WorldWideScience

Sample records for geomagnetic westward drift

  1. Latitude-dependence and dispersion of the westward drift in the geomagnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The main geomagnetic field models of IGRF1900---2000 are used to study the latitude-dependence of the westward drift in the main field. The results show that the latitude-dependence exists in the magnetic components with different wavelengths (m=l-10). The globai-average westward drift rate of the component of m=l is 0.189°/a with the maximum of 0.295°/a at latitudes 40°-45°. The component of m=2 has an average drift rate of 0.411°/a with the maximum of 1.305°/a at latitude -60°. As for the components with further shorter wavelengths, the drift is generally restricted in a limited latitude range, and has many smaller drift rates. This latitude-dependence of westward drift can not be explained by rigid rotation of the earth's core. The results of this note also show that there is a negative dispersion in the westward drift, namely the components of long wavelengths drift faster than those of short wavelengths.This dispersion feature is not in agreement with Hide's MHD model. It is likely needed to find a new mechanism for explaining the observed feature of dispersion.

  2. Inner Core Rotation from Geomagnetic Westward Drift and a Stationary Spherical Vortex in Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, C. V.

    1999-01-01

    The idea that geomagnetic westward drift indicates convective leveling of the planetary momentum gradient within Earth's core is pursued in search of a differentially rotating mean state, upon which various oscillations and secular effects might be superimposed. The desired state conforms to roughly spherical boundary conditions, minimizes dissipative interference with convective cooling in the bulk of the core, yet may aide core cooling by depositing heat in the uppermost core and lower mantle. The variational calculus of stationary dissipation applied to a spherical vortex within the core yields an interesting differential rotation profile akin to spherical Couette flow bounded by thin Hartmann layers. Four boundary conditions are required. To concentrate shear induced dissipation near the core-mantle boundary, these are taken to be: (i) no-slip at the core-mantle interface; (ii) geomagnetically estimated bulk westward flow at the base of the core-mantle boundary layer; (iii) no-slip at the inner-outer core interface; and, to describe magnetic locking of the inner core to the deep outer core, (iv) hydrodynamically stress-free at the inner-outer core boundary. By boldly assuming the axial core angular momentum anomaly to be zero, the super-rotation of the inner core is calculated to be at most 1.5 degrees per year.

  3. Electromagnetically driven westward drift and inner-core superrotation in Earth’s core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livermore, Philip W.; Hollerbach, Rainer; Jackson, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    A 3D numerical model of the earth’s core with a viscosity two orders of magnitude lower than the state of the art suggests a link between the observed westward drift of the magnetic field and superrotation of the inner core. In our model, the axial electromagnetic torque has a dominant influence only at the surface and in the deepest reaches of the core, where it respectively drives a broad westward flow rising to an axisymmetric equatorial jet and imparts an eastward-directed torque on the solid inner core. Subtle changes in the structure of the internal magnetic field may alter not just the magnitude but the direction of these torques. This not only suggests that the quasi-oscillatory nature of inner-core superrotation [Tkalčić H, Young M, Bodin T, Ngo S, Sambridge M (2013) The shuffling rotation of the earth’s inner core revealed by earthquake doublets. Nat Geosci 6:497–502.] may be driven by decadal changes in the magnetic field, but further that historical periods in which the field exhibited eastward drift were contemporaneous with a westward inner-core rotation. The model further indicates a strong internal shear layer on the tangent cylinder that may be a source of torsional waves inside the core. PMID:24043841

  4. Electromagnetically driven westward drift and inner-core superrotation in Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livermore, Philip W; Hollerbach, Rainer; Jackson, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    A 3D numerical model of the earth's core with a viscosity two orders of magnitude lower than the state of the art suggests a link between the observed westward drift of the magnetic field and superrotation of the inner core. In our model, the axial electromagnetic torque has a dominant influence only at the surface and in the deepest reaches of the core, where it respectively drives a broad westward flow rising to an axisymmetric equatorial jet and imparts an eastward-directed torque on the solid inner core. Subtle changes in the structure of the internal magnetic field may alter not just the magnitude but the direction of these torques. This not only suggests that the quasi-oscillatory nature of inner-core superrotation [Tkalčić H, Young M, Bodin T, Ngo S, Sambridge M (2013) The shuffling rotation of the earth's inner core revealed by earthquake doublets. Nat Geosci 6:497-502.] may be driven by decadal changes in the magnetic field, but further that historical periods in which the field exhibited eastward drift were contemporaneous with a westward inner-core rotation. The model further indicates a strong internal shear layer on the tangent cylinder that may be a source of torsional waves inside the core.

  5. Differential rotation of geomagnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Zigang; XU Wenyao

    2003-01-01

    The latitudinal dependence of the westward drift in the main geomagnetic field is examined by using the correlation analysis of moving random pattern. The study reveals the characteristics in the differential rotation of the main field. The results show that the global geomagnetic field drifts westward with an average speed of 0.18°/a during 1900-2000. The westward drift rate is not symmetrical with respect to the equator. The maximum westward drift rate, 0.31°/a, occurs at the latitude --= -15°, forming a Rapid Westward Drift Belt (RDB) around this latitude. Going northward and southward from this belt, the drift rate decreases and reaches the minimum (0.12°/a) at --= 50° and the minimum (0.14°/a) at --= -56°, forming a Northern Hemisphere Slow Westward Drift Belt (N-SDB) and a Southern Hemisphere Slow Westward Drift Belt (S-SDB). Three phases can be detected in the evolution of the westward drift. In the first phase (1900-1940), the RDB dominates the global drift pattern. The westward drifts in this belt are much faster than those in other areas. In the second phase (1940-1960), the drift rates in the RDB are less than those in the first phase, while the drifts in the N-SDB and S-SDB are relatively large. In this phase, the differential rotation becomes less obvious. In the third phase (1960-2000), the westward drift in the RDB increases again and the differential rotation gradually becomes apparent.

  6. A new investigation on drift of base-line value in geomagnetic observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong-Mei; Gao, Yu-Fen; Zhao, Yong-Fen; Huang, Wei-Bei

    1997-07-01

    A new explanation on drift of base-line (BL) value in geomagnetic observation was presented by means of detailed analysis on BL value of H-variometer at Tianshui Observatory from 1991 to 1995, in association with some numerical simulation. It was confirmed that drift does not always exist. For variometers running normally for many years, drift appears to be zero. The temperature-dependence of BL value is reversible below a certain temperature but irreversible above it. This irreversibility is the main reason that causes the BL value to show a monotonous declination with time, which has been mistaken for the drift in the past. As to the H-variometer at Tianshui Observatory, no drift exists in BL value in these years. A new method was introduced to study the BL value variation with temperature by separating it into three parts.

  7. Does the geoid drift west?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, G. E.; Parker, R. L.; Zumberge, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    In 1970 Hide and Malin noted a correlation of about 0.8 between the geoid and the geomagnetic potential at the Earth's surface when the latter is rotated eastward in longitude by about 160 degrees and the spherical harmonic expansions of both functions are truncated at degree 4. From a century of magnetic observatory data, Hide and Malin inferred an average magnetic westward drift rate of about 0.27 degrees/year. They attributed the magnetic-gravitational correlation to a core event at about 1350 A.D. which impressed the mantle's gravity pattern at long wavelengths onto the core motion and the resulting magnetic field. The impressed pattern was then carried westward 160 degrees by the nsuing magnetic westward drift. An alternative possibility is some sort of steady physical coupling between the magnetic and gravitational fields (perhaps migration of Hide's bumps on the core-mantle interface). This model predicts that the geoid will drift west at the magnetic rate. On a rigid earth, the resulting changes in sea level would be easily observed, but they could be masked by adjustment of the mantle if it has a shell with viscosity considerably less than 10 to the 21 poise. However, steady westward drift of the geoid also predicts secular changes in g, the local acceleration of gravity, at land stations. These changes are now ruled out by recent independent high-accuracy absolute measurements of g made by several workers at various locations in the Northern Hemisphere.

  8. Changes in cosmic ray cut-off rigidities due to secular variations of the geomagnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bhattacharyya

    Full Text Available An analytical expression is derived for the cutoff rigidity of cosmic rays arriving at a point in an arbitrary direction, when the main geomagnetic field is approximated by that of an eccentric dipole. This expression is used to determine changes in geomagnetic cutoffs due to secular variation of the geomagnetic field since 1835. Effects of westward drift of the quadrupole field and decrease in the effective dipole moment are seen in the isorigidity contours. On account of the immense computer time required to determine the cutoff rigidities more accurately using the particle trajectory tracing technique, the present formulation may be useful in estimating the transmission factor of the geomagnetic field in cosmic ray studies, modulation of cosmogenic isotope production by geomagnetic secular variation, and the contribution of geomagnetic field variation to long term changes in climate through cosmic ray related modulation of the current flow in the global electric circuit.

  9. Mapping of steady-state electric fields and convective drifts in geomagnetic fields - Part 2: The IGRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, A. D. M.

    2016-01-01

    A method of mapping electric fields along geomagnetic field lines is applied to the IGRF (International Geomagnetic Reference Field) model. The method involves integrating additional sets of first order differential equations simultaneously with those for tracing a magnetic field line. These provide a measure of the rate of change of the separation of two magnetic field lines separated by an infinitesimal amount. From the results of the integration Faraday's law is used to compute the electric field as a function of position along the field line. Examples of computations from a software package developed to implement the method are presented. This is expected to be of use in conjugate studies of magnetospheric phenomena such as SuperDARN (Super Dual Auroral Radar) observations of convection in conjugate hemispheres, or comparison of satellite electric field observations with fields measured in the ionosphere.

  10. On the lifetime and extent of an auroral westward flow channel (AWFC observed during a magnetospheric substorm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Parkinson

    Full Text Available A -190-nT negative bay in the geomagnetic X component measured at Macquarie Island ( -65° L showed that an ionospheric substorm occurred during 09:58 to 11:10 UT on 27 February 2000. Signatures of an auroral westward flow channel (AWFC were observed nearly simultaneously in the backscatter power, LOS Doppler velocity, and Doppler spectral width measured using the Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER, a Southern Hemisphere HF SuperDARN radar. Many of the characteristics of the AWFC were similar to those occurring during a polarisation jet (PJ, or subauroral ion drift (SAID event, and suggest that it may have been a pre-cursor to a fully developed, intense westward flow channel satisfying all of the criteria defining a PJ/SAID. A beam-swinging analysis showed that the westward drifts (poleward electric field associated with the flow channel were very structured in time and space, but the smoothed velocities grew to ~ 800 ms-1 (47 mVm-1 during the 22-min substorm onset interval 09:56 to 10:18 UT. Maximum west-ward drifts of >1.3 km s-1 (>77 mVm-1 occurred during a ~ 5-min velocity spike, peaking at 10:40 UT during the expansion phase. The drifts decayed rapidly to ~ 300 ms-1 (18 mVm-1 during the 6-min recovery phase interval, 11:04 to 11:10 UT. Overall, the AWFC had a lifetime of 74 min, and was located near -65° L in the evening sector west of the Harang discontinuity. The large westward drifts were confined to a geographic zonal channel of longitudinal ex-tent >20° (>1.3 h magnetic local time, and latitudinal width ~2° L. Using a half-width of ~ 100 km in latitude, the peak electric potential was >7.7 kV. However, a transient velocity of >3.1 km s-1 with potential >18.4 kV was observed further poleward at the end of the recovery phase. Auroral oval boundaries determined

  11. Bottom-up control of geomagnetic secular variation by the Earth's inner core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Julien; Finlay, Christopher C; Fournier, Alexandre

    2013-10-10

    Temporal changes in the Earth's magnetic field, known as geomagnetic secular variation, occur most prominently at low latitudes in the Atlantic hemisphere (that is, from -90 degrees east to 90 degrees east), whereas in the Pacific hemisphere there is comparatively little activity. This is a consequence of the geographical localization of intense, westward drifting, equatorial magnetic flux patches at the core surface. Despite successes in explaining the morphology of the geomagnetic field, numerical models of the geodynamo have so far failed to account systematically for this striking pattern of geomagnetic secular variation. Here we show that it can be reproduced provided that two mechanisms relying on the inner core are jointly considered. First, gravitational coupling aligns the inner core with the mantle, forcing the flow of liquid metal in the outer core into a giant, westward drifting, sheet-like gyre. The resulting shear concentrates azimuthal magnetic flux at low latitudes close to the core-mantle boundary, where it is expelled by core convection and subsequently transported westward. Second, differential inner-core growth, fastest below Indonesia, causes an asymmetric buoyancy release in the outer core which in turn distorts the gyre, forcing it to become eccentric, in agreement with recent core flow inversions. This bottom-up heterogeneous driving of core convection dominates top-down driving from mantle thermal heterogeneities, and localizes magnetic variations in a longitudinal sector centred beneath the Atlantic, where the eccentric gyre reaches the core surface. To match the observed pattern of geomagnetic secular variation, the solid material forming the inner core must now be in a state of differential growth rather than one of growth and melting induced by convective translation.

  12. Bottom-up control of geomagnetic secular variation by the Earth's inner core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aubert, Julien; Finlay, Chris; Fournier, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Temporal changes in the Earth’s magnetic field, known as geomagnetic secular variation, occur most prominently at low latitudes in the Atlantic hemisphere1, 2 (that is, from −90 degrees east to 90 degrees east), whereas in the Pacific hemisphere there is comparatively little activity. This is a c......Temporal changes in the Earth’s magnetic field, known as geomagnetic secular variation, occur most prominently at low latitudes in the Atlantic hemisphere1, 2 (that is, from −90 degrees east to 90 degrees east), whereas in the Pacific hemisphere there is comparatively little activity....... This is a consequence of the geographical localization of intense, westward drifting, equatorial magnetic flux patches at the core surface3. Despite successes in explaining the morphology of the geomagnetic field4, numerical models of the geodynamo have so far failed to account systematically for this striking pattern......-like gyre6. The resulting shear concentrates azimuthal magnetic flux at low latitudes close to the core–mantle boundary, where it is expelled by core convection and subsequently transported westward. Second, differential inner-core growth7, 8, fastest below Indonesia6, 9, causes an asymmetric buoyancy...

  13. Geomagnetism 4

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, John A

    2013-01-01

    Geomagnetism, Volume 4 focuses on the processes, methodologies, technologies, and approaches involved in geomagnetism, including electric fields, solar wind plasma, pulsations, and gravity waves.The selection first offers information on solar wind, magnetosphere, and the magnetopause of the Earth. Discussions focus on magnetopause structure and transfer processes, magnetosphere electric fields, geomagnetically trapped radiation, microstructure of the solar wind plasma, and hydro magnetic fluctuations and discontinuities. The text then examines geomagnetic tail, neutral upper atmosphere, and ge

  14. SAA drift: Experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, O. R.; Romashova, V. V.; Petrov, A. N.

    According to the paleomagnetic analysis there are variations of Earth’s magnetic field connected with magnetic moment changing. These variations affect on the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) location. Indeed different observations approved the existence of the SAA westward drift rate (0.1 1.0 deg/year) and northward drift rate (approximately 0.1 deg/year). In this work, we present the analysis of experimental results obtained in Scobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University (SINP MSU) onboard different Earth’s artificial satellites (1972 2003). The fluxes of protons with energy >50 MeV, gamma quanta with energy >500 keV and neutrons with energy 0.1 1.0 MeV in the SAA region have been analyzed. The mentioned above experimental data were obtained onboard the orbital stations Salut-6 (1979), MIR (1991, 1998) and ISS (2003) by the similar experimental equipment. The comparison of the data obtained during these two decades of investigations confirms the fact that the SAA drifts westward. Moreover the analysis of fluxes of electrons with energy about hundreds keV (Cosmos-484 (1972) and Active (Interkosmos-24, 1991) satellites) verified not only the SAA westward drift but northward drift also.

  15. Geomagnetism and paleomagnetism 1979-1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, M.

    My function, in writing these notes, is to bring you up to date in Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism, in as painless a manner as possible—without tears, as the French language texts for tourists used to promise. In writing this account of progress in the past quadrennium, I must first acknowledge that it is a personal and subjective viewpoint;; another reporter would surely emphasize other developments. Yet, there is some virture in writing of things, about which one knows something, so I leave to future reporters the task of redresssing the balance in matters covered.At the outset, one very sad event must be recorded. On April 3, 1981, Sir Edward Bullard died. His published work alone marks him as one of the leaders of geomagnetism in our times. Yet his contribution was much greater; many an American geophysicist, as well as a whole generation of British colleagues, have felt the benefit of his perceptive advice on their research. To those who saw him in the last few months of his life, his courage in the face of his illness was a remarkable example of fortitude. It is by now well known that the definitive paper, which he wrote with Malin, on secular variation at London, was only completed immediately before his death. The transmittal letter had been typed, but death prevented him from signing it. Bullard returned in this final paper to a topic to which he had contributed much. In it, he notes the role of Halley, who first described the phenomenon of westward drift, to which Bullard gave a new numerical precision, two and a half centuries later. I seem to remember Bullard saying in a lecture years ago that, while the Newtons of this world seem other than mortal, Halley was a scientist whose life and acheivements could encourage one's own efforts. Bullard, like Halley, inspires and encourages us.

  16. SAPS onset timing during substorms and the westward traveling surge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishin, Evgeny, V.

    2016-07-01

    We present multispacecraft observations in the magnetosphere and conjugate ionosphere of the onset time of subauroral polarization streams (SAPS) and tens of keV ring current injections on the duskside in three individual substorms. This is probably the first unequivocal determination of the substorm SAPS onset timing. The time lag between the SAPS and substorm onsets is much shorter than the gradient-curvature drift time of ˜10 keV ions in the plasmasphere. It seemingly depends on the propagation time of substorm-injected plasma from the dipolarization onset region to the plasmasphere, as well as on the SAPS position. These observations suggest that fast onset SAPS and ring current injections are causally related to the two-loop system of the westward traveling surge.

  17. Solar and geomagnetic activity effects on mid-latitude F-region electric fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kumar

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Diurnal patterns of average F-region ionospheric drift (electric field and their dependence on solar and geomagnetic activity have been defined using digital ionosonde Doppler measurements recorded at a southern mid-latitude station (Bundoora 145.1° E, 37.7° S geographic, 49° S magnetic. A unique database consisting of 300 907 drift velocities was compiled, mostly using one specific mode of operation throughout 1632 days of a 5-year interval (1999–2003. The velocity magnitudes were generally larger during the night than day, except during the winter months (June–August, when daytime velocities were enhanced. Of all years, the largest drifts tended to occur during the high speed solar wind streams of 2003. Diurnal patterns in the average quiet time (AE<75 nT meridional drifts (zonal electric field peaked at up to ~6 m s−1 poleward (0.3 mV m−1 eastward at 03:30 LST, reversing in direction at ~08:30 LST, and gradually reaching ~10 m s−1 equatorward at ~13:30 LST. The quiet time zonal drifts (meridional electric fields displayed a clear diurnal pattern with peak eastward flows of ~10 m s−1 (0.52 mV m−1 equatorward at 09:30 LST and peak westward flows around midnight of ~18 m s−1 (0.95 mV m−1 poleward. As the AE index increased, the westward drifts increased in amplitude and they extended over a greater fraction of the day. The perturbation drifts changed in a similar way with decreasing Dst except the daytime equatorward flows strengthened with increasing AE index, whereas they became weak for Dst<−60 nT. The responses in all velocity components to changing solar flux values were small, but net poleward perturbations during the day were associated with large solar flux values (>192×10−22 W m−2 Hz−1. These results help to more fully quantify the response of the mid

  18. Steady flows at the top of earth's core derived from geomagnetic field models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    1986-01-01

    Select models of the main geomagnetic field and its secular variation are extrapolated to the base of an insulating mantle and used to estimate the adjacent fluid motion of a perfectly conducting outer core. The assumption of steady motion provides formally unique solutions and is tested along with that of no upwelling. The hypothesis of no upwelling is found to be substantially worse than that of steady motion. Although the actual motion is not thought to be steady, the large-scale secular variation at the top of the core can be adequately described by a large-scale, combined toroidal-poloidal circulation which is steady for intervals of at least a decade or two. The derived flows include a bulk westward drift but are complicated by superimposed jets, gyres, and surface divergence indicative of vigorous vertical motion at depth. The circulation pattern and key global properties including rms speed, upwelling, and westward drift are found to be fairly insensitive to variations in modeling parameters.

  19. Early westward flow across the Tasman Gateway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. P. Sijp

    2015-10-01

    Crucially, in this situation where Australia is still situated far south and almost attached to Antarctica, the Drake Passage must be sufficiently restricted to allow the prevailing easterly wind pattern to set up this southerly restricted westward flow. In contrast, an open Drake Passage, to 517 m depth, leads to an eastward flow, even when the Tasman Gateway and the Australo-Antarctic gulf are entirely contained within the latitudes of easterly wind.

  20. Reversed polarity patches at the CMB and geomagnetic field reversal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Wenyao(徐文耀); WEI; Zigang(魏自刚)

    2002-01-01

    The International Geomagnetic Reference Field models (IGRF) for 1900-2000 are used to calculate the geomagnetic field distribution in the Earth' interior from the ground surface to the core-mantle boundary (CMB) under the assumption of insulated mantle. Four reversed polarity patches, as one of the most important features of the CMB field, are revealed. Two patches with +Z polarity (downward) at the southern African and the southern American regions stand out against the background of -Z polarity (upward) in the southern hemisphere, and two patches of -Z polarity at the North Polar and the northern Pacific regions stand out against the +Z background in the northern hemisphere. During the 1900-2000 period the southern African (SAF) patch has quickly drifted westward at a speed of 0.2-0.3°/a; meanwhile its area has expanded 5 times, and the magnetic flux crossing the area has intensified 30 times. On the other hand, other three patches show little if any change during this 100-year period. Extending upward, each of the reversed polarity patches at the CMB forms a chimney-shaped "reversed polarity column" in the mantle with the bottom at the CMB. The height of the SAF column has grown rapidly from 200km in 1900 to 900km in 2000. If the column grows steadily at the same rate in the future, its top will reach to the ground surface in 600-700 years. And then a reversed polarity patch will be observed at the Earth's surface, which will be an indicator of the beginning of a magnetic field reversal. On the basis of this study, one can describe the process of a geomagnetic polarity reversal, the polarity reversal may be observed firstly in one or several local regions; then the areas of these regions expand, and at the same time, other new reversed polarity regions may appear. Thus several poles may exist during a polarity reversal.

  1. Geomagnetism applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Wallace H.

    1995-01-01

    The social uses of geomagnetism include the physics of the space environment, satellite damage, pipeline corrosion, electric power-grid failure, communication interference, global positioning disruption, mineral-resource detection, interpretation of the Earth's formation and structure, navigation, weather, and magnetoreception in organisms. The need for continuing observations of the geomagnetic field, together with careful archiving of these records and mechanisms for dissemination of these data, is emphasized.

  2. A re-evaluation of the Italian historical geomagnetic catalogue: implications for paleomagnetic dating at active Italian volcanoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. D'Ajello Caracciolo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Paleomagnetism is proving to represent one of the most powerful dating tools of volcanics emplaced in Italy during the last few centuries/millennia. This method requires that valuable proxies of the local geomagnetic field (paleosecular variation ((PSV are available. To this end, we re-evaluate the whole Italian geomagnetic directional dataset, consisting of 833 and 696 declination and inclination measurements, respectively, carried out since 1640 AD at several localities. All directions were relocated via the virtual geomagnetic pole method to Stromboli (38.8° N, 15.2° E, the rough centre of the active Italian volcanoes. For declination-only measurements, missing inclinations were derived (always by pole method by French data (for period 1670–1789, and by nearby Italian sites/years (for periods 1640–1657 and 1790–1962. Using post-1825 declination values, we obtain a 0.46 ± 0.19° yr−1 westward drift of the geomagnetic field for Italy. The original observation years were modified, considering such drift value, to derive at a drift-corrected relocated dataset. Both datasets were found to be in substantial agreement with directions derived from the field models by Jackson et al. (2000 and Pavon-Carrasco et al. (2009. However, the drift-corrected dataset minimizes the differences between the Italian data and both field models, and eliminates a persistent 1.6° shift of 1933–1962 declination values from Castellaccio with respect to other nearly coeval Italian data. The relocated datasets were used to calculate two post-1640 Italian SV curves, with mean directions calculated every 30 and 10 years before and after 1790, respectively. The curve comparison suggests that both available field models yield the best available SV curve to perform paleomagnetic dating of 1600–1800 AD Italian volcanics, while the Italian drift-corrected curve is probably preferable for the 19th century. For the 20th century, the global model by

  3. Geographical localisation of the geomagnetic secular variation

    OpenAIRE

    Aubert, Julien; Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils

    2013-01-01

    Directly observed changes in Earth’s magnetic field occur most prominently at low latitudes beneath the Atlantic hemisphere, while the Pacific is comparatively quiet. This striking hemispheric asymmetry in geomagnetic secular variation is a consequence of the geographical localisation of intense, westward moving, magnetic flux patches at the core surface. Despite its successes in explaining the main morphological properties of Earth’s magnetic field, self-consistent numerical modelling of the...

  4. Are North Atlantic Multidecadal SST Anomalies Westward Propagating?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, Qingyi; Dijkstra, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    The westward propagation of sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies is one of the main characteristics of one of the theories of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. Here we use techniques from complex network modeling to investigate the existence of the westward propagation in the North Atlantic

  5. STARE velocities: 2. Evening westward electron flow

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    M. Uspensky

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Four evening events and one morning event of joint EISCAT/STARE observations during ~22h are considered and the differences between observed STARE line-of-sight (l-o-s velocities and EISCAT electron drift velocities projected onto the STARE beams are studied. We demonstrate that the double-pulse technique, which is currently in use in the STARE routine data handling, typically underestimates the true phase velocity as inferred from the multi-pulse STARE data. We show that the STARE velocities are persistently smaller (1.5–2 times than the EISCAT velocities, even for the multi-pulse data. The effect seems to be more pronounced in the evening sector when the Finland radar observes at large flow angles. We evaluate the performance of the ion-acoustic approach (IAA, Nielsen and Schlegel, 1985 and the off-orthogonal fluid approach (OOFA, Uspensky et al., 2003 techniques to predict the true electron drift velocity for the base event of 12 February 1999. The IAA technique predicts the convection reasonably well for enhanced flows of >~1000m/s, but not so well for slower ones. By considering the EISCAT N(h profiles, we derive the effective aspect angle and effective altitude of backscatter, and use this information for application of the OOFA technique. We demonstrate that the OOFA predictions for the base event are superior over the IAA predictions and thus, we confirm that OOFA predicts the electron velocities reasonably well in the evening sector, in addition to the morning sector, as concluded by Uspensky et al. (2003. To check how "robust" the OOFA model is and how successful it is for convection estimates without the EISCAT support, we analysed three additional evening events and one additional morning event for which information on N(h profiles was intentionally ignored. By accepting the mean STARE/EISCAT velocity ratio of 0.55 and the mean azimuth rotation of 9° (derived for the basic event, we show that the OOFA performs

  6. Satellite Geomagnetism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Stolle, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Observations of Earth’s magnetic field from space began more than 50 years ago. A continuous monitoring of the field using low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites, however, started only in 1999, and three satellites have taken highprecision measurements of the geomagnetic field during the past decade...... ability to characterize and understand the many sources that contribute to Earth’s magnetic field. In this review, we summarize investigations of Earth’s interior and environment that have been possible through the analysis of high-precision magnetic field observations taken by LEO satellites........ The unprecedented time-space coverage of their data opened revolutionary new possibilities for monitoring, understanding, and exploring Earth’s magnetic field. In the near future, the three-satellite constellation Swarm will ensure continuity of such measurement and provide enhanced possibilities to improve our...

  7. Tectonically asymmetric Earth: From net rotation to polarized westward drift of the lithosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Doglioni

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of a net rotation of the lithosphere with respect to the mantle is generally overlooked since it depends on the adopted mantle reference frames, which are arbitrary. We review the geological and geophysical signatures of plate boundaries, and show that they are markedly asymmetric worldwide. Then we compare available reference frames of plate motions relative to the mantle and discuss which is at best able to fit global tectonic data. Different assumptions about the depths of hotspot sources (below or within the asthenosphere, which decouples the lithosphere from the deep mantle predict different rates of net rotation of the lithosphere relative to the mantle. The widely used no-net-rotation (NNR reference frame, and low (1°/Ma net rotation (shallow hotspots source, all plates, albeit at different velocity, move westerly along a curved trajectory, with a tectonic equator tilted about 30° relative to the geographic equator. This is consistent with the observed global tectonic asymmetries.

  8. Tectonically asymmetric Earth:From net rotation to polarized westward drift of the lithosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carlo Doglioni; Eugenio Carminati; Mattia Crespi; Marco Cuffaro; Mattia Penati; Federica Riguzzi

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of a net rotation of the lithosphere with respect to the mantle is generally overlooked since it depends on the adopted mantle reference frames, which are arbitrary. We review the geological and geophysical signatures of plate boundaries, and show that they are markedly asym-metric worldwide. Then we compare available reference frames of plate motions relative to the mantle and discuss which is at best able to fit global tectonic data. Different assumptions about the depths of hotspot sources (below or within the asthenosphere, which decouples the lithosphere from the deep mantle) predict different rates of net rotation of the lithosphere relative to the mantle. The widely used no-net-rotation (NNR) reference frame, and low (1?/Ma) net rotation (shallow hotspots source), all plates, albeit at different velocity, move westerly along a curved trajectory, with a tectonic equator tilted about 30? relative to the geographic equator. This is consistent with the observed global tectonic asymmetries.

  9. Strike up Student Interest through Song: Technology and Westward Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Meg

    2014-01-01

    Sheet music, song lyrics, and audio recordings may not be the first primary sources that come to mind when considering ways to teach about changes brought about by technology during westward expansion, but these sources engage students in thought provoking ways. In this article the author presents a 1917 photograph of Mountain Chief, of the Piegan…

  10. Geomagnetic Principal Magnetic Storms

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The abbreviations used for observatory names are as follows: GEOMAGNETIC OBSERVATORIES Code Station Geomagnetic Latitude ABG Alibag AMS Martin de Vivie. These data...

  11. Westward migration of oceanic ridges and related asymmetric upper mantle differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalot-Prat, Françoise; Doglioni, Carlo; Falloon, Trevor

    2017-01-01

    and lithosphere. Thereby the westward drift of the lithosphere is necessarily slowed down, top to down, inducing a progressive decoupling within the mantle lithosphere itself. This intra-mantle decoupling could be at the origin of asymmetric detachment faults allowing mantle exhumation along slow-spreading ridges. Taking into account the asymmetric features of the LVZ, migration of incipient melt fractions and upwelling paths from the lower asthenosphere through the upper asthenosphere are oblique, upward and eastward. MORB are sourced from an eastward and oblique, near-adiabatic mantle upwelling from the lower asthenosphere. This unidirectional mantle transfer is induced by isostatic suction of the migrating spreading ridge.

  12. Archaeomagnetic results from southern Italy and their bearing on geomagnetic secular variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M. E.; Hoye, G. S.

    2005-07-01

    Archaeodirectional results from kilns and other baked structures in southern Italy are presented. They are generally compatible with the much larger data sets from France and Bulgaria. In particular, a summary of all the results associated with the well-known eruption of Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii ( n = 9, D = 355°, I = 58°, α95 = 1.5°) provides a reliable archaeomagnetic anchor point supporting the French and Bulgarian master curves. It is extremely well-constrained in time and it comprises independent studies carried out in four different countries. Furthermore, it is derived from a diverse set of features agreement amongst which argues strongly against significant perturbations due to magnetic refraction, structural disturbance, or depositional shallowing. In terms of geomagnetic secular variation, we interpret the western European archaeomagnetic data summarized here in terms of an open loop caused by westward drift, followed by an inclination low spanning the first few centuries CE representing the signal of a static flux pulse that reaches a maximum magnetic moment of a few percent of the earth's main central dipole.

  13. Students' misconceptions about U.S. westward migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Ralph P; MacArthur, Charles A; Okolo, Cynthia M

    2007-01-01

    Fifth-grade students with learning disabilities (LD) and their typically achieving (TA) peers participated in an 8-week investigation about 19th-century U.S. westward migration. During their investigations, the students analyzed primary and secondary sources to understand the experiences of these emigrants and Native peoples. The analysis of source material was preceded by teacher-led discussions about the possibility of bias in evidence that affects the trustworthiness of historical documentation. Quantitative analyses showed that these investigations were associated with gains in students' knowledge about the period of westward expansion and a better understanding of historical content and historical inquiry; however, these gains were not always comparable for students with LD and their TA peers. Furthermore, misconceptions about this historical period and the processes of historical investigation were evident in students' responses before and after instruction. We discuss how design features of the instruction and its implementation may have contributed to the development and persistence of these misconceptions.

  14. Un-optimistic Prospects for the Westward Movement of Aluminium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>The westward movement of aluminium is essential for the industrial development.Up till now,the northwestern area has planned to construct more than 40 aluminium projects with a total production capacity of over 20 million tons.The future rate of progress of newly constructed projects are directly related to the supplies of the aluminium market,having critical guiding meaning for the trends of

  15. IMF BY dependence of the extent of substorm westward electrojet

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Arun; Ajay Dhar; K Emperumal; B M Pathan

    2005-04-01

    In this paper the duskward extension of the westward auroral electrojet is investigated for substorm intervals on the basis of magnetograms recorded at the Indian Antarctic station, Maitri. The database comprises three years from 1998-2000. Based on an initial study of the magnetograms, an arbitrary local time of 2030 MLT is fixed to define the early manifestation of the substorm westward electrojet. Using this criterion 12 substorms are identified and the possible causes examined. Many of these events are observed to be associated with a moderate to intense ring current.The hourly average of the GSM BY-component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) for the hour preceding the substorm onset at Maitri is negative for most of the events. It is suggested that the azimuthal shift of the auroral electrojets in the southern hemisphere resulting from a negative BY-component of the IMF influences the extent of the substorm westward electrojet. This finding implies that the IMF may have a role in controlling the longitudinal extent of substorm occurrence.

  16. Auroral radio absorption and the westward travelling surge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collis, P.N.; Korth, A.

    1983-11-01

    Measurements from a network of riometers during the passage of an auroral westward traveling surge are presented. These show that the energetic precipitation producing the radio absorption expands in an almost identical fashion to the softer precipitation associated with the visible surge; but it is delayed by about two minutes with respect to the surge. The delay is interpreted as a hardening of the precipitating electron spectrum as the surge goes by. Simultaneous observations of electrons at synchronous orbit are shown to support this conclusion. 24 references.

  17. Re-Evaluation of Geomagnetic Field Observation Data at Syowa Station, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Takahashi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition has conducted geomagnetic observations at Syowa Station, Antarctica, since 1966. Geomagnetic variation data measured with a fluxgate magnetometer are not absolute but are relative to a baseline and show drift. To enhance the importance of the geomagnetic data at Syowa Station, therefore, it is necessary to correct the continuous variation data by using absolute baseline values acquired by a magnetic theodolite and proton magnetometer. However, the database of baseline values contains outliers. We detected outliers in the database and then converted the geomagnetic variation data to absolute values by using the reliable baseline values.

  18. International Geomagnetic Reference Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Maus, S.; Beggan, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    The eleventh generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was adopted in December 2009 by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy Working Group V‐MOD. It updates the previous IGRF generation with a definitive main field model for epoch 2005.0, a main field...

  19. Westward propagating twin gyres in the equatorial Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, P. Rahul Chand; Salvekar, P. S.; Deo, A. A.; Ganer, D. W.

    2004-01-01

    A reduced-gravity (1$\\frac{1}{2-layer) model forced by daily climatological winds simulates twin, anticyclonic gyres, which propagate westward on either side of the equator. The gyres form at the beginning of both the Southwest Monsoon and the Northeast monsoon in the equatorial eastern Indian Ocean, and subsequently propagate across the basin. Their existence is supported by velocity observations taken during WOCE in 1995 and by TOPEX/Poseidon sea-level observations during 1993. They are also present in the ECCO model/data product. They form at the front of a Rossby-wave packet generated by the reflection of the equatorial jet (EJ) from the eastern boundary of the basin. They are likely either Rossby solitons or result from the nonlinear interaction between the EJ and the Rossby-wave front.

  20. Geomagnetic field variations in Western Europe from 1500BC to 200AD. Part I: Directional secular variation curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, Gwenaël; Chauvin, Annick; Lanos, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    To improve the geomagnetic field secular variation curve (SVC) of Western Europe during protohistoric times, archaeomagnetic directions of 39 archaeological kilns or hearths from France were investigated. The dating of each archaeological structure was established with archaeological or chronometric methods. Thirty-seven of these structures are dated from the first millennium BC, one from the end of the second millennium BC and the last one from the fourth millennium BC. Thermomagnetic curves, unblocking temperatures and coercivities suggest that the main carrier of the remanent magnetization is a Ti-poor titanomagnetite. Archaeodirections were obtained by alternating field and thermal demagnetizations on almost 900 specimens. The anisotropy tensor of thermoremanent magnetization was determined for 35 structures and 22 mean archaeodirections were corrected for anisotropy. The new archaeodirections are very consistent with previously published data. A new directional SVC was built using bivariate statistics with selected Western Europe data located within 1000 km of Paris. Selection criteria include the number of samples, the dating reliability and the accuracy of the mean archaeodirection. Resulting secular variation between 1500BC and 0AD mainly shows large changes in declination, while inclinations are bracketed between ˜65° and ˜75°. The declinations show a strong maximum with values ˜30-35° around 800-750BC, followed by a sharp decrease to values around 0° at 500BC and close to -7° around 250BC. The main features of the secular variation from 1500BC to 0AD appear to be a dominant westward drift and two major changes around 800 and 250BC. Compared to the global and regional geomagnetic models, the new reference data are better fitted by ARCH3k_cst.1 and SCHA.DIF.3k than by ARCH3k.1 and CALS3k.4 models. The strong variation of the archaeodirection between 1000 and 500BC makes archaeomagnetism very useful for dating purposes.

  1. SECULAR VARIATIONS OF THE PLANETARY-SCALE GEOMAGNETIC ANOMALIES%行星尺度地磁异常的长期变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐文耀

    2001-01-01

    The characteristics of a planetary-scale geomagnetic anomaly are described by using‘unsigned magnetic flux' through the whole anomaly region. The eighth generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Filed (IGRF) is analyzed to study the secular variations of 5 planetary-scale geomagnetic anomalies during 1900—2000 period. The results show that the magnetic fluxes through the southern Atlantic anomaly (SAT),Australian anomaly (AUS),and African anomaly(AF) have increased by more than 200MWb,the increase of the flux through the Eurasian anomaly (EA) is smaller(157MWb),while the flux through the North American anomaly (NAM) has decreased by 50MWb. On the other hand,the variations of the anomaly areas are within 10%.The westward drift at the core-mantle boundary(CMB) is less than 0.1°/a,much slower than that at the Earth surface(0.2°/a). This difference may be attributed to the different westward drift velocities of the harmonics in the geomagnetic field:the westward drift at the Earth surface is controlled by the dominant low-degree harmonics,while the westward drift at the CMB largely depends on high-degree harmonics. Consequently,it should be careful to take the westward drift velocity at the Earth surface as the typical velocity of the fluid flow in the outer core.%为了综合反映地球表面行星尺度磁异常的展布面积、磁场极值以及磁场分布特征等多种因素及其与磁能的关系,本文用穿过各异常区的“无符号磁通量”为特征参数来表征磁异常区强度. 用第八代国际参考地磁场模型(IGRF),分析了1900年到2000年全球最大的5个磁异常区的长期变化,结果表明,在一百年中,南大西洋(SAT)、大洋洲(AUS)和非洲(AF)3个异常区的磁通量均增加了200MWb以上,欧亚异常(EA)磁通量增加幅度稍小(157MWb),上述4个异常区磁通量增幅为30%—60%,而北美异常(NAM)的磁通量则减小了50MWb. 各异常区面积虽有变

  2. Geomagnetically Induced Currents: Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Denny M.; Ngwira, Chigomezyo M.

    2017-10-01

    The geospace, or the space environment near Earth, is constantly subjected to changes in the solar wind flow generated at the Sun. The study of this environment variability is called Space Weather. Examples of effects resulting from this variability are the occurrence of powerful solar disturbances, such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The impact of CMEs on the Earth's magnetosphere very often greatly perturbs the geomagnetic field causing the occurrence of geomagnetic storms. Such extremely variable geomagnetic fields trigger geomagnetic effects measurable not only in the geospace but also in the ionosphere, upper atmosphere, and on and in the ground. For example, during extreme cases, rapidly changing geomagnetic fields generate intense geomagnetically induced currents (GICs). Intense GICs can cause dramatic effects on man-made technological systems, such as damage to high-voltage power transmission transformers leading to interruption of power supply, and/or corrosion of oil and gas pipelines. These space weather effects can in turn lead to severe economic losses. In this paper, we supply the reader with theoretical concepts related to GICs as well as their general consequences. As an example, we discuss the GIC effects on a North American power grid located in mid-latitude regions during the 13-14 March 1989 extreme geomagnetic storm. That was the most extreme storm that occurred in the space era age.

  3. Geomagnetic Indices Bulletin (GIB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Geomagnetic Indices Bulletin is a one page sheet containing the magnetic indices Kp, Ap, Cp, An, As, Am and the provisional aa indices. The bulletin is published...

  4. Geomagnetic aa Indices

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The geomagnetic aa indices are the continuation of the series beginning in the year 1868. A full description of these indices is given in the International...

  5. Geomagnetic Storm Sudden Commencements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Storm Sudden Commencements (ssc) 1868 to present: STORM1 and STORM2 Lists: (Some text here is taken from the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy...

  6. Letter to the Editor: Geomagnetic storm effects at low latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Rastogi

    Full Text Available The geomagnetic horizontal (H field from the chain of nine observatories in India are used to study the storm-time and disturbance daily variations. The peak decrease in storm-time variation in H showed significant enhancements at the equatorial electrojet stations over and above the normally expected decrease due to the ring current effects corrected for geomagnetic latitudes. The disturbance daily variation of H at equatorial stations showed a large decrease around midday hours over and above the usual dawn-maximum and dusk-minimum seen at any mid-latitude stations around the world. These slow and persistent additional decreases of H of disturbance daily variation at equatorial latitudes could be the effect of a westward electric field due to the Disturbance Ionospheric dynamo coupled with abnormally large electrical conductivities in the E region over the equator.Key words. Ionosphere (electric fields and currents · Magnetospheric physics (electric fields; storms and substorms

  7. Geomagnetic Workshop, Canberra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, C. E.; Lilley, F. E. M.; Milligan, P. R.

    On May 14-15, 1985, 63 discerning geomagnetists flocked to Canberra to attend the Geomagnetic Workshop coorganized by the Australian Bureau of Mineral Resources (BMR) and the Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University (ANU). With an aurorally glowing cast that included an International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) president, former president, and division chairman, the Oriental Magneto-Banquet (which was the center of the meeting), was assured of success. As a cunning ploy to mask the true nature of this gastronomic extravagance from the probings of income tax departments, a presentation of scientific papers on Australian geomagnetism in its global setting was arranged.The Australian region, including New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, and a large sector of the Antarctic, covers one eighth of the Earth's surface and historically has played an important role in the study of geomagnetism. The region contains both the south magnetic and geomagnetic poles, and two Australian Antarctic stations (Casey and Davis) are situated in the region of the south polar cusp (see Figure 1).

  8. Geomagnetic Observations and Models

    CERN Document Server

    Mandea, Mioara

    2011-01-01

    This volume provides comprehensive and authoritative coverage of all the main areas linked to geomagnetic field observation, from instrumentation to methodology, on ground or near-Earth. Efforts are also focused on a 21st century e-Science approach to open access to all geomagnetic data, but also to the data preservation, data discovery, data rescue, and capacity building. Finally, modeling magnetic fields with different internal origins, with their variation in space and time, is an attempt to draw together into one place the traditional work in producing models as IGRF or describing the magn

  9. Are changes of the geomagnetic field intensity related to changes of the tropical Pacific sea-level pressure during the last 50 years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Luis Eduardo Antunes; da Silva, Ligia Alves; Guarnieri, Fernando LuíS.

    2008-08-01

    The influence of solar variability into the lower atmospheric regions has been suggested on different atmospheric parameters in different time scales. However, a plausible mechanism to explain these observations remains unclear. Although it is widely accepted that the climate change over the past 50 years is attributed to human influence, we present the case that local climate change in the tropical Pacific may be due to changes in the Earth's magnetic field strength. The changes in the tropical Pacific circulation have been observed during the last 50 years, and they are attributed to the increase of the global surface temperature. However, a geomagnetic modulation of the net radiative flux in the southern tropical Pacific was recently suggested. Moreover, comparisons of long-term reconstructions of the Northern Hemisphere surface temperature and solar activity proxies indicated that the existence of a geomagnetic signal in climate data would support a direct link between solar variability and their effects on climate. Here we show that in the tropical Pacific the sea-level pressure, which is a component of the Walker circulation, could be related to the magnetospheric, ionospheric, and upper-atmosphere processes which may propagate downward to the lower atmosphere. Furthermore, we show that the changes in sea-level pressure and the Walker circulation are correlated to the westward drift of the magnetic anomaly. We compare the region averaged monthly values of the sea-level pressure in the tropical Pacific with those of the magnetic field intensity near the surface for the last 50 years. We find that the sea-level pressure in the tropical Pacific is increasing as the magnetic field intensity is decreasing. The correlation coefficient of the sea-level pressure 36-month running means versus the magnetic field intensity is 0.96. We anticipate our investigation to be a starting point for a more sophisticated investigation of the coupling between the space weather

  10. On regional geomagnetic charts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alldredge, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    When regional geomagnetic charts for areas roughly the size of the US were compiled by hand, some large local anomalies were displayed in the isomagnetic lines. Since the late 1960s, when the compilation of charts using computers and mathematical models was started, most of the details available in the hand drawn regional charts have been lost. One exception to this is the Canadian magnetic declination chart for 1980. This chart was constructed using a 180 degrees spherical harmonic model. -from Author

  11. Low-latitude ionosphere response to super geomagnetic storm of 17/18 March 2015: Results from a chain of ground-based observations over Indian sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsingh; Sripathi, S.; Sreekumar, Sreeba; Banola, S.; Emperumal, K.; Tiwari, P.; Kumar, Burudu Suneel

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present unique results of equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere response to one of the major geomagnetic storms of the current solar cycle that occurred during 17-18 March 2015, where Dst reached its minimum of -228 nT. Here we utilized data from magnetometers, chain of ionosondes located at Tirunelveli (8.73°N, 77.70°E; geometry: 0.32°N), Hyderabad (17.36°N, 78.47°E; geometry 8.76°N), and Allahabad (25.45°N, 81.85°E; geometry 16.5°N) along with multistation GPS receivers over Indian sector. The observations showed a remarkable increase of h'F to as high as ~560 km over Tirunelveli (magnetic equator) with vertical drift of ~70 m/s at 13:30 UT due to direct penetration of storm time eastward electric fields which exactly coincided with the local time of pre-reversal enhancement (PRE) and caused intense equatorial spread F irregularities in ionosondes and scintillations in GPS receivers at wide latitudes. Plasma irregularities are so intense that their signatures are seen in Allahabad/Lucknow. Storm time thermospheric meridional winds as estimated using two ionosondes suggest the equatorward surge of gravity waves with period of ~2 h. Suppression of anomaly crest on the subsequent day of the storm suggests the complex role of disturbance dynamo electric fields and disturbance wind effects. Our results also show an interesting feature of traveling ionospheric disturbances possibly associated with disturbance meridional wind surge during recovery phase. In addition, noteworthy observations are nighttime westward zonal drifts and PRE-related total electron content enhancements at anomaly crests during main phase and counter electrojet signatures during recovery phase.

  12. Response of equatorial and low latitude ionosphere to 2015 St. Patrick's Day super geomagnetic storm: Results from a chain of ground based observations over Indian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samireddipalle, Sripathi; Singh, Ram; Sreekumar, Sreeba; Suneel Kumar, Buduru

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present unique results of equatorial and low latitude ionosphere response to one of the major geomagnetic storms of the current solar cycle that occurred during 17-18 March 2015 where Dst reached its minimum of -228 nT. Here we utilized data from magnetometers, chain of ionosondes located at Tirunelveli (8.73°N, 77.70°E; geom: 0.320N), Hyderabad (17.360N, 78.470E; geom: 8.760N) and Allahabad (25.45°N, 81.85°E; geom: 16.50N) along with multi station GPS receivers over Indian sector. The observations showed a remarkable increase of h'F to as high as ~560 km over Tirunelveli (magnetic equator) with vertical drift of ~70 m/s at 13:30 UT due to direct penetration of storm time eastward electric fields which exactly coincided with the local time of Pre-Reversal Enhancement (PRE) and caused intense ESF irregularities in ionosondes and scintillations in GPS receivers at wide latitudes. Plasma irregularities are so intense that their signatures are seen in Allahabad/Lucknow. Stormtime thermospheric meridional winds as estimated using two ionosondes suggest the equatorward surge of gravity waves with period of ~2 hrs. Suppression of anomaly crest on the subsequent day of the storm suggests the complex role of disturbance dynamo electric fields and disturbance wind effects. Our results also show an interesting feature of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs) possibly associated with disturbance meridional wind surge during recovery phase. In addition, noteworthy observations are nighttime westward zonal drifts and PRE related TEC enhancements at anomaly crests during main phase and CEJ signatures during recovery phase.

  13. Satellite-tracked drifting buoy observations in the south equatorial current in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shetye, S.R.; Michael, G.S.

    Three satellite-tracked drifting buoys released in the south equatorial current in the Indian Ocean followed the path of the current moving westward approximately zonally in the vicinity of 10 degrees S latitude. On nearing the east coast of Africa...

  14. Geomagnetic storm and equatorial spread-F

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Becker-Guedes

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available In August 2000, a new ionospheric sounding station was established at Sao Jose dos Campos (23.2° S, 45.9° W; dip latitude 17.6° S, Brazil, by the University of Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP. Another ionospheric sounding station was established at Palmas (10.2° S, 48.2° W; dip latitude 5.5° S, Brazil, in April 2002, by UNIVAP in collaboration with the Lutheran University Center of Palmas (CEULP, Lutheran University of Brazil (ULBRA. Both the stations are equipped with digital ionosonde of the type known as Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosonde (CADI. In order to study the effects of geomagnetic storms on equatorial spread-F, we present and discuss three case studies, two from the ionospheric sounding observations at Sao Jose dos Campos (September and November 2000 and one from the simultaneous ionospheric sounding observations at Sao Jose dos Campos and Palmas (July 2003. Salient features from these ionospheric observations are presented and discussed in this paper. It has been observed that sometimes (e.g. 4-5 November 2000 the geomagnetic storm acts as an inhibitor (high strong spread-F season, whereas at other times (e.g. 11-12 July 2003 they act as an initiator (low strong spread-F season, possibly due to corresponding changes in the quiet and disturbed drift patterns during different seasons.

  15. Holocene geomagnetic field variations from low latitude site: contribution from the Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissel, Catherine; Laj, Carlo; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Perez-Torrado, Francisco; Carrracedo, Juan-Carlos; Wandres, Camille

    2016-04-01

    Islands, our data allow to construct a curve illustrating the Earth magnetic field intensity fluctuations for Southwestern Europe/Western Africa. This curve shows three maximum broad intensity features which are also observed in the Middle East and in Central Asia indicating that they have a very large geographical extent. These maxima do not all appear clearly in the models of variations of the dipolar field intensity which have an insufficient resolution. Within the broad maxima characterizing the first millenium BC, regional variability is observed in particular with high PI around 1000 BC in the middle East and around 600 BC in southwestern Europe. This corresponds to a westward drift rate of 0.1° longitude/yr, consistent with the values generally accepted for the westward drift of the non-dipole field.

  16. Hazards of geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    Geomagnetic storms are large and sometimes rapid fluctuations in the Earth's magnetic field that are related to disturbances on the Sun's surface. Although it is not widely recognized, these transient magnetic disturbances can be a significant hazard to people and property. Many of us know that the intensity of the auroral lights increases during magnetic storms, but few people realize that these storms can also cause massive power outages, interrupt radio communications and satellite operations, increase corrosion in oil and gas pipelines, and lead to spuriously high rejection rates in the manufacture of sensitive electronic equipment. 

  17. Bayesian inference in geomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, George E.

    1988-01-01

    The inverse problem in empirical geomagnetic modeling is investigated, with critical examination of recently published studies. Particular attention is given to the use of Bayesian inference (BI) to select the damping parameter lambda in the uniqueness portion of the inverse problem. The mathematical bases of BI and stochastic inversion are explored, with consideration of bound-softening problems and resolution in linear Gaussian BI. The problem of estimating the radial magnetic field B(r) at the earth core-mantle boundary from surface and satellite measurements is then analyzed in detail, with specific attention to the selection of lambda in the studies of Gubbins (1983) and Gubbins and Bloxham (1985). It is argued that the selection method is inappropriate and leads to lambda values much larger than those that would result if a reasonable bound on the heat flow at the CMB were assumed.

  18. Baseline neutron logging measurements in the drift scale test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, W.; Carlson, R.; Neubaurer, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Drift Scale Test (DST) is one of the thermal tests being conducted in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). One of the objectives of the DST is to study the coupled thermal-mechanical- hydrological-chemical (TMHC) processes in the ESF at the repository horizon of the potential high-level nuclear waste repository in Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objectives, the test design, and the test layouts of the DST are included in the test design report by CRWMS M&O Contractor LLNL. The configuration of the DST includes a declining Observation Drift driven mostly east and downward from main tunnel in the ESF, at about 2.827 km from the North portal. The downward slope of the Observation Drift (11.5 to 14.0 percent) ensures a minimum 10 m of middle nonlithophysal Topopah Spring Tuff as the overburden for the DST. The length of the Observation Drift is about 136 m. At the elevation of the DST crown (nominally 10 m below the upper extent of the middle nonlithophysal Topopah Spring Tuff) the Connecting Drift breaks out to the north from the Observation Drift, 136 m from the main tunnel of the ESF. The Connecting Drift extends approximately 40 m to the north from the Observation Drift. A Heater Drift breaks out westward from the Connecting Drift at about 30 m from the Observation Drift. The Heater Drift consists of an 11 m long entry, which includes a plate- loading niche, and a 47 m long heated drift. The nominal diameter of the drifts is 5 m. The detail configuration of the DST, including diagrams showing the drift and borehole layout, is included in the test design report by CRWMS M&O Contractor LLNL. Thermal neutron logging is a method used to determine moisture content in rocks and soils and will be used to monitor moisture content in boreholes ESF-HD-NEU-1 to ESF-HD-NEU-10 (Boreholes 47 to 51 and 64 to 68), ESF-HD-TEMP-1 (Borehole 79), and ESF-HD-TEMP-2 (Borehole 80) in the DST. The neutron probe contains a source of high energy neutrons and a detector for slow (thermal

  19. Sources of low-latitude ionospheric E × B drifts and their variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maute, A.; Richmond, A. D.; Roble, R. G.

    2012-06-01

    The complete mechanism of how upward propagating tropospheric tides connect to the upper atmosphere is not yet fully understood. One proposed mechanism is via ionospheric wind dynamo. However, other sources can potentially alter the vertical E × B drift: gravity and plasma pressure gradient driven current, the geomagnetic main field, and longitudinal variation in the conductivities. In this study we examine the contribution to the vertical drift from these sources, and compare them. We use March equinox results from the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model. We found that the gravity and plasma pressure gradient driven current and the longitudinal variation of the conductivities excluding the variation due to the geomagnetic main field do not change the longitudinal variation of the vertical drift significantly. Modifying the geomagnetic main field will change the vertical drift at 5-6 LT, 18-19 LT and 23-24 LT at almost all longitudes. In general the influence of the geomagnetic main field on the vertical drift is larger, with respect to the maximum difference, at 18-19 LT and 23-24 LT, equal at 5-6 LT, and smaller at 14-15 LT than the influence due to nonmigrating tidal components in the neutral winds. Examination of the contribution from E- and F-region neutral winds to the vertical drift shows that their importance depends on the local time and the solar activity. This implies that the vertical drift has to be analyzed at specific local times to examine the relation between the wave number in the vertical drift and in the neutral winds.

  20. Geomagnetic Observatory Database February 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (formerly National Geophysical Data Center) maintains an active database of worldwide geomagnetic observatory...

  1. Model simulations of early westward flow across the Tasman Gateway during the early Eocene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijp, Willem P.; von der Heydt, A.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/245567526; Bijl, P.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314028110

    2016-01-01

    The timing and role in ocean circulation and climate of the opening of Southern Ocean gateways is as yet elusive. Recent micropalaeontological studies suggest the onset of westward throughflow of surface waters from the SW Pacific into the Australo-Antarctic Gulf through a southern shallow opening o

  2. The temporal and spatial variations of low frequency geomagnetic pulsations at polar cusp and cap latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bitterly

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Geomagnetic field measurements at two Antarctic stations are compared during two weeks in the local summer (January 1-15, 1992. Low frequency (0.6-6 mHz pulsations are observed at each station near local magnetic noon. The same wave packets appear in some cases also at the other station, although with a significant attenuation, more clearly in the morning sector; the waves show a near noon reversal of the polarization sense from counter-clockwise in the morning to clockwise in the afternoon indicating a westward and an eastward propagation, respectively.

  3. Characteristics of the equatorial plasma drifts as obtained by using Canadian Doppler ionosonde over southern tip of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripathi, S.; Singh, Ram; Banola, S.; Sreekumar, Sreeba; Emperumal, K.; Selvaraj, C.

    2016-08-01

    We present here characteristics of the Doppler drift measurements over Tirunelveli (8.73°N, 77.70°E; dip 0.5°N), an equatorial site over Southern India using Doppler interferometry technique of Canadian ionosonde. Three-dimensional bulk motions of the scatterers as reflected from the ionosphere are derived by using Doppler interferometry technique at selected frequencies using spaced receivers arranged in magnetic E-W and N-S directions. After having compared with Lowell's digisonde drifts at Trivandrum, we studied the temporal and seasonal variabilities of quiet time drifts for the year 2012. The observations showed higher vertical drifts during post sunset in the equinox followed by winter and summer seasons. The comparison of Doppler vertical drifts with the drifts obtained from (a) virtual height and (b) Fejer drift model suggests that Doppler vertical drifts are relatively higher as compared to the drifts obtained from model and virtual height methods. Further, it is seen that vertical drifts exhibited equinoctial asymmetry in prereversal enhancement quite similar to such asymmetry observed in the spread F in the ionograms and GPS L band scintillations. The zonal drifts, on the other hand, showed westward during daytime with mean drifts of ~150-200 m/s and correlated well with equatorial electrojet strength indicating the role of E region dynamo during daytime, while they are eastward during nighttime with mean drifts of ~100 m/s resembling F region dynamo process. Also, zonal drifts showed large westward prior to the spread F onset during autumn equinox than vernal equinox, suggesting strong zonal shears which might cause equinoctial asymmetry in spread F.

  4. On polar daily geomagnetic variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola De Michelis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to investigate the nature of the daily magnetic field perturbations produced by ionospheric and magnetospheric currents at high latitudes. We analyse the hourly means of the X and Y geomagnetic field components recorded by a meridian chain of permanent geomagnetic observatories in the polar region of the Northern Hemisphere during a period of four years (1995-1998 around the solar minimum. We apply a mathematical method, known as natural orthogonal component (NOC, which is capable of characterizing the dominant modes of the geomagnetic field daily variability through a set of empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs. Using the first two modes we reconstruct a two-dimensional equivalent current representation of the ionospheric electric currents, which contribute substantially to the geomagnetic daily variations. The obtained current structures resemble the equivalent current patterns of DP2 and DP1. We characterize these currents by studying their evolution with the geomagnetic activity level and by analysing their dependence on the interplanetary magnetic field. The obtained results support the idea of a coexistence of two main processes during all analysed period although one of them, the directly driven process, represents the dominant component of the geomagnetic daily variation.

  5. Dike/Drift Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Gaffiney

    2004-11-23

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1).

  6. Geodynamo simulations: tools to understand and forecast the geomagnetic field evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Julien

    2016-04-01

    The past two decades have seen an extensive development of numerical geodynamo simulations as tools to understand the mechanisms through which the magnetic field of internal origin of our planet is generated. Though these are still run at parameter regimes far from that of the Earth's core, the similarity of their output with the various observables of the field, secular variation, and underlying core flows has strengthened the prospect to use these simulations as analysis and forecasting tools for the geomagnetic field evolution. In this presentation, I will report on recent progress in geomagnetic data assimilation, an emerging discipline which blends together the high-quality satellite data such as these obtained by the Swarm mission, and state-of-the art numerical geodynamo simulation with an Earth-like output. The outcome of data assimilation is an estimate of the internal geodynamo structure, which sheds light into the mechanisms currently responsible for the geomagnetic dipole decay and the extension of the South Atlantic geomagnetic anomaly. Starting from such estimates obtained at present, ensemble-based techniques akin to those used in meteorology can help to estimate how the present field will evolve in the future. For the next century, our operational forecasts predict a further dipole decay of about 1 microtesla at Earth's surface, together with a similar deepening and a westward motion of the South Atlantic anomaly.

  7. Modeling concept drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borchani, Hanen; Martinez, Ana Maria; Masegosa, Andrés R.

    2015-01-01

    An often used approach for detecting and adapting to concept drift when doing classification is to treat the data as i.i.d. and use changes in classification accuracy as an indication of concept drift. In this paper, we take a different perspective and propose a framework, based on probabilistic ...

  8. On the utility of the ionosonde Doppler derived EXB drift during the daytime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan Joshi, Lalit; Sripathi, Samireddipelle

    2016-07-01

    Vertical EXB drift measured using the ionosonde Doppler sounding during the daytime suffers from an underestimation of the actual EXB drift. This is due to the photochemistry that determines the height of the F layer during the daytime, in addition to the zonal electric field. Systematic investigations have indicated a fair/good correlation to exist between the C/NOFS and ionosonde Doppler measured vertical EXB drift during the daytime over magnetic equator. A detailed analysis, however, indicated that the linear relation between the ionosonde Doppler drift and C/NOFS EXB drift varied with seasons. Thus, solar, seasonal and also geomagnetic variables were included in the Doppler drift correction, using the artificial neural network based approach. The RMS error in the neural network was found to be lesser than that in the linear regression analysis. Daytime EXB drift was derived using the neural network which was also used to model the ionospheic redistribution in the SAMI2 model. SAMI2 model reproduced strong (/weak) equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) for cases when neural network corrected daytime vertical EXB drift was high (/low). Similar features were also observed in GIM TEC maps. Thus, the results indicate that the neural network can be utilized to derive the vertical EXB drift from its proxies, like the ionosonde Doppler drift. These results indicate that the daytime ionosonde measured vertical EXB drift can be relied upon, provided adequate corrections are applied to it.

  9. Abstraction of Drift Seepage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2004-11-01

    This model report documents the abstraction of drift seepage, conducted to provide seepage-relevant parameters and their probability distributions for use in Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Drift seepage refers to the flow of liquid water into waste emplacement drifts. Water that seeps into drifts may contact waste packages and potentially mobilize radionuclides, and may result in advective transport of radionuclides through breached waste packages [''Risk Information to Support Prioritization of Performance Assessment Models'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 168796], Section 3.3.2)]. The unsaturated rock layers overlying and hosting the repository form a natural barrier that reduces the amount of water entering emplacement drifts by natural subsurface processes. For example, drift seepage is limited by the capillary barrier forming at the drift crown, which decreases or even eliminates water flow from the unsaturated fractured rock into the drift. During the first few hundred years after waste emplacement, when above-boiling rock temperatures will develop as a result of heat generated by the decay of the radioactive waste, vaporization of percolation water is an additional factor limiting seepage. Estimating the effectiveness of these natural barrier capabilities and predicting the amount of seepage into drifts is an important aspect of assessing the performance of the repository. The TSPA-LA therefore includes a seepage component that calculates the amount of seepage into drifts [''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504], Section 6.3.3.1)]. The TSPA-LA calculation is performed with a probabilistic approach that accounts for the spatial and temporal variability and inherent uncertainty of seepage-relevant properties and processes. Results are used for subsequent TSPA-LA components that may handle, for example, waste package

  10. Extreme geomagnetically induced currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Ryuho; Ngwira, Chigomezyo

    2016-12-01

    We propose an emergency alert framework for geomagnetically induced currents (GICs), based on the empirically extreme values and theoretical upper limits of the solar wind parameters and of d B/d t, the time derivative of magnetic field variations at ground. We expect this framework to be useful for preparing against extreme events. Our analysis is based on a review of various papers, including those presented during Extreme Space Weather Workshops held in Japan in 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014. Large-amplitude d B/d t values are the major cause of hazards associated with three different types of GICs: (1) slow d B/d t with ring current evolution (RC-type), (2) fast d B/d t associated with auroral electrojet activity (AE-type), and (3) transient d B/d t of sudden commencements (SC-type). We set "caution," "warning," and "emergency" alert levels during the main phase of superstorms with the peak Dst index of less than -300 nT (once per 10 years), -600 nT (once per 60 years), or -900 nT (once per 100 years), respectively. The extreme d B/d t values of the AE-type GICs are 2000, 4000, and 6000 nT/min at caution, warning, and emergency levels, respectively. For the SC-type GICs, a "transient alert" is also proposed for d B/d t values of 40 nT/s at low latitudes and 110 nT/s at high latitudes, especially when the solar energetic particle flux is unusually high.

  11. Characteristics of ionospheric plasma drifts as obtained from Doppler ionosonde measurements at magnetic equator over Indian sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samireddipalle, Sripathi; Banola, Sridhar; Singh, Ram

    2016-07-01

    We present equatorial plasma drifts over Tirunelveli (8.73°N, 77.70°E; Dip 0.5°N), an equatorial site over Indian region using Doppler interferometry technique of Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosonde (CADI) system. In the Doppler interferometry technique, it is possible to infer three dimensional bulk motion of the scatterers as reflected from the ionosphere at selected frequencies using spaced receivers arranged in mag. east-west, north-south directions. Spectral phases and amplitudes are calculated using FFT to identify the Doppler frequencies and their drifts. This technique produces reliable drifts when sharp refractive index gradients exists which produces higher scattering sources. The vertical drifts so obtained are compared with same drifts from Digisonde at Trivandrum. After having compared with Digisonde drifts, we studied the temporal and seasonal variability of these drifts during quiet periods for the year 2012. It is seen that vertical drifts exhibited equinoctial maximum in the Pre-Reversal-Enhancement (PRE) followed by winter and summer respectively. A comparison of these vertical drifts is made with drifts obtained from (a) virtual height measured at 4 MHz and (b) Fejer drift model. The comparison suggests that Doppler vertical drifts are relatively higher as compared to the drifts obtained from model and virtual height. However, the correlation seems to be good around evening PRE times. The zonal drifts, on the other hand, showed westward drifts during daytime with mean drifts of ~250 m/s, while they are eastward during nighttime with mean drifts of ~150 m/s. These drifts seems to be higher as compared to zonal drifts obtained in the South American sector. However, the zonal drifts so obtained showed good correlation with Equatorial Electrojet (EEJ) strength suggesting zonal drifts are influenced by E region drifts during daytime in agreement with Woodman et al., 2013 paper. The magnitude of these drifts are comparable to other independent

  12. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    The Drift Burst Hypothesis postulates the existence of short-lived locally explosive trends in the price paths of financial assets. The recent US equity and Treasury flash crashes can be viewed as two high profile manifestations of such dynamics, but we argue that drift bursts of varying magnitude......, currencies and commodities. We find that the majority of identified drift bursts are accompanied by strong price reversals and these can therefore be regarded as “flash crashes” that span brief periods of severe market disruption without any material longer term price impacts....

  13. Drift in Diffusion Gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Marchesoni

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The longstanding problem of Brownian transport in a heterogeneous quasi one-dimensional medium with space-dependent self-diffusion coefficient is addressed in the overdamped (zero mass limit. A satisfactory mesoscopic description is obtained in the Langevin equation formalism by introducing an appropriate drift term, which depends on the system macroscopic observables, namely the diffuser concentration and current. The drift term is related to the microscopic properties of the medium. The paradoxical existence of a finite drift at zero current suggests the possibility of designing a Maxwell demon operating between two equilibrium reservoirs at the same temperature.

  14. On Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    1998-01-01

    A statistical description of Earth's broad scale, core-source magnetic field has been developed and tested. The description features an expected, or mean, spatial magnetic power spectrum that is neither "flat" nor "while" at any depth, but is akin to spectra advanced by Stevenson and McLeod. This multipole spectrum describes the magnetic energy range; it is not steep enough for Gubbins' magnetic dissipation range. Natural variations of core multipole powers about their mean values are to be expected over geologic time and are described via trial probability distribution functions that neither require nor prohibit magnetic isotropy. The description is thus applicable to core-source dipole and low degree non-dipole fields despite axial dipole anisotropy. The description is combined with main field models of modem satellite and surface geomagnetic measurements to make testable predictions of: (1) the radius of Earth's core, (2) mean paleomagnetic field intensity, and (3) the mean rates and durations of both dipole power excursions and durable axial dipole reversals. The predicted core radius is 0.7% above the 3480 km seismologic value. The predicted root mean square paleointensity (35.6 mu T) and mean Virtual Axial Dipole Moment (about 6.2 lx 1022 Am(exp 2)) are within the range of various mean paleointensity estimates. The predicted mean rate of dipole power excursions, as defined by an absolute dipole moment <20% of the 1980 value, is 9.04/Myr and 14% less than obtained by analysis of a 4 Myr paleointensity record. The predicted mean rate of durable axial dipole reversals (2.26/Myr) is 2.3% more than established by the polarity time-scale for the past 84 Myr. The predicted mean duration of axial dipole reversals (5533 yr) is indistinguishable from an observational value. The accuracy of these predictions demonstrates the power and utility of the description, which is thought to merit further development and testing. It is suggested that strong stable stratification

  15. Geomagnetic imprinting predicts spatio-temporal variation in homing migration of pink and sockeye salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, Nathan F; Jenkins, Erica S; Michielsens, Catherine G J; Noakes, David L G

    2014-10-06

    Animals navigate using a variety of sensory cues, but how each is weighted during different phases of movement (e.g. dispersal, foraging, homing) is controversial. Here, we examine the geomagnetic and olfactory imprinting hypotheses of natal homing with datasets that recorded variation in the migratory routes of sockeye (Oncorhynchus nerka) and pink (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) salmon returning from the Pacific Ocean to the Fraser River, British Columbia. Drift of the magnetic field (i.e. geomagnetic imprinting) uniquely accounted for 23.2% and 44.0% of the variation in migration routes for sockeye and pink salmon, respectively. Ocean circulation (i.e. olfactory imprinting) predicted 6.1% and 0.1% of the variation in sockeye and pink migration routes, respectively. Sea surface temperature (a variable influencing salmon distribution but not navigation, directly) accounted for 13.0% of the variation in sockeye migration but was unrelated to pink migration. These findings suggest that geomagnetic navigation plays an important role in long-distance homing in salmon and that consideration of navigation mechanisms can aid in the management of migratory fishes by better predicting movement patterns. Finally, given the diversity of animals that use the Earth's magnetic field for navigation, geomagnetic drift may provide a unifying explanation for spatio-temporal variation in the movement patterns of many species. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Mantle superplumes induce geomagnetic superchrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eOlson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We use polarity reversal systematics from numerical dynamos to quantify the hypothesis that the modulation of geomagnetic reversal frequency, including geomagnetic superchrons, results from changes in core heat flux related to growth and collapse of lower mantle superplumes. We parameterize the reversal frequency sensitivity from numerical dynamos in terms of average core heat flux normalized by the difference between the present-day core heat flux and the core heat flux at geomagnetic superchron onset. A low-order polynomial fit to the 0-300 Ma Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS reveals that a decrease in core heat flux relative to present-day of approximately 30% can account for the Cretaceous Normal Polarity and Kiaman Reverse Polarity Superchrons, whereas the hyper-reversing periods in the Jurassic require a core heat flux equal to or higher than present-day. Possible links between GPTS transitions, large igneous provinces (LIPs, and the two lower mantle superplumes are explored. Lower mantle superplume growth and collapse induce GPTS transitions by increasing and decreasing core heat flux, respectively. Age clusters of major LIPs postdate transitions from hyper-reversing to superchron geodynamo states by 30-60 Myr, suggesting that superchron onset may be contemporaneous with LIP-forming instabilities produced during collapses of lower mantle superplumes.

  17. Solar dynamo and geomagnetic activity

    CERN Document Server

    Georgieva, Katya

    2010-01-01

    The correlation between geomagnetic activity and the sunspot number in the 11-year solar cycle exhibits long-term variations due to the varying time lag between the sunspot-related and non-sunspot related geomagnetic activity, and the varying relative amplitude of the respective geomagnetic activity peaks. As the sunspot-related and non-sunspot related geomagnetic activity are caused by different solar agents, related to the solar toroidal and poloidal fields, respectively, we use their variations to derive the parameters of the solar dynamo transforming the poloidal field into toroidal field and back. We find that in the last 12 cycles the solar surface meridional circulation varied between 5 and 20 m/s (averaged over latitude and over the sunspot cycle), the deep circulation varied between 2.5 and 5.5 m/s, and the diffusivity in the whole of the convection zone was ~10**12 m2/s. In the last 12 cycles solar dynamo has been operating in moderately diffusion dominated regime in the bulk of the convection zone....

  18. The geomagnetic field gradient tensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsiaros, Stavros; Olsen, Nils

    2012-01-01

    We develop the general mathematical basis for space magnetic gradiometry in spherical coordinates. The magnetic gradient tensor is a second rank tensor consisting of 3 × 3 = 9 spatial derivatives. Since the geomagnetic field vector B is always solenoidal (∇ · B = 0) there are only eight independe...... of the small-scale structure of the Earth’s lithospheric field....

  19. A New Theory of Geomagnetism

    OpenAIRE

    Sidharth, B. G.

    1999-01-01

    It is pointed out, that in the light of recent results on the semionic or anomalous behaviour of electrons below the Fermi temperature, the solid core of the earth which has been ignored so far, would contribute significantly to Geomagnetism and help explain the puzzling magnetic reversals.

  20. Relation of zonal plasma drift and wind in the equatorial F region as derived from CHAMP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Park

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we estimate zonal plasma drift in the equatorial ionospheric F region without counting on ion drift meters. From June 2001 to June 2004 zonal plasma drift velocity is estimated from electron, neutral, and magnetic field observations of Challenging Mini-satellite Payload (CHAMP in the 09:00–20:00 LT sector. The estimated velocities are validated against ion drift measurements by the Republic of China Satellite-1/Ionospheric Plasma and Electrodynamics Instrument (ROCSAT-1/IPEI during the same period. The correlation between the CHAMP (altitude ~ 400 km estimates and ROCSAT-1 (altitude ~ 600 km observations is reasonably high (R ≈ 0.8. The slope of the linear regression is close to unity. However, the maximum westward drift and the westward-to-eastward reversal occur earlier for CHAMP estimates than for ROCSAT-1 measurements. In the equatorial F region both zonal wind and plasma drift have the same direction. Both generate vertical currents but with opposite signs. The wind effect (F region wind dynamo is generally larger in magnitude than the plasma drift effect (Pedersen current generated by vertical E field, thus determining the direction of the F region vertical current.

  1. Drift Scale THM Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Rutqvist

    2004-10-07

    This model report documents the drift scale coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes model development and presents simulations of the THM behavior in fractured rock close to emplacement drifts. The modeling and analyses are used to evaluate the impact of THM processes on permeability and flow in the near-field of the emplacement drifts. The results from this report are used to assess the importance of THM processes on seepage and support in the model reports ''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' and ''Abstraction of Drift Seepage'', and to support arguments for exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the analysis reports ''Features, Events, and Processes in Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport and Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events''. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations do not use any output from this report. Specifically, the coupled THM process model is applied to simulate the impact of THM processes on hydrologic properties (permeability and capillary strength) and flow in the near-field rock around a heat-releasing emplacement drift. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in elevated rock temperatures for thousands of years after waste emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, resulting in water redistribution and altered flow paths. These temperatures will also cause thermal expansion of the rock, with the potential of opening or closing fractures and thus changing fracture permeability in the near-field. Understanding the THM coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally induced permeability changes potentially effect the magnitude and spatial distribution of percolation flux in the vicinity of the drift, and hence the seepage of water into the drift. This is important because

  2. Observational evidence for westward propagation of temperature inversions in the southeastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shankar, D; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Durand, F; Shetye, S.R.; Rajan, C.K.; Johnson, Z.; Araligidad, N.; Michael, G.S.

    -1 GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Observational evidence for westward propagation of temperature inversions in the southeastern Arabian Sea D. Shankar,1 V. V. Gopalakrishna,1 S. S. C. Shenoi,1 F. Durand,1 S. R. Shetye,1 C. K. Rajan,2.... Ocean. Syst., 4, 1?29, 1996. Brandt, P., L. Stramma, F. Schott, J. Fischer, M. Dengler, and D. Quad- fasel, Annual Rossby waves in the Arabian Sea from TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter and in situ data, Deep-Sea Res. II, 49, 1197?1210, 2002. Bruce, J. G., D. R...

  3. Drift Degradation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Kicker

    2004-09-16

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal

  4. Extreme Geomagnetic Storms - 1868 - 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennerstrom, S.; Lefevre, L.; Dumbović, M.; Crosby, N.; Malandraki, O.; Patsou, I.; Clette, F.; Veronig, A.; Vršnak, B.; Leer, K.; Moretto, T.

    2016-05-01

    We present the first large statistical study of extreme geomagnetic storms based on historical data from the time period 1868 - 2010. This article is the first of two companion papers. Here we describe how the storms were selected and focus on their near-Earth characteristics. The second article presents our investigation of the corresponding solar events and their characteristics. The storms were selected based on their intensity in the aa index, which constitutes the longest existing continuous series of geomagnetic activity. They are analyzed statistically in the context of more well-known geomagnetic indices, such as the Kp and Dcx/Dst index. This reveals that neither Kp nor Dcx/Dst provide a comprehensive geomagnetic measure of the extreme storms. We rank the storms by including long series of single magnetic observatory data. The top storms on the rank list are the New York Railroad storm occurring in May 1921 and the Quebec storm from March 1989. We identify key characteristics of the storms by combining several different available data sources, lists of storm sudden commencements (SSCs) signifying occurrence of interplanetary shocks, solar wind in-situ measurements, neutron monitor data, and associated identifications of Forbush decreases as well as satellite measurements of energetic proton fluxes in the near-Earth space environment. From this we find, among other results, that the extreme storms are very strongly correlated with the occurrence of interplanetary shocks (91 - 100 %), Forbush decreases (100 %), and energetic solar proton events (70 %). A quantitative comparison of these associations relative to less intense storms is also presented. Most notably, we find that most often the extreme storms are characterized by a complexity that is associated with multiple, often interacting, solar wind disturbances and that they frequently occur when the geomagnetic activity is already elevated. We also investigate the semiannual variation in storm occurrence

  5. Evidence for Active Westward Tilting of Fortymile Wash, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKague, H. L.; Sims, D. W.; Waiting, D. J.

    2006-12-01

    Fortymile Wash is located east and south of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Several lines of evidence suggest that this may be an area of active westward tilting associated with the continued development of Crater Flat basin and slip on the Bare Mountain normal fault. Near the southern end of Busted Butte, the incised channel of Fortymile Wash changes trend downgradient from south to south-southwest. Further southward, the incised main channel grades to a divergent distributary channel system that shows evidence of increasingly westward tilt. Viewed in profiles oriented normal to the incised channel and across the Fortymile Wash distributary system, topographic elevation of the western margin of the fan decreases southward, resulting in the elevation of the western margin of Fortymile Basin being as much as 18 m [59 ft] lower than the channel system on the eastern fan margin. Mapping of the surficial deposits within the distributary channel system (Pelletier, et al., 2005; Geophy. Res. Ltr., Vol. 32) may be interpreted to show a westward shift (downslope) of the locus of erosional activity toward the topographically lower western fan margin. Most of the older alluvium (Qa3 {86±40-16 ka}) has been eroded from the eastern portion, while incipient incision into the older alluvium is occurring on the western side of the distributary channel system. The results from level-line benchmark surveys (Gilmore, 1992; USGS OFR 92- 450) from 1915 and 1984 show gradual and systematic elevation changes east of the Bare Mountain fault to just east of Amargosa City, Nevada, where a step-like increase occurs. The level-line surveys are near and along the path of U.S. Highway 95, which traverses the distributary channel system of the Fortymile Wash alluvial fan in the southern portion of the Fortymile Wash basin. These lines of evidence indicate disequilibrium in the channel system that would result from active westward tilting of the

  6. Heart attacks and geomagnetic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, E G; Armstrong, E; Lancashire, R; Wall, M; Haynes, R

    1979-10-18

    Malin and Srivastava reported a remarkable correlation between daily variations in the geomagnetic field strength and daily admissions to the cardio-thoracic wards of hospitals in Hyderabad and Secunderabad, for cardiac emergencies, during 1967--72. We have now carried out a similar enquiry in the West Midlands region of the UK for the years 1969--70, but were unable to confirm the Indian results.

  7. Ionospheric Plasma Drift Analysis Technique Based On Ray Tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari, Gizem; Toker, Cenk

    2016-07-01

    Ionospheric drift measurements provide important information about the variability in the ionosphere, which can be used to quantify ionospheric disturbances caused by natural phenomena such as solar, geomagnetic, gravitational and seismic activities. One of the prominent ways for drift measurement depends on instrumentation based measurements, e.g. using an ionosonde. The drift estimation of an ionosonde depends on measuring the Doppler shift on the received signal, where the main cause of Doppler shift is the change in the length of the propagation path of the signal between the transmitter and the receiver. Unfortunately, ionosondes are expensive devices and their installation and maintenance require special care. Furthermore, the ionosonde network over the world or even Europe is not dense enough to obtain a global or continental drift map. In order to overcome the difficulties related to an ionosonde, we propose a technique to perform ionospheric drift estimation based on ray tracing. First, a two dimensional TEC map is constructed by using the IONOLAB-MAP tool which spatially interpolates the VTEC estimates obtained from the EUREF CORS network. Next, a three dimensional electron density profile is generated by inputting the TEC estimates to the IRI-2015 model. Eventually, a close-to-real situation electron density profile is obtained in which ray tracing can be performed. These profiles can be constructed periodically with a period of as low as 30 seconds. By processing two consequent snapshots together and calculating the propagation paths, we estimate the drift measurements over any coordinate of concern. We test our technique by comparing the results to the drift measurements taken at the DPS ionosonde at Pruhonice, Czech Republic. This study is supported by TUBITAK 115E915 and Joint TUBITAK 114E092 and AS CR14/001 projects.

  8. Geomagnetic Observations for Main Field Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzka, Jürgen; Chulliat, A.; Mandea, M.

    2010-01-01

    Direct measurements of the geomagnetic field have been made for more than 400 years, beginning with individual determinations of the angle between geographic and magnetic North. This was followed by the start of continuous time series of full vector measurements at geomagnetic observatories and t...... for magnetic field measurements on ground and in space and covers geomagnetic observatories, repeat stations, automatic observatories, satellites and historic observations. Special emphasis is laid on the global network of geomagnetic observatories....... and the beginning of geomagnetic repeat stations surveys in the 19th century. In the second half of the 20th century, true global coverage with geomagnetic field measurements was accomplished by magnetometer payloads on low-Earth-orbiting satellites. This article describes the procedures and instruments...

  9. Negative Drift in Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehre, Per Kristian

    2011-01-01

    An important step in gaining a better understanding of the stochastic dynamics of evolving populations, is the development of appropriate analytical tools. We present a new drift theorem for populations that allows properties of their long-term behaviour, e.g. the runtime of evolutionary algorithms...

  10. IN DRIFT CORROSION PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. Jolley

    1999-12-02

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a conceptual model for steel and corrosion products in the engineered barrier system (EBS) is to be developed. The purpose of this conceptual model is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This document provides the conceptual framework for the in-drift corrosion products sub-model to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. This model has been developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical analyses performed by PAO. However, the concepts discussed within this report may also apply to some near and far-field geochemical processes and may have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) transport modeling efforts.

  11. Development of drifting buoys

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nayak, M.R.; Peshwe, V.B.; Tengali, S.

    . Considerable potential exists for the use of drifting buoys if the cost of data acquisition and processing systems is held at a reasonable level. As yet it is in infancy and further development is required before system reliability and longevity are considered...

  12. The Causes of Geomagnetic Storms During Solar Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    1998-01-01

    One of the oldest mysteries in geomagnetism is the linkage between solar and geomagnetic activity. The 11-year cycles of both the numbers of sunspots and Earth geomagnetic storms were first noted by Sabine (1852).

  13. Dike Propagation Near Drifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA

    2002-03-04

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) supporting the Site Recommendation/License Application (SR/LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is the development of elementary analyses of the interactions of a hypothetical dike with a repository drift (i.e., tunnel) and with the drift contents at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. This effort is intended to support the analysis of disruptive events for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). This AMR supports the Process Model Report (PMR) on disruptive events (CRWMS M&O 2000a). This purpose is documented in the development plan (DP) ''Coordinate Modeling of Dike Propagation Near Drifts Consequences for TSPA-SR/LA'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). Evaluation of that Development Plan and the work to be conducted to prepare Interim Change Notice (ICN) 1 of this report, which now includes the design option of ''Open'' drifts, indicated that no revision to that DP was needed. These analyses are intended to provide reasonable bounds for a number of expected effects: (1) Temperature changes to the waste package from exposure to magma; (2) The gas flow available to degrade waste containers during the intrusion; (3) Movement of the waste package as it is displaced by the gas, pyroclasts and magma from the intruding dike (the number of packages damaged); (4) Movement of the backfill (Backfill is treated here as a design option); (5) The nature of the mechanics of the dike/drift interaction. These analyses serve two objectives: to provide preliminary analyses needed to support evaluation of the consequences of an intrusive event and to provide a basis for addressing some of the concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expressed in the Igneous Activity Issue Resolution Status Report.

  14. Contraction of westward-travelling nonlocal modons due to the vorticity filament emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Berson

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term evolution of westward-travelling non-local modons on the β-plane, i.e. dipolar vortices imbedded in slowly damping Rossby wave fields, is studied numerically. In the framework of the nondivergent (barotropic model, two stages of the evolution are observed. At the first stage (for about 30 synoptic periods, the parameters and the form of the vortex practically remain constant, whereas at the second stage, vorticity filaments are emitted. Due to the filamentation, the vortex core contracts, the potential vorticity peaks of the vortex pair get closer, and the modon speeds up. In the divergent (equivalent-barotropic model, nonlocal modons and the Lamb modon (that has no wave field outside the dipolar core evolve much more slowly, essentially preserving the initial shape and propagation speed until about 100 synoptic periods.

  15. Wind-driven coastal upwelling and westward circulation in the Yucatan shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Castillo, Eugenio; Gomez-Valdes, Jose; Sheinbaum, Julio; Rioja-Nieto, Rodolfo

    2016-04-01

    The wind-driven circulation and wind-induced coastal upwelling in a large shelf sea with a zonally oriented coast are examined. The Yucatan shelf is located to the north of the Yucatan peninsula in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. This area is a tropical shallow body of water with a smooth sloping bottom and is one of the largest shelves in the world. This study describes the wind-driven circulation and wind-induced coastal upwelling in the Yucatan shelf, which is forced by easterly winds throughout the year. Data obtained from hydrographic surveys, acoustic current profilers and environmental satellites are used in the analysis. Hydrographic data was analyzed and geostrophic currents were calculated in each survey. In addition an analytical model was applied to reproduce the currents. The results of a general circulation model were used with an empirical orthogonal function analysis to study the variability of the currents. The study area is divided in two regions: from the 40 m to the 200 m isobaths (outer shelf) and from the coast to the 40 m isobath (inner shelf). At the outer shelf, observations revealed upwelling events throughout the year, and a westward current with velocities of approximately 0.2 m s-1 was calculated from the numerical model output and hydrographic data. In addition, the theory developed by Pedlosky (2007) for a stratified fluid along a sloping bottom adequately explains the current's primary characteristics. The momentum of the current comes from the wind, and the stratification is an important factor in its dynamics. At the inner shelf, observations and numerical model output show a wind-driven westward current with maximum velocities of 0.20 m s-1. The momentum balance in this region is between local acceleration and friction. A cold-water band is developed during the period of maximum upwelling.

  16. Gravitational dynamos and the low-frequency geomagnetic secular variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, P.

    2007-01-01

    Self-sustaining numerical dynamos are used to infer the sources of low-frequency secular variation of the geomagnetic field. Gravitational dynamo models powered by compositional convection in an electrically conducting, rotating fluid shell exhibit several regimes of magnetic field behavior with an increasing Rayleigh number of the convection, including nearly steady dipoles, chaotic nonreversing dipoles, and chaotic reversing dipoles. The time average dipole strength and dipolarity of the magnetic field decrease, whereas the dipole variability, average dipole tilt angle, and frequency of polarity reversals increase with Rayleigh number. Chaotic gravitational dynamos have large-amplitude dipole secular variation with maximum power at frequencies corresponding to a few cycles per million years on Earth. Their external magnetic field structure, dipole statistics, low-frequency power spectra, and polarity reversal frequency are comparable to the geomagnetic field. The magnetic variability is driven by the Lorentz force and is characterized by an inverse correlation between dynamo magnetic and kinetic energy fluctuations. A constant energy dissipation theory accounts for this inverse energy correlation, which is shown to produce conditions favorable for dipole drift, polarity reversals, and excursions. PMID:18048345

  17. Magnetospheric solitary structure maintained by 3000 km/s ions as a cause of westward moving auroral bulge at 19 MLT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yamauchi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In the evening equatorial magnetosphere at about 4 RE geocentric distance and 19 MLT, the four Cluster spacecraft observed a solitary structure with a width of about 1000~2000 km in the propagation direction. The solitary structure propagates sunward with about 5~10 km/s carrying sunward electric field (in the propagation direction of up to about 10 mV/m (total potential drop of about 5~10 kV, depletion of magnetic field of about 25%, and a duskward E×B convection up to 50 km/s of He+ rich cold plasma without O+. At the same time, auroral images from the IMAGE satellite together with ground based geomagnetic field data showed a westward (sunward at this location propagating auroral bulge at the magnetically conjugate ionosphere with the solitary structure. The solitary structure is maintained by flux enhancement of selectively 3000 km/s ions (about 50 keV for H+, 200 keV for He+, and 750 keV for O+. These ions are the main carrier of the diamagnetic current causing the magnetic depletion, whereas the polarization is maintained by different behavior of energetic ions and electrons. Corresponding to aurora, field-aligned accelerated ionospheric plasma of several keV appeared at Cluster from both hemispheres simultaneously. Together with good correspondence in location and propagation velocity between the auroral bulge and the solitary structure, this indicates that the sunward moving auroral bulge is caused by the sunward propagation of the solitary structure which is maintained by energetic ions. The solitary structure might also be the cause of Pi2-like magnetic variation that started simultaneously at Cluster location.

  18. Formation of Polar Ionospheric Tongue of Ionization during Minor Geomagnetic Disturbed Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Wang, W.; Burns, A. G.; Yue, X.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Previous investigations of ionospheric storm-enhanced density (SED) and tongue of ionization (TOI) focused mostly on the behavior of TOI during intense geomagnetic storms. Little attention has been paid to the spatial and temporal variations of TOI during weak to moderate geomagnetic disturbed conditions. we investigate the source and development of TOI during a moderate geomagnetic storm on 14 October 2012.Multi-instrumental observations including GPS total electron content (TEC), Defense Meteorological SatelliteProgram(DMSP) in situ measured total ion concentration and ion drift velocity, SuperDARN measured polar ionconvection patterns, and electron density profiles from the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) have been utilized in the current analysis. GPS TEC maps show salient TOI structures persisting for about 5 h over high latitudes of North America on 14 October 2012 in the later recovery phase of the storm when the magnitudes of IMF By and Bz were less than 5 nT. The PFISR electron density profiles indicate that the extra ionization for TEC enhancements mainly occurred in the topside ionosphere with no obvious changes in the bottom side ionosphere and vertical plasma drifts. Additionally, there were no signatures of penetration electric fields in the equatorial electrojet data and upward ion drifts at high latitudes. At the same time, strong subauroral polarization streams with ion drift speeds exceeding 2.5 km/s carried sunward fluxes and migrated toward lower latitudes for about 5° based on the DMSP cross-track driftmeasurements. Based on those measurements,we postulate that the combined effects of initial build-up of ionization at midlatitudes through daytime production of ionization and equatorward (or less poleward than normal daytime) neutral wind reducing downward diffusion along the inclined filed lines, and an expanded polar ion convection pattern and its associated horizontal plasma transport are important in the formation of the TOI.

  19. Style drift in private equity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Cumming; G. Fleming; A. Schwienbacher

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the concept of style drift to private equity investment. We present theory and evidence pertaining to style drifts in terms of a fund manager's stated focus on particular stages of entrepreneurial development. We develop a model that derives conditions under which style drifts are less

  20. First simultaneous measurements of thermospheric winds and zonal ion drifts from the Jicamarca Radio Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriwether, John; Baker, Brooke; Twork, Greg; Chau, Jorge; Veliz, Oskar; Woodman, Ronald; Hedden, Russell; Hysell, David

    The first simultaneous observations of thermospheric winds and zonal ion drifts have been ob-tained at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory using a new Fabry-Perot interferometer observatory installed on a mountain ridge overlooking the valley where the JRO radar is located. The re-sults show that the neutral winds and ion drifts generally have the same speed and temporal variation characteristics. These results illustrate the simultaneous detection of the midnight temperature maximum as well. The paper will also describe efforts to obtain common volume measurements of thermospheric winds and temperatures utilizing the FPI Arequipa observatory which is located 4 degrees south of the geomagnetic equator.

  1. Evidence for geomagnetic imprinting as a homing mechanism in Pacific salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, Nathan F; Lohmann, Kenneth J; Putman, Emily M; Quinn, Thomas P; Klimley, A Peter; Noakes, David L G

    2013-02-18

    In the final phase of their spawning migration, Pacific salmon use chemical cues to identify their home river, but how they navigate from the open ocean to the correct coastal area has remained enigmatic. To test the hypothesis that salmon imprint on the magnetic field that exists where they first enter the sea and later seek the same field upon return, we analyzed a 56-year fisheries data set on Fraser River sockeye salmon, which must detour around Vancouver Island to approach the river through either a northern or southern passageway. We found that the proportion of salmon using each route was predicted by geomagnetic field drift: the more the field at a passage entrance diverged from the field at the river mouth, the fewer fish used the passage. We also found that more fish used the northern passage in years with warmer sea surface temperature (presumably because fish were constrained to more northern latitudes). Field drift accounted for 16% of the variation in migratory route used, temperature 22%, and the interaction between these variables 28%. These results provide the first empirical evidence of geomagnetic imprinting in any species and imply that forecasting salmon movements is possible using geomagnetic models. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Electric Utility Industry Experience with Geomagnetic Disturbances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as a few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems' responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration.

  3. Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Taylor, E.R. Jr. [ABB Power Systems, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Tesche, F.M.

    1991-09-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems` responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

  4. Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Taylor, E.R. Jr. (ABB Power Systems, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Tesche, F.M.

    1991-09-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems' responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

  5. Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Taylor, E.R. Jr. (ABB Power Systems, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Tesche, F.M.

    1991-09-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems' responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

  6. Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Taylor, E.R. Jr. [ABB Power Systems, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Tesche, F.M.

    1991-09-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems` responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

  7. Drift-Diffusion Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Banoo

    1998-01-01

    equation in the discrete momentum space. This is shown to be similar to the conventional drift-diffusion equation except that it is a more rigorous solution to the Boltzmann equation because the current and carrier densities are resolved into M×1 vectors, where M is the number of modes in the discrete momentum space. The mobility and diffusion coefficient become M×M matrices which connect the M momentum space modes. This approach is demonstrated by simulating electron transport in bulk silicon.

  8. Geomagnetic Information Model for the Year 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Brkić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The finalization of the survey of the Basic Geomagnetic Network of the Republic of Croatia (BGNRC and completion of geomagnetic information models for the Institute for Research and Development of Defence Systems of the Ministry of Defence and the State Geodetic Administration (e.g. Brkić M., E. Jungwirth, D. Matika and Ž. Bačić, 2012, Geomagnetic Information and Safety, 3rd Conference of Croatian National Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction, National Protection and Rescue Directorate, Zagreb was followed in 2012 with validity confirmation of the GI2012 predictive model by geomagnetic observations in quiet conditions. The differences between the measured and modelled declination were found to be within the expected errors of the model. It needs to be pointed out that this was the first successful implementation of night surveying (especially suitable for geomagnetic surveys of airports in the Republic of Croatia.

  9. History of the geomagnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doell, Richard R.

    1969-01-01

    Direct measurements of the direction and strength of the earth's magnetic field have provided a knowledge of the field's form and behavior during the last few hundreds of years. For older times, however, it has been necessary to measure the magnetism of certain rocks to learn what the geomagnetic field was like. For example, when a lava flow solidifies (at temperatures near 1000??C) and cools through the Curie point of the magnetic minerals contained in it (around 500??C) it acquires a remanent magnetism that is (1) very weak, (2) very stablel, (3) paralle to the direction of the ambient geomagnetic field, and (4) proportional in intensity to the ambient field. Separating, by various analytical means, this magnetization from other 'unwanted' magnetizations has allowed paleomagnetists to study the historical and prehistorical behavior of the earth's field. It has been learned, for example, that the strength of the field was almost twice its present value 2000 years ago and that it has often completely reversed its polarity. Paleo-magnetists have also confirmed that most oceans are, geologically speaking, relatively new features, and that the continents have markedly changed their positions over the surface of the earth. ?? 1969 The American Institute of Physics.

  10. An auroral westward flow channel (AWFC and its relationship to field-aligned current, ring current, and plasmapause location determined using multiple spacecraft observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Parkinson

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available An auroral westward flow channel (AWFC is a latitudinally narrow channel of unstable F-region plasma with intense westward drift in the dusk-to-midnight sector ionosphere. AWFCs tend to overlap the equatorward edge of the auroral oval, and their life cycle is often synchronised to that of substorms: they commence close to substorm expansion phase onset, intensify during the expansion phase, and then decay during the recovery phase. Here we define for the first time the relationship between an AWFC, large-scale field-aligned current (FAC, the ring current, and plasmapause location. The Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER, a Southern Hemisphere HF SuperDARN radar, observed a jet-like AWFC during ~08:35 to 13:28 UT on 7 April 2001. The initiation of the AWFC was preceded by a band of equatorward expanding ionospheric scatter (BEES which conveyed an intense poleward electric field through the inner plasma sheet. Unlike previous AWFCs, this event was not associated with a distinct substorm surge; rather it occurred during an interval of persistent, moderate magnetic activity characterised by AL~−200 nT. The four Cluster spacecraft had perigees within the dusk sector plasmasphere, and their trajectories were magnetically conjugate to the radar observations. The Waves of High frequency and Sounder for Probing Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER instruments on board Cluster were used to identify the plasmapause location. The Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE EUV experiment also provided global-scale observations of the plasmapause. The Cluster fluxgate magnetometers (FGM provided successive measurements specifying the relative location of the ring current and filamentary plasma sheet current. An analysis of Iridium spacecraft magnetometer measurements provided estimates of large-scale ionospheric FAC in relation to the AWFC evolution. Peak flows in the AWFC were located close to the peak of a Region 2

  11. Climatology of rapid geomagnetic variations at high latitudes over two solar cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Viljanen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the characteristics of rapid geomagnetic variations at high latitudes based on the occurrence of large time derivatives of the horizontal magnetic field (dH/dt exceeding 1 nT s−1. Analysis of IMAGE magnetometer data from North Europe in 1983–2010, covering more than two solar cycles, confirms and specifies several previous findings. We show that dH/dt activity is high around the midnight and early morning hours, and nearly vanishes at noon and early afternoon. This happens during all seasons, although the midnight maximum is nearly invisible during summer. As indicated by modelled ionospheric equivalent currents, large dH/dt values occur predominantly during westward ionospheric electrojets. Before and around midnight, dH/dt tends to be north-south oriented, whereas in the morning hours, its direction is more west-east directed. dH/dt tends to be more strictly north-south oriented during winter than other seasons. The seasonal occurrence of large dH/dt values is similar to the variation of the maximum amplitude of westward equivalent currents. The yearly fraction of east-west directed large dH/dt vectors at the Kilpisjärvi station (MLAT 65.88 varies from 31 to 47 % without any clear correlation with the general geomagnetic activity nor with the yearly averages of solar wind parameters.

  12. Gravity is indeed the driving force for fault pattern formation and westward displacement of the lithosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Papa, A R R

    2005-01-01

    Gravity influence of the Sun and the Moon on the Earth is the cause of the fault pattern on Earth's surface we observe nowadays and also of the westward displacement of the lithosphere. A somewhat related hypotheses advanced in the past have been that tidal torque of the Moon may be significant. However, it has been argued that it is untenable essentially on the grounds that the viscosity of the Earth's mantle is far too high in comparison with the forces involved. To state this it was assumed that the Earth's relevant characteristic is that of two spherical shells separated by a viscous liquid, the external shell rotating at a constant angular velocity with respect to the inner shell. Here I show that this picture is not quite right and that a more careful look leads us to one in which both shells rotates at different mean angular velocities and with a forward-backward sequence of movements relative to each other. In this way what was supposed to be the principal factor against gravity influence becomes the ...

  13. Centennial to millennial geomagnetic field variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muscheler Raimund

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Reconstructions of the geomagnetic field in the past represent a useful tool not only to investigate the geodynamo process, but also to estimate the effect of geomagnetic shielding for any studies on cosmogenic radionuclides and galactic cosmic rays. A number of new millennial-scale geomagnetic field reconstructions have been published over the last years, based on improved global archeo- and paleomagnetic data compilations. Here we review several spherical harmonic models and compare their dipole field predictions to reconstructions based on virtual axial dipole moments and virtual geomagnetic poles. Dipole intensity estimates from cosmogenic radionuclide production records, with suitable filtering to minimise the solar influence, have also been included in the comparison to provide independent information about variations in the strength of the geomagnetic field. However, due to differences among geomagnetic models and between 14C and 10Be production records this comparison is fairly inconclusive with respect to multi-centennial variations. Different geomagnetic dipole tilt reconstructions agree well for much of the Holocene, but dipole moment estimates still differ substantially. Recent spherical harmonic models for the past 3 and 10 kyrs have improved considerably compared to earlier versions. Nevertheless at present we recommend to test if any interpretation depends on the choice of model.

  14. Improved geomagnetic referencing in the Arctic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poedjono, B.; Beck, N.; Buchanan, A. C.; Borri, L.; Maus, S.; Finn, Carol; Worthington, Bill; White, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Geomagnetic referencing uses the Earth’s magnetic field to determine accurate wellbore positioning essential for success in today's complex drilling programs, either as an alternative or a complement to north-seeking gyroscopic referencing. However, fluctuations in the geomagnetic field, especially at high latitudes, make the application of geomagnetic referencing in those areas more challenging. Precise crustal mapping and the monitoring of real-time variations by nearby magnetic observatories is crucial to achieving the required geomagnetic referencing accuracy. The Deadhorse Magnetic Observatory (DED), located at Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, has already played a vital role in the success of several commercial ventures in the area, providing essential, accurate, real-time data to the oilfield drilling industry. Geomagnetic referencing is enhanced with real-time data from DED and other observatories, and has been successfully used for accurate wellbore positioning. The availability of real-time geomagnetic measurements leads to significant cost and time savings in wellbore surveying, improving accuracy and alleviating the need for more expensive surveying techniques. The correct implementation of geomagnetic referencing is particularly critical as we approach the increased activity associated with the upcoming maximum of the 11-year solar cycle. The DED observatory further provides an important service to scientific communities engaged in studies of ionospheric, magnetospheric and space weather phenomena.

  15. An Ensemble Algorithm Based Component for Geomagnetic Data Assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Sun and Weijia Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Geomagnetic data assimilation is one of the most recent developments in geomagnetic studies. It combines geodynamo model outputs and surface geomagnetic observations to provide more accurate estimates of the core dynamic state and provide accurate geomagnetic secular variation forecasting. To facilitate geomagnetic data assimilation studies, we develop a stand-alone data assimilation component for the geomagnetic community. This component is used to calculate the forecast error covariance matrices and the gain matrix from a given geodynamo solution, which can then be used for sequential geomagnetic data assimilation. This component is very flexible and can be executed independently. It can also be easily integrated with arbitrary dynamo models.

  16. Minimax confidence intervals in geomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Philip B.

    1992-01-01

    The present paper uses theory of Donoho (1989) to find lower bounds on the lengths of optimally short fixed-length confidence intervals (minimax confidence intervals) for Gauss coefficients of the field of degree 1-12 using the heat flow constraint. The bounds on optimal minimax intervals are about 40 percent shorter than Backus' intervals: no procedure for producing fixed-length confidence intervals, linear or nonlinear, can give intervals shorter than about 60 percent the length of Backus' in this problem. While both methods rigorously account for the fact that core field models are infinite-dimensional, the application of the techniques to the geomagnetic problem involves approximations and counterfactual assumptions about the data errors, and so these results are likely to be extremely optimistic estimates of the actual uncertainty in Gauss coefficients.

  17. Fingermark ridge drift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Alcaraz-Fossoul, Josep; Roberts, Katherine A; Feixat, Carme Barrot; Hogrebe, Gregory G; Badia, Manel Gené

    2016-01-01

    Distortions of the fingermark topography are usually considered when comparing latent and exemplar fingerprints. These alterations are characterized as caused by an extrinsic action, which affects entire areas of the deposition and alters the overall flow of a series of contiguous ridges. Here we introduce a novel visual phenomenon that does not follow these principles, named fingermark ridge drift. An experiment was designed that included variables such as type of secretion (eccrine and sebaceous), substrate (glass and polystyrene), and degrees of exposure to natural light (darkness, shade, and direct light) indoors. Fingermarks were sequentially visualized with titanium dioxide powder, photographed and analyzed. The comparison between fresh and aged depositions revealed that under certain environmental conditions an individual ridge could randomly change its original position regardless of its unaltered adjacent ridges. The causes of the drift phenomenon are not well understood. We believe it is exclusively associated with intrinsic natural aging processes of latent fingermarks. This discovery will help explain the detection of certain dissimilarities at the minutiae/ridge level; determine more accurate "hits"; identify potentially erroneous corresponding points; and rethink identification protocols, especially the criteria of "no single minutiae discrepancy" for a positive identification.

  18. The CLEO III drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, D; Briere, R A; Chen, G; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Csorna, S; Dickson, M; Dombrowski, S V; Ecklund, K M; Lyon, A; Marka, S; Meyer, T O; Patterson, J R; Sadoff, A; Thies, P; Thorndike, E H; Urner, D

    2002-01-01

    The CLEO group at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring has constructed and commissioned a new central drift chamber. With 9796 cells arranged in 47 layers ranging in radius from 13.2 to 79 cm, the new drift chamber has a smaller outer radius and fewer wires than the drift chamber it replaces, but allows the CLEO tracking system to have improved momentum resolution. Reduced scattering material in the chamber gas and in the inner skin separating the drift chamber from the silicon vertex detector provides a reduction of the multiple scattering component of the momentum resolution and an extension of the usable measurement length into the silicon. Momentum resolution is further improved through quality control in wire positioning and symmetry of the electric fields in the drift cells which have provided a reduction in the spatial resolution to 88 mu m (averaged over the full drift range).

  19. Solar wind and geomagnetism. Toward a standard classification of geomagnetic activity from 1868 to 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerbo, J.L. [Univ. Polytechnique de Bobo Dioulasso (Burkina Faso); UPMC/Polytechique/CNRS, UMR 7648, Saint-Maur-des-Fosses (France). LPP-Lab. de Physique des Plasmas; Mazaudier, C. Amory [UPMC/Polytechique/CNRS, UMR 7648, Saint-Maur-des-Fosses (France). LPP-Lab. de Physique des Plasmas; Ouattara, F. [Koudougou Univ. (Burkina Faso). Ecole Normale Superieure; Richardson, J.D. [M.I.T., Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for Space Research

    2012-07-01

    We examined solar activity with a large series of geomagnetic data from 1868 to 2009. We have revisited the geomagnetic activity classification scheme of Legrand and Simon (1989) and improve their scheme by lowering the minimum Aa index value for shock and recurrent activity from 40 to 20 nT. This improved scheme allows us to clearly classify about 80% of the geomagnetic activity in this time period instead of only 60% for the previous Legrand and Simon classification. (orig.)

  20. The DRIFT Dark Matter Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Daw, E; Fox, J R; Gauvreau, J -L; Ghag, C; Harmon, L J; Harton, J L; Gold, M; Lee, E R; Loomba, D; Miller, E H; Murphy, A St J; Paling, S M; Landers, J M; Phan, N; Pipe, M; Pushkin, K; Robinson, M; Sadler, S W; Snowden-Ifft, D P; Spooner, N J C; Walker, D; Warner, D

    2011-01-01

    The current status of the DRIFT (Directional Recoil Identification From Tracks) experiment at Boulby Mine is presented, including the latest limits on the WIMP spin-dependent cross-section from 1.5 kg days of running with a mixture of CS2 and CF4. Planned upgrades to DRIFT IId are detailed, along with ongoing work towards DRIFT III, which aims to be the world's first 10 m3-scale directional Dark Matter detector.

  1. What happens when the geomagnetic field reverses?

    CERN Document Server

    Lemaire, Joseph F

    2012-01-01

    During geomagnetic field reversals the radiation belt high-energy proton populations become depleted. Their energy spectra become softer, with the trapped particles of highest energies being lost first, and eventually recovering after a field reversal. The radiation belts rebuild in a dynamical way with the energy spectra flattening on the average during the course of many millennia, but without ever reaching complete steady state equilibrium between successive geomagnetic storm events determined by southward turnings of the IMF orientation. Considering that the entry of galactic cosmic rays and the solar energetic particles with energies above a given threshold are strongly controlled by the intensity of the northward component of the interplanetary magnetic field, we speculate that at earlier epochs when the geomagnetic dipole was reversed, the entry of these energetic particles into the geomagnetic field was facilitated when the interplanetary magnetic field was directed northward. Unlike in other compleme...

  2. Digitized Historical Geomagnetic Publications in PDF format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A catalog of 732 historical geomagnetic publications that were at risk of loss have been digitized and converted in pdf documents.

  3. Geomagnetism solid Earth and upper atmosphere perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Basavaiah, Nathani

    2011-01-01

    This volume elaborates several important aspects of solid Earth geomagnetism. It covers all the basics of the subject, including biomagnetism and instrumentation, and offers a number of practical applications with carefully selected examples and illustrations.

  4. The geomagnetic main field and the geodynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Roberts, Paul H.

    1991-01-01

    Information available on the geomagnetic main field and the geodynamo is presented. Attention is given to the process of mapping the magnetic field, the last version of International Geomagnetic Reference Field Model, and maps of the magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary and their interpretation. Particular consideration is given to the existing geodynamo theories, with special relation given to the Braginsky and Meytlis theory of core turbulence in which the turbulence differs fundamentally from classical turbulence of Kolmogorov type.

  5. The International Geomagnetic Reference Field, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukstales, Kenneth S.; Love, Jeffrey J.

    2007-01-01

    This is a set of five world charts showing the declination, inclination, horizontal intensity, vertical component, and total intensity of the Earth's magnetic field at mean sea level at the beginning of 2005. The charts are based on the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) main model for 2005 and secular change model for 2005-2010. The IGRF is referenced to the World Geodetic System 1984 ellipsoid. Additional information about the USGS geomagnetism program is available at: http://geomag.usgs.gov/

  6. The KLOE drift chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adinolfi, M.; Aloisio, A.; Ambrosino, F.; Andryakov, A.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Anulli, F.; Bacci, C.; Bankamp, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Bellini, F.; Bencivenni, G.; Bertolucci, S.; Bini, C.; Bloise, C.; Bocci, V.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Bulychjov, S.A.; Cabibbo, G.; Calcaterra, A.; Caloi, R.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Carboni, G.; Cardini, A.; Casarsa, M.; Cataldi, G.; Ceradini, F.; Cervelli, F.; Cevenini, F.; Chiefari, G.; Ciambrone, P.; Conetti, S.; Conticelli, S.; Lucia, E. De; Robertis, G. De; Sangro, R. De; Simone, P. De; Zorzi, G. De; Dell' Agnello, S.; Denig, A.; Domenico, A. Di; Donato, C. Di; Falco, S. Di; Doria, A.; Drago, E.; Elia, V.; Erriquez, O.; Farilla, A.; Felici, G.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Forti, C.; Franceschi, A.; Franzini, P.; Gao, M.L.; Gatti, C.; Gauzzi, P.; Giovannella, S.; Golovatyuk, V.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grandegger, W.; Graziani, E.; Guarnaccia, P.; Hagel, U.V.; Han, H.G.; Han, S.W.; Huang, X.; Incagli, M.; Ingrosso, L.; Jang, Y.Y.; Kim, W.; Kluge, W.; Kulikov, V.; Lacava, F.; Lanfranchi, G.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Lomtadze, F.; Luisi, C.; Mao, C.S.; Martemianov, M.; Matsyuk, M.; Mei, W.; Merola, L.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Moalem, A.; Moccia, S.; Moulson, M.; Mueller, S.; Murtas, F.; Napolitano, M.; Nedosekin, A.; Panareo, M.; Pacciani, L.; Pages, P.; Palutan, M.; Paoluzi, L.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passalacqua, L.; Passaseo, M.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, G.; Picca, D.; Pirozzi, G.; Pistillo, C.; Pollack, M.; Pontecorvo, L.; Primavera, M.; Ruggieri, F.; Santangelo, P.; Santovetti, E.; Saracino, G.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schwick, C.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Scuri, F.; Sfiligoi, I.; Shan, J.; Silano, P.; Spadaro, T.; Spagnolo, S.; Spiriti, E.; Stanescu, C.; Tong, G.L.; Tortora, L.; Valente, E.; Valente, P. E-mail: paolo.valente@lnf.infn.it; Valeriani, B.; Venanzoni, G.; Veneziano, S.; Wu, Y.; Xie, Y.G.; Zhao, P.P.; Zhou, Y

    2001-04-01

    The tracking detector of the KLOE experiment is 4 m diameter, 3.3 m length drift chamber, designed to contain a large fraction of the decays of low-energy K{sub L} produced at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory. The chamber is made by a thin carbon fiber structure and operated with a helium-based gas mixture in order to minimise conversion of low-energy photons and multiple scattering inside the sensitive volume. The tracking information is provided by 58 layers of stereo wires defing 12,582 cells, 2x2 cm{sup 2} in size in the 12 innermost layers and 3x3 cm{sup 2} in the outer ones. Details of the chamber design, calibration procedure and tracking performances are presented.

  7. High rate drift chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, D.C. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Berisso, M.C. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Gutierrez, G. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Holmes, S.D. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Wehmann, A. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Avilez, C. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Felix, J. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Moreno, G. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Romero, M. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Sosa, M. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Forbush, M. (Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)); Huson, F.R. (Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)); Wightman, J.A. (Department of Physi

    1994-06-01

    Fermilab experiment 690, a study of target dissociation reactions pp[yields]pX using an 800 GeV/c proton beam and a liquid hydrogen target, collected data in late 1991. The incident beam and 600-800 GeV/c scattered protons were measured using a system of six 6 in.x4 in. and two 15 in.x8 in. pressurized drift chambers spaced over 260 m. These chambers provided precise measurements at rates above 10 MHz (2 MHz per cm of sense wire). The measurement resolution of the smaller chambers was 90 [mu]m, and the resolution of the larger chambers was 125 [mu]m. Construction details and performance results, including radiation damage, are presented. ((orig.))

  8. The KLOE drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Adinolfi, M; Ambrosino, F; Andryakov, A; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Anulli, F; Bacci, C; Bankamp, A; Barbiellini, G; Bellini, F; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, Sergio; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Bulychjov, S A; Cabibbo, G; Calcaterra, A; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Carboni, G; Cardini, A; Casarsa, M; Cataldi, G; Ceradini, F; Cervelli, F; Cevenini, F; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; Conetti, S; Conticelli, S; Lucia, E D; Robertis, G D; Sangro, R D; Simone, P D; Zorzi, G D; Dell'Agnello, S; Denig, A; Domenico, A D; Donato, C D; Falco, S D; Doria, A; Drago, E; Elia, V; Erriquez, O; Farilla, A; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Finocchiaro, G; Forti, C; Franceschi, A; Franzini, P; Gao, M L; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Golovatyuk, V; Gorini, E; Grancagnolo, F; Grandegger, W; Graziani, E; Guarnaccia, P; Von Hagel, U; Han, H G; Han, S W; Huang, X; Incagli, M; Ingrosso, L; Jang, Y Y; Kim, W; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Lomtadze, F; Luisi, C; Mao Chen Sheng; Martemyanov, M; Matsyuk, M; Mei, W; Merola, L; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Moalem, A; Moccia, S; Moulson, M; Müller, S; Murtas, F; Napolitano, M; Nedosekin, A; Panareo, M; Pacciani, L; Pagès, P; Palutan, M; Paoluzi, L; Pasqualucci, E; Passalacqua, L; Passaseo, M; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Petrolo, E; Petrucci, Guido; Picca, D; Pirozzi, G; Pistillo, C; Pollack, M; Pontecorvo, L; Primavera, M; Ruggieri, F; Santangelo, P; Santovetti, E; Saracino, G; Schamberger, R D; Schwick, C; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Scuri, F; Sfiligoi, I; Shan, J; Silano, P; Spadaro, T; Spagnolo, S; Spiriti, E; Stanescu, C; Tong, G L; Tortora, L; Valente, E; Valente, P; Valeriani, B; Venanzoni, G; Veneziano, Stefano; Wu, Y; Xie, Y G; Zhao, P P; Zhou, Y

    2001-01-01

    The tracking detector of the KLOE experiment is 4 m diameter, 3.3 m length drift chamber, designed to contain a large fraction of the decays of low-energy K sub L produced at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory. The chamber is made by a thin carbon fiber structure and operated with a helium-based gas mixture in order to minimise conversion of low-energy photons and multiple scattering inside the sensitive volume. The tracking information is provided by 58 layers of stereo wires defing 12,582 cells, 2x2 cm sup 2 in size in the 12 innermost layers and 3x3 cm sup 2 in the outer ones. Details of the chamber design, calibration procedure and tracking performances are presented.

  9. Geomagnetic disturbance effects on power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertson, V.D.; Bozoki, B.; Feero, W.E.; Kappenman, J.G.; Larsen, E.V.; Nordell, D.E.; Ponder, J.; Prabhakara, F.S.; Thompson, K.; Walling, R.

    1993-07-01

    In the northern hemisphere, the aurora borealis is visual evidence of simultaneous fluctuations in the earth's magnetic field (geomagnetic field). These geomagnetic disturbances (GMD's), or geomagnetic storms, can affect a number of man-made systems, including electric power systems. The GMD's are caused by the electromagnetic interaction of the solar wind plasma of protons and electrons with the geomagnetic field. These dynamic impulses in the solar wind are due to solar flares, coronal holes, and disappearing filaments, and reach the earth from one to six days after being emitted by a solar event. Instances of geomagnetic storms affecting telegraph systems were noted in England in 1846, and power system disturbances linked to GMD's were first reported in the United States in 1940. This Working Group report is a summary of the state of knowledge and research activity to the present time, and covers the GMD/Geomagnetically-induced currents (GIC) phenomena, transformer effects, the impact on generators, protective relay effects, and communication system effects. It also summarizes modeling and predicting GIC, measuring and monitoring GIC, mitigation methods, system operating guidelines during GMD's, and alerting and forecasting procedures and needs for the power industry.

  10. DRIFT EFFECTS IN HGCDTE DETECTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. PAVAN KUMAR

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of temporal drift in spectral responsivity of HgCdTe photodetectors is investigated and found to have an origin different from what has been reported in literature. Traditionally, the literature attributes the cause of drift due to the deposition of thin film of ice water on the active area of the cold detector. The source of drift as proposed in this paper is more critical owing to the difficulties in acquisition of infrared temperature measurements. A model explaining the drift phenomenon in HgCdTe detectors is described by considering the deep trapping of charge carriers and generation of radiation induced deep trap centers which are meta-stable in nature. A theoretical model is fitted to the experimental data. A comparison of the model with the experimental data shows that the radiation induced deep trap centers and charge trapping effects are mainly responsible for the drift phenomenon observed in HgCdTe detectors.

  11. Bouchaud walks with variable drift

    CERN Document Server

    Parra, Manuel Cabezas

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study a sequence of Bouchaud trap models on $\\mathbb{Z}$ with drift. We analyze the possible scaling limits for a sequence of walks, where we make the drift decay to 0 as we rescale the walks. Depending on the speed of the decay of the drift we obtain three different scaling limits. If the drift decays slowly as we rescale the walks we obtain the inverse of an \\alpha$-stable subordinator as scaling limit. If the drift decays quickly as we rescale the walks, we obtain the F.I.N. diffusion as scaling limit. There is a critical speed of decay separating these two main regimes, where a new process appears as scaling limit. This critical speed is related to the index $\\alpha$ of the inhomogeneity of the environment.

  12. CTF Void Drift Validation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salko, Robert K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gosdin, Chris [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Avramova, Maria N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gergar, Marcus [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2015-10-26

    This milestone report is a summary of work performed in support of expansion of the validation and verification (V&V) matrix for the thermal-hydraulic subchannel code, CTF. The focus of this study is on validating the void drift modeling capabilities of CTF and verifying the supporting models that impact the void drift phenomenon. CTF uses a simple turbulent-diffusion approximation to model lateral cross-flow due to turbulent mixing and void drift. The void drift component of the model is based on the Lahey and Moody model. The models are a function of two-phase mass, momentum, and energy distribution in the system; therefore, it is necessary to correctly model the ow distribution in rod bundle geometry as a first step to correctly calculating the void distribution due to void drift.

  13. On the current-voltage relationship in auroral breakups and westwards-travelling surges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Olsson

    Full Text Available Auroral precipitating electrons pass through an acceleration region before entering the atmosphere. Regardless of what produces it, a parallel electric field is assumed to cause the acceleration. It is well known that from kinetic theory an expression for the corresponding upward field-aligned current can be calculated, which under certain assumptions can be linearized to j=KV. The K constant, referred to as the Lyons-Evans-Lundin constant, depends on the source density and thermal energy of the magnetospheric electrons; it is an important parameter in magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling models. However, the K parameter is still rather unknown, and values are found in a wide range of 10–8–10–10 S m–2. In this study, we investigated how the type of auroral structure affects the K values. We look at onset and westwards-travelling surge (WTS events and make comparisons with earlier results from observations of more stable auroral arcs. A new analysis technique for studying those magnetospheric parameters using ground-based measurements is introduced. Electron density measurements are taken with the EISCAT radar, and through an inversion technique the flux-energy spectra are calculated. Source densities, thermal energies and potential drops are estimated from fittings of accelerated Maxwellian distributions. With this radar technique we have the possibility to study the changes of the mentioned parameters during the development of onsets and the passage of surges over EISCAT. The study indicates that the linearization of the full Knight formulation holds even for the very high potential drops and thermal temperatures found in the dynamic onset and WTS events. The values of K are found to be very low, around 10–11 S m–2 in onset cases as well as WTS events. The results may establish a new technique where ionospheric

  14. Depth dependence of westward-propagating North Atlantic features diagnosed from altimetry and a numerical 1/6° model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tailleux

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A 1/6° numerical simulation is used to investigate the vertical structure of westward propagation between 1993 and 2000 in the North Atlantic ocean. The realism of the simulated westward propagating signals, interpreted principally as the signature of first-mode baroclinic Rossby waves (RW, is first assessed by comparing the simulated amplitude and zonal phase speeds of Sea Level Anomalies (SLA against TOPEX/Poseidon-ERS satellite altimeter data. Then, the (unobserved subsurface signature of RW phase speeds is investigated from model outputs by means of the Radon Transform which was specifically adapted to focus on first-mode baroclinic RW. The analysis is performed on observed and simulated SLA and along 9 simulated isopycnal displacements spanning the 0–3250 m depth range. Simulated RW phase speeds agree well with their observed counterparts at the surface, although with a slight slow bias. Below the surface, the simulated phase speeds exhibit a systematic deceleration with increasing depth, by a factor that appears to vary geographically. Thus, while the reduction factor is about 15–18% on average at 3250 m over the region considered, it appears to be much weaker (about 5–8% in the eddy-active Azores Current, where westward propagating structures might be more coherent in the vertical. In the context of linear theories, these results question the often-made normal mode assumption of many WKB-based theories that the phase speed is independent of depth. Alternatively, these results could also suggest that the vertical structure of westward propagating signals may significantly depend on their degree of nonlinearity, with the degree of vertical coherence possibly increasing with the degree of nonlinearity.

  15. Ionospheric redistribution during geomagnetic storms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immel, T J; Mannucci, A J

    2013-12-01

    [1]The abundance of plasma in the daytime ionosphere is often seen to grow greatly during geomagnetic storms. Recent reports suggest that the magnitude of the plasma density enhancement depends on the UT of storm onset. This possibility is investigated over a 7year period using global maps of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) produced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The analysis confirms that the American sector exhibits, on average, larger storm time enhancement in ionospheric plasma content, up to 50% in the afternoon middle-latitude region and 30% in the vicinity of the high-latitude auroral cusp, with largest effect in the Southern Hemisphere. We investigate whether this effect is related to the magnitude of the causative magnetic storms. Using the same advanced Dst index employed to sort the TEC maps into quiet and active (Dststorm strength that corresponds closely to the TEC variation but follows it by 3-6h. For this and other reasons detailed in this report, we conclude that the UT-dependent peak in storm time TEC is likely not related to the magnitude of external storm time forcing but more likely attributable to phenomena such as the low magnetic field in the South American region. The large Dst variation suggests a possible system-level effect of the observed variation in ionospheric storm response on the measured strength of the terrestrial ring current, possibly connected through UT-dependent modulation of ion outflow.

  16. On Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2000-01-01

    A partial description of Earth's broad scale, core-source magnetic field has been developed and tested three ways. The description features an expected, or mean, spatial magnetic power spectrum that is approximately inversely proportional to horizontal wavenumber atop Earth's core. This multipole spectrum describes a magnetic energy range; it is not steep enough for Gubbins' magnetic dissipation range. Temporal variations of core multipole powers about mean values are to be expected and are described statistically, via trial probability distribution functions, instead of deterministically, via trial solution of closed transport equations. The distributions considered here are closed and neither require nor prohibit magnetic isotropy. The description is therefore applicable to, and tested against, both dipole and low degree non-dipole fields. In Part 1, a physical basis for an expectation spectrum is developed and checked. The description is then combined with main field models of twentieth century satellite and surface geomagnetic field measurements to make testable predictions of the radius of Earth's core. The predicted core radius is 0.7% above the 3480 km seismological value. Partial descriptions of other planetary dipole fields are noted.

  17. 美国西进运动的经济意义%Economic Significance of American Westward Movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈雪

    2012-01-01

    The westward movement is an epoch-making event in the development of American civilization. Using the capitalist productive way, the westward movement explores the American West. Although it is accompanied by crimes against the native Indians, many of whom are killed off or driven to the western areas, the westward movement extends its far-reaching influence to the economic development It not only improves the scale and level of agriculture, provides possibilities and needs of transportation, but also brings enormous advancement to the industrial expansion, and thus lead to the bloom of American economy and the power of the United States.%美国的西进运动在美国的文明发展史上有着划时代的意义,它运用资本主义的生产方式开发了美国西部,尽管西进运动对于印第安人造成了精神上和肉体上的迫害,但是从经济意义上看,它深入到美国农业,交通运输业和工业方面,从而促进了美国经济的全面繁荣,增强了美国的经济实力.

  18. Geographical localisation of the geomagnetic secular variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aubert, Julien; Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils

    2013-01-01

    , westward moving, magnetic flux patches at the core surface. Despite its successes in explaining the main morphological properties of Earth’s magnetic field, self-consistent numerical modelling of the geodynamo has so far failed to reproduce this field variation pattern. Furthermore its magnetohydrodynamic...

  19. Equatorial nighttime vertical f-region plasma drifts during disturbed-time in the african sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyekola, O. S.; Ojo, A.; Akinrimisi, J.

    The terrestrial ionosphere deals with the basic structure and variability of plasma within the upper atmosphere of the Earth Furthermore the ionosphere comprises less than one percent of the mass of the upper atmosphere yet it has a significant influence on advanced communication and navigation systems both have important economic consequences As society beings to rely on more complex technologies those systems become more susceptible to environmental effects However there is still considerable difficulty in the understanding of the equatorial ionospheric phenomena under different solar and geomagnetic conditions despite all extensive studies in the middle and high latitudes and in equatorial and low latitude American and Indian sectors By contrast there is a remarkably sparse database at equatorial African continent of the globe Consequently we infer F-region vertical plasma drifts at the magnetic equatorial station Ibadan 7 4 o N 3 9 o E 6 o S dip from the time variation of the hourly recorded ionosonde virtual height of F layer h F data obtained during 1957-58 International Geophysical Year IGY period corresponding to a year of high solar flux under geomagnetic disturbed night hours 1800-0600 LT The results show a strong geomagnetic control of ionospheric plasma drifts velocities variability in month-to-month and at three different seasonal conditions The largest random fluctuations are observed in June solstice months The evening and morning reversal times are highly variable The average magnitude of the downward

  20. Hemoglobin Drift after Cardiac Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Timothy J.; Beaty, Claude A.; Kilic, Arman; Haggerty, Kara A.; Frank, Steven M.; Savage, William J.; Whitman, Glenn J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Recent literature suggests that a restrictive approach to red blood cell transfusions is associated with improved outcomes in cardiac surgery (CS) patients. Even in the absence of bleeding, intravascular fluid shifts cause hemoglobin levels to drift postoperatively, possibly confounding the decision to transfuse. We undertook this study to define the natural progression of hemoglobin levels in postoperative CS patients. Methods We included all CS patients from 10/10-03/11 who did not receive a postoperative transfusion. Primary stratification was by intraoperative transfusion status. Change in hemoglobin was evaluated relative to the initial postoperative hemoglobin. Maximal drift was defined as the maximum minus the minimum hemoglobin for a given hospitalization. Final drift was defined as the difference between initial and discharge hemoglobin. Results Our final cohort included 199 patients, 71(36%) received an intraoperative transfusion while 128(64%) did not. The average initial and final hemoglobin for all patients were 11.0±1.4g/dL and 9.9±1.3g/dL, respectively, an final drift of 1.1±1.4g/dL. The maximal drift was 1.8±1.1g/dL and was similar regardless of intraoperative transfusion status(p=0.9). Although all patients’ hemoglobin initially dropped, 79% of patients reached a nadir and experienced a mean recovery of 0.7±0.7g/dL by discharge. On multivariable analysis, increasing CPB time was significantly associated with total hemoglobin drift(Coefficient/hour: 0.3[0.1–0.5]g/dL, p=0.02). Conclusions In this first report of hemoglobin drift following CS, although all postoperative patients experienced downward hemoglobin drift, 79% of patients exhibited hemoglobin recovery prior to discharge. Physicians should consider the eventual upward hemoglobin drift prior to administering red cell transfusions. PMID:22609121

  1. 3-dimensional Oil Drift Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wettre, C.; Reistad, M.; Hjøllo, B.Å.

    Simulation of oil drift has been an ongoing activity at the Norwegian Meteorological Institute since the 1970's. The Marine Forecasting Centre provides a 24-hour service for the Norwegian Pollution Control Authority and the oil companies operating in the Norwegian sector. The response time is 30 minutes. From 2002 the service is extended to simulation of oil drift from oil spills in deep water, using the DeepBlow model developed by SINTEF Applied Chemistry. The oil drift model can be applied both for instantaneous and continuous releases. The changes in the mass of oil and emulsion as a result of evaporation and emulsion are computed. For oil spill at deep water, hydrate formation and gas dissolution are taken into account. The properties of the oil depend on the oil type, and in the present version 64 different types of oil can be simulated. For accurate oil drift simulations it is important to have the best possible data on the atmospheric and oceanic conditions. The oil drift simulations at the Norwegian Meteorological Institute are always based on the most updated data from numerical models of the atmosphere and the ocean. The drift of the surface oil is computed from the vectorial sum of the surface current from the ocean model and the wave induced Stokes drift computed from wave energy spectra from the wave prediction model. In the new model the current distribution with depth is taken into account when calculating the drift of the dispersed oil droplets. Salinity and temperature profiles from the ocean model are needed in the DeepBlow model. The result of the oil drift simulations can be plotted on sea charts used for navigation, either as trajectory plots or particle plots showing the situation at a given time. The results can also be sent as data files to be included in the user's own GIS system.

  2. Bats Use Geomagnetic Field: Behavior and Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y.; Tian, L.; Zhang, B.; Zhu, R.

    2015-12-01

    It has been known that numerous animals can use the Earth's magnetic field for spatial orientation and long-distance navigation, nevertheless, how animals can respond to the magnetic field remain mostly ambiguous. The intensities of the global geomagnetic field varies between 23 and 66 μT, and the geomagnetic field intensity could drop to 10% during geomagnetic polarity reversals or geomagnetic excursions. Such dramatic changes of the geomagnetic field may pose a significant challenge for the evolution of magnetic compass in animals. For examples, it is vital whether the magnetic compass can still work in such very weak magnetic fields. Our previous experiment has demonstrated that a migratory bat (Nyctalus plancyi) uses a polarity compass for orientation during roosting when exposed to an artificial magnetic field (100 μT). Recently, we experimentally tested whether the N. plancyi can sense very weak magnetic fields that were even lower than those of the present-day geomagnetic field. Results showed: 1) the bats can sense the magnetic north in a field strength of present-day local geomagnetic field (51μT); 2) As the field intensity decreased to only 1/5th of the natural intensity (10 μT), the bats still responded by positioning themselves at the magnetic north. Notably, as the field polarity was artificially reversed, the bats still preferred the new magnetic north, even at the lowest field strength tested (10 μT). Hence, N. plancyi is able to detect the direction of a magnetic field with intensity range from twice to 1/5th of the present-day field strength. This allows them to orient themselves across the entire range of present-day global geomagnetic field strengths and sense very weak magnetic fields. We propose that this high sensitivity might have evolved in bats as the geomagnetic field strength varied and the polarity reversed tens of times over the past fifty million years since the origin of bats. The physiological mechanisms underlying

  3. Plasmaspheric trough evolution under different conditions of subauroral ion drift

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Fei; ZHANG XiaoXin; CHEN Bo; FOK MeiChing

    2012-01-01

    The statistical characteristics of the subauroral ion drift (SAID) in the ionosphere and the plasmaspheric trough evolution under different conditions of SAID were investigated in this paper,based on 566 SAID events observed by Akebono,Astrid-2,DE-2,and Freja satellites.The relationships between the latitudinal location of SAID and the Kp,AL,and Dst indices for these events were also discussed.It was found that the SAID events happened mainly at invariant latitude (ILAT) of 60.4° and magnetic local time (MLT) of 21.6 MLT and that 92.4% of the events happened when the Kp index was below 5.0,indicating a medium geomagnetic activity.The latitudinal half-width of SAID varied from 0.5° to 3.0° with a typical half-width of 1.0°.The SAID would happen at low latitudes if the geomagnetic activity was high.The effects of SAID on equatorial outer plasmasphere trough evolutions were studied with the dynamic global core plasma model (DGCPM) driven by the statistical results of SAID signatures.It was noted that locations,shapes and density of troughs vary with ILAT,MLT,latitudinal width,cross polar cap potential and lifetime of SAID events.The evolution of a trough is determined by the extent of SAID electric field penetrating into plasmasphere and not all SAID events can result in trough formations.

  4. Principles of major geomagnetic storms forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagnetko, Alexander; Applbaum, David; Dorman, Lev; Pustil'Nik, Lev; Sternlieb, Abraham; Zukerman, Igor

    According to NOAA Space Weather Scales, geomagnetic storms of scales G5 (3-hour index of geomagnetic activity Kp=9), G4 (Kp=8) and G3 (Kp=7) are dangerous for people technology and health (influence on power systems, on spacecraft operations, on HF radio-communications and others). To prevent these serious damages will be very important to forecast dangerous geomagnetic storms. In many papers it was shown that in principle for this forecasting can be used data on CR intensity and CR anisotropy changing before SC of major geomagnetic storms accompanied by sufficient Forbush-decreases (e.g., Dorman et al., 1995, 1999). In this paper we consider all types of observed precursor effects in CR what can be used for forecasting of great geomagnetic storms and possible mechanisms of these precursor effects origin. REFERENCES: Dorman L.I., et al. "Cosmic-ray forecasting features for big Forbush-decreases". Nuclear Physics B, 49A, 136-144 (1995). L.I.Dorman, et al, "Cosmic ray Forbush-decrease as indicators of space dangerous phenomenon and possible use of cosmic ray data for their pre-diction", Proc. of 26-th Intern. Cosmic Ray Conference, Salt Lake City, 6, 476-479 (1999).

  5. Distribution and drift of Atlantic cod ( Gadus morhua ) eggs and larvae in Greenland offshore waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieland, Kai; Hovgård, Holger

    2002-01-01

    Catches of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) eggs and larvae from 45 national and international ichthyoplankton surveys conducted in Greenland offshore waters during the period 1950 to 1984 have been compiled and re-analysed. Southeast and Southwest Greenland were identified as im- portant spawning areas...... from which eggs and early larvae drift towards the southern Davis Strait. Only a part of the larval population remained in the vicinity of favourable settling areas off West Greenland while a considerable part was obviously transported westward across the Davis Strait and thus did not contribute...... to the recruitment of the West Greenland cod stock. It is also shown that cod eggs and larvae occasionally drift from Southwest Iceland across the Denmark Strait to the East Greenland shelf from where a subsequent transport and immigration of juveniles to West Greenland waters can occur. Larval transport across...

  6. The latitudinal distribution of the baseline geomagnetic field during the March 17, 2015 geomagnetic storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Tommaso; Piersanti, Mirko; Lepreti, Fabio; Vecchio, Antonio; De Michelis, Paola; Villante, Umberto; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    Geomagnetic storms (GS) are global geomagnetic disturbances that result from the interaction between magnetized plasma that propagates from the Sun and plasma and magnetic fields in the near-Earth space plasma environment. The Dst (Disturbance Storm Time) global Ring Current index is still taken to be the definitive representation for geomagnetic storm and is used widely by researcher. Recent in situ measurements by satellites passing through the ring-current region (i.e. Van Allen probes) and computations with magnetospheric field models showed that there are many other field contributions on the geomagnetic storming time variations at middle and low latitudes. Appling the Empirical Mode Decomposition [Huang et al., 1998] to magnetospheric and ground observations, we detect the different magnetic field contributions during a GS and introduce the concepts of modulated baseline and fluctuations of the geomagnetic field. In this work, we apply this method to study the latitudinal distribution of the baseline geomagnetic field during the St. Patrick's Day Geomagnetic Storm 2015 in order to detect physical informations concerning the differences between high-latitude and equatorial ground measurements.

  7. Silicon Drift Detectors for ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Navach, F; CERN. Geneva

    1992-01-01

    The Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) is a semiconductor, not yet extensively used in HEP experiment, which has an excellent spatial resolution and granularity about comparable to a pixel device requiring a number of readout channels two order of magnitude less.

  8. 10th Generation International Geomagnetic Reference Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Stefan; Macmillan, Susan

    2005-04-01

    The International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) released the 10th Generation International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) on 12 December 2004. This is the latest version of a standard mathematical description of the Earth's main magnetic field, and is used widely in studies of the Earth's deep interior, crust, ionosphere, and magnetosphere. The coefficients were finalized by a task force of IAGA, Division V, Working Group V-MOD: Geomagnetic Field Modeling. The IGRF is the product of a large collaborative effort between magnetic field modelers and the institutes around the world involved in collecting and disseminating magnetic field data from satellites and observatories. The IGRF is a series of mathematical models of the Earth's main field and its annual rate of change (secular variation). The sources of the main magnetic field are electric currents in the Earth and the magnetization of crustal rocks.

  9. Quantifying Power Grid Risk from Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homeier, N.; Wei, L. H.; Gannon, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    We are creating a statistical model of the geophysical environment that can be used to quantify the geomagnetic storm hazard to power grid infrastructure. Our model is developed using a database of surface electric fields for the continental United States during a set of historical geomagnetic storms. These electric fields are derived from the SUPERMAG compilation of worldwide magnetometer data and surface impedances from the United States Geological Survey. This electric field data can be combined with a power grid model to determine GICs per node and reactive MVARs at each minute during a storm. Using publicly available substation locations, we derive relative risk maps by location by combining magnetic latitude and ground conductivity. We also estimate the surface electric fields during the August 1972 geomagnetic storm that caused a telephone cable outage across the middle of the United States. This event produced the largest surface electric fields in the continental U.S. in at least the past 40 years.

  10. Improvements in geomagnetic observatory data quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reda, Jan; Fouassier, Danielle; Isac, Anca

    2011-01-01

    between observatories and the establishment of observatory networks has harmonized standards and practices across the world; improving the quality of the data product available to the user. Nonetheless, operating a highquality geomagnetic observatory is non-trivial. This article gives a record...... of the current state of observatory instrumentation and methods, citing some of the general problems in the complex operation of geomagnetic observatories. It further gives an overview of recent improvements of observatory data quality based on presentation during 11th IAGA Assembly at Sopron and INTERMAGNET......Geomagnetic observatory practice and instrumentation has evolved significantly over the past 150 years. Evolution continues to be driven by advances in technology and by the need of the data user community for higher-resolution, lower noise data in near-real time. Additionally, collaboration...

  11. Mathematical Properties Relevant to Geomagnetic Field Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabaka, Terence J.; Hulot, Gauthier; Olsen, Nils

    2010-01-01

    properties of those spatial mathematical representations are also discussed, especially in view of providing a formal justification for the fact that geomagnetic field models can indeed be constructed from ground-based and satellite-born observations, provided those reasonably approximate the ideal......Geomagnetic field modeling consists in converting large numbers of magnetic observations into a linear combination of elementary mathematical functions that best describes those observations.The set of numerical coefficients defining this linear combination is then what one refers...... be directly measured. In this chapter, the mathematical foundation of global (as opposed to regional) geomagnetic field modeling is reviewed, and the spatial modeling of the field in spherical coordinates is focussed. Time can be dealt with as an independent variable and is not explicitly considered...

  12. Mathematical Properties Relevant to Geomagnetic Field Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabaka, Terence J.; Hulot, Gauthier; Olsen, Nils

    2014-01-01

    properties of those spatial mathematical representations are also discussed, especially in view of providing a formal justification for the fact that geomagnetic field models can indeed be constructed from ground-based and satellite-born observations, provided those reasonably approximate the ideal situation......Geomagnetic field modeling consists in converting large numbers of magnetic observations into a linear combination of elementary mathematical functions that best describes those observations. The set of numerical coefficients defining this linear combination is then what one refers...... be directly measured. In this chapter, the mathematical foundation of global (as opposed to regional) geomagnetic field modeling is reviewed, and the spatial modeling of the field in spherical coordinates is focused. Time can be dealt with as an independent variable and is not explicitly considered...

  13. International Geomagnetic Reference Field: the third generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddie, N.W.

    1982-01-01

    In August 1981 the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy revised the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). It is the second revision since the inception of the IGRF in 1968. The revision extends the earlier series of IGRF models from 1980 to 1985, introduces a new series of definitive models for 1965-1976, and defines a provisional reference field for 1975- 1980. The revision consists of: 1) a model of the main geomagnetic field at 1980.0, not continuous with the earlier series of IGRF models together with a forecast model of the secular variation of the main field during 1980-1985; 2) definitive models of the main field at 1965.0, 1970.0, and 1975.0, with linear interpolation of the model coefficients specified for intervening dates; and 3) a provisional reference field for 1975-1980, defined as the linear interpolation of the 1975 and 1980 main-field models.-from Author

  14. Progress in Studies of Geomagnetic Navigation of Animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Lanxiang; Pan Yongxin; Lin Wei; Wang Yinan; Zhang Shuyi

    2005-01-01

    @@ The geomagnetic field may play a key role in orientation and navigation of many long-distance migratory animals. Taking homing and migrating birds as examples, this paper reviews recent progress in studies of geomagnetic "compass" of animals.Moreover, we propose to address two aspects in future geomagnetic orientation research: ( 1 ) what are the true components of the "map"? (2) What are the magneto-receptors and which brain areas acquire and process the geomagnetic field information ?

  15. Toward a possible next geomagnetic transition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. De Santis

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The geomagnetic field is subject to possible reversals or excursions of polarity during its temporal evolution. Considering that: (a the typical average time between one reversal and the next (the so-called chron is around 300 000 yr, (b the last reversal occurred around 780 000 yr ago, (c more excursions (rapid changes of polarity can occur within the same chron and (d the geomagnetic field dipole is currently decreasing, a possible imminent geomagnetic reversal or excursion would not be completely unexpected. In that case, such a phenomenon would represent one of the very few natural hazards which are really global. The South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA is a great depression of the geomagnetic field at the Earth's surface, caused by a reverse magnetic flux in the terrestrial outer core. In analogy with critical point phenomena characterised by some cumulative quantity, we fit the surface extent of this anomaly over the last 400 yr with power or logarithmic functions in reverse time, also decorated by log-periodic oscillations, whose final singularity (a critical point tc reveals a great change in the near future (2034 ± 3 yr, when the SAA area reaches almost a hemisphere. An interesting aspect that has been recently found is the possible direct connection between the SAA and the global mean sea level (GSL. That the GSL is somehow connected with SAA is also confirmed from the similar result when an analogous critical-like fit is performed over GSL: the corresponding critical point (2033 ± 11 yr agrees, within the estimated errors, with the value found for SAA. From this result, we point out the intriguing conjecture that tc would be the time of no return, after which the geomagnetic field could fall into an irreversible process of a global geomagnetic transition that could be a reversal or excursion of polarity.

  16. Toward a possible next geomagnetic critical transition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamili, Enkelejda; De Santis, Angelo; Wu, Lixin

    2014-05-01

    The geomagnetic field is subject to possible reversals or excursions of polarity during its temporal evolution. Considering the characteristics of the recent geomagnetic field, a possible imminent geomagnetic reversal or excursion would not be completely unexpected. In that case, such a phenomenon would represent one of the very few natural hazards that are really global. The South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) is a great depression of the geomagnetic field strength at the Earth's surface, caused by a reverse magnetic flux in the terrestrial outer core. In analogy with critical point phenomena characterized by some cumulative quantity, we fit the surface extent of this anomaly over the last 400 yr with power law or logarithmic functions in reverse time, also decorated by log-periodic oscillations, whose final singularity (a critical point tc) reveals a great change in the near future (2034±3 yr), when the SAA area reaches almost a hemisphere. An interesting aspect that has recently been found is the possible direct connection between the SAA and the global mean sea level (GSL). That the GSL is somehow connected with SAA is also confirmed by the similar result when an analogous critical-like fit is performed over GSL: the corresponding critical point (2033±11 yr) agrees, within the estimated errors, with the value found for the SAA. From this result, we point out the intriguing conjecture that tc would be the time of no return, after which the geomagnetic field could fall into an irreversible process of a global geomagnetic transition that could be a reversal or excursion of polarity.

  17. Toward a possible next geomagnetic transition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, A.; Qamili, E.; Wu, L.

    2013-12-01

    The geomagnetic field is subject to possible reversals or excursions of polarity during its temporal evolution. Considering that: (a) in the last 83 million yr the typical average time between one reversal and the next (the so-called chron) is around 400 000 yr, (b) the last reversal occurred around 780 000 yr ago, (c) more excursions (rapid changes in polarity) can occur within the same chron and (d) the geomagnetic field dipole is currently decreasing, a possible imminent geomagnetic reversal or excursion would not be completely unexpected. In that case, such a phenomenon would represent one of the very few natural hazards that are really global. The South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) is a great depression of the geomagnetic field strength at the Earth's surface, caused by a reverse magnetic flux in the terrestrial outer core. In analogy with critical point phenomena characterized by some cumulative quantity, we fit the surface extent of this anomaly over the last 400 yr with power law or logarithmic functions in reverse time, also decorated by log-periodic oscillations, whose final singularity (a critical point tc) reveals a great change in the near future (2034 ± 3 yr), when the SAA area reaches almost a hemisphere. An interesting aspect that has recently been found is the possible direct connection between the SAA and the global mean sea level (GSL). That the GSL is somehow connected with SAA is also confirmed by the similar result when an analogous critical-like fit is performed over GSL: the corresponding critical point (2033 ± 11 yr) agrees, within the estimated errors, with the value found for the SAA. From this result, we point out the intriguing conjecture that tc would be the time of no return, after which the geomagnetic field could fall into an irreversible process of a global geomagnetic transition that could be a reversal or excursion of polarity.

  18. Satellite data for geomagnetic field modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langel, R. A.; Baldwin, R. T.

    1992-06-01

    Satellite measurements of the geomagnetic fields began with the launch of Sputnik 3 in May of 1958 and have continued sporadically. Spacecraft making significant contributions to main field geomagnetism will be reviewed and the characteristics of their data discussed, including coverage, accuracy, resolution and data availability. Of particular interest are Vanguard 3; Cosmos 49, Ogo's -2, -4, and -6; Magsat; DE-2; and POGS. Spacecraft make measurements on a moving platfrom above the ionosphere as opposed to measurements from fixed observatories and surveys, both below the ionosphere. Possible future missions, such as Aristoteles and GOS are reviewed.

  19. Satellite Data for Geomagnetic Field Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langel, R. A.; Baldwin, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    Satellite measurements of the geomagnetic fields began with the launch of Sputnik 3 in May of 1958 and have continued sporadically. Spacecraft making significant contributions to main field geomagnetism will be reviewed and the characteristics of their data discussed, including coverage, accuracy, resolution and data availability. Of particular interest are Vanguard 3; Cosmos 49, Ogo's -2, -4, and -6; Magsat; DE-2; and POGS. Spacecraft make measurements on a moving platfrom above the ionosphere as opposed to measurements from fixed observatories and surveys, both below the ionosphere. Possible future missions, such as Aristoteles and GOS are reviewed.

  20. Anencephalus, drinking water, geomagnetism and cosmic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, V E

    1979-01-01

    The mortality rates from anencephalus from 1950-1969 in Canadian cities are shown to be strongly correlated with city growth rate and with horizontal geomagnetic flux, which is directly related to the intensity of cosmic radiation. They are also shown to have some association with the magnesium content of drinking water. Prior work with these data which showed associations with magnesium in drinking water, mean income, latitude and longitude was found to be inadequate because it dismissed the observed geographic associations as having little biological meaning, and because the important variables of geomagnetism and city growth rate were overlooked.

  1. The driving mechanisms of particle precipitation during the moderate geomagnetic storm of 7 January 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Longden

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The arrival of an interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME triggered a sudden storm commencement (SSC at ~09:22 UT on the 7 January 2005. The ICME followed a quiet period in the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF. We present global scale observations of energetic electron precipitation during the moderate geomagnetic storm driven by the ICME. Energetic electron precipitation is inferred from increases in cosmic noise absorption (CNA recorded by stations in the Global Riometer Array (GLORIA. No evidence of CNA was observed during the first four hours of passage of the ICME or following the sudden commencement (SC of the storm. This is consistent with the findings of Osepian and Kirkwood (2004 that SCs will only trigger precipitation during periods of geomagnetic activity or when the magnetic perturbation in the magnetosphere is substantial. CNA was only observed following enhanced coupling between the IMF and the magnetosphere, resulting from southward oriented IMF. Precipitation was observed due to substorm activity, as a result of the initial injection and particles drifting from the injection region. During the recovery phase of the storm, when substorm activity diminished, precipitation due to density driven increases in the solar wind dynamic pressure (Pdyn were identified. A number of increases in Pdyn were shown to drive sudden impulses (SIs in the geomagnetic field. While many of these SIs appear coincident with CNA, SIs without CNA were also observed. During this period, the threshold of geomagnetic activity required for SC driven precipitation was exceeded. This implies that solar wind density driven SIs occurring during storm recovery can drive a different response in particle precipitation to typical SCs.

  2. Evidence for geomagnetic imprinting and magnetic navigation in the natal homing of sea turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, J Roger; Lohmann, Kenneth J

    2015-02-02

    Natal homing is a pattern of behavior in which animals migrate away from their geographic area of origin and then return to reproduce in the same location where they began life [1-3]. Although diverse long-distance migrants accomplish natal homing [1-8], little is known about how they do so. The enigma is epitomized by loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta), which leave their home beaches as hatchlings and migrate across entire ocean basins before returning to nest in the same coastal area where they originated [9, 10]. One hypothesis is that turtles imprint on the unique geomagnetic signature of their natal area and use this information to return [1]. Because Earth's field changes over time, geomagnetic imprinting should cause turtles to change their nesting locations as magnetic signatures drift slightly along coastlines. To investigate, we analyzed a 19-year database of loggerhead nesting sites in the largest sea turtle rookery in North America. Here we report a strong association between the spatial distribution of turtle nests and subtle changes in Earth's magnetic field. Nesting density increased significantly in coastal areas where magnetic signatures of adjacent beach locations converged over time, whereas nesting density decreased in places where magnetic signatures diverged. These findings confirm central predictions of the geomagnetic imprinting hypothesis and provide strong evidence that such imprinting plays an important role in natal homing in sea turtles. The results give credence to initial reports of geomagnetic imprinting in salmon [11, 12] and suggest that similar mechanisms might underlie long-distance natal homing in diverse animals.

  3. Westward moving dynamic substorm features observed with the IMAGE magnetometer network and other ground-based instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Lühr

    Full Text Available We present the ground signatures of dynamic substorm features with particular emphasis on the event interpretation capabilities provided by the IMAGE magnetometer network. This array covers the high latitudes from the sub-auroral to the cusp/cleft region. An isolated substorm on 11 Oct. 1993 during the late evening hours exhibited many of well-known features such as the Harang discontinuity, westward travelling surge and poleward leap, but also discrete auroral forms, known as auroral streamers, appeared propagating westward along the centre of the electrojet. Besides the magnetic field measurements, there were auroral observations and plasma flow and conductivity measurements obtained by EISCAT. The data of all three sets of instruments are consistent with the notion of upward field-aligned currents associated with the moving auroral patches. A detailed analysis of the electrodynamic parameters in the ionosphere, however, reveals that they do not agree with the expectations resulting from commonly used simplifying approximations. For example, the westward moving auroral streamers which are associated with field-aligned current filaments, are not collocated with the centres of equivalent current vortices. Furthermore, there is a clear discrepancy between the measured plasma flow direction and the obtained equivalent current direction. All this suggests that steep conductivity gradients are associated with the transient auroral forms. Also self-induction effects in the ionosphere may play a role for the orientation of the plasma flows. This study stresses the importance of multi-instrument observation for a reliable interpretation of dynamic auroral processes.

    Keywords. Ionosphere (Auroral ionosphere; Electric fields and currents; Ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions.

  4. The Drifting Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    By studying in great detail the 'ringing' of a planet-harbouring star, a team of astronomers using ESO's 3.6-m telescope have shown that it must have drifted away from the metal-rich Hyades cluster. This discovery has implications for theories of star and planet formation, and for the dynamics of our Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 09a/08 ESO PR Photo 09a/08 Iota Horologii The yellow-orange star Iota Horologii, located 56 light-years away towards the southern Horologium ("The Clock") constellation, belongs to the so-called "Hyades stream", a large number of stars that move in the same direction. Previously, astronomers using an ESO telescope had shown that the star harbours a planet, more than 2 times as large as Jupiter and orbiting in 320 days (ESO 12/99). But until now, all studies were unable to pinpoint the exact characteristics of the star, and hence to understand its origin. A team of astronomers, led by Sylvie Vauclair from the University of Toulouse, France, therefore decided to use the technique of 'asteroseismology' to unlock the star's secrets. "In the same way as geologists monitor how seismic waves generated by earthquakes propagate through the Earth and learn about the inner structure of our planet, it is possible to study sound waves running through a star, which forms a sort of large, spherical bell," says Vauclair. The 'ringing' from this giant musical instrument provides astronomers with plenty of information about the physical conditions in the star's interior. And to 'listen to the music', the astronomers used one of the best instruments available. The observations were conducted in November 2006 during 8 consecutive nights with the state-of-the-art HARPS spectrograph mounted on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla. Up to 25 'notes' could be identified in the unique dataset, most of them corresponding to waves having a period of about 6.5 minutes. These observations allowed the astronomers to obtain a very precise portrait of Iota Horologii: its

  5. What causes geomagnetic activity during sunspot minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Kirov, Boian; Georgieva, Katya; Obridko, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    The average geomagnetic activity during sunspot minimum has been continuously decreasing in the last four cycles. The geomagnetic activity is caused by both interplanetary disturbances - coronal mass ejections and high speed solar wind streams, and the background solar wind over which these disturbances ride. We show that the geomagnetic activity in cycle minimum does not depend on the number and parameters of coronal mass ejections or high speed solar wind streams, but on the background solar wind. The background solar wind has two components: slower and faster. The source of the slower component is the heliospheric current sheet, and of the faster one the polar coronal holes. It is supposed that the geomagnetic activity in cycle minimum is determined by the thickness of the heliospheric current sheet which is related to the portions of time the Earth spends in slow and in fast solar wind. We demonstrate that it is also determined by the parameters of these two components of the background solar wind which v...

  6. Some aspects of geomagnetically conjugate phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rycroft, M.J.

    1987-12-01

    Both charged particles and waves convey information about the thermosphere, ionosphere and magnetosphere from the Northern to the Southern Hemisphere and vice versa, along geomagnetic flux tubes.The interhemispheric travel time of electrons or ions, being dependent upon L-value , pitch angle and energy (which may lie between less than or equal to 1 eV and greater than or equal to 1 MeV) may be many hours, ranging down to less than or equal to 1 s. However, the one-hop propagation time for magnetohydrodynamic or whistler mode waves generally lies between 10/sup 2/s and 1 s. Such times, therefore, give the time scales of transient phenomena that are geomagnetically conjugate and of changes in steady-state plasma processes occurring in geomagnetically conjugate regions. Contrasting examples are presented of conjugate physical phenomena, obtained using satellite, rocket, aircraft and ground-based observations; the latter capitalise upon the rather rare disposition of land - rather than ocean - at each end of a geophysically interesting flux tube. Particular attention is paid to the interactions between whistler mode waves and energetic electrons. Geomagnetic, radio, optical and plasma observations, taken together with model computations, provide a wealth of knowledge on conjugate phenomena and their dependence on conditions in the solar wind, substorms, L-value, etc... Finally, some suggestions are made for future lines of research.

  7. Geomagnetic referencing in the arctic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podjono, Benny; Beck, Nathan; Buchanan, Andrew; Brink, Jason; Longo, Joseph; Finn, Carol A.; Worthington, E. William

    2011-01-01

    Geomagnetic referencing is becoming an increasingly attractive alternative to north-seeking gyroscopic surveys to achieve the precise wellbore positioning essential for success in today's complex drilling programs. However, the greater magnitude of variations in the geomagnetic environment at higher latitudes makes the application of geomagnetic referencing in those areas more challenging. Precise, real-time data on those variations from relatively nearby magnetic observatories can be crucial to achieving the required accuracy, but constructing and operating an observatory in these often harsh environments poses a number of significant challenges. Operational since March 2010, the Deadhorse Magnetic Observatory (DED), located in Deadhorse, Alaska, was created through collaboration between the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and a leading oilfield services supply company. DED was designed to produce real-time geomagnetic data at the required level of accuracy, and to do so reliably under the extreme temperatures and harsh weather conditions often experienced in the area. The observatory will serve a number of key scientific communities as well as the oilfield drilling industry, and has already played a vital role in the success of several commercial ventures in the area, providing essential, accurate data while offering significant cost and time savings, compared with traditional surveying techniques.

  8. Geomagnetic storms: historical perspective to modern view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhina, Gurbax S.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    2016-12-01

    The history of geomagnetism is more than 400 years old. Geomagnetic storms as we know them were discovered about 210 years ago. There has been keen interest in understanding Sun-Earth connection events, such as solar flares, CMEs, and concomitant magnetic storms in recent times. Magnetic storms are the most important component of space weather effects on Earth. We give an overview of the historical aspects of geomagnetic storms and the progress made during the past two centuries. Super magnetic storms can cause life-threatening power outages and satellite damage, communication failures and navigational problems. The data for such super magnetic storms that occurred in the last 50 years during the space era is sparce. Research on historical geomagnetic storms can help to create a database for intense and super magnetic storms. New knowledge of interplanetary and solar causes of magnetic storms gained from spaceage observations will be used to review the super magnetic storm of September 1-2, 1859. We discuss the occurrence probability of such super magnetic storms, and the maximum possible intensity for the effects of a perfect ICME: extreme super magnetic storm, extreme magnetospheric compression, and extreme magnetospheric electric fields.

  9. Incorporation of geomagnetic data and services into EPOS infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejda, Pavel; Chambodut, Aude; Curto, Juan-Jose; Flower, Simon; Kozlovskaya, Elena; Kubašta, Petr; Matzka, Jürgen; Tanskanen, Eija; Thomson, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of the geomagnetic field has a long history across Europe that dates back to 1830', and is currently experiencing an increased interest within Earth observation and space weather monitoring. Our goals within EPOS-IP are to consolidate the community, modernise data archival and distribution formats for existing services and create new services for magnetotelluric data and geomagnetic models. Specific objectives are: • Enhance existing services providing geomagnetic data (INTERMAGNET- INTErnational Real-time MAGnetic observatory NETwork; World Data Centre for Geomagnetism; IMAGE- International Monitor for Auroral Geomagnetic Effects) and existing services providing geomagnetic indices (ISGI - International Service of Geomagnetic Indices). • Develop and enhance the geomagnetic community's metadata systems by creating a metadata database, filling it and putting in place processes to ensure that it is kept up to date in the future. • Develop and build access to magnetotelluric (MT) data including transfer functions and time series data from temporary, portable MT-arrays in Europe, as well as to lithospheric conductivity models derived from TM-data. • Develop common web and database access points to global and regional geomagnetic field and conductivity models. • Establish links from the geomagnetic data services, products and models to the Integrated Core Services. The immediate task in the current period is to identify data models of existing services, modify them and integrate into a common model of Geomagnetic Thematic Core Services.

  10. In-Drift Microbial Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Jolley

    2000-11-09

    As directed by written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999f), Performance Assessment (PA) developed a model for microbial communities in the engineered barrier system (EBS) as documented here. The purpose of this model is to assist Performance Assessment and its Engineered Barrier Performance Section in modeling the geochemical environment within a potential repository drift for TSPA-SR/LA, thus allowing PA to provide a more detailed and complete near-field geochemical model and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This model and its predecessor (the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document, CRWMS M and O 1998a) was developed to respond to the applicable KTIs. Additionally, because of the previous development of the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a), the M and O was effectively able to resolve a previous KTI concern regarding the effects of microbial processes on seepage and flow (NRC 1998). This document supercedes the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a). This document provides the conceptual framework of the revised in-drift microbial communities model to be used in subsequent performance assessment (PA) analyses.

  11. Evidence of the AMOC interdecadal mode related to westward propagation of temperature anomalies in CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Les C.; Fedorov, Alexey V.

    2017-03-01

    Climate models show a broad diversity in the simulations of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) with its leading modes of variability having different amplitudes, periods and driving mechanisms. Theoretical considerations and computations using ocean GCMs suggest that on interdecadal timescales this variability can be controlled by an internal weakly-damped oceanic mode associated with westward propagation of large-scale density anomalies in the North Atlantic Ocean. These anomalies are dominated by temperature with some compensation from salinity. The quadrature phases of this mode include the strengthening of the AMOC, followed a quarter-period later by the development of a broad warm temperature anomaly in the northern Atlantic extending to about 1000 m, then followed by the weakening of the AMOC, and then the upper-ocean cooling. Here, we investigate whether this mode is present in the simulations of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5). Out of the 25 models investigated, we find that more than half of the models exhibit variability consistent with this mode. Some of the relevant modal features includes statistically significant spectral peaks in the band between 15 and 35 years, the westward propagation of density anomalies in the 40°N-60°N latitudinal band, which sets the period of the mode, the existence of the distinct quadrature phases of the AMOC variability, and the predominant effect of temperature on density anomalies.

  12. Solar cycle distribution of major geomagnetic storms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-Ming Le; Zi-Yu Cai; Hua-Ning Wang; Zhi-Qiang Yin; Peng Li

    2013-01-01

    We examine the solar cycle distribution of major geomagnetic storms (Dst ≤-100 nT),including intense storms at the level of-200 nT< Dst ≤-100 nT,great storms at-300 nT< Dst ≤-200 nT,and super storms at Dst ≤-300 nT,which occurred during the period of 1957-2006,based on Dst indices and smoothed monthly sunspot numbers.Statistics show that the majority (82%) of the geomagnetic storms at the level of Dst ≤-100 nT that occurred in the study period were intense geomagnetic storms,with 12.4% ranked as great storms and 5.6% as super storms.It is interesting to note that about 27% of the geomagnetic storms that occurred at all three intensity levels appeared in the ascending phase of a solar cycle,and about 73% in the descending one.Statistics also show that 76.9% of the intense storms,79.6% of the great storms and 90.9% of the super storms occurred during the two years before a solar cycle reached its peak,or in the three years after it.The correlation between the size of a solar cycle and the percentage of major storms that occurred,during the period from two years prior to maximum to three years after it,is investigated.Finally,the properties of the multi-peak distribution for major geomagnetic storms in each solar cycle is investigated.

  13. Drift tubes of Linac 2

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    With the advent of the 800 MeV PS Booster in 1972, the original injector of the PS, a 50 MeV Alvarez-type proton linac, had reached its limits, in terms of intensity and stability. In 1973 one therefore decided to build a new linac (Linac 2), also with a drift-tube Alvarez structure and an energy of 50 MeV. It had a new Cockcroft-Walton preinjector with 750 keV, instead of the previous one with 500 keV. Linac 2 was put into service in 1980. The old Linac 1 was then used for the study of, and later operation with, various types of ions. This picture shows Linac 2 drift-tubes, suspended on stems coming from the top, in contrast to Linac 1, where the drift-tubes stood on stems coming from the bottom.

  14. The CLAS drift chamber system

    CERN Document Server

    Mestayer, M D; Asavapibhop, B; Barbosa, F J; Bonneau, P; Christo, S B; Dodge, G E; Dooling, T; Duncan, W S; Dytman, S A; Feuerbach, R; Gilfoyle, G P; Gyurjyan, V; Hicks, K H; Hicks, R S; Hyde-Wright, C E; Jacobs, G; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kossov, M; Kuhn, S E; Magahiz, R A; Major, R W; Martin, C; McGuckin, T; McNabb, J; Miskimen, R A; Müller, J A; Niczyporuk, B B; O'Meara, J E; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Robb, J; Roudot, F; Schumacher, R A; Tedeschi, D J; Thompson, R A; Tilles, D; Tuzel, W; Vansyoc, K; Vineyard, M F; Weinstein, L B; Wilkin, G R; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J

    2000-01-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on the toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements.

  15. The geomagnetic cutoff rigidities at high latitudes for different solar wind and geomagnetic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, W. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Space Weather; Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). College of Earth Sciences; Qin, G. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Space Weather

    2016-04-01

    Studying the access of the cosmic rays (CRs) into the magnetosphere is important to understand the coupling between the magnetosphere and the solar wind. In this paper we numerically studied CRs' magnetospheric access with vertical geomagnetic cutoff rigidities using the method proposed by Smart and Shea (1999). By the study of CRs' vertical geomagnetic cutoff rigidities at high latitudes we obtain the CRs' window (CRW) whose boundary is determined when the vertical geomagnetic cutoff rigidities drop to a value lower than a threshold value. Furthermore, we studied the area of CRWs and found out they are sensitive to different parameters, such as the z component of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), the solar wind dynamic pressure, AE index, and Dst index. It was found that both the AE index and Dst index have a strong correlation with the area of CRWs during strong geomagnetic storms. However, during the medium storms, only AE index has a strong correlation with the area of CRWs, while Dst index has a much weaker correlation with the area of CRWs. This result on the CRW can be used for forecasting the variation of the cosmic rays during the geomagnetic storms.

  16. Steady induction effects in geomagnetism. Part 1A: Steady motional induction of geomagnetic chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    1992-01-01

    Geomagnetic effects of magnetic induction by hypothetically steady fluid motion and steady magnetic flux diffusion near the top of Earth's core are investigated using electromagnetic theory, simple magnetic earth models, and numerical experiments with geomagnetic field models. The problem of estimating a steady fluid velocity field near the top of Earth's core which induces the secular variation indicated by broad-scale models of the observed geomagnetic field is examined and solved. In Part 1, the steady surficial core flow estimation problem is solved in the context of the source-free mantle/frozen-flux core model. In the first paper (IA), the theory underlying such estimates is reviewed and some consequences of various kinematic and dynamic flow hypotheses are derived. For a frozen-flux core, fluid downwelling is required to change the mean square normal magnetic flux density averaged over the core-mantle boundary. For surficially geostrophic flow, downwelling implies poleward flow. The solution of the forward steady motional induction problem at the surface of a frozen-flux core is derived and found to be a fine, easily visualized example of deterministic chaos. Geomagnetic effects of statistically steady core surface flow may well dominate secular variation over several decades. Indeed, effects of persistent, if not steady, surficially geostrophic core flow are described which may help explain certain features of the present broad-scale geomagnetic field and perhaps paleomagnetic secular variation.

  17. International Geomagnetic Reference Field: the seventh generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, C. E.

    A seventh-generation revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was adopted by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) at the XXI General Assembly of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics in July 1995. The new spherical harmonic models adopted are based on weighted averages of candidate models submitted by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the Russian Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionospheric, and Radio Wave Propagation - IZMIRAN, and jointly by the US Naval Oceanographic Office and the British Geological Survey. The revised IGRF specifies the Earth's main field from 1900 to 2000 and is declared to be definitive from 1945 to 1990. This paper lists the IGRF coefficients, describes the derivation of the new IGRF models, and examines aspects of the IGRF's accuracy, continuity, and behaviour during the 20th century.

  18. Trapping of strangelets in the geomagnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Paulucci, L; Medina-Tanco, G A

    2007-01-01

    Strangelets coming from the interstellar medium (ISM) are an interesting target to experiments searching for evidence of this hypothetic state of hadronic matter. We entertain the possibility of a {\\it trapped} strangelet population, quite analogous to ordinary nuclei and electron belts. For a population of strangelets to be trapped by the geomagnetic field, these incoming particles would have to fulfill certain conditions, namely having magnetic rigidities above the geomagnetic cutoff and below a certain threshold for adiabatic motion to hold. We show in this work that, for fully ionized strangelets, there is a narrow window for stable trapping. An estimate of the stationary population is presented and the dominant loss mechanisms discussed. It is shown that the population would be substantially enhanced with respect to the ISM flux (up to two orders of magnitude) due to quasi-stable trapping.

  19. Modeling the ocean effect of geomagnetic storms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Kuvshinov, A.

    2004-01-01

    At coastal sites, geomagnetic variations for periods shorter than a few days are strongly distorted by the conductivity of the nearby sea-water. This phenomena, known as the ocean (or coast) effect, is strongest in the magnetic vertical component. We demonstrate the ability to predict the ocean...... if the oceans are considered. Our analysis also indicates a significant local time asymmetry (i.e., contributions from spherical harmonics other than P-I(0)), especially during the main phase of the storm....

  20. MAGSAT for geomagnetic studies over Indian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, R. G.; Bhargava, B. N.; Singh, B. P.; Rao, D. R. K.; Rangarajan, G. K.; Rajaram, R.; Roy, M.; Arora, B. R.; Seth, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Progress in the preparation of software for converting data tapes produced on an IBM system to data readable on a DEC-10 system, in the creation of awareness of the utility of MAGSAT data among users in India, and in making computer programs supplied by NASA operational on the DEC-10 system is reported. Papers presented to Indian users, at the IAGA fourth scientific assembly, at a symposium on interdisciplinary approaches to geomagnetism, and a paper published in Science Today are included.

  1. Geomagnetic effects on the average surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballatore, P.

    Several results have previously shown as the solar activity can be related to the cloudiness and the surface solar radiation intensity (Svensmark and Friis-Christensen, J. Atmos. Sol. Terr. Phys., 59, 1225, 1997; Veretenenkoand Pudovkin, J. Atmos. Sol. Terr. Phys., 61, 521, 1999). Here, the possible relationships between the averaged surface temperature and the solar wind parameters or geomagnetic activity indices are investigated. The temperature data used are the monthly SST maps (generated at RAL and available from the related ESRIN/ESA database) that represent the averaged surface temperature with a spatial resolution of 0.5°x0.5° and cover the entire globe. The interplanetary data and the geomagnetic data are from the USA National Space Science Data Center. The time interval considered is 1995-2000. Specifically, possible associations and/or correlations of the average temperature with the interplanetary magnetic field Bz component and with the Kp index are considered and differentiated taking into account separate geographic and geomagnetic planetary regions.

  2. Geomagnetic Jerks in the Swarm Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William; Beggan, Ciaran; Macmillan, Susan

    2016-08-01

    The timely provision of geomagnetic observations as part of the European Space Agency (ESA) Swarm mission means up-to-date analysis and modelling of the Earth's magnetic field can be conducted rapidly in a manner not possible before. Observations from each of the three Swarm constellation satellites are available within 4 days and a database of close-to-definitive ground observatory measurements is updated every 3 months. This makes it possible to study very recent variations of the core magnetic field. Here we investigate rapid, unpredictable internal field variations known as geomagnetic jerks. Given that jerks represent (currently) unpredictable changes in the core field and have been identified to have happened in 2014 since Swarm was launched, we ask what impact this might have on the future accuracy of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). We assess the performance of each of the IGRF-12 secular variation model candidates in light of recent jerks, given that four of the nine candidates are novel physics-based predictive models.

  3. Energetic particle drift motions in the outer dayside magnetosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, R.M.

    1987-12-01

    Models of the geomagnetic field predict that within a distance of approximately one earth radius inside the dayside magnetopause, magnetic fields produced by the Chapman-Ferraro magnetopause currents create high-latitude minimum-B ''pockets'' in the geomagnetic field. Drift-shell branching caused by the minimum-B pockets is analyzed and interpreted in terms of an adiabatic shell branching and rejoining process. We examine the shell-branching process for a static field in detail, using the Choe-Beard 1974 magnetospheric magnetic field model. We find that shell branching annd rejoining conserves the particle mirror field B/sub M/, the fieldline integral invariant I, and the directional electron flux j. We determine the spatial extent of the stable trapping regions for the Choe-Beard model. We develop an adiabatic branching map methodology which completely identifies and describes the location of shell-branching points and the adiabatic trajectories of particles on branched shells, for any model field. We employ the map to develop synthetic pitch angle distributions near the dayside magnetopause by adiabatically transforming observed midnight distributions to the dayside. We find that outer dayside lines contain particles moving on branched and unbranched shells, giving rise to distinctive pitch angle distribution features. We find a good correlation between the pitch angles which mark the transition from branched to unbranched shells in the model, and the distinctive features of the OGO-5 distributions. In the morning sector, we observe large flux changes at critical pitch angles which correspond to B-pocket edges in the model. Measurements on inbound passes in the afternoon sector show first the adiabatic particle shadow, then the arrival of fluxes on rejoined shells, then fluxes on unbranced shells - in accord with model predictions. 204 refs., 138 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Geomagnetic Earthquake Precursors Improvement Formulation on the basis of SKO (Skopje) and PAG (Intermagnet) Geomagnetic Data

    CERN Document Server

    Mavrodiev, Strachimir Chterev

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we show that the simple analysis of the local geomagnetic field behaviour can serve as reliable imminent precursor for regional seismic activity increasing. As the first step the problem was investigated using one- component Dubna fluxgate magnetometer. The result of 2001-2004 Sofia monitoring confirmed many old papers for connection between Earth tide (Sun- Moon tides as earthquakes trigger) and jump (Geomagnetic quake) of daily averaged one minute standart deviation of the geomagnetic field. The second step (2004-present), which included analisys of three-component Danish fluxgate magnetometer data, worked in Skopje Seismological observatory, confirmed the first step result. The analysis of INTERMAGNET data stations around which was happened stronger earthquakes also confirmed our result. The distribution of time difference between the times of such earthquakes and local daily averaged tide vector movement for impending tide extreme confirms our estimate that the increasing seismicity is reali...

  5. Geomagnetic excursions date early hominid migration to China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-09-01

    Global-scale geomagnetic reversals, which are periods when the direction of Earth's magnetic field flips, leave imprints in magnetic minerals present in sediments. But so do smaller-scale, even local, changes in Earth's magnetic field direction. Paleomagnetists believe that the smaller-scale events represent “failed reversals” and refer to them as “geomagnetic excursions.” Scientists use geomagnetic excursions in sedimentary basins as markers to tie together events of Earth's history across the globe.

  6. Resonant enhancement of relativistic electron fluxes during geomagnetically active periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Roth

    Full Text Available The strong increase in the flux of relativistic electrons during the recovery phase of magnetic storms and during other active periods is investigated with the help of Hamiltonian formalism and simulations of test electrons which interact with whistler waves. The intensity of the whistler waves is enhanced significantly due to injection of 10-100 keV electrons during the substorm. Electrons which drift in the gradient and curvature of the magnetic field generate the rising tones of VLF whistler chorus. The seed population of relativistic electrons which bounce along the inhomogeneous magnetic field, interacts resonantly with the whistler waves. Whistler wave propagating obliquely to the magnetic field can interact with energetic electrons through Landau, cyclotron, and higher harmonic resonant interactions when the Doppler-shifted wave frequency equals any (positive or negative integer multiple of the local relativistic gyrofrequency. Because the gyroradius of a relativistic electron may be the order of or greater than the perpendicular wavelength, numerous cyclotron, harmonics can contribute to the resonant interaction which breaks down the adiabatic invariant. A similar process diffuses the pitch angle leading to electron precipitation. The irreversible changes in the adiabatic invariant depend on the relative phase between the wave and the electron, and successive resonant interactions result in electrons undergoing a random walk in energy and pitch angle. This resonant process may contribute to the 10-100 fold increase of the relativistic electron flux in the outer radiation belt, and constitute an interesting relation between substorm-generated waves and enhancements in fluxes of relativistic electrons during geomagnetic storms and other active periods.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles · trapped; plasma waves and instabilities; storms and substorms

  7. Dispersal of invasive species by drifting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riel, van M.C.; Velde, van der G.; Vaate, bij de A.

    2011-01-01

    Drifting can be an effective way for aquatic organisms to disperse and colonise new areas. Increasing connectivity between European large rivers facilitates invasion by drifting aquatic macroinvertebrates. The present study shows that high abundances of invasive species drift in the headstream of

  8. Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-07-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  9. Coronal mass ejections and geomagnetic storms: Seasonal variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.L.; Gosling, J.T.; McComas, D.J.

    1992-07-01

    The well-established semiannual geomagnetic cycle, with peak activity near the equinoxes, has been attributed to the angle between the solar rotation axis and the geomagnetic dipole, which modulates the GSM Bz component in the interplanetary magnetic field (MF). This effect is predicted to be accentuated in the shocked plasma ahead of fast coronal mass ejections (CMESs); its relevance to the internal fields of the ejecta is unclear. CMEs, particularly fast events driving interplanetary shocks, are the cause of almost all large geomagnetic storms near solar maximum. We use a set of CMEs identified by ISEE-3 observations of bidirectional electron streaming, plus IMF and geomagnetic data, to investigate the semiannual geomagnetic variation and its relation to CMEs. We find that the geomagnetic effectiveness of CMEs and post-shock solar wind is well-ordered by speed and by the southward component of the IMF in GSM coordinates, as well as by preexisting geomagnetic conditions. The post-shock seasonal effect, with geomagnetic effectiveness maximizing near April 5 for negative GSEQ By and near October 5 for positive GSEQ By, is identifiable in shock and shock/CME events, but not for CME events without leading shocks. When used to complement the more fundamental causal parameter of CME speed, the seasonal effect appears to have value for prediction of geomagnetic storms.

  10. Coronal mass ejections and geomagnetic storms: Seasonal variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.L.; Gosling, J.T.; McComas, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    The well-established semiannual geomagnetic cycle, with peak activity near the equinoxes, has been attributed to the angle between the solar rotation axis and the geomagnetic dipole, which modulates the GSM Bz component in the interplanetary magnetic field (MF). This effect is predicted to be accentuated in the shocked plasma ahead of fast coronal mass ejections (CMESs); its relevance to the internal fields of the ejecta is unclear. CMEs, particularly fast events driving interplanetary shocks, are the cause of almost all large geomagnetic storms near solar maximum. We use a set of CMEs identified by ISEE-3 observations of bidirectional electron streaming, plus IMF and geomagnetic data, to investigate the semiannual geomagnetic variation and its relation to CMEs. We find that the geomagnetic effectiveness of CMEs and post-shock solar wind is well-ordered by speed and by the southward component of the IMF in GSM coordinates, as well as by preexisting geomagnetic conditions. The post-shock seasonal effect, with geomagnetic effectiveness maximizing near April 5 for negative GSEQ By and near October 5 for positive GSEQ By, is identifiable in shock and shock/CME events, but not for CME events without leading shocks. When used to complement the more fundamental causal parameter of CME speed, the seasonal effect appears to have value for prediction of geomagnetic storms.

  11. Nonlinear evolution of drift instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.W.; Krommes, J.A.; Oberman, C.R.; Smith, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of collisionless drift instabilities in a shear-free magnetic field has been studied by means of gyrokinetic particle simulation as well as numerical integration of model mode-coupling equations. The purpose of the investigation is to identify relevant nonlinear mechanisms responsible for the steady-state drift wave fluctuations. It is found that the saturation of the instability is mainly caused by the nonlinear E x B convection of the resonant electrons and their associated velocity space nonlinearity. The latter also induces energy exchange between the competing modes, which, in turn, gives rise to enhanced diffusion. The nonlinear E x B convection of the ions, which contributes to the nonlinear frequency shift, is also an important ingredient for the saturation.

  12. A Pascalian lateral drift sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, H., E-mail: hendrik.jansen@desy.de

    2016-09-21

    A novel concept of a layer-wise produced semiconductor sensor for precise particle tracking is proposed herein. In contrast to common semiconductor sensors, local regions with increased doping concentration deep in the bulk termed charge guides increase the lateral drift of free charges on their way to the read-out electrode. This lateral drift enables charge sharing independent of the incident position of the traversing particle. With a regular grid of charge guides the lateral charge distribution resembles a normalised Pascal's triangle for particles that are stopped in depths lower than the depth of the first layer of the charge guides. For minimum ionising particles a sum of binomial distributions describes the lateral charge distribution. This concept decouples the achievable sensor resolution from the pitch size as the characteristic length is replaced by the lateral distance of the charge guides.

  13. A Pascalian lateral drift sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, H.

    2016-09-01

    A novel concept of a layer-wise produced semiconductor sensor for precise particle tracking is proposed herein. In contrast to common semiconductor sensors, local regions with increased doping concentration deep in the bulk termed charge guides increase the lateral drift of free charges on their way to the read-out electrode. This lateral drift enables charge sharing independent of the incident position of the traversing particle. With a regular grid of charge guides the lateral charge distribution resembles a normalised Pascal's triangle for particles that are stopped in depths lower than the depth of the first layer of the charge guides. For minimum ionising particles a sum of binomial distributions describes the lateral charge distribution. This concept decouples the achievable sensor resolution from the pitch size as the characteristic length is replaced by the lateral distance of the charge guides.

  14. DC Electric Fields, Associated Plasma Drifts, and Irregularities Observed on the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J.

    2011-01-01

    Results are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. The VEFI instrument includes a vector DC electric field detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics including a burst memory. Compared to data obtained during more active solar conditions, the ambient DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts are variable and somewhat weak, typically < 1 mV/m. Although average drift directions show similarities to those previously reported, eastward/outward during day and westward/downward at night, this pattern varies significantly with longitude and is not always present. Daytime vertical drifts near the magnetic equator are largest after sunrise, with smaller average velocities after noon. Little or no pre-reversal enhancement in the vertical drift near sunset is observed, attributable to the solar minimum conditions creating a much reduced neutral dynamo at the satellite altitude. The nighttime ionosphere is characterized by larger amplitude, structured electric fields, even where the plasma density appears nearly quiescent. Data from successive orbits reveal that the vertical drifts and plasma density are both clearly organized with longitude. The spread-F density depletions and corresponding electric fields that have been detected thus far have displayed a preponderance to appear between midnight and dawn. Associated with the narrow plasma depletions that are detected are broad spectra of electric field and plasma density irregularities for which a full vector set of measurements is available for detailed study. The VEFI data represents a new set of measurements that are germane to numerous fundamental aspects of the electrodynamics

  15. DC Electric Fields and Associated Plasma Drifts Observed with the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Rowland, D.

    2009-01-01

    Initial DC electric field observations and associated plasma drifts are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite. We present statistical averages of the vector fields for the first year of operations that include both the zonal and radial components of the resulting E x B plasma flows at low latitudes. Magnetic field data from the VEFI science magnetometer are used to compute the plasma flows. The DC electric field detector reveals zonal and radial electric fields that undergo strong diurnal variations, typically displaying eastward and outward-directed fields during the day and westward and downward-directed fields at night. There is considerable variation in the large scale DC electric field data, in both the daytime and nighttime cases, with enhanced structures typically observed at night. In general, the measured zonal DC electric field amplitudes include excursions that extend within the 0.4 - 2 m V/m range, corresponding to E x B drifts of the order of 30-150 m/s. The average vertical or radial electric fields may exceed the zonal fields in amplitude by a factor of 1.5 to 2. Although the data compare well, in a general sense, with previous satellite observations and statistical patterns of vertical ion drifts, the E x B drifts we report from C/NOFS rarely show a pronounced pre-reversal enhancement after sunset. We attribute this to a combination of extreme solar minimum conditions and the fact that the C/NOFS orbit of 401 by 867 km carries the probes essentially above the lower altitude regions where the wind-driven dynamo might be expected to create enhanced upwards drifts in the early evening. Evidence for wavenumber 4 tidal effects and other longitudinal signatures have been detected and will be presented. We also discuss off-equatorial electric fields and their relation to the ambient plasma density.

  16. Structuring of intermediate scale equatorial spread F irregularities during intense geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakad, B.; Gurram, P.; Tripura Sundari, P. N. B.; Bhattacharyya, A.

    2016-07-01

    Here we examine the structuring of equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) during intense geomagnetic storm of solar cycle (SC) 24 that occurred on 17 March 2015 using spaced receiver scintillation observations on a 251 MHz radio signal, recorded by a network of stations in Indian region. As yet, this is the strongest geomagnetic storm (Dstmin˜-223nT) that occurred in present SC. Present study reveals that the structuring of equatorial spread F (ESF) irregularities was significantly different on 17 March as compared to quiet days of corresponding month. ESF irregularities of intermediate scale (100 m to few kilometers) are observed at unusually higher altitudes (≥ 800 km) covering wider longitudinal-latitudinal belt over Indian region. A presence of large-scale irregularity structures with stronger ΔN at raised F peak with small-scale irregularities at even higher altitudes is observed. It caused strong focusing effect (S4>1) that prevails throughout premidnight hours at dip equatorial station Tirunelveli. Other observational aspect is that zonal irregularity drifts over low-latitude station Kolhapur exhibited a large deviation of ˜230 m/s from their average quiet time pattern. During this geomagnetic storm, two southward turnings of significant strength (BZ≤-15 nT) occurred at 11.4 IST (Indian standard time) and 17.9 IST. The later southward turning of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF)BZ resulted in a large eastward prompt penetration electric field (PPEF) close to sunset hours in Indian longitude. Estimates of PPEF obtained from real-time ionospheric model are too low to explain the observed large upliftment of F region in the post sunset hours. Possible reason for observed enhanced PPEF-linked effects is discussed.

  17. Investigation of a strong positive ionospheric storm during geomagnetic disturbances occurred in the Brazilian sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu, A. J.; Sahai, Y.; Fagundes, P. R.; de Jesus, R.; Bittencourt, J. A.; Pillat, V. G.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the responses of the ionospheric F region at equatorial and low latitude regions in the Brazilian sector during the super geomagnetic storm on 15-16 May 2005. The geomagnetic storm reached a minimum Dst of -263 nT at 0900 UT on 15 May. In this paper, we present vertical total electron content (vTEC) and phase fluctuations (in TECU/min) from Global Positioning System (GPS) observations obtained at Belém (BELE), Brasília (BRAZ), Presidente Prudente (UEPP), and Porto Alegre (POAL), Brazil, during the period 14-17 May 2005. Also, we present ionospheric parameters h'F, hpF2, and foF2, using the Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosonde (CADI) obtained at Palmas (PAL) and São José dos Campos (SJC), Brazil, for the same period. The super geomagnetic storm has fast decrease in the Dst index soon after SSC at 0239 UT on 15 May. It is a good possibility of prompt penetration of electric field of magnetospheric origin resulting in uplifting of the F region. The vTEC observations show a trough at BELE and a crest above UEPP, soon after SSC, indicating strengthening of nighttime equatorial anomaly. During the daytime on 15 and 16 May, in the recovery phase, the variations in foF2 at SJC and the vTEC observations, particularly at BRAZ, UEPP, and POAL, show large positive ionospheric storm. There is ESF on the all nights at PAL, in the post-midnight (UT) sector, and phase fluctuations only on the night of 14-15 May at BRAZ, after the SSC. No phase fluctuations are observed at the equatorial station BELE and low latitude stations (BRAZ, UEPP, and POAL) at all other times. This indicates that the plasma bubbles are generated and confined on this magnetically disturbed night only up to the low magnetic latitude and drifted possibly to west.

  18. MPS II drift chamber system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platner, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    The MPS II detectors are narrow drift space chambers designed for high position resolution in a magnetic field and in a very high particle flux environment. Central to this implementation was the development of 3 multi-channel custom IC's and one multi-channel hybrid. The system is deadtimeless and requires no corrections on an anode-to-anode basis. Operational experience and relevance to ISABELLE detectors is discussed.

  19. The Egyptian geomagnetic reference field to the Epoch, 2010.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Deebes

    2017-06-01

    The geomagnetic anomaly maps, the normal geomagnetic field maps with their corresponding secular variation maps, the normal geomagnetic field equations of the geomagnetic elements (EGRF and their corresponding secular variations equations, are outlined. The anomalous sites, as discovered from the anomaly maps are, only, mentioned. In addition, a correlation between the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF 2010.0 and the Egyptian Geomagnetic Reference Field (EGRF 2010 is indicated.

  20. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffey, T.A. [Duffy, (T.A.) Tijeras, NM (United States); Goldman, A. [Goldman, (A.), Sandia, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Farrar, C.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated.

  1. Multiwavelength Study on Solar and Interplanetary Origins of the Strongest Geomagnetic Storm of Solar Cycle 23

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Pankaj; Uddin, Wahab

    2011-01-01

    We study the solar sources of an intense geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 23 that occurred on 20 November 2003, based on ground- and space-based multiwavelength observations. The coronal mass ejections (CMEs) responsible for the above geomagnetic storm originated from the super-active region NOAA 10501. We investigate the H-alpha observations of the flare events made with a 15 cm solar tower telescope at ARIES, Nainital, India. The propagation characteristics of the CMEs have been derived from the three-dimensional images of the solar wind (i.e., density and speed) obtained from the interplanetary scintillation data, supplemented with other ground- and space-based measurements. The TRACE, SXI and H-alpha observations revealed two successive ejections (of speeds ~350 and ~100 km/s), originating from the same filament channel, which were associated with two high speed CMEs (~1223 and ~1660 km/s, respectively). These two ejections generated propagating fast shock waves (i.e., fast drifting type II radio bursts) ...

  2. Free core nutation: new large disturbance and connection evidence with geomagnetic jerks

    CERN Document Server

    Malkin, Zinovy

    2016-01-01

    Variations in free core nutation (FCN) are connected with various processes in the Earth's fluid core and core-mantle coupling, which are also largely responsible for the geomagnetic field variations, particularly the geomagnetic jerks (GMJs). A previous study (Malkin, 2013) revealed that the epochs of the observed extremes in the FCN amplitude and phase variations are close to the GMJ epochs. In this paper, a new evidence of this connection was found. The large FCN amplitude and phase disturbance occurred at the epoch close to the newly revealed GMJ 2011. This event occurred to be the second large change in the FCN amplitude and phase after the 1999 disturbance that is also associated with the GMJ 1999. Moreover, the long-time FCN phase drift had changed suddenly in 1998--1999, immediately before the GMJ 1999, and seemed to change again at the epoch immediately preceding the GMJ 2011. The FCN amplitude showed a general long-time decrease before GMJ 1999, and it subsequently grew until GMJ 2011, and then seem...

  3. Ion heating during geomagnetic storms measured using energetic neutral atom imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesee, Amy; Elfritz, Justin; Katus, Roxanne; Scime, Earl

    2015-11-01

    Energy from the solar wind is deposited into the magnetosphere during geomagnetic storms. Much of this energy is deposited into the plasma sheet, driving phenomena that leads to heating. The plasma sheet ions are then injected to the inner magnetosphere, driving the ring current. While ions can undergo adiabatic heating during typical drift motion, collisional and wave-particle interactions can also lead to ion heating. A technique to measure ion temperatures using energetic neutral atom (ENA) data has been developed using ENA data from the Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission global maps of ion temperature during the evolution of geomagnetic storms are made. These maps exhibit the location and characteristics of regions of ion heating and during which storm phase they occur. Superposed epoch analyses of such maps have demonstrated typical characteristics of ion heating during storms driven by coronal mass ejections as compared to those driven by high speed solar wind streams. The temperatures have been used to establish boundary conditions for modeling of the inner magnetosphere. We will give an overview of recent studies using TWINS ion temperature maps. Work supported by NNX10AN08A and AGS-1113478.

  4. Effects of Geomagnetic Storms and Sudden Stratospheric Warmings on Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q.; Gablehouse, R. D.; Gell, D. A.; Johnson, R. M.; Kafkalidis, J. F.; Killeen, T. L.; Niciejewski, R. J.; Ortland, D. A.; Skinner, W. R.; Solomon, S. C.

    2003-12-01

    Neutral winds in the MLT region are affected by dynamical influences from above and below. This is particular true at high latitudes, where solar forcing of the migrating tide may be smaller but other forcings play a big role. During geomagnetic storms, MLT neutral winds can be driven by magnetospheric convection through ion-neutral interactions. This is imparted onto the ionosphere as a cross polar cap potential forming an anti-sunward two-cell ion convection pattern which in turn drives the neutral winds in the polar MLT region. The question has always been how deep into the atmosphere the ion drift can affect the neutral wind. Scarcity of high-latitude data has hampered further understanding of the problem. Also, in the winter polar regions, the stratosphere from time to time experiences sudden warming events. While it is generally understood that these warmings are caused by troposphere planetary wave activity, there are still many unknown aspects to their excitation and propagation. There are also changes in the MLT region associated with these warming events. Moreover, this phenomena, although usually confined to the northern hemisphere, occurred in the southern hemisphere in 2002. We will use TIDI data to examine MLT neutral winds during the recent geomagnetic storm events in 2002 and 2003, and present data during the recent 2002 southern hemisphere warming event.

  5. Geomagnetic secular variations of high-latitude glaciomarine sediments: data from the Kola Peninsula, northwestern Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhmutov, V.; Yevzerov, V.; Kolka, V.

    1994-08-01

    Geological, radiocarbon and paleomagnetic investigations of paleobays were carried out in the northwestern part of the Kola Peninsula (the Pechenga and Shuonijoki river valleys). The period from 10.3 to 9.5 kyear ago was characterized by the accumulation of glaciomarine sediments while the period 8.6-9.5 kyear was characterized by marine ones. Ca. 8.6 kyear marks the beginning of the formation of marine sediment transgression series. The clay sequences, accumulated in paleobays during a few hundred years, are an important object for studying the ancient geomagnetic field secular variations at high latitudes. Paleomagnetic signals in three outcrops from Pechenga river valley (69.5°N) record high-latitudinal inclination and declination variations in the time interval 8.5-10.0 kyear ago which correlate well with the secular variations of Early Holocene lacustrine deposits in the northern part of Ladoga Lake (61.5°N). A characteristic feature of the paleosecular variations at high latitudes is the proximity VGP to the observation point. Near to vertical inclination with declination variation amplitudes up to 150 took place ca. 9700-9500 year ago. The geomagnetic pole drifted south or crossed the Kola Peninsula at that time. The inclination and declination variations may be used in correlating the Early Holocene marine and lacustrine deposits in adjacent regions.

  6. Dispersal of invasive species by drifting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. VAN RIEL, G. VAN DER VELDE, A. BIJ DE VAATE

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Drifting can be an effective way for aquatic organisms to disperse and colonise new areas. Increasing connectivity between European large rivers facilitates invasion by drifting aquatic macroinvertebrates. The present study shows that high abundances of invasive species drift in the headstream of the river Rhine. Dikerogammarus villosus and Chelicorophium curvispinum represented up to 90% of the total of drifting macroinvertebrates. Drift activity shows seasonal and diel patterns. Most species started drifting in spring and were most abundant in the water column during the summer period. Drift activity was very low during the winter period. Diel patterns were apparent; most species, including D. villosus, drifted during the night. Drifting macroinvertebrates colonised stony substrate directly from the water column. D. villosus generally colonised the substrate at night, while higher numbers of C. curvispinum colonised the substrate during the day. It is very likely that drifting functions as a dispersal mechanism for crustacean invaders. Once waterways are connected, these species are no longer necessarily dependent on dispersal vectors other than drift for extending their distribution range [Current Zoology 57 (6: 818–827, 2011].

  7. Geomagnetic imprint of the Persani volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besutiu, Lucian; Seghedi, Ioan; Zlagnean, Luminita; Atanasiu, Ligia; Popa, Razvan-Gabriel; Pomeran, Mihai; Visan, Madalina

    2016-04-01

    The Persani small volume volcanism is located in the SE corner of the Transylvanian Depression, at the north-western edge of the intra-mountainous Brasov basin. It represents the south-easternmost segment of the Neogene-Quaternary volcanic chain of the East Carpathians. The alkaline basalt monogenetic volcanic field is partly coeval with the high-K calc-alkaline magmatism south of Harghita Mountains (1-1.6 Ma). Its eruptions post-dated the calc-alkaline volcanism in the Harghita Mountains (5.3-1.6 Ma), but pre-dated the high-K calc-alkaline emissions of Ciomadul volcano (1.0-0.03 Ma). The major volcanic forms have been mapped in previous geological surveys. Still, due to the small size of the volcanoes and large extent of tephra deposits and recent sediments, the location of some vents or other volcanic structures has been incompletely revealed. To overcome this problem, the area was subject to several near-surface geophysical investigations, including paleomagnetic research. However, due to their large-scale features, the previous geophysical surveys proved to be an inappropriate approach to the volcanological issues. Therefore, during the summers of 2014 and 2015, based on the high magnetic contrast between the volcanic rocks and the hosting sedimentary formations, a detailed ground geomagnetic survey has been designed and conducted, within central Persani volcanism area, in order to outline the presence of volcanic structures hidden beneath the overlying deposits. Additionally, information on the rock magnetic properties was also targeted by sampling and analysing several outcrops in the area. Based on the acquired data, a detailed total intensity scalar geomagnetic anomaly map was constructed by using the recent IGRF12 model. The revealed pattern of the geomagnetic field proved to be fully consistent with the direction of magnetisation previously determined on rock samples. In order to enhance the signal/noise ratio, the results were further processed by

  8. Analysis of geomagnetic secular variation during 1980-1985 and 1985- 1990, and geomagnetic models proposed for the 1991 revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddie, N.W.

    1992-01-01

    The secular variation of the main geomagnetic field during the periods 1980-1985 and 1985-1990 was analyzed in terms of spherical harmonics up to the eighth degree and order. Data from worldwide magnetic observatories and the Navy's Project MAGNET aerial surveys were used. The resulting pair of secular-variation models was used to update the Definitive Geomagnetic Reference Field (DGRF) model for 1980, resulting in new mainfield models for 1985.0 and 1990.0. These, along with the secular-variation model for 1985-1990, were proposed for the 1991 revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). -Author

  9. Interplanetary magnetic field and geomagnetic Dst variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, V. L.; Desai, U. D.

    1973-01-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field has been shown to influence the ring current field represented by Dst. Explorer 28 hourly magnetic field observations have been used with the hourly Dst values. The moderate geomagnetic storms of 60 gammas and quiet-time fluctuations of 10 to 30 gammas are correlated with the north to south change of the interplanetary field component perpendicular to the ecliptic. This change in the interplanetary field occurs one to three hours earlier than the corresponding change in the Dst field.

  10. Could Geoneutrinos Interact With the Geomagnetic Field?

    CERN Document Server

    Quintero, C A B

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we consider the possibility of interaction between geoneutrinos and the geomagnetic field, by adopting an approach based on the Dirac's equation with a non-minimal coupling that accounts for the magnetic interaction of the massive neutrinos. In our approach, we see that the magnetic interaction is controlled by a dimensionless parameter, $f\\simeq 10^{-1}$, and we estimate the mean value of this interaction to be of the order of $10^{-14}\\ MeV^{2}$.

  11. Properties of Pliocene sedimentary geomagnetic reversal records from the Mediterranean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linssen, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    In the history of the Earth the dipolar geomagnetic field has frequently reversed polarity. Though this property was already known early this century (Brunhes, 1906), nowadays the characteristics and the origin of polarity transitions are still largely unknown. The geomagnetic field and its

  12. Geomagnetic disturbances imprints in ground and satellite altitude observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahiat, Yasmina; Lamara, Souad; Zaourar, Naima; Hamoudi, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    The temporal evolution of the geomagnetic field and its variations have been repeatedly studied from both ground observatories and near-earth orbiting platforms. With the advent of the space ageand the launches of geomagnetic low altitude orbits satellites, a global coverage has been achieved. Since Magsat mission, more satellites were put into orbit and some of them are still collecting data enhancing the spatial and temporal descriptions of the field. Our study uses new data gathered by the latest SWARM satellite mission launched on November, 22nd 2013. It consists of a constellation of three identical satellites carrying on board high resolution and accuracy scientific equipment. Data from this constellation will allow better understanding the multiscale behavior of the geomagnetic field. Our goal is to analyze and interpret the geomagnetic data collected by this Swarm mission, for a given period and try to separate the external disturbances from internal contributions. We consider in the study the variation of the horizontal component H, for different virtual geomagnetic observatories at the satellite altitude. The analysis of data by Swarm orbital segments shows clearly the external disturbances of the magnetic field like that occurring on 27th of August 2014. This perturbation is shown on geomagnetic indexes and is related to a coronal mass ejection (CME). These results from virtual observatories are confirmed, by the equivalent analysis using ground observatories data for the same geographic positions and same epochs. Key words: Geomagnetic field, external field, geomagnetic index, SWARM mission, virtual observatories.

  13. Evaluation of candidate geomagnetic field models for IGRF-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thébault, Erwan; Finlay, Chris; Alken, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background: The 12th revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was issued in December 2014 by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) Division V Working Group V-MOD (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/IAGA/vmod/igrf.html). This revision comprises new spherical...

  14. Properties of Pliocene sedimentary geomagnetic reversal records from the Mediterranean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linssen, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    In the history of the Earth the dipolar geomagnetic field has frequently reversed polarity. Though this property was already known early this century (Brunhes, 1906), nowadays the characteristics and the origin of polarity transitions are still largely unknown. The geomagnetic field and its variatio

  15. Anisotropic macroturbulence and diffusion associated with a westward zonal jet: From laboratory to planetary atmospheres and oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galperin, Boris; Hoemann, Jesse; Espa, Stefania; Di Nitto, Gabriella; Lacorata, Guglielmo

    2016-12-01

    Turbulence with inverse energy cascade and its transport properties are investigated experimentally in a flow associated with a westward propagating jet. Turbulence and the jet were produced by an electromagnetic force in a rotating tank filled with an electrolytic saline solution. The parabolic free surface emulated the topographic β effect which evoked the zonation. The spectral and transport flow characteristics were highly anisotropic. Turbulence is diagnosed by exploring the analogy between vertical and horizontal turbulent overturns in, respectively, stably stratified and quasigeostrophic flows which gives rise to a method of potential vorticity (PV) monotonizing. The anisotropization of transport properties of the flow is investigated using the finite scale Lyapunov exponent technique. After initial exponential particle separation, radial (meridional in geophysical and planetary applications) diffusion attains a short-ranged Richardson regime which transitions to the Taylor (scale-independent diffusivity) one. The azimuthal (zonal) diffusion exhibits a double-plateau structure which attains a superdiffusive regime on large scales. The transition to the Taylor regime for the radial diffusion takes place at a scale of turbulence anisotropization. The radial eddy diffusivity in both regimes as well as the transition scale are all determined by the rate of the inverse energy cascade, ɛ , that can be diagnosed by the PV monotonizing. Conversely, ɛ can be deduced from the scale of the Richardson-Taylor regime transition in the radial eddy diffusivity which, thus, provides an additional tool of diagnosing anisotropic macroturbulence with inverse energy cascade.

  16. Anisotropic macroturbulence and diffusion associated with a westward zonal jet: From laboratory to planetary atmospheres and oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galperin, Boris; Hoemann, Jesse; Espa, Stefania; Di Nitto, Gabriella; Lacorata, Guglielmo

    2016-12-01

    Turbulence with inverse energy cascade and its transport properties are investigated experimentally in a flow associated with a westward propagating jet. Turbulence and the jet were produced by an electromagnetic force in a rotating tank filled with an electrolytic saline solution. The parabolic free surface emulated the topographic β effect which evoked the zonation. The spectral and transport flow characteristics were highly anisotropic. Turbulence is diagnosed by exploring the analogy between vertical and horizontal turbulent overturns in, respectively, stably stratified and quasigeostrophic flows which gives rise to a method of potential vorticity (PV) monotonizing. The anisotropization of transport properties of the flow is investigated using the finite scale Lyapunov exponent technique. After initial exponential particle separation, radial (meridional in geophysical and planetary applications) diffusion attains a short-ranged Richardson regime which transitions to the Taylor (scale-independent diffusivity) one. The azimuthal (zonal) diffusion exhibits a double-plateau structure which attains a superdiffusive regime on large scales. The transition to the Taylor regime for the radial diffusion takes place at a scale of turbulence anisotropization. The radial eddy diffusivity in both regimes as well as the transition scale are all determined by the rate of the inverse energy cascade, ε, that can be diagnosed by the PV monotonizing. Conversely, ε can be deduced from the scale of the Richardson-Taylor regime transition in the radial eddy diffusivity which, thus, provides an additional tool of diagnosing anisotropic macroturbulence with inverse energy cascade.

  17. LANL* V1.0: a radiation belt drift shell model suitable for real-time and reanalysis applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Reeves

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe here a new method for calculating the magnetic drift invariant, L*, that is used for modeling radiation belt dynamics and for other space weather applications. L* (pronounced L-star is directly proportional to the integral of the magnetic flux contained within the surface defined by a charged particle moving in the Earth's geomagnetic field. Under adiabatic changes to the geomagnetic field L* is a conserved quantity, while under quasi-adiabatic fluctuations diffusion (with respect to a particle's L* is the primary term in equations of particle dynamics. In particular the equations of motion for the very energetic particles that populate the Earth's radiation belts are most commonly expressed by diffusion in three dimensions: L*, energy (or momentum, and pitch angle (the dot product of velocity and the magnetic field vector. Expressing dynamics in these coordinates reduces the dimensionality of the problem by referencing the particle distribution functions to values at the magnetic equatorial point of a magnetic "drift shell" (or L-shell irrespective of local time (or longitude. While the use of L* aids in simplifying the equations of motion, practical applications such as space weather forecasting using realistic geomagnetic fields require sophisticated magnetic field models that, in turn, require computationally intensive numerical integration. Typically a single L* calculation can require on the order of 105 calls to a magnetic field model and each point in the simulation domain and each calculated pitch angle has a different value of L*. We describe here the development and validation of a neural network surrogate model for calculating L* in sophisticated geomagnetic field models with a high degree of fidelity at computational speeds that are millions of times faster than direct numerical field line mapping and integration. This new surrogate model has applications to real-time radiation belt forecasting, analysis of data sets

  18. Spiral biasing adaptor for use in Si drift detectors and Si drift detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zheng; Chen, Wei

    2016-07-05

    A drift detector array, preferably a silicon drift detector (SDD) array, that uses a low current biasing adaptor is disclosed. The biasing adaptor is customizable for any desired geometry of the drift detector single cell with minimum drift time of carriers. The biasing adaptor has spiral shaped ion-implants that generate the desired voltage profile. The biasing adaptor can be processed on the same wafer as the drift detector array and only one biasing adaptor chip/side is needed for one drift detector array to generate the voltage profiles on the front side and back side of the detector array.

  19. Cosmic rays, geomagnetic field and climate changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, M.; Smart, D.

    The possibility of a connection between cosmic radiation and climate has intrigued scientists for the past several decades. The recent studies of Friis -Christensen and Svensmark has shown an observed variation of 3-4% of the global cloud cover between 1980 and 1995 that appeared to be directly correlated with the change in galactic cosmic radiation flux over the solar cycle. However, in studies of this type, not only the solar cycle modulation of cosmic radiation must be considered, but also the changes in the cosmic radiation impinging at the top of the atmosphere as a result of the long term evolution of the geomagnetic field. We present preliminary results of an on-going study of geomagnetic cutoff rigidities over a 400-year interval. These results show (1) the change in cutoff rigidity is sufficient large so that the change in cosmic radiation flux impacting the earth is approximately equal to the relative change in flux over a solar cycle, and (2) the changes in cutoff rigidity are non- uniform over the globe with both significant increases and decreases at mid-latitude locations.

  20. Resolving issues concerning Eskdalemuir geomagnetic hourly values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Macmillan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The hourly values of the geomagnetic field from 1911 to 1931 derived from measurements made at Eskdalemuir observatory in the UK, and available online from the World Data Centre for Geomagnetism at http://www.wdc.bgs.ac.uk/, have now been corrected. Previously they were 2-point averaged and transformed from the original north, east and vertical down values in the tables in the observatory yearbooks. This paper documents the course of events from discovering the post-processing done to the data to the final resolution of the problem. As it was through the development of a new index, the Inter-Hour Variability index, that this post-processing came to light, we provide a revised series of this index for Eskdalemuir and compare it with that from another European observatory. Conclusions of studies concerning long-term magnetic field variability and inferred solar variability, whilst not necessarily consistent with one another, are not obviously invalidated by the incorrect hourly values from Eskdalemuir. This series of events illustrates the challenges that lie ahead in removing any remaining errors and inconsistencies in the data holdings of different World Data Centres.

  1. The science of geomagnetically induced currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkkinen, A.

    2012-12-01

    Geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) phenomenon impacting long conductor systems on the ground can be considered as the end link of chain of complex physical processes comprising the Sun-Earth system. In this paper I briefly review the current status of our understanding of the physics of GIC and novel applications enabled by the new understanding. More specifically, I will demonstrate how we can follow the chain of physical processes from the solar corona down to the upper mantle of the Earth and to GIC. Further, I will show how state-of-the-art models enable predictive modeling of the entire chain of complex processes. The potential for severe societal consequences has been driving recent increasing interest in extreme GIC events. I will show how we have addressed the issue by generating 100-year GIC event scenarios. These scenarios are of substantial power grid industry interest and have been fed directly into further engineering analyses. I will review the results of our of 100-year geomagnetically induced current scenarios work and discuss some of the future directions in the field.

  2. Solar Wind Charge Exchange During Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Ina P.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Sibeck, David G.; Collier, Michael R.; Kuntz, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    On March 31st. 2001, a coronal mass ejection pushed the subsolar magnetopause to the vicinity of geosynchronous orbit at 6.6 RE. The NASA/GSFC Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMe) employed a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model to simulate the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction during the peak of this geomagnetic storm. Robertson et aL then modeled the expected 50ft X-ray emission due to solar wind charge exchange with geocoronal neutrals in the dayside cusp and magnetosheath. The locations of the bow shock, magnetopause and cusps were clearly evident in their simulations. Another geomagnetic storm took place on July 14, 2000 (Bastille Day). We again modeled X-ray emission due to solar wind charge exchange, but this time as observed from a moving spacecraft. This paper discusses the impact of spacecraft location on observed X-ray emission and the degree to which the locations of the bow shock and magnetopause can be detected in images.

  3. Research on Historical Records of Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhina, G. S.; Alex, S.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    In recent times, there has been keen interest in understanding Sun-Earth connection events, such as solar flares, CMEs and concomitant magnetic storms. Magnetic storms are the most dramatic and perhaps important component of space weather effects on Earth. Super-intense magnetic storms (defined here as those with Dst cause life-threatening power outages, satellite damage, communication failures and navigational problems. However, the data for such magnetic storms is rather scarce. For example, only one super-intense magnetic storm has been recorded (Dst=-640 nT, March 13, 1989) during the space-age (since 1958), although such storms may have occurred many times in the last 160 years or so when the regular observatory network came into existence. Thus, research on historical geomagnetic storms can help to create a good data base for intense and super-intense magnetic storms. From the application of knowledge of interplanetary and solar causes of storms gained from the spaceage observations applied to the super-intense storm of September 1-2, 1859, it has been possible to deduce that an exceptionally fast (and intense) magnetic cloud was the interplanetary cause of this geomagnetic storm with a Dst -1760 nT, nearly 3 times as large as that of March 13, 1989 super-intense storm. The talk will focus on super-intense storms of September 1-2, 1859, and also discuss the results in the context of some recent intense storms.

  4. A domino model for geomagnetic field reversals

    CERN Document Server

    Mori, N; Ferriz-Mas, A; Wicht, J; Mouri, H; Nakamichi, A; Morikawa, M

    2011-01-01

    We solve the equations of motion of a one-dimensional planar Heisenberg (or Vaks-Larkin) model consisting of a system of interacting macro-spins aligned along a ring. Each spin has unit length and is described by its angle with respect to the rotational axis. The orientation of the spins can vary in time due to random forcing and spin-spin interaction. We statistically describe the behaviour of the sum of all spins for different parameters. The term "domino model" in the title refers to the interaction among the spins. We compare the model results with geomagnetic field reversals and find strikingly similar behaviour. The aggregate of all spins keeps the same direction for a long time and, once in a while, begins flipping to change the orientation by almost 180 degrees (mimicking a geomagnetic reversal) or to move back to the original direction (mimicking an excursion). Most of the time the spins are aligned or anti-aligned and deviate only slightly with respect to the rotational axis (mimicking the secular v...

  5. Synthetic and sedimentary records of geomagnetic excursions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlag, P.; Thouveny, N.; Rochette, P.

    The geomagnetic excursion recorded in the sediments of Lac St.Front (Massif Central, France) is characterized by shallow and negative inclinations followed by a younger steep inclination interval (Vlag et al., 1996). In the corresponding interval of the nearby Lac du Bouchet only steep inclinations are found. Sedimentary records of the Mono Lake excursion show similar inclination patterns; ‘complete’ records of this excursion show a succession of a shallow by a steep inclination interval, while ‘incomplete’ records only show only steep inclinations (Coe and Liddicoat, 1994). Due to a non-instantaneous acquisition of the remanence, sedimentary records reflect only a smoothed geomagnetic signal. It will be shown that smoothing of a small low-intensity ‘reversed’ interval embedded in a non-antipodal normal field interval may result in records of a shallow inclination interval followed by a steep inclination interval, while further smoothing results in only steep inclinations. Realignment of magnetic grains by the stronger normal field can also produce such records and may explain why such an unusual large lock-in depth is required by the conventional smoothing model. Whatever the mechanism, the similarities between these synthetic records and the excursional records of Lac St. Front-Lac du Bouchet and Mono Lake suggest that the latter are more or less affected by vector addition of two non-antipodal directions.

  6. Geomagnetic storm effects on GPS based navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. S. Rama Rao

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The energetic events on the sun, solar wind and subsequent effects on the Earth's geomagnetic field and upper atmosphere (ionosphere comprise space weather. Modern navigation systems that use radio-wave signals, reflecting from or propagating through the ionosphere as a means of determining range or distance, are vulnerable to a variety of effects that can degrade the performance of the navigational systems. In particular, the Global Positioning System (GPS that uses a constellation of earth orbiting satellites are affected due to the space weather phenomena.

    Studies made during two successive geomagnetic storms that occurred during the period from 8 to 12 November 2004, have clearly revealed the adverse affects on the GPS range delay as inferred from the Total Electron Content (TEC measurements made from a chain of seven dual frequency GPS receivers installed in the Indian sector. Significant increases in TEC at the Equatorial Ionization anomaly crest region are observed, resulting in increased range delay during the periods of the storm activity. Further, the storm time rapid changes occurring in TEC resulted in a number of phase slips in the GPS signal compared to those on quiet days. These phase slips often result in the loss of lock of the GPS receivers, similar to those that occur during strong(>10 dB L-band scintillation events, adversely affecting the GPS based navigation.

  7. Geomagnetic control of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bremer

    Full Text Available Using observations with the ALOMAR SOUSY radar near Andenes (69.3°N, 16.0°E from 1994 until 1997 polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE have been investigated in dependence on geomagnetic K indices derived at the Auroral Observatory Tromsø (69.66°N, 18.94°E. During night-time and morning hours a significant correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the radar results and the geomagnetic K indices could be detected with a maximum correlation near midnight. The correlation becomes markedly smaller in the afternoon and early evening hours with a minimum near 17 UT. This diurnal variation is in reasonable agreement with riometer absorption at Ivalo (68.55°N, 27.28°E and can be explained by the diurnal variation of ionization due to precipitating high energetic particles. Therefore, a part of the diurnal PMSE variation is caused by this particle precipitation. The variability of the solar EUV variation, however, has no significant influence on the PMSE during the observation period.

    Keywords: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere - Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, precipitating - Radio science (remote sensing

  8. Limits to Drift Chamber Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, Werner

    1998-01-01

    ATLAS (A Large Toroidal LHC Apparatus) will be a general-purpose experiment at the Large Hadron Collider that will be operational at CERN in the year 2004. The ATLAS muon spectrometer aims for a momentum resolution of 10% for a transverse momentum of pT=1TeV. The precision tracking devices in the muon system will be high pressure drift tubes (MDTs) with a single wire resolution of 1100 chambers covering an area of ≈ 2500m2. The high counting rates in the spectrometer as well as the aim for excellent spatial resolution and high efficiency put severe constraints on the MDT operating parameters. This work describes a detailed study of all the resolution limiting factors in the ATLAS environment. A ’full chain’ simulation of the MDT response to photons and charged particles as well as quantitative comparisons with measurements was performed. The good agreement between simulation and measurements resulted in a profound understanding of the drift chamber processes and the individual contributions to the spat...

  9. Global and Meso-scale Thermospheric Neutral Wind Response to Geomagnetic Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, G.; Conde, M.; Doornbos, E.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a case study of thermospheric response to the 5 April 2010 geomagnetic storm. The NCAR Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Electrodynamic General Circulation Model (TIMEGCM) is used to investigate thermospheric neutral wind variations during the storm, and the model results are validated through comparison with ground and space based observations. More specifically, we conduct detailed inter-comparison of the winds observed by scanning Doppler imagers (SDI) in Alaska with those derived from the TIMEGCM simulations in order to assess model's ability in reproducing the observed meso-scale wind field. The thermospheric winds obtained from the accelerometers on board the GOCE satellite are also used to validate the simulation results on a global scale. While globally the wind velocity tends to be smaller than ion drift velocity, locally the winds can exceed ion drifts and also blow in the different direction than the ions. We will discuss how the thermospheric winds affect the energetic coupling of the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system in terms of Joule heating and field-aligned currents.

  10. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.

    1992-10-01

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed.

  11. Snow Drift Management: Summit Station Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    ER D C/ CR RE L TR -1 6- 6 Engineering for Polar Operations, Logistics, and Research (EPOLAR) Snow Drift Management Summit Station...Drift Management Summit Station Greenland Robert B. Haehnel and Matthew F. Bigl U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Cold...Engineering for Polar Operations, Logistics, and Research (EPOLAR) EP-ARC-15-33, “Monitoring and Managing Snow Drifting at Summit Station, Greenland” ERDC

  12. Redshift drift in a pressure gradient cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Balcerzak, Adam

    2012-01-01

    We derive the redshift drift formula for the inhomogeneous pressure spherically symmetric Stephani universes which are complementary to inhomogeneous density Lema\\^itre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) models. We show that there is a clear difference between the redshift drift predictions for these two models. The Stephani models have positive drift values at small redshift and behave qualitatively as the $\\Lambda$CDM models while the drift for LTB models is always negative. This prediction can be tested in future space experiments such as E-ELT, TMT, GMT or CODEX.

  13. THERMAL EVALUATION OF DIFFERENT DRIFT DIAMETER SIZES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.M. Wade

    1999-01-04

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate the thermal response of a repository-emplaced waste package and its corresponding drift wall surface temperature with different drift diameters. The case examined is that of a 21 pressurized water reactor (PWR) uncanistered fuel (UCF) waste package loaded with design basis spent nuclear fuel assemblies. This calculation evaluates a 3.5 meter to 6.5 meter drift diameter range in increments of 1.0 meters. The time-dependent temperatures of interest, as determined by this calculation, are the spent nuclear fuel cladding temperature, the waste package surface temperature, and the drift wall surface temperature.

  14. RF Breakdown in Drift Tube Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Stovall, J; Lown, R

    2009-01-01

    The highest RF electric field in drift-tube linacs (DTLs) often occurs on the face of the first drift tube. Typically this drift tube contains a quadrupole focusing magnet whose fringing fields penetrate the face of the drift tube parallel to the RF electric fields in the accelerating gap. It has been shown that the threshold for RF breakdown in RF cavities may be reduced in the presence of a static magnetic field. This note offers a “rule of thumb” for picking the maximum “safe” surface electric field in DTLs based on these measurements.

  15. The statistical model for the secondary quick reversals during the geomagnetic pole transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A statistical model for the quick reversals during a geomagnetic pole transition is put forward by combining the modern geomagnetic field and paleomagnetic field. The decrease of geomagnetic intensity determines the reversals, and the quick reversals are possibly caused by the interaction between g01 and the other geomagnetic components.

  16. The statistical model for the secondary quick reversals during the geomagnetic pole transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘青松; 朱日祥; 潘永信; 郭斌

    2000-01-01

    A statistical model for the quick reversals during a geomagnetic pole transition is put forward by combining the modern geomagnetic field and paleomagnetic field. The decrease of geomagnetic intensity determines the reversals, and the quick reversals are possibly caused by the interaction between g10 and the other geomagnetic components.

  17. Fermilab drift tube Linac revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milorad Popovic

    2004-05-12

    Using the PARMILA code running under PC-WINDOWS, the present performance of the Fermilab Drift Tube Linac has been analyzed in the light of new demands on the Linac/Booster complex (the Proton Source). The Fermilab Drift Tube Linac (DTL) was designed in the sixties as a proton linac with a final energy of 200 MeV and a peak current of 100mA. In the seventies, in order to enable multi-turn charge exchange injection into the Booster, the ion source was replaced by an H- source with a peak beam current of 25mA. Since then the peak beam current was steadily increased up to 55mA. In the early nineties, part of the drift tube structure was replaced with a side-coupled cavity structure in order to increase the final energy to 400 MeV. The original and still primary purpose of the linac is to serve as the injector for the Booster. As an added benefit, the Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF) was built in the middle seventies. It uses 66MeV protons from the Linac to produce neutrons for medical purposes. The Linac/Booster complex was designed to run at a fundamental cycling rate of 15Hz, but beam is accelerated on every cycle only when NTF is running. Until recently the demand from the High Energy Physics program resulted in an average linac beam repetition rate of order 1 Hz. With the MiniBoone experiment and the NuMI program, the demands on the Proton Source have changed, with emphasis on higher beam repetition rates up to 7.5Hz. Historically the beam losses in the linac were small, localized at one spot, so activation was not an important issue. With higher beam rate, this has the potential to become the dominant issue. Until today all tuning in the linac and Proton Source was governed by two goals: to maximize the peak beam current out of the linac and to minimize the beam losses in the linac. If maximal peak current from the linac is no longer a primary goal, then the linac quadrupoles can be adjusted differently to achieve different goals.

  18. Geomagnetic response to solar and interplanetary disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maris Georgeta

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The space weather discipline involves different physical scenarios, which are characterised by very different physical conditions, ranging from the Sun to the terrestrial magnetosphere and ionosphere. Thanks to the great modelling effort made during the last years, a few Sun-to-ionosphere/thermosphere physics-based numerical codes have been developed. However, the success of the prediction is still far from achieving the desirable results and much more progress is needed. Some aspects involved in this progress concern both the technical progress (developing and validating tools to forecast, selecting the optimal parameters as inputs for the tools, improving accuracy in prediction with short lead time, etc. and the scientific development, i.e., deeper understanding of the energy transfer process from the solar wind to the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system. The purpose of this paper is to collect the most relevant results related to these topics obtained during the COST Action ES0803. In an end-to-end forecasting scheme that uses an artificial neural network, we show that the forecasting results improve when gathering certain parameters, such as X-ray solar flares, Type II and/or Type IV radio emission and solar energetic particles enhancements as inputs for the algorithm. Regarding the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction topic, the geomagnetic responses at high and low latitudes are considered separately. At low latitudes, we present new insights into temporal evolution of the ring current, as seen by Burton’s equation, in both main and recovery phases of the storm. At high latitudes, the PCC index appears as an achievement in modelling the coupling between the upper atmosphere and the solar wind, with a great potential for forecasting purposes. We also address the important role of small-scale field-aligned currents in Joule heating of the ionosphere even under non-disturbed conditions. Our scientific results in

  19. Studies on the Geomagnetic Induction Vectors of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiao; Zhang, Huiqian; Huang, Qinghua

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the geomagnetic data of 16 stations, near 6 years for most, provided by the National Geomagnetic Center of China, were used to study on the geomagnetic induction vectors. The stations cover the whole North China and part of southwestern China, both of which has a complicate geological and tectonic background. This study will not only advance the understanding of regional tectonic variations, but also provide some suggestions on the construction for geomagnetic observation network of earthquake monitoring. The time series of geomagnetic induction vectors were obtained by the robust estimation method, which has been verified and compared with the ordinary least square and the weighted square method. A principle of selecting a specified period's results from the robust estimation method was defined. Then, the results with the period of 640s for all stations were selected by this principle. The long-term trends (more than six months at least) within the time series were extracted by the Fourier harmonic analysis. Consistent phase variations exist for most stations within a similar tectonic background. About one-month period variations in the most stations' results after removing the long-term trends were found. Spectrum analysis for the results and geomagnetic activity index showed that those phenomena may relate to the period of the global geomagnetic activity. A preference azimuth of the geomagnetic induction vectors was found in each station by statistical analysis on the time series. It pointed out the possible relatively high conductivity structures. Exactly, geomagnetic vectors of BJI, JIH, LYH and TAY station, which surround the basin of North China, suggested a relatively higher conductivity layer; that of stations around the Erdos block suggested a complicated structure. Three-dimension inversion by ModEM verifies our results.

  20. Geomagnetically Induced Currents in the Irish Power Network during Geomagnetic Storms

    CERN Document Server

    Blake, Seán P; Jones, Alan G; Hogg, Colin; Campanyà, Joan; Beggan, Ciarán; Thomson, Alan W P; Kelly, Gemma S; Bell, David

    2016-01-01

    Geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) are a well-known terrestrial space weather hazard. They occur in power transmission networks and are known to have adverse effects in both high and mid-latitude countries. Here, we study GICs in the Irish power transmission network (geomagnetic latitude 54.7--58.5$^{\\circ}$ N) during five geomagnetic storms (06-07 March 2016, 20-21 December 2015, 17-18 March 2015, 29-31 October 2003 and 13-14 March 1989). We simulate electric fields using a plane wave method together with two ground resistivity models, one of which is derived from magnetotelluric measurements (MT model). We then calculate GICs in the 220, 275 and 400~kV transmission network. During the largest of the storm periods studied, the peak electric field was calculated to be as large as 3.8~V~km\\textsuperscript{-1}, with associated GICs of up to 23~A using our MT model. Using our homogenous resistivity model, those peak values were 1.46~V~km\\textsuperscript{-1} and 25.8~A. We find that three 400 and 275~kV subs...

  1. Geomagnetically induced currents in the Irish power network during geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Seán. P.; Gallagher, Peter T.; McCauley, Joe; Jones, Alan G.; Hogg, Colin; Campanyà, Joan; Beggan, Ciarán. D.; Thomson, Alan W. P.; Kelly, Gemma S.; Bell, David

    2016-12-01

    Geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) are a well-known terrestrial space weather hazard. They occur in power transmission networks and are known to have adverse effects in both high-latitude and midlatitude countries. Here we study GICs in the Irish power transmission network (geomagnetic latitude 54.7-58.5°N) during five geomagnetic storms (6-7 March 2016, 20-21 December 2015, 17-18 March 2015, 29-31 October 2003, and 13-14 March 1989). We simulate electric fields using a plane wave method together with two ground resistivity models, one of which is derived from magnetotelluric measurements (magnetotelluric (MT) model). We then calculate GICs in the 220, 275, and 400 kV transmission network. During the largest of the storm periods studied, the peak electric field was calculated to be as large as 3.8 V km-1, with associated GICs of up to 23 A using our MT model. Using our homogenous resistivity model, those peak values were 1.46 V km-1 and 25.8 A. We find that three 400 and 275 kV substations are the most likely locations for the Irish transformers to experience large GICs.

  2. Silicon drift detectors with the drift field induced by pureB-coated trenches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanver, Lis Karen; Kneževi´c, Tihomir; Suligoj, Tomislav

    2016-01-01

    Junction formation in deep trenches is proposed as a new means of creating a built-in drift field in silicon drift detectors (SDDs). The potential performance of this trenched drift detector (TDD) was investigated analytically and through simulations, and compared to simulations of conventional

  3. The Genetic Drift Inventory: A Tool for Measuring What Advanced Undergraduates Have Mastered about Genetic Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Rebecca M.; Andrews, Tessa C.; McElhinny, Teresa L.; Mead, Louise S.; Abraham, Joel K.; Thanukos, Anna; Perez, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding genetic drift is crucial for a comprehensive understanding of biology, yet it is difficult to learn because it combines the conceptual challenges of both evolution and randomness. To help assess strategies for teaching genetic drift, we have developed and evaluated the Genetic Drift Inventory (GeDI), a concept inventory that measures…

  4. Autoresonant control of drift waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagalov, A. G.; Rasmussen, J. Juul; Naulin, V.

    2017-03-01

    The control of nonlinear drift waves in a magnetized plasmas column has been investigated. The studies are based on the Hasegawa–Mima model, which is solved on a disk domain with radial inhomogeneity of the plasma density. The system is forced by a rotating potential with varying frequency defined on the boundary. To excite and control the waves we apply the autoresonant effect, taking place when the amplitude of the forcing exceeds a threshold value and the waves are phase-locked with the forcing. We demonstrate that the autoresonant approach is applicable for excitation of a range of steady nonlinear waves of the lowest azimuthal mode numbers and for controlling their amplitudes and phases. We also demonstrate the excitation of zonal flows (m = 0 modes), which are controlled via the forced modes.

  5. Autoresonant control of drift waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shagalov, A.G.; Rasmussen, Jens Juul; Naulin, Volker

    2017-01-01

    The control of nonlinear drift waves in a magnetized plasmas column has been investigated. The studies are based on the Hasegawa–Mima model, which is solved on a disk domain with radial inhomogeneity of the plasma density. The system is forced by a rotating potential with varying frequency defined...... on the boundary. To excite and control the waves we apply the autoresonant effect, taking place when the amplitude of the forcing exceeds a threshold value and the waves are phase-locked with the forcing. We demonstrate that the autoresonant approach is applicable for excitation of a range of steady nonlinear...... waves of the lowest azimuthal mode numbers and for controlling their amplitudes and phases. We also demonstrate the excitation of zonal flows (m = 0 modes), which are controlled via the forced modes....

  6. The ARGUS microvertex drift chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, E.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Appuhn, R. D.; Buchmüller, J.; Kolanoski, H.; Kreimeier, B.; Lange, A.; Siegmund, T.; Walther, A.; Edwards, K. W.; Fernholz, R. C.; Kapitza, H.; MacFarlane, D. B.; O'Neill, M.; Parsons, J. A.; Prentice, J. D.; Seidel, S. C.; Tsipolitis, G.; Ball, S.; Babaev, A.; Danilov, M.; Tichomirov, I.

    1989-11-01

    The ARGUS collaboration is currently building a new microvertex drift chamber (μVDC) as an upgrade of their detector. The μVDC is optimized for B-meson physics at DORIS energies. Important design features are minimal multiple scattering for low-momentum particles and three-dimensional reconstruction of decay vertices with equal resolutions in r- φ and r- z. Vertex resolutions of 15-25 μm are expected. Prototypes of the μVDC have been tested with different gas mixtures at various pressures. Spatial resolutions as small as 20 μm were obtained using CO 2/propane at 4 bar and DME at 1 bar. New readout electronics have been developed for the μVDC aiming at low thresholds for the TDC measurements. Employing a novel idea for noise and cross-talk suppression, which is based on a discrimination against short pulses, very low threshold settings are possible.

  7. The Wavelet Property of the Geomagnetic Anomaly Signal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JiangfaLIN; GangWANG

    1997-01-01

    In this study,wavelet analysis is utilized to analyze the geomagnetic signals for oil-gas exploration,in order to show the relation between the wavelet property of the geomagnetic signals and the underground treasure.At firest,the global geomagentic anomaly signal in the oil exploration is given.Then.with the wavelet theory the geomagnetic signals of an oil-gas field is analyzed.The preliminary wavelet analysis shows that the underground oil-gas location can be determined with the help of its regional high frequency signal distributions.

  8. Magnetic rotation imaging method to measure the geomagnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A new imaging method for measuring the geomagnetic field based on the magnetic rotation effect is put forward. With the help of polarization property of the sunlight reflected from the ground and the magnetic rotation of the atmosphere, the geomagnetic field can be measured by an optical system installed on a satellite. According to its principle, the three-dimensional image of the geomagnetic field can be obtained. The measuring speed of this method is very high, and there is no blind spot and distortion. In this paper, the principle of this method is presented, and some key problems are discussed.

  9. Geomagnetic properties of Proxima Centauri b analogues

    CERN Document Server

    Zuluaga, Jorge I

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of a planet around the closest star, Proxima Centauri, could represent a quantum leap on the testability of models in exoplanet sciences. Unlike any other discovered exoplanet, models of planetary processes in Proxima b could be contrasted against near future telescopic observations and far future in-situ measurements. In this paper we study the geomagnetic properties of Proxima b analogues, namely, solid planets with masses close but larger than Earth's mass, periods of rotation of several days and habitable surface conditions. Assuming different planetary masses, bulk compositions and periods of rotations, we calculate for each planetary analogue its radius, heat flux, time of inner core formation, dynamo lifetime and minimum dipole magnetic moment. We find that most ($\\gtrsim$70\\%) Proxima b analogues develop intrinsic dynamos that last at least 3 Gyr, although only half of them are older than the present age of the host star ($4-6$ Gyr). Relying in our planetary evolution models, we p...

  10. GEOMAGNETIC CONJUGACY OF MODERN TECTONIC STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ya. Khachikyan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An earthquake is an element of the global electric circuit (GEC –  this new idea suggested in the space age is tested in our study. In the frame of the GEC concept, one may expect that tectonic structures of the northern and southern hemispheres may be magnetically conjugated. It is found that the midocean ridges of the southern hemisphere, located along the boundary of the Antarctic lithosphere plate, are magnetically conjugated with the areas of the junction of continental orogens and platforms in the northern hemisphere. The closest geomagnetic conjugacy exists between the southern boundary of Nazca lithospheric plate and the northern boundaries of Cocos and Caribbean lithospheric plates.

  11. Basic Geomagnetic Network of the Republic of Croatia 2004 – 2012, with Geomagnetic Field Maps for 2009.5 epoch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Brkić

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available After more than half a century, scientific book Basic Geomagnetic Network of the Republic of Croatia 2004 – 2012, with Geomagnetic Field Maps for 2009.5 epoch describes the recent geomagnetic field on Croatian territory. A review of research in the past decade as well as the original solutions makes the book a document of contribution to geodesy and geomagnetism in Croatia.The book’s introduction gives an overview of two centuries of history and the strategic, security, economic and scientific significance of knowing the geomagnetic field on the Croatian territory. All the activities related to the updating of the geomagnetic information, which took place in the last decade, signified a big step toward the countries where geomagnetic survey is a mature scientific and technical discipline, and a scientific contribution to understanding of the nature of the Earth's magnetism.The declination, inclination and total intensity maps (along with the normal annual changes for the epoch 2009.5 are given in the Appendix. The book Basic Geomagnetic Network of the Republic of Croatia 2004 – 2012, with Geomagnetic Field Maps for 2009.5 epoch (ISBN 978-953-293-521-9 is published by the State Geodetic Administration of the Republic of Croatia. Beside editor in chief, M. Brkić, the authors are: E. Vujić, D. Šugar, E. Jungwirth, D. Markovinović, M. Rezo, M. Pavasović, O. Bjelotomić, M. Šljivarić, M. Varga and V. Poslončec-Petrić. The book contains 48 pages and 3 maps, and is published in 200 copies. CIP record is available in digital catalogue of the National and University Library in Zagreb under number 861937.

  12. Drift wave in pair-ion plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samiran Ghosh; Nikhil Chakrabarti; Manoranjan Khan; M R Gupta

    2013-02-01

    The conditions for the existence of low-frequency electrostatic drift wave in pair-ion plasma are discussed. It is shown that the temperature and/or mass difference of both species could produce drift wave in a pair-ion plasma. The results are discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiment.

  13. Resistive Drift Waves in a Bumpy Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2004-01-12

    A computational study of resistive drift waves in the edge plasma of a bumpy torus is presented. The magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium is obtained from a three-dimensional local equilibrium model. The use of a local magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium model allows for a computationally efficient systematic study of the impact of the magnetic field structure on drift wave stability.

  14. Biology Undergraduates' Misconceptions about Genetic Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, T. M.; Price, R. M.; Mead, L. S.; McElhinny, T. L.; Thanukos, A.; Perez, K. E.; Herreid, C. F.; Terry, D. R.; Lemons, P. P.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores biology undergraduates' misconceptions about genetic drift. We use qualitative and quantitative methods to describe students' definitions, identify common misconceptions, and examine differences before and after instruction on genetic drift. We identify and describe five overarching categories that include 16 distinct…

  15. Do Arctic waders use adaptive wind drift?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, M; Alerstam, T; Gudmundsson, GA; Hedenstrom, A; Piersma, T; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur A.; Hedenström, Anders

    2004-01-01

    We analysed five data sets of night directions of migrating arctic waders ill relation to,winds, recorded by tracking radar and optical range finder, in order to find out if these birds compensate for wind drift, or allow themselves to be drifted by winds. Our purpose was to investigate whether arct

  16. Learning under Concept Drift: an Overview

    CERN Document Server

    e, Indr\\ e Žliobait\\

    2010-01-01

    Concept drift refers to a non stationary learning problem over time. The training and the application data often mismatch in real life problems. In this report we present a context of concept drift problem 1. We focus on the issues relevant to adaptive training set formation. We present the framework and terminology, and formulate a global picture of concept drift learners design. We start with formalizing the framework for the concept drifting data in Section 1. In Section 2 we discuss the adaptivity mechanisms of the concept drift learners. In Section 3 we overview the principle mechanisms of concept drift learners. In this chapter we give a general picture of the available algorithms and categorize them based on their properties. Section 5 discusses the related research fields and Section 5 groups and presents major concept drift applications. This report is intended to give a bird's view of concept drift research field, provide a context of the research and position it within broad spectrum of research fi...

  17. Dissipative drift instability in dusty plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilakshi Das

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available An investigation has been done on the very low-frequency electrostatic drift waves in a collisional dusty plasma. The dust density gradient is taken perpendicular to the magnetic field B0⃗, which causes the drift wave. In this case, low-frequency drift instabilities can be driven by E1⃗×B0⃗ and diamagnetic drifts, where E1⃗ is the perturbed electric field. Dust charge fluctuation is also taken into consideration for our study. The dust- neutral and ion-neutral collision terms have been included in equations of motion. It is seen that the low-frequency drift instability gets damped in such a system. Both dust charging and collision of plasma particles with the neutrals may be responsible for the damping of the wave. Both analytical and numerical techniques have been used while developing the theory.

  18. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for LA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Sun

    2004-07-09

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). The scope of the work includes determination of input parameter values and loads, selection of appropriate process and methods for the calculation, application of selected methods, such as empirical or analytical, to the calculation, development and execution of numerical models, and evaluation of results. Results from this calculation are limited to use for design of the emplacement drifts and the final ground support system installed in these drifts. The design of non-emplacement openings and their ground support systems is covered in the ''Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA'' (BSC 2004c).

  19. Field investigation of the drift shadow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Grace W.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.; Marshall, Brian D.; Cook, Paul J.

    2005-09-08

    A drift shadow is an area immediately beneath an undergroundvoidthat, in theory, will be relatively drier than the surrounding rockmass. Numerical and analytical models of water flow through unsaturatedrock predict the existence of a drift shadow, but field tests confirmingits existence have yet to be performed. Proving the existence of driftshadows and understanding their hydrologic and transport characteristicscould provide a better understanding of how contaminants move in thesubsurface if released from waste emplacement drifts such as the proposednuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We describe the fieldprogram that will be used to investigate the existence of a drift shadowand the corresponding hydrological process at the Hazel-Atlas silica-sandmine located at the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve in Antioch,California. The location and configuration of this mine makes it anexcellent site to observe and measure drift shadow characteristics. Themine is located in a porous sandstone unit of the Domengine Formation, anapproximately 230 meter thick series of interbedded Eocene-age shales,coals, and massive-bedded sandstones. The mining method used at the minerequired the development of two parallel drifts, one above the other,driven along the strike of the mined sandstone stratum. Thisconfiguration provides the opportunity to introduce water into the rockmass in the upper drift and to observe and measure its flow around theunderlying drift. The passive and active hydrologic tests to be performedare described. In the passive method, cores will be obtained in a radialpattern around a drift and will be sectioned and analyzed for in-situwater content and chemical constituents. With the active hydrologic test,water will be introduced into the upper drift of the two parallel driftsand the flow of the water will be tracked as it passes near the bottomdrift. Tensiometers, electrical resistance probes, neutron probes, andground penetrating radar may be

  20. An Impending geomagnetic transition? Hints from the past.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo eLAJ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The rapid decrease of the geomagnetic field intensity in the last centuries has led to speculations that an attempt to a reversal or an excursion might be under way. Here we investigate this hypothesis by examining past records of geomagnetic field intensity obtained from sedimentary cores and from the study of cosmogenic nuclides. The selected records describe geomagnetic changes with an unprecedented temporal resolution between 20 and 75 kyr B.P. We find that some aspects of the present-day geomagnetic field have some similarities with those documented for the Laschamp excursion 41 kyr ago. Under the assumption that the dynamo processes for an eventual future reversal or excursion would be similar to those of the Laschamp excursion, we tentatively suggest that, whilst irreversible processes that will drive the geodynamo into a polarity change may have already started, a reversal or an excursion should not be expected before 500 to 1000 years.

  1. Dependence of geosynchronous relativistic electron enhancements on geomagnetic parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitriev, A V

    2014-01-01

    Relativistic electron fluxes observed in geosynchronous orbit by GOES-8 in 1997 to 2000 were considered as a complex function of geomagnetic indices PC, Kp, and Dst as well as parameters of the magnetosphere size, subsolar Rs and terminator Rf magnetopause distances. A geosynchronous relativistic electron enhancement (GREE) is determined as daily maximal electron flux exceeding the upper root mean square deviation (RMSD) threshold of about 1500 (cm2s sr)-1. Comparison analysis of the GREE dynamics and geomagnetic conditions on the rising phase of current solar cycle revealed suppression of the relativistic electron enhancements by substantially increased strong geomagnetic activity in the solar maximum. Statistical consideration of a relationship between the GREEs and the geomagnetic parameters showed that the most important parameters controlling the geosynchronous relativistic electron enhancements were 4-day averaged Kp index, PC index and magnetopause termination distance Rf delayed respectively on 3 and ...

  2. Regional cosmic ray induced ionization and geomagnetic field changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Kovaltsov

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Cosmic ray induced ionization (CRII is an important factor of outer space influences on atmospheric properties. Variations of CRII are caused by two different processes – solar activity variations, which modulate the cosmic ray flux in interplanetary space, and changes of the geomagnetic field, which affects the cosmic ray access to Earth. Migration of the geomagnetic dipole axis may greatly alter CRII in some regions on a time scale of centuries and longer. Here we present a study of CRII regional effects of the geomagnetic field changes during the last millennium for two regions: Europe and the Far East. We show that regional effects of the migration of the geomagnetic dipole axis may overcome global changes due to solar activity variations.

  3. Statistical Study of False Alarms of Geomagnetic Storms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leer, Kristoffer; Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Veronig, A.

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are known to cause geomagnetic storms on Earth. However, not all CMEs will trigger geomagnetic storms, even if they are heading towards the Earth. In this study, front side halo CMEs with speed larger than 500 km/s have been identified from the SOHO LASCO catalogue....... A subset of these halo CMEs did not cause a geomagnetic storm the following four days and have therefore been considered as false alarms. The properties of these events are investigated and discussed here. Their statistics are compared to the geo-effective CMEs. The ability to identify potential false...... alarms is considered as an important factor when forecasting geomagnetic storms. It would therefore be very helpful if there were a signature in the solar data that could indicate that a CME is a false alarm. The strength and position of associated flares have been considered as possible candidates...

  4. Statistical Study of False Alarms of Geomagnetic Storms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leer, Kristoffer; Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Veronig, A.;

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are known to cause geomagnetic storms on Earth. However, not all CMEs will trigger geomagnetic storms, even if they are heading towards the Earth. In this study, front side halo CMEs with speed larger than 500 km/s have been identified from the SOHO LASCO catalogue....... A subset of these halo CMEs did not cause a geomagnetic storm the following four days and have therefore been considered as false alarms. The properties of these events are investigated and discussed here. Their statistics are compared to the geo-effective CMEs. The ability to identify potential false...... alarms is considered as an important factor when forecasting geomagnetic storms. It would therefore be very helpful if there were a signature in the solar data that could indicate that a CME is a false alarm. The strength and position of associated flares have been considered as possible candidates...

  5. The Study of Two Geomagnetic Jerks in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Suqin; Yang Dongmei; Li Qi; Zhao Yongfen

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes the first differences of the annual means (annual rate) for the Y and Z components of the geomagnetic field from nine magnetic observatories in China, measured from 1985 to 2003. The 1991 jerk was obvious in the Y component measured but not clear for the Z component. Rapid changes in the Z components were ubiquitous around 2000 -2001, but not seen for the Y component. External effects were removed from the monthly means by comparing the monthly mean of the geomagnetic field components at the observatories with the monthly time series of the Ap geomagnetic index. However, some examples were analyzed and showed whether external effects were removed or not, there was no marked distinction in determining the jerks in China for the Y component and the Z component of the geomagnetic field. Finally, the isolines of the first differences of the annual means were used to analyze the spatial and temporal distributions of the jerks.

  6. Geomagnetic Variation Data - 1-Minute Remote Geophysical Observatory Network (RGON)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data file was generated as part of the International Magnetospheric Study (IMS). The file consists of values of the geomagnetic components D, H, X, Y, Z, and R...

  7. Human physiological reaction to geomagnetic disturbances of solar origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Sv.; Stoilova, I.

    2002-12-01

    During the last two decades publications about the influence of geomagnetic activity on human health increase but there are not still strong evidences for this relationship. We performed measurements and observations of 86 working volunteers during the period of autumn and spring equinox. We examined systolic, diastolic blood pressure and pulse rate. We also collected data for some personal health condition complaints. Four-way analyses of variance (MANOVA method) were employed and the influence of factors geomagnetic activity level, sequence of the days of measurements with respect to the increased geomagnetic activity, medicaments and sex was investigated. We also performed three-way analyses of variance and investigated influence of atmospheric pressure, medicaments and sex on the physiological parameters under consideration. Our investigations indicate that most of the persons examined irrespectively to their health status could be sensitive to the geomagnetic changes, which influence directly self-confidence and working ability.

  8. Concerning long-term geomagnetic variations and space climatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-H. Glassmeier

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available During geomagnetic polarity transitions the surface magnetic field of the Earth decays to about 25% and less of its present value. This implies a shrinking of the terrestrial magnetosphere and posses the question of whether magnetospheric magnetic field variations scale in the same manner. Furthermore, the geomagnetic main field also controls the magnetospheric magnetic field and space weather conditions. Long-term geomagnetic variations are thus intimately related to space climate. We critically assess existing scaling relations and derive new ones for various magnetospheric parameters. For example, we find that ring current perturbations do not increase with decreasing dipole moment. And we derive a scaling relation for the polar electrojet contribution, indicating a weak increase with increasing internal field. From this we infer that the ratio between external and internal field contributions may be weakly enhanced during polarity transitions. Our scaling relations also provide more insight on the importance of the internal geomagnetic field contribution for space climate.

  9. Remote Sensing of Geomagnetic Field and Applications to Climate Prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Selvam, A M

    2000-01-01

    Observations show that geomagnetic field lines follow closely the atmosphericcirculation patterns and that geomagnetic field variations are precursors toclimate change . The exact mechanism for the observed close relationshipbetween global geomagnetic field and the tropospheric weather patterns is notclear. In this paper a universal theory of atmospheric eddy dynamics ispresented which shows that the global geomagnetic field, atmospheric electricfield and weather systems are manifestations of a semi permanent scaleinvariant hierarchical atmospheric eddy continuum. Quantitative equations arederived to show that the full continuum of atmospheric eddies exist as aunified whole and originate from buoyant energy supply from frictionalturbulence at the planetary surface . Large eddy growth occurs from turbulencescale by the universal period doubling route to chaos . The turbulent eddiesare carried upwards on the large eddy envelopes and vertical mixing occurs bythe turbulent eddy fluctuations resulting in downward ...

  10. Research on Stealthy Headphone Detector Based on Geomagnetic Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Ya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A kind of stealth headphone detector based on geomagnetic sensor has been developed to deal with the stealth headphones which are small, extremely stealthy and hard to detect. The U.S. PNI geomagnetic sensor is chosen to obtain magnetic field considering the strong magnetic performance of stealth headphones. The earth’s magnetic field at the geomagnetic sensor is eliminated by difference between two geomagnetic sensors, and then weak variations of magnetic field is detected. STM8S103K2 is chosen as the central controlling chip, which is connected to LED, buzzer and LCD 1602. As shown by the experimental results, the probe is not liable to damage by the magnetic field and the developed device has high sensitivity, low False Positive Rate (FAR and satisfactory reliability.

  11. Geomagnetic Variations of Near-polar Regions and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchistova, Z. B.; Kutinov, Y. G.

    In polar region geomagnetic variations play active role to non-linear tectonic processes. This analysis is based on spatial-time spectral representation of geomagnetic variation and wave migration transformation. Many perturbations in electromagnetic fields may because by external factors (e.g. magnetic storms, ionosphere anomalies and other phenomena related to solar activity) "trigging" tectonic processes but having no direct relation to the processes of their preparation. Geophysical processes are responsible for perturbations in Earth's rotation and orientation on wide range of time-scale, from less than a day of millions of years. The geological structure of some sites of Earth's crust promotes occurrence of wave guides a number of geophysical fields (acoustic, seismic, electromagnetic), usually of transportation of acoustic, seismic, electromagnetic energy in Earth's crust are coincide spatially. During last 250 mln years Arctic Segment has been developing as an autonomous region with circumpolar zonality of geomagnetic fields, and mass - and-energy transfer in its bowlers as well as shitting of lithospheric plates and expansion of ocean are caused by rotation forces under of expanding planet. The dynamic structure of the geomagnetic variations may be characteriz ed by the variations of the order-chaos state. The order manifest itself in the rhythmic change of the medium state. Analysis of amplitude and phase of geomagnetic variations can be information on ecological state of regions. Geomagnetic variations is intrincically a multiscale process in time and space. One of the most important features of geomagnetic variations is multicyclic character, whish predetermined both extent and character of geomagnetic show, and specific features. Recently, there are collected many facts, show dependence between the processes in the Earth's biosphere, the elements of it, gelio- geo- physical and meteorological factors. The recent experimental data gives us opportunity

  12. Drift velocity and pressure monitoring of the CMS muon drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The drift velocity in drift tubes of the CMS muon chambers is a key parameter for the muon track reconstruction and trigger. It needs to be monitored precisely in order to detect any deviation from its nominal value. A change in absolute pressure, a variation of the gas admixture or a contamination of the chamber gas by air affect the drift velocity. Furthermore, the temperature and magnetic field influence its value. First data, taken with a dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) built by RWTH Aachen IIIA are presented. Another important parameter to be monitored is the pressure inside the muon drift tube chambers. The differential pressure must not exceed a certain value and the absolute pressure has to be kept slightly above ambient pressure to prevent air from entering into the muon drift tube chambers in case of a leak. Latest drift velocity monitoring results are discussed.

  13. Drift velocity and pressure monitoring of the CMS muon drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The drift velocity in drift tubes of the CMS muon chambers is a key parameter for the muon track reconstruction and trigger. It needs to be monitored precisely in order to detect any deviation from its nominal value. A change in absolute pressure, a variation of the gas admixture or a contamination of the chamber gas by air affect the drift velocity. Furthermore, the temperature and magnetic field influence its value. First data, taken with a dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) built by RWTH Aachen IIIA are presented. Another important parameter to be monitored is the pressure inside the muon drift tube chambers because the drift velocity depends on it. Furthermore the differential pressure must not exceed a certain value and the absolute pressure has to be kept slightly above ambient pressure to prevent air from entering into the muon drift tube chambers in case of a leak. Latest pressure monitoring results are discussed.

  14. International Geomagnetic Reference Field—the eighth generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandea, Mioara; Macmillan, Susan

    2000-12-01

    The eighth generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was adopted in 1999 by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) Division V, Working Group 8. This differs from the previous generation by the addition of the IGRF 2000 which comprises a main-field model for the epoch 2000.0 and a predictive secular-variation model for 2000.0-2005.0. This paper lists the IGRF coefficients and includes contour maps computed using IGRF 2000.

  15. Ionospheric response to great geomagnetic storms during solar cycle 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merline Matamba, Tshimangadzo; Bosco Habarulema, John

    2016-07-01

    The analyses of ionospheric responses due to great geomagnetic storms i.e. Dst index Total Electron Content (TEC) and ionosonde data over Southern and Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes were used to study the ionospheric responses. A geomagnetic latitude region of ±30° to ±46° within a longitude sector of 15° to 40° was considered. Using a criteria of Dst Physical mechanisms related to (but not limited to) composition changes and electric fields will be discussed.

  16. Geomagnetic disturbance and the orientation of nocturnally migrating birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, F R

    1977-05-06

    Free-flying passerine migrants respond to natural fluctuations in the earth's magnetic field. The variability in flight directions of nocturnal migrants is significantly correlated with increasing geomagnetic disturbance as measured by both the K index and various components of the earth's magnetic field. The results indicate that such disturbances influence the orientation of free-flying migrants, but the evidence is not sufficient to show that geomagnetism is a cue in their orientation system.

  17. Tsunami effects on the Z component of the geomagnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Klausner, Virginia; Mendes, Odim; Papa, Andres R R

    2011-01-01

    The vertical component (Z) of the geomagnetic field observed by ground-based observatories of the INTERMAGNET network has been used to analyze the effects of the movement of electrically conducting sea water through the geomagnetic field due to a propagation of a tsumani. The purpose of this work is to study the geomagnetic variations induced by the tsunamis occurred at 26 December, 2004, 27 February, 2010 and 11 March, 2011. For each case study, we selected four magnetic stations belonging to the INTERMAGNET programme that were influenced or more direct affected by the tsumani. To detect these disturbances in the geomagnetic data, the discrete wavelet technique have been used in four levels of decomposition. We were able to detect the localized behavior of the geomagnetic variations induced by the movement of electrically conducting sea-water through the geomagnetic field, i. e., the identification of transients related to the tsunamis. As well, using the minutely magnetogram data, it was able to localize th...

  18. Multifractal analysis of low-latitude geomagnetic fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. A. Bolzan

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The technique of large deviation multifractal spectrum has shown that the high-latitude (77.5° N, 69.2° W geomagnetic fluctuations can be described from direct dissipation process or loading-unloading regimes of the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling. In this paper, we analyze the H-component of low-latitude (22.4° S, 43.6° W geomagnetic field variability observed during the month of July 2000 at the Geomagnetic Observatory, Vassouras, RJ, Brazil. The variability pattern during this period is a mixture of quiet and disturbed days including the Bastille Day intense geomagnetic storm on 15 July. Due to the complexity of this data, we pursue a detailed analysis of the geomagnetic fluctuations in different time scales including a multifractal approach using the singular power spectrum deviations obtained from the wavelet transform modulus maxima (WTMM. The results suggest, as observed from high-latitude data, the occurrence of low-latitude multifractal processes driving the intermittent coupling between the solar wind-magnetosphere and geomagnetic field variations. On finer scales possible physical mechanisms in the context of nonlinear magnetosphere response are discussed.

  19. Globally strong geomagnetic field intensity circa 3000 years ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hoabin; Yu, Yongjae; Lee, Chan Hee; Kim, Ran Hee; Park, Jingyu; Doh, Seong-Jae; Kim, Wonnyon; Sung, Hyongmi

    2013-12-01

    High-fidelity geomagnetic field intensity determination was carried out using 191 baked fragments collected from 20 kilns or hearths with ages ranging between ∼1200 BC and ∼AD 1725 in South Korea. Geomagnetic field intensity variation displayed three narrow minima at ∼800-700 BC, ∼AD 700, and ∼AD 1600 and two maxima at ∼1200-1100 BC and ∼AD 1000-1100. In most time intervals, virtual axial dipole moment (VADM) variation is confined within 20% of the present VADM. However, geomagnetic field intensity circa 3000 yr ago is nearly 40% larger than the present value. Such high VADMs circa 3000 yr ago are in phase with those in other longitudinal bands in northern hemisphere centered at 5E (France), 30E (the Middle East) and 200E (Hawaii). Although strong geomagnetic field intensity circa 3000 yr ago is globally synchronous, the highest VADM occurs at slightly different time intervals in different locations. Hence it is possible that the globally strong geomagnetic field intensity circa 3000 yr ago reflects the migration of persistent hemispheric flux in northern hemisphere or an episode of geomagnetic field hemispheric asymmetry.

  20. Influence of geomagnetic activity and atmospheric pressure in hypertensive adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azcárate, T; Mendoza, B

    2017-03-30

    We performed a study of the systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure behavior under natural variables such as the atmospheric pressure and the horizontal geomagnetic field component. We worked with a group of eight adult hypertensive volunteers, four men and four women, with ages between 18 and 27 years in Mexico City during a geomagnetic storm in 2014. The data was divided by gender, age, and day/night cycle. We studied the time series using three methods: correlations, bivariate analysis, and superposed epoch (within a window of 2 days around the day of occurrence of a geomagnetic storm) analysis, between the systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the natural variables. The correlation analysis indicated a correlation between the systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the atmospheric pressure and the horizontal geomagnetic field component, being the largest during the night. Furthermore, the correlation and bivariate analyses showed that the largest correlations are between the systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the horizontal geomagnetic field component. Finally, the superposed epoch analysis showed that the largest number of significant changes in the blood pressure under the influence of geomagnetic field occurred in the systolic blood pressure for men.

  1. Effects of geomagnetic activity on the mesospheric electric fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Zadorozhny

    Full Text Available The results of three series of rocket measurements of mesospheric electric fields carried out under different geomagnetic conditions at polar and high middle latitudes are analysed. The measurements show a clear dependence of the vertical electric fields on geomagnetic activity at polar and high middle latitudes. The vertical electric fields in the lower mesosphere increase with the increase of geomagnetic indexes Kp and ∑Kp. The simultaneous increase of the vertical electric field strength and ion conductivity was observed in the mesosphere during geomagnetic disturbances. This striking phenomenon was displayed most clearly during the solar proton events of October, 1989 accompanied by very strong geomagnetic storm (Kp=8+. A possible mechanism of generation of the vertical electric fields in the mesosphere caused by gravitational sedimentation of charged aerosol particles is discussed. Simultaneous existence in the mesosphere of both the negative and positive multiply charged aerosol particles of different sizes is assumed for explanation of the observed V/m vertical electric fields and their behaviour under geomagnetically disturbed conditions.

    Keywords. Atmospheric composition and structure (aerosols and particles · Ionosphere (electric fields and currents · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (atmospheric electricity

  2. Influence of geomagnetic activity and atmospheric pressure in hypertensive adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azcárate, T.; Mendoza, B.

    2017-03-01

    We performed a study of the systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure behavior under natural variables such as the atmospheric pressure and the horizontal geomagnetic field component. We worked with a group of eight adult hypertensive volunteers, four men and four women, with ages between 18 and 27 years in Mexico City during a geomagnetic storm in 2014. The data was divided by gender, age, and day/night cycle. We studied the time series using three methods: correlations, bivariate analysis, and superposed epoch (within a window of 2 days around the day of occurrence of a geomagnetic storm) analysis, between the systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the natural variables. The correlation analysis indicated a correlation between the systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the atmospheric pressure and the horizontal geomagnetic field component, being the largest during the night. Furthermore, the correlation and bivariate analyses showed that the largest correlations are between the systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the horizontal geomagnetic field component. Finally, the superposed epoch analysis showed that the largest number of significant changes in the blood pressure under the influence of geomagnetic field occurred in the systolic blood pressure for men.

  3. GPS phase scintillation at high latitudes during the geomagnetic storm of 17-18 March 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prikryl, P.; Ghoddousi-Fard, R.; Weygand, J. M.; Viljanen, A.; Connors, M.; Danskin, D. W.; Jayachandran, P. T.; Jacobsen, K. S.; Andalsvik, Y. L.; Thomas, E. G.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Durgonics, T.; Oksavik, K.; Zhang, Y.; Spanswick, E.; Aquino, M.; Sreeja, V.

    2016-10-01

    The geomagnetic storm of 17-18 March 2015 was caused by the impacts of a coronal mass ejection and a high-speed plasma stream from a coronal hole. The high-latitude ionosphere dynamics is studied using arrays of ground-based instruments including GPS receivers, HF radars, ionosondes, riometers, and magnetometers. The phase scintillation index is computed for signals sampled at a rate of up to 100 Hz by specialized GPS scintillation receivers supplemented by the phase scintillation proxy index obtained from geodetic-quality GPS data sampled at 1 Hz. In the context of solar wind coupling to the magnetosphere-ionosphere system, it is shown that GPS phase scintillation is primarily enhanced in the cusp, the tongue of ionization that is broken into patches drawn into the polar cap from the dayside storm-enhanced plasma density, and in the auroral oval. In this paper we examine the relation between the scintillation and auroral electrojet currents observed by arrays of ground-based magnetometers as well as energetic particle precipitation observed by the DMSP satellites. Equivalent ionospheric currents are obtained from ground magnetometer data using the spherical elementary currents systems technique that has been applied over the ground magnetometer networks in North America and North Europe. The GPS phase scintillation is mapped to the poleward side of strong westward electrojet and to the edge of the eastward electrojet region. Also, the scintillation was generally collocated with fluxes of energetic electron precipitation observed by DMSP satellites with the exception of a period of pulsating aurora when only very weak currents were observed.

  4. Geomagnetic secular variation as a window on the dynamics of Earth's core (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, A.

    2010-12-01

    One of the forefront questions of planetary geophysics is to understand how magnetic fields can be spontaneously created by so-called dynamo action. Giant strides have been taken in recent years in understanding the theory of convectively driven dynamos; yet equally important is the marriage between theory and observation. I will argue that we are on the cusp of a new level of understanding brought about by new methods for incorporating observations and theory. In 1950 Sir Edward Bullard wrote an influential paper entitled "The westward drift of the Earth's magnetic field", with coauthors C Freedman, H Gellman and J Nixon. A comprehensive study of observations was tied together with the then nascent dynamo theory to infer properties of the dynamics of the core. Sixty years on, we have a much enriched understanding of the theory of convectively driven dynamos, and an even more comprehensive database of observations stretching back several centuries. Equally important are the new satellite observations that provide global coverage with unprecedented accuracy over the last decade. In this talk I will try to show how the interplay between theory and observation can lead to understanding of force balances in the core, and interactions between the core and the overlying mantle.

  5. Solving the drift control problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melda Ormeci Matoglu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We model the problem of managing capacity in a build-to-order environment as a Brownian drift control problem. We formulate a structured linear program that models a practical discretization of the problem and exploit a strong relationship between relative value functions and dual solutions to develop a functional lower bound for the continuous problem from a dual solution to the discrete problem. Refining the discretization proves a functional strong duality for the continuous problem. The linear programming formulation is so badly scaled, however, that solving it is beyond the capabilities of standard solvers. By demonstrating the equivalence between strongly feasible bases and deterministic unichain policies, we combinatorialize the pivoting process and by exploiting the relationship between dual solutions and relative value functions, develop a mechanism for solving the LP without ever computing its coefficients. Finally, we exploit the relationship between relative value functions and dual solutions to develop a scheme analogous to column generation for refining the discretization so as to drive the gap between the discrete approximation and the continuous problem to zero quickly while keeping the LP small. Computational studies show our scheme is much faster than simply solving a regular discretization of the problem both in terms of finding a policy with a low average cost and in terms of providing a lower bound on the optimal average cost.

  6. A Quaternary Geomagnetic Instability Time Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, B. S.

    2013-12-01

    Reversals and excursions of Earth's geomagnetic field create marker horizons that are readily detected in sedimentary and volcanic rocks worldwide. An accurate and precise chronology of these geomagnetic field instabilities is fundamental to understanding several aspects of Quaternary climate, dynamo processes, and surface processes. For example, stratigraphic correlation between marine sediment and polar ice records of climate change across the cryospheres benefits from a highly resolved record of reversals and excursions. The temporal patterns of dynamo behavior may reflect physical interactions between the molten outer core and the solid inner core or lowermost mantle. These interactions may control reversal frequency and shape the weak magnetic fields that arise during successive dynamo instabilities. Moreover, weakening of the axial dipole during reversals and excursions enhances the production of cosmogenic isotopes that are used in sediment and ice core stratigraphy and surface exposure dating. The Geomagnetic Instability Time Scale (GITS) is based on the direct dating of transitional polarity states recorded by lava flows using the 40Ar/39Ar method, in parallel with astrochronologic age models of marine sediments in which O isotope and magnetic records have been obtained. A review of data from Quaternary lava flows and sediments yields a GITS comprising 10 polarity reversals and 27 excursions during the past 2.6 million years. Nine of the ten reversals bounding chrons and subchrons are associated with 40Ar/39Ar ages of transitionally-magnetized lava flows. The tenth, the Guass-Matuyama chron boundary, is tightly bracketed by 40Ar/39Ar dated ash deposits. Of the 27 well-documented excursions, 14 occurred during the Matuyama chron and 13 during the Brunhes chron; 19 have been dated directly using the 40Ar/39Ar method on transitionally-magnetized volcanic rocks and form the backbone of the GITS. Excursions are clearly not the rare phenomena once thought

  7. Genetic drift of HIV populations in culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yegor Voronin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Populations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 undergo a surprisingly large amount of genetic drift in infected patients despite very large population sizes, which are predicted to be mostly deterministic. Several models have been proposed to explain this phenomenon, but all of them implicitly assume that the process of virus replication itself does not contribute to genetic drift. We developed an assay to measure the amount of genetic drift for HIV populations replicating in cell culture. The assay relies on creation of HIV populations of known size and measurements of variation in frequency of a neutral allele. Using this assay, we show that HIV undergoes approximately ten times more genetic drift than would be expected from its population size, which we defined as the number of infected cells in the culture. We showed that a large portion of the increase in genetic drift is due to non-synchronous infection of target cells. When infections are synchronized, genetic drift for the virus is only 3-fold higher than expected from its population size. Thus, the stochastic nature of biological processes involved in viral replication contributes to increased genetic drift in HIV populations. We propose that appreciation of these effects will allow better understanding of the evolutionary forces acting on HIV in infected patients.

  8. Small-scale fluctuations in barium drifts at high latitudes and associated Joule heating effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, L. D.; Larsen, M. F.

    2016-01-01

    Most previous estimates of Joule heating rates, especially the contribution of small-scale structure in the high-latitude ionosphere, have been based on incoherent scatter or coherent scatter radar measurements. An alternative estimate can be found from the plasma drifts obtained from ionized barium clouds released from sounding rockets. We have used barium drift data from three experiments to estimate Joule heating rates in the high-latitude E region for different magnetic activity levels. In particular, we are interested in the contribution of small-scale plasma drift fluctuations, corresponding to equivalent electric field fluctuations, to the local Joule heating rate on scales smaller than those typically resolved by radar or other measurements. Since Joule heating is a Lagrangian quantity, the inherently Lagrangian estimates provided by the chemical tracer measurements are a full description of the effects of electric field variance and neutral winds on the heating, differing from the Eulerian estimates of the type provided by ground-based measurements. Results suggest that the small-scale contributions to the heating can be more than a factor of 2 greater than the mean field contribution regardless of geomagnetic conditions, and at times the small-scale contribution is even larger. The high-resolution barium drift measurements, moreover, show that the fine structure in the electric field can be more variable than previous studies have reported for similar conditions. The neutral winds also affect the heating, altering the height-integrated Joule heating rates by as much as 12%, for the cases studied here, and modifying the height distribution of the heating profile as well.

  9. Pixelated CdZnTe drift detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl

    2005-01-01

    A technique, the so-called Drift Strip Method (DSM), for improving the CdZnTe detector energy response to hard X-rays and gamma-rays was applied as a pixel geometry. First tests have confirmed that this detector type provides excellent energy resolution and imaging performance. We specifically...... report on the performance of 3 mm thick prototype CZT drift pixel detectors fabricated using material from eV-products. We discuss issues associated with detector module performance. Characterization results obtained from several prototype drift pixel detectors are presented. Results of position...

  10. Collisional Drift Waves in Stellarator Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2003-10-07

    A computational study of resistive drift waves in the edge plasma of a stellarator with an helical magnetic axis is presented. Three coupled field equations, describing the collisional drift wave dynamics in the linear approximation, are solved as an initial-value problem along the magnetic field line. The magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium is obtained from a three-dimensional local equilibrium model. The use of a local magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium model allows for a computationally efficient systematic study of the impact of the magnetic field structure on drift wave stability.

  11. Current-driven electron drift solitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Ali, E-mail: aliahmad79@hotmail.com [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Shahdara Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT) Islamabad (Pakistan); Saleem, H. [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Shahdara Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT) Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2013-12-09

    The soliton formation by the current-driven drift-like wave is investigated for heavier ion (such as barium) plasma experiments planned to be performed in future. It is pointed out that the sheared flow of electrons can give rise to short scale solitary structures in the presence of stationary heavier ions. The nonlinearity appears due to convective term in the parallel equation of motion and not because of temperature gradient unlike the case of low frequency usual drift wave soliton. This higher frequency drift-like wave requires sheared flow of electrons and not the density gradient to exist.

  12. Nonlinear Gyrokinetic Theory With Polarization Drift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Wang and T.S. Hahm

    2010-03-25

    A set of the electrostatic toroidal gyrokinetic Vlasov equation and the Poisson equation, which explicitly includes the polarization drift, is derived systematically by using Lie-transform method. The polarization drift is introduced in the gyrocenter equations of motion, and the corresponding polarization density is derived. Contrary to the wide-spread expectation, the inclusion of the polarization drift in the gyrocenter equations of motion does not affect the expression for the polarization density significantly. This is due to modification of the gyrocenter phase-space volume caused by the electrostatic potential [T. S. Hahm, Phys. Plasmas 3, 4658 (1996)] .

  13. Storm time equatorial plasma bubble zonal drift reversal due to disturbance Hall electric field over the Brazilian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A. M.; Abdu, M. A.; Souza, J. R.; Sobral, J. H. A.; Batista, I. S.; Denardini, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of equatorial ionospheric plasma bubbles over Brazilian sector during two magnetic storm events are investigated in this work. The observations were made at varying phases of magnetic disturbances when the bubble zonal drift velocity was found to reverse westward from its normally eastward velocity. Calculation of the zonal drift based on a realistic low-latitude ionosphere modeled by the Sheffield University Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model showed on a quantitative basis a clear competition between vertical Hall electric field and disturbance zonal winds on the variations observed in the zonal velocity of the plasma bubble. The Hall electric field arising from enhanced ratio of field line-integrated conductivities, ΣH/ΣP, is most often generated by an increase in the integrated Hall conductivity, arising from enhanced energetic particle precipitation in the South American Magnetic Anomaly region for which evidence is provided from observation of anomalous sporadic E layers over Cachoeira Paulista and Fortaleza. Such sporadic E layers are also by themselves evidence for the development of the Hall electric field that modifies the zonal drift.

  14. The Contribution of a Geophysical Data Service: The International Service of Geomagnetic Indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Menvielle

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Geomagnetic indices are basic data in Solar-Terrestrial physics and in operational Space Weather activities. The International Service of Geomagnetic Indices (ISGI is in charge of the derivation and dissemination of the geomagnetic indices that are acknowledged by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA, an IUGG association. Institutes that are not part of ISGI started early in the Internet age to circulate on-line preliminary values of geomagnetic indices. In the absence of quality stamping, this resulted in a very confusing situation. The ISGI label was found to be the simplest and the safest way to insure quality stamping of circulated geomagnetic indices.

  15. Geomagnetism during solar cycle 23: Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Louis Zerbo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of more than 48 years of morphological analysis of yearly and monthly values of the sunspot number, the aa index, the solar wind speed and interplanetary magnetic field, we point out the particularities of geomagnetic activity during the period 1996–2009. We especially investigate the last cycle 23 and the long minimum which followed it. During this period, the lowest values of the yearly averaged IMF (3 nT and yearly averaged solar wind speed (364 km/s are recorded in 1996, and 2009 respectively. The year 2003 shows itself particular by recording the highest value of the averaged solar wind (568 km/s, associated to the highest value of the yearly averaged aa index (37 nT. We also find that observations during the year 2003 seem to be related to several coronal holes which are known to generate high-speed wind stream. From the long time (more than one century study of solar variability, the present period is similar to the beginning of twentieth century. We especially present the morphological features of solar cycle 23 which is followed by a deep solar minimum.

  16. Geomagnetism during solar cycle 23: Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbo, Jean-Louis; Amory-Mazaudier, Christine; Ouattara, Frédéric

    2013-05-01

    On the basis of more than 48 years of morphological analysis of yearly and monthly values of the sunspot number, the aa index, the solar wind speed and interplanetary magnetic field, we point out the particularities of geomagnetic activity during the period 1996-2009. We especially investigate the last cycle 23 and the long minimum which followed it. During this period, the lowest values of the yearly averaged IMF (3 nT) and yearly averaged solar wind speed (364 km/s) are recorded in 1996, and 2009 respectively. The year 2003 shows itself particular by recording the highest value of the averaged solar wind (568 km/s), associated to the highest value of the yearly averaged aa index (37 nT). We also find that observations during the year 2003 seem to be related to several coronal holes which are known to generate high-speed wind stream. From the long time (more than one century) study of solar variability, the present period is similar to the beginning of twentieth century. We especially present the morphological features of solar cycle 23 which is followed by a deep solar minimum.

  17. The Complexity of Solar and Geomagnetic Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesnell, W. Dean

    2017-08-01

    How far in advance can the sunspot number be predicted with any degree of confidence? Solar cycle predictions are needed to plan long-term space missions. Fleets of satellites circle the Earth collecting science data, protecting astronauts, and relaying information. All of these satellites are sensitive at some level to solar cycle effects. Statistical and timeseries analyses of the sunspot number are often used to predict solar activity. These methods have not been completely successful as the solar dynamo changes over time and one cycle's sunspots are not a faithful predictor of the next cycle's activity. In some ways, using these techniques is similar to asking whether the stock market can be predicted. It has been shown that the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) can be more accurately predicted during periods when it obeys certain statistical properties than at other times. The Hurst exponent is one such way to partition the data. Another measure of the complexity of a timeseries is the fractal dimension. We can use these measures of complexity to compare the sunspot number with other solar and geomagnetic indices. Our concentration is on how trends are removed by the various techniques, either internally or externally. Comparisons of the statistical properties of the various solar indices may guide us in understanding how the dynamo manifests in the various indices and the Sun.

  18. History of the Munich-Maisach-Fürstenfeldbruck Geomagnetic Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffel, H. C.

    2015-07-01

    The Munich-Maisach-Fürstenfeldbruck Geomagnetic Observatory is one of the observatories with the longest recordings of the geomagnetic field. It started with hourly measurements on 1 August 1840. The founder of the observatory in Munich was Johann von Lamont (1805-1879), the Director of the Royal Bavarian Astronomical Observatory. He had been stimulated to build his own observatory by the initiative of the Göttingen Magnetic Union founded in 1834 by Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) and Carl Friedrich Gauss (1777-1855). Before 1840 fewer than five observatories existed; the most prominent ones were those in London and Paris. At the beginning Lamont used equipment delivered by Gauss in Göttingen, but soon started to build instruments of his own design. Among them was a nonmagnetic theodolite which allowed precise geomagnetic measurements to be made also in the field. During the 1850s Lamont carried out geomagnetic surveys and produced geomagnetic maps for Germany and many other European countries. At the end of the nineteenth century accurate geomagnetic measurements in Munich became more and more disturbed by the magnetic stray fields from electric tramways and industry. During this period the quality of the data suffered and the measurements had to be interrupted several times. After a provisional solution in Maisach, a village 25 km west of Munich, a final solution could be found in the vicinity of the nearby city of Fürstenfeldbruck. Here the measurements started again on 1 January 1939. Since the 1980s the observatory has been part of INTERMAGNET, an organization providing almost real-time geomagnetic data of the highest quality.

  19. Vacuum condensates and `ether-drift' experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Consoli, M.; Pagano, A.; Pappalardo, L.

    2003-01-01

    The idea of a `condensed' vacuum state is generally accepted in modern elementary particle physics. We argue that this should motivate a new generation of precise `ether-drift' experiments with present-day technology.

  20. An analytical model of iceberg drift

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Till J W; Eisenman, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Iceberg drift and decay and the associated freshwater release are increasingly seen as important processes in Earth's climate system, yet a detailed understanding of their dynamics has remained elusive. Here, an idealized model of iceberg drift is presented. The model is designed to include the most salient physical processes that determine iceberg motion while remaining sufficiently simple to facilitate physical insight into iceberg drift dynamics. We derive an analytical solution of the model, which helps build understanding and also enables the rapid computation of large numbers of iceberg trajectories. The long-standing empirical rule of thumb that icebergs drift at 2% of the wind velocity, relative to the ocean current, is derived here from physical first principles, and it is shown that this relation only holds in the limit of strong winds or small icebergs, which approximately applies for typical icebergs in the Arctic. It is demonstrated that the opposite limit of weak winds or large icebergs approxim...

  1. Stabilization Strategies for Drift Tube Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2085420; Lamehi Rashti, Mohammad

    The average axial electric fields in drift tube linac cavities are known to be sensitive with respect to the perturbation errors. Postcoupler is a powerful stabilizer devices that is used to reduce this sensitivity of average axial field. Postcouplers are the cylindrical rod which is extended from cavity wall toward the drift tube without touching the drift tube surface. Postcouplers need to be adjusted to the right length to stabilize the average axial field. Although postcouplers are used successfully in many projects, there is no straightforward procedure for postcouplers adjustment and it has been done almost based on trial and errors. In this thesis, the physics and characteristics of postcouplers has been studied by using an equivalent circuit model and 3D finite element method calculations. Finally, a straightforward and accurate method to adjust postcouplers has been concluded. The method has been verified by using experimental measurements on CERN Linac4 drift tube linac cavities.

  2. CROSS DRIFT ALCOVE/NICHE UTILITIES ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Goodin

    1999-07-08

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide the design basis and general arrangement requirements of the non-potable water, waste water, compressed air and ventilation (post excavation) utilities required in support of the Cross Drift alcoves and niches.

  3. The Electron Drift Instrument for MMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Granoff, M.; Widholm, M.; Gaidos, J. A.; Briggs, B. H.; Dors, I. G.; Chutter, M. W.; Macri, J.; Argall, M.; Bodet, D.; Needell, J.; Steller, M. B.; Baumjohann, W.; Nakamura, R.; Plaschke, F.; Ottacher, H.; Hasiba, J.; Hofmann, K.; Kletzing, C. A.; Bounds, S. R.; Dvorsky, R. T.; Sigsbee, K.; Kooi, V.

    2016-03-01

    The Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) on the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission measures the in-situ electric and magnetic fields using the drift of a weak beam of test electrons that, when emitted in certain directions, return to the spacecraft after one or more gyrations. This drift is related to the electric field and, to a lesser extent, the gradient in the magnetic field. Although these two quantities can be determined separately by use of different electron energies, for MMS regions of interest the magnetic field gradient contribution is negligible. As a by-product of the drift determination, the magnetic field strength and constraints on its direction are also determined. The present paper describes the scientific objectives, the experimental method, and the technical realization of the various elements of the instrument on MMS.

  4. Nonlinear electrostatic drift Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Avadhesh C.; Srivastava, Krishna M.

    1993-01-01

    Nonlinear analysis of electrostatic drift Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is performed. It is shown that the analysis leads to the propagation of the weakly nonlinear dispersive waves, and the nonlinear behavior is governed by the nonlinear Burger's equation.

  5. Self-shielding flex-circuit drift tube, drift tube assembly and method of making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, David Alexander

    2016-04-26

    The present disclosure is directed to an ion mobility drift tube fabricated using flex-circuit technology in which every other drift electrode is on a different layer of the flex-circuit and each drift electrode partially overlaps the adjacent electrodes on the other layer. This results in a self-shielding effect where the drift electrodes themselves shield the interior of the drift tube from unwanted electro-magnetic noise. In addition, this drift tube can be manufactured with an integral flex-heater for temperature control. This design will significantly improve the noise immunity, size, weight, and power requirements of hand-held ion mobility systems such as those used for explosive detection.

  6. The Bipolar Quantum Drift-diffusion Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu Qing CHEN; Li CHEN

    2009-01-01

    A fourth order parabolic system, the bipolar quantum drift-diffusion model in semiconductor simulation, with physically motivated Dirichlet-Neumann boundary condition is studied in this paper. By semidiscretization in time and compactness argument, the global existence and semiclassical limit are obtained, in which semiclassical limit describes the relation between quantum and classical drift-diffusion models. Furthermore, in the case of constant doping, we prove the weak solution exponentially approaches its constant steady state as time increases to infinity.

  7. Drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovic, M.; Melchior, H.

    1968-01-01

    A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated.......A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated....

  8. Strange Attractors in Drift Wave Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2003-04-25

    A multi-grid part-in-cell algorithm for a shearless slab drift wave model with kinetic electrons is presented. The algorithm, which is based on an exact separation of adiabatic and nonadiabatic electron responses, is used to investigate the presence of strange attractors in drift wave turbulence. Although the simulation model has a large number of degrees of freedom, it is found that the strange attractor is low-dimensional and that it is strongly affected by dissipative (collisional) effects.

  9. A study of geomagnetic field variations along the 80° S geomagnetic parallel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepidi, Stefania; Cafarella, Lili; Francia, Patrizia; Piancatelli, Andrea; Pietrolungo, Manuela; Santarelli, Lucia; Urbini, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    The availability of measurements of the geomagnetic field variations in Antarctica at three sites along the 80° S geomagnetic parallel, separated by approximately 1 h in magnetic local time, allows us to study the longitudinal dependence of the observed variations. In particular, using 1 min data from Mario Zucchelli Station, Scott Base and Talos Dome, a temporary installation during 2007-2008 Antarctic campaign, we investigated the diurnal variation and the low-frequency fluctuations (approximately in the Pc5 range, ˜ 1-7 mHz). We found that the daily variation is clearly ordered by local time, suggesting a predominant effect of the polar extension of midlatitude ionospheric currents. On the other hand, the pulsation power is dependent on magnetic local time maximizing around magnetic local noon, when the stations are closer to the polar cusp, while the highest coherence between pairs of stations is observed in the magnetic local nighttime sector. The wave propagation direction observed during selected events, one around local magnetic noon and the other around local magnetic midnight, is consistent with a solar-wind-driven source in the daytime and with substorm-associated processes in the nighttime.

  10. Simulation of low latitude ionospheric response to 2015 St. Patrick's Day super geomagnetic storm over Indian longitude sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan Joshi, Lalit; Sripathi, Samireddipelle; Singh, Ram

    2016-07-01

    We present low latitude ionospheric response over Indian longitude to the recent super geomagnetic storm of 17 March 2015, using the SAMI2 model which incorporates ionosonde derived vertical drift impacted by prompt penetration eastward electric field occurring during the evening Prereversal Enhancement (PRE) in the vertical drift. The importance of this storm is that (a) Dst reaches as low as -228 nT and (b) prompt penetration of eastward electric field coincided with evening hours PRE. The daytime vertical EXB drifts in the SAMI2 model are, however, considered based on Scherliess-Fejer model. The simulations indicate a significant enhancement in F layer height and equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) in the post sunset hours on 17 March 2015 vis-a-vis quiet day. The model simulations during recovery phase, considering disturbance dynamo vertical EXB drift along with equatorward disturbance wind, indicates suppression of the daytime EIA. SAMI2 simulations considering the disturbance wind during the recovery phase suggests that equatorward wind enhances the ionospheric density in the low latitude, however, its role in the formation of the EIA depends on the polarity of the zonal electric field. Comparison of model derived total electron content (TEC) with the TEC from ground GPS receivers indicate that model does reproduce enhancement of the EIA during the main phase and suppression of the EIA during the recovery phase of the super storm. However, peculiarities pertaining to the ionospheric response to prompt penetration electric field in the Indian sector vis-a-vis earlier reports from American sector will be discussed.

  11. Intensity of the geomagnetic field in western Europe over the past 2000 years: New data from ancient French pottery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genevey, AgnèS.; Gallet, Yves

    2002-11-01

    We studied 14 groups of French pottery fragments dated between the 4th and 16th centuries. The potsherds were analyzed using the [1959] method, revised by [1967]. Intensity values were corrected for thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) anisotropy and cooling rate dependence of TRM acquisition. We first analyzed modern ceramics produced following ancient techniques and fired in a wood-burning kiln inside of which field intensity was measured. The recovered mean intensity is within ˜3% of the expected value, which proves the reliability of our experimental procedure. Thermal experiments carried out at rapid and slow cooling rates clearly indicate that the cooling rate correction is critical in archeointensity studies. Our data indicate that large variations in intensity occurred in France over the last 2000 years. Two relative maxima in intensity are observed, one between the 8th and 10th centuries and the second between the 14th and 15th centuries. Similarities are observed between the archeointensity data from France and Ukraine, yielding some evidence for eastward drift of geomagnetic sources between western and eastern Europe from A.D. 800 to A.D. 1700. We also show that the dipole moment evolution proposed by [1982] and [2000] for the last two millennia is likely biased toward higher values, mainly because of the absence of correction for the cooling rate dependence of TRM acquisition in most published archeointensity studies. We finally underline a possible relationship, valid at least in western Europe, between changes in direction and intensity of the geomagnetic field.

  12. Thermodynamics Insights for the Redshift Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Jian; Liu, Wen-Biao

    2015-01-01

    The secular redshift drift is a potential measurement to directly probe the cosmic expansion. Previous study on the redshift drift mainly focused on the model-dependent simulation. Apparently, the physical insights on the redshift drift are very necessary. So in this paper, it is investigated using thermodynamics on the apparent, Hubble and event horizons. Thermodynamics could analytically present the model-independent upper bounds of redshift drift. For specific assumption on the cosmological parameters, we find that the thermodynamics bounds are nearly one order of magnitude larger than the expectation in standard ΛCDM model. We then examine ten observed redshift drift from Green Bank Telescope at redshift 0.09 < z < 0.69, and find that these observational results are inconsistent with the thermodynamics. The size of the errorbars on these measurements is about three orders of magnitude larger than the effect of thermodynamical bounds for the redshift drift. Obviously, we have not yet hit any instrumental systematics at the shift level of 1m s-1 yr-1.

  13. Suppressing drift chamber diffusion without magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Martoff, C J; Ohnuki, T; Spooner, N J C; Lehner, M

    2000-01-01

    The spatial resolution in drift chamber detectors for ionizing radiation is limited by diffusion of the primary electrons. A strong magnetic field along the drift direction is often applied (Fancher et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 161 (1979) 383) because it suppresses the transverse diffusion, improving the resolution but at considerable increase in cost and complexity. Here we show that transverse track diffusion can be strongly suppressed without any magnetic field. This is achieved by using a gas additive which reversibly captures primary ionization electrons, forming negative ions. The ions drift with thermal energies even at very high drift fields and low pressures (E/P=28.5 V/cm torr), and the diffusion decreases with increasing drift field. Upon arrival at the avalanche region of the chamber the negative ions are efficiently stripped and ordinary avalanche gain is obtained. Using this technique, r.m.s. transverse diffusion less than 200 mu m has been achieved over a 15 cm drift path at 40 torr with ze...

  14. Calibration of the CMS Drift Tube Chambers and Measurement of the Drift Velocity with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00165402; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; 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    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the calibration procedure for the drift tubes of the CMS barrel muon system and reports the main results obtained with data collected during a high statistics cosmic ray data-taking period. The main goal of the calibration is to determine, for each drift cell, the minimum time delay for signals relative to the trigger, accounting for the drift velocity within the cell. The accuracy of the calibration procedure is influenced by the random arrival time of cosmic muons. A more refined analysis of the drift velocity was performed during the offline reconstruction phase, which takes into account this feature of cosmic ray events.

  15. Calibration of the CMS Drift Tube Chambers and Measurement of the Drift Velocity with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; Pinto, C; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Rajan, R; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Roselli, G; Selvaggi, G; Shinde, Y; Silvestris, L; Tupputi, S; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Bacchi, W; Benvenuti, A C; Boldini, M; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Cafaro, V D; Caiazza, S S; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; D'Antone, I; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Giunta, M; Grandi, C; Guerzoni, M; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Odorici, F; Pellegrini, G; Perrotta, A; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G; Torromeo, G; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Costa, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Broccolo, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Gallo, E; Genta, C; Landi, G; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Colonna, D; Fabbri, F; Giardoni, M; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Ponzio, B; Russo, A; Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Benaglia, A; Calloni, M; Cerati, G B; D'Angelo, P; De Guio, F; Farina, F M; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malberti, M; Malvezzi, S; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Miccio, V; Moroni, L; Negri, P; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Pullia, A; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Sala, S; Salerno, R; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tancini, V; Taroni, S; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Cimmino, A; De Gruttola, M; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Lomidze, D; Noli, P; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Barcellan, L; Bellan, P; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Biasotto, M; Bisello, D; Borsato, E; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Castellani, L; Checchia, P; Conti, E; Dal Corso, F; De Mattia, M; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Fanzago, F; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gonella, F; Gresele, A; Gulmini, M; Kaminskiy, A; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Maron, G; Mattiazzo, S; Mazzucato, M; Meneghelli, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Nespolo, M; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Perrozzi, L; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; Simonetto, F; Toniolo, N; Torassa, E; Tosi, M; Triossi, A; Vanini, S; Ventura, S; Zotto, P; Zumerle, G; Baesso, P; Berzano, U; Bricola, S; Necchi, M M; Pagano, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Vicini, A; Vitulo, P; Viviani, C; Aisa, D; Aisa, S; Babucci, E; Biasini, M; Bilei, G M; Caponeri, B; Checcucci, B; Dinu, N; Fanò, L; Farnesini, L; Lariccia, P; Lucaroni, A; Mantovani, G; Nappi, A; Piluso, A; Postolache, V; Santocchia, A; Servoli, L; Tonoiu, D; Vedaee, A; Volpe, R; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bernardini, J; Berretta, L; Boccali, T; Bocci, A; Borrello, L; Bosi, F; Calzolari, F; Castaldi, R; Dell'Orso, R; Fiori, F; Foà, L; Gennai, S; Giassi, A; Kraan, A; Ligabue, F; Lomtadze, T; Mariani, F; Martini, L; Massa, M; Messineo, A; Moggi, A; Palla, F; Palmonari, F; Petragnani, G; Petrucciani, G; Raffaelli, F; Sarkar, S; Segneri, G; Serban, A T; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Tolaini, S; Tonelli, G; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Baccaro, S; Barone, L; Bartoloni, A; Cavallari, F; Dafinei, I; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Diemoz, M; Franci, D; Longo, E; Organtini, G; Palma, A; Pandolfi, F; Paramatti, R; Pellegrino, F; Rahatlou, S; Rovelli, C; Alampi, G; Amapane, N; Arcidiacono, R; Argiro, S; Arneodo, M; Biino, C; Borgia, M A; Botta, C; Cartiglia, N; Castello, R; Cerminara, G; Costa, M; Dattola, D; Dellacasa, G; Demaria, N; Dughera, G; Dumitrache, F; Graziano, A; Mariotti, C; Marone, M; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Mila, G; Monaco, V; Musich, M; Nervo, M; Obertino, M M; Oggero, S; Panero, R; Pastrone, N; Pelliccioni, M; Romero, A; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Trapani, P P; Trocino, D; Vilela Pereira, A; Visca, L; Zampieri, A; Ambroglini, F; Belforte, S; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Gobbo, B; Penzo, A; Chang, S; Chung, J; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kong, D J; Park, H; Son, D C; Bahk, S Y; Song, S; Jung, S Y; Hong, B; Kim, H; Kim, J H; Lee, K S; Moon, D H; Park, S K; Rhee, H B; Sim, K S; Kim, J; Choi, M; Hahn, G; Park, I C; Choi, S; Choi, Y; Goh, J; Jeong, H; Kim, T J; Lee, J; Lee, S; Janulis, M; Martisiute, D; Petrov, P; Sabonis, T; Castilla Valdez, H; Sánchez Hernández, A; Carrillo Moreno, S; Morelos Pineda, A; Allfrey, P; Gray, R N C; Krofcheck, D; Bernardino Rodrigues, N; Butler, P H; Signal, T; Williams, J C; Ahmad, M; Ahmed, I; Ahmed, W; Asghar, M I; Awan, M I M; Hoorani, H R; Hussain, I; Khan, W A; Khurshid, T; Muhammad, S; Qazi, S; Shahzad, H; Cwiok, M; Dabrowski, R; Dominik, W; Doroba, K; Konecki, M; Krolikowski, J; Pozniak, K; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Zabolotny, W; Zych, P; Frueboes, T; Gokieli, R; Goscilo, L; Górski, M; Kazana, M; Nawrocki, K; Szleper, M; Wrochna, G; Zalewski, P; Almeida, N; Antunes Pedro, L; Bargassa, P; David, A; Faccioli, P; Ferreira Parracho, P G; Freitas Ferreira, M; Gallinaro, M; Guerra Jordao, M; Martins, P; Mini, G; Musella, P; Pela, J; Raposo, L; Ribeiro, P Q; Sampaio, S; Seixas, J; Silva, J; Silva, P; Soares, D; Sousa, M; Varela, J; Wöhri, H K; Altsybeev, I; Belotelov, I; Bunin, P; Ershov, Y; Filozova, I; Finger, M; Finger, M Jr; Golunov, A; Golutvin, I; Gorbounov, N; Kalagin, V; Kamenev, A; Karjavin, V; Konoplyanikov, V; Korenkov, V; Kozlov, G; Kurenkov, A; Lanev, A; Makankin, A; Mitsyn, V V; Moisenz, P; Nikonov, E; Oleynik, D; Palichik, V; Perelygin, V; Petrosyan, A; Semenov, R; Shmatov, S; Smirnov, V; Smolin, D; Tikhonenko, E; Vasil'ev, S; Vishnevskiy, A; Volodko, A; Zarubin, A; Zhiltsov, V; Bondar, N; Chtchipounov, L; Denisov, A; Gavrikov, Y; Gavrilov, G; Golovtsov, V; Ivanov, Y; Kim, V; Kozlov, V; Levchenko, P; Obrant, G; Orishchin, E; Petrunin, A; Shcheglov, Y; Shchetkovskiy, A; Sknar, V; Smirnov, I; Sulimov, V; Tarakanov, V; Uvarov, L; Vavilov, S; Velichko, G; Volkov, S; Vorobyev, A; Andreev, Yu; Anisimov, A; Antipov, P; Dermenev, A; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Kirsanov, M; Krasnikov, N; Matveev, V; Pashenkov, A; Postoev, V E; Solovey, A; Solovey, A; Toropin, A; Troitsky, S; Baud, A; Epshteyn, V; Gavrilov, V; Ilina, N; Kaftanov, V; Kolosov, V; Kossov, M; Krokhotin, A; Kuleshov, S; Oulianov, A; Safronov, G; Semenov, S; Shreyber, I; Stolin, V; Vlasov, E; Zhokin, A; Boos, E; Dubinin, M; Dudko, L; Ershov, A; Gribushin, A; Klyukhin, V; Kodolova, O; Lokhtin, I; Petrushanko, S; Sarycheva, L; Savrin, V; Snigirev, A; Vardanyan, I; Dremin, I; Kirakosyan, M; Konovalova, N; Rusakov, S V; Vinogradov, A; Akimenko, S; Artamonov, A; Azhgirey, I; Bitioukov, S; Burtovoy, V; Grishin, V; Kachanov, V; Konstantinov, D; Krychkine, V; Levine, A; Lobov, I; Lukanin, V; Mel'nik, Y; Petrov, V; Ryutin, R; Slabospitsky, S; Sobol, A; Sytine, A; Tourtchanovitch, L; Troshin, S; Tyurin, N; Uzunian, A; Volkov, A; Adzic, P; Djordjevic, M; Jovanovic, D; Krpic, D; Maletic, D; Puzovic, J; Smiljkovic, N; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Alberdi, J; Alcaraz Maestre, J; Arce, P; Barcala, J M; Battilana, C; Burgos Lazaro, C; Caballero Bejar, J; Calvo, E; Cardenas Montes, M; Cepeda, M; Cerrada, M; Chamizo Llatas, M; Clemente, F; Colino, N; Daniel, M; De La Cruz, B; Delgado Peris, A; Diez Pardos, C; Fernandez Bedoya, C; Fernández Ramos, J P; Ferrando, A; Flix, J; 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Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the calibration procedure for the drift tubes of the CMS barrel muon system and reports the main results obtained with data collected during a high statistics cosmic ray data-taking period. The main goal of the calibration is to determine, for each drift cell, the minimum time delay for signals relative to the trigger, accounting for the drift velocity within the cell. The accuracy of the calibration procedure is influenced by the random arrival time of cosmic muons. A more refined analysis of the drift velocity was performed during the offline reconstruction phase, which takes into account this feature of cosmic ray events.

  16. Historically Large Geomagnetic Storms and Potential Electric Power Grid Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappenman, J. G.

    2004-05-01

    While recent work has been done to examine the possible Dst Intensity of historically large geomagnetic storms, the impacts caused to modern day electric power grids from these storms occurs due to rapid rate-of-change of regional geomagnetic fields which in most cases are driven by large ionospheric electrojet current intensifications. These temporally and spatially dynamic disturbance morphologies are not well-characterized by Dst or other broad geomagnetic storm indices. For estimates of storm intensity that correctly scale the threat potential to electric power grids, it is necessary to describe the rate-of-change of geomagnetic field. The rate-of-change of the geomagnetic field (dB/dt usually measured in nT/min) creates at ground level a geoelectric field that causes the flow of geomagnetically-induced currents (GIC) through ground connection points in electric power grids. Therefore in general, the larger the dB/dt, the larger the resulting geo-electric field and GIC in exposed power grid infrastructures and the greater the operational impact these induced currents will have on the power grid. Both extensive modeling analysis and recent operational experience suggests that power grids are becoming more vulnerable to geomagnetic storms as they grow in size and complexity. Also, large power grid blackouts have occurred at relatively low geomagnetic storm intensities. For example, the regional disturbance intensity that triggered the Hydro Quebec collapse during the March 13, 1989 Superstorm only reached an intensity of 479 nT/min. Large numbers of power system impacts in the United States were also observed for intensities that ranged from 300 to 600 nT/min during this storm. Yet both recent and historical data indicate that storms with disturbance levels that range from 2000 nT/min to as much ~5000 nT/min may be possible over extensive regions at latitudes of concern for large continental power grids across North America and Europe. Large GIC have also been

  17. Intensity of the geomagnetic field in Europe for the last 3 ka: Influence of data quality on geomagnetic field modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavón-Carrasco, Francisco Javier; Gómez-Paccard, Miriam; Hervé, Gwenaël.; Osete, María. Luisa; Chauvin, Annick

    2014-06-01

    of the main challenges of paleomagnetic research is to obtain high-resolution geomagnetic field intensity reconstructions. For the last millennia, these reconstructions are mostly based on archeomagnetic data. However, the quality of the intensity data available in the databases is very variable, and the high scatter observed in the records clearly suggests that some of them might not be reliable. In this work we investigate how the geomagnetic field intensity reconstructions and, hence, our present knowledge of the geomagnetic field in the past, are affected by the quality of the data selected for modeling the Earth's magnetic field. For this purpose we rank the European archeointensity data in four quality categories following widely accepted paleomagnetic criteria based on the methodology used during the laboratory treatment of the samples and on the number of specimens retained to calculate the mean intensities. Four geomagnetic field regional models have been implemented by applying the revised spherical cap harmonic analysis to these four groups of input data. Geomagnetic field models strongly depend on the used data set. The model built using all the available data (without any preselection) appears to be the less accurate, indicating some internal inconsistencies of the data set. In addition, some features of this model are clearly dominated by the less reliable archeointensity data, suggesting that such features might not reflect real variations of the past geomagnetic field. On the contrary, the regional model built on selected high-quality intensity data shows a very consistent intensity pattern at the European scale, confirming that the main intensity changes observed in Europe in the recent history of the geomagnetic field occurred at the continental scale.

  18. Chandler wobbles and the geomagnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flodmark, Stig; Davstad, K.

    1986-11-01

    Paleomagnetic motion of the magnetic pole is explained by angular momentum balance between the magnetic field, inner core, outer core, and mantle. The Chandler wobbles are explained as a nutation of the mantle and crust, caused by transfer of angular momentum between the core and mantle. Evidence is found for the atmosphere not to be fully responsible for the annual oscillation period of the Chandler wobbles. The main reasons for the principal periods of 12 and 14 months are found to be the flattenings of mantle and core, respectively. The fluid core rotates collectively, as a consequence of globally coworking long-distance electromagnetic coupling. Short-distance forces may locally displace fluid core material without essentially deforming its ellipsoid of inertia. The longitudinal polar drifts of the mantle and outer core are also explained by core-mantle interaction. The core is found to force the Chandler period on the mantle, and it has high wobbling energy in comparison with the mantle.

  19. Improving geomagnetic observatory data in the South Atlantic Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzka, Jürgen; Morschhauser, Achim; Brando Soares, Gabriel; Pinheiro, Katia

    2016-04-01

    The Swarm mission clearly proofs the benefit of coordinated geomagnetic measurements from a well-tailored constellation in order to recover as good as possible the contributions of the various geomagnetic field sources. A similar truth applies to geomagnetic observatories. Their scientific value can be maximised by properly arranging the position of individual observatories with respect to the geometry of the external current systems in the ionosphere and magnetosphere, with respect to regions of particular interest for secular variation, and with respect to regions of anomalous electric conductivity in the ground. Here, we report on our plans and recent efforts to upgrade geomagnetic observatories and to recover unpublished data from geomagnetic observatories at low latitudes in the South Atlantic Anomaly. In particular, we target the magnetic equator with the equatorial electrojet and low latitudes to characterise the Sq- and ring current. The observatory network that we present allows also to study the longitudinal structure of these external current systems. The South Atlantic Anomaly region is very interesting due to its secular variation. We will show newly recovered data and comparisons with existing data sets. On the technical side, we introduce low-power data loggers. In addition, we use mobile phone data transfer, which is rapidly evolving in the region and allows timely data access and quality control at remote sites that previously were not connected to the internet.

  20. Intermittency and multifractional Brownian character of geomagnetic time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Consolini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Earth's magnetosphere exhibits a complex behavior in response to the solar wind conditions. This behavior, which is described in terms of mutifractional Brownian motions, could be the consequence of the occurrence of dynamical phase transitions. On the other hand, it has been shown that the dynamics of the geomagnetic signals is also characterized by intermittency at the smallest temporal scales. Here, we focus on the existence of a possible relationship in the geomagnetic time series between the multifractional Brownian motion character and the occurrence of intermittency. In detail, we investigate the multifractional nature of two long time series of the horizontal intensity of the Earth's magnetic field as measured at L'Aquila Geomagnetic Observatory during two years (2001 and 2008, which correspond to different conditions of solar activity. We propose a possible double origin of the intermittent character of the small-scale magnetic field fluctuations, which is related to both the multifractional nature of the geomagnetic field and the intermittent character of the disturbance level. Our results suggest a more complex nature of the geomagnetic response to solar wind changes than previously thought.

  1. Features of the Geomagnetic Variations In the Moscow Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riabova, Svetlana; Spivak, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    The results of instrumental observations indicate the presence of significant amplitude variations in Earth's magnetic field. The data obtained in the research of geomagnetic variations allow us to not only establish and classify their sources, but also to form the basis for the improvement and development of new source models of magnetospheric and ionospheric disturbances, new methods of magnetotelluric and magnetovariational sensing and diagnostic methods of geodynamic state of the Earth's crust and the research of meteorological processes in the atmosphere. In this research we used the results of instrumental observations of geomagnetic field, carried out in the period of 2009 - 2015 at Geophysical Observatory "Mikhnevo" of Institute of Geosphere Dynamics of Russian Academy of Sciences. The observatory (54,960N; 37,774E) is located in the Moscow region. The analysis shows that in general the geophysical situation in the Moscow region is disturbed. The tendency to increasing in geomagnetic activity over time is established (the number of days with a perturbed state of the geomagnetic field is increased by 7.6 times during the period of 2009 - 2015). Repeatability of geomagnetic disturbances is characterized by clearly pronounced periodicity with characteristic periods of about 14, 27, 60, 182 and 365 days.

  2. Kristian Birkeland's pioneering investigations of geomagnetic disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, A.; Burke, W. J.

    2010-04-01

    More than 100 years ago Kristian Birkeland (1967-1917) addressed questions that had vexed scientists for centuries. Why do auroras appear overhead while the Earth's magnetic field is disturbed? Are magnetic storms on Earth related to disturbances on the Sun? To answer these questions Birkeland devised terrella simulations, led coordinated campaigns in the Arctic wilderness, and then interpreted his results in the light of Maxwell's synthesis of laws governing electricity and magnetism. After analyzing thousands of magnetograms, he divided disturbances into 3 categories: 1. Polar elementary storms are auroral-latitude disturbances now called substorms. 2. Equatorial perturbations correspond to initial and main phases of magnetic storms. 3. Cyclo-median perturbations reflect enhanced solar-quiet currents on the dayside. He published the first two-cell pattern of electric currents in Earth's upper atmosphere, nearly 30 years before the ionosphere was identified as a separate entity. Birkeland's most enduring contribution toward understanding geomagnetic disturbances flowed from his recognition that field-aligned currents must connect the upper atmosphere with generators in distant space. The existence of field-aligned currents was vigorously debated among scientists for more than 50 years. Birkeland's conjecture profoundly affects present-day understanding of auroral phenomena and global electrodynamics. In 1896, four years after Lord Kelvin rejected suggestions that matter passes between the Sun and Earth, and two years before the electron was discovered, Birkeland proposed current carriers are "electric corpuscles from the Sun" and "the auroras are formed by corpuscular rays drawn in from space, and coming from the Sun". It can be reasonably argued that the year 1896 marks the founding of space plasma physics. Many of Birkeland's insights were rooted in observations made during his terrella experiments, the first attempts to simulate cosmic phenomena within a

  3. Determination of geomagnetic archaeomagnitudes from clay pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Games, K. P.; Baker, M. E.

    1981-02-01

    Archaeomagnitude determinations of a selection of clay pipes dateable to AD 1645+/-10 as well as studies of pottery samples from the same site and of the same age have been made. Values of the magnitude of the ancient magnetic field (Banc), were obtained from two pottery sherds, two pipe bowls and three pipe stems. The values from the sherds and bowls agree within 2% and compare well with the average value of the magnitude of the magnetic field for the seventeenth century as determined by other archaeomagnetic studies. However, the pipe stems give values of Banc which are significantly less than those from the bowls and pottery. We have not yet been able to explain this and thus we suggest that reliable archaeomagnitude determinations can be made from the bowls of clay pipes but not from the stems. Nevertheless, this result provides a new source of material for investigating variations in the geomagnetic field strength over the past 400 yr. Clay pipes have been manufactured in England since the end of the sixteenth century. In the firing process some pipes were broken and disposed of without ever having been smoked. One such collection, discovered at Rainford, Lancashire, in 1978, consisted of a series of discrete dumps including pipes, kiln debris and a small collection of contemporary used earthenware sherds. The internal consideration of the dumps suggested a very short period of activity and archaeologists (P. Davey, personal communication) ascribe all the material to the period 1645+/-10 yr. With such well-dated material, we set out to check whether or not reliable archaeomagnitudes could be obtained from the pipes.

  4. Airport geomagnetic surveys in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berarducci, A.

    2006-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the United States military have requirements for design, location, and construction of compass calibration pads (compass roses), these having been developed through collaboration with US Geological Survey (USGS) personnel. These requirements are detailed in the FAA Advisory Circular AC 150/5300-13, Appendix 4, and in various military documents, such as Handbook 1021/1, but the major requirement is that the range of declination measured within 75 meters of the center of a compass rose be less than or equal to 30 minutes of arc. The USGS Geomagnetism Group has developed specific methods for conducting a magnetic survey so that existing compass roses can be judged in terms of the needed standards and also that new sites can be evaluated for their suitability as potentially new compass roses. First, a preliminary survey is performed with a total-field magnetometer, with differences over the site area of less than 75nT being sufficient to warrant additional, more detailed surveying. Next, a number of survey points are established over the compass rose area and nearby, where declination is to be measured with an instrument capable of measuring declination to within 1 minute of arc, such as a Gurley transit magnetometer, DI Flux theodolite magnetometer, or Wild T-0. The data are corrected for diurnal and irregular effects of the magnetic field and declination is determined for each survey point, as well as declination range and average of the entire compass rose site. Altogether, a typical survey takes about four days to complete. ?? 2006 Springer.

  5. Examining the contributions to the longitudinal variation of the low latitude upward ExB drift as simulated by TIME-GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maute, A.; Richmond, A. D.; Hagan, M. E.; Roble, R. G.

    2010-12-01

    In the last several years space-borne observations of ionospheric and thermospheric densities as well as neutral winds have shown that there is a strong longitudinal variation even during geomagnetically quiet times. Studies have confirmed that many of these variations can be connected to the propagation of non-migrating tides which are excited in the troposphere. One mechanism to get the tidal signature from the lower thermosphere up to F-region altitude is via electrodynamic coupling due to wind driven current. It is therefore important to understand what is contributing to the longitudinal variation of the upward ExB drift at different local times. Sources of longitudinal variation include not only the neutral wind but also gravity-driven current, the geomagnetic field configuration and the conductivities. In this study we analyze the relative importance of these different sources using results from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation model (TIME-GCM) forced by the Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM02) at the lower boundary (ca. 30 km). We focus on geomagnetic quiescent conditions. The model can reproduce part of the observed longitudinal variation. We find that the importance of the different sources strongly depends on the local time. As expected, the neutral winds below 120 km contribute the most to the longitudinal variation, but mainly during the day. However, even during the day neutral winds above 120 km are very important. The relative importance of zonal and meridional winds depends on the altitude and the local time. The upward drift at night is very sensitive to changes in the geomagnetic field configuration; however, this effect is minor during the day.

  6. Concentrated Hitting Times of Randomized Search Heuristics with Variable Drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehre, Per Kristian; Witt, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    these results handle a position-dependent (variable) drift that was not covered by previous drift theorems with tail bounds. Moreover, our theorem can be specialized into virtually all existing drift theorems with drift towards the target from the literature. Finally, user-friendly specializations...

  7. Report of geomagnetic pulsation indices for space weather applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z.; Gannon, Jennifer L.; Rigler, Erin J.

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon of ultra-low frequency geomagnetic pulsations was first observed in the ground-based measurements of the 1859 Carrington Event and has been studied for over 100 years. Pulsation frequency is considered to be “ultra” low when it is lower than the natural frequencies of the plasma, such as the ion gyrofrequency. Ultra-low frequency pulsations are considered a source of noise in some geophysical analysis techniques, such as aeromagnetic surveys and transient electromagnetics, so it is critical to develop near real-time space weather products to monitor these geomagnetic pulsations. The proper spectral analysis of magnetometer data, such as using wavelet analysis techniques, can also be important to Geomagnetically Induced Current risk assessment.

  8. Wavelet Analysis on Solar Wind Parameters and Geomagnetic Indices

    CERN Document Server

    Katsavrias, Ch; Moussas, X

    2012-01-01

    The sun as an oscillator produces frequencies which propagate in the heliosphere, via solar wind, to the terrestrial magnetosphere. We searched for those frequencies in the parameters of the near Earth solar plasma and the geomagnetic indices for the past four solar cycles. The solar wind parameters used in this work are the interplanetary magnetic field, plasma beta, Alfven Mach number, solar wind speed, plasma temperature, plasma pressure, plasma density and the geomagnetic indices DST, AE, Ap and Kp. We found out that each parameter of the solar wind exhibit certain periodicities which di?erentiate in each cycle. Our results indicate intermittent periodicities in our data, some of them shared between the solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices.

  9. Variability modes in core flows inverted from geomagnetic field models

    CERN Document Server

    Pais, Maria A; Schaeffer, Nathanaël

    2014-01-01

    We use flows that we invert from two geomagnetic field models spanning centennial time periods (gufm1 and COV-OBS), and apply Principal Component Analysis and Singular Value Decomposition of coupled fields to extract the main modes characterizing their spatial and temporal variations. The quasi geostrophic flows inverted from both geomagnetic field models show similar features. However, COV-OBS has a less energetic mean flow and larger time variability. The statistical significance of flow components is tested from analyses performed on subareas of the whole domain. Bootstrapping methods are also used to extract robust flow features required by both gufm1 and COV-OBS. Three main empirical circulation modes emerge, simultaneously constrained by both geomagnetic field models and expected to be robust against the particular a priori used to build them. Mode 1 exhibits three large robust vortices at medium/high latitudes, with opposite circulation under the Atlantic and the Pacific hemispheres. Mode 2 interesting...

  10. Evidence for a new geomagnetic jerk in 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torta, J. Miquel; Pavón-Carrasco, Francisco Javier; Marsal, Santiago;

    2015-01-01

    The production of quasi-definitive data at Ebre observatory has enabled us to detect a new geomagnetic jerk in early 2014. This has been confirmed by analyzing data at several observatories in the European-African and Western Pacific-Australian sectors in the classical fashion of looking for the ......The production of quasi-definitive data at Ebre observatory has enabled us to detect a new geomagnetic jerk in early 2014. This has been confirmed by analyzing data at several observatories in the European-African and Western Pacific-Australian sectors in the classical fashion of looking...... for the characteristic V shape of the geomagnetic secular variation trend. A global model produced with the latest available satellite and observatory data supports these findings, giving a global perspective on both the jerk and a related secular acceleration pulse at the core-mantle boundary. We conclude that the jerk...

  11. Anomalous propagation of Omega VLF waves near the geomagnetic equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, A.; Kikuchi, T.; Nozaki, K.; Kurihara, N.; Kuratani, Y.; Ohse, M.

    1983-09-01

    Omega HAIKU, REUNION, and LIBERIA signals were received and anomalous propagation characteristics were obtained near the geomagnetic equator. Short-period fluctuations were found in the phase of the HAIKU 10.2 kHz signal in November 1979 and in the phase and amplitude of the HAIKU 13.6 kHz signal in November 1981. These cyclic fluctuations are in close correlation with the phase cycle slippings, which occur most frequently when the receiver is located at 6 S geomagnetic latitude. On the basis of anisotropic waveguide mode theory indicating much less attenuation in WE propagation than in EW propagation at the geomagnetic equator, it is concluded that the short-period fluctuations in the phase and amplitude are due to interference between the short-path and the long-path signals.

  12. Long-term rise in geomagnetic activity - A close connection between quiet days and storms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne

    2000-01-01

    Geomagnetic quiet days and magnetic storms are naturally believed to be due to very different solar wind conditions. In this study we however demonstrate that the long-term variation of geomagnetic quiet and disturbed days are surprisingly similar. By the use of daily averages of the geomagnetic...

  13. 77 FR 22312 - Geomagnetic Disturbances to the Bulk-Power System; Notice of Technical Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Geomagnetic Disturbances to the Bulk-Power System; Notice of Technical... Conference on Geomagnetic Disturbances to the Bulk-Power System on Monday, April 30, 2012, from 11 a.m. to 4... issues related to reliability of the Bulk-Power System as affected by geomagnetic disturbances....

  14. Geomagnetic observations on Tristan da Cunha, South Atlantic Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzka, J.; Olsen, Nils; Maule, C. F.

    2009-01-01

    Few geomagnetic ground observations exist of the Earth's strongest core field anomaly, the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). The geomagnetic repeat station on the island Tristan da Cunha, located half-way between South Africa and South America at 37 degrees 05' S, 12 degrees 18' W, is therefore...... of crucial importance. We have conducted several sets of repeat station measurements during magnetically quiet conditions (Kp 2o or less) in 2004. The procedures are described and the results are compared to those from earlier campaigns and to the predictions of various global field models. Features...... and operate a magnetometer station on Tristan da Cunha during the Swarm magnetic satellite mission (2011-2014)....

  15. Gravitational and geomagnetic tidal source of earthquake triggering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, A.

    1989-12-01

    A relationship is presently established between large earthquakes and the earth's tides and external geomagnetic fields, in conjunction with a triggering mechanism having its bases in the large solar and lunar variations observed during a number of the shocks examined. A majority of these shocks are noted to be located within a latitude-belt which coincides with the intensity maximum of ionospheric currents. A local magnetostriction process in the rocks appears to be the triggering mechanism. The large number of earthquakes occurring during maximum solar activity may be related to the enhanced geomagnetic triggering effect of higher sunspot numbers.

  16. The 9th-Generation International Geomagnetic Reference Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macmillan, S.; Maus, S.; Bondar, T.; Chambodut, A.; Golovkov, V.; Holme, R.; Langlais, B.; Lesur, V.; Lowes, F.; Lühr, H.; Mai, W.; Mandea, M.; Olsen, N.; Rother, M.; Sabaka, T.; Thomson, A.; Wardinski, I.

    2003-12-01

    The International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy has recently released the 9th-Generation International Geomagnetic Reference Field-the latest version of a standard mathematical description of the Earth's main magnetic field used widely in studies of the Earth's deep interior, its crust and its ionosphere and magnetosphere. The coefficients were recently finalized at the XXIII General Assembly of the International Union of Geophysics and Geodesy, held at Sapporo in Japan in 2003 July. The IGRF is the product of a huge collaborative effort between magnetic field modellers and the institutes involved in collecting and disseminating magnetic field data from satellites and from observatories and surveys around the world.

  17. The 10th generation international geomagnetic reference field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, S.; Macmillan, S.; Chernova, T.; Choi, S.; Dater, D.; Golovkov, V.; Lesur, V.; Lowes, F.; Lühr, H.; Mai, W.; McLean, S.; Olsen, N.; Rother, M.; Sabaka, T.; Thomson, A.; Zvereva, T.; International Association of Geomagnetism, Aeronomy (IAGA), Division V, Working Group VMOD

    The International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) on 12 December 2004 released the 10th generation International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF)—the latest version of a standard mathematical description of the Earth's main magnetic field and used widely in studies of the Earth's deep interior, its crust, ionosphere and magnetosphere. The coefficients were finalised by a task force of IAGA. The IGRF is the product of a large collaborative effort between magnetic field modellers and the institutes involved in collecting and disseminating magnetic field data from satellites and observatories around the world.

  18. The 10th-Generation International Geomagnetic Reference Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    The International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) on 2004 December 12 has released the 10th-Generation International Geomagnetic Reference Field-the latest version of a standard mathematical description of the Earth's main magnetic field used widely in studies of the Earth's deep interior, its crust, ionosphere and magnetosphere. The coefficients were finalized by a task force of IAGA. The IGRF is the product of a large collaborative effort between magnetic field modellers and the institutes involved in collecting and disseminating magnetic field data from satellites and observatories around the world.

  19. Towards an Integrated Geomagnetic Polarity Reversal Timescale for the Pleistocene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivera, Tiffany; Storey, Michael; Kuiper, Klaudia

    The development of the geomagnetic polarity timescale (GPTS) in the mid 20th century led to the greater understanding of seafloor spreading and plate tectonics (Heirtzler et al., 1968). Over 40 years later, the GPTS continues to be refined, particularly in terms of integrating multiple dating...... of various geologic events. Here, we review the ages of three Pleistocene geomagnetic polarity reversals: the Matuyama-Brunhes (ca. 0.78 Ma), the Cobb Mountain (ca. 1.2 Ma), and the Reunion (ca. 2.1 Ma) events. High-precision astronomically calibrated 40Ar/39Ar ages have been obtained via a Noblesse multi...

  20. International Geomagnetic Reference Field: the 12th generation

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The 12th generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was adopted in December 2014 by the Working Group V-MOD appointed by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA). It updates the previous IGRF generation with a definitive main field model for epoch 2010.0, a main field model for epoch 2015.0, and a linear annual predictive secular variation model for 2015.0-2020.0. Here, we present the equations defining the IGRF model, p...

  1. Ionospheric Effects of Geomagnetic Storms in Different Longitude Sectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. A. Zherebtsov; O.M. Pirog; N.M. Polekh

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyzes the state of the ionosphere during two geomagnetic storms of a different intensity evolving in different sectors of local time in different seasons. There were used the data from a network of ionospheric stations located in the opposite longitudinal sectors of 80°-150° E and 250°-310° E.This analysis has permitted us to conclude that the detected differences in the variations of the disturbances are likely to be determined by the local time difference of the geomagnetic storm development, its intensity and by the different illumination conditions of the ionosphere.

  2. H-alpha response to geomagnetic disturbed activity at Arecibo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Pedrina; Kerr, R.; Noto, J.; Brum, Christiano; Gonzalez, Sixto

    Configured with a spectral resolution of 0.0086 nm at 6563A, the low resolution Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI) installed at Arecibo Observatory sampled the geocoronal Balmer-alpha emission for sixty nights during new moon periods from September 2006 to September 2007. In this work two of these periods are analyzed according to the variability with the geomagnetic activity. With this purpose, the effect of the shadow height, local time and solar flux depen-dencies were found and isolated and only the possible variations due the geomagnetic activity were evaluated. The residuos of the relative H-alpha intensity and temperature are analyzed.

  3. International Geomagnetic Reference Field: the 12th generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thébault, Erwan; Finlay, Chris; Beggan, Ciarán D.

    2015-01-01

    The 12th generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was adopted in December 2014 by the Working Group V-MOD appointed by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA). It updates the previous IGRF generation with a definitive main field model for epoch...... for epoch 2015.0 and their predicted rates of change for 2015.0-2020.0. We also update the magnetic pole positions and discuss briefly the latest changes and possible future trends of the Earth’s magnetic field....

  4. Electron drift velocities in fast Argon and CF4 based drift gases

    CERN Document Server

    van Apeldoorn, G

    1998-01-01

    98-063 Electron drift velocities in gas mixtures were measured in a tabletop experiment using a nitrogen laser to create the primary electrons. The maximum drift times for electrons in a 5 mm (10 mm) honeycomb drift cell at 2200 V anode voltage were 28 ns (53 ns) and 21 ns (61 ns) for Ar-Cf4-CH4 (75/18/6) and Ar-CF4-CO2 (68/27/5), respectively. Changing the ratio of the latter mix did not change the drift velocity very much. The gains of the gases are ~10^4 for a single primary electron. CF4 causes electron attachment. The measured drift times agree well with GARFIELD simulations.

  5. Kristian Birkeland's pioneering investigations of geomagnetic disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Burke

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available More than 100 years ago Kristian Birkeland (1967–1917 addressed questions that had vexed scientists for centuries. Why do auroras appear overhead while the Earth's magnetic field is disturbed? Are magnetic storms on Earth related to disturbances on the Sun? To answer these questions Birkeland devised terrella simulations, led coordinated campaigns in the Arctic wilderness, and then interpreted his results in the light of Maxwell's synthesis of laws governing electricity and magnetism. After analyzing thousands of magnetograms, he divided disturbances into 3 categories:

    1. Polar elementary storms are auroral-latitude disturbances now called substorms.
    2. Equatorial perturbations correspond to initial and main phases of magnetic storms.
    3. Cyclo-median perturbations reflect enhanced solar-quiet currents on the dayside.

    He published the first two-cell pattern of electric currents in Earth's upper atmosphere, nearly 30 years before the ionosphere was identified as a separate entity. Birkeland's most enduring contribution toward understanding geomagnetic disturbances flowed from his recognition that field-aligned currents must connect the upper atmosphere with generators in distant space. The existence of field-aligned currents was vigorously debated among scientists for more than 50 years. Birkeland's conjecture profoundly affects present-day understanding of auroral phenomena and global electrodynamics. In 1896, four years after Lord Kelvin rejected suggestions that matter passes between the Sun and Earth, and two years before the electron was discovered, Birkeland proposed current carriers are "electric corpuscles from the Sun" and "the auroras are formed by corpuscular rays drawn in from space, and coming from the Sun". It can be reasonably argued that the year 1896 marks the founding of space plasma physics. Many of Birkeland's insights were rooted in observations made during his terrella

  6. Equatorial ionospheric plasma drifts and O+ concentration enhancements associated with disturbance dynamo during the 2015 St. Patrick's Day magnetic storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao-Song; Wilson, Gordon R.; Hairston, Marc R.; Zhang, Yongliang; Wang, Wenbin; Liu, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Disturbance dynamo is an important dynamic process during magnetic storms. However, very few direct observations of dynamo-induced plasma drifts and ion composition changes in the equatorial ionosphere are available. In this study, we use measurements of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites to identify the characteristics of the disturbance dynamo process in the topside equatorial ionosphere near dawn during the magnetic storm with a minimum Dst of -223 nT on 17 March 2015. Data from four DMSP satellites with equatorial crossings at 0245, 0430, 0630, and 0730 LT are available for this case. The dynamo process was first observed in the postmidnight sector 3-4.7 h after the beginning of the storm main phase and lasted for 31 h, covering the second storm intensification and the initial 20 h of the recovery phase. The dynamo vertical ion drift was upward (up to 150-200 m s-1) in the postmidnight sector and downward (up to ~80 m s-1) in the early morning sector. The dynamo zonal ion drift was westward at these locations and reached ~100 m s-1. The dynamo process caused large enhancements of the O+ concentration (the ratio of the oxygen ion density to the total ion density) at the altitude of 840 km near dawn. The O+ concentration increased from below 60% during the prestorm period to 80-90% during the storm time. More specifically, the O+ density was increased, and the H+ density was decreased. The variations of the O+ concentration were well correlated with the vertical ion drift.

  7. The KLOE drift chamber VCI 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adinolfi, M.; Aloisio, A.; Ambrosino, F.; Andryakov, A.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Anulli, F.; Bacci, C.; Bankamp, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Bellini, F.; Bencivenni, G.; Bertolucci, S.; Bini, C.; Bloise, C.; Bocci, V.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Bulychjov, S.A.; Cabibbo, G.; Calcaterra, A.; Caloi, R.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Carboni, G.; Cardini, A.; Casarsa, M.; Cataldi, G.; Ceradini, F.; Cervell, F.; Cevenini, F.; Chiefari, G.; Ciambrone, P.; Conetti, S.; Conticelli, S.; De Lucia, E. E-mail: erika.delucia@roma1.infn.it; De Robertis, G.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; De Zorzi, G.; Dell' Agnello, S.; Denig, A.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Falco, S.; Doria, A.; Drago, E.; Elia, V.; Erriquez, O.; Farilla, A.; Felici, G.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Forti, C.; Franceschi, A.; Franzini, P.; Gao, M.L.; Gatti, C.; Gauzzi, P.; Giovannella, S.; Golovatyuk, V.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grandegger, W.; Graziani, E.; Guarnaccia, P.; Hagel, U. von.; Han, H.G.; Han, S.W.; Huang, X.; Incagli, M.; Ingrosso, L.; Jang, Y.Y.; Kim, W.; Kluge, W.; Kulikov, V.; Lacava, F.; Lanfranchi, G.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Lomtadze, F.; Luisi, C.; Mao, C.S.; Martemianov, M.; Matsyuk, M.; Mei, W.; Merola, L.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Moalem, A.; Moccia, S.; Moulson, M.; Mueller, S.; Murtas, F.; Napolitano, M.; Nedosekin, A.; Panareo, M.; Pacciani, L.; Pages, P.; Palutan, M.; Paoluzi, L.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passalacqua, L.; Passaseo, M.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, G.; Picca, D.; Pirozzi, G.; Pistillo, C.; Pollack, M.; Pontecorvo, L.; Primavera, M.; Ruggieri, F.; Santangelo, P.; Santovetti, E.; Saracino, G.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schwick, C.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Scuri, F.; Sfiligoi, I.; Shan, J.; Silano, P.; Spadaro, T.; Spagnolo, S.; Spiriti, E.; Stanescu, C.; Tong, G.L.; Tortora, L.; Valente, E.; Valente, P.; Valeriani, B.; Venanzoni, G.; Veneziano, S.; Wu, Y.; Xie, Y.G.; Zhao, P.P.; Zhou, Y

    2002-02-01

    The main goal of the KLOE experiment at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory is the study CP violation in kaon decays. The tracking device of the experiment is a drift chamber whose dimensions, 4 m of diameter and 3.3 m length, provide a large acceptance volume for the decay products of low momentum K{sub L} ({lambda}{sub L}=3.4 m). A complete stereo geometry with 12.582 cells arranged in 58 layers guarantees a high and uniform efficiency in the reconstruction of the charged K{sub L} decays. Very light materials have been chosen both for the drift medium, a helium-based gas mixture, and for the mechanical structure, made of carbon fiber, to minimize multiple scattering and conversion of low-energy photons. The design requirements, the adopted solutions together with the calibration procedure and the tracking performances of the drift chamber are discussed.

  8. Epigenetic drift, epigenetic clocks and cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shijie C; Widschwendter, Martin; Teschendorff, Andrew E

    2016-05-01

    It is well-established that the DNA methylation landscape of normal cells undergoes a gradual modification with age, termed as 'epigenetic drift'. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of epigenetic drift and its potential role in cancer etiology. We propose a new terminology to help distinguish the different components of epigenetic drift, with the aim of clarifying the role of the epigenetic clock, mitotic clocks and active changes, which accumulate in response to environmental disease risk factors. We further highlight the growing evidence that epigenetic changes associated with cancer risk factors may play an important causal role in cancer development, and that monitoring these molecular changes in normal cells may offer novel risk prediction and disease prevention strategies.

  9. The KLOE drift chamber VCI 2001

    CERN Document Server

    Adinolfi, M; Ambrosino, F; Andryakov, A; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Anulli, F; Bacci, C; Bankamp, A; Barbiellini, G; Bellini, F; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, Sergio; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Bulychjov, S A; Cabibbo, G; Calcaterra, A; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Carboni, G; Cardini, A; Casarsa, M; Cataldi, G; Ceradini, F; Cervell, F; Cevenini, F; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; Conetti, S; Conticelli, S; De Lucia, E; De Robertis, G; De Simone, P; De Zorzi, G; De Sangro, R; Dell'Agnello, S; Denig, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Falco, S; Doria, A; Drago, E; Elia, V; Erriquez, O; Farilla, A; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Finocchiaro, G; Forti, C; Franceschi, A; Franzini, P; Gao, M L; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Golovatyuk, V; Gorini, E; Grancagnolo, F; Grandegger, W; Graziani, E; Guarnaccia, P; Han, H G; Han, S W; Huang, X; Incagli, M; Ingrosso, L; Jang, Y Y; Kim, W; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Lomtadze, F; Luisi, C; Mao Chen Sheng; Martemyanov, M; Matsyuk, M; Mei, W; Merola, L; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Moalem, A; Moccia, S; Moulson, M; Murtas, F; Müller, S; Napolitano, M; Nedosekin, A; Pacciani, L; Pagès, P; Palutan, M; Panareo, M; Paoluzi, L; Pasqualucci, E; Passalacqua, L; Passaseo, M; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Petrolo, E; Petrucci, Guido; Picca, D; Pirozzi, G; Pistillo, C; Pollack, M; Pontecorvo, L; Primavera, M; Ruggieri, F; Santangelo, P; Santovetti, E; Saracino, G; Schamberger, R D; Schwick, C; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Scuri, F; Sfiligoi, I; Shan, J; Silano, P; Spadaro, T; Spagnolo, S; Spiriti, E; Stanescu, C; Tong, G L; Tortora, L; Valente, E; Valente, P; Valeriani, B; Venanzoni, G; Veneziano, Stefano; Von Hagel, U; Wu, Y; Xie, Y G; Zhao, P P; Zhou, Y

    2002-01-01

    The main goal of the KLOE experiment at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory is the study CP violation in kaon decays. The tracking device of the experiment is a drift chamber whose dimensions, 4 m of diameter and 3.3 m length, provide a large acceptance volume for the decay products of low momentum K sub L (lambda sub L =3.4 m). A complete stereo geometry with 12.582 cells arranged in 58 layers guarantees a high and uniform efficiency in the reconstruction of the charged K sub L decays. Very light materials have been chosen both for the drift medium, a helium-based gas mixture, and for the mechanical structure, made of carbon fiber, to minimize multiple scattering and conversion of low-energy photons. The design requirements, the adopted solutions together with the calibration procedure and the tracking performances of the drift chamber are discussed.

  10. Behavior of Plasma and Field Parameters and their Relationship with Geomagnetic Indices during Intense Geomagnetic Storms of Solar Cycle 23

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Pande, Seema; Pande, Bimal; Pandey, Kavita

    2010-01-01

    A correlative study between the geomagnetic indices and the peak values of various plasma and field parameters during rising, maximum and decay phases as well as during complete solar cycle 23 have been presented. We have also presented the lag/lead analysis between the maximum of Dst and peak values of plasma and field parameters and found that peak values of lag/lead time lies in the +/-10 hr interval. Three geomagnetic storms (GMSs) and associated solar sources observed during these phases of this solar cycle have also been studied and found that GMSs are associated with large flares and halo CMEs.

  11. LANL* V1.0: a radiation belt drift shell model suitable for real-time and reanalysis applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Koller

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe here a new method for calculating the magnetic drift invariant, L*, that is used for modeling radiation belt dynamics and for other space weather applications. L* (pronounced L-star is directly proportional to the integral of the magnetic flux contained within the surface defined by a charged particle moving in the Earth's geomagnetic field. Under adiabatic changes to the geomagnetic field L* is a conserved quantity, while under quasi-adiabatic fluctuations diffusion (with respect to a particle's L* is the primary term in equations of particle dynamics. In particular the equations of motion for the very energetic particles that populate the Earth's radiation belts are most commonly expressed by diffusion in three dimensions: L*, energy (or momentum, and pitch angle (the dot product of velocity and the magnetic field vector. Expressing dynamics in these coordinates reduces the dimensionality of the problem by referencing the particle distribution functions to values at the magnetic equatorial point of a magnetic "drift shell" (or L-shell irrespective of local time (or longitude. While the use of L* aids in simplifying the equations of motion, practical applications such as space weather forecasting using realistic geomagnetic fields require sophisticated magnetic field models that, in turn, require computationally intensive numerical integration. Typically a single L* calculation can require on the order of 105 calls to a magnetic field model and each point in the simulation domain and each calculated pitch angle has a different value of L*. We describe here the development and validation of a neural network surrogate model for calculating L* in sophisticated geomagnetic field models with a high degree of fidelity at computational speeds that are millions of times faster than direct numerical field line mapping and integration. This new surrogate model has

  12. Learning in the context of distribution drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-09

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0039 Learning in the context of distribution drift Geoff Webb MONASH UNIVERSITY Final Report 05/09/2017 DISTRIBUTION A...Department of Defense, Executive Services, Directorate (0704-0188).   Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person ...23 Apr 2015 to 22 Apr 2017 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE Learning in the context of distribution drift 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA2386-15-1

  13. Shock drift mechanism for Forbush decreases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Andrew F.; Sarris, E. T.; Dodopoulos, C.

    1990-01-01

    Consideration is given to the way in which Forbush decreases can arise from variable drifts in nonuniform shocks, where the variation in shock strength along the shock front causes both the shock drift distance and the energy gain to become variable. More particles can then be transported out of a given region of space and energy interval than were transported in, so a spacecraft passing through this region can observe a Forbush decrease in this energy interval despite shock energization and compression. A simple example of how this can occur is presented.

  14. Ultra-low mass drift chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assiro, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Cappelli, L. [Università di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale (Italy); Cascella, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento Matematica e Fisica, Università del Salento (Italy); De Lorenzis, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Università del Salento (Italy); Grancagnolo, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Ignatov, F. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); L' Erario, A.; Maffezzoli, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Università del Salento (Italy); Miccoli, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Onorato, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Università G. Marconi, Roma (Italy); Perillo, M. [EnginSoft S.p.a., Trento (Italy); Piacentino, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Università G. Marconi, Roma (Italy); Rella, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Università del Salento (Italy); Rossetti, F. [EnginSoft S.p.a., Trento (Italy); Spedicato, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Tassielli, G., E-mail: giovanni.tassielli@le.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Università G. Marconi, Roma (Italy); and others

    2013-08-01

    We present a novel low mass drift chamber concept, developed in order to fulfill the stringent requirements imposed by the experiments for extremely rare processes, which require high resolutions (order of 100–200 keV/c) for particle momenta in a range (50–100 MeV/c) totally dominated by the multiple scattering contribution. We describe a geometry optimization procedure and a new wiring strategy with a feed-through-less wire anchoring system developed and tested on a drift chamber prototype under completion at INFN-Lecce.

  15. Magnetic local time dependence of geomagnetic disturbances contributing to the AU and AL indices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomita, S; Nose´, M; Iyemori, T;

    2010-01-01

    The Auroral Electrojet (AE) indices, which are composed of four indices (AU, AL, AE, and AO), are calculated from the geomagnetic field data obtained at 12 geomagnetic observatories that are located in geomagnetic latitude (GMLAT) of 61.7°-70°. The indices have been widely used to study magnetic...... activity in the auroral zone. In the present study, we examine magnetic local time (MLT) dependence of geomagnetic field variations contributing to the AU and AL indices. We use 1-min geomagnetic field data obtained in 2003. It is found that both AU and AL indices have two ranges of MLT (AU: 15:00-22:00MLT...

  16. The risk characteristics of solar and geomagnetic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolska, Katerina

    2016-04-01

    The main aim of this contribution is a deeper analysis of the influence of solar activity which is expected to have an impact on human health, and therefore on mortality, in particular civilization and degenerative diseases. We have constructed the characteristics that represent the risk of solar and geomagnetic activity on human health on the basis of our previous analysis of association between the daily numbers of death on diseases of the nervous system and diseases of the circulatory system and solar and geomagnetic activity in the Czech Republic during the years 1994 - 2013. We used long period daily time series of numbers of deaths by cause, long period time series of solar activity indices (namely R and F10.7), geomagnetic indicies (Kp planetary index, Dst) and ionospheric parameters (foF2 and TEC). The ionospheric parameters were related to the geographic location of the Czech Republic and adjusted for middle geographic latitudes. The risk characteristics were composed by cluster analysis in time series according to the phases of the solar cycle resp. the seasonal insolation at mid-latitudes or the daily period according to the impact of solar and geomagnetic activity on mortality by cause of death from medical cause groups of death VI. Diseases of the nervous system and IX. Diseases of the circulatory system mortality by 10th Revision of International Classification of Diseases WHO (ICD-10).

  17. Methodology for simulation of geomagnetically induced currents in power systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boteler David

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available To assess the geomagnetic hazard to power systems it is useful to be able to simulate the geomagnetically induced currents (GIC that are produced during major geomagnetic disturbances. This paper examines the methodology used in power system analysis and shows how it can be applied to modelling GIC. Electric fields in the area of the power network are used to determine the voltage sources or equivalent current sources in the transmission lines. The power network can be described by a mesh impedance matrix which is combined with the voltage sources to calculate the GIC in each loop. Alternatively the power network can be described by a nodal admittance matrix which is combined with the sum of current sources into each node to calculate the nodal voltages which are then used to calculate the GIC in the transmission lines and GIC flowing to ground at each substation. Practical calculations can be made by superposition of results calculated separately for northward and eastward electric fields. This can be done using magnetic data from a single observatory to calculate an electric field that is a uniform approximation of the field over the area of the power system. It is also shown how the superposition of results can be extended to use data from two observatories: approximating the electric field by a linear variation between the two observatory locations. These calculations provide an efficient method for simulating the GIC that would be produced by historically significant geomagnetic storm events.

  18. Estimation of geomagnetic activity using measure of anomalousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly Soloviev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we present a newly developed indicator for estimating geomagnetic activity. It is based on the magnitude of measure of anomalousness (MA of magnetometer recordings at a given time or interval. It is intended for automated estimation of geomagnetic activity level in the area of a specific magnetic station or in a given region using data of a set of stations. It reflects geomagnetic activity level at different observatories in a single scale [-1, 1], regardless of their latitudinal location and consequently typical disturbance amplitudes. To a certain extent MA indicator is an analog of traditional K index. However, a well-known shortcoming of the latter is its long, 3-hour update rate. Moreover, K index calculation requires subtraction of Sq variation that also causes delays. At the same time there is a demand for operational geomagnetic indices that have maximal time resolution and are available in near real-time. The proposed MA indicator aims to address the shortcomings of the traditional K index. The MA calculation may be implemented automatically with the same time resolution as the initial data are recorded.

  19. First results from the first Croatian geomagnetic observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandic, Igor; Herak, Davorka; Heilig, Balazs

    2013-04-01

    The first Croatian geomagnetic observatory was established in the area of the Nature Park Lonjsko Polje, after a century of sporadic efforts originating from the proposals of Andrija Mohorovicic. The location was chosen after exhaustive surveys of possible sites. It is located far enough from sources of civilization noise, and was found to be an area without magnetic anomalies and with a low field gradient. The construction of the observatory buildings was completed in the autumn of 2011. The furnishing and installation of instruments and test measurements were completed by the beginning of summer 2012, ever since we have continuous recordings of the geomagnetic elements. In the beginning of December 2012 the fluxgate magnetometer LEMI-035 (H,D,Z orientation) has been installed under the framework of the PLASMON project in cooperation with the Tihany Observatory (Hungary). Permanent data of high quality from our observatory will contribute to the monitoring of the Earth's magnetic field on the regional and global levels, thus enabling further development of geomagnetism in Croatia through collaboration with scientists from the other countries, participation in the international projects, eventual membership in the International Real-time Magnetic Observatory Network (INTERMAGNET), etc. The field elements for the epoch 2012,75 and the baselines are presented together with highlights of some recorded geomagnetic events so far. Furthermore, the comparison between the variation data recorded by the dIdD and the fluxgate LEMI-035 magnetometer is presented.

  20. An empirical model of the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Y.; Yumoto, K.; Cardinal, M.G.; Fraser, B.J.; Hattori, P.; Kakinami, Y.; Liu, J.Y.; Lynn, K.J.W.; Marshall, R.; McNamara, D.; Nagatsuma, T.; Nikiforov, V.M.; Otadoy, R.E.; Ruhimat, M.; Shevtsov, B.M.; Shiokawa, K.; Abe, S.; Uozumi, T.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2011-01-01

    An empirical model of the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation has been constructed based on geomagnetic data obtained from 21 stations along the 210 Magnetic Meridian of the Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network (CPMN) from 1996 to 2007. Using the least squares fitting method for geomagnetically quiet days (Kp ??? 2+), the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation at each station was described as a function of solar activity SA, day of year DOY, lunar age LA, and local time LT. After interpolation in latitude, the model can describe solar-activity dependence and seasonal dependence of solar quiet daily variations (S) and lunar quiet daily variations (L). We performed a spherical harmonic analysis (SHA) on these S and L variations to examine average characteristics of the equivalent external current systems. We found three particularly noteworthy results. First, the total current intensity of the S current system is largely controlled by solar activity while its focus position is not significantly affected by solar activity. Second, we found that seasonal variations of the S current intensity exhibit north-south asymmetry; the current intensity of the northern vortex shows a prominent annual variation while the southern vortex shows a clear semi-annual variation as well as annual variation. Thirdly, we found that the total intensity of the L current system changes depending on solar activity and season; seasonal variations of the L current intensity show an enhancement during the December solstice, independent of the level of solar activity. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. New insights on geomagnetic storms from observations and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordanova, Vania K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the response at Earth of the Sun's varying energy output and forecasting geomagnetic activity is of central interest to space science, since intense geomagnetic storms may cause severe damages on technological systems and affect communications. Episodes of southward (Bzgeomagnetic conditions are associated either with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and possess long and continuous negative IMF Bz excursions, or with high speed solar wind streams (HSS) whose geoeffectiveness is due to IMF Bz profiles fluctuating about zero with various amplitudes and duration. We show examples of ring current simulations during two geomagnetic storms representative of each interplanetary condition with our kinetic ring current atmosphere interactions model (RAM), and investigate the mechanisms responsible for trapping particles and for causing their loss. We find that periods of increased magnetospheric convection coinciding with enhancements of plasma sheet density are needed for strong ring current buildup. During the HSS-driven storm the convection potential is highly variable and causes small sporadic injections into the ring current. The long period of enhanced convection during the CME-driven storm causes a continuous ring current injection penetrating to lower L shells and stronger ring current buildup.

  2. Solar Activity, Different Geomagnetic Activity Levels and Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Svetla; Jordanova, Malina; Stoilova, Irina; Taseva, Tatiana; Maslarov, Dimitar

    Results on revealing a possible relationship between solar activity (SA) and geomagnetic activity (GMA) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) morbidity are presented. Studies were based on medical data covering the period from 1.12.1995 to 31.12.2004 and concerned daily distribution of patients with AMI diagnose (in total 1192 cases) from Sofia region on the day of admission at the hospital. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to check the significance of GMA intensity effect and the type of geomagnetic storms, those caused by Magnetic Clouds (MC) and by High Speed Solar Wind Streams (HSSWS), on AMI morbidity. Relevant correlation coefficients were calculated. Results revealed statistically significant positive correlation between considered GMA indices and AMI. ANOVA revealed that AMI number was signifi- cantly increased from the day before (-1st) till the day after (+1st) geomagnetic storms with different intensities. Geomagnetic storms caused by MC were related to significant increase of AMI number in comparison with the storms caused by HSSWS. There was a trend for such different effects even on -1st and +1st day.

  3. Towards an Integrated Geomagnetic Polarity Reversal Timescale for the Pleistocene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivera, Tiffany; Storey, Michael; Kuiper, Klaudia

    The development of the geomagnetic polarity timescale (GPTS) in the mid 20th century led to the greater understanding of seafloor spreading and plate tectonics (Heirtzler et al., 1968). Over 40 years later, the GPTS continues to be refined, particularly in terms of integrating multiple dating...

  4. The Use of Dispersion Relations For The Geomagnetic Transfer Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuello, A.; Queralt, P.; Ledo, J. J.

    The magnetotelluric responses are complex magnitudes, where real and imaginary parts contain the same information on the geoelectrical structure. It seems possible, from very general hypotheses on the geoelectrical models (causality, stability and passivity), to apply the Kramers-Krönig dispersion relations to the magnetotelluric responses (impedance, geomagnetic transfer functions,...). In particular, the applica- bility of these relations to the impedance is a current point of discussion, but there are not many examples of their application to the geomagnetic transfer functions (tipper). The aim of this paper is to study how the relations of dispersion are applied to the real and imaginary part of the geomagnetic transfer functions, and to check its validity. For this reason, we have considered data (or responses) from two- and three-dimensional structures, and for these data, we have taken two situations: 1.- Responses that have been synthetically generated from numerical modelling, that allows us to control the quality of the data. 2.- Responses obtained from fieldwork, that are affected by exper- imental error. Additionally, we have also explored the use of these relations to extrap- olate the geomagnetic transfer functions outside the interval of measured frequencies, in order to obtain constrains on the values of these extrapolated data. The results have shown that the dispersion relations are accomplished for the geomag- netic transfer functions, and they can offer information about how these responses are behaved outside (but near) the range of measured frequencies.

  5. Surface electric fields for North America during historical geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lisa H.; Homeier, Nichole; Gannon, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the impact of geomagnetic disturbances on the electric grid, we recreate surface electric fields from two historical geomagnetic storms—the 1989 “Quebec” storm and the 2003 “Halloween” storms. Using the Spherical Elementary Current Systems method, we interpolate sparsely distributed magnetometer data across North America. We find good agreement between the measured and interpolated data, with larger RMS deviations at higher latitudes corresponding to larger magnetic field variations. The interpolated magnetic field data are combined with surface impedances for 25 unique physiographic regions from the United States Geological Survey and literature to estimate the horizontal, orthogonal surface electric fields in 1 min time steps. The induced horizontal electric field strongly depends on the local surface impedance, resulting in surprisingly strong electric field amplitudes along the Atlantic and Gulf Coast. The relative peak electric field amplitude of each physiographic region, normalized to the value in the Interior Plains region, varies by a factor of 2 for different input magnetic field time series. The order of peak electric field amplitudes (largest to smallest), however, does not depend much on the input. These results suggest that regions at lower magnetic latitudes with high ground resistivities are also at risk from the effect of geomagnetically induced currents. The historical electric field time series are useful for estimating the flow of the induced currents through long transmission lines to study power flow and grid stability during geomagnetic disturbances.

  6. Possible helio-geomagnetic activity influence on cardiological cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsavrias, Christos

    Eruptive solar events as flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) occur during solar activ-ity periods. Energetic particles, fast solar wind plasma and electromagnetic radiation pass through interplanetary space, arrive on Earth's ionosphere-magnetosphere and produce various disturbances. It is well known the negative influence of geomagnetic substorms on the human technological applications on geospace. During the last 25 years, many studies concerning the possible influence on the human health are published. Increase of the Acute Coronary Syn-dromes and disorders of the Cardiac Rhythm, increase of accidents as well as neurological and psychological disorders (e.g. increase of suicides) during or near to the geomagnetic storms time interval are reported. In this study, we research the problem in Greece, focusing on patients with Acute Myocardial Infraction, hospitalized in the 2nd Cardiological Department of the General Hospital of Nikaea (Piraeus City), for the time interval 1997-2007 (23rd solar cycle) and also to the arrival of emergency cardiological cases to Emergency Department of two greek hospitals, the General Hospital of Lamia City and the General Hospital of Veria City during the selected months, with or without helio-geomagnetic activity, of the 23rd solar cycle. Increase of cases is recorded during the periods with increase helio-geomagnetic activity. The necessity of continuing the research for a longer period and with a bigger sample is high; so as to exact more secure conclusions.

  7. Assessment of extreme values in geomagnetic and geoelectric field variations for Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, L.; Trichtchenko, L.; Boteler, D. H.

    2016-07-01

    Disturbances of the geomagnetic field produced by space weather events can have an impact on power systems and other critical infrastructure. To mitigate these risks it is important to determine the extreme values of geomagnetic activity that can occur. More than 40 years of 1 min magnetic data recorded at 13 Canadian geomagnetic observatories have been analyzed to evaluate extreme levels in geomagnetic and geoelectric activities in different locations of Canada. The hourly ranges of geomagnetic field variations and hourly maximum in rate of change of the magnetic variations have been used as measures of geomagnetic activity. Geoelectric activity is estimated by the hourly peak amplitude of the geoelectric fields calculated with the use of Earth resistivity models specified for different locations in Canada. A generalized extreme value distribution was applied to geomagnetic and geoelectric indices to evaluate extreme geomagnetic and geoelectric disturbances, which could happen once per 50 and once per 100 years with 99% confidence interval. Influence of geomagnetic latitude and Earth resistivity models on the results for the extreme geomagnetic and geoelectric activity is discussed. The extreme values provide criteria for assessing the vulnerability of power systems and other technology to geomagnetic activity for design or mitigation purposes.

  8. On the Possibilities of Predicting Geomagnetic Secular Variation with Geodynamo Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Tangborn, Andrew; Sabaka, Terrance

    2004-01-01

    We use our MoSST core dynamics model and geomagnetic field at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) continued downward from surface observations to investigate possibilities of geomagnetic data assimilation, so that model results and current geomagnetic observations can be used to predict geomagnetic secular variation in future. As the first attempt, we apply data insertion technique to examine evolution of the model solution that is modified by geomagnetic input. Our study demonstrate that, with a single data insertion, large-scale poloidal magnetic field obtained from subsequent numerical simulation evolves similarly to the observed geomagnetic variation, regardless of the initial choice of the model solution (so long it is a well developed numerical solution). The model solution diverges on the time scales on the order of 60 years, similar to the time scales of the torsional oscillations in the Earth's core. Our numerical test shows that geomagnetic data assimilation is promising with our MoSST model.

  9. Geomagnetic Storms and Acute Myocardial Infarctions Morbidity in Middle Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, S.; Babayev, E. S.; Mustafa, F. R.; Stoilova, I.; Taseva, T.; Georgieva, K.

    2009-12-01

    Results of collaborative studies on revealing a possible relationship between solar activity (SA) and geomagnetic activity (GMA) and pre-hospital acute myocardial infarction (AMI) morbidity are presented. Studies were based on medical data from Bulgaria and Azerbaijan. Bulgarian data, covering the period from 01.12.1995 to 31.12.2004, concerned daily distribution of number of patients with AMI diagnose (in total 1192 cases) from Sofia Region on the day of admission at the hospital. Azerbaijani data contained 4479 pre-hospital AMI incidence cases for the period 01.01.2003-31.12.2005 and were collected from 21 emergency and first medical aid stations in Grand Baku Area (including Absheron Economical Region with several millions of inhabitants). Data were "cleaned" as much as possible from social and other factors and were subjected to medical and mathematical/statistical analysis. Medical analysis showed reliability of the used data. Method of ANalysis Of VAriance (ANOVA) was applied to check the significance of GMA intensity effect and the type of geomagnetic storms - those caused by magnetic clouds (MC) and by high speed solar wind streams (HSSWS) - on AMI incidences. Relevant correlation coefficients were calculated. Results were outlined for both considered data. Results obtained for the Sofia data showed statistically significant positive correlation between considered GMA indices and AMI occurrence. ANOVA revealed that AMI incidence number was significantly increased from the day before till the day after geomagnetic storms with different intensities. Geomagnetic storms caused by MC were related to significant increase of AMI number in comparison with the storms caused by HSSWS. There was a trend for such different effects even on -1st and +1st day for the period 1995-2004. Results obtained for the Baku data revealed trends similar to those obtained for Sofia data. AMI morbidity increment was observed on the days with higher GMA intensity and after these days

  10. Psychometric Consequences of Subpopulation Item Parameter Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins-Manley, Anne Corinne

    2017-01-01

    This study defines subpopulation item parameter drift (SIPD) as a change in item parameters over time that is dependent on subpopulations of examinees, and hypothesizes that the presence of SIPD in anchor items is associated with bias and/or lack of invariance in three psychometric outcomes. Results show that SIPD in anchor items is associated…

  11. Low-drift micro flow sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    The emerging fields of micro total-analysis systems (micro-TAS), micro-reactors and bio-MEMS drives the need for further miniaturisation of sensors measuring quantities such as pressure, temperature and flow. The research described in this thesis concerns the development of low-drift micro flow sens

  12. Experimental design for drifting buoy Lagrangian test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, P. M.

    1975-01-01

    A test of instrumentation fabricated to measure the performance of a free drifting buoy as a (Lagrangian) current meter is described. Specifically it is proposed to distinguish between the trajectory of a drogued buoy and the trajectory of the water at the level of the drogue by measuring the flow relative to the drogue.

  13. Psychometric Consequences of Subpopulation Item Parameter Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins-Manley, Anne Corinne

    2017-01-01

    This study defines subpopulation item parameter drift (SIPD) as a change in item parameters over time that is dependent on subpopulations of examinees, and hypothesizes that the presence of SIPD in anchor items is associated with bias and/or lack of invariance in three psychometric outcomes. Results show that SIPD in anchor items is associated…

  14. Ion Landau Damping on Drift Tearing Modes

    CERN Document Server

    Connor, J W; Zocco, A

    2012-01-01

    The equations governing the ion Landau damping (ILD) layers for a drift tearing mode are derived and solved to provide a matching to ideal MHD solutions at large $x$ and to the drift tearing solution emerging from the ion kinetic region, $k\\rho_{i}\\sim1$, at small $x,$ the distance from the rational surface. The ILD layers lie on either side of the mode rational surface at locations defined by $k_{y}xV_{Ti}/L_{s}=\\omega_{*e}(1+0.73\\eta_{e})$ and have been ignored in many previous analyses of linear drift tearing stability. The effect of the ILD layer on the drift tearing mode is to introduce an additional stabilizing contribution, requiring even larger values of the stability index, $\\Delta^{\\prime}$ for instability, than predicted by Connor Hastie and Zocco [PPCF,54, 035003, (2012)] and Cowley, Kulsrud and Hahm [Phys. Fluids,29, 3230, (1986)]. The magnitude and scaling of the new stabilizing effect in slab geometry is discussed.

  15. Stable discrete representation of relativistically drifting plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kirchen, Manuel; Godfrey, Brendan B; Dornmair, Irene; Jalas, Soeren; Peters, Kevin; Vay, Jean-Luc; Maier, Andreas R

    2016-01-01

    Representing the electrodynamics of relativistically drifting particle ensembles in discrete, co-propagating Galilean coordinates enables the derivation of a Particle-in-Cell algorithm that is intrinsically free of the Numerical Cherenkov Instability, for plasmas flowing at a uniform velocity. Application of the method is shown by modeling plasma accelerators in a Lorentz-transformed optimal frame of reference.

  16. Plate Tectonics and Continental Drift: Classroom Ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Prentice K.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests various classroom studies related to plate tectonics and continental drift, including comments on and sources of resource materials useful in teaching the topics. A complete list of magazine articles on the topics from the Sawyer Marine Resource Collection may be obtained by contacting the author. (JN)

  17. Learning drifting concepts with neural networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biehl, Michael; Schwarze, Holm

    1993-01-01

    The learning of time-dependent concepts with a neural network is studied analytically and numerically. The linearly separable target rule is represented by an N-vector, whose time dependence is modelled by a random or deterministic drift process. A single-layer network is trained online using differ

  18. Mode selective control of drift wave turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, C.; Klinger, T.; Block, D.;

    2001-01-01

    Experiments on spatiotemporal open-loop synchronization of drift wave turbulence in a magnetized cylindrical plasma are reported. The synchronization effect is modeled by a rotating current profile with prescribed mode structure. Numerical simulations of an extended Hasegawa-Wakatani model show g...

  19. Visualizing CMS muon drift tubes’ currents

    CERN Document Server

    Hamarik, Lauri

    2015-01-01

    This report documents my work as a summer student in the CMS DT group at CERN in July and August of 2015. During that time, I have participated in relocating DT monitoring experiment to GIF++ site and creating software to analyze drift tubes’ wires current dependence on luminosity and radioactivity.

  20. Drift wave launching in a linear quadrupole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessema, G.Y.; Elliott, J.A.; Rusbridge, M.G. (Manchester Univ. (UK). Inst. of Science and Technology)

    1989-12-01

    Drift waves have been successfully launched from flag probes in a steady-state magnetized plasma, and the launching mechanism has been identified. Non-linear interactions are observed between launched and intrinsic waves. A wide range of further experimental studies is thus made possible, of fundamental relevance to plasma confinement. (author).

  1. A large acceptance cylindrical drift chamber detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrose, D.A. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States); Bachman, M.G. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States); Coffey, W.P. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States); Glass, G. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States); McNaughton, K.H. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States); Riley, P.J. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States); Adams, D.L. [Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Gaussiran, T.L. [Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Hungerford, E.V. [University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Lan, K.A. [University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Johnston, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); McNaughton, M.W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Penttila, S.I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Supek, I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes a large acceptance cylindrical drift chamber detector designed and built for the study of the np{yields}pp{pi}{sup -} reaction at neutron beam energies in the range 500-800 MeV. Details of construction, electronics, testing, and detection efficiencies and resolutions are presented. (orig.).

  2. Stochastic Evolution Equations with Adapted Drift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we study stochastic evolution equations in Banach spaces. We restrict ourselves to the two following cases. First, we consider equations in which the drift is a closed linear operator that depends on time and is random. Such equations occur as mathematical models in for instance

  3. Effects of Drifting Macroalgae in Eelgrass Ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canal Vergés, Paula; Valdemarsen, Thomas Bruun; Kristensen, Erik

    2010-01-01

    and physical damage on eelgrass can occur when macroalgae are drifting as bedload. The ballistic effect of moving macroalgae on surface sediment was tested in the field as well as in a series of annular flume experiments, where simultaneous measurements of macroalgae transport and turbidity were measured...

  4. Effects of Drifting Macroalgae in Eelgrass Ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canal Vergés, Paula; Valdemarsen, Thomas Bruun; Kristensen, Erik

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that current-driven macroalge transport in shallow lagoons and estuaries may negatively impact eelgrass through increased turbidity and physical stress. Increased turbidity and lower light availability for eelgrass may result when drifting macroalgae erode surface sediment a...

  5. Generalization of the one dimensional modeling and design considerations of spiral Si drift detectors: Flat (straight) drift channels and constant drift fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Manwen, E-mail: mwliu1993@163.com; Li, Zheng, E-mail: zhengli58@gmail.com

    2016-07-11

    The one-dimensional design consideration for the spiral (cylindrical geometry) Si drift detector (SDD) has been modified and generalized for small drift distance (R) compatible to the detector thickness (d), i.e. for R–d, and for non uniform backside biasing situations. By applying a non uniform biasing voltage with a gradient similar (proportional) to the front side, one can increase the reach-through voltage, resulting in a large drift field for carriers. This can be important for large R (>3 mm). With a careful design of electric field profiles on both sides, one can obtain the optimum case of a spiral SDD with a straight (flat) drift channel and constant drift field throughout the carrier drift channel. The previous solution in the literature is an approximation of this work for R»d and with a curved drift channel.

  6. Generalization of the one dimensional modeling and design considerations of spiral Si drift detectors: Flat (straight) drift channels and constant drift fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Manwen; Li, Zheng

    2016-07-01

    The one-dimensional design consideration for the spiral (cylindrical geometry) Si drift detector (SDD) has been modified and generalized for small drift distance (R) compatible to the detector thickness (d), i.e. for R-d, and for non uniform backside biasing situations. By applying a non uniform biasing voltage with a gradient similar (proportional) to the front side, one can increase the reach-through voltage, resulting in a large drift field for carriers. This can be important for large R (>3 mm). With a careful design of electric field profiles on both sides, one can obtain the optimum case of a spiral SDD with a straight (flat) drift channel and constant drift field throughout the carrier drift channel. The previous solution in the literature is an approximation of this work for R»d and with a curved drift channel.

  7. F-region ionospheric perturbations in the low-latitude ionosphere during the geomagnetic storm of 25-27 August 1987

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kawamura

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available We have presented a comparison between the modeled NmF2 and hmF2, and NmF2 and hmF2 which were observed at the equatorial anomaly crest and close to the geomagnetic equator simultaneously by the Akita, Kokubunji, Yamagawa, Okinawa, Manila, Vanimo, and Darwin ionospheric sounders and by the middle and upper atmosphere (MU radar (34.85° N, 136.10° E during the 25-27 August 1987 geomagnetically storm-time period at low solar activity near 201°, geomagnetic longitude. A comparison between the electron and ion temperatures measured by the MU radar and those produced by the model of the ionosphere and plasmasphere is presented. The corrections of the storm-time zonal electric field, EΛ, from 16:30 UT to 21:00 UT on 25 August bring the modeled and measured hmF2 into reasonable agreement. In both hemispheres, the meridional neutral wind, W, taken from the HWW90 wind model and the NRLMSISE-00 neutral temperature, Tn, and densities are corrected so that the model results agree with the ionospheric sounders and MU radar observations. The geomagnetic latitude variations in NmF2 on 26 August differ significantly from those on 25 and 27 August. The equatorial plasma fountain undergoes significant inhibition on 26 August. This suppression of the equatorial anomaly on 26 August is not due to a reduction in the meridional component of the plasma drift perpendicular to the geomagnetic field direction, but is due to the action of storm-time changes in neutral winds and densities on the plasma fountain process. The asymmetry in W determines most of the north-south asymmetry in hmF2 and NmF2 on 25 and 27 August between about 01:00-01:30 UT and about 14:00 UT when the equatorial anomaly exists in the ionosphere, while asymmetries in W, Tn, and neutral densities relative to the geomagnetic equator are responsible for the north-south asymmetry in NmF2 and hmF2 on 26 August. A theory of the primary mechanisms causing the morning and evening peaks in the electron

  8. Discussion in the Research on American History of Westward Development%美国西部开发史研究综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王储; 蒋涛

    2012-01-01

    19世纪美国西部开发取得巨大成就,成为世界上对欠发达地区成功开发的典型。自上世纪90年代以来,我国学术界充分认识到研究美国西部开发史的现实意义,对该课题进行了卓有成效的探讨,取得了较为丰硕的成果,主要集中在美国西部开发中的土地政策、交通革命和城市化等领域。本文对这些成果加以综述,较为完整地描述了我国学术界对美国西部开发史的研究现状。%The western part of the United States has made a great progress in the development in 19th century known as "the westward expansion". This became an ideal model and was subsequ ently applied to the exploration of the undeveloped areas. Since the 1990s, scholars in China have increasingly recognized the international significance of the history of America~ development of the West. By the highly effective discussion of this study, scholars have a- chieved a lot which focus on the field of land policy, transportation revolution and urbanization under the development of western regions in America. In this paper, the author offers an deep review of these advancements. This is followed by a discussion of the current developments in the research of Chinese academics and their analysis of the American his- tory of westward development.

  9. 浅析“一带一路”与中国向西开放%One Belt One Road Initiative and China's Westward Opening up

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄勇

    2015-01-01

    To open westward has practical significance for China in paving a shortcut way for trades between China and neighboring coun-tries in Asia and Europe, facilitating trade and investment, realizing transnational productivity cooperation and upgrade of equipment man-ufacturing industry, and safeguarding a smooth energy passageway. To propel the initiative of One Belt One Road is an important content of China's 13th five year plan. Through the joint development, China is going to advance regional cooperation, fueling the strategic mutual trust, economic and trade cooperation and cultural and educational exchange between countries along the line. Finally, a free trade zone for the countries will be built, which is China's key strategy for opening up westward.%向西开放,对打通中国与亚欧邻国贸易的快捷通道、促进贸易投资便利化、实现跨国产能合作与装备制造业升级、保障中国的能源通道的畅通具有现实意义。推进一带一路是十三五规划的重要内容,中国将通过共建“一带一路”推动区域合作,努力达成沿线国家战略互信、经贸合作、人文交流,最终会整合出一带一路沿线国家自贸区,这是中国向西开放的重大战略。

  10. Barber's Point, Oahu, Hawaii Drift Card Study 2002-2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drift cards were be released from Barber's Point, Oahu, approximately once a month during the two year span to get an idea of the distribution of card drift under...

  11. Exploring Genetic Drift and Natural Selection through a Simulation Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maret, Timothy J.; Rissing, Steven W.

    1998-01-01

    Reports on the development of a laboratory exercise that would allow students to explore the concept of genetic drift. Discusses the concept of genetic drift that is coincident with natural selection and that closely models the real world. (DDR)

  12. Drift-Scale THC Seepage Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.R. Bryan

    2005-02-17

    The purpose of this report (REV04) is to document the thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) seepage model, which simulates the composition of waters that could potentially seep into emplacement drifts, and the composition of the gas phase. The THC seepage model is processed and abstracted for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Post-Processing Analysis for THC Seepage) Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172761]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this report. The plan for validation of the models documented in this report is given in Section 2.2.2, ''Model Validation for the DS THC Seepage Model,'' of the TWP. The TWP (Section 3.2.2) identifies Acceptance Criteria 1 to 4 for ''Quantity and Chemistry of Water Contacting Engineered Barriers and Waste Forms'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) as being applicable to this report; however, in variance to the TWP, Acceptance Criterion 5 has also been determined to be applicable, and is addressed, along with the other Acceptance Criteria, in Section 4.2 of this report. Also, three FEPS not listed in the TWP (2.2.10.01.0A, 2.2.10.06.0A, and 2.2.11.02.0A) are partially addressed in this report, and have been added to the list of excluded FEPS in Table 6.1-2. This report has been developed in accordance with LP-SIII.10Q-BSC, ''Models''. This report documents the THC seepage model and a derivative used for validation, the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC submodel. The THC seepage model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral

  13. Electromagnetic drift modes in an inhomogeneous electron gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P. K.; Pecseli, H. L.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1986-01-01

    A pair of nonlinear equations is derived which describes the dynamics of the electromagnetic drift oscillations in a nonuniform magnetized electron gas. It is shown that the nonlinear electromagnetic drift modes can propagate in the form of dipole vortices......A pair of nonlinear equations is derived which describes the dynamics of the electromagnetic drift oscillations in a nonuniform magnetized electron gas. It is shown that the nonlinear electromagnetic drift modes can propagate in the form of dipole vortices...

  14. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, David H.

    2001-05-30

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for the selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. REV 01 ICN 01 of this analysis is developed in accordance with AP-3.10Q, Analyses and Models, Revision 2, ICN 4, and prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M&O 2001a). The objective of this analysis is to update the previous analysis (CRWMS M&O 2000a) to account for related changes in the Ground Control System Description Document (CRWMS M&O 2000b), the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document, which is included in the Requirements and Criteria for Implementing a Repository Design that can be Operated Over a Range of Thermal Modes (BSC 2001), input information, and in environmental conditions, and to provide updated information on candidate ground support materials. Candidate materials for ground support are carbon steel and cement grout. Steel is mainly used for steel sets, lagging, channel, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement grout is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. Candidate materials for the emplacement drift invert are carbon steel and granular natural material. Materials are evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment based on the updated thermal loading condition and waste package design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground support materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning the behavior of candidate ground support materials during the preclosure period. (3) Evaluate impacts of temperature and radiation effects on mechanical and thermal properties of steel. Assess corrosion potential of steel at emplacement drift environment. (4) Evaluate factors

  15. Drifting snow climate of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenaerts, J.T.M.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the drifting snow climate of the Earth's ice sheets, Antarctica and Greenland. For that purpose we use a regional atmospheric climate model, RACMO2. We included a routine that is able to calculate the drifting snow fluxes and accounts for the interaction between drifting snow on

  16. Drifting snow climate of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenaerts, J.T.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314850163

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the drifting snow climate of the Earth's ice sheets, Antarctica and Greenland. For that purpose we use a regional atmospheric climate model, RACMO2. We included a routine that is able to calculate the drifting snow fluxes and accounts for the interaction between drifting snow on

  17. Rough differential equations with unbounded drift term

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, S.; Scheutzow, M.

    2017-01-01

    We study controlled differential equations driven by a rough path (in the sense of T. Lyons) with an additional, possibly unbounded drift term. We show that the equation induces a solution flow if the drift grows at most linearly. Furthermore, we show that the semiflow exists assuming only appropriate one-sided growth conditions. We provide bounds for both the flow and the semiflow. Applied to stochastic analysis, our results imply strong completeness and the existence of a stochastic (semi)flow for a large class of stochastic differential equations. If the driving process is Gaussian, we can further deduce (essentially) sharp tail estimates for the (semi)flow and a Freidlin-Wentzell-type large deviation result.

  18. Clean Industrial Room for Drift Tube Assembling

    CERN Document Server

    Glonti, GL; Evtoukhovitch, P G; Kroa, G; Manz, A; Potrap, I N; Rihter, P; Stoletov, G D; Tskhadadze, E G; Chepurnov, V F; Chirkov, A V; Shelkov, G A

    2001-01-01

    Description of a clean industrial room for assembly of drift tubes for the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS experiment is presented. High quality specifications on the detectors to be produced demanded creation of a workplace with stable temperature and humidity, as well as minimum quantity of dust in the room. Checking of parameters of intra-room air during long period of continuous work has been confirmed correctness of the designed characteristics of the climatic system installed in the clean room. The room large volum (\\sim 190 m^3), the powerful and flexible climatic system, and simplicity of service allow assembling of detectors with length up to 5 m. Subsequent checking of functionality of the assembled detectors has shown high quality of assembling (the amount of rejected tubes does not exceed 2 %). It demonstrates conformity to the assembling quality requirements for mass production of drift chambers for the muon spectrometer.

  19. Gas sensor with attenuated drift characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ing-Shin [Danbury, CT; Chen, Philip S. H. [Bethel, CT; Neuner, Jeffrey W [Bethel, CT; Welch, James [Fairfield, CT; Hendrix, Bryan [Danbury, CT; Dimeo, Jr., Frank [Danbury, CT

    2008-05-13

    A sensor with an attenuated drift characteristic, including a layer structure in which a sensing layer has a layer of diffusional barrier material on at least one of its faces. The sensor may for example be constituted as a hydrogen gas sensor including a palladium/yttrium layer structure formed on a micro-hotplate base, with a chromium barrier layer between the yttrium layer and the micro-hotplate, and with a tantalum barrier layer between the yttrium layer and an overlying palladium protective layer. The gas sensor is useful for detection of a target gas in environments susceptible to generation or incursion of such gas, and achieves substantial (e.g., >90%) reduction of signal drift from the gas sensor in extended operation, relative to a corresponding gas sensor lacking the diffusional barrier structure of the invention

  20. Toroidal effects on drift wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBrun, M.J.; Tajima, T.; Gray, M.G.; Furnish, G.; Horton, W.

    1992-09-23

    The universal drift instability and other drift instabilities driven by density and temperature gradients in a toroidal system are investigated in both linear and nonlinear regimes via particle simulation. Runs in toroidal and cylindrical geometry show dramatic differences in plasma behavior, primarily due to the toroidicity-induced coupling of rational surfaces through the poloidal mode number m. In the toroidal system studied, the eigenmodes are seen to possess (i) an elongated, nearly global radial extent (ii) a higher growth rate than in the corresponding cylindrical system, (iii) an eigenfrequency nearly constant with radius, (iv) a global temperature relaxation and enhancement of thermal heat conduction. Most importantly, the measured Xi shows an increase with radius and an absolute value on the order of that observed in experiment. On the basis of our observations, we argue that the increase in Xi with radius observed in experiment is caused by the global nature of heat convection in the presence of toroidicity-induced mode coupling.

  1. Nonlinear dynamics of resistive electrostatic drift waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, H.L.

    1999-01-01

    The evolution of weakly nonlinear electrostatic drift waves in an externally imposed strong homogeneous magnetic field is investigated numerically in three spatial dimensions. The analysis is based on a set of coupled, nonlinear equations, which are solved for an initial condition which is pertur......The evolution of weakly nonlinear electrostatic drift waves in an externally imposed strong homogeneous magnetic field is investigated numerically in three spatial dimensions. The analysis is based on a set of coupled, nonlinear equations, which are solved for an initial condition which...... is perturbed by a small amplitude incoherent wave-field. The initial evolution is exponential, following the growth of perturbations predicted by linear stability theory. The fluctuations saturate at relatively high amplitudes, by forming a pair of magnetic field aligned vortex-like structures of opposite...

  2. Paleointensity-assisted chronostratigraphy of detrital layers on the Eirik Drift (North Atlantic) since marine isotope stage 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Helen F.; Channell, James E. T.; Stoner, Joseph S.; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; Wright, James D.; Neitzke, Lauren C.; Mountain, Gregory S.

    2007-11-01

    Four piston cores collected in 1999 and 2002 from the Eirik Drift (southern Labrador Sea, off SE Greenland) provide paleomagnetic, environmental magnetic, and oxygen isotope records back to marine isotope stage 11. Age models for the cores are based on a combination of planktonic oxygen isotope data, relative geomagnetic paleointensity proxies, and the identification of geomagnetic excursions (Laschamp and Iceland Basin). Environmental magnetic data delineate two distinct detrital signals, interpreted to reflect the behavior of the surrounding ice sheets (Greenland and Laurentide) to orbital- and millennial-scale climate forcing. Broad decimeter-scale intervals of increased magnetic concentration and grain size occur during the early part of interglacial marine isotopic stages (MIS) 1, 5, 7, 9, and 11. Discrete centimeter-scale layers, recognized by magnetic concentration and grain-size sensitive parameters, gamma ray attenuation (GRA) bulk density, and carbonate content, are observed in glacial and interglacial stages as well as during terminations. On the basis of glacial reconstructions on Greenland during the last termination, the broad decimeter-scale coarser-grained intervals can be attributed to detrital influx associated with the retreat of the terrestrial-based Greenland Ice Sheet in the early Holocene. A similar magnetic signal observed within interglacial MIS 5, 7, 9, and 11 indicates similar Greenland Ice Sheet behavior during these time intervals. Two types of centimeter-scale detrital layers are also recognized back to MIS 11. Detrital carbonate (DC) layers reflect predominately ice-rafted debris (IRD) deposition, while the low detrital carbonate (LDC) layers reflect mass movement as evidenced by sharp basal contacts, graded bedding, and traction structures, likely from the Greenland slope. Some detrital layers on Eirik Drift, particularly the DC layers, can be tentatively correlated to detrital layers observed in the central North Atlantic and to

  3. Steady induction effects in geomagnetism. Part 1C: Geomagnetic estimation of steady surficial core motions: Application to the definitive geomagnetic reference field models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    1993-01-01

    In the source-free mantle/frozen-flux core magnetic earth model, the non-linear inverse steady motional induction problem was solved using the method presented in Part 1B. How that method was applied to estimate steady, broad-scale fluid velocity fields near the top of Earth's core that induce the secular change indicated by the Definitive Geomagnetic Reference Field (DGRF) models from 1945 to 1980 are described. Special attention is given to the derivation of weight matrices for the DGRF models because the weights determine the apparent significance of the residual secular change. The derived weight matrices also enable estimation of the secular change signal-to-noise ratio characterizing the DGRF models. Two types of weights were derived in 1987-88: radial field weights for fitting the evolution of the broad-scale portion of the radial geomagnetic field component at Earth's surface implied by the DGRF's, and general weights for fitting the evolution of the broad-scale portion of the scalar potential specified by these models. The difference is non-trivial because not all the geomagnetic data represented by the DGRF's constrain the radial field component. For radial field weights (or general weights), a quantitatively acceptable explication of broad-scale secular change relative to the 1980 Magsat epoch must account for 99.94271 percent (or 99.98784 percent) of the total weighted variance accumulated therein. Tolerable normalized root-mean-square weighted residuals of 2.394 percent (or 1.103 percent) are less than the 7 percent errors expected in the source-free mantle/frozen-flux core approximation.

  4. High-latitude geomagnetic studies (22-23 millihertz)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, A. (AT T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ (USA) City Univ. of New York, Brooklyn (USA)); Lanzerotti, L.J.; Maclennan, C.C.; Medford, L.V. (AT T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ (USA))

    1988-01-01

    Geomagnetic field measurements were initiated at Iqaluit (formerly Frobisher Bay) in the Northwest Territories of Canada during July 1985 (Wolfe et al. 1986). This site was selected because it was calculated to be in the conjugate area to the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station where extensive geomagnetic research has been conducted. The principal scientific objectives are to study the conjugacy of high-latitude magnetic fluctuations observed at Iqaluit and South Pole (L{approximately}13). In this report, the authors extend the previous report of Wolfe et al. (1987) and comment upon the conjugacy of the stations for magnetic field fluctuations in the Pc3 (22-33 millihertz) hydromagnetic regime and upon the penetration of hydromagnetic energy deeper into the magnetosphere on the local dayside.

  5. International Geomagnetic Reference Field—the tenth generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macmillan, Susan; Maus, Stefan

    2005-12-01

    The International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) 10th Generation was adopted in 2004 by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) Working Group V-MOD. It is the latest version of a standard mathematical description of the Earth's main magnetic field and is used widely in studies of the Earth's deep interior, its crust and its ionosphere and magnetosphere. This generation differs from the previous generation with the replacement of the secular-variation model for 2000.0-2005.0 with a main-field model at 2005.0 and a secular-variation model for 2005.0-2010.0. The IGRF is the product of a huge collaborative effort between magnetic field modellers and the institutes involved in collecting and disseminating magnetic field data from satellites and from observatories and surveys around the world. This paper lists the new coefficients and includes contour maps and pole positions.

  6. Estimation of cold plasma outflow during geomagnetic storms

    CERN Document Server

    Haaland, S; André, M; Maes, L; Baddeley, L; Barakat, A; Chappell, R; Eccles, V; Johnsen, C; Lybekk, B; Li, K; Pedersen, A; Schunk, R; Welling, D

    2016-01-01

    Low-energy ions of ionospheric origin constitute a significant contributor to the magnetospheric plasma population. Measuring cold ions is difficult though. Observations have to be done at sufficiently high altitudes and typically in regions of space where spacecraft attain a positive charge due to solar illumination. Cold ions are therefore shielded from the satellite particle detectors. Furthermore, spacecraft can only cover key regions of ion outflow during segments of their orbit, so additional complications arise if continuous longtime observations, such as during a geomagnetic storm, are needed. In this paper we suggest a new approach, based on a combination of synoptic observations and a novel technique to estimate the flux and total outflow during the various phases of geomagnetic storms. Our results indicate large variations in both outflow rates and transport throughout the storm. Prior to the storm main phase, outflow rates are moderate, and the cold ions are mainly emanating from moderately sized ...

  7. International Geomagnetic Reference Field: the 12th generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thébault, Erwan; Finlay, Christopher C.; Beggan, Ciarán D.; Alken, Patrick; Aubert, Julien; Barrois, Olivier; Bertrand, Francois; Bondar, Tatiana; Boness, Axel; Brocco, Laura; Canet, Elisabeth; Chambodut, Aude; Chulliat, Arnaud; Coïsson, Pierdavide; Civet, François; Du, Aimin; Fournier, Alexandre; Fratter, Isabelle; Gillet, Nicolas; Hamilton, Brian; Hamoudi, Mohamed; Hulot, Gauthier; Jager, Thomas; Korte, Monika; Kuang, Weijia; Lalanne, Xavier; Langlais, Benoit; Léger, Jean-Michel; Lesur, Vincent; Lowes, Frank J.; Macmillan, Susan; Mandea, Mioara; Manoj, Chandrasekharan; Maus, Stefan; Olsen, Nils; Petrov, Valeriy; Ridley, Victoria; Rother, Martin; Sabaka, Terence J.; Saturnino, Diana; Schachtschneider, Reyko; Sirol, Olivier; Tangborn, Andrew; Thomson, Alan; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars; Vigneron, Pierre; Wardinski, Ingo; Zvereva, Tatiana

    2015-05-01

    The 12th generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was adopted in December 2014 by the Working Group V-MOD appointed by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA). It updates the previous IGRF generation with a definitive main field model for epoch 2010.0, a main field model for epoch 2015.0, and a linear annual predictive secular variation model for 2015.0-2020.0. Here, we present the equations defining the IGRF model, provide the spherical harmonic coefficients, and provide maps of the magnetic declination, inclination, and total intensity for epoch 2015.0 and their predicted rates of change for 2015.0-2020.0. We also update the magnetic pole positions and discuss briefly the latest changes and possible future trends of the Earth's magnetic field.

  8. A new regard about Surlari National Geomagnetic Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimopolos, Laurentiu; Asimopolos, Natalia-Silvia; Pestina, Agata-Monica

    2010-05-01

    Geomagnetic field study in Romanian stations has started with irregular measurements in late XIXth century. In 1943, the foundation of Surlari National Geomagnetic Observatory (SNGO) marks the beginning of a new era in the systematic study of geomagnetic field by a continuous registration of its variations and by carrying out standard absolute measurements in a fundamental station. The location of the observatory meets the highest exigencies, being situated in physical-geological conditions of a uniform local field, at a reasonably long distance from human activities. Its laboratories observe strict conditions of non-magnetism, ensuring the possibility of absolute standard measurements (national magnetic standards) for all the units in the country, civil or military, which are endowed with equipment based on geomagnetic metrology. These basic conditions have allowed the observatory to become by developing its initial preoccupations a centre of complex geomagnetic research, constantly involved in national and international issues, promoting new themes in our country and bringing significant contributions. During the last two decades, infrastructure and equipment used in monitoring geomagnetic field at European and planetary level have experienced a remarkable development. New registering techniques have allowed a complete to automate of data acquisition, and sampling step and their precision increased by two classes of size. Systems of transmitting these data in real time to world collecting centres have resulted in the possibility of approaching globalize studies, suitable for following some phenomena at planetary scale. At the same time, a significant development in the procedures of processing primary data has been registered, based on standardized programmes. The new stage of this fundamental research, largely applicable in various fields, is also marked by the simultaneous observation of space-time distribution of terrestrial electromagnetic field by means of

  9. Acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons during small geomagnetic storms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B R; Millan, R M; Reeves, G D; Friedel, R H W

    2015-12-16

    Past studies of radiation belt relativistic electrons have favored active storm time periods, while the effects of small geomagnetic storms (Dst > -50 nT) have not been statistically characterized. In this timely study, given the current weak solar cycle, we identify 342 small storms from 1989 through 2000 and quantify the corresponding change in relativistic electron flux at geosynchronous orbit. Surprisingly, small storms can be equally as effective as large storms at enhancing and depleting fluxes. Slight differences exist, as small storms are 10% less likely to result in flux enhancement and 10% more likely to result in flux depletion than large storms. Nevertheless, it is clear that neither acceleration nor loss mechanisms scale with storm drivers as would be expected. Small geomagnetic storms play a significant role in radiation belt relativistic electron dynamics and provide opportunities to gain new insights into the complex balance of acceleration and loss processes.

  10. Geomagnetic field intensity in the middle jurassic - oligocene

    CERN Document Server

    Kurazhkovskii, A Yu; Klain, B I

    2014-01-01

    The present paper summarizes results of the studies on the intensity of geomagnetic field in the (167 - 23) Ma interval by sedimentary rocks of the Russian Plate and adjacent territories. The joint analysis of the data paleointensity obtained by sedimentary and thermomagnetized (from PINT12) rocks within this temporal interval is conducted. It is shown that the changes of the paleointensity were occurred chaotically. Alternating bursts and periods of quiet regime of the geomagnetic field are typical for intermittent processes and is a characteristic of the geological interval Jurassic-beginning of Paleogene. The distributions of the paleointensity corresponding to different intervals of geologic time were investigated. It is revealed that the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the paleointensity values is best approximated by a power function. The indices of the power functions varied depending on geologic time intervals.The analysis of the paleomagnetic data suggests that the medium in which the geoma...

  11. De-noising Diurnal Variation Data in Geomagnetic Field Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onovughe, E.

    2017-01-01

    Ground based geomagnetic observatory series have been used to investigate and describe the residuals between a continuous geomagnetic field model and observed diurnal variation for noise-removal of signal due to external field of magnetospheric ring current sources. In all the observatories studied, the residuals in the X-direction consistently show the noisiest signal. Results show that the residuals in the X-direction correlates closely with the RC-index, suggesting an origin from unmodelled external field variation. Notable cross-correlation is also seen between the residuals and the RC-index at zero-lag. Removal/reduction of this unmodelled signal enhances resolution of fine-scale detail in diurnal variation studies.

  12. PAMELA's measurements of geomagnetically trapped and albedo protons

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, A; Barbarino, G C; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Bottai, S; Bravar, U; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; Christian, E C; De Donato, C; de Nolfo, G A; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Formato, V; Galper, A M; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Koldobskiy, S; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Lee, M; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Martucci, M; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mergè, M; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Munini, R; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Panico, B; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Ryan, J M; Sarkar, R; Scotti, V; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stochaj, S; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G

    2015-01-01

    Data from the PAMELA satellite experiment were used to perform a detailed measurement of under-cutoff protons at low Earth orbits. On the basis of a trajectory tracing approach using a realistic description of the magnetosphere, protons were classified into geomagnetically trapped and re-entrant albedo. The former include stably-trapped protons in the South Atlantic Anomaly, which were analyzed in the framework of the adiabatic theory, investigating energy spectra, spatial and angular distributions; results were compared with the predictions of the AP8 and the PSB97 empirical trapped models. The albedo protons were classified into quasi-trapped, concentrating in the magnetic equatorial region, and un-trapped, spreading over all latitudes and including both short-lived (precipitating) and long-lived (pseudo-trapped) components. Features of the penumbra region around the geomagnetic cutoff were investigated as well. PAMELA observations significantly improve the characterization of the high energy proton populat...

  13. Exploiting the geomagnetic distortion of the inclined atmospheric showers

    CERN Document Server

    Billoir, Pierre; Blanco, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel approach for the determination of the nature of ultra-high energy cosmic rays by exploiting the geomagnetic deviation of muons in nearly horizontal showers. The distribution of the muons at ground level is well described by a simple parametrization providing a few shape parameters tightly correlated to $X^\\mu_\\mathrm{max}$, the depth of maximal muon production, which is a mass indicator tightly correlated to the usual parameter $X_\\mathrm{max}$, the depth of maximal development of the shower. We show that some constraints can be set on the predictions of hadronic models, especially by combining the geomagnetic distortion with standard measurement of the longitudinal profile. We discuss the precision needed to obtain significant results and we propose a schematic layout of a detector.

  14. Evaluation of candidate geomagnetic field models for IGRF-11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Maus, S.; Beggan, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    The eleventh generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was agreed in December 2009 by a task force appointed by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) Division V Working Group V-MOD. New spherical harmonic main field models for epochs 2005.0 (DGRF...... coefficients is also reported. Maps of differences in the vertical field intensity at Earth’s surface between the candidates and weighted mean models are presented. Candidates with anomalous aspects are identified and efforts made to pinpoint both troublesome coefficients and geographical regions where large...... vector satellite data is demonstrated; based on internal consistency DGRF-2005 has a formal root mean square vector field error over Earth’s surface of 1.0 nT. Difficulties nevertheless remain in accurately forecasting field evolution only five years into the future....

  15. Some remarks on electronics for drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Verweij, H

    1973-01-01

    A brief outline of the required functions is given. Analogue and digital time measuring methods are compared. Amplifiers and current division circuits are discussed. A method for storage of analogue information, and the analogue shift register, is proposed. Functional block diagrams and more detailed information is given on complete systems, which are at present being developed at CERN. They allow the measurement of two orthogonal coordinates, one by the drift time, the other by the current division. (6 refs).

  16. Silicon drift detectors in the ALICE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bonvicini, V; Crescio, E; Giubellino, P; Hernández-Montoya, R; Kolojvari, A A; Mazza, G; Montaño-Zetina, L M; Nissinen, J; Nouais, D; Rashevsky, A; Rivetti, A; Tosello, F; Vacchi, A

    2000-01-01

    Silicon drift detectors (SDDs) are well suited to high-energy physics experiments with relatively low event rates. In particular SDDs will be used for the two intermediate layers of the Inner Tracking System of the ALICE experiment. Beam test results of linear SDD prototypes have shown a resolution of 40*30 mu m/sup 2/ and a cluster finding efficiency of essentially 100% with E=600 V/cm. (6 refs).

  17. The drift chambers of the NOMAD experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anfreville, M.; Astier, P.; Authier, M.; Baldisseri, A.; Banner, M.; Besson, N.; Bouchez, J.; Castera, A.; Cloue, O.; Dumarchez, J. E-mail: jacques.dumarchez@cern.ch; Dumps, L.; Gangler, E.; Gosset, J.; Hagner, C.; Jollec, C.; Lachaud, C.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.-M.; Linssen, L.; Meyer, J.-P.; Ouriet, J.-P.; Passerieux, J.-P.; Margaley, T.P.T. Pedrol; Placci, A.; Pluquet, A.; Poinsignon, J.; Popov, B.A.; Rathouit, P.; Schahmaneche, K.; Stolarczyk, T.; Uros, V.; Vannucci, F.; Vo, M.K.; Zaccone, H

    2002-04-01

    We present a detailed description of the drift chambers used as an active target and a tracking device in the NOMAD experiment at CERN. The main characteristics of these chambers are a large area (3{center_dot}3 m{sup 2}), a self-supporting structure made of light composite materials and a low cost. A spatial resolution of 150 {mu}m has been achieved with a single hit efficiency of 97%.

  18. Unintended Positional Drift and Its Potential Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Christian; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Walking-In-Place interaction techniques seem particularly useful in relation to immersive virtual environments where the user's movement is greatly constrained by a limited physical space. However, current techniques may not be particularly useful in combination with head-mounted displays since...... many users unintentionally move forward while walking in place. We refer to this phenomenon accidental movement as Unintended Positional Drift. The poster presents evidence of the phenomenon's existence and subsequently discusses different design solutions which potentially could circumvent the problem....

  19. The drift table: designing for ludic engagement

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The Drift Table is an electronic coffee table that displays slowly moving aerial photography controlled by the distribution of weight on its surface. It was designed to investigate our ideas about how technologies for the home could support ludic activities-that is, activities motivated by curiosity, exploration, and reflection rather than externally-defined tasks. The many design choices we made, for example to block or disguise utilitarian functionality, helped to articulate our emerging un...

  20. THERMAL DRIFT CHARACTERISTICS OF CAPACITIVE PRESSURE SENSORS

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The capacitive pressure sensors based on silicon are characterized by their very high sensitivities and their low power consumption. Nevertheless, their thermal behavior remains more or less unpredictable because they can indicate very high thermal coefficients. The study of the thermal behavior of these sensors is essential to define the parameters that cause the output characteristics drift. In this study, we modeled the thermal behavior of this sensors, using Finite Element Analysis (FE...

  1. Correlated Energy Exchange in Drifting Sea Ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chmel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The ice floe speed variations were monitored at the research camp North Pole 35 established on the Arctic ice pack in 2008. A three-month time series of measured speed values was used for determining changes in the kinetic energy of the drifting ice floe. The constructed energy distributions were analyzed by methods of nonextensive statistical mechanics based on the Tsallis statistics for open nonequilibrium systems, such as tectonic formations and drifting sea ice. The nonextensivity means the nonadditivity of externally induced energy changes in multicomponent systems due to dynamic interrelation of components having no structural links. The Tsallis formalism gives one an opportunity to assess the correlation between ice floe motions through a specific parameter, the so-called parameter of nonextensivity. This formalistic assessment of the actual state of drifting pack allows one to forecast some important trends in sea ice behavior, because the level of correlated dynamics determines conditions for extended mechanical perturbations in ice pack. In this work, we revealed temporal fluctuations of the parameter of nonextensivity and observed its maximum value before a large-scale sea ice fragmentation (faulting of consolidated sea ice. The correlation was not detected in fragmented sea ice where long-range interactions are weakened.

  2. Monitored Drift Chambers in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Herten, G

    Monitored Drift Chambers (MDT) are used in the ATLAS Detector to measure the momentum of high energy muons. They consist of drift tubes, which are filled with an Ar-CO2 gas mixture at 3 bar gas pressure. About 1200 drift chambers are required for ATLAS. They are up to 6 m long. Nevertheless the position of every wire needs to be known with a precision of 20 µm within a chamber. In addition, optical alignment sensors are required to measure the relative position of adjacent chambers with a precision of 30µm. This gigantic task seems impossible at first instance. Indeed it took many years of R&D to invent the right tools and methods before the first chamber could be built according to specifications. Today, at the time when 50% of the chambers have been produced, we are confident that the goal for ATLAS can be reached. The mechanical precision of the chambers could be verified with the x-ray tomograph at CERN. This ingenious device, developed for the MDT system, is able to measure the wire position insid...

  3. Ambipolar Drift Heating in Turbulent Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Padoan, P; Nordlund, A A; Padoan, Paolo

    1999-01-01

    Although thermal pressure is unimportant dynamically in most molecular gas, the temperature is an important diagnostic of dynamical processes and physical conditions. This is the first of two papers on thermal equilibrium in molecular clouds. We present calculations of frictional heating by ion-neutral (or ambipolar) drift in three-dimensional simulations of turbulent, magnetized molecular clouds. We show that ambipolar drift heating is a strong function of position in a turbulent cloud, and its average value can be significantly larger than the average cosmic ray heating rate. The volume averaged heating rate per unit volume due to ambipolar drift, H_AD ~ |JxB|^2 ~ B^4/L_B^2, is found to depend on the rms Alfvenic Mach number, M_A, and on the average field strength, as H_AD ~ M_A^2^4. This implies that the typical scale of variation of the magnetic field, L_B, is inversely proportional to M_A, which we also demonstrate.

  4. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Tang

    2000-01-07

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period. The Development Plan (DP) for this analysis is given in CRWMS M&O (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor) (1999a). The candidate materials for ground support are steel (carbon steel, ductile cast iron, galvanized steel, and stainless steel, etc.) and cement. Steel will mainly be used for steel sets, lagging, channels, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement usage is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. The candidate materials for the invert structure are steel and crushed rock ballast. The materials shall be evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment under a specific thermal loading condition based on the proposed License Application Design Selection (LADS) design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground control materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning behavior of candidate ground control materials during the preclosure period. The major criteria to be considered for steel are mechanical and thermal properties, and durability, of which corrosion is the most important concern. (3) Evaluate the available results and develop recommendations for material(s) to be used.

  5. Social diffusion and global drift on networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayama, Hiroki; Sinatra, Roberta

    2015-03-01

    We study a mathematical model of social diffusion on a symmetric weighted network where individual nodes' states gradually assimilate to local social norms made by their neighbors' average states. Unlike physical diffusion, this process is not state conservational and thus the global state of the network (i.e., sum of node states) will drift. The asymptotic average node state will be the average of initial node states weighted by their strengths. Here we show that, while the global state is not conserved in this process, the inner product of strength and state vectors is conserved instead, and perfect positive correlation between node states and local averages of their self-neighbor strength ratios always results in upward (or at least neutral) global drift. We also show that the strength assortativity negatively affects the speed of homogenization. Based on these findings, we propose an adaptive link weight adjustment method to achieve the highest upward global drift by increasing the strength-state correlation. The effectiveness of the method was confirmed through numerical simulations and implications for real-world social applications are discussed.

  6. Wind tunnel observations of drifting snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterna, Enrico; Crivelli, Philip; Lehning, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Drifting snow has a significant impact on snow redistribution in mountains, prairies as well as on glaciers, ice shelves, and sea ice. In all these environments, the local mass balance is highly influenced by drifting snow. Understanding the dynamic of snow saltation is crucial to the accurate description of the process. We applied digital shadowgraphy in a cold wind tunnel to measure drifting snow over natural snow covers. The acquisition and evaluation of time-resolved shadowgraphy images allowed us to resolve a large part of the saltation layer. The technique has been successfully compared to the measurements obtained from a Snow Particle Counter, considered the most robust technique for snow mass-flux measurements so far. The streamwise snow transport is dominated by large-scale events. The vertical snow transport has a more equal distribution of energy across the scales, similarly to what is observed for the flow turbulence velocities. It is hypothesized that the vertical snow transport is a quantity that reflects the local entrainment of the snow crystals into the saltation layer while the streamwise snow transport results from the streamwise development of the trajectories of the snow particles once entrained, and therefore is rather a non-local quantity.

  7. Chemotaxis when bacteria remember: drift versus diffusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakuntala Chatterjee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli (E. coli bacteria govern their trajectories by switching between running and tumbling modes as a function of the nutrient concentration they experienced in the past. At short time one observes a drift of the bacterial population, while at long time one observes accumulation in high-nutrient regions. Recent work has viewed chemotaxis as a compromise between drift toward favorable regions and accumulation in favorable regions. A number of earlier studies assume that a bacterium resets its memory at tumbles - a fact not borne out by experiment - and make use of approximate coarse-grained descriptions. Here, we revisit the problem of chemotaxis without resorting to any memory resets. We find that when bacteria respond to the environment in a non-adaptive manner, chemotaxis is generally dominated by diffusion, whereas when bacteria respond in an adaptive manner, chemotaxis is dominated by a bias in the motion. In the adaptive case, favorable drift occurs together with favorable accumulation. We derive our results from detailed simulations and a variety of analytical arguments. In particular, we introduce a new coarse-grained description of chemotaxis as biased diffusion, and we discuss the way it departs from older coarse-grained descriptions.

  8. Internal Clock Drift Estimation in Computer Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham Marouani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Most computers have several high-resolution timing sources, from the programmable interrupt timer to the cycle counter. Yet, even at a precision of one cycle in ten millions, clocks may drift significantly in a single second at a clock frequency of several GHz. When tracing the low-level system events in computer clusters, such as packet sending or reception, each computer system records its own events using an internal clock. In order to properly understand the global system behavior and performance, as reported by the events recorded on each computer, it is important to estimate precisely the clock differences and drift between the different computers in the system. This article studies the clock precision and stability of several computer systems, with different architectures. It also studies the typical network delay characteristics, since time synchronization algorithms rely on the exchange of network packets and are dependent on the symmetry of the delays. A very precise clock, based on the atomic time provided by the GPS satellite network, was used as a reference to measure clock drifts and network delays. The results obtained are of immediate use to all applications which depend on computer clocks or network time synchronization accuracy.

  9. Giving cosmic redshift drift a whirl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Alex G.; Linder, Eric V.; Edelstein, Jerry; Erskine, David

    2015-03-01

    Redshift drift provides a direct kinematic measurement of cosmic acceleration but it occurs with a characteristic time scale of a Hubble time. Thus redshift observations with a challenging precision of 10-9 require a 10 year time span to obtain a signal-to-noise of 1. We discuss theoretical and experimental approaches to address this challenge, potentially requiring less observer time and having greater immunity to common systematics. On the theoretical side we explore allowing the universe, rather than the observer, to provide long time spans; speculative methods include radial baryon acoustic oscillations, cosmic pulsars, and strongly lensed quasars. On the experimental side, we explore beating down the redshift precision using differential interferometric techniques, including externally dispersed interferometers and spatial heterodyne spectroscopy. Low-redshift emission line galaxies are identified as having high cosmology leverage and systematics control, with an 8 h exposure on a 10-m telescope (1000 h of exposure on a 40-m telescope) potentially capable of measuring the redshift of a galaxy to a precision of 10-8 (few ×10-10). Low-redshift redshift drift also has very strong complementarity with cosmic microwave background measurements, with the combination achieving a dark energy figure of merit of nearly 300 (1400) for 5% (1%) precision on drift.

  10. Transient chaotic transport in dissipative drift motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyarzabal, R.S. [Pós-Graduação em Ciências/Física, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Szezech, J.D. [Departamento de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Batista, A.M., E-mail: antoniomarcosbatista@gmail.com [Departamento de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Souza, S.L.T. de [Departamento de Física e Matemática, Universidade Federal de São João del Rei, 36420-000, Ouro Branco, MG (Brazil); Caldas, I.L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 05315-970, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Viana, R.L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Sanjuán, M.A.F. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Tulipán s/n, 28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-04-22

    Highlights: • We consider a situation for which a chaotic transient is present in the dynamics of the two-wave model with damping. • The damping in plasma models can be a way for study a realistic behavior of confinement due the collisional effect. • The escape time as a function of the damping obey a power-law scaling. • We have made a qualitative transport analysis with a simple model that can be useful for more complete models. • We have shown that the pattern of the basin of attraction depends on the damping parameter. - Abstract: We investigate chaotic particle transport in magnetised plasmas with two electrostatic drift waves. Considering dissipation in the drift motion, we verify that the removed KAM surfaces originate periodic attractors with their corresponding basins of attraction. We show that the properties of the basins depend on the dissipation and the space-averaged escape time decays exponentially when the dissipation increases. We find positive finite time Lyapunov exponents in dissipative drift motion, consequently the trajectories exhibit transient chaotic transport. These features indicate how the transient plasma transport depends on the dissipation.

  11. THERMAL DRIFT CHARACTERISTICS OF CAPACITIVE PRESSURE SENSORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDELAZIZ BEDDIAF

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The capacitive pressure sensors based on silicon are characterized by their very high sensitivities and their low power consumption. Nevertheless, their thermal behavior remains more or less unpredictable because they can indicate very high thermal coefficients. The study of the thermal behavior of these sensors is essential to define the parameters that cause the output characteristics drift. In this study, we modeled the thermal behavior of this sensors, using Finite Element Analysis (FEA made in COMSOL. The model solved by COMSOL environment takes into account the entire sensor and thermal effects due to the temperature considering the materials’ properties, the geometric shape and also the heat transfer mechanisms. By COMSOL we determine how the temperature affects the sensor during the manufacturing process. For that end, we calculated the thermal drift of capacitance at rest, the thermal coefficients and we compared them with experimental results to validate our model. Further, we studied the thermal drift of sensor characteristics both at rest and under constant and uniform pressure. Further, our study put emphasis on the geometric influence parameters on these characteristics to optimize the sensor performance. Finally, this study allows us to predict the sensor behavior against temperature and to minimize this effect by optimizing the geometrical parameters.

  12. Evolution of a high-latitude sediment drift inside a glacially-carved trough based on high-resolution seismic stratigraphy (Kveithola, NW Barents Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebesco, Michele; Özmaral, Asli; Urgeles, Roger; Accettella, Daniela; Lucchi, Renata G.; Rüther, Denise; Winsborrow, Monica; Llopart, Jaume; Caburlotto, Andrea; Lantzsch, Hendrik; Hanebuth, Till J. J.

    2016-09-01

    drift. Though both Atlantic and Arctic waters are known to enter the trough, from the west and the north respectively, brine-enriched shelf water (BSW) produced during winter and flowing westward in the moat, is suggested to be responsible for the genesis of the Kveithola Drift. The formation of BSW is inferred to have started around 13 cal ka BP, the onset of drift deposition, suggesting that conditions leading to atmospheric cooling of the surface waters and/or the presence of coastal polynyas and wind or floating ice shelves have persisted on the western Barents Shelf since that time. The units inferred to have been deposited under more energetic sedimentary conditions (tentatively dated to the Younger Dryas and to 8.9-8.2 cal ka BP) are suggestive of stronger BSW formation. In general, we infer that variations in the bottom current regime were mainly related to BSW formation due to atmospheric changes. They could also have been a response to successive episodes of grounded and sea ice retreat that allowed for a first limited, later open shelf current, which progressively established on the western Barents Sea shelf.

  13. Geomagnetic activity effects on plasma sheet energy conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamrin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article we use three years (2001, 2002, and 2004 of Cluster plasma sheet data to investigate what happens to localized energy conversion regions (ECRs in the plasma sheet during times of high magnetospheric activity. By examining variations in the power density, E·J, where E is the electric field and J is the current density obtained by Cluster, we have studied the influence on Concentrated Load Regions (CLRs and Concentrated Generator Regions (CGRs from variations in the geomagnetic disturbance level as expressed by the Kp, the AE, and the Dst indices. We find that the ECR occurrence frequency increases during higher magnetospheric activities, and that the ECRs become stronger. This is true both for CLRs and for CGRs, and the localized energy conversion therefore concerns energy conversion in both directions between the particles and the fields in the plasma sheet. A higher geomagnetic activity hence increases the general level of energy conversion in the plasma sheet. Moreover, we have shown that CLRs live longer during magnetically disturbed times, hence converting more electromagnetic energy. The CGR lifetime, on the other hand, seems to be unaffected by the geomagnetic activity level. The evidence for increased energy conversion during geomagnetically disturbed times is most clear for Kp and for AE, but there are also some indications that energy conversion increases during large negative Dst. This is consistent with the plasma sheet magnetically mapping to the auroral zone, and therefore being more tightly coupled to auroral activities and variations in the AE and Kp indices, than to variations in the ring current region as described by the Dst index.

  14. Space Weather Monitoring for ISS Geomagnetic Storm Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Parker, Linda Neergaard

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) space environments community utilizes near real time space weather data to support a variety of ISS engineering and science activities. The team has operated the Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) suite of plasma instruments (two Langmuir probes, a floating potential probe, and a plasma impedance probe) on ISS since 2006 to obtain in-situ measurements of plasma density and temperature along the ISS orbit and variations in ISS frame potential due to electrostatic current collection from the plasma environment (spacecraft charging) and inductive (vxB) effects from the vehicle motion across the Earth s magnetic field. An ongoing effort is to use FPMU for measuring the ionospheric response to geomagnetic storms at ISS altitudes and investigate auroral charging of the vehicle as it passes through regions of precipitating auroral electrons. This work is challenged by restrictions on FPMU operations that limit observation time to less than about a third of a year. As a result, FPMU campaigns ranging in length from a few days to a few weeks are typically scheduled weeks in advance for ISS engineering and payload science activities. In order to capture geomagnetic storm data under these terms, we monitor near real time space weather data from NASA, NOAA, and ESA sources to determine solar wind disturbance arrival times at Earth likely to be geoeffective (including coronal mass ejections and high speed streams associated with coronal holes) and activate the FPMU ahead of the storm onset. Using this technique we have successfully captured FPMU data during a number of geomagnetic storm periods including periods with ISS auroral charging. This presentation will describe the strategies and challenges in capturing FPMU data during geomagnetic storms, the near real time space weather resources utilized for monitoring the space weather environment, and provide examples of auroral charging data obtained during storm operations.

  15. Effect of Cross-Correlation on Geomagnetic Forecast Accuracies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Weijia; Wei, Zigang; Tangborn, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Surface geomagnetic observation can determine up to degree L = 14 time-varying spherical harmonic coefficients of the poloidal magnetic field. Assimilation of these coefficients to numerical dynamo simulation could help us understand better the dynamical processes in the Earth's outer core, and to provide more accurate forecast of geomagnetic secular variations (SV). In our previous assimilation studies, only the poloidal magnetic field in the core is corrected by the observations in the analysis. Unobservable core state variables (the toroidal magnetic field and the core velocity field) are corrected via the dynamical equations of the geodynamo. Our assimilation experiments show that the assimilated core state converges near the CMB, implying that the dynamo state is strongly constrained by surface geomagnetic observations, and is pulled closer to the truth by the data. We are now carrying out an ensemble of assimilation runs with 1000 years of geomagnetic and archeo/paleo magnetic record. In these runs the cross correlation between the toroidal and the poloidal magnetic fields is incorporated into the analysis. This correlation is derived from the physical boundary conditions of the toroidal field at the core-mantle boundary (CMB). The assimilation results are then compared with those of the ensemble runs without the cross-correlation, aiming at understanding two fundamental issues: the effect of the crosscorrelation on (1) the convergence of the core state, and (2) the SV prediction accuracies. The constrained dynamo solutions will provide valuable insights on interpreting the observed SV, e.g. the near-equator magnetic flux patches, the core-mantle interactions, and possibly other geodynamic observables.

  16. Geomagnetic Observatory Data for Real-Time Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, J. J.; Finn, C. A.; Rigler, E. J.; Kelbert, A.; Bedrosian, P.

    2015-12-01

    The global network of magnetic observatories represents a unique collective asset for the scientific community. Historically, magnetic observatories have supported global magnetic-field mapping projects and fundamental research of the Earth's interior and surrounding space environment. More recently, real-time data streams from magnetic observatories have become an important contributor to multi-sensor, operational monitoring of evolving space weather conditions, especially during magnetic storms. In this context, the U.S. Geological Survey (1) provides real-time observatory data to allied space weather monitoring projects, including those of NOAA, the U.S. Air Force, NASA, several international agencies, and private industry, (2) collaborates with Schlumberger to provide real-time geomagnetic data needed for directional drilling for oil and gas in Alaska, (3) develops products for real-time evaluation of hazards for the electric-power grid industry that are associated with the storm-time induction of geoelectric fields in the Earth's conducting lithosphere. In order to implement strategic priorities established by the USGS Natural Hazards Mission Area and the National Science and Technology Council, and with a focus on developing new real-time products, the USGS is (1) leveraging data management protocols already developed by the USGS Earthquake Program, (2) developing algorithms for mapping geomagnetic activity, a collaboration with NASA and NOAA, (3) supporting magnetotelluric surveys and developing Earth conductivity models, a collaboration with Oregon State University and the NSF's EarthScope Program, (4) studying the use of geomagnetic activity maps and Earth conductivity models for real-time estimation of geoelectric fields, (5) initiating geoelectric monitoring at several observatories, (6) validating real-time estimation algorithms against historical geomagnetic and geoelectric data. The success of these long-term projects is subject to funding constraints

  17. Geomagnetic Secular Variation Prediction with Thermal Heterogeneous Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Weijia; Tangborn, Andrew; Jiang, Weiyuan

    2011-01-01

    It has long been conjectured that thermal heterogeneity at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) affects the geodynamo substantially. The observed two pairs of steady and strong magnetic flux lobes near the Polar Regions and the low secular variation in the Pacific over the past 400 years (and perhaps longer) are likely the consequences of this CMB thermal heterogeneity. There are several studies on the impact of the thermal heterogeneity with numerical geodynamo simulations. However, direct correlation between the numerical results and the observations is found very difficult, except qualitative comparisons of certain features in the radial component of the magnetic field at the CMB. This makes it difficult to assess accurately the impact of thermal heterogeneity on the geodynamo and the geomagnetic secular variation. We revisit this problem with our MoSST_DAS system in which geomagnetic data are assimilated with our geodynamo model to predict geomagnetic secular variations. In this study, we implement a heterogeneous heat flux across the CMB that is chosen based on the seismic tomography of the lowermost mantle. The amplitude of the heat flux (relative to the mean heat flux across the CMB) varies in the simulation. With these assimilation studies, we will examine the influences of the heterogeneity on the forecast accuracies, e.g. the accuracies as functions of the heterogeneity amplitude. With these, we could be able to assess the model errors to the true core state, and thus the thermal heterogeneity in geodynamo modeling.

  18. Spurious behavior in volcanic records of geomagnetic field reversals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlut, Julie; Vella, Jerome; Valet, Jean-Pierre; Soler, Vicente; Legoff, Maxime

    2016-04-01

    Very large directional variations of magnetization have been reported in several lava flows recording a geomagnetic reversal. Such behavior could reflect real geomagnetic changes or be caused by artifacts due to post-emplacement alteration and/or non-ideal magnetic behavior. More recently, a high resolution paleomagnetic record from sediments pleads also for an extremely rapid reversal process during the last reversal. Assuming that the geomagnetic field would have moved by tens of degrees during cooling of moderate thickness lava flows implies brief episodes of rapid changes by a few degrees per day that are difficult to reconcile with the rate of liquid motions at the core surface. Systematical mineralogical bias is a most likely explanation to promote such behavior as recently reconsidered by Coe et al., 2014 for the rapid field changes recorded at Steens Mountain. We resampled three lava flows at La Palma island (Canarias) that are sandwiched between reverse polarity and normal polarity flows associated with the last reversal. The results show an evolution of the magnetization direction from top to bottom. Thermal demagnetization experiments were conducted using different heating and cooling rates. Similarly, continuous demagnetization and measurements. In both cases, we did not notice any remagnetization associated with mineralogical transformations during the experiments. Magnetic grain sizes do not show any correlation with the amplitude of the deviations. Microscopic observations indicate poor exsolution, which could suggests post-cooling thermochemical remagnetization processes.

  19. Global structure of ionospheric TEC anomalies driven by geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancheva, D.; Mukhtarov, P.; Andonov, B.

    2016-07-01

    This study examines the structure and variability of the ionospheric TEC anomalies driven by geomagnetic storms. For this purpose the CODE global ionospheric TEC data from four geomagnetically disturbed periods (29 October-1 November 2003, 7-10 November 2004, 14-15 December 2006, and 5-6 August 2011) have been considered. By applying the tidal analysis to the geomagnetically forced TEC anomalies we made an attempt to identify the tidal or stationary planetary wave (SPW) signatures that may contribute to the generation of these anomalies. It has been found that three types of positive anomalies with different origin and different latitudinal appearance are observed. These are: (i) anomalies located near latitudes of ±40° and related to the enhancement and poleward moving of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) crests; (ii) anomalies located near latitudes of ±60° and seen predominantly in the night-side ionosphere, and (iii) very high latitude anomalies having mainly zonally symmetric structure and related to the auroral heating and thermospheric expansion. The decomposition analysis revealed that these anomalies can be reconstructed as a result of superposition of the following components: zonal mean (ZM), diurnal migrating (DW1), zonally symmetric diurnal (D0), and stationary planetary wave 1 (SPW1).

  20. Remagnetization of lava flows spanning the last geomagnetic reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Jérôme; Carlut, Julie; Valet, Jean-Pierre; Goff, Maxime Le; Soler, Vicente; Lopes, Fernando

    2017-08-01

    Large directional changes of remanent magnetization within lava flows that cooled during geomagnetic reversals have been reported in several studies. A geomagnetic scenario implies extremely rapid geomagnetic changes of several degrees per day, thus difficult to reconcile with the rate of the earth's core liquid motions. So far, no complete rock magnetic model provides a clear explanation. We revisited lava flows sandwiched between an underlying reverse and an overlying normal polarity flow marking the last reversal in three distinct volcanic sequences of the La Palma Island (Canary archipelago, Spain) that are characterized by a gradual evolution of the direction of their remanent magnetization from bottom to top. Cleaning efficiency of thermal demagnetization was not improved by very rapid heating and cooling rates as well as by continuous demagnetization using a Triaxe magnetometer. We did not observe partial self-reversals and minor changes in magnetic grain sizes are not related to the within-flow directional changes. Microscopic observations indicate poor exsolution, which suggests post-cooling thermochemical remagnetization processes. This scenario is strongly reinforced by laboratory experiments that show large resistance to thermal demagnetization when thermoremanence was acquired over a long time period. We speculate that in the present situation exsolution was reactivated during in field reheating and yielded formation of new magnetite, yet magnetic domain state rearrangements could also play a role. Initial reheating when the overlying flow took place, albeit moderate (less than 200-300 °C), was enough to produce overlying components with significantly higher unblocking temperatures.

  1. Recent developments in the global geomagnetic observatory network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulliat, A.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic observatories provide precise and continuous measurements of geomagnetic variations over time scales ranging from one second to more than a century. They have been an essential observational infrastructure for geomagnetic research for about 170 years. A large fraction of magnetic observatories belong to INTERMAGNET (International Real-time Magnetic Observatory Network), a global network founded in the late 1980s which now includes about 115 observatories in 45 countries. INTERMAGNET magnetic observatories comply with strict data quality and timeliness standards and distribute their data through an integrated data information system. Recent years have seen a rapid expansion of the global network: new observatories have been installed in remote locations, such as oceanic islands (St Helena, Easter Island, Tristan da Cunha) or Antarctica (Dome C); ancient observatories have been upgraded to international standards (for example in China and Siberia). This has been prompted by the need to have a more geographically homogeneous network. In parallel, new data products (one second data and quasi-definitive data) are being made available, addressing a wide variety of research needs, and real timeliness is being improved for operational purposes such as space weather monitoring and forecasting. This presentation will provide an overview of these recent developments, focusing on those most relevant to the geomagnetic modeling community, and discuss their expected scientific benefits.

  2. Study on the Phenomenon of Geomagnetic Low-value Displacement before Moderately Strong Earthquakes in Gansu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Suping; Feng Jiangang

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes the distribution characteristics of geomagnetic low-value displacement in Gansu and its adjacent areas from 1995 to 2003 on the basis of the data of the daily amplitude minimum value time of the geomagnetic vertical component. It is shown that in addition to the changing rules of geomagnetic low-value displacement itself, there is a better correlation between geomagnetic low-value displacement and the occurrence of moderately strong earthquakes. There appeared to be geomagnetic low-value displacement before the moderately strong earthquakes in Gansu in the 9 years from 1995 to 2003. This result indicates that geomagnetic low-value displacement is of instructive significance for earthquake prediction to some extents.

  3. Geomagnetic Field Variation during Winter Storm at Localized Southern and Northern High Latitude

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Babita Devi; Smita Dubey; Shailendra Saini; Rajni Devi; Rashmi Wahi; Ajay Dhar; S. K. Vijay; A. K. Gwal

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents the effect of geomagnetic storm on geomagnetic field components at Southern (Maitri) and Northern (Kiruna) Hemispheres. The Indian Antarctic Station Maitri is located at geom. long. 66.03° S; 53.21° E whereas Kiruna is located at geom. long. 67.52° N; 23.38° E. We have studied all the geomagnetic storms that occurred during winter season of the year 2004–2005. We observed that at Southern Hemisphere the variation is large as compared to the Northern Hemisphere. Geomagnetic field components vary when the interplanetary magnetic field is oriented in southward direction. Geomagnetic field components vary in the main phase of the ring current. Due to southward orientation of vertical component of IMF reconnection takes place all across the dayside that transports plasma and magnetic flux which create the geomagnetic field variation.

  4. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Mariner

    2001-01-10

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), an analysis of the effects of salts and precipitates on the repository chemical environment is to be developed and documented in an Analyses/Model Report (AMR). The purpose of this analysis is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and the Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). The purpose of this ICN is to qualify and document qualification of the AMR's technical products. The scope of this document is to develop a model of the processes that govern salt precipitation and dissolution and resulting water composition in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS). This model is developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical modeling work performed by PAO and is to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. However, the concepts may also apply to some near and far field geochemical processes and can have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone and saturated zone transport modeling efforts. The intended use of the model developed in this report is to estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the pH, chloride concentration, and ionic strength of water on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the post-closure period. These estimates are based on evaporative processes that are subject to a broad range of potential environmental conditions and are independent of the presence or absence of backfill. An additional intended use is to estimate the environmental conditions required for complete vaporization of water. The presence and composition of liquid water

  5. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for SR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Sun

    2000-04-07

    This analysis demonstrates that a satisfactory ground control system can be designed for the Yucca Mountain site, and provides the technical basis for the design of ground support systems to be used in repository emplacement and non-emplacement drifts. The repository ground support design was based on analytical methods using acquired computer codes, and focused on the final support systems. A literature review of case histories, including the lessons learned from the design and construction of the ESF, the studies on the seismic damages of underground openings, and the use of rock mass classification systems in the ground support design, was conducted (Sections 6.3.4 and 6.4). This review provided some basis for determining the inputs and methodologies used in this analysis. Stability of the supported and unsupported emplacement and non-emplacement drifts was evaluated in this analysis. The excavation effects (i.e., state of the stress change due to excavation), thermal effects (i.e., due to heat output from waste packages), and seismic effects (i.e., from potential earthquake events) were evaluated, and stress controlled modes of failure were examined for two in situ stress conditions (k_0=0.3 and 1.0) using rock properties representing rock mass categories of 1 and 5. Variation of rock mass units such as the non-lithophysal (Tptpmn) and lithophysal (Tptpll) was considered in the analysis. The focus was on the non-lithophysal unit because this unit appears to be relatively weaker and has much smaller joint spacing. Therefore, the drift stability and ground support needs were considered to be controlled by the design for this rock unit. The ground support systems for both emplacement and non-emplacement drifts were incorporated into the models to assess their performance under in situ, thermal, and seismic loading conditions. Both continuum and discontinuum modeling approaches were employed in the analyses of the rock mass behavior and in the evaluation of the

  6. Reconnection and Spire Drift in Coronal Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Falconer, David

    2015-04-01

    It is observed that there are two morphologically-different kinds of X-ray/EUV jets in coronal holes: standard jets and blowout jets. In both kinds: (1) in the base of the jet there is closed magnetic field that has one foot in flux of polarity opposite that of the ambient open field of the coronal hole, and (2) in coronal X-ray/EUV images of the jet there is typically a bright nodule at the edge of the base. In the conventional scenario for jets of either kind, the bright nodule is a compact flare arcade, the downward product of interchange reconnection of closed field in the base with impacted ambient open field, and the upper product of this reconnection is the jet-outflow spire. It is also observed that in most jets of either kind the spire drifts sideways away from the bright nodule. We present the observed bright nodule and spire drift in an example standard jet and in two example blowout jets. With cartoons of the magnetic field and its reconnection in jets, we point out: (1) if the bright nodule is a compact flare arcade made by interchange reconnection, then the spire should drift toward the bright nodule, and (2) if the bright nodule is instead a compact flare arcade made, as in a filament-eruption flare, by internal reconnection of the legs of the erupting sheared-field core of a lobe of the closed field in the base, then the spire, made by the interchange reconnection that is driven on the outside of that lobe by the lobe’s internal convulsion, should drift away from the bright nodule. Therefore, from the observation that the spire usually drifts away from the bright nodule, we infer: (1) in X-ray/EUV jets of either kind in coronal holes the interchange reconnection that generates the jet-outflow spire usually does not make the bright nodule; instead, the bright nodule is made by reconnection inside erupting closed field in the base, as in a filament eruption, the eruption being either a confined eruption for a standard jet or a blowout eruption (as

  7. Airborne organophosphate pesticides drift in Mediterranean climate: The importance of secondary drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivan, Ohad; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Dubowski, Yael

    2016-02-01

    Pesticide application is a short-term air-pollution episode with near and far field effects due to atmospheric drift. In order to better evaluate resulting air concentrations in nearby communities following pesticide application, measurements of airborne pesticides were conducted at ∼70 m from field edge. This was done following three different application events of the organophosphate pesticide Chlorpyrifos in a persimmon orchard. Complementary information on larger spatial scale was obtained using CALPUFF modeling in which application and meteorological data was used to better evaluate dispersion patterns. Measurements indicated high airborne concentrations during application hours (few μg m-3 for 8 h average), which dropped to tens of ng m-3 in the following days. Measured atmospheric concentrations show that secondary drift (i.e., post-application drift) involves significant loads of pesticides and hence should not be ignored in exposure considerations. Furthermore, CALPUFF modeling revealed the complex dispersion pattern when weak winds prevailed, and showed that during the 24 h after application air concentrations reached levels above the hourly Texas effect screening level (0.1 μg m-3). Interestingly, weak winds on the night after application resulted in a secondary peak in measured and modeled air concentrations. Long exposure time (when secondary drift is considered) and concentrations measured following such common air-assisted orchard application, suggest pesticide drift may have health repercussions that are currently unknown, and emphasize the need for further epidemiological studies.

  8. Simplified Drift Analysis for Proving Lower Bounds in Evolutionary Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveto, Pietro S.; Witt, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Drift analysis is a powerful tool used to bound the optimization time of evolutionary algorithms (EAs). Various previous works apply a drift theorem going back to Hajek in order to show exponential lower bounds on the optimization time of EAs. However, this drift theorem is tedious to read...... and to apply since it requires two bounds on the moment-generating (exponential) function of the drift. A recent work identifies a specialization of this drift theorem that is much easier to apply. Nevertheless, it is not as simple and not as general as possible. The present paper picks up Hajek’s line...... of thought to prove a drift theorem that is very easy to use in evolutionary computation. Only two conditions have to be verified, one of which holds for virtually all EAs with standard mutation. The other condition is a bound on what is really relevant, the drift. Applications show how previous analyses...

  9. The geomagnetic field - An explanation for the microturbulence in coaxial gun plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, J. W.; Ahluwalia, H. S.

    1988-01-01

    The complexity introduced by the geomagnetic field in several regions of a coaxial gun plasma device is described. It is shown that the annihilation of the swept-up geomagnetic flux, trapped within the highly compressed turbulent plasma, provides an explanation for varied performance and experimental results. The results indicate that the device should be aligned along the direction of the local geomagnetic field or enclosed in a mu-metal shield.

  10. Global Empirical Model of the TEC Response to Geomagnetic Activity and Forcing from Below

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2014-0025 Global empirical model of the TEC response to geomagnetic activity and forcing from below Dora...April 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Global empirical model of the TEC response to geomagnetic activity and forcing from below 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...the global background TEC model c) Development of global empirical model of TEC response to geomagnetic activity d) On-line implementation of both

  11. Geomagnetic observatories: monitoring the Earth’s magnetic and space weather environment

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, Alan W.P.

    2014-01-01

    Geomagnetism research provides insight into the Earth’s properties and processes, from the core out to space. For this reason continuous geomagnetic field observations have been carried out in the UK for more than 170 years. Geomagnetism also has diverse applications, in navigation, maps, even smart phone apps, and in the monitoring and prediction of space weather impacts on technology. Modern instruments, together with digital sampling, real-time data processing and product dissemination, su...

  12. Study on geomagnetic effects of the March 9, 1997 solar eclipse in Mohe area, China*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯忠孝; 高金田; 任熙宪

    2002-01-01

    The geomagnetic effects of the total solar eclipse in Mohe area and the partial eclipse occurred on March 9, 1997 in China are analyzed in this paper. The geomagnetic effects of the eclipse widely distributed in China are obtained, which show H component decreases obviously and is symmetric along the latitude with a center near 33(N during the eclipse time. These results of solar eclipse geomagnetic effects are the newest in recent years obtained in the largest area in China.

  13. Magnetization of Steel Building Materials and Structures in the Natural Geomagnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Čermáková

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the physical basis of the magnetic properties of ferromagnetic materials and shows their relationships with external geomagnetic field. It graphically processes the experimental data detected by an HMR magnetometer. Taking into account the natural geomagnetic field under the effects of steel U profiles, variations of the natural geomagnetic field in a steel structure building are indicated and the potential existence of Sick Building Syndrome (SBS in these types of buildings is pointed out. 

  14. First observations of poleward large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances over the African sector during geomagnetic storm conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habarulema, John Bosco; Katamzi, Zama Thobeka; Yizengaw, Endawoke

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents first observations of poleward traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) during strong geomagnetic conditions over the African sector. By analyzing different data sets we have observed both positive and negative ionospheric responses during the storm period of 08-10 March 2012. Considering the African region as a whole, three longitudinal sectors were strategically selected to establish the entire regional response. On both sides of the geomagnetic equator, results show poleward shift in peak total electron content (TEC) enhancements/depletions at different times which are associated to large-scale TIDs. The observed phenomena are linked to the global ionospheric response and electrodynamics. The understanding has been established using data from International GNSS Service receiver network, radio occultation electron density profiles, derived E×B drift measurements from magnetometer observations and regional ground-based and satellite data. Contrary to other related studies, generated regional TEC perturbation maps were not enough to show obvious directions of the large-scale TIDs due to insufficient data over the northern hemispheric part of the African sector. There appears to be a switch between positive and negative storm phases during the same storm period especially in the Southern Hemisphere part of the African region where "enough" data were available. However, a detailed analysis revealed that the positive storm phase corresponded to the expansion of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) toward some parts of midlatitude regions (and possibly with the contribution from low-latitude electrodynamics associated to equatorial electrojet), while the other part recorded a negative storm phase due to storm-induced changes from the auroral origin. We have observed a simultaneous occurrence of both poleward and equatorward propagating TIDs over the African sector during the same geomagnetic storm period. Our results show that short-lived large

  15. On multifractality of high-latitude geomagnetic fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Vörös

    Full Text Available In order to contribute to the understanding of solar wind-magnetosphere interactions the multifractal scaling properties of high-latitude geomagnetic fluctuations observed at the Thule observatory have been studied. Using the local observatory data and the present experimental knowledge only it seems hard to characterize directly the, presumably intermittent, mesoscale energy accumulation and dissipation processes taking place at the magnetotail, auroral region, etc. Instead a positive probability measure, describing the accumulated local geomagnetic signal energy content at the given time scales has been introduced and its scaling properties have been studied. There is evidence for the multifractal nature of the so defined intermittent field ε, a result obtained by using the recently introduced technique of large deviation multifractal spectra. This technique allows us to describe the geomagnetic fluctuations locally in time by means of singularity exponents α, which represent a generalization of the local degree of differentiability and characterize the power-law scaling dependence of the introduced measure on resolution. A global description of the geomagnetic fluctuations is insured by the spectrum of exponents f(α which represents a rate function quantifying the deviations of the observed singularities α from the expected value. The results show that there exists a multifractal counterpart of the previously reported spectral break and different types of f(α spectra describe the fluctuations in direct dissipation or loading-unloading regimes of the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction. On the time scale of substorms and storms the multi-fractal structure of the loading-unloading mode fluctuations seems to be analogous to the simple multiplicative P-model, while the f(α spectra in direct dissipation regime are close but not equal to the features of a uniform distribution. Larger deviations from the multiplicative

  16. Automatic prediction of solar flares and super geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hui

    Space weather is the response of our space environment to the constantly changing Sun. As the new technology advances, mankind has become more and more dependent on space system, satellite-based services. A geomagnetic storm, a disturbance in Earth's magnetosphere, may produce many harmful effects on Earth. Solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are believed to be the major causes of geomagnetic storms. Thus, establishing a real time forecasting method for them is very important in space weather study. The topics covered in this dissertation are: the relationship between magnetic gradient and magnetic shear of solar active regions; the relationship between solar flare index and magnetic features of solar active regions; based on these relationships a statistical ordinal logistic regression model is developed to predict the probability of solar flare occurrences in the next 24 hours; and finally the relationship between magnetic structures of CME source regions and geomagnetic storms, in particular, the super storms when the D st index decreases below -200 nT is studied and proved to be able to predict those super storms. The results are briefly summarized as follows: (1) There is a significant correlation between magnetic gradient and magnetic shear of active region. Furthermore, compared with magnetic shear, magnetic gradient might be a better proxy to locate where a large flare occurs. It appears to be more accurate in identification of sources of X-class flares than M-class flares; (2) Flare index, defined by weighting the SXR flares, is proved to have positive correlation with three magnetic features of active region; (3) A statistical ordinal logistic regression model is proposed for solar flare prediction. The results are much better than those data published in the NASA/SDAC service, and comparable to the data provided by the NOAA/SEC complicated expert system. To our knowledge, this is the first time that logistic regression model has been applied

  17. The correlations of ions density with geomagnetic activity and solar dynamic pressure in cusp region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO JianGuang; SHI JianKui; ZHANG TieLong; LIU ZhenXing; A. FAZAKERLEY; H. R(E)ME; Ⅰ. DANDOURAS; E. LUCEK

    2007-01-01

    A statistical study of the properties of ions (O+, He+ and H+) measured by the Cluster-Ⅱ in cusp region as a function of the solar wind dynamic pressure and geomagnetic index Kp respectively was made during the summer and fall of 2001 -2003. The main results are that: (1) O+ ion density responds in a significant way to geomagnetic index Kp, and He+ ion density is not correlated with geomagnetic index Kp,both of them have a significant positive correlation with solar wind dynamic pressure; (2) H+ ion density is also observed to increase with solar wind dynamic pressure, and not correlated with geomagnetic index Kp.

  18. Enhancement in Surface Atmospheric Pressure Variability Associated with a Major Geomagnetic Storm

    CERN Document Server

    Selvam, A M; Athale, S U; Tinmaker, M I R

    1998-01-01

    Observational studies indicate that there is a close association between geomagnetic storm and meteorological parameters. Geomagnetic field lines follow closely the isobars of surface pressure . A Physical mechanism linking upper atmospheric geomagnetic storm disturbances with tropospheric weather has been proposed by the author and her group where it is postulated that vertical mixing by turbulent eddy fluctuations results in the net transport upward of positive charges originating from lower levels accompanied simultaneously by downward flow of negative charges from higher levels. The present study reports enhancement of high frequency (<15 days period) fluctuations in daily surface pressure during March 1989 in association with major geomagnetic storm (Ap index = 246) on 13 march 1989.

  19. Statistical analysis of extreme values for geomagnetic and geoelectric field variations for Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, Lidia; Trichtchenko, Larisa; Boteler, David

    2016-04-01

    Disturbances of the geomagnetic field produced by space weather events cause variable geoelectric fields at Earth's surface which drive electric currents in power systems, resulting in hazardous impacts on electric power transmission. In extreme cases, as during the magnetic storm in March 13, 1989, this can result in burnt-out transformers and power blackouts. To make assessment of geomagnetic and geoelectric activity in Canada during extreme space weather events, extreme value statistical analysis has been applied to more than 40 years of magnetic data from the Canadian geomagnetic observatories network. This network has archived digital data recordings for observatories located in sub-auroral, auroral, and polar zones. Extreme value analysis was applied to hourly ranges of geomagnetic variations as an index of geomagnetic activity and to hourly maximum of rate-of-change of geomagnetic field. To estimate extreme geoelectric fields, the minute geomagnetic data were used together with Earth conductivity models for different Canadian locations to calculate geoelectric fields. The extreme value statistical analysis was applied to hourly maximum values of the horizontal geoelectric field. This assessment provided extreme values of geomagnetic and geoelectric activity which are expected to happen once per 50 years and once per 100 years. The results of this analysis are designed to be used to assess the geomagnetic hazard to power systems and help the power industry mitigate risks from extreme space weather events.

  20. Worldwide Magnetograms with Geomagnetic Components D, H, Z, or X, Y, and Z

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (formerly National Geophysical Data Center) receives magnetograms from over 200 geomagnetic observatories....

  1. Moon Shadow by Cosmic Rays under the Influence of Geomagnetic Field and Search for Antiprotons at Multi-TeV Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Bi, X J; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, J Y; Lou, Y Q; Lü, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saitô, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Sasaki, T; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B S; Wang, H; Wang, X; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang Zhaxisangzhu, Yi; Zhou, X X

    2007-01-01

    We have observed the shadowing of galactic cosmic ray flux in the direction of the moon, the so-called moon shadow, using the Tibet-III air shower array operating at Yangbajing (4300 m a.s.l.) in Tibet since 1999. Almost all cosmic rays are positively charged; for that reason, they are bent by the geomagnetic field, thereby shifting the moon shadow westward. The cosmic rays will also produce an additional shadow in the eastward direction of the moon if cosmic rays contain negatively charged particles, such as antiprotons, with some fraction. We selected 1.5 x10^{10} air shower events with energy beyond about 3 TeV from the dataset observed by the Tibet-III air shower array and detected the moon shadow at $\\sim 40 \\sigma$ level. The center of the moon was detected in the direction away from the apparent center of the moon by 0.23$^\\circ$ to the west. Based on these data and a full Monte Carlo simulation, we searched for the existence of the shadow produced by antiprotons at the multi-TeV energy region. No evid...

  2. Field experiment on spray drift: deposition and airborne drift during application to a winter wheat crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, André; Linnemann, Volker; van de Zande, Jan C; Vereecken, Harry

    2008-11-01

    A field experiment was performed to evaluate various techniques for measuring spray deposition and airborne drift during spray application to a winter wheat crop. The application of a spraying agent containing the fluorescent dye Brilliant Sulfo Flavine by a conventional boom sprayer was done according to good agricultural practice. Deposition was measured by horizontal collectors in various arrangements in and outside the treated area. Airborne spray drift was measured both with a passive and an active air collecting system. Spray deposits on top of the treated canopy ranged between 68 and 71% of the applied dose and showed only small differences for various arrangements of the collectors. Furthermore, only small variations were measured within the various groups of collectors used for these arrangements. Generally, the highest spray deposition outside the treated area was measured close to the sprayed plot and was accompanied by a high variability of values, while a rapid decline of deposits was detected in more remote areas. Estimations of spray deposits with the IMAG Drift Calculator were in accordance with experimental findings only for areas located at a distance of 0.5-4.5 m from the last nozzle, while there was an overestimation of a factor of 4 at a distance of 2.0-3.0 m, thus revealing a high level of uncertainty of the estimation of deposition for short distances. Airborne spray drift measured by passive and active air collecting systems was approximately at the same level, when taking into consideration the collector efficiency of the woven nylon wire used as sampling material for the passive collecting system. The maximum value of total airborne spray drift for both spray applications (0.79% of the applied dose) was determined by the active collecting system. However, the comparatively high variability of measurements at various heights above the soil by active and passive collecting systems revealed need for further studies to elucidate the spatial

  3. Dextral strike-slip along the Kapıdağ shear zone (NW Turkey): evidence for Eocene westward translation of the Anatolian plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkoğlu, Ercan; Zulauf, Gernold; Linckens, Jolien; Ustaömer, Timur

    2016-10-01

    The northern part of the Kapıdağ Peninsula (Marmara Sea, NW Turkey) is affected by the E-W trending Kapıdağ shear zone, which cuts through calc-alkaline granitoids of the Ocaklar pluton resulting in mylonitic orthogneiss. Macroscopic and microscopic shear-sense indicators, such as SC fabrics, shear bands, σ-clasts and mica fish, unequivocally suggest dextral strike-slip for the Kapıdağ shear zone. Based on petrographic data, deformation microfabrics of quartz and feldspar, and the slip systems in quartz, the dextral shearing should have been active at T = 500-300 °C and P < 5 kbar. Published K-Ar and 39Ar-40Ar cooling ages of hornblende and biotite suggest that cooling below 500-300 °C occurred during the Eocene (ca. 45-ca. 35 Ma), meaning that the Kapıdağ shear zone should have been active during Middle to Late Eocene times. The differential stress related to the shearing was <50 MPa as is indicated by the size of recrystallized quartz grains. Based on the new and published data, it is concluded that the westward movement of the Anatolian plate might have been active almost continuously from the Middle Eocene until recent times.

  4. New interpretation of laser gyro drifts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Discuss and develop some contents which are relevant to the IEEE Std 647TM-2006 in this paper. The IEEE Std only involves Allan variance, and decomposes it into five primary noise terms, in which, however, the noise nature of the so called "rate random walk noise" and the "rate ramp" is doubted by the IEEE Std editors. Here we use a mathematical identity to entirely affirm the first query and partially the second query as mentioned above. Besides, we argue that only the classical variance can be used in navigation, not the Allan variance. In order to seek the true nature of all drift terms in the variance, we adopt our original work that represents the noises as damped oscillations, to obtain the power spectral density (PSD) of the noises which is then transformed back into time domain. When the damped time constant is much longer than the sampling interval, the re-sulting slow variation term may be expanded into three terms: ordinary bias instability, rate random walk, and rate ramp. Therefore, these "noise terms" are not independent, and they are more of deterministic errors than random noises, and can be explained quantitatively. The resulting fast variation drift may be expanded into two terms. The first term is the same as angle random noise, while the second term adds to the true quantization noise term to form a new combined term called "quantiza-tion noise term". As the result of our research, not only the IEEE Std editors’ suspicions above are answered completely, but a new theory to analyze the laser gyro drifts is also presented, with several supporting examples to explain and verify the theory.

  5. Indoor spray measurement of spray drift potential using a spray drift test bench : effect of drift-reducing nozzle types, spray boom height, nozzle spacing and forward speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno Ruiz, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    In a series of indoor experiments spray drift potential was assessed when spraying over a spray drift testbench with two different driving speeds, 2m/s and 4m/s, two different spray boom heights, 30 cm and 50 cm, and two different nozzle spacing, 25 cm and 50 cm, for six different nozzle types. The

  6. Drift Chamber Alignment using Cosmic Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V. [Duke U.; Hays, Christopher P. [Oxford U.

    2014-05-07

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a general-purpose experimental apparatus with an inner tracking detector for measuring charged particles, surrounded by a calorimeter for measurements of electromagnetic and hadronic showers, and a muon detector system. We present a technique for, and results of, a precise relative alignment of the drift chamber wires of the CDF tracker. This alignment has been an important component of the track momentum calibration, which is the basis for the charged-lepton calibration for the measurement of the W boson mass at CDF.

  7. The Mark II Vertex Drift Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, J.P.; Baggs, R.; Fujino, D.; Hayes, K.; Hoard, C.; Hower, N.; Hutchinson, D.; Jaros, J.A.; Koetke, D.; Kowalski, L.A.

    1989-03-01

    We have completed constructing and begun operating the Mark II Drift Chamber Vertex Detector. The chamber, based on a modified jet cell design, achieves 30 {mu}m spatial resolution and <1000 {mu}m track-pair resolution in pressurized CO{sub 2} gas mixtures. Special emphasis has been placed on controlling systematic errors including the use of novel construction techniques which permit accurate wire placement. Chamber performance has been studied with cosmic ray tracks collected with the chamber located both inside and outside the Mark II. Results on spatial resolution, average pulse shape, and some properties of CO{sub 2} mixtures are presented. 10 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Crowdsourcing and annotating NER for Twitter #drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fromreide, Hege; Hovy, Dirk; Søgaard, Anders

    2014-01-01

    We present two new NER datasets for Twitter; a manually annotated set of 1,467 tweets (kappa=0.942) and a set of 2,975 expert-corrected, crowdsourced NER annotated tweets from the dataset described in Finin et al. (2010). In our experiments with these datasets, we observe two important points: (a......) language drift on Twitter is significant, and while off-the-shelf systems have been reported to perform well on in-sample data, they often perform poorly on new samples of tweets, (b) state-of-the-art performance across various datasets can beobtained from crowdsourced annotations, making it more feasible...

  9. Drift Tube Linac Conditioning of Tank1

    CERN Document Server

    Shafqat, N; Toor, W A

    2014-01-01

    Tank1 of the Drift Tube Linac (DTL) of the Linac4 has been conditioned at the Linac4 tunnel. The tank was tuned for resonance at 352.2 MHz, and stable operation has been achieved with 725 µs long RF pulses at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. The maximum RF level that has been reached is 810 kW with a pulse width of 600 µs. Since this was the first RF structure exclusively conditioned in the Linac4 tunnel with the operation and control software of Linac4, some related issues and limitations had to be taken into account.

  10. Drift Chamber Alignment using Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V

    2014-01-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a general-purpose experimental apparatus with an inner tracking detector for measuring charged particles, surrounded by a calorimeter for measurements of electromagnetic and hadronic showers, and a muon detector system. We present a technique for, and results of, a precise relative alignment of the drift chamber wires of the CDF tracker. This alignment has been an important component of the track momentum calibration, which is the basis for the charged-lepton calibration for the measurement of the W boson mass at CDF.

  11. Royston Drift: new mine - new techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Round, C.; Lewis, S.

    1981-07-01

    Royston Drift Mine is described and the techniques and philosophy that have contributed to Royston proving to be one of Britain's most productive mines are reviewed. The whole mining concept, including the cognizance taken of the geological restriction is discussed. Transport systems and the design and organization of the record-breaking retreat faces are dealt with in detail. The introduction and testing of the Caledonian Arch support system and its potential is then described. Finally the future of the mine, in relation to monitoring and content of both underground and surface operations, is outlined.

  12. Characteristics of the ALICE Silicon Drift Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bonvicini, V; Crescio, E; Giubellino, P; Hernández-Montoya, R; Kolojvari, A A; Montaño, L M; Nouais, D; Piemonte, C; Rashevsky, A; Tosello, F; Vacchi, A; Wheadon, R

    2001-01-01

    A Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) with an active area of 7.0 x 7.5 cm2 has been designed, produced and tested for the ALICE Inner Tracking System. The development of the SDD has been focussed on the capability of the detector to work without an external support to the integrated high voltage divider. Severalfeatures have been implemented in the design in order to increase the robustness and the long-term electrical stability of the detector. One of the prototypes has been tested in a pion beam at the CERN SPS. Preliminary results on the position resolution are given.

  13. PROSPECTS FIXATION DRIFT SANDS PHYSICOCHEMICAL METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maujuda MUZAFFAROVA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on the theoretical foundations of secure mobile sand being considered for reducing the negative impact of one of the manifestations of exogenous plains on such an important natural-technical system as a railroad. It suggests practical measures to build a system of design protection against sand drifts. The article also suggests ways to conserve resources and rational use of machinery and performers as well as the consolidation of mobile sand wet with water soluble waste of local production of waste dextrin. Consolidation is exposed on dry and wet sand.

  14. MoSST DAS: The First Working Geomagnetic Data Assimilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Weijia; Wei, Zigang; Tangborn, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The Earth possesses an internal magnetic field (geomagnetic field) generated by convection in the outer core (geodynamo). Previous efforts have been focused along two distinct paths: (1) numerical geodynamo modeling to understand the origin of the geomagnetic field, and the mechanisms of geomagnetic secular variations (SV); and (2) geomagnetic field modeling to map the spatial/temporal variations of the field from geomagnetic data, and to derive core properties, e.g. inversion of core flow near the core-mantle boundary (CMB). Geomagnetic data assimilation is a new approach emerged over the past 5 years: surface observations are assimilated with geodynamo models for better understanding of the core dynamical state, and accurately prediction of SV. In collaboration with several geomagnetic research groups, we have developed the first working geomagnetic data assimilation system, Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent, and Three-dimensional (MoSST) DAS, that includes the MoSST numerical dynamo model; 7000 years of geomagnetic field maps from several field models utilizing satellite and ground observatory data, historical magnetic records and archeo/paleo magnetic data; and an ensemble based optimal interpolation (01) assimilation algorithm. With this system, we have demonstrated clearly that the assimilated core dynamical state is substantially different from those of pure geodynamo simulations. Ensemble assimilation runs also show the convergence of the assimilated solutions inside the core, suggesting that the simulation state is pulled closer to the truth via data assimilation. The forecasts from this system are also very accurate: the 5-year forecast of the geomagnetic field agrees very well with the observations; and the 5-year secular variation forecast is more accurate than the IGRF SV forecast models in the past. Using geomagnetic records up to 2009, we have made an SV forecast for the period from 2010-2015, and is a candidate SV model for IGRF-11.

  15. The Egyptian geomagnetic reference field to the Epoch, 2010.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deebes, H. A.; Abd Elaal, E. M.; Arafa, T.; Lethy, A.; El Emam, A.; Ghamry, E.; Odah, H.

    2017-06-01

    The present work is a compilation of two tasks within the frame of the project ;Geomagnetic Survey & Detailed Geomagnetic Measurements within the Egyptian Territory; funded by the ;Science and Technology Development Fund agency (STDF);. The National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics (NRIAG), has conducted a new extensive land geomagnetic survey that covers the whole Egyptian territory. The field measurements have been done at 3212 points along all the asphalted roads, defined tracks, and ill-defined tracks in Egypt; with total length of 11,586 km. In the present work, the measurements cover for the first time new areas as: the southern eastern borders of Egypt including Halayeb and Shlatin, the Quattara depresion in the western desert, and the new roads between Farafra and Baharia oasis. Also marine geomagnetic survey have been applied for the first time in Naser lake. Misallat and Abu-Simble geomagnetic observatories have been used to reduce the field data to the Epoch 2010. During the field measurements, whenever possible, the old stations occupied by the previous observers have been re-occupied to determine the secular variations at these points. The geomagnetic anomaly maps, the normal geomagnetic field maps with their corresponding secular variation maps, the normal geomagnetic field equations of the geomagnetic elements (EGRF) and their corresponding secular variations equations, are outlined. The anomalous sites, as discovered from the anomaly maps are, only, mentioned. In addition, a correlation between the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) 2010.0 and the Egyptian Geomagnetic Reference Field (EGRF) 2010 is indicated.

  16. Field experiment on spray drift: Deposition and airborne drift during application to a winter wheat crop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, A.; Linnemann, V.; Zande, van de J.C.; Vereecken, H.

    2008-01-01

    A field experiment was performed to evaluate various techniques for measuring spray deposition and airborne drift during spray application to a winter wheat crop. The application of a spraying agent containing the fluorescent dye Brilliant Sulfo Flavine by a conventional boom sprayer was done

  17. Congenital Ulnar Drift in a Surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desirae McKee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Windblown hand is a term used in many instances to describe ulnar deviations of the fingers with or without other malformations. In 1994 Wood reviewed all of the descriptions of cases of windblown hand and pointed out how many variants of congenital ulnar drift there are, suggesting that the many variations seen may all belong to a larger type of arthrogryposis. While the most common cause of ulnar deviation of the fingers is rheumatoid arthritis, it can also be caused by other conditions such as windblown hand or Jaccoud’s arthropathy. While most hand surgeons are familiar with presentations of congenital ulnar drift, few of them are knowledgeable about Jaccoud’s arthropathy as this is usually discussed within medical communities such as Rheumatology. We present a case of a surgeon who has had noticeable ulnar deviation of the digits at the level of the metacarpophalangeal joint since his early 20s. We propose that the current case is a demonstration of a type of windblown hand that has some hereditary component but is not immediately obvious at birth and presents physically more like Jaccoud’s arthropathy than traditional windblown hand.

  18. Coherent Vortex Evolution in Drift Wave Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, R.; Terry, P. W.

    1998-11-01

    Localized structures in turbulence are subject to loss of coherence by mixing. Phase space structures, such as drift-hole, (P. W. Terry, P. H. Diamond, T. S. Hahm, Phys. Fluids B) 2 9 2048 (1990) possess a self-electric field, which if sufficiently large maintains particle trapping against the tidal deformations of ambient turbulence. We show here that intense vortices in fluid drift wave turbulence avoid mixing by suppressing ambient turbulence with the strong flow shear of the vortex edge. Analysis of turbulence evolution in the vortex edge recovers Rapid Distortion Theory (G. K. Batchelor and I. Proudman, Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math.) 7 83 (1954) as the short time limit and the shear suppression scaling theory (H. Biglari, P. H. Diamond and P. W. Terry, Phys. Fluids B) 2 1 (1990) as the long time limit. Shear suppression leads to an amplitude condition for coherence and delineates the Gaussian core from the non Gaussian tail of the probability distribution function. The amplitude condition of shear suppression is compared with the trapping condition for phase space holes. The possibility of nonlinear vortex growth will be examined by considering electron dynamics in the vortex evolution.

  19. Electromagnetic drift waves dispersion for arbitrarily collisional plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wonjae, E-mail: wol023@ucsd.edu; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I., E-mail: skrash@mae.ucsd.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Angus, J. R. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The impacts of the electromagnetic effects on resistive and collisionless drift waves are studied. A local linear analysis on an electromagnetic drift-kinetic equation with Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook-like collision operator demonstrates that the model is valid for describing linear growth rates of drift wave instabilities in a wide range of plasma parameters showing convergence to reference models for limiting cases. The wave-particle interactions drive collisionless drift-Alfvén wave instability in low collisionality and high beta plasma regime. The Landau resonance effects not only excite collisionless drift wave modes but also suppress high frequency electron inertia modes observed from an electromagnetic fluid model in collisionless and low beta regime. Considering ion temperature effects, it is found that the impact of finite Larmor radius effects significantly reduces the growth rate of the drift-Alfvén wave instability with synergistic effects of high beta stabilization and Landau resonance.

  20. Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Tang

    2004-02-26

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository non-emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for non-emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). This calculation will provide input for the development of LA documents. The scope of this calculation is limited to the non-emplacement drifts including access mains, ramps, exhaust mains, turnouts, intersections between access mains and turnouts, and intersections between exhaust mains and emplacement drifts, portals, TBM launch chambers, observation drift and test alcove in the performance confirmation (PC) facilities, etc. The calculation is limited to the non-emplacement drifts subjected to a combined loading of in-situ stress, seismic stress, and/or thermal stress. Other effects such as hydrological and chemical effects are not considered in this analysis.

  1. Effect of Stokes drift on upper ocean mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shuang; SONG Jinbao; SUN Qun

    2008-01-01

    Stokes drift is the main source of vertical vorticity in the ocean mixed layer.In the ways of Coriolis - Stokes forcing and Langmuir circulations,Stokes drift can substantially affect the whole mixed layer.A modified Mellor-Yamada 2.5 level turbulence closure model is used to parameterize its effect on upper ocean mixing conventionally.Results show that comparing surface heating with wave breaking,Stokes drift plays the most important role in the entire ocean mixed layer,especially in the subsurface layer.As expected,Stokes drift elevates both the dissipation rate and the turbulence energy in the upper ocean mixing.Also,influence of the surface heating,wave breaking and wind speed on Stokes drift is investigated respectively.Research shows that it is significant and important to assessing the Stokes drift into ocean mixed layer studying.The laboratory observations are supporting numerical experiments quantitatively.

  2. The Study of the Geomagnetic Variation for Sq current System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X.; Du, A.

    2012-04-01

    The solar quiet variation (Sq) with a period of 24 hrs is a typical one of the quiet variations. Sq is generally caused by atmospheric tide-dynamo in ionosphere and it is controlled by the electric field, electric conductivity in ionosphere and neutral wind in middle-high altitude atmosphere. In our work, the geomagnetic field data observed by 90 ground-based observatories is used to analyze the local time variation of Sq. Sq is derived from five quiet-day geomagnetic data in every month by the FFT method. According to the pattern of geomagnetic X component in Sq, there is a prenoon-postnoon (before noon and after noon) asymmetry. This asymmetry is obvious in spring, summer and winter. The X component at 12:00-13:00 LT is about 5 nT larger than it at 11:00-12:00 LT. The ratio between the X component of daily variable amplitude and Y component of daily variable amplitude in middle and low (high) latitude regions in summer is greater (smaller) than that in winter. Used the sphere harmonic analysis method, the Sq equivalent current system is obtained. From the pattern of Sq current system, the prenoon-postnoon asymmetry may be caused by the electric field in the high latitude region. This electric field has two effects: the one is that the electric field from high latitude maps to the low latitude region; the other is this electric field penetrate to the middle latitude region directly. The combined action of these two effects makes the prenoon-postnoon asymmetry of Sq. The asymmetry also has an obvious seasonal effect. It may relate to the polar Sq and DP2 in the high latitude region.

  3. An overset grid method for global geomagnetic induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Chester J.

    2014-07-01

    A new finite difference solution to the global geomagnetic induction problem is developed and tested, based on a modified Lorenz gauge of the magnetic vector and electric scalar potentials and implementing a novel, overset `Yin-Yang' grid that avoids unnecessary mesh refinement at the geographic poles. Previously used in whole-earth mantle convection models, the overset grid is built from a pair of partially overlapping mid-latitude latitude-longitude (lat/lon) grids, one of which is rotated with respect to the other for complete coverage of the sphere. Because of this symmetry, only one set of finite difference templates is required for global discretization of the governing Maxwell equations, a redundancy that is exploited for computational efficiency and multithreaded parallelization. Comparisons between solutions obtained by the proposed method show excellent agreement with those obtained by independent integral equation methods for 1-D, 2-D and 3-D problem geometries. The computational footprint of the method is minimized through a (non-symmetric) matrix-free BiCG-STAB iterative solver which computes finite difference matrix coefficients `on the fly' as needed, rather than pulling stored values from memory. Scaling of the matrix-free BiCG-STAB algorithm with problem size shows behaviour similar to that seen with the (symmetric) QMR algorithm used in the Cartesian case from which the present algorithm is based. The proposed method may therefore provide a competitive addition to the existing body of global-scale geomagnetic induction modelling algorithms, allowing for resource-efficient forward modelling as the kernel for large-scale computing such as inversion of geomagnetic response functions, computational hypothesis testing and parametric studies of mantle geodynamics and physiochemical state.

  4. K-type geomagnetic index nowcast with data quality control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Warnant

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available

    A nowcast system for operational estimation of a proxy K-type geomagnetic index is presented. The system is based on a fully automated computer procedure for real-time digital magnetogram data acquisition that includes screening of the dataset and removal of the outliers, estimation of the solar regular variation (SR of the geomagnetic field, calculation of the index, and issuing of an alert if storm-level activity is indicated. This is a time-controlled (rather than event-driven system that delivers the regular output of: the index value, the estimated quality flag, and eventually, an alert. The novel features provided are first, the strict control of the data input and processing, and second, the increased frequency of production of the index (every 1 h. Such quality control and increased time resolution have been found to be of crucial importance for various applications, e.g. ionospheric monitoring, that are of particular interest to us and to users of our service. The nowcast system operability, accuracy and precision have been tested with instantaneous measurements from recent years. A statistical comparison between the nowcast and the definitive index values shows that the average root-mean-square error is smaller than 1 KU. The system is now operational at the site of the Geophysical Centre of the Royal Meteorological Institute in Dourbes (50.1ºN, 4.6ºE, and it is being used for alerting users when geomagnetic storms take place.

  5. Continuous global geomagnetic field models for the past 3000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korte, Monika; Constable, Catherine

    2003-11-01

    Several global geomagnetic field models exist for recent decades, but due to limited data availability models for several centuries to millennia are rare. We present a continuous spherical harmonic model for almost 3 millennia from 1000 b.c. to 1800 a.d., based on a dataset of directional archaeo- and paleomagnetic data and axial dipole constraints. The model, named Continuous Archaeomagnetic and Lake Sediment Geomagnetic Model for the last 3k years (CALS3K.1), can be used to predict both the field and secular variation. Comparisons and tests with synthetic data lead to the conclusion that CALS3K.1 gives a good general, large-scale representation of the geomagnetic field, but lacks small-scale structure due to the limited resolution of the sparse dataset. In future applications the model can be used for comparisons with additional, new data for that time span. For better resolved regions, the agreement of data with CALS3K.1 will provide an idea about the general compatibility of the data with the field and secular variation in that region of the world. For poorly covered regions and time intervals we hope to iteratively improve the model by comparisons with and inclusion of new data. Animations and additional snapshot plots of model predictions as well as the model coefficients and a FORTRAN code to evaluate them for any time can be accessed under http://www.mahi.ucsd.edu/cathy/Holocene/holocene.html. The whole package is also stored in the Earthref digital archive at http://www.earthref.org/...

  6. Longitudinal and geomagnetic activity modulation of the equatorial thermosphere anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jiuhou; Thayer, Jeffrey P.; Forbes, Jeffrey M.

    2010-08-01

    In this paper we examine the detailed similarities and differences between the equatorial thermosphere anomaly (ETA) and the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) from 20 March to 6 April 2002, when both the ETA and the EIA are distinct in the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) observations. The characteristics of the ETA and the EIA are obtained from the CHAMP accelerometer, in situ electron density measurements, and total electron content (TEC) above the CHAMP satellite. Our results show that the trough locations of the ETA and the EIA in latitude show a good agreement, and both correspond well with the dip magnetic equator, while the ETA crests are usually located poleward of the EIA. Meanwhile, the latitudinal locations of the ETA crests exhibit strong hemispheric asymmetry and large variability during our study interval. The longitudinal variations between the EIA and the ETA show significant differences. The EIA crests from the CHAMP observations show strong wave 4 structures, but the primary component in the ETA is wave 1. Moreover, the ETA densities show strong variations in response to geomagnetic activity, whereas CHAMP in situ electron densities and TEC at the EIA do not reflect such large day-to-day variability. Therefore, a simple EIA-ETA relationship cannot explain the dependence of the longitudinal and geomagnetic activity modulation of the ETA and the EIA. The meridional ion drag, which is significantly modulated by enhanced equatorward winds during elevated geomagnetic activity, is probably responsible for some of the observed features in the ETA, although no unambiguous explanation for ETA formation yet exists.

  7. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Mariner

    2004-11-09

    This report documents the development and validation of the in-drift precipitates/salts (IDPS) model. The IDPS model is a geochemical model designed to predict the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). Application of the model in support of TSPA-LA is documented in ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169860]). Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156]) is the technical work plan (TWP) for this report. It called for a revision of the previous version of the report (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167734]) to achieve greater transparency, readability, data traceability, and report integration. The intended use of the IDPS model is to estimate and tabulate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation, deliquescence, and potential environmental conditions on the pH, ionic strength, and chemical compositions of water and minerals on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the postclosure period. Specifically, the intended use is as follows: (1) To estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the presence and composition of water occurring within the repository during the postclosure period (i.e., effects on pH, ionic strength, deliquescence relative humidity, total concentrations of dissolved components in the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO{sub 3}-SO{sub 4}-Br-CO{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O, and concentrations of the following aqueous species that potentially affect acid neutralizing capacity: HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, OH{sup -}, H{sup +}, HSO{sub 4}{sup -}, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, CaHCO{sub 3}{sup +}, MgHCO{sub 3

  8. Detecting drift of quantum sources: not the de Finetti theorem

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, Lucia

    2011-01-01

    We propose and analyze a method to detect and characterize the drift of a nonstationary quantum source. It generalizes a standard measurement for detecting phase diffusion of laser fields to quantum systems of arbitrary Hilbert space dimension, qubits in particular. We distinguish diffusive and systematic drifts, and examine how quickly one can determine that a source is drifting. We show that for single-photon wavepackets our measurement is implemented by the Hong-Ou-Mandel effect.

  9. Compact drift-chambers for the OPAL forward detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, B.E.; Attree, D.J.; Charalambous, A.; Cranfield, R.; Cresswell, M.; Crone, G.; Dallavalle, G.M.; Dryburgh, M.; Kennedy, B.W.; Hayes, D.; Marradi, L.; Miller, D.J.; Sherwood, P.; Spreadbury, E.; Wood, N.C.; Young, K.K. (University Coll., London (UK). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1989-11-10

    Two planes of four chambers are mounted in front of the forward calorimeter at each end of OPAL. Beam tests at CERN show good linearity (within 0.5 mm over 130 mm maximum drift) and good resolution in the drift direction (average 300 {mu}m over the whole range of drift distances). The resolution along the wire is {plus minus}1 mm. (orig.).

  10. Anomalous drift of spiral waves in heterogeneous excitable media

    CERN Document Server

    Sridhar, S; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2009-01-01

    We study the drift of spiral waves in a simple model of heterogeneous excitable medium, having gradients in local excitability or cellular coupling. For the first time, we report the anomalous drift of spiral waves towards regions having higher excitability, in contrast to all earlier observations in reaction-diffusion models of excitable media. Such anomalous drift can promote the onset of complex spatio-temporal patterns, e.g., those responsible for life-threatening arrhythmias in the heart.

  11. Active experiments in the ionosphere and geomagnetic field variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivokon, V. P.; Cherneva, N. V.; Khomutov, S. Y.; Serovetnikov, A. S.

    2014-11-01

    Variations of ionospheric-magnetospheric relation energy, as one of the possible outer climatology factors, may be traced on the basis of analysis of natural geophysical phenomena such as ionosphere artificial radio radiation and magnetic storms. Experiments on active impact on the ionosphere have been carried out for quite a long time in Russia as well. The most modern heating stand is located in Alaska; it has been used within the HAARP Program. The possibility of this stand to affect geophysical fields, in particular, the geomagnetic field is of interest.

  12. A proposed International Geomagnetic Reference Field for 1965- 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddie, N.W.; Fabiano, E.B.

    1982-01-01

    A set of spherical harmonic models describing the Earth's main magnetic field from 1965 to 1985 has been developed and is proposed as the next revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). A tenth degree and order spherical harmonic model of the main field was derived from Magsat data. A series of eighth degree and order spherical harmonic models of the secular variation of the main field was derived from magnetic observatory annual mean values. Models of the main field at 1965, 1970, 1975, and 1980 were obtained by extrapolating the main-field model using the secular variation models.-Authors spherical harmonic models Earth main magnetic field Magsat data

  13. Quiet geomagnetic field representation for all days and latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W.H.; Schiffmacher, E.R.; Arora, B.R.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a technique for obtaining the quiet-time geomagnetic field variation expected for all days of the year and distribution of latitudes from a limited set of selected quiet days within a year at a discrete set of locations. A data set of observatories near 75??E longitude was used as illustration. The method relies upon spatial smoothing of the decomposed spectral components. An evaluation of the fidelity of the resulting model shows correlation coefficients usually above 0.9 at the lower latitudes and near 0.7 at the higher latitudes with variations identified as dependent upon season and field element. -from Authors

  14. Can the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini survive in the absence of the geomagnetic field?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Weronika; Idzikowski, Bogdan; Kowalski, Wojciech; Szymański, Bogdan; Kosicki, Jakub Z; Kaczmarek, Łukasz

    2017-01-01

    Earth's geomagnetic field has undergone critical changes in the past. Studies on the influence of the magnetic field on Earth's organisms are crucial for the understanding of evolution of life on Earth and astrobiological considerations. Numerous studies conducted both on plants and animals confirmed the significant influence of the geomagnetic field on the metabolism of living organisms. Water bears (Tardigrada), which are a mong the most resistant animals due to their cryptobiotic abilities, show significant resistance to a number of environmental stressors, but the influence of the geomagnetic field on their fitness has not been addressed before. In our studies, we used eutardigrade Hypsibius dujardini to analyse whether isolation from the geomagnetic field had an effect on mortality. We found that Hypsibius dujardini specimens demonstrated relatively high mortality during anhydrobiosis, also in control groups exposed to the normal geomagnetic field. Moreover, similar mortality was observed in anhydrobiotic specimens isolated from the geomagnetic field. However, a significant difference was noted between tardigrade survival and the moment of their isolation from the geomagnetic field. In particular, tardigrade mortality substantially increased in absence of a magnetic field during the process of entering anhydrobiosis and returning to active life. Our results suggest that these processes rely on complex metabolic processes that are critically influenced by the geomagnetic field.

  15. The geomagnetic observatory on Tristan da Cunha: Setup, operation and experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzka, Jürgen; Husøy, Bjørn-Ove; Berarducci, Alan;

    2011-01-01

    The island Tristan da Cunha is located in the South Atlantic Anomaly, and until recently the area has been one of the largest gaps in the global geomagnetic observatory network. As part of the Danish project SAADAN we set up a geomagnetic observatory on the island. Here we report on how we...

  16. Solar activity and human health at middle and low geomagnetic latitudes in Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Blanca; Sánchez de La Peña, Salvador

    2010-08-01

    The study of the possible effect of solar variability on living organisms is one of the most controversial issues of present day science. It has been firstly and mainly carried on high latitudes, while at middle and low latitudes this study is rare. In the present review we focused on the work developed at middle and low geomagnetic latitudes of America. At these geomagnetic latitudes the groups consistently dedicated to this issue are mainly two, one in Cuba and the other in Mexico. The Cuban and Mexican studies show that at such latitudes there are biological consequences to the solar/geomagnetic activity, coinciding in four points: (1) the male population behave differently from the female population, (2) the most vulnerable age group to geomagnetic perturbations is that of ⩾65 years old, (3) there is a tendency for myocardial infarctions (death or occurrence) to increase one day after a geomagnetic Ap index large value or during the day of the associated Forbush decrease, and (4) the myocardial infarctions (death or occurrence) increase as the geomagnetic perturbation increases. Additionally, the Cuban group found seasonal periodicities from their data, and also that increases of female myocardial infarctions occurred before and after the day of the geomagnetic disturbance. The Mexican group found that the male sex is more vulnerable to geomagnetic perturbations and that the myocardial infarction deaths present the conspicuous cycle of ˜7 days.

  17. A westward propagating slab tear model for Late Triassic Qinling Orogenic Belt geodynamic evolution: Insights from the petrogenesis of the Caoping and Shahewan intrusions, central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fangyang; Liu, Shuwen; Zhang, Wanyi; Deng, Zhengbin; Chen, Xu

    2016-10-01

    temperature (TZr = 770-817 °C, comparing with Caoping intrusion of TZr = 727-773 °C), together with the magma mixing and isothermal decompression processes. Integrated with previous regional data, the SQB shows that mantle-derived magmatic activations initiated at ~ 234 Ma near Wudang in the east, and westward systematically decreased to ~ 222-219 Ma near Caoping and to 212-208 Ma near Yangba. We attribute this temporal-spatial distribution of mantle-derived magmatism within the SQB to the progressive tear of the subducted oceanic slab. Combined with sedimentary studies on the foreland basins, paleomagnetic studies as well as numerical and seismic tomography models of slab break-off, we propose that the ~ 225-205 Ma magmatism in the SQB resulted from a westward slab tear following the collision between the NCC and YZC.

  18. Greater circadian disadvantage during evening games for the National Basketball Association (NBA), National Hockey League (NHL) and National Football League (NFL) teams travelling westward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Jonathan; Forest, Geneviève

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the effects of a circadian disadvantage (i.e. playing in a different time zone) on the winning percentages in three major sport leagues in North America: the National Basketball Association, the National Hockey League and the National Football League. We reviewed 5 years of regular season games in the National Basketball Association, National Hockey League and National Football League, and noted the winning percentage of the visiting team depending on the direction of travel (west, east, and same time zone) and game time (day and evening games). T-tests and analysis of variance were performed to evaluate the effects of the circadian disadvantage, its direction, the number of time zones travelled, and the game time on winning percentages in each major league. The results showed an association between the winning percentages and the number of time zones traveled for the away evening games, with a clear disadvantage for the teams travelling westward. There was a significant difference in the teams' winning percentages depending on the travelling direction in the National Basketball Association (F2,5908  = 16.12, P < 0.0001) and the National Hockey League (F2,5639  = 4.48, P = 0.011), and a trend was found in the National Football League (F2,1279  = 2.86, P = 0.058). The effect of the circadian disadvantage transcends the type of sport and needs to be addressed for greater equity among the western and eastern teams in professional sports. These results also highlight the importance of circadian rhythms in sport performance and athletic competitions. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  19. Temperature Drift Modeling of FOG Based on LS-WSVM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li-ping; KONG Xiao-mei; FU Meng-yin; WANG Mei-ling; ZHANG Jia-wen; JIANG Ming

    2008-01-01

    Large temperature drift is an important factor for improving the performance of FOG. A trend term of temperature drift of FOG is obtained using stationary wavelets transform, and an FOG drift algorithm with least squares wavelet support vector machine (LS-WSVM) is developed. The algorithm used Maxihat wavelet as a kernel function of LSWSVM to establish an FOG drift model. It has better modeling precise than LS-WSVM model with Gauss kernel. Results indicate the efficiency of this algorithm of LS-WSVM.

  20. Calibration of the TWIST high-precision drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Grossheim, A; Olin, A; 10.1016/j.nima.2010.08.105

    2010-01-01

    A method for the precise measurement of drift times for the high-precision drift chambers used in the TWIST detector is described. It is based on the iterative correction of the space-time relationships by the time residuals of the track fit, resulting in a measurement of the effective drift times. The corrected drift time maps are parametrised individually for each chamber using spline functions. Biases introduced by the reconstruction itself are taken into account as well, making it necessary to apply the procedure to both data and simulation. The described calibration is shown to improve the reconstruction performance and to extend significantly the physics reach of the experiment.