and job satisfaction and lowest for psychosomatic health. Except for social support and role ambiguity, diabetic nurses rate their [work] organisation, [work] aspects and psychological [work] reactions more positively than nurses employed in other health care settings.

  18. Balancing the Responsibilities of Work and Family Life: Results of the Family Caregiver Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Eileen M.; Poertner, John

    1997-01-01

    Patterns of work and family balance were examined for 184 employed parents of children with serious emotional disorders. Results found that caregivers employed outside the home had higher levels of job stress than those working in the home but reported using work as a way of coping. (CR)

  19. Sector surveys on working conditions : hotels and restaurants in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossche, S.N.J. van den; Jettinghoff, K.; Houtman, I.L.D.

    2003-01-01

    The European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions has asked TNO Work & Employment to report on the quality of work and employment in the sector of Hotels & Restaurants in The Netherlands. Other research institutes were asked to do the same for the situation in the other

  20. Tripod sigma: results of a pro-active work stress-survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelemans, R.; Wiezer, N.; Vaas, F.; Gort, J.; Groeneweg, J.

    2003-01-01

    Work related stress is an important causes of disability and absenteeism. TNO Work and Employment has developed an instrument, called Tripod Sigma, that identifies risks to work stress and provides tools for remedying these risks. The Tripod Sigma model is developed analogous to the Tripod

  1. History of geophysical studies at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borns, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    A variety of geophysical methods including the spectrum of seismic, electrical, electromagnetic and potential field techniques have used support characterization, monitoring and experimental studies at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The geophysical studies have provided significant understanding of the nature of site deformation, tectonics and stability. Geophysical methods have delineated possible brine reservoirs beneath the underground facility and have defined the disturbed rock zone that forms around underground excavations. The role of geophysics in the WIPP project has evolved with the project. The early uses were for site characterization to satisfy site selection criteria or factors. As the regulatory framework for WIPP grew since 1980, the geophysics program was focused on support of experimental and field programs such as Salado hydrogeology and underground room systems and excavations. In summary, the major types of issues that geophysical studies addressed for WIPP are: Issue 1: Site Characterization; Issue 2: Castile Brine Reservoirs; Issue 3: Rustler /Dewey Lake Hydrogeology; Issue 4: Salado Hydrogeology; and Issue 5: Excavation Effects. The nature of geophysics program for WIPP has been to support investigation rather than being the principal investigation itself. The geophysics program has been used to define conceptual models (e.g., the Disturbed Rock Zone-DRZ) or to test conceptual models (e.g., high transmissivity zones in the Rustler Formation). An effect of being a support program is that as new project priorities arose the funding for the geophysics program was limited and withdrawn. An outcome is that much of the geophysics survey information resides in contractor reports since final interpretation reports were not funded

  2. Working Conditions and Lifestyle of Female Surgeons Affiliated to the Japan Neurosurgical Society: Findings of Individual and Institutional Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimaki, Takamitsu; Shibui, Soichiro; Kato, Yoko; Matsumura, Akira; Yamasaki, Mami; Date, Isao; Hongo, Kazuhiro; Kuroda, Satoshi; Matsumae, Mitsunori; Nakao, Naoyuki; Sakurada, Kaori; Shimokawa, Shoko; Kayama, Takamasa

    2016-11-15

    To investigate the working conditions of female neurosurgeons in Japan, two surveys were conducted by The Japan Neurosurgical Society: one involving female neurosurgeons themselves and the other involving the chiefs of neurosurgical departments. The responses were received from 224 (43.8%) female neurosurgeons and 496 (61.2%) departmental chiefs. About half (50.2%) of the female neurosurgeons were married and 39.2% had children (average number of children, 1.27). Their work was full-time in 80.6% of cases; on average, they worked 51.9 h per week, had night duty 2.8 times per month, and had 5.7 days off per month. Many of them stated that they were satisfied with their job status, but about half of them reported difficulty in maintaining a correct work-life balance. Among the institutions surveyed, 29% had female neurosurgeons. The survey of departmental chiefs revealed that the proxies for maternity leave were not available at most institutions, and that there was only limited availability of night child care (41%) or sick child care (39%); female neurosurgeons did not appear to be well-informed of these support systems. These findings suggest that apart from systematic approaches already in place, female neurosurgeons would prefer to have more understanding from their peers and chiefs.

  3. How psychosocial factors affect well-being of practice assistants at work in general medical care?--a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Katja; Berger, Sarah; Gavartina, Amina; Zaroti, Stavria; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2015-11-11

    Well-being at work is an important aspect of a workforce strategy. The aim of the study was to explore and evaluate psychosocial factors and health and work-related outcomes of practices assistants depending on their employment status in general medical practices. This observational study was based on a questionnaire survey to evaluate psychosocial aspects at work in general medical practices. A standardized questionnaire was used, the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ). Beside descriptive analyses linear regression analyses were performed for each health and work-related outcome scale of the COPSOQ. 586 practice assistants out of 794 respondents (73.8 %) from 234 general medical practices completed the questionnaire. Practice assistants reported the highest scores for the psychosocial factor 'sense of community' (mean = 85.9) and the lower score for 'influence at work' (mean = 41.2). Moreover, practice assistants who worked part-time rated their psychosocial factors at work and health-related outcomes more positively than full-time employees. Furthermore, the two scales of health related outcomes 'burnout' and 'job satisfaction' showed strong associations between different psychosocial factors and socio-demographic variables. Psychosocial factors at work influence well-being at work and could be strong risk factors for poor health and work-related outcomes. Effective management of these issues could have an impact on the retention and recruitment of health care staff.

  4. Amorphous transparent conducting oxides in context: Work function survey, trends, and facile modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, T. C.; Zhu, Q.; Buchholz, D. B.; Martinson, A. B.; Chang, R. P. H.; Mason, T. O.

    2015-03-01

    The work functions of various amorphous and crystalline transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) were measured using Kelvin probe. The films, made by pulsed laser deposition, exhibited varying work functions dependent on the composition and deposition parameters. Tin oxide showed the largest work functions of the oxides measured, while zinc oxide showed the lowest. Binary and ternary combinations of the basis TCOs showed intermediate work functions dependent on the endpoint components. Amorphous TCOs, important in OPV and other technological applications, exhibited similar work functions to their crystalline counterparts. UV/ozone treatment of TCOs temporarily increased the work function, consistent with proposed defect mechanisms associated with near-surface changes in carrier content and Fermi level. Finally, a method for facile adjustment of the work function of commercial TCOs by atomic layer deposition (ALD) capping layers was presented, illustrated by the growth of zinc oxide layers on commercial crystalline ITO films.

  5. Addressing the difficulty of changing fields in geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civilini, F.; Savage, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    Geophysics is a wonderfully diverse field of study, encompassing a variety of disciplines greatly different from one other. Even within the same discipline, various branches of study can have drastically different vocabulary and methodologies. The difficulty of breaking this "jargon" barrier is also an important reminder for scientists of how critical it is to clearly and concisely convey information. This presentation will focus on strategies that students can focus on to ease a transition between fields in geophysics. I believe that a student changing disciplines should proceed in the following steps: [1] Do a cursory literature review to find a review paper of the desired topic and work backwards through the details until a level of understanding or recognition is reached, [2] Obtain a clear physical understanding of the data and methods of the proposed study, and [3] Establish a support network through the research group or elsewhere which will recognize the areas in which the student is behind and offer remedies in a supportive and productive manner. These strategies are based on my own personal experience changing from music to geophysics in my undergrad and working on projects spanning various subdisciplines of geophysics during my Masters and PhD. It is worthwhile for research groups to spend the time to mentor students switching from other disciplines because those students will in time be able to observe the research in a different way than their peers, and easily adapt to changes of direction within the research.

  6. Analysis of shallow continuous electromagnetic measurements on archaeological sites in southern Austria and comparison with other geophysical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesner, Erich

    2010-05-01

    Aim of this investigation was outlining the potential of continuous electromagnetic measurements by the comparison of the electromagnetic results with other different geophysical methods at known archaeological sites in Carinthia (Southern Austria). In general a very high resolution is necessary to outline the foundations of roman buildings covered by a sedimentary layer of at least half a meter thickness. The electromagnetic prospecting method had been applied within an archaeologically important region, the archaeological remnants of the first roman provincial capital at the Magdalensberg and at the site of the later location of the capital, at Virunum. With the establishment and consolidation of the Roman Empire the Romans needed more settlement space for the fast growing town and also the demands for defence were less - therefore the Romans transferred the provincial capital down to the "Zollfeld" valley northeast of Klagenfurt. Additional to the electromagnetic investigations, geoelectric, magnetic and susceptibility mapping, spontaneous potential surveys, multielectrode tomography (Niesner, Scholger, Leonhardt 2009) and ground penetrating radar (Morawetz 2006) have been employed jointly during the last years. Also visual and infrared aerial pictures had been available from those areas. The work had been done within a collaborative project between the Geophysical Institute of the University of Leoben and the Landesmuseum Kärnten. The fieldwork and part of the interpretation had been done by students of the University of Leoben within summer field camps. Within these surveys various portions of the archaeological sites had been mapped, providing valuable information of this ancient settlement. One of the most important achievements of the past years of close integration work by the archaeological and the geophysical team was the detailed outlining of an early Christian church, dated by the archaeologists to the early time of the Christians (Dolenz, Niesner

  7. U.S. Geological Survey scientific activities in the exploration of Antarctica: 1946-2006 record of personnel in Antarctica and their postal cachets: U.S. Navy (1946-48, 1954-60), International Geophysical Year (1957-58), and USGS (1960-2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Tony K.; Williams, Richard S.; Ferrigno, Jane G.

    2007-01-01

    Antarctica, a vast region encompassing 13.2 million km2 (5.1 million mi2), is considered to be one of the most important scientific laboratories on Earth. During the past 60 years, the USGS, in collaboration and with logistical support from the National Science Foundation's Office of Polar Programs, has sent 325 USGS scientists to Antarctica to work on a wide range of projects: 169 personnel from the NMD (mostly aerial photography, surveying, and geodesy, primarily used for the modern mapping of Antarctica), 138 personnel from the GD (mostly geophysical and geological studies onshore and offshore), 15 personnel from the WRD (mostly hydrological/glaciological studies in the McMurdo Dry Valleys), 2 personnel from the BRD (microbiological studies in the McMurdo Dry Valleys), and 1 person from the Director's Office (P. Patrick Leahy, Acting Director, 2005–06 austral field season). Three GD scientists and three NMD scientists have carried out field work in Antarctica 9 or more times: John C. Behrendt (15), who started in 1956–57 and published two memoirs (Behrendt, 1998, 2005), Arthur B. Ford (10), who started in 1960–61, and Gary D. Clow (9), who started in 1985–86; Larry D. Hothem (12), who began as a winter-over geodesist at Mawson Station in 1968–69, and Jerry L. Mullins (12), who started in 1982–83 and followed in the legendary footsteps of his NMD predecessor, William R. MacDonald (9), who started in 1960–61 and supervised the acquisition of more than 1,000,000 square miles of aerial photography of Antarctica. This report provides a record as complete as possible, of USGS and non-USGS collaborating personnel in Antarctica from 1946–2006, the geographic locations of their work, and their scientific/engineering disciplines represented. Postal cachets for each year follow the table of personnel and scientific activities in the exploration of Antarctica during those 60 years. To commemorate special events and projects in Antarctica, it became an

  8. Geodetic and geophysical observations in Antarctica an overview in the IPY perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Capra, Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    This book is a collection of papers on various aspects of the geodetic and geophysical investigation and observation techniques. It includes material from the Arctic and Antarctica, as well as covering work from both temporary and permanent observatories.

  9. The Emerging Role of Social Work in Primary Health Care: A Survey of Social Workers in Ontario Family Health Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, Rachelle; McMillan, Colleen; Ambrose-Miller, Wayne; McKee, Ryan; Brown, Judith Belle

    2018-05-01

    Primary health care systems are increasingly integrating interprofessional team-based approaches to care delivery. As members of these interprofessional primary health care teams, it is important for social workers to explore our experiences of integration into these newly emerging teams to help strengthen patient care. Despite the expansion of social work within primary health care settings, few studies have examined the integration of social work's role into this expanding area of the health care system. A survey was conducted with Canadian social work practitioners who were employed within Family Health Teams (FHTs), an interprofessional model of primary health care in Ontario emerging from a period of health care reform. One hundred and twenty-eight (N = 128) respondents completed the online survey. Key barriers to social work integration in FHTs included difficulties associated with a medical model environment, confusion about social work role, and organizational barriers. Facilitators for integration of social work in FHTs included adequate education and competencies, collaborative engagement, and organizational structures.

  10. The innovative application of surface geophysical techniques for remedial investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, W.R. [OYO Geospace, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Smith, S. [ICF Kaiser Engineers, Boston, MA (United States); Gilmore, P. [Fishbeck, Thomson, Carr and Huber, Aida, MI (United States); Cox, S. [Blasland, Bouck, and Lee, Edison, NJ (United States)

    1993-03-01

    When researchers are investigating potential subsurface contamination at hazardous waste landfills, the surface geophysical techniques they may use are often limited. Many geophysical surveys are concerned with areas next to and not directly within the landfill units. The highly variable properties of the materials within the landfill may result in geophysical data that are either difficult or impossible to interpret. Therefore, contamination at these sites may not be detected until substantial lateral migration away from the unit has occurred. In addition, because of the poor resolution of some techniques, the landfill as a whole must be considered as a source, where discrete disposal areas within landfill units may be the actual point sources of contaminants. In theory, if specific sources within the landfill are identified and isolated, then reduced time, effort, and expenditures will be required for remediation activities. In the summer of 1989, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) investigated a small potentially hazardous waste landfill to determine if contaminant hot spots could be identified within the landfill and to determine if significant vertical and lateral migration of contaminants was occurring away from these locations. Based on the present hydrogeologic conditions, researchers anticipated that subsurface flow would be primarily vertical, with the zone of saturation at a depth greater than 150 meters. This necessitated that the survey be performed, for the most part, directly on the capped portion of the landfill. Focused geophysical surveys conducted off the landfill would not have provided useful information concerning conditions directly beneath the landfill. This paper discusses the planning, application, and analysis of four combined sensing methods: two methods of electromagnetic induction [low induction (Em) and time domain (TEM)], ground penetrating radar (GPR), and soil gas.

  11. New Insights Into Valley Formation and Preservation: Geophysical Imaging of the Offshore Trinity River Paleovalley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed, C. M.; Swartz, J. M.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Goff, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Trinity River paleovalley is an offshore stratigraphic structure located on the inner continental shelf of the Gulf of Mexico offshore Galveston, Texas. Its formation is linked to the paleo-Trinity system as it existed across the continental shelf during the last glacial period. Newly acquired high-resolution geophysical data have imaged more complexity to the valley morphology and shelf stratigraphy than was previously captured. Significantly, the paleo-Trinity River valley appears to change in the degree of confinement and relief relative to the surrounding strata. Proximal to the modern shoreline, the interpreted time-transgressive erosive surface formed by the paleo-river system is broad and rugose with no single valley, but just 5 km farther offshore the system appears to become confined to a 10 km wide valley structure before again becoming unconfined once again 30 km offshore. Fluvial stratigraphy in this region has a similar degree of complexity in morphology and preservation. A dense geophysical survey of several hundred km is planned for Fall 2017, which will provide unprecedented imaging of the paleovalley morphology and associated stratigraphy. Our analysis leverages robust chirp processing techniques that allow for imaging of strata on the decimeter scale. We will integrate our geophysical results with a wide array of both newly collected and previously published sediment cores. This approach will allow us to address several key questions regarding incised valley formation and preservation on glacial-interglacial timescales including: to what extent do paleo-rivers remain confined within a single broad valley structure, what is the fluvial systems response to transgression, and what stratigraphy is created and preserved at the transition from fluvial to estuarine environments? Our work illustrates that traditional models of incised valley formation and subsequent infilling potentially fail to capture the full breadth of dynamics of past river

  12. Towards a geophysical decision-support system for monitoring and managing unstable slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, J. E.; Meldrum, P.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Uhlemann, S.; Swift, R. T.; Inauen, C.; Gunn, D.; Kuras, O.; Whiteley, J.; Kendall, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    Conventional approaches for condition monitoring, such as walk over surveys, remote sensing or intrusive sampling, are often inadequate for predicting instabilities in natural and engineered slopes. Surface observations cannot detect the subsurface precursors to failure events; instead they can only identify failure once it has begun. On the other hand, intrusive investigations using boreholes only sample a very small volume of ground and hence small scale deterioration process in heterogeneous ground conditions can easily be missed. It is increasingly being recognised that geophysical techniques can complement conventional approaches by providing spatial subsurface information. Here we describe the development and testing of a new geophysical slope monitoring system. It is built around low-cost electrical resistivity tomography instrumentation, combined with integrated geotechnical logging capability, and coupled with data telemetry. An automated data processing and analysis workflow is being developed to streamline information delivery. The development of this approach has provided the basis of a decision-support tool for monitoring and managing unstable slopes. The hardware component of the system has been operational at a number of field sites associated with a range of natural and engineered slopes for up to two years. We report on the monitoring results from these sites, discuss the practicalities of installing and maintaining long-term geophysical monitoring infrastructure, and consider the requirements of a fully automated data processing and analysis workflow. We propose that the result of this development work is a practical decision-support tool that can provide near-real-time information relating to the internal condition of problematic slopes.

  13. Work stress among nursing home care attendants in Taiwan: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hui-Chuan; Kung, Yuan-Wei; Huang, Hsiao-Chien; Ho, Pei-Yu; Lin, Ya-Ying; Chen, Wen-Shin

    2007-07-01

    Care attendants constitute the main workforce in nursing homes, but their heavy workload, low autonomy, and indefinite responsibility result in high levels of stress and may affect quality of care. However, few studies have focused of this problem. The aim of this study was to examine work-related stress and associated factors that affect care attendants in nursing homes and to offer suggestions for how management can alleviate these problems in care facilities. We recruited participants from nine nursing homes with 50 or more beds located in middle Taiwan; 110 care attendants completed the questionnaire. The work stress scale for the care attendants was validated and achieved good reliability (Cronbach's alpha=0.93). We also conducted exploratory factor analysis. Six factors were extracted from the work stress scale: insufficient ability, stressful reactions, heavy workload, trouble in care work, poor management, and working time problems. The explained variance achieved 64.96%. Factors related to higher work stress included working in a hospital-based nursing home, having a fixed schedule, night work, feeling burden, inconvenient facility, less enthusiasm, and self-rated higher stress. Work stress for care attendants in nursing homes is related to human resource management and quality of care. We suggest potential management strategies to alleviate work stress for these workers.

  14. Survey and analysis of work structure in nuclear power plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauman, M.B.; Pain, R.F.; Van Cott, H.P.; Davidson, M.K.

    1983-06-01

    Work-structure factors are those factors that relate to the way in which work at all levels in a plant is organized, staffed, managed, rewarded, and perceived by plant personnel. Research over many years has demonstrated that these work-structure factors are closely correlated with organizational effectiveness, safety, and profitability. The work structure of ten nuclear power plants was assessed using questionnaires. Structured critical incident interviews were conducted to verify the questionnaire results. The study revealed that a variety of work-structure factor problem areas do exist in nuclear power plants. The study recommends a prioritized set of candidate research issues to be considered as part of EPRI's Work Structure and Performance Research Program

  15. [Influence of the shift work on circadian-rhythms compare survey on health service employees and policemen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santorek-Strumiłło, Edyta; Zawilska, Jolanta B; Misiak, Piotr; Jabłoński, Sławomir; Kordiak, Jacek; Brocki, Marian

    2012-01-01

    It has been estimating that about 20% working persons works in the shift system. It concerns health service employees and policemen among others. The shift work causes permanent conflict "of biological clock" with required working hours. The work in the night hours is less effective, it is held with greater expensive and triggering the increased tiredness.The aim of overtaken by the authors questionnaire survey amongst the population working in shifts, was to determining the influence of the shift work on the length and the quality of the dream and the tiredness and the sleepiness during day in comparison to group working only on the day shift. The survey was conducted in the group of employees of the Health Service (30 persons) and policemen (20 persons) working in shifts. Healthy volunteers working in the system of the daily work constituted the control group (30 persons). The examination consisted of questionnaire forms which were filled in anonymously, the duration of examining one person lasted 4 weeks. Age and sex of the examined and control group were similar. In the examined period of time the number of night shift was averaged 6. During holidays 47 persons had night changes. Average time of dream was approximately 7 hours, for those who was working only at daily shift. On the following day after the night shift examined slept additionally average about 3 hours. Those who didn't work in shifts slept average 7.5 hour/24. Clinically significant sleeplessness was developed: examined group--18 persons, control group--3 persons. Amongst respondents we measured level of sleepiness during night shift using carolain scale of the sleepiness. Increase of sleepiness and decrease of activity appeared between 2:00 and 6:00 a.m. In the process of the examination a measurement of appearing the indications of exaggerated sleepiness and tiredness was also conducted using the ATS scale. The frequency of appearing was two or even three times bigger in the examined group. In

  16. The impact of personal-, disease- and work-related factors on work ability of women with breast cancer living in the community: a cross-sectional survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Kin; Ching, Siu Yin Shirley; Chan, Amy; Cheung, Doris; Cheung, Suk Yee Polly

    2017-11-01

    The aims of this study were to identify the work ability (WA) of breast cancer (BC) survivors during the course of their illness, and the relationships between personal-, disease-, and work-related factors, and their WA. This is a cross-sectional survey study. One hundred fifty-one participants with the response rate of 88.9% were recruited from the community in 2014 and 2015. BC survivors' WA was at its highest before diagnosis, and then dropped to the lowest during treatment. Although their current WA had improved, it has not bounced back to that before diagnosis. The resignation rate was 35.8%. Factors positively associated with current WA included (a) age and year of diagnosis, (b) physical and psychological health and (c) WA before diagnosis or during treatment, working years, work control and mastery. However, compliance with appropriate healthy eating habits and believing in personal health controlled by chance were negatively associated with current WA. Furthermore, the participants would more likely to have higher current WA if they (a) were more optimistic with good stress management; (b) currently were not receiving treatment or other illnesses; (c) perceived less effects of their health problems, physical workloads or their cancer diagnoses on their work and (d) perceived continue to work in the next 2 years, with good ability to handle physical and mental work. This study confirmed that most BC survivors continued to work after their diagnoses. The factors affecting their WA were multifactorial. It is important to enhance their positive thinking.

  17. Geophysical imaging of near-surface structure using electromagnetic and seismic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongping

    This thesis includes three different studies of geophysical imaging: (1) inference of plume moments from tomograms with cross-hole radar; (2) simulated annealing inversion for near-surface shear-wave velocity structure with microtremor measurements; and (3) time-lapse GPR imaging of water movement in the vadose zone. Although these studies involve different geophysical approaches, they are linked by a common theme---using geophysical imaging to understand hydrologic phenomena or subsurface structure. My first study in this thesis is concerned with the identification of plume moments from geophysical tomograms. Previously geophysical imaging has been applied to characterize contaminant plume migration in groundwater, and to determine plume mass, extent, velocity, and shape. Although tomograms have been used for quantitative inference of plume moments, the reliability of these inferred moments is poorly understood. In general, tomograms represent blurry and blunted images of subsurface properties, as a consequence of limited data acquisition geometry, measurement error, and the effects of regularization. In this thesis, I investigated the effect of tomographic resolution on the inference of plume moments from tomograms. I presented a new approach to quantify the resolution of inferred moments, drawing on concepts from conventional geophysical image appraisal, and also image reconstruction from orthogonal moments. This new approach is demonstrated by synthetic examples in radar tomography. My results indicated that moments calculated from tomograms are subject to substantial error and bias. For example, for many practical survey geometries, crosshole radar tomography (1) is incapable of resolving the lateral center of mass, and (2) severely underpredicts total mass. The degree of bias and error varies spatially over the tomogram, in a complicated manner, as a result of spatially variable resolution. These findings have important implications for the quantitative use

  18. Working conditions and health in Central America: a survey of 12,024 workers in six countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Fernando G; Wesseling, Catharina; Delclos, George L; Felknor, Sarah; Pinilla, Javier; Rodrigo, Fernando

    2014-07-01

    To describe the survey methodology and initial general findings of the first Central American Survey of Working Conditions and Health. A representative sample of 12,024 workers was interviewed at home in Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama. Questionnaire items addressed worker demographics, employment conditions, occupational risk factors and self-perceived health. Overall, self-employment (37%) is the most frequent type of employment, 8% of employees lack a work contract and 74% of the workforce is not covered by social security. These percentages are higher in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador, and lower in Costa Rica, Panama and Nicaragua. A third of the workforce works more than 48 h per week, regardless of gender; this is similar across countries. Women and men report frequent or usual exposures to high ambient temperature (16% and 25%, respectively), dangerous tools and machinery (10%, 24%), work on slippery surfaces (10%, 23%), breathing chemicals (12.1%, 18%), handling toxic substances (5%, 12.1%), heavy loads (6%, 20%) and repetitive movements (43%, 49%). Two-thirds of the workforce perceive their health as being good or very good, and slightly more than half reports having good mental health. The survey offers, for the first time, comparable data on the work and health status of workers in the formal and informal economy in the six Spanish-speaking Central American countries, based on representative national samples. This provides a benchmark for future monitoring of employment and working conditions across countries. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Potential shallow aquifers characterization through an integrated geophysical method: multivariate approach by means of k-means algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Bernardinetti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The need to obtain a detailed hydrogeological characterization of the subsurface and its interpretation for the groundwater resources management, often requires to apply several and complementary geophysical methods. The goal of the approach in this paper is to provide a unique model of the aquifer by synthesizing and optimizing the information provided by several geophysical methods. This approach greatly reduces the degree of uncertainty and subjectivity of the interpretation by exploiting the different physical and mechanic characteristics of the aquifer. The studied area, into the municipality of Laterina (Arezzo, Italy, is a shallow basin filled by lacustrine and alluvial deposits (Pleistocene and Olocene epochs, Quaternary period, with alternated silt, sand with variable content of gravel and clay where the bottom is represented by arenaceous-pelitic rocks (Mt. Cervarola Unit, Tuscan Domain, Miocene epoch. This shallow basin constitutes the unconfined superficial aquifer to be exploited in the nearly future. To improve the geological model obtained from a detailed geological survey we performed electrical resistivity and P wave refraction tomographies along the same line in order to obtain different, independent and integrable data sets. For the seismic data also the reflected events have been processed, a remarkable contribution to draw the geologic setting. Through the k-means algorithm, we perform a cluster analysis for the bivariate data set to individuate relationships between the two sets of variables. This algorithm allows to individuate clusters with the aim of minimizing the dissimilarity within each cluster and maximizing it among different clusters of the bivariate data set. The optimal number of clusters “K”, corresponding to the individuated geophysical facies, depends to the multivariate data set distribution and in this work is estimated with the Silhouettes. The result is an integrated tomography that shows a finite

  20. Geophysical examinations of deposits and old sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Geomagnetic total field measurements by proton magnetometers with memories form the systematic exploration of suspected surfaces of old sites and old sites of an important, flexible and reasonably priced geophysical process. From experience, there are two important main applications. These are firstly the detailed work on location problems jointly with and supplementing multi-temporal evaluations of the air picture and secondly to locate iron in deposits. The particular advantage of geo-magnetics is that even in the most difficult measurement conditions, with the aid of the suitable analytical method evaluation, clear results and practically usable information can be obtained. In comparison with this, other high resolution methods of measurement, such as electromagnetic charting, for example (problem of integral anomaly pictures which cannot be evaluated) and geo-radar (loam covering, trickled water saturation) are limited to a considerably narrower measurement and evaluation spectrum in practical applications. (orig.) [de