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Sample records for geometric moment computation

  1. Efficient 3D geometric and Zernike moments computation from unstructured surface meshes.

    Pozo, José María; Villa-Uriol, Maria-Cruz; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2011-03-01

    This paper introduces and evaluates a fast exact algorithm and a series of faster approximate algorithms for the computation of 3D geometric moments from an unstructured surface mesh of triangles. Being based on the object surface reduces the computational complexity of these algorithms with respect to volumetric grid-based algorithms. In contrast, it can only be applied for the computation of geometric moments of homogeneous objects. This advantage and restriction is shared with other proposed algorithms based on the object boundary. The proposed exact algorithm reduces the computational complexity for computing geometric moments up to order N with respect to previously proposed exact algorithms, from N(9) to N(6). The approximate series algorithm appears as a power series on the rate between triangle size and object size, which can be truncated at any desired degree. The higher the number and quality of the triangles, the better the approximation. This approximate algorithm reduces the computational complexity to N(3). In addition, the paper introduces a fast algorithm for the computation of 3D Zernike moments from the computed geometric moments, with a computational complexity N(4), while the previously proposed algorithm is of order N(6). The error introduced by the proposed approximate algorithms is evaluated in different shapes and the cost-benefit ratio in terms of error, and computational time is analyzed for different moment orders.

  2. Fast computation of Krawtchouk moments

    Honarvar Shakibaei Asli, B.; Flusser, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 288, č. 1 (2014), s. 73-86 ISSN 0020-0255 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/11/1552 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Krawtchouk polynomial * Krawtchouk moment * Geometric moment * Impulse response * Fast computation * Digital filter Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 4.038, year: 2014 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/ZOI/flusser-0432452.pdf

  3. Geometric Algebra Computing

    Corrochano, Eduardo Bayro

    2010-01-01

    This book presents contributions from a global selection of experts in the field. This useful text offers new insights and solutions for the development of theorems, algorithms and advanced methods for real-time applications across a range of disciplines. Written in an accessible style, the discussion of all applications is enhanced by the inclusion of numerous examples, figures and experimental analysis. Features: provides a thorough discussion of several tasks for image processing, pattern recognition, computer vision, robotics and computer graphics using the geometric algebra framework; int

  4. Geometric Constructions with the Computer.

    Chuan, Jen-chung

    The computer can be used as a tool to represent and communicate geometric knowledge. With the appropriate software, a geometric diagram can be manipulated through a series of animation that offers more than one particular snapshot as shown in a traditional mathematical text. Geometric constructions with the computer enable the learner to see and…

  5. Geometric Computing for Freeform Architecture

    Wallner, J.; Pottmann, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Geometric computing has recently found a new field of applications, namely the various geometric problems which lie at the heart of rationalization and construction-aware design processes of freeform architecture. We report on our work in this area

  6. Geometric interpretation of the Zero-Moment Point

    van Oort, Gijs; Stramigioli, Stefano

    In this article we show that the concept of screws and wrenches gives us tools to geometrically establish the relation between the ground reaction wrench and the Zero-Moment Point. In order to arrive at this, we show how a wrench can be decomposed into separate components. The proposed method gives

  7. Geometric Computing for Freeform Architecture

    Wallner, J.

    2011-06-03

    Geometric computing has recently found a new field of applications, namely the various geometric problems which lie at the heart of rationalization and construction-aware design processes of freeform architecture. We report on our work in this area, dealing with meshes with planar faces and meshes which allow multilayer constructions (which is related to discrete surfaces and their curvatures), triangles meshes with circle-packing properties (which is related to conformal uniformization), and with the paneling problem. We emphasize the combination of numerical optimization and geometric knowledge.

  8. ATS drugs molecular structure representation using refined 3D geometric moment invariants

    Pratama, S. F.; Muda, A. K.; Choo, J. H.; Flusser, Jan; Abraham, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 10 (2017), s. 1951-1963 ISSN 0259-9791 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-16928S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : 3D moment invariants * Geometric moment invariants * ATS drugs * Molecular similarity * Molecular descriptors Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 1.308, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/ZOI/flusser-0479217.pdf

  9. Geometric phases and quantum computation

    Vedral, V.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In my lectures I will talk about the notion of the geometric phase and explain its relevance for both fundamental quantum mechanics as well as quantum computation. The phase will be at first introduced via the idea of Pancharatnam which involves interference of three or more light beams. This notion will then be generalized to the evolving quantum systems. I will discuss both pure and mixed states as well as unitary and non-unitary evolutions. I will also show how the concept of the vacuum induced geometric phase arises in quantum optics. A simple measurement scheme involving a Mach Zehnder interferometer will be presented and will be used to illustrate all the concepts in the lecture. Finally, I will expose a simple generalization of the geometric phase to evolving degenerate states. This will be seen to lead to the possibility of universal quantum computation using geometric effects only. Moreover, this contains a promise of intrinsically fault tolerant quantum information processing, whose prospects will be outlined at the end of the lecture. (author)

  10. An Algorithm for Fast Computation of 3D Zernike Moments for Volumetric Images

    Hosny, Khalid M.; Hafez, Mohamed A.

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm was proposed for very fast and low-complexity computation of three-dimensional Zernike moments. The 3D Zernike moments were expressed in terms of exact 3D geometric moments where the later are computed exactly through the mathematical integration of the monomial terms over the digital image/object voxels. A new symmetry-based method was proposed to compute 3D Zernike moments with 87% reduction in the computational complexity. A fast 1D cascade algorithm was also employed to add m...

  11. Feature Extraction of Weld Defectology in Digital Image of Radiographic Film Using Geometric Invariant Moment and Statistical Texture

    Muhtadan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to perform feature extraction in weld defect of digital image of radiographic film using geometric invariant moment and statistical texture method. Feature extraction values can be use as values that used to classify and pattern recognition on interpretation of weld defect in digital image of radiographic film by computer automatically. Weld defectology type that used in this research are longitudinal crack, transversal crack, distributed porosity, clustered porosity, wormhole, and no defect. Research methodology on this research are program development to read digital image, then performing image cropping to localize weld position, and then applying geometric invariant moment and statistical texture formulas to find feature values. The result of this research are feature extraction values that have tested with RST (rotation, scale, transformation) treatment and yield moment values that more invariant there are ϕ 3 , ϕ 4 , ϕ 5 from geometric invariant moment method. Feature values from statistical texture that are average intensity, average contrast, smoothness, 3 rd moment, uniformity, and entropy, they used as feature extraction values. (author)

  12. Moment matrices, border bases and radical computation

    B. Mourrain; J.B. Lasserre; M. Laurent (Monique); P. Rostalski; P. Trebuchet (Philippe)

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractIn this paper, we describe new methods to compute the radical (resp. real radical) of an ideal, assuming it complex (resp. real) variety is nte. The aim is to combine approaches for solving a system of polynomial equations with dual methods which involve moment matrices and

  13. Moment matrices, border bases and radical computation

    Lasserre, J.B.; Laurent, M.; Mourrain, B.; Rostalski, P.; Trébuchet, P.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe new methods to compute the radical (resp. real radical) of an ideal, assuming its complex (resp. real) variety is finite. The aim is to combine approaches for solving a system of polynomial equations with dual methods which involve moment matrices and semi-definite

  14. Moment matrices, border bases and radical computation

    B. Mourrain; J.B. Lasserre; M. Laurent (Monique); P. Rostalski; P. Trebuchet (Philippe)

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractIn this paper, we describe new methods to compute the radical (resp. real radical) of an ideal, assuming it complex (resp. real) variety is nte. The aim is to combine approaches for solving a system of polynomial equations with dual methods which involve moment matrices and

  15. An introduction to geometric computation

    Nievergelt, J.

    1991-01-01

    Computational geometry has some appealing features that make it ideal for learning about algorithms and data structures, namely the problem statements are easily understood, intuitively meaningful, and mathematically rigorous, problem statement, solution, and every step of the construction have natural visual representations that support abstract thinking and help in detecting errors of reasoning, and finally, these algorithms are practical because is easy to come up with examples where they can be applied. Figs

  16. Moment-based method for computing the two-dimensional discrete Hartley transform

    Dong, Zhifang; Wu, Jiasong; Shu, Huazhong

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we present a fast algorithm for computing the two-dimensional (2-D) discrete Hartley transform (DHT). By using kernel transform and Taylor expansion, the 2-D DHT is approximated by a linear sum of 2-D geometric moments. This enables us to use the fast algorithms developed for computing the 2-D moments to efficiently calculate the 2-D DHT. The proposed method achieves a simple computational structure and is suitable to deal with any sequence lengths.

  17. Geometric Series and Computers--An Application.

    McNerney, Charles R.

    1983-01-01

    This article considers the sum of a finite geometric series as applied to numeric data storage in the memory of an electronic digital computer. The presentation is viewed as relevant to programing in several languages and removes some of the mystique associated with syntax constraints that any language imposes. (MP)

  18. Adaptive Mesh Refinement and High Order Geometrical Moment Method for the Simulation of Polydisperse Evaporating Sprays

    Essadki Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Predictive simulation of liquid fuel injection in automotive engines has become a major challenge for science and applications. The key issue in order to properly predict various combustion regimes and pollutant formation is to accurately describe the interaction between the carrier gaseous phase and the polydisperse evaporating spray produced through atomization. For this purpose, we rely on the EMSM (Eulerian Multi-Size Moment Eulerian polydisperse model. It is based on a high order moment method in size, with a maximization of entropy technique in order to provide a smooth reconstruction of the distribution, derived from a Williams-Boltzmann mesoscopic model under the monokinetic assumption [O. Emre (2014 PhD Thesis, École Centrale Paris; O. Emre, R.O. Fox, M. Massot, S. Chaisemartin, S. Jay, F. Laurent (2014 Flow, Turbulence and Combustion 93, 689-722; O. Emre, D. Kah, S. Jay, Q.-H. Tran, A. Velghe, S. de Chaisemartin, F. Laurent, M. Massot (2015 Atomization Sprays 25, 189-254; D. Kah, F. Laurent, M. Massot, S. Jay (2012 J. Comput. Phys. 231, 394-422; D. Kah, O. Emre, Q.-H. Tran, S. de Chaisemartin, S. Jay, F. Laurent, M. Massot (2015 Int. J. Multiphase Flows 71, 38-65; A. Vié, F. Laurent, M. Massot (2013 J. Comp. Phys. 237, 277-310]. The present contribution relies on a major extension of this model [M. Essadki, S. de Chaisemartin, F. Laurent, A. Larat, M. Massot (2016 Submitted to SIAM J. Appl. Math.], with the aim of building a unified approach and coupling with a separated phases model describing the dynamics and atomization of the interface near the injector. The novelty is to be found in terms of modeling, numerical schemes and implementation. A new high order moment approach is introduced using fractional moments in surface, which can be related to geometrical quantities of the gas-liquid interface. We also provide a novel algorithm for an accurate resolution of the evaporation. Adaptive mesh refinement properly scaling on massively

  19. Plasma geometric optics analysis and computation

    Smith, T.M.

    1983-01-01

    Important practical applications in the generation, manipulation, and diagnosis of laboratory thermonuclear plasmas have created a need for elaborate computational capabilities in the study of high frequency wave propagation in plasmas. A reduced description of such waves suitable for digital computation is provided by the theory of plasma geometric optics. The existing theory is beset by a variety of special cases in which the straightforward analytical approach fails, and has been formulated with little attention to problems of numerical implementation of that analysis. The standard field equations are derived for the first time from kinetic theory. A discussion of certain terms previously, and erroneously, omitted from the expansion of the plasma constitutive relation is given. A powerful but little known computational prescription for determining the geometric optics field in the neighborhood of caustic singularities is rigorously developed, and a boundary layer analysis for the asymptotic matching of the plasma geometric optics field across caustic singularities is performed for the first time with considerable generality. A proper treatment of birefringence is detailed, wherein a breakdown of the fundamental perturbation theory is identified and circumvented. A general ray tracing computer code suitable for applications to radiation heating and diagnostic problems is presented and described

  20. Deteksi Batik Parang Menggunakan Fitur Co-Occurence Matrix Dan Geometric Moment Invariant Dengan Klasifikasi KNN

    Ni Luh Wiwik Sri Rahayu Ginantra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Motif batik merupakan suatu dasar atau pokok suatu pola gambar yang merupakan pusat suatu rancangan gambar sehingga makna dari tanda, simbol atau lambang dibalik motif batik tersebut dapat diungkapkan. Identifikasi secara visual memerlukan skill penglihatan dan pengetahuan dalam mengklasifikasikan pola yang terbentuk dari citra batik.  Kurangnya media informasi yang dibuat  tentang motif batik menjadikan masyarakat luas kurang mendapatkan informasi tentang motif batik. Berdasarkan hal tersebut penelitian ini dilakukan guna mengimplementasikan identifikasi secara visual kedalam komputer yang dapat membantu dan memudahkan dalam mengidentifikasi jenis batik.  Pengenalan citra batik dengan menggunakan metode Co-occurrence Matrix sebagai ekstraksi ciri tekstur dan Geometric Moment Invariant dan pengklasifikasian citra batik dengan menggunakan K Nearest Neighbor.menghasilkan nilai akurasi yang diperoleh dengan metode Geometric Moment Invariant lebih baik dalam mengenali pola batik Parang yang termasuk jenis batik geometric yaitu 80% dibandingkan dengan hasil pada metode Co-occurence Matrix yaitu 70%.

  1. Sampling theorem for geometric moment determination and its application to a laser beam position detector.

    Loce, R P; Jodoin, R E

    1990-09-10

    Using the tools of Fourier analysis, a sampling requirement is derived that assures that sufficient information is contained within the samples of a distribution to calculate accurately geometric moments of that distribution. The derivation follows the standard textbook derivation of the Whittaker-Shannon sampling theorem, which is used for reconstruction, but further insight leads to a coarser minimum sampling interval for moment determination. The need for fewer samples to determine moments agrees with intuition since less information should be required to determine a characteristic of a distribution compared with that required to construct the distribution. A formula for calculation of the moments from these samples is also derived. A numerical analysis is performed to quantify the accuracy of the calculated first moment for practical nonideal sampling conditions. The theory is applied to a high speed laser beam position detector, which uses the normalized first moment to measure raster line positional accuracy in a laser printer. The effects of the laser irradiance profile, sampling aperture, number of samples acquired, quantization, and noise are taken into account.

  2. An Algorithm for Fast Computation of 3D Zernike Moments for Volumetric Images

    Khalid M. Hosny

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm was proposed for very fast and low-complexity computation of three-dimensional Zernike moments. The 3D Zernike moments were expressed in terms of exact 3D geometric moments where the later are computed exactly through the mathematical integration of the monomial terms over the digital image/object voxels. A new symmetry-based method was proposed to compute 3D Zernike moments with 87% reduction in the computational complexity. A fast 1D cascade algorithm was also employed to add more complexity reduction. The comparison with existing methods was performed, where the numerical experiments and the complexity analysis ensured the efficiency of the proposed method especially with image and objects of large sizes.

  3. Image Retrieval based on Integration between Color and Geometric Moment Features

    Saad, M.H.; Saleh, H.I.; Konbor, H.; Ashour, M.

    2012-01-01

    Content based image retrieval is the retrieval of images based on visual features such as colour, texture and shape. .the Current approaches to CBIR differ in terms of which image features are extracted; recent work deals with combination of distances or scores from different and usually independent representations in an attempt to induce high level semantics from the low level descriptors of the images. content-based image retrieval has many application areas such as, education, commerce, military, searching, commerce, and biomedicine and Web image classification. This paper proposes a new image retrieval system, which uses color and geometric moment feature to form the feature vectors. Bhattacharyya distance and histogram intersection are used to perform feature matching. This framework integrates the color histogram which represents the global feature and geometric moment as local descriptor to enhance the retrieval results. The proposed technique is proper for precisely retrieving images even in deformation cases such as geometric deformations and noise. It is tested on a standard the results shows that a combination of our approach as a local image descriptor with other global descriptors outperforms other approaches.

  4. Direct computation of harmonic moments for tomographic reconstruction

    Nara, Takaaki; Ito, Nobutaka; Takamatsu, Tomonori; Sakurai, Tetsuya

    2007-01-01

    A novel algorithm to compute harmonic moments of a density function from its projections is presented for tomographic reconstruction. For projection p(r, θ), we define harmonic moments of projection by ∫ π 0 ∫ ∞ -∞ p(r,θ)(re iθ ) n drd θ and show that it coincides with the harmonic moments of the density function except a constant. Furthermore, we show that the harmonic moment of projection of order n can be exactly computed by using n+ 1 projection directions, which leads to an efficient algorithm to reconstruct the vertices of a polygon from projections.

  5. Geometric modeling for computer aided design

    Schwing, James L.; Olariu, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    The primary goal of this grant has been the design and implementation of software to be used in the conceptual design of aerospace vehicles particularly focused on the elements of geometric design, graphical user interfaces, and the interaction of the multitude of software typically used in this engineering environment. This has resulted in the development of several analysis packages and design studies. These include two major software systems currently used in the conceptual level design of aerospace vehicles. These tools are SMART, the Solid Modeling Aerospace Research Tool, and EASIE, the Environment for Software Integration and Execution. Additional software tools were designed and implemented to address the needs of the engineer working in the conceptual design environment. SMART provides conceptual designers with a rapid prototyping capability and several engineering analysis capabilities. In addition, SMART has a carefully engineered user interface that makes it easy to learn and use. Finally, a number of specialty characteristics have been built into SMART which allow it to be used efficiently as a front end geometry processor for other analysis packages. EASIE provides a set of interactive utilities that simplify the task of building and executing computer aided design systems consisting of diverse, stand-alone, analysis codes. Resulting in a streamlining of the exchange of data between programs reducing errors and improving the efficiency. EASIE provides both a methodology and a collection of software tools to ease the task of coordinating engineering design and analysis codes.

  6. Generalized Kerr spacetime with an arbitrary mass quadrupole moment: geometric properties versus particle motion

    Bini, Donato; Geralico, Andrea; Luongo, Orlando; Quevedo, Hernando

    2009-01-01

    An exact solution of Einstein's field equations in empty space first found in 1985 by Quevedo and Mashhoon is analyzed in detail. This solution generalizes Kerr spacetime to include the case of matter with an arbitrary mass quadrupole moment and is specified by three parameters, the mass M, the angular momentum per unit mass a and the quadrupole parameter q. It reduces to the Kerr spacetime in the limiting case q = 0 and to the Erez-Rosen spacetime when the specific angular momentum a vanishes. The geometrical properties of such a solution are investigated. Causality violations, directional singularities and repulsive effects occur in the region close to the source. Geodesic motion and accelerated motion are studied on the equatorial plane which, due to the reflection symmetry property of the solution, also turns out to be a geodesic plane.

  7. Comparison of organs' shapes with geometric and Zernike 3D moments.

    Broggio, D; Moignier, A; Ben Brahim, K; Gardumi, A; Grandgirard, N; Pierrat, N; Chea, M; Derreumaux, S; Desbrée, A; Boisserie, G; Aubert, B; Mazeron, J-J; Franck, D

    2013-09-01

    The morphological similarity of organs is studied with feature vectors based on geometric and Zernike 3D moments. It is particularly investigated if outliers and average models can be identified. For this purpose, the relative proximity to the mean feature vector is defined, principal coordinate and clustering analyses are also performed. To study the consistency and usefulness of this approach, 17 livers and 76 hearts voxel models from several sources are considered. In the liver case, models with similar morphological feature are identified. For the limited amount of studied cases, the liver of the ICRP male voxel model is identified as a better surrogate than the female one. For hearts, the clustering analysis shows that three heart shapes represent about 80% of the morphological variations. The relative proximity and clustering analysis rather consistently identify outliers and average models. For the two cases, identification of outliers and surrogate of average models is rather robust. However, deeper classification of morphological feature is subject to caution and can only be performed after cross analysis of at least two kinds of feature vectors. Finally, the Zernike moments contain all the information needed to re-construct the studied objects and thus appear as a promising tool to derive statistical organ shapes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Spacetime Memory of Geometric Phases and Quantum Computing

    Binder, B

    2002-01-01

    Spacetime memory is defined with a holonomic approach to information processing, where multi-state stability is introduced by a non-linear phase-locked loop. Geometric phases serve as the carrier of physical information and geometric memory (of orientation) given by a path integral measure of curvature that is periodically refreshed. Regarding the resulting spin-orbit coupling and gauge field, the geometric nature of spacetime memory suggests to assign intrinsic computational properties to the electromagnetic field.

  9. Automatic computation of moment magnitudes for small earthquakes and the scaling of local to moment magnitude

    Edwards, Benjamin; Allmann, Bettina; Fäh, Donat; Clinton, John

    2017-01-01

    Moment magnitudes (MW) are computed for small and moderate earthquakes using a spectral fitting method. 40 of the resulting values are compared with those from broadband moment tensor solutions and found to match with negligible offset and scatter for available MW values of between 2.8 and 5.0. Using the presented method, MW are computed for 679 earthquakes in Switzerland with a minimum ML= 1.3. A combined bootstrap and orthogonal L1 minimization is then used to produce a scaling relation bet...

  10. Geometric computations with interval and new robust methods applications in computer graphics, GIS and computational geometry

    Ratschek, H

    2003-01-01

    This undergraduate and postgraduate text will familiarise readers with interval arithmetic and related tools to gain reliable and validated results and logically correct decisions for a variety of geometric computations plus the means for alleviating the effects of the errors. It also considers computations on geometric point-sets, which are neither robust nor reliable in processing with standard methods. The authors provide two effective tools for obtaining correct results: (a) interval arithmetic, and (b) ESSA the new powerful algorithm which improves many geometric computations and makes th

  11. Computing moment to moment BOLD activation for real-time neurofeedback

    Hinds, Oliver; Ghosh, Satrajit; Thompson, Todd W.; Yoo, Julie J.; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Triantafyllou, Christina; Gabrieli, John D.E.

    2013-01-01

    Estimating moment to moment changes in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) activation levels from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data has applications for learned regulation of regional activation, brain state monitoring, and brain-machine interfaces. In each of these contexts, accurate estimation of the BOLD signal in as little time as possible is desired. This is a challenging problem due to the low signal-to-noise ratio of fMRI data. Previous methods for real-time fMRI analysis have either sacrificed the ability to compute moment to moment activation changes by averaging several acquisitions into a single activation estimate or have sacrificed accuracy by failing to account for prominent sources of noise in the fMRI signal. Here we present a new method for computing the amount of activation present in a single fMRI acquisition that separates moment to moment changes in the fMRI signal intensity attributable to neural sources from those due to noise, resulting in a feedback signal more reflective of neural activation. This method computes an incremental general linear model fit to the fMRI timeseries, which is used to calculate the expected signal intensity at each new acquisition. The difference between the measured intensity and the expected intensity is scaled by the variance of the estimator in order to transform this residual difference into a statistic. Both synthetic and real data were used to validate this method and compare it to the only other published real-time fMRI method. PMID:20682350

  12. Novel theory of the HD dipole moment. II. Computations

    Thorson, W.R.; Choi, J.H.; Knudson, S.K.

    1985-01-01

    In the preceding paper we derived a new theory of the dipole moments of homopolar but isotopically asymmetric molecules (such as HD, HT, and DT) in which the electrical asymmetry appears directly in the electronic Hamiltonian (in an appropriate Born-Oppenheimer separation) and the dipole moment may be computed as a purely electronic property. In the present paper we describe variation-perturbation calculations and convergence studies on the dipole moment for HD, which is found to have the value 8.51 x 10 -4 debye at 1.40 a.u. Using the two alternative formulations of the electronic problem, we can provide a test of basis-set adequacy and convergence of the results, and such convergence studies are reported here. We have also computed vibration-rotation transition matrix elements and these are compared with experimental and other theoretical results

  13. Methods for teaching geometric modelling and computer graphics

    Rotkov, S.I.; Faitel`son, Yu. Ts.

    1992-05-01

    This paper considers methods for teaching the methods and algorithms of geometric modelling and computer graphics to programmers, designers and users of CAD and computer-aided research systems. There is a bibliography that can be used to prepare lectures and practical classes. 37 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Organising geometric computations for space telerobotics

    Cameron, Stephen

    1989-01-01

    A truly intelligent system that interacts with the physical world must be endowed with the ability the compute with shapes: despite this, spatial reasoning is rarely regarded as part of mainstream artificial intelligence. Here, researchers argue that the study of intelligent spatial algorithms is a worthwhile activity, and give opinions and suggestions for the way forward.

  15. Numerical problems with the Pascal triangle in moment computation

    Kautsky, J.; Flusser, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 306, č. 1 (2016), s. 53-68 ISSN 0377-0427 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-16928S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : moment computation * Pascal triangle * appropriate polynomial basis * numerical problems Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 1.357, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/ZOI/flusser-0459096.pdf

  16. Automatic computation of moment magnitudes for small earthquakes and the scaling of local to moment magnitude

    Edwards, Benjamin; Allmann, Bettina; Fäh, Donat; Clinton, John

    2010-10-01

    Moment magnitudes (MW) are computed for small and moderate earthquakes using a spectral fitting method. 40 of the resulting values are compared with those from broadband moment tensor solutions and found to match with negligible offset and scatter for available MW values of between 2.8 and 5.0. Using the presented method, MW are computed for 679 earthquakes in Switzerland with a minimum ML = 1.3. A combined bootstrap and orthogonal L1 minimization is then used to produce a scaling relation between ML and MW. The scaling relation has a polynomial form and is shown to reduce the dependence of the predicted MW residual on magnitude relative to an existing linear scaling relation. The computation of MW using the presented spectral technique is fully automated at the Swiss Seismological Service, providing real-time solutions within 10 minutes of an event through a web-based XML database. The scaling between ML and MW is explored using synthetic data computed with a stochastic simulation method. It is shown that the scaling relation can be explained by the interaction of attenuation, the stress-drop and the Wood-Anderson filter. For instance, it is shown that the stress-drop controls the saturation of the ML scale, with low-stress drops (e.g. 0.1-1.0 MPa) leading to saturation at magnitudes as low as ML = 4.

  17. An integrated introduction to computer graphics and geometric modeling

    Goldman, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    … this book may be the first book on geometric modelling that also covers computer graphics. In addition, it may be the first book on computer graphics that integrates a thorough introduction to 'freedom' curves and surfaces and to the mathematical foundations for computer graphics. … the book is well suited for an undergraduate course. … The entire book is very well presented and obviously written by a distinguished and creative researcher and educator. It certainly is a textbook I would recommend. …-Computer-Aided Design, 42, 2010… Many books concentrate on computer programming and soon beco

  18. Geometric optical transfer function and tis computation method

    Wang Qi

    1992-01-01

    Geometric Optical Transfer Function formula is derived after expound some content to be easily ignored, and the computation method is given with Bessel function of order zero and numerical integration and Spline interpolation. The method is of advantage to ensure accuracy and to save calculation

  19. SIAM Conference on Geometric Design and Computing. Final Technical Report

    None

    2002-03-11

    The SIAM Conference on Geometric Design and Computing attracted 164 domestic and international researchers, from academia, industry, and government. It provided a stimulating forum in which to learn about the latest developments, to discuss exciting new research directions, and to forge stronger ties between theory and applications. Final Report

  20. Geometrical metrology on silicone rubber by computed tomography

    Müller, Pavel; Pacurar, Ramona Alexandra; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) represents a suitable measuring technique for investigation of deformable materials, since no forces are developed on the part during scanning. As for any other measuring instruments, the traceability of the CT scanners needs to be assured. An investigation on geometrical...

  1. Process for computing geometric perturbations for probabilistic analysis

    Fitch, Simeon H. K. [Charlottesville, VA; Riha, David S [San Antonio, TX; Thacker, Ben H [San Antonio, TX

    2012-04-10

    A method for computing geometric perturbations for probabilistic analysis. The probabilistic analysis is based on finite element modeling, in which uncertainties in the modeled system are represented by changes in the nominal geometry of the model, referred to as "perturbations". These changes are accomplished using displacement vectors, which are computed for each node of a region of interest and are based on mean-value coordinate calculations.

  2. Variational-moment method for computing magnetohydrodynamic equilibria

    Lao, L.L.

    1983-08-01

    A fast yet accurate method to compute magnetohydrodynamic equilibria is provided by the variational-moment method, which is similar to the classical Rayleigh-Ritz-Galerkin approximation. The equilibrium solution sought is decomposed into a spectral representation. The partial differential equations describing the equilibrium are then recast into their equivalent variational form and systematically reduced to an optimum finite set of coupled ordinary differential equations. An appropriate spectral decomposition can make the series representing the solution coverge rapidly and hence substantially reduces the amount of computational time involved. The moment method was developed first to compute fixed-boundary inverse equilibria in axisymmetric toroidal geometry, and was demonstrated to be both efficient and accurate. The method since has been generalized to calculate free-boundary axisymmetric equilibria, to include toroidal plasma rotation and pressure anisotropy, and to treat three-dimensional toroidal geometry. In all these formulations, the flux surfaces are assumed to be smooth and nested so that the solutions can be decomposed in Fourier series in inverse coordinates. These recent developments and the advantages and limitations of the moment method are reviewed. The use of alternate coordinates for decomposition is discussed

  3. Effect of geometric imperfections on the ultimate moment capacity of cold-formed sigma-shape se

    Bassem L. Gendy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, cold formed steel sections are used more and more as primary framing components and as a secondary structural system. They are used as purlins and side rails or floor joist, and after that in the building envelops. Beams are not perfectly straight and are usually associated with geometric imperfections. Initial geometric imperfections can significantly influence the stability response of cold-formed steel members. This paper reports a numerical investigation concerning the effect of these imperfections on the behavior of the simply supported beams subjected to a uniform bending moment. The beam profile is cold formed sigma sections. Group of beams with different overall member slenderness ratios were studied. Several approaches have been utilized to model the geometric imperfections. First, the elastic buckling modes were considered as the imperfect beam shape. In this approach, the elastic buckling analysis was done first to get the elastic buckling modes. In the second approach, the imperfections were considered by assuming the beam bent in a half sine wave along its length. Finally, combination of these two approaches was considered. Results reveal that, the ultimate bending moments of beams with short and intermediate overall slenderness ratios are sensitive to the imperfect shape that comprise compression flange local buckling.

  4. Manifestations of geometric phases in a proton electric-dipole-moment experiment in an all-electric storage ring

    Silenko, Alexander J.

    2017-12-01

    We consider a proton electric-dipole-moment experiment in an all-electric storage ring when the spin is frozen and local longitudinal and vertical electric fields alternate. In this experiment, the geometric (Berry) phases are very important. Due to the these phases, the spin rotates about the radial axis. The corresponding systematic error is rather important while it can be canceled with clockwise and counterclockwise beams. The geometric phases also lead to the spin rotation about the radial axis. This effect can be canceled with clockwise and counterclockwise beams as well. The sign of the azimuthal component of the angular velocity of the spin precession depends on the starting point where the spin orientation is perfect. The radial component of this quantity keeps its value and sign for each starting point. When the longitudinal and vertical electric fields are joined in the same sections without any alternation, the systematic error due to the geometric phases does not appear but another systematic effect of the spin rotation about the azimuthal axis takes place. It has opposite signs for clockwise and counterclockwise beams.

  5. The Effects of Computer-assisted and Distance Learning of Geometric Modeling

    Omer Faruk Sozcu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of computer-assisted and distance learning of geometric modeling and computer aided geometric design are studied. It was shown that computer algebra systems and dynamic geometric environments can be considered as excellent tools for teaching mathematical concepts of mentioned areas, and distance education technologies would be indispensable for consolidation of successfully passed topics

  6. Geometric and computer-aided spline hob modeling

    Brailov, I. G.; Myasoedova, T. M.; Panchuk, K. L.; Krysova, I. V.; Rogoza, YU A.

    2018-03-01

    The paper considers acquiring the spline hob geometric model. The objective of the research is the development of a mathematical model of spline hob for spline shaft machining. The structure of the spline hob is described taking into consideration the motion in parameters of the machine tool system of cutting edge positioning and orientation. Computer-aided study is performed with the use of CAD and on the basis of 3D modeling methods. Vector representation of cutting edge geometry is accepted as the principal method of spline hob mathematical model development. The paper defines the correlations described by parametric vector functions representing helical cutting edges designed for spline shaft machining with consideration for helical movement in two dimensions. An application for acquiring the 3D model of spline hob is developed on the basis of AutoLISP for AutoCAD environment. The application presents the opportunity for the use of the acquired model for milling process imitation. An example of evaluation, analytical representation and computer modeling of the proposed geometrical model is reviewed. In the mentioned example, a calculation of key spline hob parameters assuring the capability of hobbing a spline shaft of standard design is performed. The polygonal and solid spline hob 3D models are acquired by the use of imitational computer modeling.

  7. Geometric moments and artificial neural network in per optimization of radiotherapy treatment planning

    Yahaqi, E.; Movafeghi, A.; Hosseini- Ashrafi, M.E.

    2004-01-01

    Given the number of possible combinations of different setting in radiotherapy such as the number of fields etc., arriving at an optimum treatment plan with a completely conventional solution would require an unacceptable number of interaction. Using a priori information whether of a qualitative or quantitative nature has the potential of greatly reducing amount of calculation required in any optimization procedure. Having extracted the outline of the body counter line the treatment area, the sensitive organ and any in- homogeneity present in the given cross section quantitative information in the form of moments is calculated for each treatment case. An artificial neural network classifier is then developed using group of sample treatment case and applied to arrive at initial treatment plan for any new case. The approach has been shown to have strong potential for greatly reducing the number of choices in selecting the optimum answer in treatment planning

  8. Computational Contact Mechanics Geometrically Exact Theory for Arbitrary Shaped Bodies

    Konyukhov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    This book contains a systematical analysis of geometrical situations  leading to  contact pairs -- point-to-surface, surface-to-surface, point-to-curve, curve-to-curve and curve-to-surface.  Each contact pair  is inherited with a special coordinate system based on its geometrical properties such as a Gaussian surface coordinate system or a Serret-Frenet curve coordinate system.  The formulation in a covariant form allows in a straightforward fashion to consider various constitutive relations for a  certain pair such as anisotropy for both frictional and structural parts. Then standard methods well known in computational contact mechanics such as penalty, Lagrange multiplier methods, combination of both and others  are formulated in these coordinate systems. Such formulations require then the powerful apparatus of differential geometry of surfaces and curves as well as of convex analysis. The final goals of such transformations are  then ready-for-implementation numerical algorithms within the finite e...

  9. Computing the Moments of Order Statistics from Truncated Pareto Distributions Based on the Conditional Expectation

    Gökhan Gökdere

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, closed form expressions for the moments of the truncated Pareto order statistics are obtained by using conditional distribution. We also derive some results for the moments which will be useful for moment computations based on ordered data.

  10. Unconventional geometric quantum computation in a two-mode cavity

    Wu Chunfeng; Wang Zisheng; Feng Xunli; Lai, C. H.; Oh, C. H.; Goan, H.-S.; Kwek, L. C.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a scheme for implementing unconventional geometric quantum computation by using the interaction of two atoms with a two-mode cavity field. The evolution of the system results in a nontrivial two-qubit phase gate. The operation of the proposed gate involves only metastable states of the atom and hence is not affected by spontaneous emission. The effect of cavity decay on the gate is investigated. It is shown that the evolution time of the gate in the two-mode case is less than that in the single-mode case proposed by Feng et al. [Phys. Rev. A 75, 052312 (2007)]. Thus the gate can be more decay tolerant than the previous one. The scheme can also be generalized to a system consisting of two atoms interacting with an N-mode cavity field

  11. Geometric Nonlinear Computation of Thin Rods and Shells

    Grinspun, Eitan

    2011-03-01

    We develop simple, fast numerical codes for the dynamics of thin elastic rods and shells, by exploiting the connection between physics, geometry, and computation. By building a discrete mechanical picture from the ground up, mimicking the axioms, structures, and symmetries of the smooth setting, we produce numerical codes that not only are consistent in a classical sense, but also reproduce qualitative, characteristic behavior of a physical system----such as exact preservation of conservation laws----even for very coarse discretizations. As two recent examples, we present discrete computational models of elastic rods and shells, with straightforward extensions to the viscous setting. Even at coarse discretizations, the resulting simulations capture characteristic geometric instabilities. The numerical codes we describe are used in experimental mechanics, cinema, and consumer software products. This is joint work with Miklós Bergou, Basile Audoly, Max Wardetzky, and Etienne Vouga. This research is supported in part by the Sloan Foundation, the NSF, Adobe, Autodesk, Intel, the Walt Disney Company, and Weta Digital.

  12. Geometric calculus: a new computational tool for Riemannian geometry

    Moussiaux, A.; Tombal, P.

    1988-01-01

    We compare geometric calculus applied to Riemannian geometry with Cartan's exterior calculus method. The correspondence between the two methods is clearly established. The results obtained by a package written in an algebraic language and doing general manipulations on multivectors are compared. We see that the geometric calculus is as powerful as exterior calculus

  13. GeoBuilder: a geometric algorithm visualization and debugging system for 2D and 3D geometric computing.

    Wei, Jyh-Da; Tsai, Ming-Hung; Lee, Gen-Cher; Huang, Jeng-Hung; Lee, Der-Tsai

    2009-01-01

    Algorithm visualization is a unique research topic that integrates engineering skills such as computer graphics, system programming, database management, computer networks, etc., to facilitate algorithmic researchers in testing their ideas, demonstrating new findings, and teaching algorithm design in the classroom. Within the broad applications of algorithm visualization, there still remain performance issues that deserve further research, e.g., system portability, collaboration capability, and animation effect in 3D environments. Using modern technologies of Java programming, we develop an algorithm visualization and debugging system, dubbed GeoBuilder, for geometric computing. The GeoBuilder system features Java's promising portability, engagement of collaboration in algorithm development, and automatic camera positioning for tracking 3D geometric objects. In this paper, we describe the design of the GeoBuilder system and demonstrate its applications.

  14. Continuous-variable geometric phase and its manipulation for quantum computation in a superconducting circuit.

    Song, Chao; Zheng, Shi-Biao; Zhang, Pengfei; Xu, Kai; Zhang, Libo; Guo, Qiujiang; Liu, Wuxin; Xu, Da; Deng, Hui; Huang, Keqiang; Zheng, Dongning; Zhu, Xiaobo; Wang, H

    2017-10-20

    Geometric phase, associated with holonomy transformation in quantum state space, is an important quantum-mechanical effect. Besides fundamental interest, this effect has practical applications, among which geometric quantum computation is a paradigm, where quantum logic operations are realized through geometric phase manipulation that has some intrinsic noise-resilient advantages and may enable simplified implementation of multi-qubit gates compared to the dynamical approach. Here we report observation of a continuous-variable geometric phase and demonstrate a quantum gate protocol based on this phase in a superconducting circuit, where five qubits are controllably coupled to a resonator. Our geometric approach allows for one-step implementation of n-qubit controlled-phase gates, which represents a remarkable advantage compared to gate decomposition methods, where the number of required steps dramatically increases with n. Following this approach, we realize these gates with n up to 4, verifying the high efficiency of this geometric manipulation for quantum computation.

  15. Computation of temperature-dependent legendre moments of a double-differential elastic cross section

    Arbanas, G.; Dunn, M.E.; Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Williams, M.L.; Becker, B.; Dagan, R.

    2011-01-01

    A general expression for temperature-dependent Legendre moments of a double-differential elastic scattering cross section was derived by Ouisloumen and Sanchez [Nucl. Sci. Eng. 107, 189-200 (1991)]. Attempts to compute this expression are hindered by the three-fold nested integral, limiting their practical application to just the zeroth Legendre moment of an isotropic scattering. It is shown that the two innermost integrals could be evaluated analytically to all orders of Legendre moments, and for anisotropic scattering, by a recursive application of the integration by parts method. For this method to work, the anisotropic angular distribution in the center of mass is expressed as an expansion in Legendre polynomials. The first several Legendre moments of elastic scattering of neutrons on 238 U are computed at T=1000 K at incoming energy 6.5 eV for isotropic scattering in the center of mass frame. Legendre moments of the anisotropic angular distribution given via Blatt-Biedenharn coefficients are computed at 1 keV. The results are in agreement with those computed by the Monte Carlo method. (author)

  16. Investigation study of geometric dimensions of the magnetic system of the switched-reluctance machine influence on magnetic moment

    Petrushin, A.; Shevkunova, A.

    2018-02-01

    The article deals with the investigation concentrated to optimizing the active part of the switched-reluctance motor with the aim of increasing the value of the average electromagnetic torque. Susceptibility of the average value of the electromagnetic torque to changes of the geometric dimensions of the magnetic system found in the optimization process was set.

  17. Curves and surfaces for computer-aided geometric design a practical guide

    Farin, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    A leading expert in CAGD, Gerald Farin covers the representation, manipulation, and evaluation of geometric shapes in this the Third Edition of Curves and Surfaces for Computer Aided Geometric Design. The book offers an introduction to the field that emphasizes Bernstein-Bezier methods and presents subjects in an informal, readable style, making this an ideal text for an introductory course at the advanced undergraduate or graduate level.The Third Edition includes a new chapter on Topology, offers new exercises and sections within most chapters, combines the material on Geometric Continuity i

  18. Computing the Expected Value and Variance of Geometric Measures

    Staals, Frank; Tsirogiannis, Constantinos

    2017-01-01

    distance (MPD), the squared Euclidean distance from the centroid, and the diameter of the minimum enclosing disk. We also describe an efficient (1-e)-approximation algorithm for computing the mean and variance of the mean pairwise distance. We implemented three of our algorithms and we show that our...

  19. Computing as Context: Experiences of Dis/Connection beyond the Moment of Non/Use

    Harmon, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    What does it mean to be "constantly connected" or to work for a "24/7" company? What does it mean to "disconnect" in an era of "always on" connectivity? This dissertation examines some of the textures of American life in an historical moment marked both by the arrival of ubiquitous computing and the…

  20. Influence from cavity decay on geometric quantum computation in the large-detuning cavity QED model

    Chen Changyong; Zhang Xiaolong; Deng Zhijiao; Gao Kelin; Feng Mang

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a general displacement operator to investigate the unconventional geometric quantum computation with dissipation under the model of many identical three-level atoms in a cavity, driven by a classical field. Our concrete calculation is made for the case of two atoms, based on a previous scheme [S.-B. Zheng, Phys. Rev. A 70, 052320 (2004)] for the large-detuning interaction of the atoms with the cavity mode. The analytical results we present will be helpful for experimental realization of geometric quantum computation in real cavities

  1. Computationally efficient near-field source localization using third-order moments

    Chen, Jian; Liu, Guohong; Sun, Xiaoying

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a third-order moment-based estimation of signal parameters via rotational invariance techniques (ESPRIT) algorithm is proposed for passive localization of near-field sources. By properly choosing sensor outputs of the symmetric uniform linear array, two special third-order moment matrices are constructed, in which the steering matrix is the function of electric angle γ, while the rotational factor is the function of electric angles γ and ϕ. With the singular value decomposition (SVD) operation, all direction-of-arrivals (DOAs) are estimated from a polynomial rooting version. After substituting the DOA information into the steering matrix, the rotational factor is determined via the total least squares (TLS) version, and the related range estimations are performed. Compared with the high-order ESPRIT method, the proposed algorithm requires a lower computational burden, and it avoids the parameter-match procedure. Computer simulations are carried out to demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  2. Computing Moment-Based Probability Tables for Self-Shielding Calculations in Lattice Codes

    Hebert, Alain; Coste, Mireille

    2002-01-01

    As part of the self-shielding model used in the APOLLO2 lattice code, probability tables are required to compute self-shielded cross sections for coarse energy groups (typically with 99 or 172 groups). This paper describes the replacement of the multiband tables (typically with 51 subgroups) with moment-based tables in release 2.5 of APOLLO2. An improved Ribon method is proposed to compute moment-based probability tables, allowing important savings in CPU resources while maintaining the accuracy of the self-shielding algorithm. Finally, a validation is presented where the absorption rates obtained with each of these techniques are compared with exact values obtained using a fine-group elastic slowing-down calculation in the resolved energy domain. Other results, relative to the Rowland's benchmark and to three assembly production cases, are also presented

  3. A novel computational framework for deducing muscle synergies from experimental joint moments

    Anantharaman eGopalakrishnan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prior experimental studies have hypothesized the existence of a ‘muscle synergy’ based control scheme for producing limb movements and locomotion in vertebrates. Such synergies have been suggested to consist of fixed muscle grouping schemes with the co-activation of all muscles in a synergy resulting in limb movement. Quantitative representations of these groupings (termed muscle weightings and their control signals (termed synergy controls have traditionally been derived by the factorization of experimentally measured EMG. This study presents a novel approach for deducing these weightings and controls from inverse dynamic joint moments that are computed from an alternative set of experimental measurements – movement kinematics and kinetics. This technique was applied to joint moments for healthy human walking at 0.7 and 1.7 m/s, and two sets of ‘simulated’ synergies were computed based on two different criteria (1 synergies were required to minimize errors between experimental and simulated joint moments in a musculoskeletal model (pure-synergy solution (2 along with minimizing joint moment errors, synergies also minimized muscle activation levels (optimal-synergy solution. On comparing the two solutions, it was observed that the introduction of optimality requirements (optimal-synergy to a control strategy solely aimed at reproducing the joint moments (pure-synergy did not necessitate major changes in the muscle grouping within synergies or the temporal profiles of synergy control signals. Synergies from both the simulated solutions exhibited many similarities to EMG derived synergies from a previously published study, thus implying that the analysis of the two different types of experimental data reveals similar, underlying synergy structures.

  4. Geometric Data Perturbation-Based Personal Health Record Transactions in Cloud Computing

    Balasubramaniam, S.; Kavitha, V.

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new delivery model for information technology services and it typically involves the provision of dynamically scalable and often virtualized resources over the Internet. However, cloud computing raises concerns on how cloud service providers, user organizations, and governments should handle such information and interactions. Personal health records represent an emerging patient-centric model for health information exchange, and they are outsourced for storage by third parties, such as cloud providers. With these records, it is necessary for each patient to encrypt their own personal health data before uploading them to cloud servers. Current techniques for encryption primarily rely on conventional cryptographic approaches. However, key management issues remain largely unsolved with these cryptographic-based encryption techniques. We propose that personal health record transactions be managed using geometric data perturbation in cloud computing. In our proposed scheme, the personal health record database is perturbed using geometric data perturbation and outsourced to the Amazon EC2 cloud. PMID:25767826

  5. Geometric Data Perturbation-Based Personal Health Record Transactions in Cloud Computing

    S. Balasubramaniam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is a new delivery model for information technology services and it typically involves the provision of dynamically scalable and often virtualized resources over the Internet. However, cloud computing raises concerns on how cloud service providers, user organizations, and governments should handle such information and interactions. Personal health records represent an emerging patient-centric model for health information exchange, and they are outsourced for storage by third parties, such as cloud providers. With these records, it is necessary for each patient to encrypt their own personal health data before uploading them to cloud servers. Current techniques for encryption primarily rely on conventional cryptographic approaches. However, key management issues remain largely unsolved with these cryptographic-based encryption techniques. We propose that personal health record transactions be managed using geometric data perturbation in cloud computing. In our proposed scheme, the personal health record database is perturbed using geometric data perturbation and outsourced to the Amazon EC2 cloud.

  6. Geometric data perturbation-based personal health record transactions in cloud computing.

    Balasubramaniam, S; Kavitha, V

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new delivery model for information technology services and it typically involves the provision of dynamically scalable and often virtualized resources over the Internet. However, cloud computing raises concerns on how cloud service providers, user organizations, and governments should handle such information and interactions. Personal health records represent an emerging patient-centric model for health information exchange, and they are outsourced for storage by third parties, such as cloud providers. With these records, it is necessary for each patient to encrypt their own personal health data before uploading them to cloud servers. Current techniques for encryption primarily rely on conventional cryptographic approaches. However, key management issues remain largely unsolved with these cryptographic-based encryption techniques. We propose that personal health record transactions be managed using geometric data perturbation in cloud computing. In our proposed scheme, the personal health record database is perturbed using geometric data perturbation and outsourced to the Amazon EC2 cloud.

  7. The effects of geometric uncertainties on computational modelling of knee biomechanics

    Meng, Qingen; Fisher, John; Wilcox, Ruth

    2017-08-01

    The geometry of the articular components of the knee is an important factor in predicting joint mechanics in computational models. There are a number of uncertainties in the definition of the geometry of cartilage and meniscus, and evaluating the effects of these uncertainties is fundamental to understanding the level of reliability of the models. In this study, the sensitivity of knee mechanics to geometric uncertainties was investigated by comparing polynomial-based and image-based knee models and varying the size of meniscus. The results suggested that the geometric uncertainties in cartilage and meniscus resulting from the resolution of MRI and the accuracy of segmentation caused considerable effects on the predicted knee mechanics. Moreover, even if the mathematical geometric descriptors can be very close to the imaged-based articular surfaces, the detailed contact pressure distribution produced by the mathematical geometric descriptors was not the same as that of the image-based model. However, the trends predicted by the models based on mathematical geometric descriptors were similar to those of the imaged-based models.

  8. Optimization and large scale computation of an entropy-based moment closure

    Kristopher Garrett, C.; Hauck, Cory; Hill, Judith

    2015-12-01

    We present computational advances and results in the implementation of an entropy-based moment closure, MN, in the context of linear kinetic equations, with an emphasis on heterogeneous and large-scale computing platforms. Entropy-based closures are known in several cases to yield more accurate results than closures based on standard spectral approximations, such as PN, but the computational cost is generally much higher and often prohibitive. Several optimizations are introduced to improve the performance of entropy-based algorithms over previous implementations. These optimizations include the use of GPU acceleration and the exploitation of the mathematical properties of spherical harmonics, which are used as test functions in the moment formulation. To test the emerging high-performance computing paradigm of communication bound simulations, we present timing results at the largest computational scales currently available. These results show, in particular, load balancing issues in scaling the MN algorithm that do not appear for the PN algorithm. We also observe that in weak scaling tests, the ratio in time to solution of MN to PN decreases.

  9. Floating-point geometry: toward guaranteed geometric computations with approximate arithmetics

    Bajard, Jean-Claude; Langlois, Philippe; Michelucci, Dominique; Morin, Géraldine; Revol, Nathalie

    2008-08-01

    Geometric computations can fail because of inconsistencies due to floating-point inaccuracy. For instance, the computed intersection point between two curves does not lie on the curves: it is unavoidable when the intersection point coordinates are non rational, and thus not representable using floating-point arithmetic. A popular heuristic approach tests equalities and nullities up to a tolerance ɛ. But transitivity of equality is lost: we can have A approx B and B approx C, but A not approx C (where A approx B means ||A - B|| < ɛ for A,B two floating-point values). Interval arithmetic is another, self-validated, alternative; the difficulty is to limit the swell of the width of intervals with computations. Unfortunately interval arithmetic cannot decide equality nor nullity, even in cases where it is decidable by other means. A new approach, developed in this paper, consists in modifying the geometric problems and algorithms, to account for the undecidability of the equality test and unavoidable inaccuracy. In particular, all curves come with a non-zero thickness, so two curves (generically) cut in a region with non-zero area, an inner and outer representation of which is computable. This last approach no more assumes that an equality or nullity test is available. The question which arises is: which geometric problems can still be solved with this last approach, and which cannot? This paper begins with the description of some cases where every known arithmetic fails in practice. Then, for each arithmetic, some properties of the problems they can solve are given. We end this work by proposing the bases of a new approach which aims to fulfill the geometric computations requirements.

  10. User's Manual for FOMOCO Utilities-Force and Moment Computation Tools for Overset Grids

    Chan, William M.; Buning, Pieter G.

    1996-01-01

    In the numerical computations of flows around complex configurations, accurate calculations of force and moment coefficients for aerodynamic surfaces are required. When overset grid methods are used, the surfaces on which force and moment coefficients are sought typically consist of a collection of overlapping surface grids. Direct integration of flow quantities on the overlapping grids would result in the overlapped regions being counted more than once. The FOMOCO Utilities is a software package for computing flow coefficients (force, moment, and mass flow rate) on a collection of overset surfaces with accurate accounting of the overlapped zones. FOMOCO Utilities can be used in stand-alone mode or in conjunction with the Chimera overset grid compressible Navier-Stokes flow solver OVERFLOW. The software package consists of two modules corresponding to a two-step procedure: (1) hybrid surface grid generation (MIXSUR module), and (2) flow quantities integration (OVERINT module). Instructions on how to use this software package are described in this user's manual. Equations used in the flow coefficients calculation are given in Appendix A.

  11. Variation in the human ribs geometrical properties and mechanical response based on X-ray computed tomography images resolution.

    Perz, Rafał; Toczyski, Jacek; Subit, Damien

    2015-01-01

    Computational models of the human body are commonly used for injury prediction in automobile safety research. To create these models, the geometry of the human body is typically obtained from segmentation of medical images such as computed tomography (CT) images that have a resolution between 0.2 and 1mm/pixel. While the accuracy of the geometrical and structural information obtained from these images depend greatly on their resolution, the effect of image resolution on the estimation of the ribs geometrical properties has yet to be established. To do so, each of the thirty-four sections of ribs obtained from a Post Mortem Human Surrogate (PMHS) was imaged using three different CT modalities: standard clinical CT (clinCT), high resolution clinical CT (HRclinCT), and microCT. The images were processed to estimate the rib cross-section geometry and mechanical properties, and the results were compared to those obtained from the microCT images by computing the 'deviation factor', a metric that quantifies the relative difference between results obtained from clinCT and HRclinCT to those obtained from microCT. Overall, clinCT images gave a deviation greater than 100%, and were therefore deemed inadequate for the purpose of this study. HRclinCT overestimated the rib cross-sectional area by 7.6%, the moments of inertia by about 50%, and the cortical shell area by 40.2%, while underestimating the trabecular area by 14.7%. Next, a parametric analysis was performed to quantify how the variations in the estimate of the geometrical properties affected the rib predicted mechanical response under antero-posterior loading. A variation of up to 45% for the predicted peak force and up to 50% for the predicted stiffness was observed. These results provide a quantitative estimate of the sensitivity of the response of the FE model to the resolution of the images used to generate it. They also suggest that a correction factor could be derived from the comparison between microCT and

  12. Area collapse algorithm computing new curve of 2D geometric objects

    Buczek, Michał Mateusz

    2017-06-01

    The processing of cartographic data demands human involvement. Up-to-date algorithms try to automate a part of this process. The goal is to obtain a digital model, or additional information about shape and topology of input geometric objects. A topological skeleton is one of the most important tools in the branch of science called shape analysis. It represents topological and geometrical characteristics of input data. Its plot depends on using algorithms such as medial axis, skeletonization, erosion, thinning, area collapse and many others. Area collapse, also known as dimension change, replaces input data with lower-dimensional geometric objects like, for example, a polygon with a polygonal chain, a line segment with a point. The goal of this paper is to introduce a new algorithm for the automatic calculation of polygonal chains representing a 2D polygon. The output is entirely contained within the area of the input polygon, and it has a linear plot without branches. The computational process is automatic and repeatable. The requirements of input data are discussed. The author analyzes results based on the method of computing ends of output polygonal chains. Additional methods to improve results are explored. The algorithm was tested on real-world cartographic data received from BDOT/GESUT databases, and on point clouds from laser scanning. An implementation for computing hatching of embankment is described.

  13. Applications of computed nuclear structure functions to inclusive scattering, R-ratios and their moments

    Rinat, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    We discuss applications of previously computed nuclear structure functions (SF) to inclusive cross sections, compare predictions with recent CEBAF data and perform two scaling tests. We mention that the large Q 2 plateau of scaling functions may only in part be due to the asymptotic limit of SF, which prevents the extraction of the nucleon momentum distribution in a model- independent way. We show that there may be sizable discrepancies between computed and semi-heuristic estimates of SF ratios. We compute ratios of moments of nuclear SF and show these to be in reasonable agreement with data. We speculate that an effective theory may underly the model for the nuclear SF, which produces overall agreement with several observables. (author)

  14. Geometrical-optics code for computing the optical properties of large dielectric spheres.

    Zhou, Xiaobing; Li, Shusun; Stamnes, Knut

    2003-07-20

    Absorption of electromagnetic radiation by absorptive dielectric spheres such as snow grains in the near-infrared part of the solar spectrum cannot be neglected when radiative properties of snow are computed. Thus a new, to our knowledge, geometrical-optics code is developed to compute scattering and absorption cross sections of large dielectric particles of arbitrary complex refractive index. The number of internal reflections and transmissions are truncated on the basis of the ratio of the irradiance incident at the nth interface to the irradiance incident at the first interface for a specific optical ray. Thus the truncation number is a function of the angle of incidence. Phase functions for both near- and far-field absorption and scattering of electromagnetic radiation are calculated directly at any desired scattering angle by using a hybrid algorithm based on the bisection and Newton-Raphson methods. With these methods a large sphere's absorption and scattering properties of light can be calculated for any wavelength from the ultraviolet to the microwave regions. Assuming that large snow meltclusters (1-cm order), observed ubiquitously in the snow cover during summer, can be characterized as spheres, one may compute absorption and scattering efficiencies and the scattering phase function on the basis of this geometrical-optics method. A geometrical-optics method for sphere (GOMsphere) code is developed and tested against Wiscombe's Mie scattering code (MIE0) and a Monte Carlo code for a range of size parameters. GOMsphere can be combined with MIE0 to calculate the single-scattering properties of dielectric spheres of any size.

  15. Simple and practical approach for computing the ray Hessian matrix in geometrical optics.

    Lin, Psang Dain

    2018-02-01

    A method is proposed for simplifying the computation of the ray Hessian matrix in geometrical optics by replacing the angular variables in the system variable vector with their equivalent cosine and sine functions. The variable vector of a boundary surface is similarly defined in such a way as to exclude any angular variables. It is shown that the proposed formulations reduce the computation time of the Hessian matrix by around 10 times compared to the previous method reported by the current group in Advanced Geometrical Optics (2016). Notably, the method proposed in this study involves only polynomial differentiation, i.e., trigonometric function calls are not required. As a consequence, the computation complexity is significantly reduced. Five illustrative examples are given. The first three examples show that the proposed method is applicable to the determination of the Hessian matrix for any pose matrix, irrespective of the order in which the rotation and translation motions are specified. The last two examples demonstrate the use of the proposed Hessian matrix in determining the axial and lateral chromatic aberrations of a typical optical system.

  16. Computer-aided diagnosis of mammographic masses using geometric verification-based image retrieval

    Li, Qingliang; Shi, Weili; Yang, Huamin; Zhang, Huimao; Li, Guoxin; Chen, Tao; Mori, Kensaku; Jiang, Zhengang

    2017-03-01

    Computer-Aided Diagnosis of masses in mammograms is an important indicator of breast cancer. The use of retrieval systems in breast examination is increasing gradually. In this respect, the method of exploiting the vocabulary tree framework and the inverted file in the mammographic masse retrieval have been proved high accuracy and excellent scalability. However it just considered the features in each image as a visual word and had ignored the spatial configurations of features. It greatly affect the retrieval performance. To overcome this drawback, we introduce the geometric verification method to retrieval in mammographic masses. First of all, we obtain corresponding match features based on the vocabulary tree framework and the inverted file. After that, we grasps the main point of local similarity characteristic of deformations in the local regions by constructing the circle regions of corresponding pairs. Meanwhile we segment the circle to express the geometric relationship of local matches in the area and generate the spatial encoding strictly. Finally we judge whether the matched features are correct or not, based on verifying the all spatial encoding are whether satisfied the geometric consistency. Experiments show the promising results of our approach.

  17. Accurate technique for complete geometric calibration of cone-beam computed tomography systems

    Cho Youngbin; Moseley, Douglas J.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Jaffray, David A.

    2005-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography systems have been developed to provide in situ imaging for the purpose of guiding radiation therapy. Clinical systems have been constructed using this approach, a clinical linear accelerator (Elekta Synergy RP) and an iso-centric C-arm. Geometric calibration involves the estimation of a set of parameters that describes the geometry of such systems, and is essential for accurate image reconstruction. We have developed a general analytic algorithm and corresponding calibration phantom for estimating these geometric parameters in cone-beam computed tomography (CT) systems. The performance of the calibration algorithm is evaluated and its application is discussed. The algorithm makes use of a calibration phantom to estimate the geometric parameters of the system. The phantom consists of 24 steel ball bearings (BBs) in a known geometry. Twelve BBs are spaced evenly at 30 deg in two plane-parallel circles separated by a given distance along the tube axis. The detector (e.g., a flat panel detector) is assumed to have no spatial distortion. The method estimates geometric parameters including the position of the x-ray source, position, and rotation of the detector, and gantry angle, and can describe complex source-detector trajectories. The accuracy and sensitivity of the calibration algorithm was analyzed. The calibration algorithm estimates geometric parameters in a high level of accuracy such that the quality of CT reconstruction is not degraded by the error of estimation. Sensitivity analysis shows uncertainty of 0.01 deg. (around beam direction) to 0.3 deg. (normal to the beam direction) in rotation, and 0.2 mm (orthogonal to the beam direction) to 4.9 mm (beam direction) in position for the medical linear accelerator geometry. Experimental measurements using a laboratory bench Cone-beam CT system of known geometry demonstrate the sensitivity of the method in detecting small changes in the imaging geometry with an uncertainty of 0.1 mm in

  18. A new computational method of a moment-independent uncertainty importance measure

    Liu Qiao; Homma, Toshimitsu

    2009-01-01

    For a risk assessment model, the uncertainty in input parameters is propagated through the model and leads to the uncertainty in the model output. The study of how the uncertainty in the output of a model can be apportioned to the uncertainty in the model inputs is the job of sensitivity analysis. Saltelli [Sensitivity analysis for importance assessment. Risk Analysis 2002;22(3):579-90] pointed out that a good sensitivity indicator should be global, quantitative and model free. Borgonovo [A new uncertainty importance measure. Reliability Engineering and System Safety 2007;92(6):771-84] further extended these three requirements by adding the fourth feature, moment-independence, and proposed a new sensitivity measure, δ i . It evaluates the influence of the input uncertainty on the entire output distribution without reference to any specific moment of the model output. In this paper, a new computational method of δ i is proposed. It is conceptually simple and easier to implement. The feasibility of this new method is proved by applying it to two examples.

  19. A computationally efficient moment-preserving Monte Carlo electron transport method with implementation in Geant4

    Dixon, D.A., E-mail: ddixon@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS P365, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Prinja, A.K., E-mail: prinja@unm.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, MSC01 1120, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States); Franke, B.C., E-mail: bcfrank@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87123 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    This paper presents the theoretical development and numerical demonstration of a moment-preserving Monte Carlo electron transport method. Foremost, a full implementation of the moment-preserving (MP) method within the Geant4 particle simulation toolkit is demonstrated. Beyond implementation details, it is shown that the MP method is a viable alternative to the condensed history (CH) method for inclusion in current and future generation transport codes through demonstration of the key features of the method including: systematically controllable accuracy, computational efficiency, mathematical robustness, and versatility. A wide variety of results common to electron transport are presented illustrating the key features of the MP method. In particular, it is possible to achieve accuracy that is statistically indistinguishable from analog Monte Carlo, while remaining up to three orders of magnitude more efficient than analog Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, it is shown that the MP method can be generalized to any applicable analog scattering DCS model by extending previous work on the MP method beyond analytical DCSs to the partial-wave (PW) elastic tabulated DCS data.

  20. Fluid-structure interaction computations for geometrically resolved rotor simulations using CFD

    Heinz, Joachim Christian; Sørensen, Niels N.; Zahle, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    fluid dynamics (CFD) solver EllipSys3D. The paper shows that the implemented loose coupling scheme, despite a non-conservative force transfer, maintains a sufficient numerical stability and a second-order time accuracy. The use of a strong coupling is found to be redundant. In a first test case......This paper presents a newly developed high-fidelity fluid–structure interaction simulation tool for geometrically resolved rotor simulations of wind turbines. The tool consists of a partitioned coupling between the structural part of the aero-elastic solver HAWC2 and the finite volume computational......, the newly developed coupling between HAWC2 and EllipSys3D (HAWC2CFD) is utilized to compute the aero-elastic response of the NREL 5-MW reference wind turbine (RWT) under normal operational conditions. A comparison with the low-fidelity but state-of-the-art aero-elastic solver HAWC2 reveals a very good...

  1. An efficient approach for computing the geometrical optics field reflected from a numerically specified surface

    Mittra, R.; Rushdi, A.

    1979-01-01

    An approach for computing the geometrical optic fields reflected from a numerically specified surface is presented. The approach includes the step of deriving a specular point and begins with computing the reflected rays off the surface at the points where their coordinates, as well as the partial derivatives (or equivalently, the direction of the normal), are numerically specified. Then, a cluster of three adjacent rays are chosen to define a 'mean ray' and the divergence factor associated with this mean ray. Finally, the ampilitude, phase, and vector direction of the reflected field at a given observation point are derived by associating this point with the nearest mean ray and determining its position relative to such a ray.

  2. 几何分布高阶原点矩的递推公式及推论%Recursive Formula and Inference of High - order Origin Moments of Geometric Distribution

    韩建玲

    2012-01-01

    利用幂级数逐项积分性质给出几何分布高阶原点矩的递推公式,并得到推论,使得计算高阶原点矩更为简捷方便.%In this paper, the recursive formula and inference of high -order origin moments of geometric distribution are given by using the nature of power series.

  3. Morphometric Evaluation of Korean Femurs by Geometric Computation: Comparisons of the Sex and the Population

    Ho-Jung Cho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We measured 28 parameters of 202 femurs from Koreans by an automated geometric computation program using 3D models generated from computed tomography images. The measurement parameters were selected with reference to physical and forensic anthropology studies as well as orthopedic implant design studies. All measurements were calculated using 3D reconstructions on a computer using scientific computation language. We also analyzed sex and population differences by comparison with data from previous studies. Most parameters were larger in males than in females. The height, head diameter, head center offset, and chord length of the diaphysis, most parameters in the distal femur, and the isthmic width of the medullary canal were smaller in Koreans than in other populations. However, the neck-shaft angle, subtense, and width of the intercondylar notch in the distal femur were larger than those in other populations. The results of this study will be useful as a reference for physical and forensic anthropology as well as the design of medical devices suitable for Koreans.

  4. Performance improvement of ERP-based brain-computer interface via varied geometric patterns.

    Ma, Zheng; Qiu, Tianshuang

    2017-12-01

    Recently, many studies have been focusing on optimizing the stimulus of an event-related potential (ERP)-based brain-computer interface (BCI). However, little is known about the effectiveness when increasing the stimulus unpredictability. We investigated a new stimulus type of varied geometric pattern where both complexity and unpredictability of the stimulus are increased. The proposed and classical paradigms were compared in within-subject experiments with 16 healthy participants. Results showed that the BCI performance was significantly improved for the proposed paradigm, with an average online written symbol rate increasing by 138% comparing with that of the classical paradigm. Amplitudes of primary ERP components, such as N1, P2a, P2b, N2, were also found to be significantly enhanced with the proposed paradigm. In this paper, a novel ERP BCI paradigm with a new stimulus type of varied geometric pattern is proposed. By jointly increasing the complexity and unpredictability of the stimulus, the performance of an ERP BCI could be considerably improved.

  5. Computation of higher spherical harmonics moments of the angular flux for neutron transport problems in spherical geometry

    Sahni, D.C.; Sharma, A.

    2000-01-01

    The integral form of one-speed, spherically symmetric neutron transport equation with isotropic scattering is considered. Two standard problems are solved using normal mode expansion technique. The expansion coefficients are obtained by solving their singular integral equations. It is shown that these expansion coefficients provide a representation of all spherical harmonics moments of the angular flux as a superposition of Bessel functions. It is seen that large errors occur in the computation of higher moments unless we take certain precautions. The reasons for this phenomenon are explained. They throw some light on the failure of spherical harmonics method in treating spherical geometry problems as observed by Aronsson

  6. Quantitative computed tomography derived structural geometric accuracy using custom built anthropometric phantom of the proximal femur

    Khoo, B.C.C.; Price, R.; Hicks, N.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Material and structural properties influence bone strength. Structural strength may be determined through imaging methods, though currently there is no commercially available phantom to assess structural geometrical (SG) accuracy. This paper describes the design of an anthropometric SG phantom of the proximal femur and the performance testing on quantitative computed tomography (QCT) derived SG outcomes. Aims of study were to determine accuracy of QCT-derived SG outcomes and its effects from kYp. The phantom consists of three basic components; femoral head, a modular and interchangeable neck insert and shaft. The interchangeable neck modules were designed with different cortical thickness and shape. QCT scans were performed with Mindways QA (Mindways Software Inc., USA) phantom, then with anthropometric phantom in water bath together with Mindways calibration phantom. All QCT scans were done on Philips 64 MDCT (Philips Healthcare, USA). Three neck modules were selected and scanned. Each neck module was repeated scanned five times at 120 mAs, 0.67 mm slice thickness and 0.33 mm increment and at 80, 120 and 140 kYps. SG parameters analysed included bone mineral density(aBMD) and outer-diameter (OD).

  7. Assessing vertebral fracture risk on volumetric quantitative computed tomography by geometric characterization of trabecular bone structure

    Checefsky, Walter A.; Abidin, Anas Z.; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Bauer, Jan S.; Baum, Thomas; Wismüller, Axel

    2016-03-01

    The current clinical standard for measuring Bone Mineral Density (BMD) is dual X-ray absorptiometry, however more recently BMD derived from volumetric quantitative computed tomography has been shown to demonstrate a high association with spinal fracture susceptibility. In this study, we propose a method of fracture risk assessment using structural properties of trabecular bone in spinal vertebrae. Experimental data was acquired via axial multi-detector CT (MDCT) from 12 spinal vertebrae specimens using a whole-body 256-row CT scanner with a dedicated calibration phantom. Common image processing methods were used to annotate the trabecular compartment in the vertebral slices creating a circular region of interest (ROI) that excluded cortical bone for each slice. The pixels inside the ROI were converted to values indicative of BMD. High dimensional geometrical features were derived using the scaling index method (SIM) at different radii and scaling factors (SF). The mean BMD values within the ROI were then extracted and used in conjunction with a support vector machine to predict the failure load of the specimens. Prediction performance was measured using the root-mean-square error (RMSE) metric and determined that SIM combined with mean BMD features (RMSE = 0.82 +/- 0.37) outperformed MDCT-measured mean BMD (RMSE = 1.11 +/- 0.33) (p biomechanical strength prediction in vertebrae can be significantly improved through the use of SIM-derived texture features from trabecular bone.

  8. Geometrical analysis of woven fabric microstructure based on micron-resolution computed tomography data

    Krieger, Helga; Seide, Gunnar; Gries, Thomas; Stapleton, Scott E.

    2018-04-01

    The global mechanical properties of textiles such as elasticity and strength, as well as transport properties such as permeability depend strongly on the microstructure of the textile. Textiles are heterogeneous structures with highly anisotropic material properties, including local fiber orientation and local fiber volume fraction. In this paper, an algorithm is presented to generate a virtual 3D-model of a woven fabric architecture with information about the local fiber orientation and the local fiber volume fraction. The geometric data of the woven fabric impregnated with resin was obtained by micron-resolution computed tomography (μCT). The volumetric μCT-scan was discretized into cells and the microstructure of each cell was analyzed and homogenized. Furthermore, the discretized data was used to calculate the local permeability tensors of each cell. An example application of the analyzed data is the simulation of the resin flow through a woven fabric based on the determined local permeability tensors and on Darcy's law. The presented algorithm is an automated and robust method of going from μCT-scans to structural or flow models.

  9. Exact computation of the Voronoi Diagram of spheres in 3D, its topology and its geometric invariants

    Anton, François; Mioc, Darka; Santos, Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we are addressing the exact computation of the Delaunay graph (or quasi-triangulation) and the Voronoi diagram of spheres using Wu’s algorithm. Our main contribution is first a methodology for automated derivation of invariants of the Delaunay empty circumcircle predicate for spheres...... and the Voronoi vertex of four spheres, then the application of this methodology to get all geometrical invariants that intervene in this problem and the exact computation of the Delaunay graph and the Voronoi diagram of spheres. To the best of our knowledge, there does not exist a comprehensive treatment...... of the exact computation with geometrical invariants of the Delaunay graph and the Voronoi diagram of spheres. Starting from the system of equations defining the zero-dimensional algebraic set of the problem, we are following Wu’s algorithm to transform the initial system into an equivalent Wu characteristic...

  10. Numerically stable, scalable formulas for parallel and online computation of higher-order multivariate central moments with arbitrary weights

    Pebay, Philippe [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Terriberry, Timothy B. [Xiph.Org Foundation, Arlington, VA (United States); Kolla, Hemanth [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Bennett, Janine [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-29

    Formulas for incremental or parallel computation of second order central moments have long been known, and recent extensions of these formulas to univariate and multivariate moments of arbitrary order have been developed. Formulas such as these, are of key importance in scenarios where incremental results are required and in parallel and distributed systems where communication costs are high. We survey these recent results, and improve them with arbitrary-order, numerically stable one-pass formulas which we further extend with weighted and compound variants. We also develop a generalized correction factor for standard two-pass algorithms that enables the maintenance of accuracy over nearly the full representable range of the input, avoiding the need for extended-precision arithmetic. We then empirically examine algorithm correctness for pairwise update formulas up to order four as well as condition number and relative error bounds for eight different central moment formulas, each up to degree six, to address the trade-offs between numerical accuracy and speed of the various algorithms. Finally, we demonstrate the use of the most elaborate among the above mentioned formulas, with the utilization of the compound moments for a practical large-scale scientific application.

  11. The geometrical precision of virtual bone models derived from clinical computed tomography data for forensic anthropology.

    Colman, Kerri L; Dobbe, Johannes G G; Stull, Kyra E; Ruijter, Jan M; Oostra, Roelof-Jan; van Rijn, Rick R; van der Merwe, Alie E; de Boer, Hans H; Streekstra, Geert J

    2017-07-01

    Almost all European countries lack contemporary skeletal collections for the development and validation of forensic anthropological methods. Furthermore, legal, ethical and practical considerations hinder the development of skeletal collections. A virtual skeletal database derived from clinical computed tomography (CT) scans provides a potential solution. However, clinical CT scans are typically generated with varying settings. This study investigates the effects of image segmentation and varying imaging conditions on the precision of virtual modelled pelves. An adult human cadaver was scanned using varying imaging conditions, such as scanner type and standard patient scanning protocol, slice thickness and exposure level. The pelvis was segmented from the various CT images resulting in virtually modelled pelves. The precision of the virtual modelling was determined per polygon mesh point. The fraction of mesh points resulting in point-to-point distance variations of 2 mm or less (95% confidence interval (CI)) was reported. Colour mapping was used to visualise modelling variability. At almost all (>97%) locations across the pelvis, the point-to-point distance variation is less than 2 mm (CI = 95%). In >91% of the locations, the point-to-point distance variation was less than 1 mm (CI = 95%). This indicates that the geometric variability of the virtual pelvis as a result of segmentation and imaging conditions rarely exceeds the generally accepted linear error of 2 mm. Colour mapping shows that areas with large variability are predominantly joint surfaces. Therefore, results indicate that segmented bone elements from patient-derived CT scans are a sufficiently precise source for creating a virtual skeletal database.

  12. Computational Prediction of Muscle Moments During ARED Squat Exercise on the International Space Station.

    Fregly, Benjamin J; Fregly, Christopher D; Kim, Brandon T

    2015-12-01

    Prevention of muscle atrophy caused by reduced mechanical loading in microgravity conditions remains a challenge for long-duration spaceflight. To combat leg muscle atrophy, astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) often perform squat exercise using the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED). While the ARED is effective at building muscle strength and volume on Earth, NASA researchers do not know how closely ARED squat exercise on the ISS replicates Earth-level squat muscle moments, or how small variations in exercise form affect muscle loading. This study used dynamic simulations of ARED squat exercise on the ISS to address these two questions. A multibody dynamic model of the complete astronaut-ARED system was constructed in OpenSim. With the ARED base locked to ground and gravity set to 9.81 m/s², we validated the model by reproducing muscle moments, ground reaction forces, and foot center of pressure (CoP) positions for ARED squat exercise on Earth. With the ARED base free to move relative to the ISS and gravity set to zero, we then used the validated model to simulate ARED squat exercise on the ISS for a reference squat motion and eight altered squat motions involving changes in anterior-posterior (AP) foot or CoP position on the ARED footplate. The reference squat motion closely reproduced Earth-level muscle moments for all joints except the ankle. For the altered squat motions, changing the foot position was more effective at altering muscle moments than was changing the CoP position. All CoP adjustments introduced an undesirable shear foot reaction force that could cause the feet to slip on the ARED footplate, while some foot and CoP adjustments introduced an undesirable sagittal plane foot reaction moment that would cause the astronaut to rotate off the ARED footplate without the use of some type of foot fixation. Our results provide potentially useful information for achieving desired increases or decreases in specific muscle moments

  13. Computational Study of Geometry, Solvation Free Energy, Dipole Moment, Polarizability, Hyperpolarizability and Molecular Properties of 2-Methylimidazole

    Mohammad Firoz Khan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio calculations were carried out to study the geometry, solvation free energy, dipole moment, molecular electrostatic potential (MESP, Mulliken and Natural charge distribution, polarizability, hyperpolarizability, Natural Bond Orbital (NBO energetic and different molecular properties like global reactivity descriptors (chemical hardness, softness, chemical potential, electronegativity, electrophilicity index of 2-methylimidazole. B3LYP/6-31G(d,p level of theory was used to optimize the structure both in the gas phase and in solution. The solvation free energy, dipole moment and molecular properties were calculated by applying the Solvation Model on Density (SMD in four solvent systems, namely water, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO, n-octanol and chloroform. The computed bond distances, bond angles and dihedral angles of 2-methylimidazole agreed reasonably well with the experimental data except for C(2-N(1, C(4-C(5 and N(1-H(7 bond lengths and N(1-C(5-C(4 bond angle. The solvation free energy, dipole moment, polarizability, first order hyperpolarizability, chemical potential, electronegativity and electrophilicity index of 2-methylimidazole increased on going from non-polar to polar solvents. Chemical hardness also increased with increasing polarity of the solvent and the opposite relation was found in the case of softness. These results provide better understanding of the stability and reactivity of 2-methylimidazole in different solvent systems.

  14. Computational modelling of locomotor muscle moment arms in the basal dinosaur Lesothosaurus diagnosticus: assessing convergence between birds and basal ornithischians.

    Bates, Karl T; Maidment, Susannah C R; Allen, Vivian; Barrett, Paul M

    2012-03-01

    Ornithischia (the 'bird-hipped' dinosaurs) encompasses bipedal, facultative quadrupedal and quadrupedal taxa. Primitive ornithischians were small bipeds, but large body size and obligate quadrupedality evolved independently in all major ornithischian lineages. Numerous pelvic and hind limb features distinguish ornithischians from the majority of other non-avian dinosaurs. However, some of these features, notably a retroverted pubis and elongate iliac preacetabular process, appeared convergently in maniraptoran theropods, and were inherited by their avian descendants. During maniraptoran/avian evolution these pelvic modifications led to significant changes in the functions of associated muscles, involving alterations to the moment arms and the activation patterns of pelvic musculature. However, the functions of these features in ornithischians and their influence on locomotion have not been tested and remain poorly understood. Here, we provide quantitative tests of bipedal ornithischian muscle function using computational modelling to estimate 3D hind limb moment arms for the most complete basal ornithischian, Lesothosaurus diagnosticus. This approach enables sensitivity analyses to be carried out to explore the effects of uncertainties in muscle reconstructions of extinct taxa, and allows direct comparisons to be made with similarly constructed models of other bipedal dinosaurs. This analysis supports some previously proposed qualitative inferences of muscle function in basal ornithischians. However, more importantly, this work highlights ambiguities in the roles of certain muscles, notably those inserting close to the hip joint. Comparative analysis reveals that moment arm polarities and magnitudes in Lesothosaurus, basal tetanuran theropods and the extant ostrich are generally similar. However, several key differences are identified, most significantly in comparisons between the moment arms of muscles associated with convergent osteological features in

  15. Modeling cotton (Gossypium spp) leaves and canopy using computer aided geometric design (CAGD)

    The goal of this research is to develop a geometrically accurate model of cotton crop canopies for exploring changes in canopy microenvironment and physiological function with leaf structure. We develop an accurate representation of the leaves, including changes in three-dimensional folding and orie...

  16. Research of z-axis geometric dose efficiency in multi-detector computed tomography

    Kim, You Hyun; Kim, Moon Chan

    2006-01-01

    With the recent prevalence of helical CT and multi-slice CT, which deliver higher radiation dose than conventional CT due to overbeaming effect in X-ray exposure and interpolation technique in image reconstruction. Although multi-detector and helical CT scanner provide a variety of opportunities for patient dose reduction, the potential risk for high radiation levels in CT examination can't be overemphasized in spite of acquiring more diagnostic information. So much more concerns is necessary about dose characteristics of CT scanner, especially dose efficient design as well as dose modulation software, because dose efficiency built into the scanner's design is probably the most important aspect of successful low dose clinical performance. This study was conducted to evaluate z-axis geometric dose efficiency in single detector CT and each level multi-detector CT, as well as to compare z-axis dose efficiency with change of technical scan parameters such as focal spot size of tube, beam collimation, detector combination, scan mode, pitch size, slice width and interval. The results obtained were as follows; 1. SDCT was most highest and 4 MDCT was most lowest in z-axis geometric dose efficiency among SDCT, 4, 8, 16, 64 slice MDCT made by GE manufacture. 2. Small focal spot was 0.67-13.62% higher than large focal spot in z-axis geometric dose efficiency at MDCT. 3. Large beam collimation was 3.13-51.52% higher than small beam collimation in z-axis geometric dose efficiency at MDCT. Z-axis geometric dose efficiency was same at 4 slice MDCT in all condition and 8 slice MDCT of large beam collimation with change of detector combination, but was changed irregularly at 8 slice MDCT of small beam collimation and 16 slice MDCT in all condition with change of detector combination. 5. There was no significant difference for z-axis geometric dose efficiency between conventional scan and helical scan, and with change of pitch factor, as well as change of slice width or interval for

  17. Multi-fidelity stochastic collocation method for computation of statistical moments

    Zhu, Xueyu, E-mail: xueyu-zhu@uiowa.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Linebarger, Erin M., E-mail: aerinline@sci.utah.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Xiu, Dongbin, E-mail: xiu.16@osu.edu [Department of Mathematics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2017-07-15

    We present an efficient numerical algorithm to approximate the statistical moments of stochastic problems, in the presence of models with different fidelities. The method extends the multi-fidelity approximation method developed in . By combining the efficiency of low-fidelity models and the accuracy of high-fidelity models, our method exhibits fast convergence with a limited number of high-fidelity simulations. We establish an error bound of the method and present several numerical examples to demonstrate the efficiency and applicability of the multi-fidelity algorithm.

  18. DelPhi web server v2: incorporating atomic-style geometrical figures into the computational protocol.

    Smith, Nicholas; Witham, Shawn; Sarkar, Subhra; Zhang, Jie; Li, Lin; Li, Chuan; Alexov, Emil

    2012-06-15

    A new edition of the DelPhi web server, DelPhi web server v2, is released to include atomic presentation of geometrical figures. These geometrical objects can be used to model nano-size objects together with real biological macromolecules. The position and size of the object can be manipulated by the user in real time until desired results are achieved. The server fixes structural defects, adds hydrogen atoms and calculates electrostatic energies and the corresponding electrostatic potential and ionic distributions. The web server follows a client-server architecture built on PHP and HTML and utilizes DelPhi software. The computation is carried out on supercomputer cluster and results are given back to the user via http protocol, including the ability to visualize the structure and corresponding electrostatic potential via Jmol implementation. The DelPhi web server is available from http://compbio.clemson.edu/delphi_webserver.

  19. Development changes of geometric layout product, developed by means of computer aided design

    С.Г. Кєворков

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available  Contains results of development of modification formation methodology in a product geometrical mockup made by means of CAD system. Change process of a CAD data (assembly structures, details and influencing on a product structure is considered. The analysis of the assembly version creations algorithm, which creates a product structure with certain serial number, is carried out. The algorithms of CAD user environment creations, restriction of CAD object and CAD object cancellation algorithm are created.

  20. Speeding Up Non-Parametric Bootstrap Computations for Statistics Based on Sample Moments in Small/Moderate Sample Size Applications.

    Elias Chaibub Neto

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a vectorized implementation of the non-parametric bootstrap for statistics based on sample moments. Basically, we adopt the multinomial sampling formulation of the non-parametric bootstrap, and compute bootstrap replications of sample moment statistics by simply weighting the observed data according to multinomial counts instead of evaluating the statistic on a resampled version of the observed data. Using this formulation we can generate a matrix of bootstrap weights and compute the entire vector of bootstrap replications with a few matrix multiplications. Vectorization is particularly important for matrix-oriented programming languages such as R, where matrix/vector calculations tend to be faster than scalar operations implemented in a loop. We illustrate the application of the vectorized implementation in real and simulated data sets, when bootstrapping Pearson's sample correlation coefficient, and compared its performance against two state-of-the-art R implementations of the non-parametric bootstrap, as well as a straightforward one based on a for loop. Our investigations spanned varying sample sizes and number of bootstrap replications. The vectorized bootstrap compared favorably against the state-of-the-art implementations in all cases tested, and was remarkably/considerably faster for small/moderate sample sizes. The same results were observed in the comparison with the straightforward implementation, except for large sample sizes, where the vectorized bootstrap was slightly slower than the straightforward implementation due to increased time expenditures in the generation of weight matrices via multinomial sampling.

  1. Computation of geometric representation of novel spectrophotometric methods used for the analysis of minor components in pharmaceutical preparations.

    Lotfy, Hayam M; Saleh, Sarah S; Hassan, Nagiba Y; Salem, Hesham

    2015-01-01

    Novel spectrophotometric methods were applied for the determination of the minor component tetryzoline HCl (TZH) in its ternary mixture with ofloxacin (OFX) and prednisolone acetate (PA) in the ratio of (1:5:7.5), and in its binary mixture with sodium cromoglicate (SCG) in the ratio of (1:80). The novel spectrophotometric methods determined the minor component (TZH) successfully in the two selected mixtures by computing the geometrical relationship of either standard addition or subtraction. The novel spectrophotometric methods are: geometrical amplitude modulation (GAM), geometrical induced amplitude modulation (GIAM), ratio H-point standard addition method (RHPSAM) and compensated area under the curve (CAUC). The proposed methods were successfully applied for the determination of the minor component TZH below its concentration range. The methods were validated as per ICH guidelines where accuracy, repeatability, inter-day precision and robustness were found to be within the acceptable limits. The results obtained from the proposed methods were statistically compared with official ones where no significant difference was observed. No difference was observed between the obtained results when compared to the reported HPLC method, which proved that the developed methods could be alternative to HPLC techniques in quality control laboratories. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Computer-aided diagnosis for phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography: quantitative characterization of human patellar cartilage with high-dimensional geometric features.

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B; Coan, Paola; Huber, Markus B; Diemoz, Paul C; Glaser, Christian; Wismüller, Axel

    2014-02-01

    Phase-contrast computed tomography (PCI-CT) has shown tremendous potential as an imaging modality for visualizing human cartilage with high spatial resolution. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of PCI-CT to visualize (1) structural details of the human patellar cartilage matrix and (2) changes to chondrocyte organization induced by osteoarthritis. This study investigates the use of high-dimensional geometric features in characterizing such chondrocyte patterns in the presence or absence of osteoarthritic damage. Geometrical features derived from the scaling index method (SIM) and statistical features derived from gray-level co-occurrence matrices were extracted from 842 regions of interest (ROI) annotated on PCI-CT images of ex vivo human patellar cartilage specimens. These features were subsequently used in a machine learning task with support vector regression to classify ROIs as healthy or osteoarthritic; classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC). SIM-derived geometrical features exhibited the best classification performance (AUC, 0.95 ± 0.06) and were most robust to changes in ROI size. These results suggest that such geometrical features can provide a detailed characterization of the chondrocyte organization in the cartilage matrix in an automated and non-subjective manner, while also enabling classification of cartilage as healthy or osteoarthritic with high accuracy. Such features could potentially serve as imaging markers for evaluating osteoarthritis progression and its response to different therapeutic intervention strategies.

  3. A Moment of Mindfulness: Computer-Mediated Mindfulness Practice Increases State Mindfulness

    Mahmood, L.; Hopthrow, T.; Randsley de Moura, G.

    2016-01-01

    Three studies investigated the use of a 5-minute, computer-mediated mindfulness practice in increasing levels of state mindfulness. In Study 1, 54 high school students completed the computer-mediated mindfulness practice in a lab setting and Toronto Mindfulness Scale (TMS) scores were measured before and after the practice. In Study 2 (N = 90) and Study 3 (N = 61), the mindfulness practice was tested with an entirely online sample to test the delivery of the 5-minute mindfulness practice via ...

  4. Computational analysis on the electrode geometric parameters for the reversible solid oxide cells

    Lee, Seoung-Ju; Jung, Chi-Young; Yi, Sung-Chul

    2017-01-01

    Increasing global energy demands have been accelerating the research and development of reversible electrochemical systems that can realize an efficient use of the intermittent renewable energy resources. This paper thus describes a numerical investigation of reversible solid oxide cells (RSOCs), for their high energy efficiency delivered from the high operating temperatures ranging from 600 to 1000 °C. Unlike the previous studies, a model-based strategy is applied for the simultaneous integration of different operating modes (namely, fuel cell and electrolysis cell modes) to enable more realistic predictions on the trade-off behavior of the effects of electrode design parameters on the cell performance. This approach was taken to investigate the effects of various geometric designs and operating parameters (electrode backing layer thickness; interconnector rib size; fuel gas composition) on the current-potential characteristic and the round-trip efficiency. The cell performance was significantly affected by the rib size, particularly when the backing layer was thin, because of the uneven distribution of the reactant species. Overall, this study provides insights into key geometric design parameters that dominate the performance of dual-mode RSOCs.

  5. A Moment of Mindfulness: Computer-Mediated Mindfulness Practice Increases State Mindfulness.

    Lynsey Mahmood

    Full Text Available Three studies investigated the use of a 5-minute, computer-mediated mindfulness practice in increasing levels of state mindfulness. In Study 1, 54 high school students completed the computer-mediated mindfulness practice in a lab setting and Toronto Mindfulness Scale (TMS scores were measured before and after the practice. In Study 2 (N = 90 and Study 3 (N = 61, the mindfulness practice was tested with an entirely online sample to test the delivery of the 5-minute mindfulness practice via the internet. In Study 2 and 3, we found a significant increase in TMS scores in the mindful condition, but not in the control condition. These findings highlight the impact of a brief, mindfulness practice for single-session, computer-mediated use to increase mindfulness as a state.

  6. Methods for Computing Accurate Atomic Spin Moments for Collinear and Noncollinear Magnetism in Periodic and Nonperiodic Materials.

    Manz, Thomas A; Sholl, David S

    2011-12-13

    The partitioning of electron spin density among atoms in a material gives atomic spin moments (ASMs), which are important for understanding magnetic properties. We compare ASMs computed using different population analysis methods and introduce a method for computing density derived electrostatic and chemical (DDEC) ASMs. Bader and DDEC ASMs can be computed for periodic and nonperiodic materials with either collinear or noncollinear magnetism, while natural population analysis (NPA) ASMs can be computed for nonperiodic materials with collinear magnetism. Our results show Bader, DDEC, and (where applicable) NPA methods give similar ASMs, but different net atomic charges. Because they are optimized to reproduce both the magnetic field and the chemical states of atoms in a material, DDEC ASMs are especially suitable for constructing interaction potentials for atomistic simulations. We describe the computation of accurate ASMs for (a) a variety of systems using collinear and noncollinear spin DFT, (b) highly correlated materials (e.g., magnetite) using DFT+U, and (c) various spin states of ozone using coupled cluster expansions. The computed ASMs are in good agreement with available experimental results for a variety of periodic and nonperiodic materials. Examples considered include the antiferromagnetic metal organic framework Cu3(BTC)2, several ozone spin states, mono- and binuclear transition metal complexes, ferri- and ferro-magnetic solids (e.g., Fe3O4, Fe3Si), and simple molecular systems. We briefly discuss the theory of exchange-correlation functionals for studying noncollinear magnetism. A method for finding the ground state of systems with highly noncollinear magnetism is introduced. We use these methods to study the spin-orbit coupling potential energy surface of the single molecule magnet Fe4C40H52N4O12, which has highly noncollinear magnetism, and find that it contains unusual features that give a new interpretation to experimental data.

  7. New method of computing the contributions of graphs without lepton loops to the electron anomalous magnetic moment in QED

    Volkov, Sergey

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a new method of numerical computation of the mass-independent QED contributions to the electron anomalous magnetic moment which arise from Feynman graphs without closed electron loops. The method is based on a forestlike subtraction formula that removes all ultraviolet and infrared divergences in each Feynman graph before integration in Feynman-parametric space. The integration is performed by an importance sampling Monte-Carlo algorithm with the probability density function that is constructed for each Feynman graph individually. The method is fully automated at any order of the perturbation series. The results of applying the method to 2-loop, 3-loop, 4-loop Feynman graphs, and to some individual 5-loop graphs are presented, as well as the comparison of this method with other ones with respect to Monte Carlo convergence speed.

  8. Geometrical metrology on vacuum cast silicone rubber form using computed tomography

    Pacurar, Ramona; Müller, Pavel; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    An investigation on geometrical measurements of silicone rubber cake form and polyamide molds using three measuring techniques - CMM, optical scanner and CT scanner - was carried out. The only measurand was diameter of a cone measured at specified levels. An uncertainty budget for all three...... techniques. It was found that when the silicon rubber form was measured on the supported bottom mold or the bottom mold was measured itself, the diameter measurements performed on optical scanner and CT scanner were bigger compared to CMM measurements. On the other hand, the diameter resulted in smaller...... values when the silicon rubber form was measured on the supported top mold or the top mold was measured itself. A procedure for measurement of highly deformable part, such as silicone rubber form, was developed. Uncertainties from measurement on the optical scanner were big. This was mainly connected...

  9. Moment-Preserving Computational Approach for High Energy Charged Particle Transport

    2016-05-16

    posed, but with modified cross sections such that the resulting single-event Monte Carlo simulation is computationally efficient (minutes vs . days...configurations, which are all characteristics of real world applications. In other words , it is possible to simulate real, physical phenomena using charged...0 < 0.95) ~ 1 2() ≫ 1, (3) Demonstrating that scattering is highly forward peaked. Thus, the picture of charged particle interactions

  10. Nuclear moments

    Kopferman, H; Massey, H S W

    1958-01-01

    Nuclear Moments focuses on the processes, methodologies, reactions, and transformations of molecules and atoms, including magnetic resonance and nuclear moments. The book first offers information on nuclear moments in free atoms and molecules, including theoretical foundations of hyperfine structure, isotope shift, spectra of diatomic molecules, and vector model of molecules. The manuscript then takes a look at nuclear moments in liquids and crystals. Discussions focus on nuclear paramagnetic and magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance. The text discusses nuclear moments and nucl

  11. Tensor Arithmetic, Geometric and Mathematic Principles of Fluid Mechanics in Implementation of Direct Computational Experiments

    Bogdanov Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The architecture of a digital computing system determines the technical foundation of a unified mathematical language for exact arithmetic-logical description of phenomena and laws of continuum mechanics for applications in fluid mechanics and theoretical physics. The deep parallelization of the computing processes results in functional programming at a new technological level, providing traceability of the computing processes with automatic application of multiscale hybrid circuits and adaptive mathematical models for the true reproduction of the fundamental laws of physics and continuum mechanics.

  12. Center for computation and visualization of geometric structures. [Annual], Progress report

    1993-02-12

    The mission of the Center is to establish a unified environment promoting research, education, and software and tool development. The work is centered on computing, interpreted in a broad sense to include the relevant theory, development of algorithms, and actual implementation. The research aspects of the Center are focused on geometry; correspondingly the computational aspects are focused on three (and higher) dimensional visualization. The educational aspects are likewise centered on computing and focused on geometry. A broader term than education is `communication` which encompasses the challenge of explaining to the world current research in mathematics, and specifically geometry.

  13. Detection of Chorus Elements and other Wave Signatures Using Geometric Computational Techniques in the Van Allen radiation belts

    Sengupta, A.; Kletzing, C.; Howk, R.; Kurth, W. S.

    2017-12-01

    An important goal of the Van Allen Probes mission is to understand wave particle interactions that can energize relativistic electron in the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts. The EMFISIS instrumentation suite provides measurements of wave electric and magnetic fields of wave features such as chorus that participate in these interactions. Geometric signal processing discovers structural relationships, e.g. connectivity across ridge-like features in chorus elements to reveal properties such as dominant angles of the element (frequency sweep rate) and integrated power along the a given chorus element. These techniques disambiguate these wave features against background hiss-like chorus. This enables autonomous discovery of chorus elements across the large volumes of EMFISIS data. At the scale of individual or overlapping chorus elements, topological pattern recognition techniques enable interpretation of chorus microstructure by discovering connectivity and other geometric features within the wave signature of a single chorus element or between overlapping chorus elements. Thus chorus wave features can be quantified and studied at multiple scales of spectral geometry using geometric signal processing techniques. We present recently developed computational techniques that exploit spectral geometry of chorus elements and whistlers to enable large-scale automated discovery, detection and statistical analysis of these events over EMFISIS data. Specifically, we present different case studies across a diverse portfolio of chorus elements and discuss the performance of our algorithms regarding precision of detection as well as interpretation of chorus microstructure. We also provide large-scale statistical analysis on the distribution of dominant sweep rates and other properties of the detected chorus elements.

  14. Securing a cyber physical system in nuclear power plants using least square approximation and computational geometric approach

    Gawand, Hemangi Laxman; Bhattacharjee, A. K.; Roy, Kallol

    2017-01-01

    In industrial plants such as nuclear power plants, system operations are performed by embedded controllers orchestrated by Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) software. A targeted attack (also termed a control aware attack) on the controller/SCADA software can lead a control system to operate in an unsafe mode or sometimes to complete shutdown of the plant. Such malware attacks can result in tremendous cost to the organization for recovery, cleanup, and maintenance activity. SCADA systems in operational mode generate huge log files. These files are useful in analysis of the plant behavior and diagnostics during an ongoing attack. However, they are bulky and difficult for manual inspection. Data mining techniques such as least squares approximation and computational methods can be used in the analysis of logs and to take proactive actions when required. This paper explores methodologies and algorithms so as to develop an effective monitoring scheme against control aware cyber attacks. It also explains soft computation techniques such as the computational geometric method and least squares approximation that can be effective in monitor design. This paper provides insights into diagnostic monitoring of its effectiveness by attack simulations on a four-tank model and using computation techniques to diagnose it. Cyber security of instrumentation and control systems used in nuclear power plants is of paramount importance and hence could be a possible target of such applications

  15. Securing a cyber physical system in nuclear power plants using least square approximation and computational geometric approach

    Gawand, Hemangi Laxman [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Computer Section, BARC, Mumbai (India); Bhattacharjee, A. K. [Reactor Control Division, BARC, Mumbai (India); Roy, Kallol [BHAVINI, Kalpakkam (India)

    2017-04-15

    In industrial plants such as nuclear power plants, system operations are performed by embedded controllers orchestrated by Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) software. A targeted attack (also termed a control aware attack) on the controller/SCADA software can lead a control system to operate in an unsafe mode or sometimes to complete shutdown of the plant. Such malware attacks can result in tremendous cost to the organization for recovery, cleanup, and maintenance activity. SCADA systems in operational mode generate huge log files. These files are useful in analysis of the plant behavior and diagnostics during an ongoing attack. However, they are bulky and difficult for manual inspection. Data mining techniques such as least squares approximation and computational methods can be used in the analysis of logs and to take proactive actions when required. This paper explores methodologies and algorithms so as to develop an effective monitoring scheme against control aware cyber attacks. It also explains soft computation techniques such as the computational geometric method and least squares approximation that can be effective in monitor design. This paper provides insights into diagnostic monitoring of its effectiveness by attack simulations on a four-tank model and using computation techniques to diagnose it. Cyber security of instrumentation and control systems used in nuclear power plants is of paramount importance and hence could be a possible target of such applications.

  16. Securing a Cyber Physical System in Nuclear Power Plants Using Least Square Approximation and Computational Geometric Approach

    Hemangi Laxman Gawand

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In industrial plants such as nuclear power plants, system operations are performed by embedded controllers orchestrated by Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA software. A targeted attack (also termed a control aware attack on the controller/SCADA software can lead a control system to operate in an unsafe mode or sometimes to complete shutdown of the plant. Such malware attacks can result in tremendous cost to the organization for recovery, cleanup, and maintenance activity. SCADA systems in operational mode generate huge log files. These files are useful in analysis of the plant behavior and diagnostics during an ongoing attack. However, they are bulky and difficult for manual inspection. Data mining techniques such as least squares approximation and computational methods can be used in the analysis of logs and to take proactive actions when required. This paper explores methodologies and algorithms so as to develop an effective monitoring scheme against control aware cyber attacks. It also explains soft computation techniques such as the computational geometric method and least squares approximation that can be effective in monitor design. This paper provides insights into diagnostic monitoring of its effectiveness by attack simulations on a four-tank model and using computation techniques to diagnose it. Cyber security of instrumentation and control systems used in nuclear power plants is of paramount importance and hence could be a possible target of such applications.

  17. Preliminary results of very fast computation of Moment Magnitude and focal mechanism in the context of tsunami warning

    Schindelé, François; Roch, Julien; Rivera, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Various methodologies were recently developed to compute the moment magnitude and the focal mechanism, thanks to the real time access to numerous broad-band seismic data. Several methods were implemented at the CENALT, in particular the W-Phase method developed by H. Kanamori and L. Rivera. For earthquakes of magnitudes in the range 6.5-9.0, this method provides accurate results in less than 40 minutes. The context of the tsunami warning in Mediterranean, a small basin impacted in less than one hour, and with small sources but some with high tsunami potential (Boumerdes 2003), a comprehensive tsunami warning system in that region should include very fast computation of the seismic parameters. The results of the values of Mw, the focal depth and the type of fault (reverse, normal, strike-slip) are the most relevant parameters expected for the tsunami warning. Preliminary results will be presented using data in the North-eastern and Mediterranean region for the recent period 2010-2014. This work is funded by project ASTARTE - - Assessment, Strategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe - FP7-ENV2013 6.4-3, Grant 603839

  18. Physics Education through Computational Tools: The Case of Geometrical and Physical Optics

    Rodríguez, Y.; Santana, A.; Mendoza, L. M.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, with the development of more powerful and accurate computational tools, the inclusion of new didactic materials in the classroom is known to have increased. However, the form in which these materials can be used to enhance the learning process is still under debate. Many different methodologies have been suggested for constructing new…

  19. Computational fluid dynamics for propulsion technology: Geometric grid visualization in CFD-based propulsion technology research

    Ziebarth, John P.; Meyer, Doug

    1992-01-01

    The coordination is examined of necessary resources, facilities, and special personnel to provide technical integration activities in the area of computational fluid dynamics applied to propulsion technology. Involved is the coordination of CFD activities between government, industry, and universities. Current geometry modeling, grid generation, and graphical methods are established to use in the analysis of CFD design methodologies.

  20. Do Computers Improve the Drawing of a Geometrical Figure for 10 Year-Old Children?

    Martin, Perrine; Velay, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, computer aided design (CAD) is widely used by designers. Would children learn to draw more easily and more efficiently if they were taught with computerised tools? To answer this question, we made an experiment designed to compare two methods for children to do the same drawing: the classical "pen and paper" method and a CAD…

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Channel Geometric Effect for Fischer-Tropsch Microchannel Reactor

    Na, Jonggeol; Jung, Ikhwan; Kshetrimayum, Krishnadash S.; Park, Seongho; Park, Chansaem; Han, Chonghun

    2014-01-01

    Driven by both environmental and economic reasons, the development of small to medium scale GTL(gas-to-liquid) process for offshore applications and for utilizing other stranded or associated gas has recently been studied increasingly. Microchannel GTL reactors have been preferred over the conventional GTL reactors for such applications, due to its compactness, and additional advantages of small heat and mass transfer distance desired for high heat transfer performance and reactor conversion. In this work, multi-microchannel reactor was simulated by using commercial CFD code, ANSYS FLUENT, to study the geometric effect of the microchannels on the heat transfer phenomena. A heat generation curve was first calculated by modeling a Fischer-Tropsch reaction in a single-microchannel reactor model using Matlab-ASPEN integration platform. The calculated heat generation curve was implemented to the CFD model. Four design variables based on the microchannel geometry namely coolant channel width, coolant channel height, coolant channel to process channel distance, and coolant channel to coolant channel distance, were selected for calculating three dependent variables namely, heat flux, maximum temperature of coolant channel, and maximum temperature of process channel. The simulation results were visualized to understand the effects of the design variables on the dependent variables. Heat flux and maximum temperature of cooling channel and process channel were found to be increasing when coolant channel width and height were decreased. Coolant channel to process channel distance was found to have no effect on the heat transfer phenomena. Finally, total heat flux was found to be increasing and maximum coolant channel temperature to be decreasing when coolant channel to coolant channel distance was decreased. Using the qualitative trend revealed from the present study, an appropriate process channel and coolant channel geometry along with the distance between the adjacent

  2. Design of high-order rotation invariants from Gaussian-Hermite moments

    Yang, Bo; Flusser, Jan; Suk, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 1 (2015), s. 61-67 ISSN 0165-1684 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-16928S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Rotationinvariants * Geometric moments * Gaussian–Hermite moments * Recurrentrelation Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 2.063, year: 2015 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2015/ZOI/flusser-0441266.pdf

  3. Integration of experimental and computational methods for identifying geometric, thermal and diffusive properties of biomaterials

    Weres, Jerzy; Kujawa, Sebastian; Olek, Wiesław; Czajkowski, Łukasz

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of physical properties of biomaterials is important in understanding and designing agri-food and wood processing industries. In the study presented in this paper computational methods were developed and combined with experiments to enhance identification of agri-food and forest product properties, and to predict heat and water transport in such products. They were based on the finite element model of heat and water transport and supplemented with experimental data. Algorithms were proposed for image processing, geometry meshing, and inverse/direct finite element modelling. The resulting software system was composed of integrated subsystems for 3D geometry data acquisition and mesh generation, for 3D geometry modelling and visualization, and for inverse/direct problem computations for the heat and water transport processes. Auxiliary packages were developed to assess performance, accuracy and unification of data access. The software was validated by identifying selected properties and using the estimated values to predict the examined processes, and then comparing predictions to experimental data. The geometry, thermal conductivity, specific heat, coefficient of water diffusion, equilibrium water content and convective heat and water transfer coefficients in the boundary layer were analysed. The estimated values, used as an input for simulation of the examined processes, enabled reduction in the uncertainty associated with predictions.

  4. A contribution to the physically and geometrically nonlinear computer analysis of general reinforced concrete shells

    Zahlten, W.

    1990-02-01

    Starting from a Kirchhoff-Love type shell theory of finite rotations a layered shell element for reinforced concrete is developed. The plastic-fracturing theory due to Bazant/Kim is used to describe the uncracked concrete. Tension cracking is controlled by a principle tensile stress criterion. An elasto-plastic law with kinematic hardening models the reinforcing steel. The tension stiffening concept of Gilbert/Warner allows an averaged consideration of the concrete between cracks. By discretization of the displacement field the element matrices are obtained which are derived via tensor notation. The nonlinear structural response is computed by incremental-iterative path-tracing algorithms. The range of applicability of the model is finally be proven by several examples with time-invariant and time-dependent loading. (orig.) [de

  5. A geometric method for computing ocular kinematics and classifying gaze events using monocular remote eye tracking in a robotic environment.

    Singh, Tarkeshwar; Perry, Christopher M; Herter, Troy M

    2016-01-26

    Robotic and virtual-reality systems offer tremendous potential for improving assessment and rehabilitation of neurological disorders affecting the upper extremity. A key feature of these systems is that visual stimuli are often presented within the same workspace as the hands (i.e., peripersonal space). Integrating video-based remote eye tracking with robotic and virtual-reality systems can provide an additional tool for investigating how cognitive processes influence visuomotor learning and rehabilitation of the upper extremity. However, remote eye tracking systems typically compute ocular kinematics by assuming eye movements are made in a plane with constant depth (e.g. frontal plane). When visual stimuli are presented at variable depths (e.g. transverse plane), eye movements have a vergence component that may influence reliable detection of gaze events (fixations, smooth pursuits and saccades). To our knowledge, there are no available methods to classify gaze events in the transverse plane for monocular remote eye tracking systems. Here we present a geometrical method to compute ocular kinematics from a monocular remote eye tracking system when visual stimuli are presented in the transverse plane. We then use the obtained kinematics to compute velocity-based thresholds that allow us to accurately identify onsets and offsets of fixations, saccades and smooth pursuits. Finally, we validate our algorithm by comparing the gaze events computed by the algorithm with those obtained from the eye-tracking software and manual digitization. Within the transverse plane, our algorithm reliably differentiates saccades from fixations (static visual stimuli) and smooth pursuits from saccades and fixations when visual stimuli are dynamic. The proposed methods provide advancements for examining eye movements in robotic and virtual-reality systems. Our methods can also be used with other video-based or tablet-based systems in which eye movements are performed in a peripersonal

  6. Reconstruction of convex bodies from moments

    Hörrmann, Julia; Kousholt, Astrid

    We investigate how much information about a convex body can be retrieved from a finite number of its geometric moments. We give a sufficient condition for a convex body to be uniquely determined by a finite number of its geometric moments, and we show that among all convex bodies, those which......- rithm that approximates a convex body using a finite number of its Legendre moments. The consistency of the algorithm is established using the stabil- ity result for Legendre moments. When only noisy measurements of Legendre moments are available, the consistency of the algorithm is established under...

  7. Feasibility of geometrical verification of patient set-up using body contours and computed tomography data

    Ploeger, Lennert S.; Betgen, Anja; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G.A.; Herk, Marcel van

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: Body contours can potentially be used for patient set-up verification in external-beam radiotherapy and might enable more accurate set-up of patients prior to irradiation. The aim of this study is to test the feasibility of patient set-up verification using a body contour scanner. Material and methods: Body contour scans of 33 lung cancer and 21 head-and-neck cancer patients were acquired on a simulator. We assume that this dataset is representative for the patient set-up on an accelerator. Shortly before acquisition of the body contour scan, a pair of orthogonal simulator images was taken as a reference. Both the body contour scan and the simulator images were matched in 3D to the planning computed tomography scan. Movement of skin with respect to bone was quantified based on an analysis of variance method. Results: Set-up errors determined with body-contours agreed reasonably well with those determined with simulator images. For the lung cancer patients, the average set-up errors (mm)±1 standard deviation (SD) for the left-right, cranio-caudal and anterior-posterior directions were 1.2±2.9, -0.8±5.0 and -2.3±3.1 using body contours, compared to -0.8±3.2, -1.0±4.1 and -1.2±2.4 using simulator images. For the head-and-neck cancer patients, the set-up errors were 0.5±1.8, 0.5±2.7 and -2.2±1.8 using body contours compared to -0.4±1.2, 0.1±2.1, -0.1±1.8 using simulator images. The SD of the set-up errors obtained from analysis of the body contours were not significantly different from those obtained from analysis of the simulator images. Movement of the skin with respect to bone (1 SD) was estimated at 2.3 mm for lung cancer patients and 1.7 mm for head-and-neck cancer patients. Conclusion: Measurement of patient set-up using a body-contouring device is possible. The accuracy, however, is limited by the movement of the skin with respect to the bone. In situations where the error in the patient set-up is relatively large, it is

  8. Geometric Optimization for Non-Thrombogenicity of a Centrifugal Blood Pump through Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis

    Nishida, Masahiro; Yamane, Takashi

    A monopivot magnetic suspension blood pump has been developed in our laboratory. The flow patterns within the pump should be carefully examined in order to prevent thrombogenesis, especially around the pivot bearing. Therefore, the effects of the pump geometry on the local flow were analyzed using computational fluid dynamics together with the experimental flow visualization. The engineering goal was to reduce the area of stagnation around the pivot in order to prevent thrombus formation. As a result, the stagnation area and the flow rate through the washout holes were found to be highly affected by the size and geometry of the washout holes. Secondary flow was revealed to form a jet-like wash against the pivot, thus preventing thrombus formation. The flow rate through the washout holes was estimated to be up to one fifth of the pump flow rate, depending on the cross-sectional areas of the washout holes. Furthermore, an anti-thrombogenic effect was attained by removing a small gap between the male and female pivots.

  9. Geometrical optimization of a particle tracking system for proton computed tomography

    Penfold, S.N.; Rosenfeld, A.B.; Schulte, R.W.; Sadrozinksi, H.-F.W.

    2011-01-01

    Proton computed tomography (pCT) is currently being developed as an imaging modality for improving the accuracy of treatment planning in proton therapy. A tracking telescope comprising eight planes of single-sided silicon strip detectors (SSDs) forms an integral part of our present pCT design. Due to the currently maximum available Si wafer size, the sensitive area of 9 cm × 18 cm of the pCT tracker requires each tracking plane to be composed of two individual SSDs, which creates potential reconstruction problems due to overlap or gaps of the sensitive SSD areas. Furthermore, the spacing of the tracking planes creates competing design requirements between compactness and spatial resolution. Two Monte Carlo simulations were performed to study the effect of tracking detector location on pCT image quality. It was found that a “shingled” detector design suppressed reconstruction artefacts and, for the spatial resolution of the current detector hardware, reconstructed spatial resolution was not improved with a tracking separation of greater than 8 cm.

  10. Transmuted Complementary Weibull Geometric Distribution

    Ahmed Z. A…fify

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a new generalization of the complementary Weibull geometric distribution that introduced by Tojeiro et al. (2014, using the quadratic rank transmutation map studied by Shaw and Buckley (2007. The new distribution is referred to as transmuted complementary Weibull geometric distribution (TCWGD. The TCWG distribution includes as special cases the complementary Weibull geometric distribution (CWGD, complementary exponential geometric distribution(CEGD,Weibull distribution (WD and exponential distribution (ED. Various structural properties of the new distribution including moments, quantiles, moment generating function and RØnyi entropy of the subject distribution are derived. We proposed the method of maximum likelihood for estimating the model parameters and obtain the observed information matrix. A real data set are used to compare the ‡exibility of the transmuted version versus the complementary Weibull geometric distribution.

  11. Variations of dose distribution in high energy electron beams as a function of geometrical parameters of irradiation. Application to computer calculation

    Villeret, O.

    1985-04-01

    An algorithm is developed for the purpose of compter treatment planning of electron therapy. The method uses experimental absorbed dose distribution data in the irradiated medium for electron beams in the 8-20 MeV range delivered by the Sagittaire linear accelerator (study of central axis depth dose, beam profiles) in various geometrical conditions. Experimental verification of the computer program showed agreement with 2% between dose measurement and computer calculation [fr

  12. Geometric chaos indicators and computations of the spherical hypertube manifolds of the spatial circular restricted three-body problem

    Guzzo, Massimiliano; Lega, Elena

    2018-06-01

    The circular restricted three-body problem has five relative equilibria L1 ,L2, . . . ,L5. The invariant stable-unstable manifolds of the center manifolds originating at the partially hyperbolic equilibria L1 ,L2 have been identified as the separatrices for the motions which transit between the regions of the phase-space which are internal or external with respect to the two massive bodies. While the stable and unstable manifolds of the planar problem have been extensively studied both theoretically and numerically, the spatial case has not been as deeply investigated. This paper is devoted to the global computation of these manifolds in the spatial case with a suitable finite time chaos indicator. The definition of the chaos indicator is not trivial, since the mandatory use of the regularizing Kustaanheimo-Stiefel variables may introduce discontinuities in the finite time chaos indicators. From the study of such discontinuities, we define geometric chaos indicators which are globally defined and smooth, and whose ridges sharply approximate the stable and unstable manifolds of the center manifolds of L1 ,L2. We illustrate the method for the Sun-Jupiter mass ratio, and represent the topology of the asymptotic manifolds using sections and three-dimensional representations.

  13. Comparison of stresses on homogeneous spheroids in the optical stretcher computed with geometrical optics and generalized Lorenz-Mie theory.

    Boyde, Lars; Ekpenyong, Andrew; Whyte, Graeme; Guck, Jochen

    2012-11-20

    We present two electromagnetic frameworks to compare the surface stresses on spheroidal particles in the optical stretcher (a dual-beam laser trap that can be used to capture and deform biological cells). The first model is based on geometrical optics (GO) and limited in its applicability to particles that are much greater than the incident wavelength. The second framework is more sophisticated and hinges on the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT). Despite the difference in complexity between both theories, the stress profiles computed with GO and GLMT are in good agreement with each other (relative errors are on the order of 1-10%). Both models predict a diminishing of the stresses for larger wavelengths and a strong increase of the stresses for shorter laser-cell distances. Results indicate that surface stresses on a spheroid with an aspect ratio of 1.2 hardly differ from the stresses on a sphere of similar size. Knowledge of the surface stresses and whether or not they redistribute during the stretching process is of crucial importance in real-time applications of the stretcher that aim to discern the viscoelastic properties of cells for purposes of cell characterization, sorting, and medical diagnostics.

  14. Moment invariants for particle beams

    Lysenko, W.P.; Overley, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    The rms emittance is a certain function of second moments in 2-D phase space. It is preserved for linear uncoupled (1-D) motion. In this paper, the authors present new functions of moments that are invariants for coupled motion. These invariants were computed symbolically using a computer algebra system. Possible applications for these invariants are discussed. Also, approximate moment invariants for nonlinear motion are presented

  15. Moment methods for nonlinear maps

    Pusch, G.D.; Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that Differential Algebra (DA) may be used to push moments of distributions through a map, at a computational cost per moment comparable to pushing a single particle. The algorithm is independent of order, and whether or not the map is symplectic. Starting from the known result that moment-vectors transform linearly - like a tensor - even under a nonlinear map, I suggest that the form of the moment transformation rule indicates that the moment-vectors are elements of the dual to DA-vector space. I propose several methods of manipulating moments and constructing invariants using DA. I close with speculations on how DA might be used to ''close the circle'' to solve the inverse moment problem, yielding an entirely DA-and-moment-based space-charge code. (Author)

  16. Experimental and computed dipole moments in donor-bridge-acceptor systems with p-phenylene and p-carboranediyl bridges

    Drož, L.; Fox, M. A.; Hnyk, Drahomír; Low, P.J.; MacBride, J.A.H.; Všetečka, V.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 1 (2009), s. 131-146 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC523 Grant - others:EPSRC(GB) GR/S80943/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : donor-bridge-acceptor systems * p-carboranylenes * dipole moments Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.856, year: 2009

  17. Handling of computational in vitro/in vivo correlation problems by Microsoft Excel II. Distribution functions and moments.

    Langenbucher, Frieder

    2003-01-01

    MS Excel is a useful tool to handle in vitro/in vivo correlation (IVIVC) distribution functions, with emphasis on the Weibull and the biexponential distribution, which are most useful for the presentation of cumulative profiles, e.g. release in vitro or urinary excretion in vivo, and differential profiles such as the plasma response in vivo. The discussion includes moments (AUC and mean) as summarizing statistics, and data-fitting algorithms for parameter estimation.

  18. Geometrical parton

    Ebata, T [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Coll. of General Education

    1976-06-01

    The geometrical distribution inferred from the inelastic cross section is assumed to be proportional to the partial waves. The precocious scaling and the Q/sup 2/-dependence of various quantities are treated from the geometrical point of view. It is shown that the approximate conservation of the orbital angular momentum may be a very practical rule to understand the helicity structure of various hadronic and electromagnetic reactions. The rule can be applied to inclusive reactions as well. The model is also applied to large angle processes. Through the discussion, it is suggested that many peculiar properties of the quark-parton can be ascribed to the geometrical effects.

  19. Comparability of the performance of in-line computer vision for geometrical verification of parts, produced by Additive Manufacturing

    Pedersen, David B.; Hansen, Hans N.

    2014-01-01

    The field of Additive Manufacturing is growing at an accelerated rate, as prototyping is left in favor of direct manufacturing of components for the industry and consumer. A consequence of masscustomization and component complexity is an adverse geometrical verification challenge. Mass...

  20. D-dimensional moments of inertia

    Bender, C.M.; Mead, L.R.

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the moments of inertia of D-dimensional spheres and spherical shells, where D is a complex number. We also examine the moments of inertia of fractional-dimensional geometrical objects such as the Cantor set and the Sierpinski carpet and their D-dimensional analogs. copyright 1995 American Association of Physics Teachers

  1. Geometric analysis

    Bray, Hubert L; Mazzeo, Rafe; Sesum, Natasa

    2015-01-01

    This volume includes expanded versions of the lectures delivered in the Graduate Minicourse portion of the 2013 Park City Mathematics Institute session on Geometric Analysis. The papers give excellent high-level introductions, suitable for graduate students wishing to enter the field and experienced researchers alike, to a range of the most important areas of geometric analysis. These include: the general issue of geometric evolution, with more detailed lectures on Ricci flow and Kähler-Ricci flow, new progress on the analytic aspects of the Willmore equation as well as an introduction to the recent proof of the Willmore conjecture and new directions in min-max theory for geometric variational problems, the current state of the art regarding minimal surfaces in R^3, the role of critical metrics in Riemannian geometry, and the modern perspective on the study of eigenfunctions and eigenvalues for Laplace-Beltrami operators.

  2. Improvement of 2D ERT measurements conducted along a small earth-filled dyke using 3D topographic data and 3D computation of geometric factors

    Bièvre, Grégory; Oxarango, Laurent; Günther, Thomas; Goutaland, David; Massardi, Michael

    2018-06-01

    In the framework of earth-filled dykes characterization and monitoring, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) turns out to be a commonly used method. 2D sections are generally acquired along the dyke crest thus putting forward the question of 3D artefacts in the inversion process. This paper proposes a methodology based on 3D direct numerical simulations of the ERT acquisition using a realistic topography of the study site. It allows computing ad hoc geometrical factors which can be used for the inversion of experimental ERT data. The method is first evaluated on a set of synthetic dyke configurations. Then, it is applied to experimental static and time-lapse ERT data set acquired before and after repair works carried out on a leaking zone of an earth-filled canal dyke in the centre of France. The computed geometric factors are lower than the analytic geometric factors in a range between -8% and - 18% for measurements conducted on the crest of the dyke. They exhibit a maximum under-estimation for intermediate electrode spacings in the Wenner and Schlumberger configurations. In the same way, for measurements conducted on the mid-slope of the dyke, the computed geometric factors are higher for short electrode spacings (+18%) and lower for lower for large electrode spacings (-8%). The 2D inversion of the synthetic data with these computed geometric factors provides a significant improvement of the agreement with the original resistivity. Two experimental profiles conducted on the same portion of the dyke but at different elevations also reveal a better agreement using this methodology. The comparison with apparent resistivity from EM31 profiling along the stretch of the dyke also supports this evidence. In the same way, some spurious effects which affected the time-lapse data were removed and improved the global readability of the time-lapse resistivity sections. The benefit on the structural interpretation of ERT images remains moderate but allows a better

  3. Determining the closed forms of the O(α3s) anomalous dimensions and Wilson coefficients from Mellin moments by means of computer algebra

    Bluemlein, Johannes; Klein, Sebastian; Kauers, Manuel; Schneider, Carsten

    2009-02-01

    Single scale quantities, as anomalous dimensions and hard scattering cross sections, in renormalizable Quantum Field Theories are found to obey difference equations of finite order in Mellin space. It is often easier to calculate fixed moments for these quantities compared to a direct attempt to derive them in terms of harmonic sums and their generalizations involving the Mellin parameter N. Starting from a sufficiently large number of given moments, we establish linear recurrence relations of lowest possible order with polynomial coefficients of usually high degree. Then these recurrence equations are solved in terms of d'Alembertian solutions where the involved nested sums are represented in optimal nested depth. Given this representation, it is then an easy task to express the result in terms of harmonic sums. In this process we compactify the result such that no algebraic relations occur among the sums involved. We demonstrate the method for the QCD unpolarized anomalous dimensions and massless Wilson coefficients to 3-loop order treating the contributions for individual color coefficients. For the most complicated subproblem 5114 moments were needed in order to produce a recurrence of order 35 whose coefficients have degrees up to 938. About four months of CPU time were needed to establish and solve the recurrences for the anomalous dimensions and Wilson coefficients on a 2 GHz machine requiring less than 10 GB of memory. No algorithm is known yet to provide such a high number of moments for 3-loop quantities. Yet the method presented shows that it is possible to establish and solve recurrences of rather large order and degree, occurring in physics problems, uniquely, fast and reliably with computer algebra. (orig.)

  4. Determining the closed forms of the O({alpha}{sup 3}{sub s}) anomalous dimensions and Wilson coefficients from Mellin moments by means of computer algebra

    Bluemlein, Johannes; Klein, Sebastian [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Kauers, Manuel; Schneider, Carsten [Johannes Kepler Univ., Linz (Austria). Research Inst. for Symbolic Computation

    2009-02-15

    Single scale quantities, as anomalous dimensions and hard scattering cross sections, in renormalizable Quantum Field Theories are found to obey difference equations of finite order in Mellin space. It is often easier to calculate fixed moments for these quantities compared to a direct attempt to derive them in terms of harmonic sums and their generalizations involving the Mellin parameter N. Starting from a sufficiently large number of given moments, we establish linear recurrence relations of lowest possible order with polynomial coefficients of usually high degree. Then these recurrence equations are solved in terms of d'Alembertian solutions where the involved nested sums are represented in optimal nested depth. Given this representation, it is then an easy task to express the result in terms of harmonic sums. In this process we compactify the result such that no algebraic relations occur among the sums involved. We demonstrate the method for the QCD unpolarized anomalous dimensions and massless Wilson coefficients to 3-loop order treating the contributions for individual color coefficients. For the most complicated subproblem 5114 moments were needed in order to produce a recurrence of order 35 whose coefficients have degrees up to 938. About four months of CPU time were needed to establish and solve the recurrences for the anomalous dimensions and Wilson coefficients on a 2 GHz machine requiring less than 10 GB of memory. No algorithm is known yet to provide such a high number of moments for 3-loop quantities. Yet the method presented shows that it is possible to establish and solve recurrences of rather large order and degree, occurring in physics problems, uniquely, fast and reliably with computer algebra. (orig.)

  5. EFFECTS OF X-RAY BEAM ANGLE AND GEOMETRIC DISTORTION ON WIDTH OF EQUINE THORACOLUMBAR INTERSPINOUS SPACES USING RADIOGRAPHY AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    Djernaes, Julie D.; Nielsen, Jon V.; Berg, Lise C.

    2017-01-01

    The widths of spaces between the thoracolumbar processi spinosi (interspinous spaces) are frequently assessed using radiography in sports horses; however effects of varying X-ray beam angles and geometric distortion have not been previously described. The aim of this prospective, observational...... study was to determine whether X-ray beam angle has an effect on apparent widths of interspinous spaces. Thoracolumbar spine specimens were collected from six equine cadavers and left-right lateral radiographs and sagittal and dorsal reconstructed computed tomographic (CT) images were acquired...... measurements. Effect of geometric distortion was evaluated by comparing the interspinous space in radiographs with sagittal and dorsal reconstructed CT images. A total of 49 interspinous spaces were sampled, yielding 274 measurements. X-ray beam angle significantly affected measured width of interspinous...

  6. Integrated computer-aided design in automotive development development processes, geometric fundamentals, methods of CAD, knowledge-based engineering data management

    Mario, Hirz; Gfrerrer, Anton; Lang, Johann

    2013-01-01

    The automotive industry faces constant pressure to reduce development costs and time while still increasing vehicle quality. To meet this challenge, engineers and researchers in both science and industry are developing effective strategies and flexible tools by enhancing and further integrating powerful, computer-aided design technology. This book provides a valuable overview of the development tools and methods of today and tomorrow. It is targeted not only towards professional project and design engineers, but also to students and to anyone who is interested in state-of-the-art computer-aided development. The book begins with an overview of automotive development processes and the principles of virtual product development. Focusing on computer-aided design, a comprehensive outline of the fundamentals of geometry representation provides a deeper insight into the mathematical techniques used to describe and model geometrical elements. The book then explores the link between the demands of integrated design pr...

  7. Generalized Free-Surface Effect and Random Vibration Theory: a new tool for computing moment magnitudes of small earthquakes using borehole data

    Malagnini, Luca; Dreger, Douglas S.

    2016-07-01

    Although optimal, computing the moment tensor solution is not always a viable option for the calculation of the size of an earthquake, especially for small events (say, below Mw 2.0). Here we show an alternative approach to the calculation of the moment-rate spectra of small earthquakes, and thus of their scalar moments, that uses a network-based calibration of crustal wave propagation. The method works best when applied to a relatively small crustal volume containing both the seismic sources and the recording sites. In this study we present the calibration of the crustal volume monitored by the High-Resolution Seismic Network (HRSN), along the San Andreas Fault (SAF) at Parkfield. After the quantification of the attenuation parameters within the crustal volume under investigation, we proceed to the spectral correction of the observed Fourier amplitude spectra for the 100 largest events in our data set. Multiple estimates of seismic moment for the all events (1811 events total) are obtained by calculating the ratio of rms-averaged spectral quantities based on the peak values of the ground velocity in the time domain, as they are observed in narrowband-filtered time-series. The mathematical operations allowing the described spectral ratios are obtained from Random Vibration Theory (RVT). Due to the optimal conditions of the HRSN, in terms of signal-to-noise ratios, our network-based calibration allows the accurate calculation of seismic moments down to Mw < 0. However, because the HRSN is equipped only with borehole instruments, we define a frequency-dependent Generalized Free-Surface Effect (GFSE), to be used instead of the usual free-surface constant F = 2. Our spectral corrections at Parkfield need a different GFSE for each side of the SAF, which can be quantified by means of the analysis of synthetic seismograms. The importance of the GFSE of borehole instruments increases for decreasing earthquake's size because for smaller earthquakes the bandwidth available

  8. Geometric metamorphosis.

    Niethammer, Marc; Hart, Gabriel L; Pace, Danielle F; Vespa, Paul M; Irimia, Andrei; Van Horn, John D; Aylward, Stephen R

    2011-01-01

    Standard image registration methods do not account for changes in image appearance. Hence, metamorphosis approaches have been developed which jointly estimate a space deformation and a change in image appearance to construct a spatio-temporal trajectory smoothly transforming a source to a target image. For standard metamorphosis, geometric changes are not explicitly modeled. We propose a geometric metamorphosis formulation, which explains changes in image appearance by a global deformation, a deformation of a geometric model, and an image composition model. This work is motivated by the clinical challenge of predicting the long-term effects of traumatic brain injuries based on time-series images. This work is also applicable to the quantification of tumor progression (e.g., estimating its infiltrating and displacing components) and predicting chronic blood perfusion changes after stroke. We demonstrate the utility of the method using simulated data as well as scans from a clinical traumatic brain injury patient.

  9. Volumetric quantitative characterization of human patellar cartilage with topological and geometrical features on phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography.

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B; Coan, Paola; Huber, Markus B; Diemoz, Paul C; Wismüller, Axel

    2015-11-01

    Phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography (PCI-CT) has attracted significant interest in recent years for its ability to provide significantly improved image contrast in low absorbing materials such as soft biological tissue. In the research context of cartilage imaging, previous studies have demonstrated the ability of PCI-CT to visualize structural details of human patellar cartilage matrix and capture changes to chondrocyte organization induced by osteoarthritis. This study evaluates the use of geometrical and topological features for volumetric characterization of such chondrocyte patterns in the presence (or absence) of osteoarthritic damage. Geometrical features derived from the scaling index method (SIM) and topological features derived from Minkowski Functionals were extracted from 1392 volumes of interest (VOI) annotated on PCI-CT images of ex vivo human patellar cartilage specimens. These features were subsequently used in a machine learning task with support vector regression to classify VOIs as healthy or osteoarthritic; classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Our results show that the classification performance of SIM-derived geometrical features (AUC: 0.90 ± 0.09) is significantly better than Minkowski Functionals volume (AUC: 0.54 ± 0.02), surface (AUC: 0.72 ± 0.06), mean breadth (AUC: 0.74 ± 0.06) and Euler characteristic (AUC: 0.78 ± 0.04) (p < 10(-4)). These results suggest that such geometrical features can provide a detailed characterization of the chondrocyte organization in the cartilage matrix in an automated manner, while also enabling classification of cartilage as healthy or osteoarthritic with high accuracy. Such features could potentially serve as diagnostic imaging markers for evaluating osteoarthritis progression and its response to different therapeutic intervention strategies.

  10. Computation of Scattering from Bodies of Revolution Using an Entire-Domain Basis Implementation of the Moment Method

    Ford, Arthur

    1999-01-01

    Research into improved calibration targets for measurement of radar cross-section has created a need for the ability to accurately compute the scattering from perfectly conducting bodies of revolution...

  11. Approximate Forward Difference Equations for the Lower Order Non-Stationary Statistics of Geometrically Non-Linear Systems subject to Random Excitation

    Köylüoglu, H. U.; Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Cakmak, A. S.

    Geometrically non-linear multi-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) systems subject to random excitation are considered. New semi-analytical approximate forward difference equations for the lower order non-stationary statistical moments of the response are derived from the stochastic differential equations...... of motion, and, the accuracy of these equations is numerically investigated. For stationary excitations, the proposed method computes the stationary statistical moments of the response from the solution of non-linear algebraic equations....

  12. Projective moment invariants

    Suk, Tomáš; Flusser, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 10 (2004), s. 1364-1367 ISSN 0162-8828 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/03/0675 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1075907 Keywords : projective transform * moment invariants * object recognition Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 4.352, year: 2004 http://library.utia.cas.cz/prace/20040112.pdf

  13. Geometric approximation algorithms

    Har-Peled, Sariel

    2011-01-01

    Exact algorithms for dealing with geometric objects are complicated, hard to implement in practice, and slow. Over the last 20 years a theory of geometric approximation algorithms has emerged. These algorithms tend to be simple, fast, and more robust than their exact counterparts. This book is the first to cover geometric approximation algorithms in detail. In addition, more traditional computational geometry techniques that are widely used in developing such algorithms, like sampling, linear programming, etc., are also surveyed. Other topics covered include approximate nearest-neighbor search, shape approximation, coresets, dimension reduction, and embeddings. The topics covered are relatively independent and are supplemented by exercises. Close to 200 color figures are included in the text to illustrate proofs and ideas.

  14. Computational modeling of elastic properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites with interphase regions. Part I: Micro-structural characterization and geometric modeling

    Han, Fei

    2014-01-01

    A computational strategy to predict the elastic properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer composites is proposed in this two-part paper. In Part I, the micro-structural characteristics of these nano-composites are discerned. These characteristics include networks/agglomerations of carbon nanotubes and thick polymer interphase regions between the nanotubes and the surrounding matrix. An algorithm is presented to construct three-dimensional geometric models with large amounts of randomly dispersed and aggregated nanotubes. The effects of the distribution of the nanotubes and the thickness of the interphase regions on the concentration of the interphase regions are demonstrated with numerical results. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Computational Investigation of the Geometrical and Electronic Structures of VGen-/0 (n = 1-4) Clusters by Density Functional Theory and Multiconfigurational CASSCF/CASPT2 Method.

    Tran, Van Tan; Nguyen, Minh Thao; Tran, Quoc Tri

    2017-10-12

    Density functional theory and the multiconfigurational CASSCF/CASPT2 method have been employed to study the low-lying states of VGe n -/0 (n = 1-4) clusters. For VGe -/0 and VGe 2 -/0 clusters, the relative energies and geometrical structures of the low-lying states are reported at the CASSCF/CASPT2 level. For the VGe 3 -/0 and VGe 4 -/0 clusters, the computational results show that due to the large contribution of the Hartree-Fock exact exchange, the hybrid B3LYP, B3PW91, and PBE0 functionals overestimate the energies of the high-spin states as compared to the pure GGA BP86 and PBE functionals and the CASPT2 method. On the basis of the pure GGA BP86 and PBE functionals and the CASSCF/CASPT2 results, the ground states of anionic and neutral clusters are defined, the relative energies of the excited states are computed, and the electron detachment energies of the anionic clusters are evaluated. The computational results are employed to give new assignments for all features in the photoelectron spectra of VGe 3 - and VGe 4 - clusters.

  16. Geometric recursion

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Borot, Gaëtan; Orantin, Nicolas

    We propose a general theory whose main component are functorial assignments ∑→Ω∑ ∈ E (∑), for a large class of functors E from a certain category of bordered surfaces (∑'s) to a suitable a target category of topological vector spaces. The construction is done by summing appropriate compositions...... as Poisson structures on the moduli space of flat connections. The theory has a wider scope than that and one expects that many functorial objects in low-dimensional geometry and topology should have a GR construction. The geometric recursion has various projections to topological recursion (TR) and we...... in particular show it retrieves all previous variants and applications of TR. We also show that, for any initial data for topological recursion, one can construct initial data for GR with values in Frobenius algebra-valued continuous functions on Teichmueller space, such that the ωg,n of TR are obtained...

  17. Present capabilities and future requirements for computer-aided geometric modeling in the design and manufacture of gas turbine

    Caille, E.; Propen, M.; Hoffman, A.

    1984-01-01

    Gas turbine engine design requires the ability to rapidly develop complex structures which are subject to severe thermal and mechanical operating loads. As in all facets of the aerospace industry, engine designs are constantly driving towards increased performance, higher temperatures, higher speeds, and lower weight. The ability to address such requirements in a relatively short time frame has resulted in a major thrust towards integrated design/analysis/manufacturing systems. These computer driven graphics systems represent a unique challenge, with major payback opportunities if properly conceived, implemented, and applied.

  18. Computer Οptimization of Geometric Form of Tool and Preform for Closed-die Forging of Compressor Blade Simulator

    A. V. Botkin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Using the software package DEFORM 3D when developing technology of isothermal forging workpiece blades it is possible to reduce the pre-production time, to improve the quality of forgings and increase lifetime of forging dies. Computer modeling allows to predict the formation of such defects during forging as notches and wrinkles, underfilling of die impression, to estimate tool loads. Preform shape and angular position of the blade simulator were optimized in order to minimize the lateral forces generated during the forging operation.

  19. Applicability of a geometrical model coupled to computed tomography to characterize the transport properties of porous materials: comparison with through diffusion experiments

    Chagneau, Aurelie; Claret, Francis; Made, Benoit; Tuckermann, Juergen; Enzmann, Frieder; Schaefer, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    they contain a heavy element (Sr) that can easily be differentiated from the lighter matrix elements (Si, Al) by tomography. The diffusion columns used consist of two reservoirs, one containing the strontium and radiotracer and the other the sulfate or carbonate stock solutions, one at each end of a 5 cm long column. Before any precipitation experiments, the De and porosity of the materials are characterized by realizing diffusion profiles of tritiated water (HTO), and the results are compared to a geometrical model of the material based on computed tomography observations. For this purpose, the images obtained by CT are reconstructed in three dimensions and then processed by separating the porous material and the pore network. The 3D reconstruction of the pore network is directly implemented into a geometrical model, GeoDict, to calculate the different properties of the material (e.g. porosity, tortuosity, diffusivity). The results obtained by the two different experimental approaches compare fairly well. For example, the connected porosity of a column filled with silica beads of 40 to 70 μm particle size was estimated at 0.39 by HTO diffusion and at 0.40 to 0.45 by computed tomography coupled to GeoDict. Computed tomography is a simple yet efficient method, when coupled to a geometrical model, to record the evolution of porosity with time, and to accurately estimate the impact of clogging on the diffusion properties of porous materials, without disturbing the system. To this characterization method will be added in further steps post mortem analyses by microscopic methods, microprobe and synchrotron μ-tomography. In parallel, experiments in the presence of trivalent actinides are planned to compare the chemical speciation during secondary phase formation in compacted systems with data already available obtained in batch-type and mixed flow reactor (MFR) experiments. (authors)

  20. Computational studies on the effect of geometric parameters on the performance of a solar chimney power plant

    Patel, Sandeep K.; Prasad, Deepak; Ahmed, M. Rafiuddin

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: This work is aimed at optimizing the geometry of the major components of a solar chimney power plant using ANSYS-CFX. The collector inlet opening, collector height, collector outlet diameter, the chimney throat diameter and the chimney divergence angle were varied for the same chimney height and collector diameter and the performance of the plant was studied in terms of the available power and an optimum configuration was obtained. The temperature and velocity variations in the collector and along the chimney height were also studied. - Highlights: • Geometry of the major components of a solar chimney power plant optimized using CFX. • Collector inlet opening, height, outlet diameter, chimney throat diameter, and the chimney divergence angle were varied. • Temperature and velocity variations and available power were obtained for different configurations. • Optimum values of collector outlet height and diameter and the divergence angle were obtained. - Abstract: A solar chimney power plant (SCPP) is a renewable-energy power plant that transforms solar energy into electricity. The SCPP consists of three essential elements – solar air collector, chimney tower, and wind turbine(s). The present work is aimed at optimizing the geometry of the major components of the SCPP using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software ANSYS-CFX to study and improve the flow characteristics inside the SCPP. The overall chimney height and the collector diameter of the SCPP were kept constant at 10 m and 8 m respectively. The collector inlet opening was varied from 0.05 m to 0.2 m. The collector outlet diameter was also varied from 0.6 m to 1 m. These modified collectors were tested with chimneys of different divergence angles (0°–3°) and also different chimney inlet openings of 0.6 m to 1 m. The diameter of the chimney was also varied from 0.25 m to 0.3 m. Based on the CFX computational results, the best configuration was achieved using the chimney

  1. Relativistic Coupled Cluster (RCC) Computation of the Electric Dipole Moment Enhancement Factor of Francium Due to the Violation of Time Reversal Symmetry

    Mukherjee, Debashis; Sahoo, B. K.; Nataraj, H. S.; Das, B. P.

    2009-01-01

    A relativistic many-body theory for the electric dipole moment (EDM) of paramagnetic atoms arising from the electric dipole moment of the electron is presented and implemented. The relativistic coupled-cluster method with single and double excitations (RCCSD) using the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian and

  2. Maximal Electric Dipole Moments of Nuclei with Enhanced Schiff Moments

    Ellis, John; Pilaftsis, Apostolos

    2011-01-01

    The electric dipole moments (EDMs) of heavy nuclei, such as 199Hg, 225Ra and 211Rn, can be enhanced by the Schiff moments induced by the presence of nearby parity-doublet states. Working within the framework of the maximally CP-violating and minimally flavour-violating (MCPMFV) version of the MSSM, we discuss the maximal values that such EDMs might attain, given the existing experimental constraints on the Thallium, neutron and Mercury EDMs. The maximal EDM values of the heavy nuclei are obtained with the help of a differential-geometrical approach proposed recently that enables the maxima of new CP-violating observables to be calculated exactly in the linear approximation. In the case of 225Ra, we find that its EDM may be as large as 6 to 50 x 10^{-27} e.cm.

  3. Mobile Watermarking against Geometrical Distortions

    Jing Zhang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mobile watermarking robust to geometrical distortions is still a great challenge. In mobile watermarking, efficient computation is necessary because mobile devices have very limited resources due to power consumption. In this paper, we propose a low-complexity geometrically resilient watermarking approach based on the optimal tradeoff circular harmonic function (OTCHF correlation filter and the minimum average correlation energy Mellin radial harmonic (MACE-MRH correlation filter. By the rotation, translation and scale tolerance properties of the two kinds of filter, the proposed watermark detector can be robust to geometrical attacks. The embedded watermark is weighted by a perceptual mask which matches very well with the properties of the human visual system. Before correlation, a whitening process is utilized to improve watermark detection reliability. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed watermarking approach is computationally efficient and robust to geometrical distortions.

  4. Lectures in geometric combinatorics

    Thomas, Rekha R

    2006-01-01

    This book presents a course in the geometry of convex polytopes in arbitrary dimension, suitable for an advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate student. The book starts with the basics of polytope theory. Schlegel and Gale diagrams are introduced as geometric tools to visualize polytopes in high dimension and to unearth bizarre phenomena in polytopes. The heart of the book is a treatment of the secondary polytope of a point configuration and its connections to the state polytope of the toric ideal defined by the configuration. These polytopes are relatively recent constructs with numerous connections to discrete geometry, classical algebraic geometry, symplectic geometry, and combinatorics. The connections rely on Gr�bner bases of toric ideals and other methods from commutative algebra. The book is self-contained and does not require any background beyond basic linear algebra. With numerous figures and exercises, it can be used as a textbook for courses on geometric, combinatorial, and computational as...

  5. Reply to Comment on 'Excited states in the infinite quantum lens potential: conformal mapping and moment quantization methods'

    RodrIguez, Arezky H; Handy, Carlos R; Trallero-Giner, C

    2004-01-01

    The suitability of conformal transformation (CT) analysis, and the eigenvalue moment method (EMM), for determining the eigenenergies and eigenfunctions of a quantum particle confined within a lens geometry, is reviewed and compared to the recent results by Even and Loualiche (2003 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 15 8465). It is shown that CT and EMM define two accurate and versatile analytical/computational methods relevant to lens shaped regions of varying geometrical aspect ratios. (reply)

  6. Assembling Transgender Moments

    Greteman, Adam J.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the author seeks to assemble moments--scholarly, popular, and aesthetic--in order to explore the possibilities that emerge as moments collect in education's encounters with the needs, struggles, and possibilities of transgender lives and practices. Assembling moments, the author argues, illustrates the value of "moments"…

  7. How do deltoid muscle moment arms change after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty?

    Walker, David R; Struk, Aimee M; Matsuki, Keisuke; Wright, Thomas W; Banks, Scott A

    2016-04-01

    Although many advantages of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) have been demonstrated, a variety of complications indicate there is much to learn about how RTSA modifies normal shoulder function. This study used a subject-specific computational model driven by in vivo kinematic data to assess how RTSA affects deltoid muscle moment arms after surgery. A subject-specific 12 degree-of-freedom musculoskeletal model was used to analyze the shoulders of 26 individuals (14 RTSA and 12 normal). The model was modified from the work of Holzbaur to directly input 6 degree-of-freedom humeral and scapular kinematics obtained using fluoroscopy. The moment arms of the anterior, lateral, and posterior aspects of the deltoid were significantly different when RTSA and normal cohorts were compared at different abduction angles. Anterior and lateral deltoid moment arms were significantly larger in the RTSA group at the initial elevation of the arm. The posterior deltoid was significantly larger at maximum elevation. There was large intersubject variability within the RTSA group. Placement of implant components during RTSA can directly affect the geometric relationship between the humerus and scapula and the muscle moment arms in the RTSA shoulder. RTSA shoulders maintain the same anterior and posterior deltoid muscle moment-arm patterns as healthy shoulders but show much greater intersubject variation and larger moment-arm magnitudes. These observations provide a basis for determining optimal implant configuration and surgical placement to maximize RTSA function in a patient-specific manner. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Exponentiated Lomax Geometric Distribution: Properties and Applications

    Amal Soliman Hassan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new four-parameter lifetime distribution, called the exponentiated Lomax geometric (ELG is introduced. The new lifetime distribution contains the Lomax geometric and exponentiated Pareto geometric as new sub-models. Explicit algebraic formulas of probability density function, survival and hazard functions are derived. Various structural properties of the new model are derived including; quantile function, Re'nyi entropy, moments, probability weighted moments, order statistic, Lorenz and Bonferroni curves. The estimation of the model parameters is performed by maximum likelihood method and inference for a large sample is discussed. The flexibility and potentiality of the new model in comparison with some other distributions are shown via an application to a real data set. We hope that the new model will be an adequate model for applications in various studies.

  9. Geometric procedures for civil engineers

    Tonias, Elias C

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a multitude of geometric constructions usually encountered in civil engineering and surveying practice.  A detailed geometric solution is provided to each construction as well as a step-by-step set of programming instructions for incorporation into a computing system. The volume is comprised of 12 chapters and appendices that may be grouped in three major parts: the first is intended for those who love geometry for its own sake and its evolution through the ages, in general, and, more specifically, with the introduction of the computer. The second section addresses geometric features used in the book and provides support procedures used by the constructions presented. The remaining chapters and the appendices contain the various constructions. The volume is ideal for engineering practitioners in civil and construction engineering and allied areas.

  10. On bivariate geometric distribution

    K. Jayakumar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Characterizations of bivariate geometric distribution using univariate and bivariate geometric compounding are obtained. Autoregressive models with marginals as bivariate geometric distribution are developed. Various bivariate geometric distributions analogous to important bivariate exponential distributions like, Marshall-Olkin’s bivariate exponential, Downton’s bivariate exponential and Hawkes’ bivariate exponential are presented.

  11. Visualizing the Geometric Series.

    Bennett, Albert B., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Mathematical proofs often leave students unconvinced or without understanding of what has been proved, because they provide no visual-geometric representation. Presented are geometric models for the finite geometric series when r is a whole number, and the infinite geometric series when r is the reciprocal of a whole number. (MNS)

  12. Operational geometric phase for mixed quantum states

    Andersson, O; Heydari, H

    2013-01-01

    The geometric phase has found a broad spectrum of applications in both classical and quantum physics, such as condensed matter and quantum computation. In this paper, we introduce an operational geometric phase for mixed quantum states, based on spectral weighted traces of holonomies, and we prove that it generalizes the standard definition of the geometric phase for mixed states, which is based on quantum interferometry. We also introduce higher order geometric phases, and prove that under a fairly weak, generically satisfied, requirement, there is always a well-defined geometric phase of some order. Our approach applies to general unitary evolutions of both non-degenerate and degenerate mixed states. Moreover, since we provide an explicit formula for the geometric phase that can be easily implemented, it is particularly well suited for computations in quantum physics. (paper)

  13. Charge distribution within hypercarbon-halogenated 1-Ph-2-X-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaboranes, (X = F, Cl, Br, I): A dipole moment and computational study

    Hnyk, Drahomír; Všetečka, V.; Drož, L.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 978, 1-3 (2010), s. 246-249 ISSN 0022-2860 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC523 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : halogens * carboranes * dipole moments Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.599, year: 2010

  14. Guide to Geometric Algebra in Practice

    Dorst, Leo

    2011-01-01

    This highly practical "Guide to Geometric Algebra in Practice" reviews algebraic techniques for geometrical problems in computer science and engineering, and the relationships between them. The topics covered range from powerful new theoretical developments, to successful applications, and the development of new software and hardware tools. This title: provides hands-on review exercises throughout the book, together with helpful chapter summaries; presents a concise introductory tutorial to conformal geometric algebra (CGA) in the appendices; examines the application of CGA for the d

  15. Anomalous magnetic moment with heavy virtual leptons

    Kurz, Alexander [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Liu, Tao; Steinhauser, Matthias [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik; Marquard, Peter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    We compute the contributions to the electron and muon anomalous magnetic moment induced by heavy leptons up to four-loop order. Asymptotic expansion is applied to obtain three analytic expansion terms which show rapid convergence.

  16. Magnetic moments of baryons

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1983-06-01

    The new experimental values of hyperon magnetic moments are compared with sum rules predicted from general quark models. Three difficulties are encountered which are not easily explained by simple models. The isovector contributions of nonstrange quarks to hyperon moments are smaller than the corresponding contribution to nucleon moments, indicating either appreciable configuration mixing present in hyperon wave functions and absent in nucleons or an additional isovector contribution beyond that of valence quarks; e.g. from a pion cloud. The large magnitude of the ω - moment may indicate that the strange quark contribution to the ω moments is considerably larger than the value μ(#betta#) predicted by simple models which have otherwise been very successful. The set of controversial values from different experiments of the μ - moment include a value very close to -(1/2)μ(μ + ) which would indicate that strange quarks do not contribute at all to the μ moments. (author)

  17. Geometric scaling as traveling waves

    Munier, S.; Peschanski, R.

    2003-01-01

    We show the relevance of the nonlinear Fisher and Kolmogorov-Petrovsky-Piscounov (KPP) equation to the problem of high energy evolution of the QCD amplitudes. We explain how the traveling wave solutions of this equation are related to geometric scaling, a phenomenon observed in deep-inelastic scattering experiments. Geometric scaling is for the first time shown to result from an exact solution of nonlinear QCD evolution equations. Using general results on the KPP equation, we compute the velocity of the wave front, which gives the full high energy dependence of the saturation scale

  18. Fast geometric algorithms

    Noga, M.T.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis addresses a number of important problems that fall within the framework of the new discipline of Computational Geometry. The list of topics covered includes sorting and selection, convex hull algorithms, the L 1 hull, determination of the minimum encasing rectangle of a set of points, the Euclidean and L 1 diameter of a set of points, the metric traveling salesman problem, and finding the superrange of star-shaped and monotype polygons. The main theme of all the work was to develop a set of very fast state-of-the-art algorithms that supersede any rivals in terms of speed and ease of implementation. In some cases existing algorithms were refined; for others new techniques were developed that add to the present database of fast adaptive geometric algorithms. What emerges is a collection of techniques that is successful at merging modern tools developed in analysis of algorithms with those of classical geometry

  19. Geometric Design Laboratory

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The mission of the Geometric Design Laboratory (GDL) is to support the Office of Safety Research and Development in research related to the geometric design...

  20. The geometric phase in quantum physics

    Bohm, A.

    1993-03-01

    After an explanatory introduction, a quantum system in a classical time-dependent environment is discussed; an example is a magnetic moment in a classical magnetic field. At first, the general abelian case is discussed in the adiabatic approximation. Then the geometric phase for nonadiabatic change of the environment (Anandan--Aharonov phase) is introduced, and after that general cyclic (nonadiabatic) evolution is discussed. The mathematics of fiber bundles is introduced, and some of its results are used to describe the relation between the adiabatic Berry phase and the geometric phase for general cyclic evolution of a pure state. The discussion is restricted to the abelian, U(1) phase

  1. Lepton dipole moments

    Marciano, William J

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a self-contained description of the measurements of the magnetic dipole moments of the electron and muon, along with a discussion of the measurements of the fine structure constant, and the theory associated with magnetic and electric dipole moments. Also included are the searches for a permanent electric dipole moment of the electron, muon, neutron and atomic nuclei. The related topic of the transition moment for lepton flavor violating processes, such as neutrinoless muon or tauon decays, and the search for such processes are included as well. The papers, written by many o

  2. Electric dipole moments reconsidered

    Rupertsberger, H.

    1989-01-01

    The electric dipole moments of elementary particles, atoms, molecules and their connection to the electric susceptibility are discussed for stationary states. Assuming rotational invariance it is emphasized that for such states only in the case of a parity and time reversal violating interaction the considered particles can obtain a nonvanishing expectation value for the electric dipole moment. 1 fig., 13 refs. (Author)

  3. Multi-moment maps

    Swann, Andrew Francis; Madsen, Thomas Bruun

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a notion of moment map adapted to actions of Lie groups that preserve a closed three-form. We show existence of our multi-moment maps in many circumstances, including mild topological assumptions on the underlying manifold. Such maps are also shown to exist for all groups whose second...

  4. Nuclear Anapole Moments

    Michael Ramsey-Musolf; Wick Haxton; Ching-Pang Liu

    2002-03-29

    Nuclear anapole moments are parity-odd, time-reversal-even E1 moments of the electromagnetic current operator. Although the existence of this moment was recognized theoretically soon after the discovery of parity nonconservation (PNC), its experimental isolation was achieved only recently, when a new level of precision was reached in a measurement of the hyperfine dependence of atomic PNC in 133Cs. An important anapole moment bound in 205Tl also exists. In this paper, we present the details of the first calculation of these anapole moments in the framework commonly used in other studies of hadronic PNC, a meson exchange potential that includes long-range pion exchange and enough degrees of freedom to describe the five independent S-P amplitudes induced by short-range interactions. The resulting contributions of pi-, rho-, and omega-exchange to the single-nucleon anapole moment, to parity admixtures in the nuclear ground state, and to PNC exchange currents are evaluated, using configuration-mixed shell-model wave functions. The experimental anapole moment constraints on the PNC meson-nucleon coupling constants are derived and compared with those from other tests of the hadronic weak interaction. While the bounds obtained from the anapole moment results are consistent with the broad ''reasonable ranges'' defined by theory, they are not in good agreement with the constraints from the other experiments. We explore possible explanations for the discrepancy and comment on the potential importance of new experiments.

  5. Nuclear Anapole Moments

    Michael Ramsey-Musolf; Wick Haxton; Ching-Pang Liu

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear anapole moments are parity-odd, time-reversal-even E1 moments of the electromagnetic current operator. Although the existence of this moment was recognized theoretically soon after the discovery of parity nonconservation (PNC), its experimental isolation was achieved only recently, when a new level of precision was reached in a measurement of the hyperfine dependence of atomic PNC in 133Cs. An important anapole moment bound in 205Tl also exists. In this paper, we present the details of the first calculation of these anapole moments in the framework commonly used in other studies of hadronic PNC, a meson exchange potential that includes long-range pion exchange and enough degrees of freedom to describe the five independent S-P amplitudes induced by short-range interactions. The resulting contributions of pi-, rho-, and omega-exchange to the single-nucleon anapole moment, to parity admixtures in the nuclear ground state, and to PNC exchange currents are evaluated, using configuration-mixed shell-model wave functions. The experimental anapole moment constraints on the PNC meson-nucleon coupling constants are derived and compared with those from other tests of the hadronic weak interaction. While the bounds obtained from the anapole moment results are consistent with the broad ''reasonable ranges'' defined by theory, they are not in good agreement with the constraints from the other experiments. We explore possible explanations for the discrepancy and comment on the potential importance of new experiments

  6. Geometrical differences in target volumes based on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography and four-dimensional computed tomography maximum intensity projection images of primary thoracic esophageal cancer.

    Guo, Y; Li, J; Wang, W; Zhang, Y; Wang, J; Duan, Y; Shang, D; Fu, Z

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to compare geometrical differences of target volumes based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) maximum intensity projection (MIP) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) images of primary thoracic esophageal cancer for radiation treatment. Twenty-one patients with thoracic esophageal cancer sequentially underwent contrast-enhanced three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT), 4DCT, and 18F-FDG PET/CT thoracic simulation scans during normal free breathing. The internal gross target volume defined as IGTVMIP was obtained by contouring on MIP images. The gross target volumes based on PET/CT images (GTVPET ) were determined with nine different standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds and manual contouring: SUV≥2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5 (SUVn); ≥20%, 25%, 30%, 35%, 40% of the maximum (percentages of SUVmax, SUVn%). The differences in volume ratio (VR), conformity index (CI), and degree of inclusion (DI) between IGTVMIP and GTVPET were investigated. The mean centroid distance between GTVPET and IGTVMIP ranged from 4.98 mm to 6.53 mm. The VR ranged from 0.37 to 1.34, being significantly (P<0.05) closest to 1 at SUV2.5 (0.94), SUV20% (1.07), or manual contouring (1.10). The mean CI ranged from 0.34 to 0.58, being significantly closest to 1 (P<0.05) at SUV2.0 (0.55), SUV2.5 (0.56), SUV20% (0.56), SUV25% (0.53), or manual contouring (0.58). The mean DI of GTVPET in IGTVMIP ranged from 0.61 to 0.91, and the mean DI of IGTVMIP in GTVPET ranged from 0.34 to 0.86. The SUV threshold setting of SUV2.5, SUV20% or manual contouring yields the best tumor VR and CI with internal-gross target volume contoured on MIP of 4DCT dataset, but 3DPET/CT and 4DCT MIP could not replace each other for motion encompassing target volume delineation for radiation treatment. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  7. The moment problem

    Schmüdgen, Konrad

    2017-01-01

    This advanced textbook provides a comprehensive and unified account of the moment problem. It covers the classical one-dimensional theory and its multidimensional generalization, including modern methods and recent developments. In both the one-dimensional and multidimensional cases, the full and truncated moment problems are carefully treated separately. Fundamental concepts, results and methods are developed in detail and accompanied by numerous examples and exercises. Particular attention is given to powerful modern techniques such as real algebraic geometry and Hilbert space operators. A wide range of important aspects are covered, including the Nevanlinna parametrization for indeterminate moment problems, canonical and principal measures for truncated moment problems, the interplay between Positivstellensätze and moment problems on semi-algebraic sets, the fibre theorem, multidimensional determinacy theory, operator-theoretic approaches, and the existence theory and important special topics of multidime...

  8. Moment approach to charged particle beam dynamics

    Channell, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    We have derived the hierarchy of moment equations that describes the dynamics of charged-particle beams in linear accelerators and can truncate the hierarchy at any level either by discarding higher moments or by a cumulant expansion discarding only correlation functions. We have developed a procedure for relating the density expansion linearly to the moments to any order. The relation of space-charge fields to the density has been derived; and an accurate, systematic, and computationally convenient expansion of the resultant integrals has been developed

  9. From moments to functions in quantum chromodynamics

    Bluemlein, Johannes; Klein, Sebastian; Kauers, Manuel; Schneider, Carsten

    2009-02-01

    Single-scale quantities, like the QCD anomalous dimensions andWilson coefficients, obey difference equations. Therefore their analytic form can be determined from a finite number of moments. We demonstrate this in an explicit calculation by establishing and solving large scale recursions by means of computer algebra for the anomalous dimensions and Wilson coefficients in unpolarized deeply inelastic scattering from their Mellin moments to 3-loop order. (orig.)

  10. From moments to functions in quantum chromodynamics

    Bluemlein, Johannes; Klein, Sebastian [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Kauers, Manuel; Schneider, Carsten [Johannes Kepler Univ., Linz (Austria). Research Inst. for Symbolic Computation

    2009-02-15

    Single-scale quantities, like the QCD anomalous dimensions andWilson coefficients, obey difference equations. Therefore their analytic form can be determined from a finite number of moments. We demonstrate this in an explicit calculation by establishing and solving large scale recursions by means of computer algebra for the anomalous dimensions and Wilson coefficients in unpolarized deeply inelastic scattering from their Mellin moments to 3-loop order. (orig.)

  11. Development and implementation of computational geometric model for simulation of plate type fuel fabrication process with microspheres dispersed in metallic matrix

    Lage, Aldo M.F.; Reis, Sergio C.; Braga, Daniel M.; Santos, Armindo; Ferraz, Wilmar B.

    2005-01-01

    In this report it is presented the development of a geometric model to simulate the plate type fuel fabrication process with fuels microspheres dispersed in metallic matrix, as well as its software implementation. The developed geometric model encloses the steps of pellets pressing and sintering, as well as the plate rolling passes. The model permits the simulation of structures, where the values of the various variables of the fabrication processes can be studied and modified. The following variables were analyzed: microspheres diameters, density of the powder/microspheres mixing, microspheres density, fuel volume fraction, sintering densification, and rolling passes number. In the model implementation, which was codified in DELPHI programming language, systems of structured analysis techniques were utilized. The structures simulated were visualized utilizing the AutoCAD applicative, what permitted to obtain planes sections in diverse directions. The objective of this model is to enable the analysis of the simulated structures and supply information that can help in the improvement of the dispersion microspheres fuel plates fabrication process, now in development at CDTN (Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear) in cooperation with the CTMSP (Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo). (author)

  12. Quadrupole moments of hadrons

    Krivoruchenko, M.I.

    1985-01-01

    In chiral bag model an expression is obtained for the quark wave functions with account of color and pion interaction of quarks. The quadrupole moments of nonstrange hadrons are calculated. Quadrupole moment of nucleon isobar is found to be Q(Δ)=-6.3x10 -28 esub(Δ)(cm)sup(2). Fredictions of the chiral bag model are in strong disagreement with the non-relativistic quark model

  13. Particle electric dipole moments

    Pendlebury, J M

    2000-01-01

    Measurements of particle electric dipole moments (EDMs) continue to put powerful constraints on theories of T-symmetry and CP-symmetry violation, which form currently one of the most prominent fields in particle physics. EDM measurements have been concentrated on neutral systems such as the neutron and atoms and molecules. These measurements allow one to deduce, in turn, the electric dipole moments of the fundamental fermions, that is, the lighter leptons and quarks and also those of some heavy nuclei.

  14. A new generalization of the Pareto–geometric distribution

    M. Nassar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce a new distribution called the beta Pareto–geometric. We provide a comprehensive treatment of the mathematical properties of the proposed distribution and derive expressions for its moment generating function and the rth generalized moment. We discuss estimation of the parameters by maximum likelihood and obtain the information matrix that is easily numerically determined. We also demonstrate its usefulness on a real data set.

  15. 5th Dagstuhl Seminar on Geometric Modelling

    Brunnett, Guido; Farin, Gerald; Goldman, Ron

    2004-01-01

    In 19 articles presented by leading experts in the field of geometric modelling the state-of-the-art on representing, modeling, and analyzing curves, surfaces as well as other 3-dimensional geometry is given. The range of applications include CAD/CAM-systems, computer graphics, scientific visualization, virtual reality, simulation and medical imaging. The content of this book is based on selected lectures given at a workshop held at IBFI Schloss Dagstuhl, Germany. Topics treated are: – curve and surface modelling – non-manifold modelling in CAD – multiresolution analysis of complex geometric models – surface reconstruction – variational design – computational geometry of curves and surfaces – 3D meshing – geometric modelling for scientific visualization – geometric models for biomedical applications

  16. Sparse geometric graphs with small dilation

    Aronov, B.; Berg, de M.; Cheong, O.; Gudmundsson, J.; Haverkort, H.J.; Vigneron, A.; Deng, X.; Du, D.

    2005-01-01

    Given a set S of n points in the plane, and an integer k such that 0 = k geometric graph with vertex set S, at most n – 1 + k edges, and dilation O(n / (k + 1)) can be computed in time O(n log n). We also construct n–point sets for which any geometric graph with n – 1 + k edges

  17. Scale invariants from Gaussian-Hermite moments

    Yang, B.; Kostková, Jitka; Flusser, Jan; Suk, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 1 (2017), s. 77-84 ISSN 0165-1684 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-16928S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Scale invariants * Gaussian–Hermite moments * Variable modulation * Normalization * Zernike moments Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 3.110, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/ZOI/flusser-0466031.pdf

  18. Computational modeling of elastic properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites with interphase regions. Part I: Micro-structural characterization and geometric modeling

    Han, Fei; Azdoud, Yan; Lubineau, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    A computational strategy to predict the elastic properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer composites is proposed in this two-part paper. In Part I, the micro-structural characteristics of these nano-composites are discerned

  19. Moment magnitude scale

    Hanks, T.C.; Kanamori, H.

    1979-05-10

    The nearly conincident forms of the relations between seismic moment M/sub o/ and the magnitudes M/sub L/, M/sub s/, and M/sub w/ imply a moment magnitude scale M=2/3 log M/sub o/-10.7 which is uniformly valid for 3< or approx. =M/sub L/< or approx. = 7, 5 < or approx. =M/sub s/< or approx. =7 1/2 and M/sub w/> or approx. = 7 1/2.

  20. Magnetic moments of hyperons

    Overseth, O.E.

    1981-01-01

    The Fermilab Neutral Hyperon Beam Collaboration has measured the magnetic moments of Λ 0 , XI-neutral and XI-minus hyperons. With a recently published result for the Σ + hyperon, we now have precision measurements on the magnetic moments of six baryons. This allows a sensitive test of the quark model. The data are in qualitative agreement with the simple additive static quark model. Quantitatively however the data disagree with theoretical predictions by typically 15%. Several theoretical attempts to understand or remedy this discrepancy will be mentioned

  1. Geometrical criteria versus quantum chemical criteria for assessment of intramolecular hydrogen bond (IMHB) interaction: A computational comparison into the effect of chlorine substitution on IMHB of salicylic acid in its lowest energy ground state conformer

    Paul, Bijan Kumar [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 A.P.C. Road, Calcutta 700009 (India); Guchhait, Nikhil, E-mail: nikhil.guchhait@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 A.P.C. Road, Calcutta 700009 (India)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IMHB) in salicylic acid and its chloro derivatives. ► A complex effect of +R and −I effect of chlorine substituents on IMHB energy. ► Interplay between IMHB energy and aromaticity. ► Directional nature of IMHB from quantum chemical assessment. ► Quantum chemical treatment vs. geometrical criteria to assess weak interaction. - Abstract: Density functional theory based computational study has been performed to characterize intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IMHB) interaction in a series of salicylic acid derivatives varying in chlorine substitution on the benzene ring. The molecular systems studied are salicylic acid, 5-chlorosalicylic acid, 3,5-dichlorosalicylic acid and 3,5,6-tricholorosalicylic acid. Major emphasis is rendered on the analysis of IMHB interaction by calculation of electron density ρ(r) and Laplacian ∇{sup 2}ρ(r) at the bond critical point using atoms-in-molecule theory. Topological features, energy densities based on ρ(r) through perturbing the intramolecular H-bond distances suggest that at equilibrium geometry the IMHB interaction develops certain characteristics typical of covalent interaction. The interplay between aromaticity and resonance-assisted hydrogen bonding (RAHB) is discussed using both geometrical and magnetic criteria as the descriptors of aromaticity. The optimized geometry features, molecular electrostatic potential map analysis are also found to produce a consensus view in relation with the formation of RAHB in these systems.

  2. Geometrical criteria versus quantum chemical criteria for assessment of intramolecular hydrogen bond (IMHB) interaction: A computational comparison into the effect of chlorine substitution on IMHB of salicylic acid in its lowest energy ground state conformer

    Paul, Bijan Kumar; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IMHB) in salicylic acid and its chloro derivatives. ► A complex effect of +R and −I effect of chlorine substituents on IMHB energy. ► Interplay between IMHB energy and aromaticity. ► Directional nature of IMHB from quantum chemical assessment. ► Quantum chemical treatment vs. geometrical criteria to assess weak interaction. - Abstract: Density functional theory based computational study has been performed to characterize intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IMHB) interaction in a series of salicylic acid derivatives varying in chlorine substitution on the benzene ring. The molecular systems studied are salicylic acid, 5-chlorosalicylic acid, 3,5-dichlorosalicylic acid and 3,5,6-tricholorosalicylic acid. Major emphasis is rendered on the analysis of IMHB interaction by calculation of electron density ρ(r) and Laplacian ∇ 2 ρ(r) at the bond critical point using atoms-in-molecule theory. Topological features, energy densities based on ρ(r) through perturbing the intramolecular H-bond distances suggest that at equilibrium geometry the IMHB interaction develops certain characteristics typical of covalent interaction. The interplay between aromaticity and resonance-assisted hydrogen bonding (RAHB) is discussed using both geometrical and magnetic criteria as the descriptors of aromaticity. The optimized geometry features, molecular electrostatic potential map analysis are also found to produce a consensus view in relation with the formation of RAHB in these systems

  3. Baryon magnetic moments: Symmetries and relations

    Parreno, Assumpta [University of Barcelona; Savage, Martin [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Tiburzi, Brian [City College of New York, NY (United States); City Univ. (CUNY), NY (United States); Wilhelm, Jonas [Justus-Liebig-Universitat Giessen, Giessen, Germany; Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Chang, Emmanuel [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Detmold, William [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Orginos, Kostas [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic moments of the octet baryons are computed using lattice QCD in background magnetic fields, including the first treatment of the magnetically coupled Σ0- Λ system. Although the computations are performed for relatively large values of the up and down quark masses, we gain new insight into the symmetries and relations between magnetic moments by working at a three-flavor mass-symmetric point. While the spinflavor symmetry in the large Nc limit of QCD is shared by the naïve constituent quark model, we find instances where quark model predictions are considerably favored over those emerging in the large Nc limit. We suggest further calculations that would shed light on the curious patterns of baryon magnetic moments.

  4. Geometric group theory

    Druţu, Cornelia

    2018-01-01

    The key idea in geometric group theory is to study infinite groups by endowing them with a metric and treating them as geometric spaces. This applies to many groups naturally appearing in topology, geometry, and algebra, such as fundamental groups of manifolds, groups of matrices with integer coefficients, etc. The primary focus of this book is to cover the foundations of geometric group theory, including coarse topology, ultralimits and asymptotic cones, hyperbolic groups, isoperimetric inequalities, growth of groups, amenability, Kazhdan's Property (T) and the Haagerup property, as well as their characterizations in terms of group actions on median spaces and spaces with walls. The book contains proofs of several fundamental results of geometric group theory, such as Gromov's theorem on groups of polynomial growth, Tits's alternative, Stallings's theorem on ends of groups, Dunwoody's accessibility theorem, the Mostow Rigidity Theorem, and quasiisometric rigidity theorems of Tukia and Schwartz. This is the f...

  5. Geometric and engineering drawing

    Morling, K

    2010-01-01

    The new edition of this successful text describes all the geometric instructions and engineering drawing information that are likely to be needed by anyone preparing or interpreting drawings or designs with plenty of exercises to practice these principles.

  6. Differential geometric structures

    Poor, Walter A

    2007-01-01

    This introductory text defines geometric structure by specifying parallel transport in an appropriate fiber bundle and focusing on simplest cases of linear parallel transport in a vector bundle. 1981 edition.

  7. Geometric ghosts and unitarity

    Ne'eman, Y.

    1980-09-01

    A review is given of the geometrical identification of the renormalization ghosts and the resulting derivation of Unitarity equations (BRST) for various gauges: Yang-Mills, Kalb-Ramond, and Soft-Group-Manifold

  8. Moments of Negotiation

    Pieters, Jurgen

    2001-01-01

    'Moments of Negotiation' offers the first book-length and indepth analysis of the New Historicist reading method, which the American Shakespeare-scolar Stephen Greenblatt introduced at the beginning of the 1980s. Ever since, Greenblatt has been hailed as the prime representative of this movement,

  9. Magnetic moments revisited

    Towner, I.S.; Khanna, F.C.

    1984-01-01

    Consideration of core polarization, isobar currents and meson-exchange processes gives a satisfactory understanding of the ground-state magnetic moments in closed-shell-plus (or minus)-one nuclei, A = 3, 15, 17, 39 and 41. Ever since the earliest days of the nuclear shell model the understanding of magnetic moments of nuclear states of supposedly simple configurations, such as doubly closed LS shells +-1 nucleon, has been a challenge for theorists. The experimental moments, which in most cases are known with extraordinary precision, show a small yet significant departure from the single-particle Schmidt values. The departure, however, is difficult to evaluate precisely since, as will be seen, it results from a sensitive cancellation between several competing corrections each of which can be as large as the observed discrepancy. This, then, is the continuing fascination of magnetic moments. In this contribution, we revisit the subjet principally to identify the role played by isobar currents, which are of much concern at this conference. But in so doing we warn quite strongly of the dangers of considering just isobar currents in isolation; equal consideration must be given to competing processes which in this context are the mundane nuclear structure effects, such as core polarization, and the more popular meson-exchange currents

  10. The Humanist Moment

    Higgins, Chris

    2014-01-01

    In "The Humanist Moment," Chris Higgins sets out to recover a tenable, living humanism, rejecting both the version vilified by the anti-humanists and the one sentimentalized by the reactionary nostalgists. Rescuing humanism from such polemics is only the first step, as we find at least nine rival, contemporary definitions of humanism.…

  11. Asymptotic and geometrical quantization

    Karasev, M.V.; Maslov, V.P.

    1984-01-01

    The main ideas of geometric-, deformation- and asymptotic quantizations are compared. It is shown that, on the one hand, the asymptotic approach is a direct generalization of exact geometric quantization, on the other hand, it generates deformation in multiplication of symbols and Poisson brackets. Besides investigating the general quantization diagram, its applications to the calculation of asymptotics of a series of eigenvalues of operators possessing symmetry groups are considered

  12. On geometrized gravitation theories

    Logunov, A.A.; Folomeshkin, V.N.

    1977-01-01

    General properties of the geometrized gravitation theories have been considered. Geometrization of the theory is realized only to the extent that by necessity follows from an experiment (geometrization of the density of the matter Lagrangian only). Aor a general case the gravitation field equations and the equations of motion for matter are formulated in the different Riemann spaces. A covariant formulation of the energy-momentum conservation laws is given in an arbitrary geometrized theory. The noncovariant notion of ''pseudotensor'' is not required in formulating the conservation laws. It is shown that in the general case (i.e., when there is an explicit dependence of the matter Lagrangian density on the covariant derivatives) a symmetric energy-momentum tensor of the matter is explicitly dependent on the curvature tensor. There are enlisted different geometrized theories that describe a known set of the experimental facts. The properties of one of the versions of the quasilinear geometrized theory that describes the experimental facts are considered. In such a theory the fundamental static spherically symmetrical solution has a singularity only in the coordinate origin. The theory permits to create a satisfactory model of the homogeneous nonstationary Universe

  13. Moving walls and geometric phases

    Facchi, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.facchi@ba.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica and MECENAS, Università di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Garnero, Giancarlo, E-mail: giancarlo.garnero@uniba.it [Dipartimento di Fisica and MECENAS, Università di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Marmo, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche and MECENAS, Università di Napoli “Federico II”, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Napoli, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Samuel, Joseph [Raman Research Institute, 560080 Bangalore (India)

    2016-09-15

    We unveil the existence of a non-trivial Berry phase associated to the dynamics of a quantum particle in a one dimensional box with moving walls. It is shown that a suitable choice of boundary conditions has to be made in order to preserve unitarity. For these boundary conditions we compute explicitly the geometric phase two-form on the parameter space. The unboundedness of the Hamiltonian describing the system leads to a natural prescription of renormalization for divergent contributions arising from the boundary.

  14. Effects of the racket polar moment of inertia on dominant upper limb joint moments during tennis serve.

    Isabelle Rogowski

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of the polar moment of inertia of a tennis racket on upper limb loading in the serve. Eight amateur competition tennis players performed two sets of 10 serves using two rackets identical in mass, position of center of mass and moments of inertia other than the polar moment of inertia (0.00152 vs 0.00197 kg.m2. An eight-camera motion analysis system collected the 3D trajectories of 16 markers, located on the thorax, upper limbs and racket, from which shoulder, elbow and wrist net joint moments and powers were computed using inverse dynamics. During the cocking phase, increased racket polar moment of inertia was associated with significant increases in the peak shoulder extension and abduction moments, as well the peak elbow extension, valgus and supination moments. During the forward swing phase, peak wrist extension and radial deviation moments significantly increased with polar moment of inertia. During the follow-through phase, the peak shoulder adduction, elbow pronation and wrist external rotation moments displayed a significant inverse relationship with polar moment of inertia. During the forward swing, the magnitudes of negative joint power at the elbow and wrist were significantly larger when players served using the racket with a higher polar moment of inertia. Although a larger polar of inertia allows players to better tolerate off-center impacts, it also appears to place additional loads on the upper extremity when serving and may therefore increase injury risk in tennis players.

  15. Effects of the racket polar moment of inertia on dominant upper limb joint moments during tennis serve.

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Creveaux, Thomas; Chèze, Laurence; Macé, Pierre; Dumas, Raphaël

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of the polar moment of inertia of a tennis racket on upper limb loading in the serve. Eight amateur competition tennis players performed two sets of 10 serves using two rackets identical in mass, position of center of mass and moments of inertia other than the polar moment of inertia (0.00152 vs 0.00197 kg.m2). An eight-camera motion analysis system collected the 3D trajectories of 16 markers, located on the thorax, upper limbs and racket, from which shoulder, elbow and wrist net joint moments and powers were computed using inverse dynamics. During the cocking phase, increased racket polar moment of inertia was associated with significant increases in the peak shoulder extension and abduction moments, as well the peak elbow extension, valgus and supination moments. During the forward swing phase, peak wrist extension and radial deviation moments significantly increased with polar moment of inertia. During the follow-through phase, the peak shoulder adduction, elbow pronation and wrist external rotation moments displayed a significant inverse relationship with polar moment of inertia. During the forward swing, the magnitudes of negative joint power at the elbow and wrist were significantly larger when players served using the racket with a higher polar moment of inertia. Although a larger polar of inertia allows players to better tolerate off-center impacts, it also appears to place additional loads on the upper extremity when serving and may therefore increase injury risk in tennis players.

  16. Rovibrational matrix elements of the multipole moments

    Rovibrational matrix elements of the multipole moments ℓ up to rank 10 and of the linear polarizability of the H2 molecule in the condensed phase have been computed taking into account the effect of the intermolecular potential. Comparison with gas phase matrix elements shows that the effect of solid state interactions is ...

  17. Polarized electric dipole moment of well-deformed reflection asymmetric nuclei

    Denisov, V.Yu.

    2012-01-01

    The expression for polarized electric dipole moment of well-deformed reflection asymmetric nuclei is obtained in the framework of liquid-drop model in the case of geometrically similar proton and neutron surfaces. The expression for polarized electric dipole moment consists of the first and second orders terms. It is shown that the second-order correction terms of the polarized electric dipole moment are important for well-deformed nuclei

  18. An effective chaos-geometric computational approach to analysis and prediction of evolutionary dynamics of the environmental systems: Atmospheric pollution dynamics

    Buyadzhi, V. V.; Glushkov, A. V.; Khetselius, O. Yu; Bunyakova, Yu Ya; Florko, T. A.; Agayar, E. V.; Solyanikova, E. P.

    2017-10-01

    The present paper concerns the results of computational studying dynamics of the atmospheric pollutants (dioxide of nitrogen, sulphur etc) concentrations in an atmosphere of the industrial cities (Odessa) by using the dynamical systems and chaos theory methods. A chaotic behaviour in the nitrogen dioxide and sulphurous anhydride concentration time series at several sites of the Odessa city is numerically investigated. As usually, to reconstruct the corresponding attractor, the time delay and embedding dimension are needed. The former is determined by the methods of autocorrelation function and average mutual information, and the latter is calculated by means of a correlation dimension method and algorithm of false nearest neighbours. Further, the Lyapunov’s exponents spectrum, Kaplan-Yorke dimension and Kolmogorov entropy are computed. It has been found an existence of a low-D chaos in the time series of the atmospheric pollutants concentrations.

  19. Computational study of the effects of shroud geometric variation on turbine performance in a 1.5-stage high-loaded turbine

    Jia, Wei; Liu, Huoxing

    2013-10-01

    Generally speaking, main flow path of gas turbine is assumed to be perfect for standard 3D computation. But in real engine, the turbine annulus geometry is not completely smooth for the presence of the shroud and associated cavity near the end wall. Besides, shroud leakage flow is one of the dominant sources of secondary flow in turbomachinery, which not only causes a deterioration of useful work but also a penalty on turbine efficiency. It has been found that neglect shroud leakage flow makes the computed velocity profiles and loss distribution significantly different to those measured. Even so, the influence of shroud leakage flow is seldom taken into consideration during the routine of turbine design due to insufficient understanding of its impact on end wall flows and turbine performance. In order to evaluate the impact of tip shroud geometry on turbine performance, a 3D computational investigation for 1.5-stage turbine with shrouded blades was performed in this paper. The following geometry parameters were varied respectively: Inlet cavity length and exit cavity length

  20. 3D rotation invariants of Gaussian-Hermite moments

    Yang, Bo; Flusser, Jan; Suk, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 1 (2015), s. 18-26 ISSN 0167-8655 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/11/1552 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Rotation invariants * Orthogonal moments * Gaussian–Hermite moments * 3D moment invariants Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 1.586, year: 2015 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/ZOI/yang-0438325.pdf

  1. The effect of photometric and geometric context on photometric and geometric lightness effects.

    Lee, Thomas Y; Brainard, David H

    2014-01-24

    We measured the lightness of probe tabs embedded at different orientations in various contextual images presented on a computer-controlled stereo display. Two background context planes met along a horizontal roof-like ridge. Each plane was a graphic rendering of a set of achromatic surfaces with the simulated illumination for each plane controlled independently. Photometric context was varied by changing the difference in simulated illumination intensity between the two background planes. Geometric context was varied by changing the angle between them. We parsed the data into separate photometric effects and geometric effects. For fixed geometry, varying photometric context led to linear changes in both the photometric and geometric effects. Varying geometric context did not produce a statistically reliable change in either the photometric or geometric effects.

  2. On geometrical splitting in nonanalog Monte Carlo

    Lux, I.

    1985-01-01

    A very general geometrical procedure is considered, and it is shown how the free flights, the statistical weights and the contribution of particles participating in splitting are to be chosen in order to reach unbiased estimates in games where the transition kernels are nonanalog. Equations governing the second moment of the score and the number of flights to be stimulated are derived. It is shown that the post-splitting weights of the fragments are to be chosen equal to reach maximum gain in variance. Conditions are derived under which the expected number of flights remains finite. Simplified example illustrate the optimization of the procedure (author)

  3. Redefining the political moment

    James Arvanitakis

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available On 16 February 2003, more than half a million people gathered in Sydney, Australia, as part of a global anti-war protest aimed at stopping the impending invasion of Iraq by the then US Administration. It is difficult to estimate how many millions marched on the coordinated protest, but it was by far the largest mobilization of a generation. Walking and chanting on the streets of Sydney that day, it seemed that a political moment was upon us. In a culture that rarely embraces large scale activism, millions around Australian demanded to be heard. The message was clear: if you do not hear us, we would be willing to bring down a government. The invasion went ahead, however, with the then Australian government, under the leadership of John Howard, being one of the loudest and staunchest supporters of the Bush Administrations drive to war. Within 18 months, anti-war activists struggled to have a few hundred participants take part in anti-Iraq war rallies, and the Howard Government was comfortably re-elected for another term. The political moment had come and gone, with both social commentators and many members of the public looking for a reason. While the conservative media was often the focus of analysis, this paper argues that in a time of late capitalism, the political moment is hollowed out by ‘Politics’ itself. That is to say, that formal political processes (or ‘Politics’ undermine the political practices that people participate in everyday (or ‘politics’. Drawing on an ongoing research project focusing on democracy and young people, I discuss how the concept of ’politics‘ has been destabilised and subsequently, the political moment has been displaced. This displacement has led to a re-definition of ‘political action’ and, I argue, the emergence of a different type of everyday politics.

  4. Geometrical optical illusionists.

    Wade, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Geometrical optical illusions were given this title by Oppel in 1855. Variants on such small distortions of visual space were illustrated thereafter, many of which bear the names of those who first described them. Some original forms of the geometrical optical illusions are shown together with 'perceptual portraits' of those who described them. These include: Roget, Chevreul, Fick, Zöllner, Poggendorff, Hering, Kundt, Delboeuf Mach, Helmholtz, Hermann, von Bezold, Müller-Lyer, Lipps, Thiéry, Wundt, Münsterberg, Ebbinghaus, Titchener, Ponzo, Luckiesh, Sander, Ehrenstein, Gregory, Heard, White, Shepard, and. Lingelbach. The illusions are grouped under the headings of orientation, size, the combination of size and orientation, and contrast. Early theories of illusions, before geometrical optical illusions were so named, are mentioned briefly.

  5. Geometrical method of decoupling

    C. Baumgarten

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The computation of tunes and matched beam distributions are essential steps in the analysis of circular accelerators. If certain symmetries—like midplane symmetry—are present, then it is possible to treat the betatron motion in the horizontal, the vertical plane, and (under certain circumstances the longitudinal motion separately using the well-known Courant-Snyder theory, or to apply transformations that have been described previously as, for instance, the method of Teng and Edwards. In a preceding paper, it has been shown that this method requires a modification for the treatment of isochronous cyclotrons with non-negligible space charge forces. Unfortunately, the modification was numerically not as stable as desired and it was still unclear, if the extension would work for all conceivable cases. Hence, a systematic derivation of a more general treatment seemed advisable. In a second paper, the author suggested the use of real Dirac matrices as basic tools for coupled linear optics and gave a straightforward recipe to decouple positive definite Hamiltonians with imaginary eigenvalues. In this article this method is generalized and simplified in order to formulate a straightforward method to decouple Hamiltonian matrices with eigenvalues on the real and the imaginary axis. The decoupling of symplectic matrices which are exponentials of such Hamiltonian matrices can be deduced from this in a few steps. It is shown that this algebraic decoupling is closely related to a geometric “decoupling” by the orthogonalization of the vectors E[over →], B[over →], and P[over →], which were introduced with the so-called “electromechanical equivalence.” A mathematical analysis of the problem can be traced down to the task of finding a structure-preserving block diagonalization of symplectic or Hamiltonian matrices. Structure preservation means in this context that the (sequence of transformations must be symplectic and hence canonical. When

  6. Trunk muscle cocontraction: the effects of moment direction and moment magnitude.

    Lavender, S A; Tsuang, Y H; Andersson, G B; Hafezi, A; Shin, C C

    1992-09-01

    This study investigated the cocontraction of eight trunk muscles during the application of asymmetric loads to the torso. External moments of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 Nm were applied to the torso via a harness system. The direction of the applied moment was varied by 30 degrees increments to the subjects' right side between the sagittally symmetric orientations front and rear. Electromyographic (EMG) data from the left and right latissimus dorsi, erector spinae, external oblique, and rectus abdominus were collected from 10 subjects. The normalized EMG data were tested using multivariate and univariate analyses of variance procedures. These analyses showed significant interactions between the moment magnitude and the moment direction for seven of the eight muscles. Most of the interactions could be characterized as due to changes in muscle recruitment with changes in the direction of the external moment. Analysis of the relative activation levels, which were computed for each combination of moment magnitude and direction, indicated large changes in muscle recruitment due to asymmetry, but only small adjustments in the relative activation levels due to increased moment magnitude.

  7. Geometric optimization and sums of algebraic functions

    Vigneron, Antoine E.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new optimization technique that yields the first FPTAS for several geometric problems. These problems reduce to optimizing a sum of nonnegative, constant description complexity algebraic functions. We first give an FPTAS for optimizing such a sum of algebraic functions, and then we apply it to several geometric optimization problems. We obtain the first FPTAS for two fundamental geometric shape-matching problems in fixed dimension: maximizing the volume of overlap of two polyhedra under rigid motions and minimizing their symmetric difference. We obtain the first FPTAS for other problems in fixed dimension, such as computing an optimal ray in a weighted subdivision, finding the largest axially symmetric subset of a polyhedron, and computing minimum-area hulls.

  8. Discrete Hermite moments and their application in chemometrics

    Honarvar Shakibaei Asli, Barmak; Flusser, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 177, č. 1 (2018), s. 83-88 ISSN 0169-7439 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Orthogonal polynomials * Discrete polynomials * Tchebichef moment * Hermite moment * Gauss–Hermite quadrature Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science OBOR OECD: Electrical and electronic engineering Impact factor: 2.303, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2018/ZOI/honarvar-0489186.pdf

  9. Effective magnetic moment of neutrinos in strong magnetic fields

    Perez M, A.; Perez R, H.; Masood, S.S.; Gaitan, R.; Rodriguez R, S.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we compute the effective magnetic moment of neutrinos propagating in dense high magnetized medium. Taking typical values of magnetic field and densities of astrophysical objects (such as the cores of supernovae and neutron stars) we obtain an effective type of dipole magnetic moment in agreement with astrophysical and cosmological bounds. (Author)

  10. Heavy quark and magnetic moment

    Mubarak, Ahmad; Jallu, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    The magnetic moments and transition moments of heavy hadrons including the conventional particles are obtained under the SU(5) truth symmetry scheme. To this end state vectors are defined and the quark additivity principle is taken into account. (author)

  11. Stereo Correspondence Using Moment Invariants

    Premaratne, Prashan; Safaei, Farzad

    Autonomous navigation is seen as a vital tool in harnessing the enormous potential of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) and small robotic vehicles for both military and civilian use. Even though, laser based scanning solutions for Simultaneous Location And Mapping (SLAM) is considered as the most reliable for depth estimation, they are not feasible for use in UAV and land-based small vehicles due to their physical size and weight. Stereovision is considered as the best approach for any autonomous navigation solution as stereo rigs are considered to be lightweight and inexpensive. However, stereoscopy which estimates the depth information through pairs of stereo images can still be computationally expensive and unreliable. This is mainly due to some of the algorithms used in successful stereovision solutions require high computational requirements that cannot be met by small robotic vehicles. In our research, we implement a feature-based stereovision solution using moment invariants as a metric to find corresponding regions in image pairs that will reduce the computational complexity and improve the accuracy of the disparity measures that will be significant for the use in UAVs and in small robotic vehicles.

  12. Pengenalan Pose Tangan Menggunakan HuMoment

    Dina Budhi Utami

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Computer vision yang didasarkan pada pengenalan bentuk memiliki banyak potensi dalam interaksi manusia dan komputer. Pose tangan dapat dijadikan simbol interaksi manusia dengan komputer seperti halnya pada penggunaan berbagai pose tangan pada bahasa isyarat. Berbagai pose tangan dapat digunakan untuk menggantikan fungsi mouse, untuk mengendalikan robot, dan sebagainya. Penelitian ini difokuskan pada pembangunan sistem pengenalan pose tangan menggunakan HuMoment. Proses pengenalan pose tangan dimulai dengan melakukan segmentasi citra masukan untuk menghasilkan citra ROI (Region of Interest yaitu area telapak tangan. Selanjutnya dilakukan proses deteksi tepi. Kemudian dilakukan ekstraksi nilai HuMoment. Nilai HuMoment dikuantisasikan ke dalam bukukode yang dihasilkan dari proses pelatihan menggunakan K-Means. Proses kuantisasi dilakukan dengan menghitung nilai Euclidean Distance terkecil antara nilai HuMomment citra masukan dan bukukode. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian, nilai akurasi sistem dalam mengenali pose tangan adalah 88.57%.

  13. Geometric Models for Collaborative Search and Filtering

    Bitton, Ephrat

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation explores the use of geometric and graphical models for a variety of information search and filtering applications. These models serve to provide an intuitive understanding of the problem domains and as well as computational efficiencies to our solution approaches. We begin by considering a search and rescue scenario where both…

  14. Geometric Representations for Discrete Fourier Transforms

    Cambell, C. W.

    1986-01-01

    Simple geometric representations show symmetry and periodicity of discrete Fourier transforms (DFT's). Help in visualizing requirements for storing and manipulating transform value in computations. Representations useful in any number of dimensions, but particularly in one-, two-, and three-dimensional cases often encountered in practice.

  15. Material Characterization and Geometric Segmentation of a Composite Structure Using Microfocus X-Ray Computed Tomography Image-Based Finite Element Modeling

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Roth, D. J.; Cotton, R.; Studor, George F.; Christiansen, Eric; Young, P. C.

    2011-01-01

    This study utilizes microfocus x-ray computed tomography (CT) slice sets to model and characterize the damage locations and sizes in thermal protection system materials that underwent impact testing. ScanIP/FE software is used to visualize and process the slice sets, followed by mesh generation on the segmented volumetric rendering. Then, the local stress fields around several of the damaged regions are calculated for realistic mission profiles that subject the sample to extreme temperature and other severe environmental conditions. The resulting stress fields are used to quantify damage severity and make an assessment as to whether damage that did not penetrate to the base material can still result in catastrophic failure of the structure. It is expected that this study will demonstrate that finite element modeling based on an accurate three-dimensional rendered model from a series of CT slices is an essential tool to quantify the internal macroscopic defects and damage of a complex system made out of thermal protection material. Results obtained showing details of segmented images; three-dimensional volume-rendered models, finite element meshes generated, and the resulting thermomechanical stress state due to impact loading for the material are presented and discussed. Further, this study is conducted to exhibit certain high-caliber capabilities that the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) group at NASA Glenn Research Center can offer to assist in assessing the structural durability of such highly specialized materials so improvements in their performance and capacities to handle harsh operating conditions can be made.

  16. A Study of Moment Based Features on Handwritten Digit Recognition

    Pawan Kumar Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Handwritten digit recognition plays a significant role in many user authentication applications in the modern world. As the handwritten digits are not of the same size, thickness, style, and orientation, therefore, these challenges are to be faced to resolve this problem. A lot of work has been done for various non-Indic scripts particularly, in case of Roman, but, in case of Indic scripts, the research is limited. This paper presents a script invariant handwritten digit recognition system for identifying digits written in five popular scripts of Indian subcontinent, namely, Indo-Arabic, Bangla, Devanagari, Roman, and Telugu. A 130-element feature set which is basically a combination of six different types of moments, namely, geometric moment, moment invariant, affine moment invariant, Legendre moment, Zernike moment, and complex moment, has been estimated for each digit sample. Finally, the technique is evaluated on CMATER and MNIST databases using multiple classifiers and, after performing statistical significance tests, it is observed that Multilayer Perceptron (MLP classifier outperforms the others. Satisfactory recognition accuracies are attained for all the five mentioned scripts.

  17. Geometric Liouville gravity

    La, H.

    1992-01-01

    A new geometric formulation of Liouville gravity based on the area preserving diffeo-morphism is given and a possible alternative to reinterpret Liouville gravity is suggested, namely, a scalar field coupled to two-dimensional gravity with a curvature constraint

  18. A Geometric Dissection Problem

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 7. A Geometric Dissection Problem. M N Deshpande. Think It Over Volume 7 Issue 7 July 2002 pp 91-91. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/007/07/0091-0091. Author Affiliations.

  19. Geometric statistical inference

    Periwal, Vipul

    1999-01-01

    A reparametrization-covariant formulation of the inverse problem of probability is explicitly solved for finite sample sizes. The inferred distribution is explicitly continuous for finite sample size. A geometric solution of the statistical inference problem in higher dimensions is outlined

  20. Geometric Series via Probability

    Tesman, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Infinite series is a challenging topic in the undergraduate mathematics curriculum for many students. In fact, there is a vast literature in mathematics education research on convergence issues. One of the most important types of infinite series is the geometric series. Their beauty lies in the fact that they can be evaluated explicitly and that…

  1. Geometric convergence of some two-point Pade approximations

    Nemeth, G.

    1983-01-01

    The geometric convergences of some two-point Pade approximations are investigated on the real positive axis and on certain infinite sets of the complex plane. Some theorems concerning the geometric convergence of Pade approximations are proved, and bounds on geometric convergence rates are given. The results may be interesting considering the applications both in numerical computations and in approximation theory. As a specific case, the numerical calculations connected with the plasma dispersion function may be performed. (D.Gy.)

  2. Pragmatic geometric model evaluation

    Pamer, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Quantification of subsurface model reliability is mathematically and technically demanding as there are many different sources of uncertainty and some of the factors can be assessed merely in a subjective way. For many practical applications in industry or risk assessment (e. g. geothermal drilling) a quantitative estimation of possible geometric variations in depth unit is preferred over relative numbers because of cost calculations for different scenarios. The talk gives an overview of several factors that affect the geometry of structural subsurface models that are based upon typical geological survey organization (GSO) data like geological maps, borehole data and conceptually driven construction of subsurface elements (e. g. fault network). Within the context of the trans-European project "GeoMol" uncertainty analysis has to be very pragmatic also because of different data rights, data policies and modelling software between the project partners. In a case study a two-step evaluation methodology for geometric subsurface model uncertainty is being developed. In a first step several models of the same volume of interest have been calculated by omitting successively more and more input data types (seismic constraints, fault network, outcrop data). The positions of the various horizon surfaces are then compared. The procedure is equivalent to comparing data of various levels of detail and therefore structural complexity. This gives a measure of the structural significance of each data set in space and as a consequence areas of geometric complexity are identified. These areas are usually very data sensitive hence geometric variability in between individual data points in these areas is higher than in areas of low structural complexity. Instead of calculating a multitude of different models by varying some input data or parameters as it is done by Monte-Carlo-simulations, the aim of the second step of the evaluation procedure (which is part of the ongoing work) is to

  3. Paul Callaghan luminous moments

    Callaghan, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Acknowledged internationally for his ground-breaking scientific research in the field of magnetic resonance, Sir Paul Callaghan was a scientist and visionary with a rare gift for promoting science to a wide audience. He was named New Zealander of the Year in 2011. His death in early 2012 robbed New Zealand of an inspirational leader. Paul Callaghan: Luminous Moments brings together some of his most significant writing. Whether he describes his childhood in Wanganui, reflects on discovering the beauty of science, sets out New Zealand's future potential or discusses the experience of fa

  4. Neutron Electric Dipole Moment

    Mischke, R.E.

    2003-01-01

    The status of experiments to measure the electric dipole moment of the neutron is presented and the planned experiment at Los Alamos is described. The goal of this experiment is an improvement in sensitivity of a factor of 50 to 100 over the current limit. It has the potential to reveal new sources of T and CP violation and to challenge calculations that propose extensions to the Standard Model. The experiment employs several advances in technique to reach its goals and the feasibility of meeting these technical challenges is currently under study

  5. Quantum tunneling of the magnetic moment in a free nanoparticle

    O'Keeffe, M.F.; Chudnovsky, E.M.; Garanin, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    We study tunneling of the magnetic moment in a particle that has full rotational freedom. Exact energy levels are obtained and the ground-state magnetic moment is computed for a symmetric rotor. The effect of mechanical freedom on spin tunneling manifests itself in a strong dependence of the magnetic moment on the moments of inertia of the rotor. The energy of the particle exhibits quantum phase transitions between states with different values of the magnetic moment. Particles of various shapes are investigated and the quantum phase diagram is obtained. - Highlights: ► We obtain an exact analytical solution of a tunneling spin in a mechanical rotator. ► The quantum phase diagram shows magnetic moment dependence on rotator shape and size. ► Our work explains magnetic properties of free atomic clusters and magnetic molecules.

  6. Quantum tunneling of the magnetic moment in a free nanoparticle

    O' Keeffe, M.F. [Physics Department, Lehman College, City University of New York, 250 Bedford Park Boulevard West, Bronx, New York, 10468-1589 (United States); Chudnovsky, E.M., E-mail: eugene.chudnovsky@lehman.cuny.edu [Physics Department, Lehman College, City University of New York, 250 Bedford Park Boulevard West, Bronx, New York, 10468-1589 (United States); Garanin, D.A. [Physics Department, Lehman College, City University of New York, 250 Bedford Park Boulevard West, Bronx, New York, 10468-1589 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    We study tunneling of the magnetic moment in a particle that has full rotational freedom. Exact energy levels are obtained and the ground-state magnetic moment is computed for a symmetric rotor. The effect of mechanical freedom on spin tunneling manifests itself in a strong dependence of the magnetic moment on the moments of inertia of the rotor. The energy of the particle exhibits quantum phase transitions between states with different values of the magnetic moment. Particles of various shapes are investigated and the quantum phase diagram is obtained. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We obtain an exact analytical solution of a tunneling spin in a mechanical rotator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The quantum phase diagram shows magnetic moment dependence on rotator shape and size. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our work explains magnetic properties of free atomic clusters and magnetic molecules.

  7. Moment-to-moment dynamics of ADHD behaviour

    Aase Heidi

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The behaviour of children with Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder is often described as highly variable, in addition to being hyperactive, impulsive and inattentive. One reason might be that they do not acquire complete and functional sequences of behaviour. The dynamic developmental theory of ADHD proposes that reinforcement and extinction processes are inefficient because of hypofunctioning dopamine systems, resulting in a narrower time window for associating antecedent stimuli and behaviour with its consequences. One effect of this may be that the learning of behavioural sequences is delayed, and that only short behavioural sequences are acquired in ADHD. The present study investigated acquisition of response sequences in the behaviour of children with ADHD. Methods Fifteen boys with ADHD and thirteen boys without, all aged between 6–9 yr, completed a computerized task presented as a game with two squares on the screen. One square was associated with reinforcement. The task required responses by the computer mouse under reinforcement contingencies of variable interval schedules. Reinforcers were cartoon pictures and small trinkets. Measures related to response location (spatial dimension and to response timing (temporal dimension were analyzed by autocorrelations of consecutive responses across five lags. Acquired response sequences were defined as predictable responding shown by high explained variance. Results Children with ADHD acquired shorter response sequences than comparison children on the measures related to response location. None of the groups showed any predictability in response timing. Response sequencing on the measure related to the discriminative stimulus was highly related to parent scores on a rating scale for ADHD symptoms. Conclusion The findings suggest that children with ADHD have problems with learning long sequences of behaviour, particularly related to response location. Problems with

  8. Three-dimensional geometric analysis of felid limb bone allometry.

    Michael Doube

    Full Text Available Studies of bone allometry typically use simple measurements taken in a small number of locations per bone; often the midshaft diameter or joint surface area is compared to body mass or bone length. However, bones must fulfil multiple roles simultaneously with minimum cost to the animal while meeting the structural requirements imposed by behaviour and locomotion, and not exceeding its capacity for adaptation and repair. We use entire bone volumes from the forelimbs and hindlimbs of Felidae (cats to investigate regional complexities in bone allometry.Computed tomographic (CT images (16435 slices in 116 stacks were made of 9 limb bones from each of 13 individuals of 9 feline species ranging in size from domestic cat (Felis catus to tiger (Panthera tigris. Eleven geometric parameters were calculated for every CT slice and scaling exponents calculated at 5% increments along the entire length of each bone. Three-dimensional moments of inertia were calculated for each bone volume, and spherical radii were measured in the glenoid cavity, humeral head and femoral head. Allometry of the midshaft, moments of inertia and joint radii were determined. Allometry was highly variable and related to local bone function, with joint surfaces and muscle attachment sites generally showing stronger positive allometry than the midshaft.Examining whole bones revealed that bone allometry is strongly affected by regional variations in bone function, presumably through mechanical effects on bone modelling. Bone's phenotypic plasticity may be an advantage during rapid evolutionary divergence by allowing exploitation of the full size range that a morphotype can occupy. Felids show bone allometry rather than postural change across their size range, unlike similar-sized animals.

  9. A Hybrid Joint Moment Ratio Test for Financial Time Series

    Groenendijk, Patrick A.; Lucas, André; Vries, de Casper G.

    1998-01-01

    We advocate the use of absolute moment ratio statistics in conjunctionwith standard variance ratio statistics in order to disentangle lineardependence, non-linear dependence, and leptokurtosis in financial timeseries. Both statistics are computed for multiple return horizonssimultaneously, and the

  10. Modifications of Geometric Truncation of the Scattering Phase Function

    Radkevich, A.

    2017-12-01

    Phase function (PF) of light scattering on large atmospheric particles has very strong peak in forward direction constituting a challenge for accurate numerical calculations of radiance. Such accurate (and fast) evaluations are important in the problems of remote sensing of the atmosphere. Scaling transformation replaces original PF with a sum of the delta function and a new regular smooth PF. A number of methods to construct such a PF were suggested. Delta-M and delta-fit methods require evaluation of the PF moments which imposes a numerical problem if strongly anisotropic PF is given as a function of angle. Geometric truncation keeps the original PF unchanged outside the forward peak cone replacing it with a constant within the cone. This approach is designed to preserve the asymmetry parameter. It has two disadvantages: 1) PF has discontinuity at the cone; 2) the choice of the cone is subjective, no recommendations were provided on the choice of the truncation angle. This choice affects both truncation fraction and the value of the phase function within the forward cone. Both issues are addressed in this study. A simple functional form of the replacement PF is suggested. This functional form allows for a number of modifications. This study consider 3 versions providing continuous PF. The considered modifications also bear either of three properties: preserve asymmetry parameter, provide continuity of the 1st derivative of the PF, and preserve mean scattering angle. The second problem mentioned above is addressed with a heuristic approach providing unambiguous criterion of selection of the truncation angle. The approach showed good performance on liquid water and ice clouds with different particle size distributions. Suggested modifications were tested on different cloud PFs using both discrete ordinates and Monte Carlo methods. It was showed that the modifications provide better accuracy of the radiance computation compare to the original geometric truncation.

  11. Moments in time

    Marc eWittmann

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that perception and action can be understood as evolving in temporal epochs or sequential processing units. Successive events are fused into units forming a unitary experience or ‘psychological present’. Studies have identified several temporal integration levels on different time scales which are fundamental for our understanding of behaviour and subjective experience. In recent literature concerning the philosophy and neuroscience of consciousness these separate temporal processing levels are not always precisely distinguished. Therefore, empirical evidence from psychophysics and neuropsychology on these distinct temporal processing levels is presented and discussed within philosophical conceptualizations of time experience. On an elementary level, one can identify a functional moment, a basic temporal building block of perception in the range of milliseconds that defines simultaneity and succession. Below a certain threshold temporal order is not perceived, individual events are processed as co-temporal. On a second level, an experienced moment, which is based on temporal integration of up to a few seconds, has been reported in many qualitatively different experiments in perception and action. It has been suggested that this segmental processing mechanism creates temporal windows that provide a logistical basis for conscious representation and the experience of nowness. On a third level of integration, continuity of experience is enabled by working-memory in the range of multiple seconds allowing the maintenance of cognitive operations and emotional feelings, leading to mental presence, a temporal window of an individual’s experienced presence.

  12. Dynamics in geometrical confinement

    Kremer, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the dynamics of low molecular weight and polymeric molecules when they are constrained under conditions of geometrical confinement. It covers geometrical confinement in different dimensionalities: (i) in nanometer thin layers or self supporting films (1-dimensional confinement) (ii) in pores or tubes with nanometric diameters (2-dimensional confinement) (iii) as micelles embedded in matrices (3-dimensional) or as nanodroplets.The dynamics under such conditions have been a much discussed and central topic in the focus of intense worldwide research activities within the last two decades. The present book discusses how the resulting molecular mobility is influenced by the subtle counterbalance between surface effects (typically slowing down molecular dynamics through attractive guest/host interactions) and confinement effects (typically increasing the mobility). It also explains how these influences can be modified and tuned, e.g. through appropriate surface coatings, film thicknesses or pore...

  13. Geometric group theory

    Bestvina, Mladen; Vogtmann, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Geometric group theory refers to the study of discrete groups using tools from topology, geometry, dynamics and analysis. The field is evolving very rapidly and the present volume provides an introduction to and overview of various topics which have played critical roles in this evolution. The book contains lecture notes from courses given at the Park City Math Institute on Geometric Group Theory. The institute consists of a set of intensive short courses offered by leaders in the field, designed to introduce students to exciting, current research in mathematics. These lectures do not duplicate standard courses available elsewhere. The courses begin at an introductory level suitable for graduate students and lead up to currently active topics of research. The articles in this volume include introductions to CAT(0) cube complexes and groups, to modern small cancellation theory, to isometry groups of general CAT(0) spaces, and a discussion of nilpotent genus in the context of mapping class groups and CAT(0) gro...

  14. Geometric information provider platform

    Meisam Yousefzadeh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Renovation of existing buildings is known as an essential stage in reduction of the energy loss. Considerable part of renovation process depends on geometric reconstruction of building based on semantic parameters. Following many research projects which were focused on parameterizing the energy usage, various energy modelling methods were developed during the last decade. On the other hand, by developing accurate measuring tools such as laser scanners, the interests of having accurate 3D building models are rapidly growing. But the automation of 3D building generation from laser point cloud or detection of specific objects in that is still a challenge.  The goal is designing a platform through which required geometric information can be efficiently produced to support energy simulation software. Developing a reliable procedure which extracts required information from measured data and delivers them to a standard energy modelling system is the main purpose of the project.

  15. Gravity, a geometrical course

    Frè, Pietro Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    ‘Gravity, a Geometrical Course’ presents general relativity (GR) in a systematic and exhaustive way, covering three aspects that are homogenized into a single texture: i) the mathematical, geometrical foundations, exposed in a self consistent contemporary formalism, ii) the main physical, astrophysical and cosmological applications,  updated to the issues of contemporary research and observations, with glimpses on supergravity and superstring theory, iii) the historical development of scientific ideas underlying both the birth of general relativity and its subsequent evolution. The book is divided in two volumes.   Volume One is dedicated to the development of the theory and basic physical applications. It guides the reader from the foundation of special relativity to Einstein field equations, illustrating some basic applications in astrophysics. A detailed  account  of the historical and conceptual development of the theory is combined with the presentation of its mathematical foundations.  Differe...

  16. Geometric homology revisited

    Ruffino, Fabio Ferrari

    2013-01-01

    Given a cohomology theory, there is a well-known abstract way to define the dual homology theory using the theory of spectra. In [4] the author provides a more geometric construction of the homology theory, using a generalization of the bordism groups. Such a generalization involves in its definition the vector bundle modification, which is a particular case of the Gysin map. In this paper we provide a more natural variant of that construction, which replaces the vector bundle modification wi...

  17. Geometric measure theory

    Waerden, B

    1996-01-01

    From the reviews: "... Federer's timely and beautiful book indeed fills the need for a comprehensive treatise on geometric measure theory, and his detailed exposition leads from the foundations of the theory to the most recent discoveries. ... The author writes with a distinctive style which is both natural and powerfully economical in treating a complicated subject. This book is a major treatise in mathematics and is essential in the working library of the modern analyst." Bulletin of the London Mathematical Society.

  18. Developing geometrical reasoning

    Brown, Margaret; Jones, Keith; Taylor, Ron; Hirst, Ann

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarises a report (Brown, Jones & Taylor, 2003) to the UK Qualifications and Curriculum Authority of the work of one geometry group. The group was charged with developing and reporting on teaching ideas that focus on the development of geometrical reasoning at the secondary school level. The group was encouraged to explore what is possible both within and beyond the current requirements of the UK National Curriculum and the Key Stage 3 strategy, and to consider the whole atta...

  19. Geometrically Consistent Mesh Modification

    Bonito, A.

    2010-01-01

    A new paradigm of adaptivity is to execute refinement, coarsening, and smoothing of meshes on manifolds with incomplete information about their geometry and yet preserve position and curvature accuracy. We refer to this collectively as geometrically consistent (GC) mesh modification. We discuss the concept of discrete GC, show the failure of naive approaches, and propose and analyze a simple algorithm that is GC and accuracy preserving. © 2010 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  20. Geometric theory of information

    2014-01-01

    This book brings together geometric tools and their applications for Information analysis. It collects current and many uses of in the interdisciplinary fields of Information Geometry Manifolds in Advanced Signal, Image & Video Processing, Complex Data Modeling and Analysis, Information Ranking and Retrieval, Coding, Cognitive Systems, Optimal Control, Statistics on Manifolds, Machine Learning, Speech/sound recognition, and natural language treatment which are also substantially relevant for the industry.

  1. Magnetic dipolar ordering and hysteresis of geometrically defined nanoparticle clusters

    Kure, Mathias; Beleggia, Marco; Frandsen, Cathrine

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle clusters have several biomedical and engineering applications, and revealing the basic interplay between particle configuration and magnetic properties is important for tuning the clusters for specific uses. Here, we consider the nanoparticles as macrospins and use computer...... of the polyhedra, the central moment relaxes along one of the principal axes and induces partial alignment of the surrounding moments. The resulting net moment is up to nearly four times that of the single moment added. Furthermore, we model quasi-static hysteresis loops for structures with and without a central...

  2. Geometric leaf placement strategies

    Fenwick, J D; Temple, S W P; Clements, R W; Lawrence, G P; Mayles, H M O; Mayles, W P M

    2004-01-01

    Geometric leaf placement strategies for multileaf collimators (MLCs) typically involve the expansion of the beam's-eye-view contour of a target by a uniform MLC margin, followed by movement of the leaves until some point on each leaf end touches the expanded contour. Film-based dose-distribution measurements have been made to determine appropriate MLC margins-characterized through an index d 90 -for multileaves set using one particular strategy to straight lines lying at various angles to the direction of leaf travel. Simple trigonometric relationships exist between different geometric leaf placement strategies and are used to generalize the results of the film work into d 90 values for several different strategies. Measured d 90 values vary both with angle and leaf placement strategy. A model has been derived that explains and describes quite well the observed variations of d 90 with angle. The d 90 angular variations of the strategies studied differ substantially, and geometric and dosimetric reasoning suggests that the best strategy is the one with the least angular variation. Using this criterion, the best straightforwardly implementable strategy studied is a 'touch circle' approach for which semicircles are imagined to be inscribed within leaf ends, the leaves being moved until the semicircles just touch the expanded target outline

  3. Studies in geometric quantization

    Tuynman, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis contains five chapters, of which the first, entitled 'What is prequantization, and what is geometric quantization?', is meant as an introduction to geometric quantization for the non-specialist. The second chapter, entitled 'Central extensions and physics' deals with the notion of central extensions of manifolds and elaborates and proves the statements made in the first chapter. Central extensions of manifolds occur in physics as the freedom of a phase factor in the quantum mechanical state vector, as the phase factor in the prequantization process of classical mechanics and it appears in mathematics when studying central extension of Lie groups. In this chapter the connection between these central extensions is investigated and a remarkable similarity between classical and quantum mechanics is shown. In chapter three a classical model is given for the hydrogen atom including spin-orbit and spin-spin interaction. The method of geometric quantization is applied to this model and the results are discussed. In the final chapters (4 and 5) an explicit method to calculate the operators corresponding to classical observables is given when the phase space is a Kaehler manifold. The obtained formula are then used to quantise symplectic manifolds which are irreducible hermitian symmetric spaces and the results are compared with other quantization procedures applied to these manifolds (in particular to Berezin's quantization). 91 refs.; 3 tabs

  4. Approximating distributions from moments

    Pawula, R. F.

    1987-11-01

    A method based upon Pearson-type approximations from statistics is developed for approximating a symmetric probability density function from its moments. The extended Fokker-Planck equation for non-Markov processes is shown to be the underlying foundation for the approximations. The approximation is shown to be exact for the beta probability density function. The applicability of the general method is illustrated by numerous pithy examples from linear and nonlinear filtering of both Markov and non-Markov dichotomous noise. New approximations are given for the probability density function in two cases in which exact solutions are unavailable, those of (i) the filter-limiter-filter problem and (ii) second-order Butterworth filtering of the random telegraph signal. The approximate results are compared with previously published Monte Carlo simulations in these two cases.

  5. Geometrical model of multiple production

    Chikovani, Z.E.; Jenkovszky, L.L.; Kvaratshelia, T.M.; Struminskij, B.V.

    1988-01-01

    The relation between geometrical and KNO-scaling and their violation is studied in a geometrical model of multiple production of hadrons. Predictions concerning the behaviour of correlation coefficients at future accelerators are given

  6. The geometrical theory of diffraction for axially symmetric reflectors

    Rusch, W.; Sørensen, O.

    1975-01-01

    The geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD) (cf. [1], for example) may be applied advantageously to many axially symmetric reflector antenna geometries. The material in this communication presents analytical, computational, and experimental results for commonly encountered reflector geometries...

  7. On the geometrical factor in the off-centre diffusion

    Despa, F.; Apostol, M.

    1995-07-01

    The geometrical factor of the off-centre diffusion coefficient is computed for certain two- and three-dimensional cubic lattice, and a method is indicated for estimating this factor in more general cases. (author). 7 refs, 4 figs

  8. A new geometric-based model to accurately estimate arm and leg inertial estimates.

    Wicke, Jason; Dumas, Geneviève A

    2014-06-03

    Segment estimates of mass, center of mass and moment of inertia are required input parameters to analyze the forces and moments acting across the joints. The objectives of this study were to propose a new geometric model for limb segments, to evaluate it against criterion values obtained from DXA, and to compare its performance to five other popular models. Twenty five female and 24 male college students participated in the study. For the criterion measures, the participants underwent a whole body DXA scan, and estimates for segment mass, center of mass location, and moment of inertia (frontal plane) were directly computed from the DXA mass units. For the new model, the volume was determined from two standing frontal and sagittal photographs. Each segment was modeled as a stack of slices, the sections of which were ellipses if they are not adjoining another segment and sectioned ellipses if they were adjoining another segment (e.g. upper arm and trunk). Length of axes of the ellipses was obtained from the photographs. In addition, a sex-specific, non-uniform density function was developed for each segment. A series of anthropometric measurements were also taken by directly following the definitions provided of the different body segment models tested, and the same parameters determined for each model. Comparison of models showed that estimates from the new model were consistently closer to the DXA criterion than those from the other models, with an error of less than 5% for mass and moment of inertia and less than about 6% for center of mass location. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Geometrical geodesy using information and computer technology

    Hooijberg, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    Surveying a Century Ago As it was based on the principles of geometry and trigonometry, surveying may be may be looked upon as a branch of practical mathematics. Hence, it was necessary that land surveyors and hydrographers should have a fair general knowledge, not only of these subjects, but also of all the subjects comprised by the term mathemat­ ics. In addition, the knowledge of mathematics required in ordinary chain surveying and levelling was not very extensive but in geodetical work, the highest mathematical ability and great organising power were required for a proper conception and supervision of the operations (Threlfall, 1940). Only small area of a few hundred square kilometres can be accurately mapped and surveyed without a frame­ work, since no difficulty is encountered because of Earth-curvature. In the past, especially in hydrography due to the type of work, surveying was carried out on the principles of ordinary practice, but in a very rough man­ ner, rapidity of execution being of paramoun...

  10. Combinatorial theory of the semiclassical evaluation of transport moments II: Algorithmic approach for moment generating functions

    Berkolaiko, G. [Department of Mathematics, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3368 (United States); Kuipers, J. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany)

    2013-12-15

    Electronic transport through chaotic quantum dots exhibits universal behaviour which can be understood through the semiclassical approximation. Within the approximation, calculation of transport moments reduces to codifying classical correlations between scattering trajectories. These can be represented as ribbon graphs and we develop an algorithmic combinatorial method to generate all such graphs with a given genus. This provides an expansion of the linear transport moments for systems both with and without time reversal symmetry. The computational implementation is then able to progress several orders further than previous semiclassical formulae as well as those derived from an asymptotic expansion of random matrix results. The patterns observed also suggest a general form for the higher orders.

  11. Expert judgement combination using moment methods

    Wisse, Bram; Bedford, Tim; Quigley, John

    2008-01-01

    Moment methods have been employed in decision analysis, partly to avoid the computational burden that decision models involving continuous probability distributions can suffer from. In the Bayes linear (BL) methodology prior judgements about uncertain quantities are specified using expectation (rather than probability) as the fundamental notion. BL provides a strong foundation for moment methods, rooted in work of De Finetti and Goldstein. The main objective of this paper is to discuss in what way expert assessments of moments can be combined, in a non-Bayesian way, to construct a prior assessment. We show that the linear pool can be justified in an analogous but technically different way to linear pools for probability assessments, and that this linear pool has a very convenient property: a linear pool of experts' assessments of moments is coherent if each of the experts has given coherent assessments. To determine the weights of the linear pool we give a method of performance based weighting analogous to Cooke's classical model and explore its properties. Finally, we compare its performance with the classical model on data gathered in applications of the classical model

  12. Geometric multipartite entanglement measures

    Paz-Silva, Gerardo A.; Reina, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Within the framework of constructions for quantifying entanglement, we build a natural scenario for the assembly of multipartite entanglement measures based on Hopf bundle-like mappings obtained through Clifford algebra representations. Then, given the non-factorizability of an arbitrary two-qubit density matrix, we give an alternate quantity that allows the construction of two types of entanglement measures based on their arithmetical and geometrical averages over all pairs of qubits in a register of size N, and thus fully characterize its degree and type of entanglement. We find that such an arithmetical average is both additive and strongly super additive

  13. Geometric correlations and multifractals

    Amritkar, R.E.

    1991-07-01

    There are many situations where the usual statistical methods are not adequate to characterize correlations in the system. To characterize such situations we introduce mutual correlation dimensions which describe geometric correlations in the system. These dimensions allow us to distinguish between variables which are perfectly correlated with or without a phase lag, variables which are uncorrelated and variables which are partially correlated. We demonstrate the utility of our formalism by considering two examples from dynamical systems. The first example is about the loss of memory in chaotic signals and describes auto-correlations while the second example is about synchronization of chaotic signals and describes cross-correlations. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs

  14. New discrete orthogonal moments for signal analysis

    Honarvar Shakibaei Asli, Barmak; Flusser, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 141, č. 1 (2017), s. 57-73 ISSN 0165-1684 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-16928S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Orthogonal polynomials * Moment functions * Z-transform * Rodrigues formula * Hypergeometric form Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 3.110, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/ZOI/flusser-0475248.pdf

  15. Face recognition using Krawtchouk moment

    Zernike moment to enhance the discriminant nature (Pang et al 2006). ... was proposed which is partially invariant to changes in the local image samples, ... tigate the Krawtchouk discrete orthogonal moment-based feature ..... in scale have been achieved by changing the distance between the person and the video camera.

  16. Variational approach to magnetic moments

    Lipparini, E; Stringari, S; Traini, M [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Libera Universita di Trento, Italy

    1977-11-07

    Magnetic moments in nuclei with a spin unsaturated core plus or minus an extra nucleon have been studied using a restricted Hartree-Fock approach. The method yields simple explicit expressions for the deformed ground state and for magnetic moments. Different projection techniques of the HF scheme have been discussed and compared with perturbation theory.

  17. On fractional Fourier transform moments

    Alieva, T.; Bastiaans, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    Based on the relation between the ambiguity function represented in a quasi-polar coordinate system and the fractional power spectra, the fractional Fourier transform moments are introduced. Important equalities for the global second-order fractional Fourier transform moments are derived and their

  18. Neutron Electric Dipole Moment Experiments

    Peng, Jen-Chieh

    2008-01-01

    The neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) provides unique information on CP violation and physics beyond the Standard Model. We first review the history of experimental searches for neutron electric dipole moment. The status of future neutron EDM experiments, including experiments using ultra-cold neutrons produced in superfluid helium, will then be presented.

  19. Quantitative characterization and comparison of precipitate and grain shape in Nickel -base superalloys using moment invariants

    Callahan, Patrick Gregory

    A fundamental objective of materials science and engineering is to understand the structure-property-processing-performance relationship. We need to know the true 3-D microstructure of a material to understand certain geometric properties of a material, and thus fulfill this objective. Focused ion beam (FIB) serial sectioning allows us to find the true 3-D microstructure of Ni-base superalloys. Once the true 3-D microstructure is obtained, an accurate quantitative description and characterization of precipitate and/or grain shapes is needed to understand the microstructure and describe it in an unbiased way. In this thesis, second order moment invariants, the shape quotient Q, a convexity measure relating the volume of an object to the volume of its convex hull, V/Vconv, and Gaussian curvature have been used to compare an experimentally observed polycrystalline IN100 microstructure to three synthetic microstructures. The three synthetic microstructures used different shape classes to produce starting grain shapes. The three shape classes are ellipsoids, superellipsoids, and the shapes generated when truncating a cube with an octahedron. The microstructures are compared using a distance measure, the Hellinger distance. The Hellinger distance is used to compare distributions of shape descriptors for the grains in each microstructure. The synthetic microstructure that has the smallest Hellinger distance, and so best matched the experimentally observed microstructure is the microstructure that used superellipsoids as a starting grain shape. While it has the smallest Hellinger distance, and is approaching realistic grain morphologies, the superellipsoidal microstructure is still not realistic. Second order moment invariants, Q, and V/V conv have also been used to characterize the γ' precipitate shapes from four experimental Ru-containing Ni-base superalloys with differences in alloying additions. The superalloys are designated UM-F9, UM-F18, UM-F19, and UM-F22. The

  20. Numerically Stable Evaluation of Moments of Random Gram Matrices With Applications

    Elkhalil, Khalil; Kammoun, Abla; Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the computation of the positive moments of one-side correlated random Gram matrices. Closed-form expressions for the moments can be obtained easily, but numerical evaluation thereof is prone to numerical stability, especially in high-dimensional settings. This letter provides a numerically stable method that efficiently computes the positive moments in closed-form. The developed expressions are more accurate and can lead to higher accuracy levels when fed to moment based-approaches. As an application, we show how the obtained moments can be used to approximate the marginal distribution of the eigenvalues of random Gram matrices.

  1. Numerically Stable Evaluation of Moments of Random Gram Matrices With Applications

    Elkhalil, Khalil

    2017-07-31

    This paper focuses on the computation of the positive moments of one-side correlated random Gram matrices. Closed-form expressions for the moments can be obtained easily, but numerical evaluation thereof is prone to numerical stability, especially in high-dimensional settings. This letter provides a numerically stable method that efficiently computes the positive moments in closed-form. The developed expressions are more accurate and can lead to higher accuracy levels when fed to moment based-approaches. As an application, we show how the obtained moments can be used to approximate the marginal distribution of the eigenvalues of random Gram matrices.

  2. Magnetic Moment of $^{59}$Cu

    2002-01-01

    Experiment IS358 uses the intense and pure beams of copper isotopes provided by the ISOLDE RILIS (resonance ionization laser ion source). The isotopes are implanted and oriented in the low temperature nuclear orientation set-up NICOLE. Magnetic moments are measured by $\\beta$-NMR. Copper (Z=29), with a single proton above the proton-magic nickel isotopes provides an ideal testground for precise shell model calculations of magnetic moments and their experimental verification. In the course of our experiments we already determined the magnetic moments of $^{67}$Ni, $^{67}$Cu, $^{68g}$Cu, $^{69}$Cu and $^{71}$Cu which provide important information on the magicity of the N=40 subshell closure. In 2001 we plan to conclude our systematic investigations by measuring the magnetic moment of the neutron-deficient isotope $^{59}$Cu. This will pave the way for a subsequent study of the magnetic moment of $^{57}$Cu with a complementary method.

  3. 2011 Van earthquake (Mw=7.2) aftershocks using the source spectra an approach to real-time estimation of moment magnitude

    Meral Ozel, N.; Kusmezer, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Converging Grid Search (CGS) algorithm was tested on broadband waveforms data from large aftershocks of the October 23, Van earthquake with the hypocentral distances within 0-300 km over a magnitude range of 4.0≤M≤5.6.Observed displacement spectra were virtually well adapted to the Brune's source model in the whole frequency range for many waveforms.The estimated Mw solutions were compared to global CMT catalogue solutions, and were seen to be in good agreement. To estimate Mw from a shear-wave displacement spectrum, an automatic routine named as CGS was applied to attempt to test and develop a method for stable moment magnitude estimation to be used as a real-time operation.The spectra were corrected for average an elastic attenuation and geometrical spreading factors and then were scaled to compute moment at the long period asymptote where the spectral plateau for 0 Hz is flat.For this aim, an automatic procedure was utilized: 1)calculating the displacement spectra for vertical components at a given station, 2)estimating corner frequency and seismic moment using CGS which is based on minimizing the differences between observed and synthetic source spectra, 3)calculating moment magnitude from seismic moment for each station separately, and then are averaged to give the mean values of each event. The best fitting iteration of these parameters was obtained after a few seconds. The noise spectrum was also computed to suggest a comparison between signals to noise ratio before performing the inversion.Weak events with low SNR were excluded from the computations. The method examined on the Van earthquake aftershock dataset proved that it is applicable to have stable and reliable estimates of magnitude for the routine processing within a few seconds from the initial P wave detection though the location estimation is necessary.This allows a fast determination of Mw magnitude and assist to measure physical quantities of the source available for the real time

  4. Geometric modeling in probability and statistics

    Calin, Ovidiu

    2014-01-01

    This book covers topics of Informational Geometry, a field which deals with the differential geometric study of the manifold probability density functions. This is a field that is increasingly attracting the interest of researchers from many different areas of science, including mathematics, statistics, geometry, computer science, signal processing, physics and neuroscience. It is the authors’ hope that the present book will be a valuable reference for researchers and graduate students in one of the aforementioned fields. This textbook is a unified presentation of differential geometry and probability theory, and constitutes a text for a course directed at graduate or advanced undergraduate students interested in applications of differential geometry in probability and statistics. The book contains over 100 proposed exercises meant to help students deepen their understanding, and it is accompanied by software that is able to provide numerical computations of several information geometric objects. The reader...

  5. Geometric morphometric footprint analysis of young women

    Domjanic, Jacqueline; Fieder, Martin; Seidler, Horst; Mitteroecker, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Background Most published attempts to quantify footprint shape are based on a small number of measurements. We applied geometric morphometric methods to study shape variation of the complete footprint outline in a sample of 83 adult women. Methods The outline of the footprint, including the toes, was represented by a comprehensive set of 85 landmarks and semilandmarks. Shape coordinates were computed by Generalized Procrustes Analysis. Results The first four principal components represented t...

  6. Random geometric graphs with general connection functions

    Dettmann, Carl P.; Georgiou, Orestis

    2016-03-01

    In the original (1961) Gilbert model of random geometric graphs, nodes are placed according to a Poisson point process, and links formed between those within a fixed range. Motivated by wireless ad hoc networks "soft" or "probabilistic" connection models have recently been introduced, involving a "connection function" H (r ) that gives the probability that two nodes at distance r are linked (directly connect). In many applications (not only wireless networks), it is desirable that the graph is connected; that is, every node is linked to every other node in a multihop fashion. Here the connection probability of a dense network in a convex domain in two or three dimensions is expressed in terms of contributions from boundary components for a very general class of connection functions. It turns out that only a few quantities such as moments of the connection function appear. Good agreement is found with special cases from previous studies and with numerical simulations.

  7. Higher Mellin moments for charged current DIS

    Rogal, M.; Moch, S.

    2007-06-01

    We report on our recent results for deep-inelastic neutrino(ν)-proton(P) scattering. We have computed the perturbative QCD corrections to three loops for the charged current structure functions F 2 , F L and F 3 for the combination νP- anti νP. In leading twist approximation we have calculated the first six odd-integer Mellin moments in the case of F 2 and F L and the first six even-integer moments in the case of F 3 . As a new result we have obtained the coefficient functions to O(α 3 s ) and we have found the corresponding anomalous dimensions to agree with known results in the literature. (orig.)

  8. Geometrization of quantum physics

    Ol'khov, O.A.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that the Dirac equation for a free particle can be considered as a description of specific distortion of the space Euclidean geometry (space topological defect). This approach is based on the possibility of interpretation of the wave function as vector realizing representation of the fundamental group of the closed topological space-time 4-manifold. Mass and spin appear to be topological invariants. Such a concept explains all so-called 'strange' properties of quantum formalism: probabilities, wave-particle duality, nonlocal instantaneous correlation between noninteracting particles (EPR-paradox) and so on. Acceptance of the suggested geometrical concept means rejection of atomistic concept where all matter is considered as consisting of more and more small elementary particles. There are no any particles a priory, before measurement: the notions of particles appear as a result of classical interpretation of the contact of the region of the curved space with a device

  9. Geometrization of quantum physics

    Ol'Khov, O. A.

    2009-12-01

    It is shown that the Dirac equation for free particle can be considered as a description of specific distortion of the space euclidean geometry (space topological defect). This approach is based on possibility of interpretation of the wave function as vector realizing representation of the fundamental group of the closed topological space-time 4-manifold. Mass and spin appear to be topological invariants. Such concept explains all so called “strange” properties of quantum formalism: probabilities, wave-particle duality, nonlocal instantaneous correlation between noninteracting particles (EPR-paradox) and so on. Acceptance of suggested geometrical concept means rejection of atomistic concept where all matter is considered as consisting of more and more small elementary particles. There is no any particles a priori, before measurement: the notions of particles appear as a result of classical interpretation of the contact of the region of the curved space with a device.

  10. Geometrical Image Transforms

    Havelka, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Tato diplomová práce se zabývá akcelerací geometrických transformací obrazu s využitím GPU a architektury NVIDIA (R) CUDA TM. Časově kritické části kódu jsou přesunuty na GPU a vykonány paralelně. Jedním z výsledků je demonstrační aplikace pro porovnání výkonnosti obou architektur: CPU, a GPU v kombinaci s CPU. Pro referenční implementaci jsou použity vysoce optimalizované algoritmy z knihovny OpenCV, od firmy Intel. This master's thesis deals with acceleration of geometrical image transfo...

  11. Characteristic signatures of quantum criticality driven by geometrical frustration.

    Tokiwa, Yoshifumi; Stingl, Christian; Kim, Moo-Sung; Takabatake, Toshiro; Gegenwart, Philipp

    2015-04-01

    Geometrical frustration describes situations where interactions are incompatible with the lattice geometry and stabilizes exotic phases such as spin liquids. Whether geometrical frustration of magnetic interactions in metals can induce unconventional quantum critical points is an active area of research. We focus on the hexagonal heavy fermion metal CeRhSn, where the Kondo ions are located on distorted kagome planes stacked along the c axis. Low-temperature specific heat, thermal expansion, and magnetic Grüneisen parameter measurements prove a zero-field quantum critical point. The linear thermal expansion, which measures the initial uniaxial pressure derivative of the entropy, displays a striking anisotropy. Critical and noncritical behaviors along and perpendicular to the kagome planes, respectively, prove that quantum criticality is driven be geometrical frustration. We also discovered a spin flop-type metamagnetic crossover. This excludes an itinerant scenario and suggests that quantum criticality is related to local moments in a spin liquid-like state.

  12. Moments of inertia and the shapes of Brownian paths

    Fougere, F.; Desbois, J.

    1993-01-01

    The joint probability law of the principal moments of inertia of Brownian paths (open or closed) is computed, using constrained path integrals and Random Matrix Theory. The case of two-dimensional paths is discussed in detail. In particular, it is shown that the ratio of the average values of the largest and smallest moments is equal to 4.99 (open paths) and 3.07 (closed paths). Results of numerical simulations are also presented, which include investigation of the relationships between the moments of inertia and the arithmetic area enclosed by a path. (authors) 28 refs., 2 figs

  13. Monte Carlo Volcano Seismic Moment Tensors

    Waite, G. P.; Brill, K. A.; Lanza, F.

    2015-12-01

    Inverse modeling of volcano seismic sources can provide insight into the geometry and dynamics of volcanic conduits. But given the logistical challenges of working on an active volcano, seismic networks are typically deficient in spatial and temporal coverage; this potentially leads to large errors in source models. In addition, uncertainties in the centroid location and moment-tensor components, including volumetric components, are difficult to constrain from the linear inversion results, which leads to a poor understanding of the model space. In this study, we employ a nonlinear inversion using a Monte Carlo scheme with the objective of defining robustly resolved elements of model space. The model space is randomized by centroid location and moment tensor eigenvectors. Point sources densely sample the summit area and moment tensors are constrained to a randomly chosen geometry within the inversion; Green's functions for the random moment tensors are all calculated from modeled single forces, making the nonlinear inversion computationally reasonable. We apply this method to very-long-period (VLP) seismic events that accompany minor eruptions at Fuego volcano, Guatemala. The library of single force Green's functions is computed with a 3D finite-difference modeling algorithm through a homogeneous velocity-density model that includes topography, for a 3D grid of nodes, spaced 40 m apart, within the summit region. The homogenous velocity and density model is justified by long wavelength of VLP data. The nonlinear inversion reveals well resolved model features and informs the interpretation through a better understanding of the possible models. This approach can also be used to evaluate possible station geometries in order to optimize networks prior to deployment.

  14. Rotation invariants of vector fields from orthogonal moments

    Yang, B.; Kostková, Jitka; Flusser, Jan; Suk, Tomáš; Bujack, R.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 1 (2018), s. 110-121 ISSN 0031-3203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-16928S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Vector field * Total rotation * Invariants * Gaussian–Hermite moments * Zernike moments * Numerical stability Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 4.582, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/ZOI/flusser-0478329.pdf

  15. Discrete geometric structures for architecture

    Pottmann, Helmut

    2010-06-13

    The emergence of freeform structures in contemporary architecture raises numerous challenging research problems, most of which are related to the actual fabrication and are a rich source of research topics in geometry and geometric computing. The talk will provide an overview of recent progress in this field, with a particular focus on discrete geometric structures. Most of these result from practical requirements on segmenting a freeform shape into planar panels and on the physical realization of supporting beams and nodes. A study of quadrilateral meshes with planar faces reveals beautiful relations to discrete differential geometry. In particular, we discuss meshes which discretize the network of principal curvature lines. Conical meshes are among these meshes; they possess conical offset meshes at a constant face/face distance, which in turn leads to a supporting beam layout with so-called torsion free nodes. This work can be generalized to a variety of multilayer structures and laid the ground for an adapted curvature theory for these meshes. There are also efforts on segmenting surfaces into planar hexagonal panels. Though these are less constrained than planar quadrilateral panels, this problem is still waiting for an elegant solution. Inspired by freeform designs in architecture which involve circles and spheres, we present a new kind of triangle mesh whose faces\\' in-circles form a packing, i.e., the in-circles of two triangles with a common edge have the same contact point on that edge. These "circle packing (CP) meshes" exhibit an aesthetic balance of shape and size of their faces. They are closely tied to sphere packings on surfaces and to various remarkable structures and patterns which are of interest in art, architecture, and design. CP meshes constitute a new link between architectural freeform design and computational conformal geometry. Recently, certain timber structures motivated us to study discrete patterns of geodesics on surfaces. This

  16. On the baryon magnetic moments

    Ferreira, P.L.

    1976-01-01

    In the context of quark confinement ideas, the baryon magnetic moments are calculated by assuming a SU(3) breaking due to the inequalities of the quark masses (m sub(p) different m sub(n) different m lambda ). The modified SU(6) result for the ratio of the magnetic moments of the neutron and proton is obtained. The p-quark is found heavier than the n-quark by circa 15 MeV. and alternative way of evaluating the baryon magnetic moments by means of simple physical considerations based on the properties of the SU(6) baryon S-waves functions is given

  17. Moment Magnitude discussion in Austria

    Weginger, Stefan; Jia, Yan; Hausmann, Helmut; Lenhardt, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    We implemented and tested the Moment Magnitude estimation „dbmw" from the University of Trieste in our Antelope near real-time System. It is used to get a fast Moment Magnitude solutions and Ground Motion Parameter (PGA, PGV, PSA 0.3, PSA 1.0 and PSA 3.0) to calculate Shake and Interactive maps. A Moment Magnitude Catalogue was generated and compared with the Austrian Earthquake Catalogue and all available Magnitude solution of the neighbouring agencies. Relations of Mw to Ml and Ground Motion to Intensity are presented.

  18. Magnetic moment of 33Cl

    Matsuta, K.; Arimura, K.; Nagatomo, T.; Akutsu, K.; Iwakoshi, T.; Kudo, S.; Ogura, M.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, K.; Sumikama, T.; Minamisono, K.; Miyake, T.; Minamisono, T.; Fukuda, M.; Mihara, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Sasaki, M.; Kanazawa, M.; Torikoshi, M.; Suda, M.; Hirai, M.; Momota, S.; Nojiri, Y.; Sakamoto, A.; Saihara, M.; Ohtsubo, T.; Alonso, J.R.; Krebs, G.F.; Symons, T.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The magnetic moment of 33 Cl (Iπ=3/2+, T1/2=2.51s) has been re-measured precisely by β-NMR method. The obtained magnetic moment |μ|=0.7549(3)μN is consistent with the old value 0.7523(16)μN, but is 5 times more accurate. The value is well reproduced by the shell model calculation, μSM=0.70μN. Combined with the magnetic moment of the mirror partner 33 S, the nuclear matrix elements , , , and were derived

  19. Moment methods with effective nuclear Hamiltonians; calculations of radial moments

    Belehrad, R.H.

    1981-02-01

    A truncated orthogonal polynomial expansion is used to evaluate the expectation value of the radial moments of the one-body density of nuclei. The expansion contains the configuration moments, , , and 2 >, where R/sup (k)/ is the operator for the k-th power of the radial coordinate r, and H is the effective nuclear Hamiltonian which is the sum of the relative kinetic energy operator and the Bruckner G matrix. Configuration moments are calculated using trace reduction formulae where the proton and neutron orbitals are treated separately in order to find expectation values of good total isospin. The operator averages are taken over many-body shell model states in the harmonic oscillator basis where all particles are active and single-particle orbitals through six major shells are included. The radial moment expectation values are calculated for the nuclei 16 O, 40 Ca, and 58 Ni and find that is usually the largest term in the expansion giving a large model space dependence to the results. For each of the 3 nuclei, a model space is found which gives the desired rms radius and then we find that the other 5 lowest moments compare favorably with other theoretical predictions. Finally, we use a method of Gordon (5) to employ the lowest 6 radial moment expectation values in the calculation of elastic electron scattering from these nuclei. For low to moderate momentum transfer, the results compare favorably with the experimental data

  20. Geometric interpretation of optimal iteration strategies

    Jones, R.B.

    1977-01-01

    The relationship between inner and outer iteration errors is extremely complex, and even formal description of total error behavior is difficult. Inner and outer iteration error propagation is analyzed in a variational formalism for a reactor model describing multidimensional, one-group theory. In a generalization the work of Akimov and Sabek, the number of inner iterations performed during each outer serial that minimizes the total computation time is determined. The generalized analysis admits a geometric interpretation of total error behavior. The results can be applied to both transport and diffusion theory computer methods. 1 figure

  1. Geometric Reasoning for Automated Planning

    Clement, Bradley J.; Knight, Russell L.; Broderick, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    An important aspect of mission planning for NASA s operation of the International Space Station is the allocation and management of space for supplies and equipment. The Stowage, Configuration Analysis, and Operations Planning teams collaborate to perform the bulk of that planning. A Geometric Reasoning Engine is developed in a way that can be shared by the teams to optimize item placement in the context of crew planning. The ISS crew spends (at the time of this writing) a third or more of their time moving supplies and equipment around. Better logistical support and optimized packing could make a significant impact on operational efficiency of the ISS. Currently, computational geometry and motion planning do not focus specifically on the optimized orientation and placement of 3D objects based on multiple distance and containment preferences and constraints. The software performs reasoning about the manipulation of 3D solid models in order to maximize an objective function based on distance. It optimizes for 3D orientation and placement. Spatial placement optimization is a general problem and can be applied to object packing or asset relocation.

  2. Simulating geometrically complex blast scenarios

    Ian G. Cullis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of blast waves generated by energetic and non-energetic sources are of continuing interest to the ballistics research community. Modern conflicts are increasingly characterised by asymmetric urban warfare, with improvised explosive devices (IEDs often playing a dominant role on the one hand and an armed forces requirement for minimal collateral effects from their weapons on the other. These problems are characterised by disparate length- and time-scales and may also be governed by complex physics. There is thus an increasing need to be able to rapidly assess and accurately predict the effects of energetic blast in topologically complex scenarios. To this end, this paper presents a new QinetiQ-developed advanced computational package called EAGLE-Blast, which is capable of accurately resolving the generation, propagation and interaction of blast waves around geometrically complex shapes such as vehicles and buildings. After a brief description of the numerical methodology, various blast scenario simulations are described and the results compared with experimental data to demonstrate the validation of the scheme and its ability to describe these complex scenarios accurately and efficiently. The paper concludes with a brief discussion on the use of the code in supporting the development of algorithms for fast running engineering models.

  3. Generalized Geometric Quantum Speed Limits

    Diego Paiva Pires

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The attempt to gain a theoretical understanding of the concept of time in quantum mechanics has triggered significant progress towards the search for faster and more efficient quantum technologies. One of such advances consists in the interpretation of the time-energy uncertainty relations as lower bounds for the minimal evolution time between two distinguishable states of a quantum system, also known as quantum speed limits. We investigate how the nonuniqueness of a bona fide measure of distinguishability defined on the quantum-state space affects the quantum speed limits and can be exploited in order to derive improved bounds. Specifically, we establish an infinite family of quantum speed limits valid for unitary and nonunitary evolutions, based on an elegant information geometric formalism. Our work unifies and generalizes existing results on quantum speed limits and provides instances of novel bounds that are tighter than any established one based on the conventional quantum Fisher information. We illustrate our findings with relevant examples, demonstrating the importance of choosing different information metrics for open system dynamics, as well as clarifying the roles of classical populations versus quantum coherences, in the determination and saturation of the speed limits. Our results can find applications in the optimization and control of quantum technologies such as quantum computation and metrology, and might provide new insights in fundamental investigations of quantum thermodynamics.

  4. Harmonic and geometric analysis

    Citti, Giovanna; Pérez, Carlos; Sarti, Alessandro; Zhong, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    This book presents an expanded version of four series of lectures delivered by the authors at the CRM. Harmonic analysis, understood in a broad sense, has a very wide interplay with partial differential equations and in particular with the theory of quasiconformal mappings and its applications. Some areas in which real analysis has been extremely influential are PDE's and geometric analysis. Their foundations and subsequent developments made extensive use of the Calderón–Zygmund theory, especially the Lp inequalities for Calderón–Zygmund operators (Beurling transform and Riesz transform, among others) and the theory of Muckenhoupt weights.  The first chapter is an application of harmonic analysis and the Heisenberg group to understanding human vision, while the second and third chapters cover some of the main topics on linear and multilinear harmonic analysis. The last serves as a comprehensive introduction to a deep result from De Giorgi, Moser and Nash on the regularity of elliptic partial differen...

  5. Probability density cloud as a geometrical tool to describe statistics of scattered light.

    Yaitskova, Natalia

    2017-04-01

    First-order statistics of scattered light is described using the representation of the probability density cloud, which visualizes a two-dimensional distribution for complex amplitude. The geometric parameters of the cloud are studied in detail and are connected to the statistical properties of phase. The moment-generating function for intensity is obtained in a closed form through these parameters. An example of exponentially modified normal distribution is provided to illustrate the functioning of this geometrical approach.

  6. Local electric dipole moments: A generalized approach.

    Groß, Lynn; Herrmann, Carmen

    2016-09-30

    We present an approach for calculating local electric dipole moments for fragments of molecular or supramolecular systems. This is important for understanding chemical gating and solvent effects in nanoelectronics, atomic force microscopy, and intensities in infrared spectroscopy. Owing to the nonzero partial charge of most fragments, "naively" defined local dipole moments are origin-dependent. Inspired by previous work based on Bader's atoms-in-molecules (AIM) partitioning, we derive a definition of fragment dipole moments which achieves origin-independence by relying on internal reference points. Instead of bond critical points (BCPs) as in existing approaches, we use as few reference points as possible, which are located between the fragment and the remainder(s) of the system and may be chosen based on chemical intuition. This allows our approach to be used with AIM implementations that circumvent the calculation of critical points for reasons of computational efficiency, for cases where no BCPs are found due to large interfragment distances, and with local partitioning schemes other than AIM which do not provide BCPs. It is applicable to both covalently and noncovalently bound systems. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Regular Polygons and Geometric Series.

    Jarrett, Joscelyn A.

    1982-01-01

    Examples of some geometric illustrations of limits are presented. It is believed the limit concept is among the most important topics in mathematics, yet many students do not have good intuitive feelings for the concept, since it is often taught very abstractly. Geometric examples are suggested as meaningful tools. (MP)

  8. Geometric Invariants and Object Recognition.

    1992-08-01

    University of Chicago Press. Maybank , S.J. [1992], "The Projection of Two Non-coplanar Conics", in Geometric Invariance in Machine Vision, eds. J.L...J.L. Mundy and A. Zisserman, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA. Mundy, J.L., Kapur, .. , Maybank , S.J., and Quan, L. [1992a] "Geometric Inter- pretation of

  9. Vibrational transition moments of CH4 from first principles

    Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Barber, Robert J.; Thiel, Walter

    2013-09-01

    New nine-dimensional (9D), ab initio electric dipole moment surfaces (DMSs) of methane in its ground electronic state are presented. The DMSs are computed using an explicitly correlated coupled cluster CCSD(T)-F12 method in conjunction with an F12-optimized correlation consistent basis set of the TZ-family. A symmetrized molecular bond representation is used to parameterise these 9D DMSs in terms of sixth-order polynomials. Vibrational transition moments as well as band intensities for a large number of IR-active vibrational bands of 12CH4 are computed by vibrationally averaging the ab initio dipole moment components. The vibrational wavefunctions required for these averages are computed variationally using the program TROVE and a new ‘spectroscopic’ 12CH4 potential energy surface. The new DMSs will be used to produce a hot line list for 12CH4.

  10. Geometric description of images as topographic maps

    Caselles, Vicent

    2010-01-01

    This volume discusses the basic geometric contents of an image and presents a tree data structure to handle those contents efficiently. The nodes of the tree are derived from connected components of level sets of the intensity, while the edges represent inclusion information. Grain filters, morphological operators simplifying these geometric contents, are analyzed and several applications to image comparison and registration, and to edge and corner detection, are presented. The mathematically inclined reader may be most interested in Chapters 2 to 6, which generalize the topological Morse description to continuous or semicontinuous functions, while mathematical morphologists may more closely consider grain filters in Chapter 3. Computer scientists will find algorithmic considerations in Chapters 6 and 7, the full justification of which may be found in Chapters 2 and 4 respectively. Lastly, all readers can learn more about the motivation for this work in the image processing applications presented in Chapter 8...

  11. A Practical Guide to Experimental Geometrical Optics

    Garbovskiy, Yuriy A.; Glushchenko, Anatoliy V.

    2017-12-01

    Preface; 1. Markets of optical materials, components, accessories, light sources and detectors; 2. Introduction to optical experiments: light producing, light managing, light detection and measuring; 3. Light detectors based on semiconductors: photoresistors, photodiodes in a photo-galvanic regime. Principles of operation and measurements; 4. Linear light detectors based on photodiodes; 5. Basic laws of geometrical optics: experimental verification; 6. Converging and diverging thin lenses; 7. Thick lenses; 8. Lens systems; 9. Simple optical instruments I: the eye and the magnifier, eyepieces and telescopes; 10. Simple optical instruments II: light illuminators and microscope; 11. Spherical mirrors; 12. Introduction to optical aberrations; 13. Elements of optical radiometry; 14. Cylindrical lenses and vials; 15. Methods of geometrical optics to measure refractive index; 16. Dispersion of light and prism spectroscope; 17. Elements of computer aided optical design; Index.

  12. Progressive geometric algorithms

    Alewijnse, S.P.A.; Bagautdinov, T.M.; de Berg, M.T.; Bouts, Q.W.; ten Brink, Alex P.; Buchin, K.A.; Westenberg, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive algorithms are algorithms that, on the way to computing a complete solution to the problem at hand, output intermediate solutions that approximate the complete solution increasingly well. We present a framework for analyzing such algorithms, and develop efficient progressive algorithms

  13. Progressive geometric algorithms

    Alewijnse, S.P.A.; Bagautdinov, T.M.; Berg, de M.T.; Bouts, Q.W.; Brink, ten A.P.; Buchin, K.; Westenberg, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Progressive algorithms are algorithms that, on the way to computing a complete solution to the problem at hand, output intermediate solutions that approximate the complete solution increasingly well. We present a framework for analyzing such algorithms, and develop efficient progressive algorithms

  14. 3-D Geometric Modeling for the 21st Century.

    Ault, Holly K.

    1999-01-01

    Describes new geometric computer models used in contemporary computer-aided design (CAD) software including wire frame, surface, solid, and parametric models. Reviews their use in engineering design and discusses the impact of these new technologies on the engineering design graphics curriculum. (Author/CCM)

  15. Invariant moments based convolutional neural networks for image analysis

    Vijayalakshmi G.V. Mahesh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a method using convolutional neural network to effectively evaluate the discrimination between face and non face patterns, gender classification using facial images and facial expression recognition. The novelty of the method lies in the utilization of the initial trainable convolution kernels coefficients derived from the zernike moments by varying the moment order. The performance of the proposed method was compared with the convolutional neural network architecture that used random kernels as initial training parameters. The multilevel configuration of zernike moments was significant in extracting the shape information suitable for hierarchical feature learning to carry out image analysis and classification. Furthermore the results showed an outstanding performance of zernike moment based kernels in terms of the computation time and classification accuracy.

  16. Electric moments in molecule interferometry

    Eibenberger, Sandra; Gerlich, Stefan; Arndt, Markus; Tuexen, Jens; Mayor, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the influence of different electric moments on the shift and dephasing of molecules in a matter wave interferometer. Firstly, we provide a quantitative comparison of two molecules that are non-polar yet polarizable in their thermal ground state and that differ in their stiffness and response to thermal excitations. While C 25 H 20 is rather rigid, its larger derivative C 49 H 16 F 52 is additionally equipped with floppy side chains and vibrationally activated dipole moment variations. Secondly, we elucidate the role of a permanent electric dipole momentby contrasting the quantum interference pattern of a (nearly) non-polar and a polar porphyrin derivative. We find that a high molecular polarizability and even sizeable dipole moment fluctuations are still well compatible with high-contrast quantum interference fringes. The presence of permanent electric dipole moments, however, can lead to a dephasing and rapid degradation of the quantum fringe pattern already at moderate electric fields. This finding is of high relevance for coherence experiments with large organic molecules, which are generally equipped with strong electric moments.

  17. Analysis of Arbitrary Reflector Antennas Applying the Geometrical Theory of Diffraction Together with the Master Points Technique

    María Jesús Algar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient approach for the analysis of surface conformed reflector antennas fed arbitrarily is presented. The near field in a large number of sampling points in the aperture of the reflector is obtained applying the Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD. A new technique named Master Points has been developed to reduce the complexity of the ray-tracing computations. The combination of both GTD and Master Points reduces the time requirements of this kind of analysis. To validate the new approach, several reflectors and the effects on the radiation pattern caused by shifting the feed and introducing different obstacles have been considered concerning both simple and complex geometries. The results of these analyses have been compared with the Method of Moments (MoM results.

  18. Moment of inertia of liquid in a tank

    Gyeong Joong Lee

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the inertial properties of fully filled liquid in a tank were studied based on the potential theory. The analytic solution was obtained for the rectangular tank, and the numerical solutions using Green's 2nd identity were obtained for other shapes. The inertia of liquid behaves like solid in recti-linear acceleration. But under rotational acceleration, the moment of inertia of liquid becomes small compared to that of solid. The shapes of tank investigated in this study were ellipse, rectangle, hexagon, and octagon with various aspect ratios. The numerical solutions were compared with analytic solution, and an ad hoc semi-analytical approximate formula is proposed herein and this formula gives very good predictions for the moment of inertia of the liquid in a tank of several different geometrical shapes. The results of this study will be useful in analyzing of the motion of LNG/LPG tanker, liquid cargo ship, and damaged ship.

  19. Geometric phase for a neutral particle in rotating frames in a cosmic string spacetime

    Bakke, Knut; Furtado, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    We study of the appearance of geometric quantum phases in the dynamics of a neutral particle that possess a permanent magnetic dipole moment in rotating frames in a cosmic string spacetime. The relativistic dynamics of spin-1/2 particle in this frame is investigated and we obtain several contributions to relativistic geometric phase due rotation and topology of spacetime. We also study the geometric phase in the nonrelativistic limit. We obtain effects analogous to the Sagnac effect and Mashhoon effect in a rotating frame in the background of a cosmic string.

  20. Geometric inequalities for black holes

    Dain, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Full text: A geometric inequality in General Relativity relates quantities that have both a physical interpretation and a geometrical definition. It is well known that the parameters that characterize the Kerr-Newman black hole satisfy several important geometric inequalities. Remarkably enough, some of these inequalities also hold for dynamical black holes. This kind of inequalities, which are valid in the dynamical and strong field regime, play an important role in the characterization of the gravitational collapse. They are closed related with the cosmic censorship conjecture. In this talk I will review recent results in this subject. (author)

  1. Optical traps with geometric aberrations

    Roichman, Yael; Waldron, Alex; Gardel, Emily; Grier, David G.

    2006-01-01

    We assess the influence of geometric aberrations on the in-plane performance of optical traps by studying the dynamics of trapped colloidal spheres in deliberately distorted holographic optical tweezers. The lateral stiffness of the traps turns out to be insensitive to moderate amounts of coma, astigmatism, and spherical aberration. Moreover holographic aberration correction enables us to compensate inherent shortcomings in the optical train, thereby adaptively improving its performance. We also demonstrate the effects of geometric aberrations on the intensity profiles of optical vortices, whose readily measured deformations suggest a method for rapidly estimating and correcting geometric aberrations in holographic trapping systems

  2. Geometric inequalities for black holes

    Dain, Sergio [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba (Argentina)

    2013-07-01

    Full text: A geometric inequality in General Relativity relates quantities that have both a physical interpretation and a geometrical definition. It is well known that the parameters that characterize the Kerr-Newman black hole satisfy several important geometric inequalities. Remarkably enough, some of these inequalities also hold for dynamical black holes. This kind of inequalities, which are valid in the dynamical and strong field regime, play an important role in the characterization of the gravitational collapse. They are closed related with the cosmic censorship conjecture. In this talk I will review recent results in this subject. (author)

  3. Stochastic Generalized Method of Moments

    Yin, Guosheng; Ma, Yanyuan; Liang, Faming; Yuan, Ying

    2011-01-01

    The generalized method of moments (GMM) is a very popular estimation and inference procedure based on moment conditions. When likelihood-based methods are difficult to implement, one can often derive various moment conditions and construct the GMM objective function. However, minimization of the objective function in the GMM may be challenging, especially over a large parameter space. Due to the special structure of the GMM, we propose a new sampling-based algorithm, the stochastic GMM sampler, which replaces the multivariate minimization problem by a series of conditional sampling procedures. We develop the theoretical properties of the proposed iterative Monte Carlo method, and demonstrate its superior performance over other GMM estimation procedures in simulation studies. As an illustration, we apply the stochastic GMM sampler to a Medfly life longevity study. Supplemental materials for the article are available online. © 2011 American Statistical Association.

  4. Stochastic Generalized Method of Moments

    Yin, Guosheng

    2011-08-16

    The generalized method of moments (GMM) is a very popular estimation and inference procedure based on moment conditions. When likelihood-based methods are difficult to implement, one can often derive various moment conditions and construct the GMM objective function. However, minimization of the objective function in the GMM may be challenging, especially over a large parameter space. Due to the special structure of the GMM, we propose a new sampling-based algorithm, the stochastic GMM sampler, which replaces the multivariate minimization problem by a series of conditional sampling procedures. We develop the theoretical properties of the proposed iterative Monte Carlo method, and demonstrate its superior performance over other GMM estimation procedures in simulation studies. As an illustration, we apply the stochastic GMM sampler to a Medfly life longevity study. Supplemental materials for the article are available online. © 2011 American Statistical Association.

  5. Method of moments in electromagnetics

    Gibson, Walton C

    2007-01-01

    Responding to the need for a clear, up-to-date introduction to the field, The Method of Moments in Electromagnetics explores surface integral equations in electromagnetics and presents their numerical solution using the method of moments (MOM) technique. It provides the numerical implementation aspects at a nuts-and-bolts level while discussing integral equations and electromagnetic theory at a higher level. The author covers a range of topics in this area, from the initial underpinnings of the MOM to its current applications. He first reviews the frequency-domain electromagnetic theory and t

  6. Neutron star moments of inertia

    Ravenhall, D. G.; Pethick, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    An approximation for the moment of inertia of a neutron star in terms of only its mass and radius is presented, and insight into it is obtained by examining the behavior of the relativistic structural equations. The approximation is accurate to approximately 10% for a variety of nuclear equations of state, for all except very low mass stars. It is combined with information about the neutron-star crust to obtain a simple expression (again in terms only of mass and radius) for the fractional moment of inertia of the crust.

  7. Decompositions of the polyhedral product functor with applications to moment-angle complexes and related spaces.

    Bahri, A; Bendersky, M; Cohen, F R; Gitler, S

    2009-07-28

    This article gives a natural decomposition of the suspension of a generalized moment-angle complex or partial product space which arises as the polyhedral product functor described below. The introduction and application of the smash product moment-angle complex provides a precise identification of the stable homotopy type of the values of the polyhedral product functor. One direct consequence is an analysis of the associated cohomology. For the special case of the complements of certain subspace arrangements, the geometrical decomposition implies the homological decomposition in earlier work of others as described below. Because the splitting is geometric, an analogous homological decomposition for a generalized moment-angle complex applies for any homology theory. Implied, therefore, is a decomposition for the Stanley-Reisner ring of a finite simplicial complex, and natural generalizations.

  8. Discrete geometric structures for architecture

    Pottmann, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    . The talk will provide an overview of recent progress in this field, with a particular focus on discrete geometric structures. Most of these result from practical requirements on segmenting a freeform shape into planar panels and on the physical realization

  9. Geometric Rationalization for Freeform Architecture

    Jiang, Caigui

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of freeform architecture provides interesting geometric challenges with regards to the design and manufacturing of large-scale structures. To design these architectural structures, we have to consider two types of constraints. First

  10. Geometrical optics in general relativity

    Loinger, A.

    2006-01-01

    General relativity includes geometrical optics. This basic fact has relevant consequences that concern the physical meaning of the discontinuity surfaces propagated in the gravitational field - as it was first emphasized by Levi-Civita.

  11. Geometrical splitting in Monte Carlo

    Dubi, A.; Elperin, T.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    A statistical model is presented by which a direct statistical approach yielded an analytic expression for the second moment, the variance ratio, and the benefit function in a model of an n surface-splitting Monte Carlo game. In addition to the insight into the dependence of the second moment on the splitting parameters the main importance of the expressions developed lies in their potential to become a basis for in-code optimization of splitting through a general algorithm. Refs

  12. Geometric inequalities methods of proving

    Sedrakyan, Hayk

    2017-01-01

    This unique collection of new and classical problems provides full coverage of geometric inequalities. Many of the 1,000 exercises are presented with detailed author-prepared-solutions, developing creativity and an arsenal of new approaches for solving mathematical problems. This book can serve teachers, high-school students, and mathematical competitors. It may also be used as supplemental reading, providing readers with new and classical methods for proving geometric inequalities. .

  13. Geometric Algebra Techniques in Flux Compactifications

    Coman, Ioana Alexandra; Lazaroiu, Calin Iuliu; Babalic, Elena Mirela

    2016-01-01

    We study “constrained generalized Killing (s)pinors,” which characterize supersymmetric flux compactifications of supergravity theories. Using geometric algebra techniques, we give conceptually clear and computationally effective methods for translating supersymmetry conditions into differential and algebraic constraints on collections of differential forms. In particular, we give a synthetic description of Fierz identities, which are an important ingredient of such problems. As an application, we show how our approach can be used to efficiently treat N=1 compactification of M-theory on eight manifolds and prove that we recover results previously obtained in the literature.

  14. Bending Moment Calculations for Piles Based on the Finite Element Method

    Yu-xin Jie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the finite element analysis program ABAQUS, a series of calculations on a cantilever beam, pile, and sheet pile wall were made to investigate the bending moment computational methods. The analyses demonstrated that the shear locking is not significant for the passive pile embedded in soil. Therefore, higher-order elements are not always necessary in the computation. The number of grids across the pile section is important for bending moment calculated with stress and less significant for that calculated with displacement. Although computing bending moment with displacement requires fewer grid numbers across the pile section, it sometimes results in variation of the results. For displacement calculation, a pile row can be suitably represented by an equivalent sheet pile wall, whereas the resulting bending moments may be different. Calculated results of bending moment may differ greatly with different grid partitions and computational methods. Therefore, a comparison of results is necessary when performing the analysis.

  15. Quiet Moment around the Campfire

    2014-06-18

    Byron Breedlove reads his essay, "Quiet Moment around the Campfire," about the art of Frederic Remington and the transmission of pathogens as frontiers expand.  Created: 6/18/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 6/19/2014.

  16. Particle electric dipole-moments

    Pendlebury, J M [Sussex Univ., Brighton (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01

    The incentive to detect particle electric dipole-moments, as a window on time-reversal violation, remains undiminished. Efforts to improve the measurements for the neutron, the electron and some nuclei are still making rapid progress as more powerful experimental methods are brought to bear. A new measurement for the neutron at ILL is presented. (author). 7 refs.

  17. Moment of Inertia by Differentiation

    Rizcallah, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    The calculation of the moment of inertia of an extended body, as presented in standard introductory-level textbooks, involves the evaluation of a definite integral--an operation often not fully mastered by beginners, let alone the conceptual difficulties it presents, even to the advanced student, in understanding and setting up the integral in the…

  18. Unteachable Moments and Pedagogical Relationships

    Wang, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses how Julia Kristeva's theory can inform our understanding of unteachable moments. It proposes a pedagogical relationship that can contain breakdowns of meanings and work toward breakthroughs to new awareness, particularly related to social justice pedagogy in teacher education. First, one example from the author's own teaching…

  19. Moment Distributions of Phase Type

    Bladt, Mogens; Nielsen, Bo Friis

    2011-01-01

    Moment distributions of phase-type and matrix-exponential distributions are shown to remain within their respective classes. We provide a probabilistic phase-type representation for the former case and an alternative representation, with an analytically appealing form, for the latter. First order...

  20. Moment methods and Lanczos methods

    Whitehead, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    In contrast to many of the speakers at this conference I am less interested in average properties of nuclei than in detailed spectroscopy. I will try to show, however, that the two are very closely connected and that shell-model calculations may be used to give a great deal of information not normally associated with the shell-model. It has been demonstrated clearly to us that the level spacing fluctuations in nuclear spectra convey very little physical information. This is true when the fluctuations are averaged over the entire spectrum but not if one's interest is in the lowest few states, whose spacings are relatively large. If one wishes to calculate a ground state (say) accurately, that is with an error much smaller than the excitation energy of the first excited state, very high moments, μ/sub n/, n approx. 200, are needed. As I shall show, we use such moments as a matter of course, albeit without actually calculating them; in fact I will try to show that, if at all possible, the actual calculations of moments is to be avoided like the plague. At the heart of the new shell-model methods embodied in the Glasgow shell-model program and one or two similar ones is the so-called Lanczos method and this, it turns out, has many deep and subtle connections with the mathematical theory of moments. It is these connections that I will explore here

  1. A New Integral Geometric Formula of the Blaschke-Petkantschin Type

    Jensen, Eva B. Vedel; Kieu, K

    1992-01-01

    Recently, a new geometric measure decomposition has been derived by ZAHLE (1990), involving the r-fold product of the d-dimensional HAUSDORFF measure with itself The application to moment measure estimation has been discussed in JENSEN et al. (1990a) and ZAHLE (1990). The decomposition involves, ...

  2. The verification of the Taylor-expansion moment method in solving aerosol breakage

    Yu Ming-Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of the method of moment, characterizing the particle population balance, and the computational fluid dynamics has been an emerging research issue in the studies on the aerosol science and on the multiphase flow science. The difficulty of solving the moment equation arises mainly from the closure of some fractal moment variables which appears in the transform from the non-linear integral-differential population balance equation to the moment equations. Within the Taylor-expansion moment method, the breakage-dominated Taylor-expansion moment equation is first derived here when the symmetric fragmentation mechanism is involved. Due to the high efficiency and the high precision, this proposed moment model is expected to become an important tool for solving population balance equations.

  3. A Hybrid Joint Moment Ratio Test for Financial Time Series

    P.A. Groenendijk (Patrick); A. Lucas (André); C.G. de Vries (Casper)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractWe advocate the use of absolute moment ratio statistics in conjunction with standard variance ratio statistics in order to disentangle linear dependence, non-linear dependence, and leptokurtosis in financial time series. Both statistics are computed for multiple return horizons

  4. Moments of the weighted sum-of-digits function | Larcher ...

    The weighted sum-of-digits function is a slight generalization of the well known sum-of-digits function with the difference that here the digits are weighted by some weights. So for example in this concept also the alternated sum-of-digits function is included. In this paper we compute the first and the second moment of the ...

  5. Neck Muscle Moment Arms Obtained In-Vivo from MRI: Effect of Curved and Straight Modeled Paths.

    Suderman, Bethany L; Vasavada, Anita N

    2017-08-01

    Musculoskeletal models of the cervical spine commonly represent neck muscles with straight paths. However, straight lines do not best represent the natural curvature of muscle paths in the neck, because the paths are constrained by bone and soft tissue. The purpose of this study was to estimate moment arms of curved and straight neck muscle paths using different moment arm calculation methods: tendon excursion, geometric, and effective torque. Curved and straight muscle paths were defined for two subject-specific cervical spine models derived from in vivo magnetic resonance images (MRI). Modeling neck muscle paths with curvature provides significantly different moment arm estimates than straight paths for 10 of 15 neck muscles (p straight lines to model muscle paths can lead to overestimating neck extension moment. However, moment arm methods for curved paths should be investigated further, as different methods of calculating moment arm can provide different estimates.

  6. Geometric Mixing, Peristalsis, and the Geometric Phase of the Stomach.

    Arrieta, Jorge; Cartwright, Julyan H E; Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Piro, Nicolas; Piro, Oreste; Tuval, Idan

    2015-01-01

    Mixing fluid in a container at low Reynolds number--in an inertialess environment--is not a trivial task. Reciprocating motions merely lead to cycles of mixing and unmixing, so continuous rotation, as used in many technological applications, would appear to be necessary. However, there is another solution: movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion to introduce a geometric phase. We show using journal-bearing flow as a model that such geometric mixing is a general tool for using deformable boundaries that return to the same position to mix fluid at low Reynolds number. We then simulate a biological example: we show that mixing in the stomach functions because of the "belly phase," peristaltic movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion introduces a geometric phase that avoids unmixing.

  7. Geometric Mixing, Peristalsis, and the Geometric Phase of the Stomach.

    Jorge Arrieta

    Full Text Available Mixing fluid in a container at low Reynolds number--in an inertialess environment--is not a trivial task. Reciprocating motions merely lead to cycles of mixing and unmixing, so continuous rotation, as used in many technological applications, would appear to be necessary. However, there is another solution: movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion to introduce a geometric phase. We show using journal-bearing flow as a model that such geometric mixing is a general tool for using deformable boundaries that return to the same position to mix fluid at low Reynolds number. We then simulate a biological example: we show that mixing in the stomach functions because of the "belly phase," peristaltic movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion introduces a geometric phase that avoids unmixing.

  8. Geometrical error calibration in reflective surface testing based on reverse Hartmann test

    Gong, Zhidong; Wang, Daodang; Xu, Ping; Wang, Chao; Liang, Rongguang; Kong, Ming; Zhao, Jun; Mo, Linhai; Mo, Shuhui

    2017-08-01

    In the fringe-illumination deflectometry based on reverse-Hartmann-test configuration, ray tracing of the modeled testing system is performed to reconstruct the test surface error. Careful calibration of system geometry is required to achieve high testing accuracy. To realize the high-precision surface testing with reverse Hartmann test, a computer-aided geometrical error calibration method is proposed. The aberrations corresponding to various geometrical errors are studied. With the aberration weights for various geometrical errors, the computer-aided optimization of system geometry with iterative ray tracing is carried out to calibration the geometrical error, and the accuracy in the order of subnanometer is achieved.

  9. A new geometrical gravitational theory

    Obata, T.; Chiba, J.; Oshima, H.

    1981-01-01

    A geometrical gravitational theory is developed. The field equations are uniquely determined apart from one unknown dimensionless parameter ω 2 . It is based on an extension of the Weyl geometry, and by the extension the gravitational coupling constant and the gravitational mass are made to be dynamical and geometrical. The fundamental geometrical objects in the theory are a metric gsub(μν) and two gauge scalars phi and psi. The theory satisfies the weak equivalence principle, but breaks the strong one generally. u(phi, psi) = phi is found out on the assumption that the strong one keeps holding good at least for bosons of low spins. Thus there is the simple correspondence between the geometrical objects and the gravitational objects. Since the theory satisfies the weak one, the inertial mass is also dynamical and geometrical in the same way as is the gravitational mass. Moreover, the cosmological term in the theory is a coscalar of power -4 algebraically made of psi and u(phi, psi), so it is dynamical, too. Finally spherically symmetric exact solutions are given. The permissible range of the unknown parameter ω 2 is experimentally determined by applying the solutions to the solar system. (author)

  10. COMPUTING

    M. Kasemann

    Overview In autumn the main focus was to process and handle CRAFT data and to perform the Summer08 MC production. The operational aspects were well covered by regular Computing Shifts, experts on duty and Computing Run Coordination. At the Computing Resource Board (CRB) in October a model to account for service work at Tier 2s was approved. The computing resources for 2009 were reviewed for presentation at the C-RRB. The quarterly resource monitoring is continuing. Facilities/Infrastructure operations Operations during CRAFT data taking ran fine. This proved to be a very valuable experience for T0 workflows and operations. The transfers of custodial data to most T1s went smoothly. A first round of reprocessing started at the Tier-1 centers end of November; it will take about two weeks. The Computing Shifts procedure was tested full scale during this period and proved to be very efficient: 30 Computing Shifts Persons (CSP) and 10 Computing Resources Coordinators (CRC). The shift program for the shut down w...

  11. Experimental realization of universal geometric quantum gates with solid-state spins.

    Zu, C; Wang, W-B; He, L; Zhang, W-G; Dai, C-Y; Wang, F; Duan, L-M

    2014-10-02

    Experimental realization of a universal set of quantum logic gates is the central requirement for the implementation of a quantum computer. In an 'all-geometric' approach to quantum computation, the quantum gates are implemented using Berry phases and their non-Abelian extensions, holonomies, from geometric transformation of quantum states in the Hilbert space. Apart from its fundamental interest and rich mathematical structure, the geometric approach has some built-in noise-resilience features. On the experimental side, geometric phases and holonomies have been observed in thermal ensembles of liquid molecules using nuclear magnetic resonance; however, such systems are known to be non-scalable for the purposes of quantum computing. There are proposals to implement geometric quantum computation in scalable experimental platforms such as trapped ions, superconducting quantum bits and quantum dots, and a recent experiment has realized geometric single-bit gates in a superconducting system. Here we report the experimental realization of a universal set of geometric quantum gates using the solid-state spins of diamond nitrogen-vacancy centres. These diamond defects provide a scalable experimental platform with the potential for room-temperature quantum computing, which has attracted strong interest in recent years. Our experiment shows that all-geometric and potentially robust quantum computation can be realized with solid-state spin quantum bits, making use of recent advances in the coherent control of this system.

  12. The Critical Moment of Transition

    Svalgaard, Lotte

    2018-01-01

    By providing a holding environment to acknowledge sensitivities and address emotions, leadership programs prove to be powerful spaces for increasing self- and social awareness. However, the challenge is for one to maintain the newly gained self- and social awareness after leaving the holding...... environment and entering a context characterized by activity and performance. This is a frequently debated challenge for both academics and providers of management learning. Yet, critical moments in this transition remain under-exposed and under-researched. The contribution of this article is a research study......—within the context of an international MBA program—of MBA students applying their knowledge from a Leadership Stream in an international consultancy project. This article contributes to the theory and practice of management learning by providing a lens through which subjective experience of critical moments...

  13. Moment of truth for CMS

    2006-01-01

    One of the first events reconstructed in the Muon Drift Tubes, the Hadron Calorimeter and elements of the Silicon Tracker (TK) at 3 Tesla. The atmosphere in the CMS control rooms was electric. Everbody was at the helm for the first full-scale testing of the experiment. This was a crunch moment for the entire collaboration. On Tuesday, 22 August the magnet attained almost its nominal power of 4 Tesla! At the same moment, in a tiny improvised control room, the physicists were keyed up to test the entire detector system for the first time. The first cosmic ray tracks appeared on their screens in the week of 15 August. The tests are set to continue for several weeks more until the first CMS components are lowered into their final positions in the cavern.

  14. Moment Distributions of Phase Type

    Bladt, Mogens; Nielsen, Bo Friis

    In this paper we prove that the class of distributions on the positive reals with a rational Laplace transform, also known as matrix-exponential distributions, is closed under formation of moment distributions. In particular, the results are hence valid for the well known class of phase-type dist...... alternative representation in terms of sub{intensity matrices. Finally we are able to nd explicit expressions for both the Lorenz curve and the Gini index....

  15. Electric Dipole Moments of Hadrons

    Wirzba, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    A nonzero electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron, proton, deuteron, helion or any finite system necessarily involves the breaking of a symmetry, either by the presence of external fields (leading to the case of induced EDMs) or explicitly by the breaking of the discrete parity and time-reflection symmetries in the case of permanent EDMs. Recent - and in the case of the deuteron even unpublished - results for the relevant matrix elements of nuclear EDM operators are presented and the rel...

  16. Geometric group theory an introduction

    Löh, Clara

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by classical geometry, geometric group theory has in turn provided a variety of applications to geometry, topology, group theory, number theory and graph theory. This carefully written textbook provides a rigorous introduction to this rapidly evolving field whose methods have proven to be powerful tools in neighbouring fields such as geometric topology. Geometric group theory is the study of finitely generated groups via the geometry of their associated Cayley graphs. It turns out that the essence of the geometry of such groups is captured in the key notion of quasi-isometry, a large-scale version of isometry whose invariants include growth types, curvature conditions, boundary constructions, and amenability. This book covers the foundations of quasi-geometry of groups at an advanced undergraduate level. The subject is illustrated by many elementary examples, outlooks on applications, as well as an extensive collection of exercises.

  17. COMPUTING

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction CMS distributed computing system performed well during the 2011 start-up. The events in 2011 have more pile-up and are more complex than last year; this results in longer reconstruction times and harder events to simulate. Significant increases in computing capacity were delivered in April for all computing tiers, and the utilisation and load is close to the planning predictions. All computing centre tiers performed their expected functionalities. Heavy-Ion Programme The CMS Heavy-Ion Programme had a very strong showing at the Quark Matter conference. A large number of analyses were shown. The dedicated heavy-ion reconstruction facility at the Vanderbilt Tier-2 is still involved in some commissioning activities, but is available for processing and analysis. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Facility and Infrastructure operations have been active with operations and several important deployment tasks. Facilities participated in the testing and deployment of WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request...

  18. COMPUTING

    P. McBride

    The Computing Project is preparing for a busy year where the primary emphasis of the project moves towards steady operations. Following the very successful completion of Computing Software and Analysis challenge, CSA06, last fall, we have reorganized and established four groups in computing area: Commissioning, User Support, Facility/Infrastructure Operations and Data Operations. These groups work closely together with groups from the Offline Project in planning for data processing and operations. Monte Carlo production has continued since CSA06, with about 30M events produced each month to be used for HLT studies and physics validation. Monte Carlo production will continue throughout the year in the preparation of large samples for physics and detector studies ramping to 50 M events/month for CSA07. Commissioning of the full CMS computing system is a major goal for 2007. Site monitoring is an important commissioning component and work is ongoing to devise CMS specific tests to be included in Service Availa...

  19. COMPUTING

    M. Kasemann

    Overview During the past three months activities were focused on data operations, testing and re-enforcing shift and operational procedures for data production and transfer, MC production and on user support. Planning of the computing resources in view of the new LHC calendar in ongoing. Two new task forces were created for supporting the integration work: Site Commissioning, which develops tools helping distributed sites to monitor job and data workflows, and Analysis Support, collecting the user experience and feedback during analysis activities and developing tools to increase efficiency. The development plan for DMWM for 2009/2011 was developed at the beginning of the year, based on the requirements from the Physics, Computing and Offline groups (see Offline section). The Computing management meeting at FermiLab on February 19th and 20th was an excellent opportunity discussing the impact and for addressing issues and solutions to the main challenges facing CMS computing. The lack of manpower is particul...

  20. Austerity and geometric structure of field theories

    Kheyfets, A.

    1986-01-01

    The relation between the austerity idea and the geometric structure of the three basic field theories - electrodynamics, Yang-Mills theory, and general relativity - is studied. One of the most significant manifestations of the austerity idea in field theories is thought to be expressed by the boundary of a boundary principle (BBP). The BBP says that almost all content of the field theories can be deduced from the topological identity of delta dot produced with delta = 0 used twice, at the 1-2-3-dimensional level (providing the homogeneous field equations), and at the 2-3-4-dimensional level (providing the conservation laws for the source currents). There are some difficulties in this line of thought due to the apparent lack of universality in application of the BBP to the three basic modern field theories above. This dissertation: (a) analyzes the difficulties by means of algebraic topology, integration theory, and modern differential geometry based on the concepts of principal bundles and Ehresmann connections: (b) extends the BBP to the unified Kaluza-Klein theory; (c) reformulates the inhomogeneous field equations and the BBP in terms of E. Cartan moment of rotation, in the way universal for the three theories and compatible with the original austerity idea; and (d) underlines the important role of the soldering structure on spacetime, and indicates that the future development of the austerity idea would involve the generalized theories

  1. Discrete Hermite moments and their application in chemometrics

    Honarvar Shakibaei Asli, Barmak; Flusser, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 177, č. 1 (2018), s. 83-88 ISSN 0169-7439 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA18-07247S; GA ČR GJ18-26018Y Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Orthogonal polynomials * Discrete polynomials * Tchebichef moment * Hermite moment * Gauss–Hermite quadrature Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics OBOR OECD: Automation and control systems Impact factor: 2.303, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2018/ZOI/honarvar-0489147.pdf

  2. Projection Operators and Moment Invariants to Image Blurring

    Flusser, Jan; Suk, Tomáš; Boldyš, Jiří; Zitová, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 4 (2015), s. 786-802 ISSN 0162-8828 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-29225S; GA ČR GAP103/11/1552 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Blurred image * N-fold rotation symmetry * projection operators * image moments * moment invariants * blur invariants * object recognition Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 6.077, year: 2015 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/ZOI/flusser-0434521.pdf

  3. Nonlinear Radon Transform Using Zernike Moment for Shape Analysis

    Ziping Ma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We extend the linear Radon transform to a nonlinear space and propose a method by applying the nonlinear Radon transform to Zernike moments to extract shape descriptors. These descriptors are obtained by computing Zernike moment on the radial and angular coordinates of the pattern image's nonlinear Radon matrix. Theoretical and experimental results validate the effectiveness and the robustness of the method. The experimental results show the performance of the proposed method in the case of nonlinear space equals or outperforms that in the case of linear Radon.

  4. Electric dipole moments as a test of supersymmetric unification

    Dimopoulos, Savas K; Dimopoulos, S; Hall, L J

    1995-01-01

    In a class of supersymmetric grand unified theories, including those based on the gauge group SO(10), there are new contributions to the electric dipole moments of the neutron and electron, which arise as a heavy top quark effect. These contributions arise from CKM-like phases, not from phases of the supersymmetry breaking operators, and can be reliably computed in terms of the parameters of the weak scale supersymmetric theory. For the expected ranges of these parameters, the electric dipole moments of the neutron and the electron are predicted to be close to present experimental limits.

  5. Finite moments approach to the time-dependent neutron transport equation

    Kim, Sang Hyun

    1994-02-01

    Currently, nodal techniques are widely used in solving the multidimensional diffusion equation because of savings in computing time and storage. Thanks to the development of computer technology, one can now solve the transport equation instead of the diffusion equation to obtain more accurate solution. The finite moments method, one of the nodal methods, attempts to represent the fluxes in the cell and on cell surfaces more rigorously by retaining additional spatial moments. Generally, there are two finite moments schemes to solve the time-dependent transport equation. In one, the time variable is treated implicitly with finite moments method in space variable (implicit finite moments method), the other method uses finite moments method in both space and time (space-time finite moments method). In this study, these two schemes are applied to two types of time-dependent neutron transport problems. One is a fixed source problem, the other a heterogeneous fast reactor problem with delayed neutrons. From the results, it is observed that the two finite moments methods give almost the same solutions in both benchmark problems. However, the space-time finite moments method requires a little longer computing time than that of the implicit finite moments method. In order to reduce the longer computing time in the space-time finite moments method, a new iteration strategy is exploited, where a few time-stepwise calculation, in which original time steps are grouped into several coarse time divisions, is performed sequentially instead of performing iterations over the entire time steps. This strategy results in significant reduction of the computing time and we observe that 2-or 3-stepwise calculation is preferable. In addition, we propose a new finite moments method which is called mixed finite moments method in this thesis. Asymptotic analysis for the finite moments method shows that accuracy of the solution in a heterogeneous problem mainly depends on the accuracy of the

  6. An introduction to geometrical physics

    Aldrovandi, R

    1995-01-01

    This book stresses the unifying power of the geometrical framework in bringing together concepts from the different areas of physics. Common underpinnings of optics, elasticity, gravitation, relativistic fields, particle mechanics and other subjects are underlined. It attempts to extricate the notion of space currently in the physical literature from the metric connotation.The book's goal is to present mathematical ideas associated with geometrical physics in a rather introductory language. Included are many examples from elementary physics and also, for those wishing to reach a higher level o

  7. Asymptotic geometric analysis, part I

    Artstein-Avidan, Shiri

    2015-01-01

    The authors present the theory of asymptotic geometric analysis, a field which lies on the border between geometry and functional analysis. In this field, isometric problems that are typical for geometry in low dimensions are substituted by an "isomorphic" point of view, and an asymptotic approach (as dimension tends to infinity) is introduced. Geometry and analysis meet here in a non-trivial way. Basic examples of geometric inequalities in isomorphic form which are encountered in the book are the "isomorphic isoperimetric inequalities" which led to the discovery of the "concentration phenomen

  8. Geometric integration for particle accelerators

    Forest, Etienne

    2006-01-01

    This paper is a very personal view of the field of geometric integration in accelerator physics-a field where often work of the highest quality is buried in lost technical notes or even not published; one has only to think of Simon van der Meer Nobel prize work on stochastic cooling-unpublished in any refereed journal. So I reconstructed the relevant history of geometrical integration in accelerator physics as much as I could by talking to collaborators and using my own understanding of the field. The reader should not be too surprised if this account is somewhere between history, science and perhaps even fiction

  9. Geometrical spin symmetry and spin

    Pestov, I. B.

    2011-01-01

    Unification of General Theory of Relativity and Quantum Mechanics leads to General Quantum Mechanics which includes into itself spindynamics as a theory of spin phenomena. The key concepts of spindynamics are geometrical spin symmetry and the spin field (space of defining representation of spin symmetry). The essence of spin is the bipolar structure of geometrical spin symmetry induced by the gravitational potential. The bipolar structure provides a natural derivation of the equations of spindynamics. Spindynamics involves all phenomena connected with spin and provides new understanding of the strong interaction.

  10. Geometric integration for particle accelerators

    Forest, Étienne

    2006-05-01

    This paper is a very personal view of the field of geometric integration in accelerator physics—a field where often work of the highest quality is buried in lost technical notes or even not published; one has only to think of Simon van der Meer Nobel prize work on stochastic cooling—unpublished in any refereed journal. So I reconstructed the relevant history of geometrical integration in accelerator physics as much as I could by talking to collaborators and using my own understanding of the field. The reader should not be too surprised if this account is somewhere between history, science and perhaps even fiction.

  11. Lattice degeneracies of geometric fermions

    Raszillier, H.

    1983-05-01

    We give the minimal numbers of degrees of freedom carried by geometric fermions on all lattices of maximal symmetries in d = 2, 3, and 4 dimensions. These numbers are lattice dependent, but in the (free) continuum limit, part of the degrees of freedom have to escape to infinity by a Wilson mechanism built in, and 2sup(d) survive for any lattice. On self-reciprocal lattices we compare the minimal numbers of degrees of freedom of geometric fermions with the minimal numbers of naive fermions on these lattices and argue that these numbers are equal. (orig.)

  12. Mechanical Fault Diagnosis Using Color Image Recognition of Vibration Spectrogram Based on Quaternion Invariable Moment

    Liang Hua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic extraction of time-frequency spectral image of mechanical faults can be achieved and faults can be identified consequently when rotating machinery spectral image processing technology is applied to fault diagnosis, which is an advantage. Acquired mechanical vibration signals can be converted into color time-frequency spectrum images by the processing of pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution. Then a feature extraction method based on quaternion invariant moment was proposed, combining image processing technology and multiweight neural network technology. The paper adopted quaternion invariant moment feature extraction method and gray level-gradient cooccurrence matrix feature extraction method and combined them with geometric learning algorithm and probabilistic neural network algorithm, respectively, and compared the recognition rates of rolling bearing faults. The experimental results show that the recognition rates of quaternion invariant moment are higher than gray level-gradient cooccurrence matrix in the same recognition method. The recognition rates of geometric learning algorithm are higher than probabilistic neural network algorithm in the same feature extraction method. So the method based on quaternion invariant moment geometric learning and multiweight neural network is superior. What is more, this algorithm has preferable generalization performance under the condition of fewer samples, and it has practical value and acceptation on the field of fault diagnosis for rotating machinery as well.

  13. Correct use of the Gordon decomposition in the calculation of nucleon magnetic dipole moments

    Mekhfi, Mustapha

    2008-01-01

    We perform the calculation of the nucleon dipole magnetic moment in full detail using the Gordon decomposition of the free quark current. This calculation has become necessary because of frequent misuse of the Gordon decomposition by some authors in computing the nucleon dipole magnetic moment

  14. Quadrupole moment in the excited 2Psub(1/2) state

    Amusia, M.Ya.; Yakhontov, V.L.

    1984-01-01

    Computation of the quadrupole moment values in the 2Psub(1/2) states of hydrogen and meso-hydrogen is carried out. It is shown that allowance for the hyperfine interaction of the electron with the proton in the first order of perturbation theory results in giant values of the quadrupole moment of the atoms. (author)

  15. The electric dipole moment of the neutron in low energy supergravity

    Polchinski, J.; Wise, M.B.

    1983-01-01

    We compute the electric dipole moment of the neutron in models with low energy supergravity or softly broken supersymmetry. The electric dipole moment is typically of order 10sup(-(22-23))e cm times CP-violating phases. We discuss the origin of these phases. (orig.)

  16. COMPUTING

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing activity had ramped down after the completion of the reprocessing of the 2012 data and parked data, but is increasing with new simulation samples for analysis and upgrade studies. Much of the Computing effort is currently involved in activities to improve the computing system in preparation for 2015. Operations Office Since the beginning of 2013, the Computing Operations team successfully re-processed the 2012 data in record time, not only by using opportunistic resources like the San Diego Supercomputer Center which was accessible, to re-process the primary datasets HTMHT and MultiJet in Run2012D much earlier than planned. The Heavy-Ion data-taking period was successfully concluded in February collecting almost 500 T. Figure 3: Number of events per month (data) In LS1, our emphasis is to increase efficiency and flexibility of the infrastructure and operation. Computing Operations is working on separating disk and tape at the Tier-1 sites and the full implementation of the xrootd federation ...

  17. Moment Closure for the Stochastic Logistic Model

    Singh, Abhyudai; Hespanha, Joao P

    2006-01-01

    ..., which we refer to as the moment closure function. In this paper, a systematic procedure for constructing moment closure functions of arbitrary order is presented for the stochastic logistic model...

  18. An extended geometric criterion for chaos in the Dicke model

    Li Jiangdan; Zhang Suying

    2010-01-01

    We extend HBLSL's (Horwitz, Ben Zion, Lewkowicz, Schiffer and Levitan) new Riemannian geometric criterion for chaotic motion to Hamiltonian systems of weak coupling of potential and momenta by defining the 'mean unstable ratio'. We discuss the Dicke model of an unstable Hamiltonian system in detail and show that our results are in good agreement with that of the computation of Lyapunov characteristic exponents.

  19. The Geometric Supposer: What Is It a Case of?

    Schwartz, Judah L., Ed.; And Others

    This volume attempts to bring together a collection of reports on the Geometric Supposer, a series of computer software environments which can be a tool for exploring particulars and generalizations in geometry. The book contains the following chapters: (1) "A Personal View of the Supposer: Reflections on Particularities and Generalities in…

  20. Further results on geometric operators in quantum gravity

    Loll, R.

    1996-01-01

    We investigate some properties of geometric operators in canonical quantum gravity in the connection approach `a la Ashtekar, which are associated with volume, area and length of spatial regions. We motivate the construction of analogous discretized lattice quantities, compute various quantum

  1. Geometrical Similarity Transformations in Dynamic Geometry Environment Geogebra

    Andraphanova, Natalia V.

    2015-01-01

    The subject of the article is usage of modern computer technologies through the example of interactive geometry environment Geogebra as an innovative technology of representing and studying of geometrical material which involves such didactical opportunities as vizualisation, simulation and dynamics. There is shown a classification of geometric…

  2. Top Quark Amplitudes with an Anomolous Magnetic Moment

    Larkoski, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The anomalous magnetic moment of the top quark may be measured during the first run of the LHC at 7 TeV. For these measurements, it will be useful to have available tree amplitudes with t(bar t) and arbitrarily many photons and gluons, including both QED and color anomalous magnetic moments. In this paper, we present a method for computing these amplitudes using the Britto-Cachazo-Feng-Witten recursion formula. Because we deal with an effective theory with higher-dimension couplings, there are roadblocks to a direct computation with the Britto-Cachazo-Feng-Witten method. We evade these by using an auxiliary scalar theory to compute a subset of the amplitudes.

  3. Top quark amplitudes with an anomalous magnetic moment

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Peskin, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    The anomalous magnetic moment of the top quark may be measured during the first run of the LHC at 7 TeV. For these measurements, it will be useful to have available tree amplitudes with tt and arbitrarily many photons and gluons, including both QED and color anomalous magnetic moments. In this paper, we present a method for computing these amplitudes using the Britto-Cachazo-Feng-Witten recursion formula. Because we deal with an effective theory with higher-dimension couplings, there are roadblocks to a direct computation with the Britto-Cachazo-Feng-Witten method. We evade these by using an auxiliary scalar theory to compute a subset of the amplitudes.

  4. Temperature-dependent particle-number projected moment of inertia

    Allal, N. H.; Fellah, M.; Benhamouda, N.; Oudih, M. R.

    2008-01-01

    Expressions of the parallel and perpendicular temperature-dependent particle-number projected nuclear moment of inertia have been established by means of a discrete projection method. They generalize that of the FTBCS method and are well adapted to numerical computation. The effects of particle-number fluctuations have been numerically studied for some even-even actinide nuclei by using the single-particle energies and eigenstates of a deformed Woods-Saxon mean field. It has been shown that the parallel moment of inertia is practically not modified by the use of the projection method. In contrast, the discrepancy between the projected and FTBCS perpendicular moment of inertia values may reach 5%. Moreover, the particle-number fluctuation effects vary not only as a function of the temperature but also as a function of the deformation for a given temperature. This is not the case for the system energy

  5. Neutron Electric Dipole Moment from Gauge-String Duality.

    Bartolini, Lorenzo; Bigazzi, Francesco; Bolognesi, Stefano; Cotrone, Aldo L; Manenti, Andrea

    2017-03-03

    We compute the electric dipole moment of nucleons in the large N_{c} QCD model by Witten, Sakai, and Sugimoto with N_{f}=2 degenerate massive flavors. Baryons in the model are instantonic solitons of an effective five-dimensional action describing the whole tower of mesonic fields. We find that the dipole electromagnetic form factor of the nucleons, induced by a finite topological θ angle, exhibits complete vector meson dominance. We are able to evaluate the contribution of each vector meson to the final result-a small number of modes are relevant to obtain an accurate estimate. Extrapolating the model parameters to real QCD data, the neutron electric dipole moment is evaluated to be d_{n}=1.8×10^{-16}θ e cm. The electric dipole moment of the proton is exactly the opposite.

  6. Height and Tilt Geometric Texture

    Andersen, Vedrana; Desbrun, Mathieu; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas

    2009-01-01

    compromise between functionality and simplicity: it can efficiently handle and process geometric texture too complex to be represented as a height field, without having recourse to full blown mesh editing algorithms. The height-and-tilt representation proposed here is fully intrinsic to the mesh, making...

  7. In Defence of Geometrical Algebra

    Blasjo, V.N.E.

    The geometrical algebra hypothesis was once the received interpretation of Greek mathematics. In recent decades, however, it has become anathema to many. I give a critical review of all arguments against it and offer a consistent rebuttal case against the modern consensus. Consequently, I find that

  8. Geometrical interpretation of extended supergravity

    Townsend, P.K.; Nieuwenhuizen, P.van

    1977-01-01

    SO 2 extended supergravity is shown to be a geometrical theory, whose underlying gauge group is OSp(4,2). The couplings which gauge the SO 2 symmetry as well as the accompanying cosmological and masslike terms are directly obtained, and the usual SO 2 model is obtained after a Wigner-Inoenue group contraction. (Auth.)

  9. Geometric scaling in exclusive processes

    Munier, S.; Wallon, S.

    2003-01-01

    We show that according to the present understanding of the energy evolution of the observables measured in deep-inelastic scattering, the photon-proton scattering amplitude has to exhibit geometric scaling at each impact parameter. We suggest a way to test this experimentally at HERA. A qualitative analysis based on published data is presented and discussed. (orig.)

  10. Geometric quantization and general relativity

    Souriau, J.-M.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of geometric quantization is to give a rigorous mathematical content to the 'correspondence principle' between classical and quantum mechanics. The main tools are borrowed on one hand from differential geometry and topology (differential manifolds, differential forms, fiber bundles, homology and cohomology, homotopy), on the other hand from analysis (functions of positive type, infinite dimensional group representations, pseudo-differential operators). Some satisfactory results have been obtained in the study of dynamical systems, but some fundamental questions are still waiting for an answer. The 'geometric quantization of fields', where some further well known difficulties arise, is still in a preliminary stage. In particular, the geometric quantization on the gravitational field is still a mere project. The situation is even more uncertain due to the fact that there is no experimental evidence of any quantum gravitational effect which could give us a hint towards what we are supposed to look for. The first level of both Quantum Theory, and General Relativity describes passive matter: influence by the field without being a source of it (first quantization and equivalence principle respectively). In both cases this is only an approximation (matter is always a source). But this approximation turns out to be the least uncertain part of the description, because on one hand the first quantization avoids the problems of renormalization and on the other hand the equivalence principle does not imply any choice of field equations (it is known that one can modify Einstein equations at short distances without changing their geometrical properties). (Auth.)

  11. Geometric origin of central charges

    Lukierski, J.; Rytel, L.

    1981-05-01

    The complete set of N(N-1) central charge generators for D=4 N-extended super Poincare algebra is obtained by suitable contraction of OSp (2N; 4) superalgebra. The superspace realizations of the spinorial generators with central charges are derived. The conjugate set of N(N-1) additional bosonic superspace coordinates is introduced in an unique and geometric way. (author)

  12. Vergence, Vision, and Geometric Optics

    Keating, Michael P.

    1975-01-01

    Provides a definition of vergence in terms of the curvature of the wave fronts, and gives examples to illustrate the advantages of this approach. The vergence treatment of geometrical optics provides both conceptual and algebraic advantages, particularly for the life science student, over the traditional object distance-image distance-focal length…

  13. Cartan's geometrical structure of supergravity

    Baaklini, N.S.

    1977-06-01

    The geometrical partnership of the vierbein and the spin-3/2 field in the structure of the supergravity Lagrangian is emphasized. Both fields are introduced as component of the same matrix differential form. The only local symmetry of the theory is SL(2,C)

  14. Efficient Geometric Sound Propagation Using Visibility Culling

    Chandak, Anish

    2011-07-01

    Simulating propagation of sound can improve the sense of realism in interactive applications such as video games and can lead to better designs in engineering applications such as architectural acoustics. In this thesis, we present geometric sound propagation techniques which are faster than prior methods and map well to upcoming parallel multi-core CPUs. We model specular reflections by using the image-source method and model finite-edge diffraction by using the well-known Biot-Tolstoy-Medwin (BTM) model. We accelerate the computation of specular reflections by applying novel visibility algorithms, FastV and AD-Frustum, which compute visibility from a point. We accelerate finite-edge diffraction modeling by applying a novel visibility algorithm which computes visibility from a region. Our visibility algorithms are based on frustum tracing and exploit recent advances in fast ray-hierarchy intersections, data-parallel computations, and scalable, multi-core algorithms. The AD-Frustum algorithm adapts its computation to the scene complexity and allows small errors in computing specular reflection paths for higher computational efficiency. FastV and our visibility algorithm from a region are general, object-space, conservative visibility algorithms that together significantly reduce the number of image sources compared to other techniques while preserving the same accuracy. Our geometric propagation algorithms are an order of magnitude faster than prior approaches for modeling specular reflections and two to ten times faster for modeling finite-edge diffraction. Our algorithms are interactive, scale almost linearly on multi-core CPUs, and can handle large, complex, and dynamic scenes. We also compare the accuracy of our sound propagation algorithms with other methods. Once sound propagation is performed, it is desirable to listen to the propagated sound in interactive and engineering applications. We can generate smooth, artifact-free output audio signals by applying

  15. On the interpretation of the support moment

    Hof, AL

    2000-01-01

    It has been suggested by Winter (J. Biomech. 13 (1980) 923-927) that the 'support moment', the sum of the sagittal extension moments, shows less variability in walking than any of the joint moments separately. A simple model is put forward to explain this finding. It is proposed to reformulate the

  16. Geometric Transformations in Engineering Geometry

    I. F. Borovikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, for business purposes, in view of current trends and world experience in training engineers, research and faculty staff there has been a need to transform traditional courses of descriptive geometry into the course of engineering geometry in which the geometrical transformations have to become its main section. On the basis of critical analysis the paper gives suggestions to improve a presentation technique of this section both in the classroom and in academic literature, extend an application scope of geometrical transformations to solve the position and metric tasks and simulation of surfaces, as well as to design complex engineering configurations, which meet a number of pre-specified conditions.The article offers to make a number of considerable amendments to the terms and definitions used in the existing courses of descriptive geometry. It draws some conclusions and makes the appropriate proposals on feasibility of coordination in teaching the movement transformation in the courses of analytical and descriptive geometry. This will provide interdisciplinary team teaching and allow students to be convinced that a combination of analytical and graphic ways to solve geometric tasks is useful and reasonable.The traditional sections of learning courses need to be added with a theory of projective and bi-rational transformations. In terms of application simplicity and convenience it is enough to consider the central transformations when solving the applied tasks. These transformations contain a beam of sub-invariant (low-invariant straight lines on which the invariant curve induces non-involution and involution projectivities. The expediency of nonlinear transformations application is shown in the article by a specific example of geometric modeling of the interfacing surface "spar-blade".Implementation of these suggestions will contribute to a real transformation of a traditional course of descriptive geometry to the engineering geometry

  17. COMPUTING

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion An activity that is still in progress is computing for the heavy-ion program. The heavy-ion events are collected without zero suppression, so the event size is much large at roughly 11 MB per event of RAW. The central collisions are more complex and...

  18. COMPUTING

    M. Kasemann P. McBride Edited by M-C. Sawley with contributions from: P. Kreuzer D. Bonacorsi S. Belforte F. Wuerthwein L. Bauerdick K. Lassila-Perini M-C. Sawley

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the comput...

  19. Failure of geometric electromagnetism in the adiabatic vector Kepler problem

    Anglin, J.R.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2004-01-01

    The magnetic moment of a particle orbiting a straight current-carrying wire may precess rapidly enough in the wire's magnetic field to justify an adiabatic approximation, eliminating the rapid time dependence of the magnetic moment and leaving only the particle position as a slow degree of freedom. To zeroth order in the adiabatic expansion, the orbits of the particle in the plane perpendicular to the wire are Keplerian ellipses. Higher-order postadiabatic corrections make the orbits precess, but recent analysis of this 'vector Kepler problem' has shown that the effective Hamiltonian incorporating a postadiabatic scalar potential ('geometric electromagnetism') fails to predict the precession correctly, while a heuristic alternative succeeds. In this paper we resolve the apparent failure of the postadiabatic approximation, by pointing out that the correct second-order analysis produces a third Hamiltonian, in which geometric electromagnetism is supplemented by a tensor potential. The heuristic Hamiltonian of Schmiedmayer and Scrinzi is then shown to be a canonical transformation of the correct adiabatic Hamiltonian, to second order. The transformation has the important advantage of removing a 1/r 3 singularity which is an artifact of the adiabatic approximation

  20. Bisimulation for Higher-Dimensional Automata. A Geometric Interpretation

    Fahrenberg, Ulrich

    We show how parallel compostition of higher-dimensional automata (HDA) can be expressed categorically in the spirit of Winskel & Nielsen. Employing the notion of computation path introduced by van Glabbeek, we define a new notion of bisimulation of HDA using open maps. We derive a connection...... between computation paths and carrier sequences of dipaths and show that bisimilarity of HDA can be decided by the use of geometric techniques....

  1. Magnetic dipole moments of deformed odd-odd nuclei in 2s-1d and 2p-1f shells

    Verma, A K; Garg, V P; Sharma, S D [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1979-01-01

    A simple expression is derived for the computation of the magnetic moments of odd-odd nuclei. The computation of magnetic dipole moments is done with and without quenching factors for the last proton and neutron. The results are found to improve for /sup 22/Na, /sup 24/Na, sup(82m)Rb, /sup 14/N, /sup 68/Gd, /sup 54/Mn and /sup 86/Rb with extreme coupling of angular moments.

  2. Electric and Magnetic Dipole Moments

    CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    The stringent limit on the electric dipole moment of the neutron forced the issue on the strong CP-problem. The most elegant solution of which is the axion field proposed by Peccei and Quinn. The current limit on the QCD parameter theta coming from the limit on the neutron EDM is of order 10-10. I am going to describe the present status on the neutron EDM searches and further prospects on getting down to theta_qcd sensitivity of 10-13 with the new deuteron EDM in storage rings proposal. For completeness the current status and prospects of the muon g-2 experiment will also be given.

  3. The Muon Electric Dipole Moment

    Barger, Vernon; Kao, Chung; Das, Ashok

    1997-01-01

    The electric dipole moment of the muon ($d_\\mu$) is evaluated in a two Higgs doublet model with a softly broken discrete symmetry. For $\\tan\\beta \\equiv |v_2|/|v_1| \\sim 1$, contributions from two loop diagrams involving the $t$ quark and the $W$ boson dominate; while for $\\tan\\beta \\gsim 10$, contributions from two loop diagrams involving the $b$ quark and the $\\tau$ lepton are dominant. For $8 \\gsim \\tan\\beta \\gsim 4$, significant cancellation occurs among the contributions from two loop di...

  4. Generation of the pitch moment during the controlled flight after takeoff of fruitflies.

    Mao Wei Chen

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the controlled flight of fruitflies after voluntary takeoff is studied. Wing and body kinematics of the insects after takeoff are measured using high-speed video techniques, and the aerodynamic force and moment are calculated by the computational fluid dynamics method based on the measured data. How the control moments are generated is analyzed by correlating the computed moments with the wing kinematics. A fruit-fly has a large pitch-up angular velocity owing to the takeoff jump and the fly controls its body attitude by producing pitching moments. It is found that the pitching moment is produced by changes in both the aerodynamic force and the moment arm. The change in the aerodynamic force is mainly due to the change in angle of attack. The change in the moment arm is mainly due to the change in the mean stroke angle and deviation angle, and the deviation angle plays a more important role than the mean stroke angle in changing the moment arm (note that change in deviation angle implies variation in the position of the aerodynamic stroke plane with respect to the anatomical stroke plane. This is unlike the case of fruitflies correcting pitch perturbations in steady free flight, where they produce pitching moment mainly by changes in mean stroke angle.

  5. Generation of the pitch moment during the controlled flight after takeoff of fruitflies.

    Chen, Mao Wei; Wu, Jiang Hao; Sun, Mao

    2017-01-01

    In the present paper, the controlled flight of fruitflies after voluntary takeoff is studied. Wing and body kinematics of the insects after takeoff are measured using high-speed video techniques, and the aerodynamic force and moment are calculated by the computational fluid dynamics method based on the measured data. How the control moments are generated is analyzed by correlating the computed moments with the wing kinematics. A fruit-fly has a large pitch-up angular velocity owing to the takeoff jump and the fly controls its body attitude by producing pitching moments. It is found that the pitching moment is produced by changes in both the aerodynamic force and the moment arm. The change in the aerodynamic force is mainly due to the change in angle of attack. The change in the moment arm is mainly due to the change in the mean stroke angle and deviation angle, and the deviation angle plays a more important role than the mean stroke angle in changing the moment arm (note that change in deviation angle implies variation in the position of the aerodynamic stroke plane with respect to the anatomical stroke plane). This is unlike the case of fruitflies correcting pitch perturbations in steady free flight, where they produce pitching moment mainly by changes in mean stroke angle.

  6. Multiscale geometric modeling of macromolecules I: Cartesian representation

    Xia, Kelin; Feng, Xin; Chen, Zhan; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the geometric modeling and computational algorithm development of biomolecular structures from two data sources: Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) in the Eulerian (or Cartesian) representation. Molecular surface (MS) contains non-smooth geometric singularities, such as cusps, tips and self-intersecting facets, which often lead to computational instabilities in molecular simulations, and violate the physical principle of surface free energy minimization. Variational multiscale surface definitions are proposed based on geometric flows and solvation analysis of biomolecular systems. Our approach leads to geometric and potential driven Laplace-Beltrami flows for biomolecular surface evolution and formation. The resulting surfaces are free of geometric singularities and minimize the total free energy of the biomolecular system. High order partial differential equation (PDE)-based nonlinear filters are employed for EMDB data processing. We show the efficacy of this approach in feature-preserving noise reduction. After the construction of protein multiresolution surfaces, we explore the analysis and characterization of surface morphology by using a variety of curvature definitions. Apart from the classical Gaussian curvature and mean curvature, maximum curvature, minimum curvature, shape index, and curvedness are also applied to macromolecular surface analysis for the first time. Our curvature analysis is uniquely coupled to the analysis of electrostatic surface potential, which is a by-product of our variational multiscale solvation models. As an expository investigation, we particularly emphasize the numerical algorithms and computational protocols for practical applications of the above multiscale geometric models. Such information may otherwise be scattered over the vast literature on this topic. Based on the curvature and electrostatic analysis from our multiresolution surfaces, we introduce a new concept, the

  7. Multiscale geometric modeling of macromolecules I: Cartesian representation

    Xia, Kelin [Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, MI 48824 (United States); Feng, Xin [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Michigan State University, MI 48824 (United States); Chen, Zhan [Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, MI 48824 (United States); Tong, Yiying [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Michigan State University, MI 48824 (United States); Wei, Guo-Wei, E-mail: wei@math.msu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, MI 48824 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    This paper focuses on the geometric modeling and computational algorithm development of biomolecular structures from two data sources: Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) in the Eulerian (or Cartesian) representation. Molecular surface (MS) contains non-smooth geometric singularities, such as cusps, tips and self-intersecting facets, which often lead to computational instabilities in molecular simulations, and violate the physical principle of surface free energy minimization. Variational multiscale surface definitions are proposed based on geometric flows and solvation analysis of biomolecular systems. Our approach leads to geometric and potential driven Laplace–Beltrami flows for biomolecular surface evolution and formation. The resulting surfaces are free of geometric singularities and minimize the total free energy of the biomolecular system. High order partial differential equation (PDE)-based nonlinear filters are employed for EMDB data processing. We show the efficacy of this approach in feature-preserving noise reduction. After the construction of protein multiresolution surfaces, we explore the analysis and characterization of surface morphology by using a variety of curvature definitions. Apart from the classical Gaussian curvature and mean curvature, maximum curvature, minimum curvature, shape index, and curvedness are also applied to macromolecular surface analysis for the first time. Our curvature analysis is uniquely coupled to the analysis of electrostatic surface potential, which is a by-product of our variational multiscale solvation models. As an expository investigation, we particularly emphasize the numerical algorithms and computational protocols for practical applications of the above multiscale geometric models. Such information may otherwise be scattered over the vast literature on this topic. Based on the curvature and electrostatic analysis from our multiresolution surfaces, we introduce a new concept, the

  8. Collaborative spectrum sensing based on the ratio between largest eigenvalue and Geometric mean of eigenvalues

    Shakir, Muhammad

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new detector referred to as Geometric mean detector (GEMD) which is based on the ratio of the largest eigenvalue to the Geometric mean of the eigenvalues for collaborative spectrum sensing. The decision threshold has been derived by employing Gaussian approximation approach. In this approach, the two random variables, i.e. The largest eigenvalue and the Geometric mean of the eigenvalues are considered as independent Gaussian random variables such that their cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) are approximated by a univariate Gaussian distribution function for any number of cooperating secondary users and received samples. The approximation approach is based on the calculation of exact analytical moments of the largest eigenvalue and the Geometric mean of the eigenvalues of the received covariance matrix. The decision threshold has been calculated by exploiting the CDF of the ratio of two Gaussian distributed random variables. In this context, we exchange the analytical moments of the two random variables with the moments of the Gaussian distribution function. The performance of the detector is compared with the performance of the energy detector and eigenvalue ratio detector. Analytical and simulation results show that our newly proposed detector yields considerable performance advantage in realistic spectrum sensing scenarios. Moreover, our results based on proposed approximation approach are in perfect agreement with the empirical results. © 2011 IEEE.

  9. Geometric-optical illusions at isoluminance.

    Hamburger, Kai; Hansen, Thorsten; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2007-12-01

    The idea of a largely segregated processing of color and form was initially supported by observations that geometric-optical illusions vanish under isoluminance. However, this finding is inconsistent with some psychophysical studies and also with physiological evidence showing that color and luminance are processed together by largely overlapping sets of neurons in the LGN, in V1, and in extrastriate areas. Here we examined the strength of nine geometric-optical illusions under isoluminance (Delboeuf, Ebbinghaus, Hering, Judd, Müller-Lyer, Poggendorff, Ponzo, Vertical, Zöllner). Subjects interactively manipulated computer-generated line drawings to counteract the illusory effect. In all cases, illusions presented under isoluminance (both for colors drawn from the cardinal L-M or S-(L+M) directions of DKL color space) were as effective as the luminance versions (both for high and low contrast). The magnitudes of the illusion effects were highly correlated across subjects for the different conditions. In two additional experiments we determined that the strong illusions observed under isoluminance were not due to individual deviations from the photometric point of isoluminance or due to chromatic aberrations. Our findings show that our conscious percept is affected similarly for both isoluminance and luminance conditions, suggesting that the joint processing for chromatic and luminance defined contours may extend well beyond early visual areas.

  10. COMPUTING

    P. McBride

    It has been a very active year for the computing project with strong contributions from members of the global community. The project has focused on site preparation and Monte Carlo production. The operations group has begun processing data from P5 as part of the global data commissioning. Improvements in transfer rates and site availability have been seen as computing sites across the globe prepare for large scale production and analysis as part of CSA07. Preparations for the upcoming Computing Software and Analysis Challenge CSA07 are progressing. Ian Fisk and Neil Geddes have been appointed as coordinators for the challenge. CSA07 will include production tests of the Tier-0 production system, reprocessing at the Tier-1 sites and Monte Carlo production at the Tier-2 sites. At the same time there will be a large analysis exercise at the Tier-2 centres. Pre-production simulation of the Monte Carlo events for the challenge is beginning. Scale tests of the Tier-0 will begin in mid-July and the challenge it...

  11. COMPUTING

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction During the past six months, Computing participated in the STEP09 exercise, had a major involvement in the October exercise and has been working with CMS sites on improving open issues relevant for data taking. At the same time operations for MC production, real data reconstruction and re-reconstructions and data transfers at large scales were performed. STEP09 was successfully conducted in June as a joint exercise with ATLAS and the other experiments. It gave good indication about the readiness of the WLCG infrastructure with the two major LHC experiments stressing the reading, writing and processing of physics data. The October Exercise, in contrast, was conducted as an all-CMS exercise, where Physics, Computing and Offline worked on a common plan to exercise all steps to efficiently access and analyze data. As one of the major results, the CMS Tier-2s demonstrated to be fully capable for performing data analysis. In recent weeks, efforts were devoted to CMS Computing readiness. All th...

  12. COMPUTING

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion The Tier 0 infrastructure was able to repack and promptly reconstruct heavy-ion collision data. Two copies were made of the data at CERN using a large CASTOR disk pool, and the core physics sample was replicated ...

  13. COMPUTING

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Computing continued with a high level of activity over the winter in preparation for conferences and the start of the 2012 run. 2012 brings new challenges with a new energy, more complex events, and the need to make the best use of the available time before the Long Shutdown. We expect to be resource constrained on all tiers of the computing system in 2012 and are working to ensure the high-priority goals of CMS are not impacted. Heavy ions After a successful 2011 heavy-ion run, the programme is moving to analysis. During the run, the CAF resources were well used for prompt analysis. Since then in 2012 on average 200 job slots have been used continuously at Vanderbilt for analysis workflows. Operations Office As of 2012, the Computing Project emphasis has moved from commissioning to operation of the various systems. This is reflected in the new organisation structure where the Facilities and Data Operations tasks have been merged into a common Operations Office, which now covers everything ...

  14. COMPUTING

    M. Kasemann

    CCRC’08 challenges and CSA08 During the February campaign of the Common Computing readiness challenges (CCRC’08), the CMS computing team had achieved very good results. The link between the detector site and the Tier0 was tested by gradually increasing the number of parallel transfer streams well beyond the target. Tests covered the global robustness at the Tier0, processing a massive number of very large files and with a high writing speed to tapes.  Other tests covered the links between the different Tiers of the distributed infrastructure and the pre-staging and reprocessing capacity of the Tier1’s: response time, data transfer rate and success rate for Tape to Buffer staging of files kept exclusively on Tape were measured. In all cases, coordination with the sites was efficient and no serious problem was found. These successful preparations prepared the ground for the second phase of the CCRC’08 campaign, in May. The Computing Software and Analysis challen...

  15. COMPUTING

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The first data taking period of November produced a first scientific paper, and this is a very satisfactory step for Computing. It also gave the invaluable opportunity to learn and debrief from this first, intense period, and make the necessary adaptations. The alarm procedures between different groups (DAQ, Physics, T0 processing, Alignment/calibration, T1 and T2 communications) have been reinforced. A major effort has also been invested into remodeling and optimizing operator tasks in all activities in Computing, in parallel with the recruitment of new Cat A operators. The teams are being completed and by mid year the new tasks will have been assigned. CRB (Computing Resource Board) The Board met twice since last CMS week. In December it reviewed the experience of the November data-taking period and could measure the positive improvements made for the site readiness. It also reviewed the policy under which Tier-2 are associated with Physics Groups. Such associations are decided twice per ye...

  16. COMPUTING

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the co...

  17. Geometrical-optics approximation of forward scattering by coated particles.

    Xu, Feng; Cai, Xiaoshu; Ren, Kuanfang

    2004-03-20

    By means of geometrical optics we present an approximation algorithm with which to accelerate the computation of scattering intensity distribution within a forward angular range (0 degrees-60 degrees) for coated particles illuminated by a collimated incident beam. Phases of emerging rays are exactly calculated to improve the approximation precision. This method proves effective for transparent and tiny absorbent particles with size parameters larger than 75 but fails to give good approximation results at scattering angles at which refractive rays are absent. When the absorption coefficient of a particle is greater than 0.01, the geometrical optics approximation is effective only for forward small angles, typically less than 10 degrees or so.

  18. A differential-geometric approach to generalized linear models with grouped predictors

    Augugliaro, Luigi; Mineo, Angelo M.; Wit, Ernst C.

    We propose an extension of the differential-geometric least angle regression method to perform sparse group inference in a generalized linear model. An efficient algorithm is proposed to compute the solution curve. The proposed group differential-geometric least angle regression method has important

  19. Fifth SIAM conference on geometric design 97: Final program and abstracts. Final technical report

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The meeting was divided into the following sessions: (1) CAD/CAM; (2) Curve/Surface Design; (3) Geometric Algorithms; (4) Multiresolution Methods; (5) Robotics; (6) Solid Modeling; and (7) Visualization. This report contains the abstracts of papers presented at the meeting. Proceding the conference there was a short course entitled ``Wavelets for Geometric Modeling and Computer Graphics``.

  20. Recent Advances in Material and Geometrical Modelling in Dental Applications

    Waleed M. S. Al Qahtani

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This article touched, in brief, the recent advances in dental materials and geometric modelling in dental applications. Most common categories of dental materials as metallic alloys, composites, ceramics and nanomaterials were briefly demonstrated. Nanotechnology improved the quality of dental biomaterials. This new technology improves many existing materials properties, also, to introduce new materials with superior properties that covered a wide range of applications in dentistry. Geometric modelling was discussed as a concept and examples within this article. The geometric modelling with engineering Computer-Aided-Design (CAD system(s is highly satisfactory for further analysis or Computer-Aided-Manufacturing (CAM processes. The geometric modelling extracted from Computed-Tomography (CT images (or its similar techniques for the sake of CAM also reached a sufficient level of accuracy, while, obtaining efficient solid modelling without huge efforts on body surfaces, faces, and gaps healing is still doubtable. This article is merely a compilation of knowledge learned from lectures, workshops, books, and journal articles, articles from the internet, dental forum, and scientific groups' discussions.

  1. On chromatic and geometrical calibration

    Folm-Hansen, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    The main subject of the present thesis is different methods for the geometrical and chromatic calibration of cameras in various environments. For the monochromatic issues of the calibration we present the acquisition of monochrome images, the classic monochrome aberrations and the various sources...... the correct interpolation method is described. For the chromatic issues of calibration we present the acquisition of colour and multi-spectral images, the chromatic aberrations and the various lens/camera based non-uniformities of the illumination of the image plane. It is described how the monochromatic...... to design calibration targets for both geometrical and chromatic calibration are described. We present some possible systematical errors on the detection of the objects in the calibration targets, if viewed in a non orthogonal angle, if the intensities are uneven or if the image blurring is uneven. Finally...

  2. Geometrical approach to tumor growth.

    Escudero, Carlos

    2006-08-01

    Tumor growth has a number of features in common with a physical process known as molecular beam epitaxy. Both growth processes are characterized by the constraint of growth development to the body border, and surface diffusion of cells and particles at the growing edge. However, tumor growth implies an approximate spherical symmetry that makes necessary a geometrical treatment of the growth equations. The basic model was introduced in a former paper [C. Escudero, Phys. Rev. E 73, 020902(R) (2006)], and in the present work we extend our analysis and try to shed light on the possible geometrical principles that drive tumor growth. We present two-dimensional models that reproduce the experimental observations, and analyze the unexplored three-dimensional case, for which interesting conclusions on tumor growth are derived.

  3. Computation of principal stresses and stress intensity of a nozzle on a spherical pressure vessel

    Sun, B.C.; Lyow, B.L.; Koplik, B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a Stress Computation Table that systematically computes the local stresses at various locations of the sphere-nozzle intersection. The six components of external loading are: radial load, two overturning moments, two horizontal shear forces, and a torsional moment. The radial and overturning moments induce local membrane and bending stresses in both the circumferential and meridional directions of the sphere around the nozzle. The shear forces and torsional moment produce local shear stresses. In addition, the shear forces induce local membrane and bending stresses around the nozzle. The local stress factors from each external loading component are taken from recent publications by Lyow, Sun and Koplik who have studied this subject through the use of the finite element method. These factors are a function of the nozzle-sphere geometrical parameters, beta, β, (nozzle radius/sphere radius) and gamma, γ, (sphere radius/thickness), with the beta value ranging from 0.1 to 0.5, and the gamma value ranging from 10 to 100. The Stress Table summarizes all the normal and shear stresses at eight different locations around the nozzle, and finally the principal stresses and stress intensity are computed. The stress factor plots from previous publications are replotted in this paper to provide a handy reference as well as consistency. A numerical sample employing a FORTRAN program is also given. (author)

  4. Geometrical interpretation of optical absorption

    Monzon, J. J.; Barriuso, A. G.; Sanchez-Soto, L. L. [Departamento de Optica, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Montesinos-Amilibia, J. M. [Departamento de Geometria y Topologia, Facultad de Matematicas, Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-15

    We reinterpret the transfer matrix for an absorbing system in very simple geometrical terms. In appropriate variables, the system appears as performing a Lorentz transformation in a (1 + 3)-dimensional space. Using homogeneous coordinates, we map that action on the unit sphere, which is at the realm of the Klein model of hyperbolic geometry. The effects of absorption appear then as a loxodromic transformation, that is, a rhumb line crossing all the meridians at the same angle.

  5. Parametric FEM for geometric biomembranes

    Bonito, Andrea; Nochetto, Ricardo H.; Sebastian Pauletti, M.

    2010-05-01

    We consider geometric biomembranes governed by an L2-gradient flow for bending energy subject to area and volume constraints (Helfrich model). We give a concise derivation of a novel vector formulation, based on shape differential calculus, and corresponding discretization via parametric FEM using quadratic isoparametric elements and a semi-implicit Euler method. We document the performance of the new parametric FEM with a number of simulations leading to dumbbell, red blood cell and toroidal equilibrium shapes while exhibiting large deformations.

  6. Geometrical methods in learning theory

    Burdet, G.; Combe, Ph.; Nencka, H.

    2001-01-01

    The methods of information theory provide natural approaches to learning algorithms in the case of stochastic formal neural networks. Most of the classical techniques are based on some extremization principle. A geometrical interpretation of the associated algorithms provides a powerful tool for understanding the learning process and its stability and offers a framework for discussing possible new learning rules. An illustration is given using sequential and parallel learning in the Boltzmann machine

  7. Geometrical approach to tumor growth

    Escudero, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    Tumor growth has a number of features in common with a physical process known as molecular beam epitaxy. Both growth processes are characterized by the constraint of growth development to the body border, and surface diffusion of cells/particles at the growing edge. However, tumor growth implies an approximate spherical symmetry that makes necessary a geometrical treatment of the growth equations. The basic model was introduced in a former article [C. Escudero, Phys. Rev. E 73, 020902(R) (200...

  8. The perfect message at the perfect moment.

    Kalyanam, Kirthi; Zweben, Monte

    2005-11-01

    Marketers planning promotional campaigns ask questions to boost the odds that the messages will be accepted: Who should receive each message? What should be its content? How should we deliver it? The one question they rarely ask is, when should we deliver it? That's too bad, because in marketing, timing is arguably the most important variable of all. Indeed, there are moments in a customer's relationship with a business when she wants to communicate with that business because something has changed. If the company contacts her with the right message in the right format at the right time, there's a good chance of a warm reception. The question of "when" can be answered by a new computer-based model called "dialogue marketing," which is, to date, the highest rung on an evolutionary ladder that ascends from database marketing to relationship marketing to one-to-one marketing. Its principle advantages over older approaches are that it is completely interactive, exploits many communication channels, and is "relationship aware": that is, it continuously tracks every nuance of the customer's interaction with the business. Thus, dialogue marketing responds to each transition in that relationship at the moment the customer requires attention. Turning a traditional marketing strategy into a dialogue-marketing program is a straightforward matter. Begin by identifying the batch communications you make with customers, then ask yourself what events could trigger those communications to make them more timely. Add a question or call to action to each message and prepare a different treatment or response for each possible answer. Finally, create a series of increasingly urgent calls to action that kick in if the question or call to action goes unanswered by the customer. As dialogue marketing proliferates, it may provide the solid new footing that Madison Avenue seeks.

  9. Riemannian geometry and geometric analysis

    Jost, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    This established reference work continues to provide its readers with a gateway to some of the most interesting developments in contemporary geometry. It offers insight into a wide range of topics, including fundamental concepts of Riemannian geometry, such as geodesics, connections and curvature; the basic models and tools of geometric analysis, such as harmonic functions, forms, mappings, eigenvalues, the Dirac operator and the heat flow method; as well as the most important variational principles of theoretical physics, such as Yang-Mills, Ginzburg-Landau or the nonlinear sigma model of quantum field theory. The present volume connects all these topics in a systematic geometric framework. At the same time, it equips the reader with the working tools of the field and enables her or him to delve into geometric research.  The 7th edition has been systematically reorganized and updated. Almost no page has been left unchanged. It also includes new material, for instance on symplectic geometry, as well as the B...

  10. Geometric mean for subspace selection.

    Tao, Dacheng; Li, Xuelong; Wu, Xindong; Maybank, Stephen J

    2009-02-01

    Subspace selection approaches are powerful tools in pattern classification and data visualization. One of the most important subspace approaches is the linear dimensionality reduction step in the Fisher's linear discriminant analysis (FLDA), which has been successfully employed in many fields such as biometrics, bioinformatics, and multimedia information management. However, the linear dimensionality reduction step in FLDA has a critical drawback: for a classification task with c classes, if the dimension of the projected subspace is strictly lower than c - 1, the projection to a subspace tends to merge those classes, which are close together in the original feature space. If separate classes are sampled from Gaussian distributions, all with identical covariance matrices, then the linear dimensionality reduction step in FLDA maximizes the mean value of the Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergences between different classes. Based on this viewpoint, the geometric mean for subspace selection is studied in this paper. Three criteria are analyzed: 1) maximization of the geometric mean of the KL divergences, 2) maximization of the geometric mean of the normalized KL divergences, and 3) the combination of 1 and 2. Preliminary experimental results based on synthetic data, UCI Machine Learning Repository, and handwriting digits show that the third criterion is a potential discriminative subspace selection method, which significantly reduces the class separation problem in comparing with the linear dimensionality reduction step in FLDA and its several representative extensions.

  11. Time Series Analysis Using Geometric Template Matching.

    Frank, Jordan; Mannor, Shie; Pineau, Joelle; Precup, Doina

    2013-03-01

    We present a novel framework for analyzing univariate time series data. At the heart of the approach is a versatile algorithm for measuring the similarity of two segments of time series called geometric template matching (GeTeM). First, we use GeTeM to compute a similarity measure for clustering and nearest-neighbor classification. Next, we present a semi-supervised learning algorithm that uses the similarity measure with hierarchical clustering in order to improve classification performance when unlabeled training data are available. Finally, we present a boosting framework called TDEBOOST, which uses an ensemble of GeTeM classifiers. TDEBOOST augments the traditional boosting approach with an additional step in which the features used as inputs to the classifier are adapted at each step to improve the training error. We empirically evaluate the proposed approaches on several datasets, such as accelerometer data collected from wearable sensors and ECG data.

  12. Noncyclic geometric changes of quantum states

    Kult, David; Sjoeqvist, Erik; Aaberg, Johan

    2006-01-01

    Non-Abelian quantum holonomies, i.e., unitary state changes solely induced by geometric properties of a quantum system, have been much under focus in the physics community as generalizations of the Abelian Berry phase. Apart from being a general phenomenon displayed in various subfields of quantum physics, the use of holonomies has lately been suggested as a robust technique to obtain quantum gates; the building blocks of quantum computers. Non-Abelian holonomies are usually associated with cyclic changes of quantum systems, but here we consider a generalization to noncyclic evolutions. We argue that this open-path holonomy can be used to construct quantum gates. We also show that a structure of partially defined holonomies emerges from the open-path holonomy. This structure has no counterpart in the Abelian setting. We illustrate the general ideas using an example that may be accessible to tests in various physical systems

  13. Point- and curve-based geometric conflation

    Ló pez-Vá zquez, C.; Manso Callejo, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Geometric conflation is the process undertaken to modify the coordinates of features in dataset A in order to match corresponding ones in dataset B. The overwhelming majority of the literature considers the use of points as features to define the transformation. In this article we present a procedure to consider one-dimensional curves also, which are commonly available as Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) tracks, routes, coastlines, and so on, in order to define the estimate of the displacements to be applied to each object in A. The procedure involves three steps, including the partial matching of corresponding curves, the computation of some analytical expression, and the addition of a correction term in order to satisfy basic cartographic rules. A numerical example is presented. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  14. Geometric regularizations and dual conifold transitions

    Landsteiner, Karl; Lazaroiu, Calin I.

    2003-01-01

    We consider a geometric regularization for the class of conifold transitions relating D-brane systems on noncompact Calabi-Yau spaces to certain flux backgrounds. This regularization respects the SL(2,Z) invariance of the flux superpotential, and allows for computation of the relevant periods through the method of Picard-Fuchs equations. The regularized geometry is a noncompact Calabi-Yau which can be viewed as a monodromic fibration, with the nontrivial monodromy being induced by the regulator. It reduces to the original, non-monodromic background when the regulator is removed. Using this regularization, we discuss the simple case of the local conifold, and show how the relevant field-theoretic information can be extracted in this approach. (author)

  15. Combining the multilevel fast multipole method with the uniform geometrical theory of diffraction

    A. Tzoulis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of arbitrarily shaped and electrically large objects in the same environment leads to hybridization of the Method of Moments (MoM with the Uniform Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (UTD. The computation and memory complexity of the MoM solution is improved with the Multilevel Fast Multipole Method (MLFMM. By expanding the k-space integrals in spherical harmonics, further considerable amount of memory can be saved without compromising accuracy and numerical speed. However, until now MoM-UTD hybrid methods are restricted to conventional MoM formulations only with Electric Field Integral Equation (EFIE. In this contribution, a MLFMM-UTD hybridization for Combined Field Integral Equation (CFIE is proposed and applied within a hybrid Finite Element - Boundary Integral (FEBI technique. The MLFMM-UTD hybridization is performed at the translation procedure on the various levels of the MLFMM, using a far-field approximation of the corresponding translation operator. The formulation of this new hybrid technique is presented, as well as numerical results.

  16. Analysis of aggregate optical spectra using moments. Application to the purple membrane of halobacterium halobium

    Hemenger, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of extracting structural information from the optical spectra of aggregates of molecules interacting through their electronic transitions is studied. One serious difficulty common to all approaches to this problem is that of properly taking into account the effects of molecular vibrations. A series of exact relations derived previously which are correct with regard to molecular vibrations provide a number of independent, explicit connections between aggregate geometrical parameters and moments of experimental spectra. It is shown that, by applying these moment relations to the optical absorption and circular dichroism spectra of simple aggregates, a complete set of equations can be found, i.e., enough equations can be found to solve for all of the geometrical parameters which enter into the expressions for absorption and circular dichroism spectra. This procedure is applied in some detail to the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium. The results are completely consistent with what is known about its structure

  17. Enhancement of geometric phase by frustration of decoherence: A Parrondo-like effect

    Banerjee, Subhashish; Chandrashekar, C. M.; Pati, Arun K.

    2013-04-01

    Geometric phase plays an important role in evolution of pure or mixed quantum states. However, when a system undergoes decoherence the development of geometric phase may be inhibited. Here we show that when a quantum system interacts with two competing environments there can be enhancement of geometric phase. This effect is akin to a Parrondo-like effect on the geometric phase which results from quantum frustration of decoherence. Our result suggests that the mechanism of two competing decoherence can be useful in fault-tolerant holonomic quantum computation.

  18. Comparative Geometrical Investigations of Hand-Held Scanning Systems

    Kersten, T. P.; Przybilla, H.-J.; Lindstaedt, M.; Tschirschwitz, F.; Misgaiski-Hass, M.

    2016-06-01

    An increasing number of hand-held scanning systems by different manufacturers are becoming available on the market. However, their geometrical performance is little-known to many users. Therefore the Laboratory for Photogrammetry & Laser Scanning of the HafenCity University Hamburg has carried out geometrical accuracy tests with the following systems in co-operation with the Bochum University of Applied Sciences (Laboratory for Photogrammetry) as well as the Humboldt University in Berlin (Institute for Computer Science): DOTProduct DPI-7, Artec Spider, Mantis Vision F5 SR, Kinect v1 + v2, Structure Sensor and Google's Project Tango. In the framework of these comparative investigations geometrically stable reference bodies were used. The appropriate reference data were acquired by measurement with two structured light projection systems (AICON smartSCAN and GOM ATOS I 2M). The comprehensive test results of the different test scenarios are presented and critically discussed in this contribution.

  19. COMPARATIVE GEOMETRICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF HAND-HELD SCANNING SYSTEMS

    T. P. Kersten

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of hand-held scanning systems by different manufacturers are becoming available on the market. However, their geometrical performance is little-known to many users. Therefore the Laboratory for Photogrammetry & Laser Scanning of the HafenCity University Hamburg has carried out geometrical accuracy tests with the following systems in co-operation with the Bochum University of Applied Sciences (Laboratory for Photogrammetry as well as the Humboldt University in Berlin (Institute for Computer Science: DOTProduct DPI-7, Artec Spider, Mantis Vision F5 SR, Kinect v1 + v2, Structure Sensor and Google’s Project Tango. In the framework of these comparative investigations geometrically stable reference bodies were used. The appropriate reference data were acquired by measurement with two structured light projection systems (AICON smartSCAN and GOM ATOS I 2M. The comprehensive test results of the different test scenarios are presented and critically discussed in this contribution.

  20. Stress concentration factors for integral and pad reinforced nozzles in spherical pressure vessels subjected to radial load and moment

    Soliman, S.F.; Gill, S.S.

    1979-01-01

    Charts are presented giving the elastic stress concentration factors in spherical pressure vessels with pad and integral reinforcement for radial branches subjected to radial load and moment. The effect of all the geometrical parameters is discussed, including the limitations of thin shell theory on the validity of the results. (author)

  1. COMPUTING

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Just two months after the “LHC First Physics” event of 30th March, the analysis of the O(200) million 7 TeV collision events in CMS accumulated during the first 60 days is well under way. The consistency of the CMS computing model has been confirmed during these first weeks of data taking. This model is based on a hierarchy of use-cases deployed between the different tiers and, in particular, the distribution of RECO data to T1s, who then serve data on request to T2s, along a topology known as “fat tree”. Indeed, during this period this model was further extended by almost full “mesh” commissioning, meaning that RECO data were shipped to T2s whenever possible, enabling additional physics analyses compared with the “fat tree” model. Computing activities at the CMS Analysis Facility (CAF) have been marked by a good time response for a load almost evenly shared between ALCA (Alignment and Calibration tasks - highest p...

  2. COMPUTING

    Contributions from I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The start of the 2012 run has been busy for Computing. We have reconstructed, archived, and served a larger sample of new data than in 2011, and we are in the process of producing an even larger new sample of simulations at 8 TeV. The running conditions and system performance are largely what was anticipated in the plan, thanks to the hard work and preparation of many people. Heavy ions Heavy Ions has been actively analysing data and preparing for conferences.  Operations Office Figure 6: Transfers from all sites in the last 90 days For ICHEP and the Upgrade efforts, we needed to produce and process record amounts of MC samples while supporting the very successful data-taking. This was a large burden, especially on the team members. Nevertheless the last three months were very successful and the total output was phenomenal, thanks to our dedicated site admins who keep the sites operational and the computing project members who spend countless hours nursing the...

  3. COMPUTING

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction A large fraction of the effort was focused during the last period into the preparation and monitoring of the February tests of Common VO Computing Readiness Challenge 08. CCRC08 is being run by the WLCG collaboration in two phases, between the centres and all experiments. The February test is dedicated to functionality tests, while the May challenge will consist of running at all centres and with full workflows. For this first period, a number of functionality checks of the computing power, data repositories and archives as well as network links are planned. This will help assess the reliability of the systems under a variety of loads, and identifying possible bottlenecks. Many tests are scheduled together with other VOs, allowing the full scale stress test. The data rates (writing, accessing and transfer¬ring) are being checked under a variety of loads and operating conditions, as well as the reliability and transfer rates of the links between Tier-0 and Tier-1s. In addition, the capa...

  4. COMPUTING

    Matthias Kasemann

    Overview The main focus during the summer was to handle data coming from the detector and to perform Monte Carlo production. The lessons learned during the CCRC and CSA08 challenges in May were addressed by dedicated PADA campaigns lead by the Integration team. Big improvements were achieved in the stability and reliability of the CMS Tier1 and Tier2 centres by regular and systematic follow-up of faults and errors with the help of the Savannah bug tracking system. In preparation for data taking the roles of a Computing Run Coordinator and regular computing shifts monitoring the services and infrastructure as well as interfacing to the data operations tasks are being defined. The shift plan until the end of 2008 is being put together. User support worked on documentation and organized several training sessions. The ECoM task force delivered the report on “Use Cases for Start-up of pp Data-Taking” with recommendations and a set of tests to be performed for trigger rates much higher than the ...

  5. COMPUTING

    P. MacBride

    The Computing Software and Analysis Challenge CSA07 has been the main focus of the Computing Project for the past few months. Activities began over the summer with the preparation of the Monte Carlo data sets for the challenge and tests of the new production system at the Tier-0 at CERN. The pre-challenge Monte Carlo production was done in several steps: physics generation, detector simulation, digitization, conversion to RAW format and the samples were run through the High Level Trigger (HLT). The data was then merged into three "Soups": Chowder (ALPGEN), Stew (Filtered Pythia) and Gumbo (Pythia). The challenge officially started when the first Chowder events were reconstructed on the Tier-0 on October 3rd. The data operations teams were very busy during the the challenge period. The MC production teams continued with signal production and processing while the Tier-0 and Tier-1 teams worked on splitting the Soups into Primary Data Sets (PDS), reconstruction and skimming. The storage sys...

  6. COMPUTING

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing operation has been lower as the Run 1 samples are completing and smaller samples for upgrades and preparations are ramping up. Much of the computing activity is focusing on preparations for Run 2 and improvements in data access and flexibility of using resources. Operations Office Data processing was slow in the second half of 2013 with only the legacy re-reconstruction pass of 2011 data being processed at the sites.   Figure 1: MC production and processing was more in demand with a peak of over 750 Million GEN-SIM events in a single month.   Figure 2: The transfer system worked reliably and efficiently and transferred on average close to 520 TB per week with peaks at close to 1.2 PB.   Figure 3: The volume of data moved between CMS sites in the last six months   The tape utilisation was a focus for the operation teams with frequent deletion campaigns from deprecated 7 TeV MC GEN-SIM samples to INVALID datasets, which could be cleaned up...

  7. COMPUTING

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

      Introduction Computing activity has been running at a sustained, high rate as we collect data at high luminosity, process simulation, and begin to process the parked data. The system is functional, though a number of improvements are planned during LS1. Many of the changes will impact users, we hope only in positive ways. We are trying to improve the distributed analysis tools as well as the ability to access more data samples more transparently.  Operations Office Figure 2: Number of events per month, for 2012 Since the June CMS Week, Computing Operations teams successfully completed data re-reconstruction passes and finished the CMSSW_53X MC campaign with over three billion events available in AOD format. Recorded data was successfully processed in parallel, exceeding 1.2 billion raw physics events per month for the first time in October 2012 due to the increase in data-parking rate. In parallel, large efforts were dedicated to WMAgent development and integrati...

  8. The Critical Moment of Transition

    Svalgaard, Lotte

    2018-01-01

    By providing a holding environment to acknowledge sensitivities and address emotions, leadership programmes prove to be powerful spaces for increasing self- and social awareness. However, the challenge is for one to maintain the newly gained self- and social awareness after leaving the holding...... – within the context of an international MBA program – of MBA students applying their knowledge from a Leadership Stream in an International Consultancy Project. This paper contributes to the theory and practice of management learning by providing lenses to understand subjective experiences of critical...... moments of transition, developing the notion of “mindful avoidance,” and pointing out a major and neglected potential space in the design of management education....

  9. Iris recognition using image moments and k-means algorithm.

    Khan, Yaser Daanial; Khan, Sher Afzal; Ahmad, Farooq; Islam, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a biometric technique for identification of a person using the iris image. The iris is first segmented from the acquired image of an eye using an edge detection algorithm. The disk shaped area of the iris is transformed into a rectangular form. Described moments are extracted from the grayscale image which yields a feature vector containing scale, rotation, and translation invariant moments. Images are clustered using the k-means algorithm and centroids for each cluster are computed. An arbitrary image is assumed to belong to the cluster whose centroid is the nearest to the feature vector in terms of Euclidean distance computed. The described model exhibits an accuracy of 98.5%.

  10. Quasirandom geometric networks from low-discrepancy sequences

    Estrada, Ernesto

    2017-08-01

    We define quasirandom geometric networks using low-discrepancy sequences, such as Halton, Sobol, and Niederreiter. The networks are built in d dimensions by considering the d -tuples of digits generated by these sequences as the coordinates of the vertices of the networks in a d -dimensional Id unit hypercube. Then, two vertices are connected by an edge if they are at a distance smaller than a connection radius. We investigate computationally 11 network-theoretic properties of two-dimensional quasirandom networks and compare them with analogous random geometric networks. We also study their degree distribution and their spectral density distributions. We conclude from this intensive computational study that in terms of the uniformity of the distribution of the vertices in the unit square, the quasirandom networks look more random than the random geometric networks. We include an analysis of potential strategies for generating higher-dimensional quasirandom networks, where it is know that some of the low-discrepancy sequences are highly correlated. In this respect, we conclude that up to dimension 20, the use of scrambling, skipping and leaping strategies generate quasirandom networks with the desired properties of uniformity. Finally, we consider a diffusive process taking place on the nodes and edges of the quasirandom and random geometric graphs. We show that the diffusion time is shorter in the quasirandom graphs as a consequence of their larger structural homogeneity. In the random geometric graphs the diffusion produces clusters of concentration that make the process more slow. Such clusters are a direct consequence of the heterogeneous and irregular distribution of the nodes in the unit square in which the generation of random geometric graphs is based on.

  11. COMPUTING

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The Computing Team successfully completed the storage, initial processing, and distribution for analysis of proton-proton data in 2011. There are still a variety of activities ongoing to support winter conference activities and preparations for 2012. Heavy ions The heavy-ion run for 2011 started in early November and has already demonstrated good machine performance and success of some of the more advanced workflows planned for 2011. Data collection will continue until early December. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Operational and deployment support for WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request Manager components, routinely used in production by Data Operations, are provided. The GlideInWMS and components installation are now deployed at CERN, which is added to the GlideInWMS factory placed in the US. There has been new operational collaboration between the CERN team and the UCSD GlideIn factory operators, covering each others time zones by monitoring/debugging pilot jobs sent from the facto...

  12. Near infrared face recognition using Zernike moments and Hermite kernels

    Farokhi, Sajad; Sheikh, U.U.; Flusser, Jan; Yang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 316, č. 1 (2015), s. 234-245 ISSN 0020-0255 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-29225S Keywords : face recognition * Zernike moments * Hermite kernel * Decision fusion * Near infrared Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 3.364, year: 2015 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2015/ZOI/flusser-0444205.pdf

  13. Rotation invariants from Gaussian-Hermite moments of color images

    Yang, B.; Suk, Tomáš; Flusser, Jan; Shi, Z.; Chen, X.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 143, č. 1 (2018), s. 282-291 ISSN 0165-1684 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-16928S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Color images * Object recognition * Rotation invariants * Gaussian–Hermite moments * Joint invariants Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 3.110, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/ZOI/suk-0479748.pdf

  14. The Equivalence Principle and Anomalous Magnetic Moment Experiments

    Alvarez, C.; Mann, R. B.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of testing of the Einstein Equivalence Principle (EEP) using measurements of anomalous magnetic moments of elementary particles. We compute the one loop correction for the $g-2$ anomaly within the class of non metric theories of gravity described by the \\tmu formalism. We find several novel mechanisms for breaking the EEP whose origin is due purely to radiative corrections. We discuss the possibilities of setting new empirical constraints on these effects.

  15. Exact Solutions for Einstein's Hyperbolic Geometric Flow

    He Chunlei

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the Einstein's hyperbolic geometric flow and obtain some interesting exact solutions for this kind of flow. Many interesting properties of these exact solutions have also been analyzed and we believe that these properties of Einstein's hyperbolic geometric flow are very helpful to understanding the Einstein equations and the hyperbolic geometric flow

  16. Multivariate moment closure techniques for stochastic kinetic models

    Lakatos, Eszter; Ale, Angelique; Kirk, Paul D. W.; Stumpf, Michael P. H.

    2015-01-01

    Stochastic effects dominate many chemical and biochemical processes. Their analysis, however, can be computationally prohibitively expensive and a range of approximation schemes have been proposed to lighten the computational burden. These, notably the increasingly popular linear noise approximation and the more general moment expansion methods, perform well for many dynamical regimes, especially linear systems. At higher levels of nonlinearity, it comes to an interplay between the nonlinearities and the stochastic dynamics, which is much harder to capture correctly by such approximations to the true stochastic processes. Moment-closure approaches promise to address this problem by capturing higher-order terms of the temporally evolving probability distribution. Here, we develop a set of multivariate moment-closures that allows us to describe the stochastic dynamics of nonlinear systems. Multivariate closure captures the way that correlations between different molecular species, induced by the reaction dynamics, interact with stochastic effects. We use multivariate Gaussian, gamma, and lognormal closure and illustrate their use in the context of two models that have proved challenging to the previous attempts at approximating stochastic dynamics: oscillations in p53 and Hes1. In addition, we consider a larger system, Erk-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinases signalling, where conventional stochastic simulation approaches incur unacceptably high computational costs

  17. Multivariate moment closure techniques for stochastic kinetic models

    Lakatos, Eszter, E-mail: e.lakatos13@imperial.ac.uk; Ale, Angelique; Kirk, Paul D. W.; Stumpf, Michael P. H., E-mail: m.stumpf@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Life Sciences, Centre for Integrative Systems Biology and Bioinformatics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-07

    Stochastic effects dominate many chemical and biochemical processes. Their analysis, however, can be computationally prohibitively expensive and a range of approximation schemes have been proposed to lighten the computational burden. These, notably the increasingly popular linear noise approximation and the more general moment expansion methods, perform well for many dynamical regimes, especially linear systems. At higher levels of nonlinearity, it comes to an interplay between the nonlinearities and the stochastic dynamics, which is much harder to capture correctly by such approximations to the true stochastic processes. Moment-closure approaches promise to address this problem by capturing higher-order terms of the temporally evolving probability distribution. Here, we develop a set of multivariate moment-closures that allows us to describe the stochastic dynamics of nonlinear systems. Multivariate closure captures the way that correlations between different molecular species, induced by the reaction dynamics, interact with stochastic effects. We use multivariate Gaussian, gamma, and lognormal closure and illustrate their use in the context of two models that have proved challenging to the previous attempts at approximating stochastic dynamics: oscillations in p53 and Hes1. In addition, we consider a larger system, Erk-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinases signalling, where conventional stochastic simulation approaches incur unacceptably high computational costs.

  18. Noncommutative QED and anomalous dipole moments

    Riad, I.F.; Sheikh-Jabbari, M.M.

    2000-09-01

    We study QED on noncommutative spaces, NCQED. In particular we present the detailed calculation for the noncommutative electron-photon vertex and show that the Ward identity is satisfied. We discuss that in the noncommutative case moving electron will show electric dipole effects. In addition, we work out the electric and magnetic dipole moments up to one loop level. For the magnetic moment we show that noncommutative electron has an intrinsic (spin independent) magnetic moment. (author)

  19. Electric dipole moment of diatomic molecules

    Rosato, A.

    1983-01-01

    The electric dipole moment of some diatomic molecules is calculated using the Variational Cellular Method. The results obtained for the molecules CO, HB, HF and LiH are compared with other calculations and with experimental data. It is shown that there is strong dependence of the electric dipole moment with respect to the geometry of the cells. It is discussed the possibility of fixing the geometry of the problem by giving the experimental value of the dipole moment. (Author) [pt

  20. Electric dipole moment of diatomic molecules

    Rosato, A.

    1983-01-01

    The electric dipole moment of some diatomic molecules is calculated using the Variational Cellular Method. The results obtained for the CO, HB, HF and LiH molecules are compared with other calculations and with experimental data. It is shown that there is strong dependence of the electric dipole moment with respect to the geometry of the cells. The possibility of fixing the geometry of the problem by giving the experimental value of the dipole moment is discussed. (Author) [pt

  1. Restrictions on the neutrino magnetic dipole moment

    Duncan, M.J.; Sankar, S.U.; Grifols, J.A.; Mendez, A.

    1987-01-01

    We examine mechanisms for producing neutrino magnetic moments from a wide class of particle theories which are extensions of the standard model. We show that it is difficult to naturally obtain a moment greater than ≅ 10 -2 electron Bohr magnetons. Thus models of phenomena requiring moments of order ≅ 10 -10 magnetons, such as those proposed as a resolution to the solar neutrino puzzle, are in conflict with current perceptions in particle physics. (orig.)

  2. W-boson electric dipole moment

    He, X.; McKellar, B.H.J.

    1990-01-01

    The W-boson electric dipole moment is calculated in the SU(3) C xSU(2) L xU(1) Y model with several Higgs-boson doublets. Using the constraint on the CP-violating parameters from the experimental upper bound of the neutron electric dipole moment, we find that the W-boson electric dipole moment is constrained to be less than 10 -4

  3. Geometrically Induced Interactions and Bifurcations

    Binder, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    In order to evaluate the proper boundary conditions in spin dynamics eventually leading to the emergence of natural and artificial solitons providing for strong interactions and potentials with monopole charges, the paper outlines a new concept referring to a curvature-invariant formalism, where superintegrability is given by a special isometric condition. Instead of referring to the spin operators and Casimir/Euler invariants as the generator of rotations, a curvature-invariant description is introduced utilizing a double Gudermann mapping function (generator of sine Gordon solitons and Mercator projection) cross-relating two angular variables, where geometric phases and rotations arise between surfaces of different curvature. Applying this stereographic projection to a superintegrable Hamiltonian can directly map linear oscillators to Kepler/Coulomb potentials and/or monopoles with Pöschl-Teller potentials and vice versa. In this sense a large scale Kepler/Coulomb (gravitational, electro-magnetic) wave dynamics with a hyperbolic metric could be mapped as a geodesic vertex flow to a local oscillator singularity (Dirac monopole) with spherical metrics and vice versa. Attracting fixed points and dynamic constraints are given by special isometries with magic precession angles. The nonlinear angular encoding directly provides for a Shannon mutual information entropy measure of the geodesic phase space flow. The emerging monopole patterns show relations to spiral Fresnel holography and Berry/Aharonov-Bohm geometric phases subject to bifurcation instabilities and singularities from phase ambiguities due to a local (entropy) overload. Neutral solitons and virtual patterns emerging and mediating in the overlap region between charged or twisted holographic patterns are visualized and directly assigned to the Berry geometric phase revealing the role of photons, neutrons, and neutrinos binding repulsive charges in Coulomb, strong and weak interaction.

  4. Geometrical approach to elementary particles

    Elbaz, E.; Meyer, J.

    Starting with an isospin doublet R = (T/V) with spin 1/2 and hypercharge 1/3, the rishon considered as a vector in the color-space, we define the dirishon R* rank-one tensor product with spin 0 and hypercharge 2/3. Leptons and quarks of the first generation are then obtained as the scalar and dot product l = R*. R and f vector = R* Λ R'. The internal quantum numbers are then expressed with the rishon number. The lepton and quark generations are then defined and a quark mass formula proposed. Baryon magnetic moments are calculated and compared to experiment [fr

  5. COMPUTING

    M. Kasemann

    CMS relies on a well functioning, distributed computing infrastructure. The Site Availability Monitoring (SAM) and the Job Robot submission have been very instrumental for site commissioning in order to increase availability of more sites such that they are available to participate in CSA07 and are ready to be used for analysis. The commissioning process has been further developed, including "lessons learned" documentation via the CMS twiki. Recently the visualization, presentation and summarizing of SAM tests for sites has been redesigned, it is now developed by the central ARDA project of WLCG. Work to test the new gLite Workload Management System was performed; a 4 times increase in throughput with respect to LCG Resource Broker is observed. CMS has designed and launched a new-generation traffic load generator called "LoadTest" to commission and to keep exercised all data transfer routes in the CMS PhE-DEx topology. Since mid-February, a transfer volume of about 12 P...

  6. Non-stoquastic Hamiltonians in quantum annealing via geometric phases

    Vinci, Walter; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2017-09-01

    We argue that a complete description of quantum annealing implemented with continuous variables must take into account the non-adiabatic Aharonov-Anandan geometric phase that arises when the system Hamiltonian changes during the anneal. We show that this geometric effect leads to the appearance of non-stoquasticity in the effective quantum Ising Hamiltonians that are typically used to describe quantum annealing with flux qubits. We explicitly demonstrate the effect of this geometric non-stoquasticity when quantum annealing is performed with a system of one and two coupled flux qubits. The realization of non-stoquastic Hamiltonians has important implications from a computational complexity perspective, since it is believed that in many cases quantum annealing with stoquastic Hamiltonians can be efficiently simulated via classical algorithms such as Quantum Monte Carlo. It is well known that the direct implementation of non-stoquastic Hamiltonians with flux qubits is particularly challenging. Our results suggest an alternative path for the implementation of non-stoquasticity via geometric phases that can be exploited for computational purposes.

  7. Geometric Topology and Shape Theory

    Segal, Jack

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this international conference the third of its type was to survey recent developments in Geometric Topology and Shape Theory with an emphasis on their interaction. The volume contains original research papers and carefully selected survey of currently active areas. The main topics and themes represented by the papers of this volume include decomposition theory, cell-like mappings and CE-equivalent compacta, covering dimension versus cohomological dimension, ANR's and LCn-compacta, homology manifolds, embeddings of continua into manifolds, complement theorems in shape theory, approximate fibrations and shape fibrations, fibered shape, exact homologies and strong shape theory.

  8. Geometric approach to soliton equations

    Sasaki, R.

    1979-09-01

    A class of nonlinear equations that can be solved in terms of nxn scattering problem is investigated. A systematic geometric method of exploiting conservation laws and related equations, the so-called prolongation structure, is worked out. The nxn problem is reduced to nsub(n-1)x(n-1) problems and finally to 2x2 problems, which have been comprehensively investigated recently by the author. A general method of deriving the infinite numbers of polynomial conservation laws for an nxn problem is presented. The cases of 3x3 and 2x2 problems are discussed explicitly. (Auth.)

  9. Geometric Rationalization for Freeform Architecture

    Jiang, Caigui

    2016-06-20

    The emergence of freeform architecture provides interesting geometric challenges with regards to the design and manufacturing of large-scale structures. To design these architectural structures, we have to consider two types of constraints. First, aesthetic constraints are important because the buildings have to be visually impressive. Sec- ond, functional constraints are important for the performance of a building and its e cient construction. This thesis contributes to the area of architectural geometry. Specifically, we are interested in the geometric rationalization of freeform architec- ture with the goal of combining aesthetic and functional constraints and construction requirements. Aesthetic requirements typically come from designers and architects. To obtain visually pleasing structures, they favor smoothness of the building shape, but also smoothness of the visible patterns on the surface. Functional requirements typically come from the engineers involved in the construction process. For exam- ple, covering freeform structures using planar panels is much cheaper than using non-planar ones. Further, constructed buildings have to be stable and should not collapse. In this thesis, we explore the geometric rationalization of freeform archi- tecture using four specific example problems inspired by real life applications. We achieve our results by developing optimization algorithms and a theoretical study of the underlying geometrical structure of the problems. The four example problems are the following: (1) The design of shading and lighting systems which are torsion-free structures with planar beams based on quad meshes. They satisfy the functionality requirements of preventing light from going inside a building as shad- ing systems or reflecting light into a building as lighting systems. (2) The Design of freeform honeycomb structures that are constructed based on hex-dominant meshes with a planar beam mounted along each edge. The beams intersect without

  10. Field guide to geometrical optics

    Greivenkamp, John E

    2004-01-01

    This Field Guide derives from the treatment of geometrical optics that has evolved from both the undergraduate and graduate programs at the Optical Sciences Center at the University of Arizona. The development is both rigorous and complete, and it features a consistent notation and sign convention. This volume covers Gaussian imagery, paraxial optics, first-order optical system design, system examples, illumination, chromatic effects, and an introduction to aberrations. The appendices provide supplemental material on radiometry and photometry, the human eye, and several other topics.

  11. Geometric phase from dielectric matrix

    Banerjee, D.

    2005-10-01

    The dielectric property of the anisotropic optical medium is found by considering the polarized photon as two component spinor of spherical harmonics. The Geometric Phase of a polarized photon has been evaluated in two ways: the phase two-form of the dielectric matrix through a twist and the Pancharatnam phase (GP) by changing the angular momentum of the incident polarized photon over a closed triangular path on the extended Poincare sphere. The helicity in connection with the spin angular momentum of the chiral photon plays the key role in developing these phase holonomies. (author)

  12. A history of geometrical methods

    Coolidge, Julian Lowell

    2013-01-01

    Full and authoritative, this history of the techniques for dealing with geometric questions begins with synthetic geometry and its origins in Babylonian and Egyptian mathematics; reviews the contributions of China, Japan, India, and Greece; and discusses the non-Euclidean geometries. Subsequent sections cover algebraic geometry, starting with the precursors and advancing to the great awakening with Descartes; and differential geometry, from the early work of Huygens and Newton to projective and absolute differential geometry. The author's emphasis on proofs and notations, his comparisons betwe

  13. Geometrical optics and optimal transport.

    Rubinstein, Jacob; Wolansky, Gershon

    2017-10-01

    The Fermat principle is generalized to a system of rays. It is shown that all the ray mappings that are compatible with two given intensities of a monochromatic wave, measured at two planes, are stationary points of a canonical functional, which is the weighted average of the actions of all the rays. It is further shown that there exist at least two stationary points for this functional, implying that in the geometrical optics regime the phase from intensity problem has inherently more than one solution. The caustic structures of all the possible ray mappings are analyzed. A number of simulations illustrate the theoretical considerations.

  14. How to introduce the magnetic dipole moment

    Bezerra, M; Kort-Kamp, W J M; Cougo-Pinto, M V; Farina, C

    2012-01-01

    We show how the concept of the magnetic dipole moment can be introduced in the same way as the concept of the electric dipole moment in introductory courses on electromagnetism. Considering a localized steady current distribution, we make a Taylor expansion directly in the Biot-Savart law to obtain, explicitly, the dominant contribution of the magnetic field at distant points, identifying the magnetic dipole moment of the distribution. We also present a simple but general demonstration of the torque exerted by a uniform magnetic field on a current loop of general form, not necessarily planar. For pedagogical reasons we start by reviewing briefly the concept of the electric dipole moment. (paper)

  15. Gross shell structure of moments of inertia

    Deleplanque, M.A.; Frauendorf, S.; Pashkevich, V.V.; Chu, S.Y.; Unzhakova, A.

    2002-01-01

    Average yrast moments of inertia at high spins, where the pairing correlations are expected to be largely absent, were found to deviate from the rigid-body values. This indicates that shell effects contribute to the moment of inertia. We discuss the gross dependence of moments of inertia and shell energies on the neutron number in terms of the semiclassical periodic orbit theory. We show that the ground-state shell energies, nuclear deformations and deviations from rigid-body moments of inertia are all due to the same periodic orbits

  16. Analysis of scaled-factorial-moment data

    Seibert, D.

    1990-01-01

    We discuss the two standard constructions used in the search for intermittency, the exclusive and inclusive scaled factorial moments. We propose the use of a new scaled factorial moment that reduces to the exclusive moment in the appropriate limit and is free of undesirable multiplicity correlations that are contained in the inclusive moment. We show that there are some similarities among most of the models that have been proposed to explain factorial-moment data, and that these similarities can be used to increase the efficiency of testing these models. We begin by calculating factorial moments from a simple independent-cluster model that assumes only approximate boost invariance of the cluster rapidity distribution and an approximate relation among the moments of the cluster multiplicity distribution. We find two scaling laws that are essentially model independent. The first scaling law relates the moments to each other with a simple formula, indicating that the different factorial moments are not independent. The second scaling law relates samples with different rapidity densities. We find evidence for much larger clusters in heavy-ion data than in light-ion data, indicating possible spatial intermittency in the heavy-ion events

  17. A robust two-node, 13 moment quadrature method of moments for dilute particle flows including wall bouncing

    Sun, Dan; Garmory, Andrew; Page, Gary J.

    2017-02-01

    For flows where the particle number density is low and the Stokes number is relatively high, as found when sand or ice is ingested into aircraft gas turbine engines, streams of particles can cross each other's path or bounce from a solid surface without being influenced by inter-particle collisions. The aim of this work is to develop an Eulerian method to simulate these types of flow. To this end, a two-node quadrature-based moment method using 13 moments is proposed. In the proposed algorithm thirteen moments of particle velocity, including cross-moments of second order, are used to determine the weights and abscissas of the two nodes and to set up the association between the velocity components in each node. Previous Quadrature Method of Moments (QMOM) algorithms either use more than two nodes, leading to increased computational expense, or are shown here to give incorrect results under some circumstances. This method gives the computational efficiency advantages of only needing two particle phase velocity fields whilst ensuring that a correct combination of weights and abscissas is returned for any arbitrary combination of particle trajectories without the need for any further assumptions. Particle crossing and wall bouncing with arbitrary combinations of angles are demonstrated using the method in a two-dimensional scheme. The ability of the scheme to include the presence of drag from a carrier phase is also demonstrated, as is bouncing off surfaces with inelastic collisions. The method is also applied to the Taylor-Green vortex flow test case and is found to give results superior to the existing two-node QMOM method and is in good agreement with results from Lagrangian modelling of this case.

  18. Vibrationally averaged dipole moments of methane and benzene isotopologues

    Arapiraca, A. F. C. [Laboratório de Átomos e Moléculas Especiais, Departamento de Física, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, P. O. Box 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Minas Gerais, Coordenação de Ciências, CEFET-MG, Campus I, 30.421-169 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Mohallem, J. R., E-mail: rachid@fisica.ufmg.br [Laboratório de Átomos e Moléculas Especiais, Departamento de Física, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, P. O. Box 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2016-04-14

    DFT-B3LYP post-Born-Oppenheimer (finite-nuclear-mass-correction (FNMC)) calculations of vibrationally averaged isotopic dipole moments of methane and benzene, which compare well with experimental values, are reported. For methane, in addition to the principal vibrational contribution to the molecular asymmetry, FNMC accounts for the surprisingly large Born-Oppenheimer error of about 34% to the dipole moments. This unexpected result is explained in terms of concurrent electronic and vibrational contributions. The calculated dipole moment of C{sub 6}H{sub 3}D{sub 3} is about twice as large as the measured dipole moment of C{sub 6}H{sub 5}D. Computational progress is advanced concerning applications to larger systems and the choice of appropriate basis sets. The simpler procedure of performing vibrational averaging on the Born-Oppenheimer level and then adding the FNMC contribution evaluated at the equilibrium distance is shown to be appropriate. Also, the basis set choice is made by heuristic analysis of the physical behavior of the systems, instead of by comparison with experiments.

  19. Image understanding using geometric context

    Zhang, Xiaochun; Liu, Chuancai

    2017-07-01

    A Gibbs Sampler based topic model for image annotation, which takes into account the interaction between visual geometric context and related topic, is presented. Most of the existing topic models for scene annotation use segmentation-based algorithm. However, topic models using segmentation algorithm alone sometimes can produce erroneous results when used to annotate real-life scene pictures. Therefore, our algorithm makes use of peaks of image surface instead of segmentation regions. Existing approaches use SIFT algorithm and treat the peaks as round blob features. In this paper, the peaks are treated as anisotropic blob features, which models low level visual elements more precisely. In order to better utilize visual features, our model not only takes into consideration visual codeword, but also considers influence of visual properties to topic formation, such as orientation, width, length and color. The basic idea is based on the assumption that different topics will produce distinct visual appearance, and different visual appearance is helpful to distinguish topics. During the learning stage, each topic will be associated with a set of distributions of visual properties, which depicts appearance of the topic. This paper considers more geometric properties, which will reduce topic uncertainty and learn the images better. Tested with Corel5K, SAIAPR-TC12 and Espgame100k Datasets, our method performs moderately better than some state of the arts methods.

  20. Geometrical approach to fluid models

    Kuvshinov, B.N.; Schep, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    Differential geometry based upon the Cartan calculus of differential forms is applied to investigate invariant properties of equations that describe the motion of continuous media. The main feature of this approach is that physical quantities are treated as geometrical objects. The geometrical notion of invariance is introduced in terms of Lie derivatives and a general procedure for the construction of local and integral fluid invariants is presented. The solutions of the equations for invariant fields can be written in terms of Lagrange variables. A generalization of the Hamiltonian formalism for finite-dimensional systems to continuous media is proposed. Analogously to finite-dimensional systems, Hamiltonian fluids are introduced as systems that annihilate an exact two-form. It is shown that Euler and ideal, charged fluids satisfy this local definition of a Hamiltonian structure. A new class of scalar invariants of Hamiltonian fluids is constructed that generalizes the invariants that are related with gauge transformations and with symmetries (Noether). copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  1. Geometric back-reaction in pre-inflation from relativistic quantum geometry

    Arcodia, Marcos R.A. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR), Mar del Plata (Argentina); Bellini, Mauricio [Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Mar del Plata (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR), Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2016-06-15

    The pre-inflationary evolution of the universe describes the beginning of the expansion from a static initial state, such that the Hubble parameter is initially zero, but increases to an asymptotic constant value, in which it could achieve a de Sitter (inflationary) expansion. The expansion is driven by a background phantom field. The back-reaction effects at this moment should describe vacuum geometrical excitations, which are studied in detail in this work using relativistic quantum geometry. (orig.)

  2. The neutron electric dipole moment

    He, X.G.; McKellar, B.H.J.; Pakvasa, S.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic study was made of the electric dipole moment (EDM) of neutron D n in various models of CP violation. It was found that in the standard KM model with 3 families the neutron EDM is in the range 1.4x10 -33 ≤ D n ≤ 1.6x10 -31 ecm; that the two Higgs doublet model has approximately the same value of D n as the standard model; that D n in the Weinberg model is predicted to satisfy D n > 10 -25 ecm; that in a class of left-right symmetric models D n is of the order of 10 -26-11 ecm; that in supersymmetric models D n is of the order 10 -22 φ ecm with φ being the possible phase difference of the phases of gluino mass and the gluino-quark-smark mixing matrix and that the strong CP parameter θ is found to be θ -9 , using the present experimental limit that D n -25 ecm with 90% confidence. 65 refs., 10 figs

  3. Kant’s Machiavellian Moment

    Jay Foster

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available At least two recent collections of essays – Postmodernism and the Enlightenment (2001 and What’s Left of Enlightenment?: A Postmodern Question (2001 – have responded to postmodern critiques of Enlightenment by arguing that Enlightenment philosophes themselves embraced a number of post-modern themes. This essay situates Kant’s essay Was ist Aufklärung (1784 in the context of this recent literature about the appropriate characterization of modernity and the Enlightenment. Adopting an internalist reading of Kant’s Aufklärung essay, this paper observes that Kant is surprisingly ambivalent about who might be Enlightened and unspecific about when Enlightenment might be achieved. The paper argues that this is because Kant is concerned less with elucidating his concept of Enlightenment and more with characterizing a political condition that might provide the conditions for the possibility of Enlightenment. This paper calls this political condition modernity and it is achieved when civil order can be maintained alongside fractious and possibly insoluble public disagreement about matters of conscience, including the nature and possibility of Enlightenment. Thus, the audience for the Aufklärung essay is not the tax collector, soldier or clergyman, but rather the sovereign. Kant enjoins and advises the prince that discord and debate about matters of conscience need not entail any political unrest or upheaval. It is in this restricted (Pocockian sense that the Enlightenment essay is Kant’s Machiavellian moment.

  4. Moment of inertia of liquid in a tank

    Lee Gyeong Joong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the inertial properties of fully filled liquid in a tank were studied based on the potential theory. The analytic solution was obtained for the rectangular tank, and the numerical solutions using Green’s 2nd identity were obtained for other shapes. The inertia of liquid behaves like solid in recti-linear acceleration. But under rotational acceleration, the moment of inertia of liquid becomes small compared to that of solid. The shapes of tank investigated in this study were ellipse, rectangle, hexagon, and octagon with various aspect ratios. The numerical solu¬tions were compared with analytic solution, and an ad hoc semi-analytical approximate formula is proposed herein and this formula gives very good predictions for the moment of inertia of the liquid in a tank of several different geometrical shapes. The results of this study will be useful in analyzing of the motion of LNG/LPG tanker, liquid cargo ship, and damaged ship.

  5. Advances on geometric flux optical design method

    García-Botella, Ángel; Fernández-Balbuena, Antonio Álvarez; Vázquez, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    Nonimaging optics is focused on the study of methods to design concentrators or illuminators systems. It can be included in the area of photometry and radiometry and it is governed by the laws of geometrical optics. The field vector method, which starts with the definition of the irradiance vector E, is one of the techniques used in nonimaging optics. Called "Geometrical flux vector" it has provide ideal designs. The main property of this model is, its ability to estimate how radiant energy is transferred by the optical system, from the concepts of field line, flux tube and pseudopotential surface, overcoming traditional raytrace methods. Nevertheless this model has been developed only at an academic level, where characteristic optical parameters are ideal not real and the studied geometries are simple. The main objective of the present paper is the application of the vector field method to the analysis and design of real concentration and illumination systems. We propose the development of a calculation tool for optical simulations by vector field, using algorithms based on Fermat`s principle, as an alternative to traditional tools for optical simulations by raytrace, based on reflection and refraction law. This new tool provides, first, traditional simulations results: efficiency, illuminance/irradiance calculations, angular distribution of light- with lower computation time, photometrical information needs about a few tens of field lines, in comparison with million rays needed nowadays. On the other hand the tool will provides new information as vector field maps produced by the system, composed by field lines and quasipotential surfaces. We show our first results with the vector field simulation tool.

  6. Confronting Higgcision with electric dipole moments

    Cheung, Kingman [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Division of Quantum Phases and Devices, School of Physics, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Sik [Department of Physics, Chonnam National University, 300 Yongbong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju, 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Senaha, Eibun [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Tseng, Po-Yan [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-26

    Current data on the signal strengths and angular spectrum of the 125.5 GeV Higgs boson still allow a CP-mixed state, namely, the pseudoscalar coupling to the top quark can be as sizable as the scalar coupling: C{sub u}{sup S}≈C{sub u}{sup P}=1/2. CP violation can then arise and manifest in sizable electric dipole moments (EDMs). In the framework of two-Higgs-doublet models, we not only update the Higgs precision (Higgcision) study on the couplings with the most updated Higgs signal strength data, but also compute all the Higgs-mediated contributions from the 125.5 GeV Higgs boson to the EDMs, and confront the allowed parameter space against the existing constraints from the EDM measurements of Thallium, neutron, Mercury, and Thorium monoxide. We found that the combined EDM constraints restrict the pseudoscalar coupling to be less than about 10{sup −2}, unless there are contributions from other Higgs bosons, supersymmetric particles, or other exotic particles that delicately cancel the current Higgs-mediated contributions.

  7. GENERATION OF GEOMETRIC ORNAMENTS IN ANCIENT MOSAIC ART

    SASS Ludmila

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines geometrical ornaments from ancient mosaic.We studied the geometric generation by using Computer Aided Graphics for three examples of ancient mosaic: a mosaic of Ancient Corinth, a mosaic of the sacred geometry Flower of Life (exposed in the National Museum of Israel and a mosaic of fortress Masada - Israel. The technique of drawing ancient mosaic is recomposed using computer aided graphics. A program has been developed that can help draw a petal-type arc (semicircle of the mosaic that is the Byzantine church of Masada. Based on these mosaics, other variants of aesthetic images in monochrome or black and white and polychrome were drawn, all of which can be materialized in decorative art to embellish various surfaces: walls, floors, pools, fountains, etc.

  8. Image-Based Geometric Modeling and Mesh Generation

    2013-01-01

    As a new interdisciplinary research area, “image-based geometric modeling and mesh generation” integrates image processing, geometric modeling and mesh generation with finite element method (FEM) to solve problems in computational biomedicine, materials sciences and engineering. It is well known that FEM is currently well-developed and efficient, but mesh generation for complex geometries (e.g., the human body) still takes about 80% of the total analysis time and is the major obstacle to reduce the total computation time. It is mainly because none of the traditional approaches is sufficient to effectively construct finite element meshes for arbitrarily complicated domains, and generally a great deal of manual interaction is involved in mesh generation. This contributed volume, the first for such an interdisciplinary topic, collects the latest research by experts in this area. These papers cover a broad range of topics, including medical imaging, image alignment and segmentation, image-to-mesh conversion,...

  9. Local electric dipole moments for periodic systems via density functional theory embedding.

    Luber, Sandra

    2014-12-21

    We describe a novel approach for the calculation of local electric dipole moments for periodic systems. Since the position operator is ill-defined in periodic systems, maximally localized Wannier functions based on the Berry-phase approach are usually employed for the evaluation of local contributions to the total electric dipole moment of the system. We propose an alternative approach: within a subsystem-density functional theory based embedding scheme, subset electric dipole moments are derived without any additional localization procedure, both for hybrid and non-hybrid exchange-correlation functionals. This opens the way to a computationally efficient evaluation of local electric dipole moments in (molecular) periodic systems as well as their rigorous splitting into atomic electric dipole moments. As examples, Infrared spectra of liquid ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate are presented, which are commonly employed as solvents in Lithium ion batteries.

  10. Local electric dipole moments for periodic systems via density functional theory embedding

    Luber, Sandra, E-mail: sandra.luber@chem.uzh.ch [Institut für Chemie, Universität Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-12-21

    We describe a novel approach for the calculation of local electric dipole moments for periodic systems. Since the position operator is ill-defined in periodic systems, maximally localized Wannier functions based on the Berry-phase approach are usually employed for the evaluation of local contributions to the total electric dipole moment of the system. We propose an alternative approach: within a subsystem-density functional theory based embedding scheme, subset electric dipole moments are derived without any additional localization procedure, both for hybrid and non-hybrid exchange–correlation functionals. This opens the way to a computationally efficient evaluation of local electric dipole moments in (molecular) periodic systems as well as their rigorous splitting into atomic electric dipole moments. As examples, Infrared spectra of liquid ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate are presented, which are commonly employed as solvents in Lithium ion batteries.

  11. Closed forms and multi-moment maps

    Madsen, Thomas Bruun; Swann, Andrew Francis

    2013-01-01

    We extend the notion of multi-moment map to geometries defined by closed forms of arbitrary degree. We give fundamental existence and uniqueness results and discuss a number of essential examples, including geometries related to special holonomy. For forms of degree four, multi-moment maps are gu...

  12. Magnetic moment of single layer graphene rings

    Margulis, V. A.; Karpunin, V. V.; Mironova, K. I.

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic moment of single layer graphene rings is investigated. An analytical expression for the magnetic moment as a function of the magnetic field flux through the one-dimensional quantum rings is obtained. This expression has the oscillation character. The oscillation period is equal to one flux quanta.

  13. 6-quark contribution to nuclear magnetic moments

    Ito, H.

    1985-01-01

    The magnetic moments of nuclei with LS closed shell +/-1 particle are calculated. Core polarization and meson exchange current are treated realistically in order to single out the 6-quark contribution. Overall agreement with experimental values is quite good. It is shown that the 6-quark system contributes to the respective iso-vector and iso-scalar moments with reasonable magnitudes

  14. Dynamical moments of inertia for superdeformed nuclei

    Obikhod, T.V.

    1995-01-01

    The method of quantum groups has been applied for calculation the dynamical moments of inertia for the yrast superdeformed bands in 194 Hg and 192 Hg as well as to calculation of the dynamical moments of inertia of superdeformed bands in 150 Gd and 148 Gd

  15. Polarization electric dipole moment in nonaxial nuclei

    Denisov, V.Yu.; Davidovskaya, O.I.

    1996-01-01

    An expression for the macroscopic polarization electric dipole moment is obtained for nonaxial nuclei whose radii of the proton and neutron surfaces are related by a linear equation. Dipole transitions associated with the polarization electric dipole moment are analyzed for static and dynamical multipole deformations

  16. Droplet-model electric dipole moments

    Myers, W.D.; Swiatecki, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    Denisov's recent criticism of the droplet-model formula for the dipole moment of a deformed nucleus as derived by Dorso et al., it shown to be invalid. This helps to clarify the relation of theory to the measured dipole moments, as discussed in the review article by Aberg et al. (orig.)

  17. Teachable Moment: Google Earth Takes Us There

    Williams, Ann; Davinroy, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    In the current educational climate, where clearly articulated learning objectives are required, it is clear that the spontaneous teachable moment still has its place. Authors Ann Williams and Thomas Davinroy think that instructors from almost any discipline can employ Google Earth as a tool to take advantage of teachable moments through the…

  18. The elastic theory of shells using geometric algebra.

    Gregory, A L; Lasenby, J; Agarwal, A

    2017-03-01

    We present a novel derivation of the elastic theory of shells. We use the language of geometric algebra, which allows us to express the fundamental laws in component-free form, thus aiding physical interpretation. It also provides the tools to express equations in an arbitrary coordinate system, which enhances their usefulness. The role of moments and angular velocity, and the apparent use by previous authors of an unphysical angular velocity, has been clarified through the use of a bivector representation. In the linearized theory, clarification of previous coordinate conventions which have been the cause of confusion is provided, and the introduction of prior strain into the linearized theory of shells is made possible.

  19. Recognition of Simple 3D Geometrical Objects under Partial Occlusion

    Barchunova, Alexandra; Sommer, Gerald

    In this paper we present a novel procedure for contour-based recognition of partially occluded three-dimensional objects. In our approach we use images of real and rendered objects whose contours have been deformed by a restricted change of the viewpoint. The preparatory part consists of contour extraction, preprocessing, local structure analysis and feature extraction. The main part deals with an extended construction and functionality of the classifier ensemble Adaptive Occlusion Classifier (AOC). It relies on a hierarchical fragmenting algorithm to perform a local structure analysis which is essential when dealing with occlusions. In the experimental part of this paper we present classification results for five classes of simple geometrical figures: prism, cylinder, half cylinder, a cube, and a bridge. We compare classification results for three classical feature extractors: Fourier descriptors, pseudo Zernike and Zernike moments.

  20. Geometrical charged-particle optics

    Rose, Harald

    2012-01-01

    This second edition is an extended version of the first edition of Geometrical Charged-Particle Optics. The updated reference monograph is intended as a guide for researchers and graduate students who are seeking a comprehensive treatment of the design of instruments and beam-guiding systems of charged particles and their propagation in electromagnetic fields. Wave aspects are included in this edition for explaining electron holography, the Aharanov-Bohm effect and the resolution of electron microscopes limited by diffraction. Several methods for calculating the electromagnetic field are presented and procedures are outlined for calculating the properties of systems with arbitrarily curved axis. Detailed methods are presented for designing and optimizing special components such as aberration correctors, spectrometers, energy filters monochromators, ion traps, electron mirrors and cathode lenses. In particular, the optics of rotationally symmetric lenses, quadrupoles, and systems composed of these elements are...