WorldWideScience

Sample records for geomagnetic deep soundings

  1. Thin-Sheet Inversion Modeling of Geomagnetic Deep Sounding Data Using MCMC Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendra Grandis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The geomagnetic deep sounding (GDS method is one of electromagnetic (EM methods in geophysics that allows the estimation of the subsurface electrical conductivity distribution. This paper presents the inversion modeling of GDS data employing Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC algorithm to evaluate the marginal posterior probability of the model parameters. We used thin-sheet model to represent quasi-3D conductivity variations in the heterogeneous subsurface. The algorithm was applied to invert field GDS data from the zone covering an area that spans from eastern margin of the Bohemian Massif to the West Carpathians in Europe. Conductivity anomalies obtained from this study confirm the well-known large-scale tectonic setting of the area.

  2. Sounding of the plasma sheet in the deep geomagnetic tail using energetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, P.W.; Wenzel, K.; Sanderson, T.R.

    1984-10-01

    Energetic ions (E>35 keV) at 90/sup 0/ to the magnetic field line are measured on ISEE-3 in the distant geomagnetic tail and are used as tracers of the particle density during two encounters with the plasma sheet at 210 and 128 earth radii from the earth. Because of the finite gyroradius (2400 km) of these (assumed) protons, different orientation about the magnetic field measure the intensity of different locations, allowing a separation of spatial from temporal variations. Density contour maps of the plasma hseet are constructed, demonstrating the wavy nature of this regime, as well as the existence of density layers within it.

  3. An electromagnetic sounding experiment in Germany using the vertical gradient of geomagnetic variations observed in a deep borehole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmucker, Ulrich; Spitzer, Klaus; Steveling, Erich

    2009-09-01

    We have recorded for 13 d, geomagnetic variations simultaneously on the Earth's surface and in a borehole at 832 m depth straight below, with a sampling rate of 1 Hz. In addition, geoelectric variations were observed at the same site near Bad Königshofen in Frankonia, Germany. The penetrated moderately conductive Triassic sediments lie above highly resistive Permian deposits. A presumably crystalline basement begins at 1500-1900 m depth. The purpose of the experiment is to determine the skin effect of geomagnetic variations and to derive from it the equivalent to the magnetotelluric (MT) surface impedance, using the vertical gradient (VG) method of electromagnetic (EM) sounding. In this way, we were able to reproduce all four elements of the MT impedance tensor, except for an unexplained but consistent downward shift of VG phases against MT phases by roughly 15° for the two off-diagonal elements. Hence, our tensor evaluation goes beyond the common practice, to express the skin effect by a single VG transfer function in response to a layered structure. The otherwise good agreement of VG and MT results implies that at our test site, the MT impedance tensor is largely distortion-free and that, for example, its pronounced anisotropy should be regarded as a genuine characteristic of the EM response for a laterally non-uniform or possibly anisotropic deep structure. The drilling site lies within the range of a widespread induction anomaly. We have observed the resulting variations of the vertical magnetic component at the surface and in the borehole and found them to be identical. The thus established absence of a skin effect for the vertical component allows us to treat the sedimentary layer down to the depth of the borehole instrument as a thin sheet, and the pertinent thin-sheet approximation for EM induction forms the basis of our analysis. We have derived the required estimate of conductance from the skin effect of horizontal components, noting that this estimate

  4. GDS (Geomagnetic Depth Sounding in Italy: applications and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gambetta

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of geomagnetic field variations is a useful tool to detect electrical conductivity contrasts within the Earth. Lateral resolution of outlined patterns depends on the array dimensions and density of measurement sites over the investigated area. The inspection depth is constrained by the period of geomagnetic variations considered in data processing. Regions with significant geological features such as boundaries of continental plates, marginal areas of contact between tectonic units or other geodynamical processes, are of primary interest for the application of the MagnetoVariational (MV method. In the last ten years, in the frame of the ElectroMagnetic (EM sounding techniques in applied geophysics, this method has been applied in Italy by researchers of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica, Rome, the Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universitá di Genova and the Czech Science Academy of Prague. The Ivrea body in the Northwestern Alps and their junction with the Apennine chain, the micro-plate of the Sardinian-Corsican system and, recently, the central part of the peninsula along Tyrrhenian-Adriatic lithospheric transects were investigated. Studies in time and frequency-domain used in the first investigations, have been followed by more refined analysis involving tests on the induced EM field dimension, computations of single site Transfer Functions (TFs through Parkinson arrows' and Fourier maps in the Hypothetical Event technique (HE. It was possible to describe the electrical conductivity distribution in the inner part of the SW Alpine arc and to confirm the presence of lithospheric and asthenospheric anomalies obtained by other geophysical methods. For the Sardinia-Corsica system, 2D and 3D inversion models highlighted the existence of two major conducting bodies, one north of Corsica, and the other south of Sardinia. In Central Italy, the regional electrical conductivity distribution pointed out a deep conductive structure

  5. Viscously driven plasma flows in the deep geomagnetic tail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, C.J.; Slavin, J.A. (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States))

    1992-07-24

    The authors present an analysis, based on the principles of stress balance in a 1-dimensional current sheet, which considers the problem of closed magnetic flux transport into the deep tail by a viscous'-like interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere. They illustrate the analysis with an example of ISEE-3 data showing strong tailward plasma sheet flows on apparently closed field lines in the deep tail. Apart from narrow regions adjacent to the magnetopause, these flows are not driven by the scattering of magnetosheath plasma into the magnetosphere. They estimate the fraction of the magnetosheath momentum flux needed to be anomalously transferred into the plasma sheet to drive the flows. In their example this is [approximately] 6%. No previously suggested mechanism (e.g., the Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability) has been shown capable of providing anomalous momentum transport of this magnitude. Their current understanding of the viscous' interaction between the solar wind and magnetosphere is thus insufficient to explain these observations.

  6. Thin current sheets in the deep geomagnetic tail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulkkinen, T.I. (Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland)); Baker, D.N.; Owen, C.J. (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)); Gosling, J.T. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Murphy, N. (Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States))

    1993-11-19

    The ISEE-3 magnetic field and plasma electron data from Jan-March 1983 have been searched to study thin current sheets in the deep tail region. 33 events were selected where the spacecraft crossed through the current sheet from lobe to lobe within 15 minutes. The average thickness of the observed current sheets was 2.45R[sub E], and in 24 cases the current sheet was thinner than 3.0R[sub E]; 6 very thin current sheets (thickness [lambda] < 0.5R[sub E]) were found. The electron data show that the very thin current sheets are associated with considerable temperature anisotropy. On average, the electron gradient current was [approximately]17% of the total current, whereas the current arising from the electron temperature anisotropy varied between 8-45% of the total current determined from the lobe field magnitude. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  7. The Deep Ocean Sound Channel in Areas Around Australia,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    Kinne) Oceanography Division, St. Louis, USA (Attention: Mr A. Pressman, Code 330) Laboratorio de Ensayo de Materiales e Investigaciones Tecnologicas...AD-AlSO 715 MATERIALS RESEARCH LABS ASCOT VALE (AUSTRALIA) F/B 20/1 THE DEEP OCEAN SOUND CHANNEL IN AREAS AROUND AUSTRALIA,CU) OCT 80 D J WHELAN... MATERIALS RESEARCH LABORATORIES MELBOURNE, VICTORIA ~REPORT MRL-R-788 THE DEEP OCEAN SOUND CHANNEL IN AREAS AROUND AUSTRALIA Daniel J. Whelan Approved

  8. An exploration and modeling of the crustal conductivity aberration through Hesse and Thuringia in Central Germany with Geomagnetic Depth Sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, N. A.; Bahr, D.

    2011-12-01

    With geomagnetic depth sounding we analyze geomagnetic field variations within the earth and detect electrical conductivity contrasts. Using this method Peter (1994) and Hippmann (2010) found an strongly increased By-component around Göttingen in Central Germany, and this electrical conductivity anomaly was expanded to the middle of Hesse through an additional survey by Reich in 2010. Now we can set the boundaries in a new way. In spring and summer 2011 we installed 13 new magnetometer stations in Hesse, Thuringia and Lower Saxony to specify the anomaly boundaries. Our result shows that the "Göttingen By anomaly" is spreading further into the North than expected and far into the South-West. In addition the boundaries to the West and East could be confirmed. The result suggests that the anomaly spreads over the conurbation around Frankfurt and connects to the Rhine rift valley which is part of the European Cenozoic rift system. Therefor the "Göttingen By anomaly" goes over in a central German conductivity anomaly which exact North and South border is yet to be specified. Besides the data for geomagnetic depth sounding we also collected magnetotelluric data which help constraining the conductivity contrasts. Preliminary models of the conduction mechanism suggest that fluids alone are insufficient to explain the conductance of this structure.

  9. ULF fluctuations of the geomagnetic field and ionospheric sounding measurements at low latitudes during the first CAWSES campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Villante

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of ULF geomagnetic field fluctuations at low latitudes during the first CAWSES campaign (29 March-3 April 2004. During the whole campaign, mainly in the prenoon sector, a moderate Pc3-4 pulsation activity is observed, clearly related to interplanetary upstream waves. On 3 April, in correspondence to the Earth's arrival of a coronal mass ejection, two SIs are observed whose waveforms are indicative of a contribution of the high-latitude ionospheric currents to the low-latitude ground field. During the following geomagnetic storm, low frequency (Pc5 waves are observed at discrete frequencies. Their correspondence with the same frequencies detected in the radial components of the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind speed suggests that Alfvénic solar wind fluctuations may act as direct drivers of magnetospheric fluctuations. A cross-phase analysis, using different pairs of stations, is also presented for identifying field line resonant frequencies and monitoring changes in plasmaspheric mass density. Lastly, an analysis of ionospheric vertical soundings, measured at the Rome ionosonde station (41.8° N, 12.5° E, and vertical TEC measurements deduced from GPS signals within an European network shows the relation between the ULF resonances in the inner magnetosphere and thermal plasma density variations during geomagnetically quiet conditions, in contrast to various storm phases at the end of the CAWSES campaign.

  10. A deep seismic sounding profile across the Tianshan Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The deep seismic sounding profile across the Tianshan Mountains revealed a two-layer crustal structure in the Tianshregion, namely the lower and upper crusts. Lateral variations of layer velocity and thickness are evidently shown. Low-velocity layers spread discontinuously at the bottom of the upper crust. The Moho depth is 47 km in the Kuytun area and 50 km in the Xayar area. In the Tianshan Mountains, the Moho becomes deeper with the maximum depth of 62 km around the boundary between the southern and northern Tianshan Mountains. The average velocity ranges from 6.1 to 6.3 km/s in the crust and 8.15 km/s at the top of the upper mantle. Two groups of reliable reflective seismic phases of the Moho (Pm1 and Pm2) are recognized on the shot record section of the Kuytun area. A staked and offset region, 20-30 km long, is displayed within a shot-geophone distance of 190-210 km in Pm1 and Pm2. Calculation shows that the Moho is offset by 10 km in the northern Tianshan region, 62 km deep in the south while 52 km deep in the north, and plunges northwards. In comparison with typical collisional orogenic belts, the structure of the Moho beneath the Tianshan Mountains presents a similar pattern. This can be used to explain the subduction of the Tarim plate towards the Tianshan Mountains. This intracontinental subduction is considered the dynamic mechanism of the Cenozoic uplifting of the Tianshan Mountains. The discovery of seismic phases Pm1 and Pm2 serves as the seismological evidence for the northward subduction of the Tarim plate.

  11. Automatic Segmentation and Deep Learning of Bird Sounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koops, Hendrik Vincent; Van Balen, J.M.H.; Wiering, F.

    2015-01-01

    We present a study on automatic birdsong recognition with deep neural networks using the BIRDCLEF2014 dataset. Through deep learning, feature hierarchies are learned that represent the data on several levels of abstraction. Deep learning has been applied with success to problems in fields such as mu

  12. Automatic Segmentation and Deep Learning of Bird Sounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koops, Hendrik Vincent; Van Balen, J.M.H.; Wiering, F.

    2015-01-01

    We present a study on automatic birdsong recognition with deep neural networks using the BIRDCLEF2014 dataset. Through deep learning, feature hierarchies are learned that represent the data on several levels of abstraction. Deep learning has been applied with success to problems in fields such as mu

  13. Automatic Segmentation and Deep Learning of Bird Sounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koops, Hendrik Vincent; Van Balen, J.M.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/352221860; Wiering, F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/141928034

    2015-01-01

    We present a study on automatic birdsong recognition with deep neural networks using the BIRDCLEF2014 dataset. Through deep learning, feature hierarchies are learned that represent the data on several levels of abstraction. Deep learning has been applied with success to problems in fields such as

  14. Voyager Observations in the Distant Heliosheath - an Analogy With ISEE-3 Observations in theDeep Geomagnetic Tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Ian

    2015-04-01

    We suggest an analogy between energetic particle and magnetic field observations made by the Voyager 1 spacecraft in the distant heliosheath at 122 AU in August 2012 and those made in the distant geomagnetic tail by the Energetic Particle Anisotropy Spectrometer (EPAS) on the ISEE 3 spacecraft in 1982-1983, including remarkable similarities in the behavior of the energetic particle intensities and anisotropies despite large differences in the time and distance scales.The analogy suggests that Voyager 1 may have moved not into the interstellar medium from heliosheath but instead into a region equivalent to the “lobes” of the geomagnetic tail. This region may be composed of heliospheric field lines which have reconnected with the interstellar medium beyond the spacecraft and so are open to the entry of cosmic rays, while heliospheric particles (e.g., Anomalous Cosmic Rays) are free to escape, leaving only a weak population of large pitch-angle ACRs with “pancake” distributions similar to those also seen by ISEE 3 in the lobes of the tail. If this is the case, the actual heliopause (equivalent to the magnetopause), where the ambient interstellar medium is entered, lies beyond the current distance of Voyager 1.Temporary variations in the energetic particle and magnetic field intensities at Voyager over a period of around 27 days prior to the final boundary crossing are interpreted as the boundary twice approaching Voyager 1 and then retreating Sunward before the final crossing occurred. Similar features were frequently observed in the deep tail due to tail dynamics and “flapping” in the solar wind. The 27 day interval suggests that rotation of the heliosphere may have contributed to this boundary motion.Energetic particles in the tail are accelerated by reconnection in the plasma sheet which can lead to the formation of plasmoids. Both are elements of some recent models of the heliopause.

  15. Breaking the spatial resolution barrier via iterative sound-light interaction in deep tissue microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Ke Si; Reto Fiolka; Meng Cui

    2012-01-01

    Optical microscopy has so far been restricted to superficial layers, leaving many important biological questions unanswered. Random scattering causes the ballistic focus, which is conventionally used for image formation, to decay exponentially with depth. Optical imaging beyond the ballistic regime has been demonstrated by hybrid techniques that combine light with the deeper penetration capability of sound waves. Deep inside highly scattering media, the sound focus dimensions restrict the ima...

  16. Rapid Inversion Imaging Techniques for Deep Transient Electromagnetic Sounding Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChenBenchi; Shaomin; HeZhanxiang; LiuHong

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces two types of rapid inversion imaging techniques for long offset transient electromagnetic sounding: namely S-inversing algorithm based on the conductive sheet model and quasi-wave equation based on wavefield transform. The corresponding software was developed with VC++. Application of the algorithms to the processing of the real Lotem data from the western part of China proved that two the algorithms and the developed software package are effective, fast and stable.

  17. Inversion Method for Sound Velocity Profile of Eddy in Deep Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱晓芳; 彭临慧; 王宁; 朱建相

    2001-01-01

    The modal wave number tomography approach is used to obtain sound speed profile of water column in deep ocean. The approach consists of estimation of the local modal eigenvalues from complex pressure field and use of these data as input to modal perturbative inversion method for obtaining the local sound speed profile. The empirical orthonormal function (EOF) is applied to reduce the parameter search space. The ocean environment used for numerical simulations includes the Munk profile as the unperturbed background speed profile and a weak Gaussian eddy as the sound speed profile perturbation. The results of numerical simulations show the method is capable of monitoring the oceanic interior structure.

  18. Interdecadal change in the deep Puget sound benthos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, F.H.

    2003-01-01

    Data from quantitative samples of the benthos at a 200-m site in central Puget Sound, collected twice yearly in most years between 1963 and 1992, were evaluated to determine the extent to which species composition in a continental-shelf depth community exhibits long-term persistence. Study results showed that the most abundant species were consistently present over the 30-year period. However, measures of species composition (e.g., similarity, diversity) reveal a subtle, gradual change in the community over time. Among the changes are (1) multi-year periods of greatly increased abundance of the common species; (2) an overall increase in the total abundance of the benthic community beginning in the mid-1970s; (3) periods of increased abundance, during the late 1970s and early 1980s, of two species that are tolerant of organic enrichment; and (4) the steady decline in abundance of the large burrowing echinoderm, Brisaster latifrons as a consequence of the lack of recruitment to the site since 1970. Despite the conspicuousness of these changes, there are no observed environmental factors that readily explain them. Circumstantial evidence suggests that climate-related change in Puget Sound circulation beginning in the mid-1970s, organic enrichment associated with a nearby large source of primary-treated sewage, and the influence of changes in the abundance of the large echinoderms on the smaller species are potential agents of change. The principle reasons for our inability to identify causes of long-term change in the Puget Sound benthos are (a) inconsistent long-term monitoring of environmental variables, (b) the lack of quantitative information about long-term changes in plankton and fish populations, (c) lack of knowledge of specific predator/prey and competitive interactions in soft bottom benthos, (d) unknown influence of moderate levels of contamination on biota; and (e) lack of understanding of possible linkages between climate regime shifts and fluctuations in

  19. Breaking the spatial resolution barrier via iterative sound-light interaction in deep tissue microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Ke; Fiolka, Reto; Cui, Meng

    2012-01-01

    Optical microscopy has so far been restricted to superficial layers, leaving many important biological questions unanswered. Random scattering causes the ballistic focus, which is conventionally used for image formation, to decay exponentially with depth. Optical imaging beyond the ballistic regime has been demonstrated by hybrid techniques that combine light with the deeper penetration capability of sound waves. Deep inside highly scattering media, the sound focus dimensions restrict the imaging resolutions. Here we show that by iteratively focusing light into an ultrasound focus via phase conjugation, we can fundamentally overcome this resolution barrier in deep tissues and at the same time increase the focus to background ratio. We demonstrate fluorescence microscopy beyond the ballistic regime of light with a threefold improved resolution and a fivefold increase in contrast. This development opens up practical high resolution fluorescence imaging in deep tissues.

  20. Breaking the spatial resolution barrier via iterative sound-light interaction in deep tissue microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Si, Ke; Cui, Meng

    2012-01-01

    Optical microscopy has so far been restricted to superficial layers, leaving many important biological questions unanswered. Random scattering causes the ballistic focus, which is conventionally used for image formation, to decay exponentially with depth. Optical imaging beyond the ballistic regime has been demonstrated by hybrid techniques that combine light with the deeper penetration capability of sound waves. Deep inside highly scattering media, the sound focus dimensions restrict the imaging resolutions. Here we show that by iteratively focusing light into an ultrasound focus via phase conjugation, we can fundamentally overcome this resolution barrier in deep tissues and at the same time increase the focus to background ratio. We demonstrate fluorescence microscopy beyond the ballistic regime of light with a threefold improved resolution and a fivefold increase in contrast. This development opens up practical high resolution fluorescence imaging in deep tissues.

  1. Range-Depth Tracking of Sounds from a Single-Point Deployment by Exploiting the Deep-Water Sound Speed Minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    mammal sounds in range and depth from a single mooring or platform (e.g. glider), by exploiting the propagation effects of the deep-water sound...makes mitigation decisions problematic. The range of a marine mammal sound from a compact platform can also be obtained by detecting the same event...remains the same. 9 Figure 9: Evolution of ray arrival angles (top) and relative multipath arrival times (bottom) as a controlled source is winched

  2. Geomagnetism 4

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, John A

    2013-01-01

    Geomagnetism, Volume 4 focuses on the processes, methodologies, technologies, and approaches involved in geomagnetism, including electric fields, solar wind plasma, pulsations, and gravity waves.The selection first offers information on solar wind, magnetosphere, and the magnetopause of the Earth. Discussions focus on magnetopause structure and transfer processes, magnetosphere electric fields, geomagnetically trapped radiation, microstructure of the solar wind plasma, and hydro magnetic fluctuations and discontinuities. The text then examines geomagnetic tail, neutral upper atmosphere, and ge

  3. A direct inversion scheme for deep resistivity sounding data using artificial neural networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jimmy Stephen; C Manoj; S B Singh

    2004-03-01

    Initialization of model parameters is crucial in the conventional 1D inversion of DC electrical data, since a poor guess may result in undesired parameter estimations. In the present work, we investigate the performance of neural networks in the direct inversion of DC sounding data, without the need of a priori information. We introduce a two-step network approach where the first network identifies the curve type, followed by the model parameter estimation using the second network. This approach provides the flexibility to accommodate all the characteristic sounding curve types with a wide range of resistivity and thickness. Here we realize a three layer feed-forward neural network with fast back propagation learning algorithms performing well. The basic data sets for training and testing were simulated on the basis of available deep resistivity sounding (DRS) data from the crystalline terrains of south India. The optimum network parameters and performance were decided as a function of the testing error convergence with respect to the network training error. On adequate training, the final weights simulate faithfully to recover resistivity and thickness on new data. The small discrepancies noticed, however, are well within the resolvability of resistivity sounding curve interpretations.

  4. Deep temperature distribution along a deep seismic sounding profile across the Carpathians (model calculations)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cermak, V. (Geophys. Inst., Prague)

    1974-01-01

    The first draft of the heat flow map of Central and Eastern Europe demonstrates the general heat flow pattern in the Carpathians. The Pannonian Basin, located between the Carpathians and Dinarides, is a zone of anomalous heat flow (greater than 2.0 HFU). The geothermal activity decreases rapidly to 1.3-1.5 HFU in the Carpathian arc. A preliminary map of crustal thickness, based on the results of gravity and seismic surveys, shows that the Mohorovicic discontinuity lies at a shallow depth below the Basin (24-26 km) and is deeper below the Carpathians (50 km). With some basic assumptions concerning the distribution of thermal conductivity and heat production applied, deep temperatures along a traverse crossing the Carpathian arc were calculated. The Moho temperature of 700/sup 0/C beneath the peri-Pieninian Lineament may increase to 800-1000/sup 0/C beneath the Pannonian Basin, and regional heat flow differences may reach 1.0 HFU. This type of variation in the energy input from the upper mantle is important in interpreting the tectonic evolution of the entire area.

  5. Voyager observations in the distant heliosheath: An analogy with ISEE-3 observations in the deep geomagnetic tail

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Ian G.

    2016-01-01

    We suggest an analogy between energetic particle and magnetic field observations made by the Voyager 1 spacecraft in the distant heliosheath at 122 AU in August 2012, and those made in the distant geomagnetic tail by the ISEE 3 spacecraft in 1982-1983, despite large differences in the time and distance scales. The analogy suggests that in August, 2012, Voyager 1 may not have moved from the anomalous cosmic ray (ACR)-dominated heliosheath into the interstellar medium but into a region equivale...

  6. [Evaluation of the influence of deep geomagnetic impacting on growth rate and sensitivity to antibiotics in Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmakov, V M; Kulikov, V Iu; Evstropov, A N; Voronin, A Iu

    2002-01-01

    The short-term (1-7 days) and prolonged (30-90 days) adaptation of bacteria to hypomagnetic conditions was studied by observing changes in growth rate and resistance to antibiotics in E. coli used as an experimental model. The decrease of the growth rate of bacterial cells in the exponential phase was found to occur. The effect disappeared when the screened culture was placed under normal geomagnetic conditions for 1 hour daily. After prolonged screening an increase in the resistance of these bacteria to kanamycin and carbenicillin was registered. These changes were not hereditary: after the cessation of screening the sensitivity of the bacteria to antibiotics was restored.

  7. Deep seismic sounding investigation into the deep structure of the magma system in Changbaishan-Tianchi volcanic region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张先康; 张成科; 赵金仁; 杨卓欣; 李松林; 张建狮; 刘宝峰; 成双喜; 孙国伟; 潘素珍

    2002-01-01

    The magma system of Changbaishan-Tianchi Volcanic region is studied with three-dimensional deep seismic sounding (DSS) technique. The results show that the magma system of Changbaishan-Tianchi volcanic region, mainly characterized by low velocity of P wave, can be divided into three parts in terms of depth. At the depth range of 9(15 km, the distribution of the magma system is characterized by extensiveness, large scale and near-SN orientation. This layer is the major place for magma storage. From the depth of 15 km down to the lower crust, it is characterized by small lateral scale, which indicates the (trace( of magma intrusion from the upper mantle into the crust and also implies that the magma system most probably extends to the upper mantle, or even deeper.(less than 8(9 km deep), the range of magma distribution is even smaller, centering on an SN-oriented area just north of the Tianchi crater. If low velocity of P wave is related to the magma system, it then reflects that the magma here is still in a state of relatively high temperature. In this sense, the magma system of Changbaishan-Tianchi volcanic region is at least not (remains(, in other words, it is in an (active( state.

  8. Voyager observations in the distant heliosheath: An analogy with ISEE-3 observations in the deep geomagnetic tail

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, Ian G

    2016-01-01

    We suggest an analogy between energetic particle and magnetic field observations made by the Voyager 1 spacecraft in the distant heliosheath at 122 AU in August 2012, and those made in the distant geomagnetic tail by the ISEE 3 spacecraft in 1982-1983, despite large differences in the time and distance scales. The analogy suggests that in August, 2012, Voyager 1 may not have moved from the anomalous cosmic ray (ACR)-dominated heliosheath into the interstellar medium but into a region equivalent to the "lobes" of the geomagnetic tail, composed of heliospheric field lines which have reconnected with the interstellar medium beyond the spacecraft and so are open to the entry of cosmic rays, while heliospheric particles (e.g., ACRs) are free to escape, and which maintain a ~Parker spiral configuration. The heliopause, analogous to the magnetopause forming the outer boundary of the lobes, may then lie beyond this so-called "heliocliff". Even if this analogy is incorrect, the remarkable similarities between the ener...

  9. Voyager observations in the distant heliosheath: An analogy with ISEE-3 observations in the deep geomagnetic tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Ian G.

    2017-08-01

    We suggest an analogy between energetic particle and magnetic field observations made by the Voyager 1 spacecraft in the distant heliosheath at 122 AU in August 2012, and those made in the distant geomagnetic tail by the ISEE 3 spacecraft in 1982-1983, despite large differences in the time and distance scales. The analogy suggests that in August, 2012, Voyager 1 may not have moved from the anomalous cosmic ray (ACR)-dominated heliosheath into the interstellar medium but into a region equivalent to the ;lobes; of the geomagnetic tail, composed of heliospheric field lines which have reconnected with the interstellar medium beyond the spacecraft and so are open to the entry of cosmic rays, while heliospheric particles (e.g., ACRs) are free to escape, and which maintain a ∼Parker spiral configuration. The heliopause, analogous to the magnetopause forming the outer boundary of the lobes, may then lie beyond this so-called ;heliocliff;. Even if this analogy is incorrect, the remarkable similarities between the energetic particle and magnetic field observations in these very different regions are worth noting.

  10. Sound

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Muddled about what makes music? Stuck on the study of harmonics? Dumbfounded by how sound gets around? Now you no longer have to struggle to teach concepts you really don t grasp yourself. Sound takes an intentionally light touch to help out all those adults science teachers, parents wanting to help with homework, home-schoolers seeking necessary scientific background to teach middle school physics with confidence. The book introduces sound waves and uses that model to explain sound-related occurrences. Starting with the basics of what causes sound and how it travels, you'll learn how musical instruments work, how sound waves add and subtract, how the human ear works, and even why you can sound like a Munchkin when you inhale helium. Sound is the fourth book in the award-winning Stop Faking It! Series, published by NSTA Press. Like the other popular volumes, it is written by irreverent educator Bill Robertson, who offers this Sound recommendation: One of the coolest activities is whacking a spinning metal rod...

  11. [Reaction of circadian rhythms of the lymphoid system to deep screening from geomagnetic fields of the earth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodin, Iu I; Letiagin, A Y

    1990-02-01

    C57B1/6 inbred mice were placed in hypomagnetic condition during 14 days constantly. Degree of relaxation of geomagnetic field was 10(4). The increase of the number of eosinophil granulocytes was discovered in peripheral blood of mice. Measures of circadian rhythms of blood's absolute lymphocytosis, absolute number of cells in bone marrow, thymus, spleen and inguinal lymph nodes were safe. Adaptation of lymphoid system to hypomagnetic condition was manifested by desynchronization of circadian rhythmicity on the basis of different sensitivity of lymphoid organs, that realized in strengthening of ultradian rhythms with periods of 15 hours. There are indirect data, that show the increase of speed and/or volume of recirculation of lymphoid cells.

  12. Sound

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Sound has the power to soothe, excite, warn, protect, and inform. Indeed, the transmission and reception of audio signals pervade our daily lives. Readers will examine the mechanics and properties of sound and provides an overview of the "interdisciplinary science called acoustics." Also covered are functions and diseases of the human ear.

  13. Geomagnetism applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Wallace H.

    1995-01-01

    The social uses of geomagnetism include the physics of the space environment, satellite damage, pipeline corrosion, electric power-grid failure, communication interference, global positioning disruption, mineral-resource detection, interpretation of the Earth's formation and structure, navigation, weather, and magnetoreception in organisms. The need for continuing observations of the geomagnetic field, together with careful archiving of these records and mechanisms for dissemination of these data, is emphasized.

  14. An exploration for deep-sea fish sounds off Vancouver Island from the NEPTUNE Canada ocean observing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Carrie C.; Rountree, Rodney A.; Pomerleau, Corinne; Juanes, Francis

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the significance of sound production to the ecology of deep-sea fish communities has improved little since anatomical surveys in the 1950s first suggested that sound production is widespread among slope-water fishes. The recent implementation of cabled ocean observatory networks around the world that include passive acoustic recording instruments provides scientists an opportunity to search for evidence of deep-sea fish sounds. We examined deep-sea acoustic recordings made at the NEPTUNE Canada Barkley Canyon Axis Pod (985 m) located off the west coast of Vancouver Island in the Northeast Pacific between June 2010 and May 2011 to determine the presence of fish sounds. A subset of over 300 5-min files was examined by selecting one day each month and analyzing one file for each hour over the 24 h day. Despite the frequent occurrence of marine mammal sounds, no examples of fish sounds were identified. However, we report examples of isolated unknown sounds that might be produced by fish, invertebrates, or more likely marine mammals. This finding is in direct contrast to recent smaller studies in the Atlantic where potential fish sounds appear to be more common. A review of the literature indicates 32 species found off British Columbia that potentially produce sound could occur in depths greater than 700 m but of these only Anoplopoma fimbria and Coryphaenoides spp. have been previously reported at the site. The lack of fish sounds observed here may be directly related to the low diversity and abundance of fishes present at the Barkley Canyon site. Other contributing factors include possible masking of low amplitude biological signals by self-generated noise from the platform instrumentation and ship noise. We suggest that examination of data both from noise-reduced ocean observatories around the world and from dedicated instrument surveys designed to search for deep-sea fish sounds to provide a larger-scale, more conclusive investigation into the

  15. Genetic algorithm in seismic waveform inversion and its application in deep seismic sounding data interpretation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fu-yun; ZHANG Xian-kang

    2006-01-01

    A genetic algorithm of body waveform inversion is presented for better understanding of crustal and upper mantle structures with deep seismic sounding (DSS) waveform data. General reflection and transmission synthetic seismogram algorithm, which is capable of calculating the response of thin alternating high and low velocity layers, is applied as a solution for forward modeling, and the genetic algorithm is used to find the optimal solution of the inverse problem. Numerical tests suggest that the method has the capability of resolving low-velocity layers, thin alternating high and low velocity layers, and noise suppression. Waveform inversion using P-wave records from Zeku, Xiahe and Lintao shots in the seismic wide-angle reflection/refraction survey along northeastern Qinghai-Xizang (Tibeteau) Plateau has revealed fine structures of the bottom of the upper crust and alternating layers in the middle/lower crust and topmost upper mantle.

  16. Tests for orbital influences on the geomagnetic field, and Quarternary magnetic records from North Atlantic and Arctic deep-sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Chuang

    This dissertation investigated the possible connection between orbital variations and the Earth's magnetic field, and the origin of orbital periods in sedimentary relative paleointensity (RPI) records, using previously published data. Circular statistic methods were utilized to test whether there is any consistent relationship between the phase of orbital parameters and the timing of geomagnetic reversals or excursions. The results indicate no discernable tendency, disagreeing with orbital forcing on the geodynamo. Numerical simulations further indicate that precision of the current polarity timescales need to be improved for any firm relationship to be established. Wavelet analyses methods were employed to investigate the origin of orbital periods in the RPI records. In some records, significant coherence at orbital periods occurs between RPI and a particular magnetic grain-size proxy. Therefore, orbital periods in some RPI records are attributed to lithologic 'contamination' resulted from incomplete normalization of the natural remanent magnetization (NRM) record. Comparison of RPI records from different regions of the world in both the time and time-frequency domains imply that the 'contamination' does not debilitate most RPI records as a global signal that is primarily of geomagnetic origin. Calibrated RPI and oxygen isotope stack records (PISO-1500) were developed by simultaneously matching and stacking both RPI and oxygen isotope data for 13 pairs of high-resolution global records. Wavelet analyses on the PISO-1500 RPI stack record failed to show significant orbital periods, and no tendencies were found for RPI minima in the stack to occur at particular phases of orbital variations. The generation of high-resolution paleomagnetic data is often associated with processing large volumes of measurement data. MATLAB(TM) software with graphical user interfaces was developed in this dissertation work to improve the efficiency of processing large volumes of

  17. Observationally constrained modeling of sound in curved ocean internal waves: examination of deep ducting and surface ducting at short range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Timothy F; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Reeder, D Benjamin

    2011-09-01

    A study of 400 Hz sound focusing and ducting effects in a packet of curved nonlinear internal waves in shallow water is presented. Sound propagation roughly along the crests of the waves is simulated with a three-dimensional parabolic equation computational code, and the results are compared to measured propagation along fixed 3 and 6 km source/receiver paths. The measurements were made on the shelf of the South China Sea northeast of Tung-Sha Island. Construction of the time-varying three-dimensional sound-speed fields used in the modeling simulations was guided by environmental data collected concurrently with the acoustic data. Computed three-dimensional propagation results compare well with field observations. The simulations allow identification of time-dependent sound forward scattering and ducting processes within the curved internal gravity waves. Strong acoustic intensity enhancement was observed during passage of high-amplitude nonlinear waves over the source/receiver paths, and is replicated in the model. The waves were typical of the region (35 m vertical displacement). Two types of ducting are found in the model, which occur asynchronously. One type is three-dimensional modal trapping in deep ducts within the wave crests (shallow thermocline zones). The second type is surface ducting within the wave troughs (deep thermocline zones).

  18. Crustal structure at the western end of the North Anatolian Fault Zone from deep seismic sounding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Baier

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The first deep seismic sounding experiment in Northwestern Anatolia was carried out in October 1991 as part of the "German - Turkish Project on Earthquake Prediction Research" in the Mudurnu area of the North Anatolian Fault Zone. The experiment was a joint enterprise by the Institute of Meteorology and Geophysics of Frankfurt University, the Earthquake Research Institute (ERI in Ankara, and the Turkish Oil Company (TPAO. Two orthogonal profiles, each 120 km in length with a crossing point near Akyazi, were covered in succession by 30 short period tape recording seismograph stations with 2 km station spacing. 12 shots, with charge sizes between 100 and 250 kg, were fired and 342 seismograms out of 360 were used for evaluation. By coincidence an M b = 4.5 earthquake located below Imroz Island was also recorded and provided additional information on Moho and the sub-Moho velocity. A ray tracing method orginally developed by Weber (1986 was used for travel time inversion. From a compilation of all data two generalized crustal models were derived, one with velocity gradients within the layers and one with constant layer velocities. The latter consists of a sediment cover of about 2 km with V p » 3.6 km/s, an upper crystalline crust down to 13 km with V p » 5.9 km/s, a middle crust down to 25 km depth with V p » 6.5 km/s, a lower crust down to 39 km Moho depth with V p » 7.0 km/s and V p » 8.05 km/s below the Moho. The structure of the individual profiles differs slightly. The thickest sediment cover is reached in the Izmit-Sapanca-trough and in the Akyazi basin. Of particular interest is a step of about 4 km in the lower crust near Lake Sapanca and probably an even larger one in the Moho (derived from the Imroz earthquake data. After the catastrophic earthquake of Izmit on 17 August 1999 this significant heterogeneity in crustal structure appears in a new light with regard to the possible cause of the Izmit earthquake. Heterogeneities in

  19. Study on the Geomagnetic Short Period Variations of the Northwestern Yunnan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Y.; Li, Q.; Cai, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Northwestern Yunnan is located in the interaction area between the Eurasian plate and the India plate. This area has been the ideal place for the research of continental dynamics and the prediction for risk region of strong earthquake for its complex tectonic environment and frequent seismic activity. Therefore the study on the geomagnetic short period variations is of great significance in the exploration of deep electrical structure, analysis of the seismic origin and deep geodynamics in the Northwestern Yunnan of China . This paper is based on the geomagnetic data from the magnetometer array with 8 sites built in the northwestern Yunnan to explore the deep electrical structure by the method of geomagnetic depth sounding. Firstly, we selected a total of 183 geomagnetic short period events at the range of 6min to 120min period. And we found a north northwest dividing line, of which two sides has the opposite value in the vertical component variation amplitude, which indicates the obvious conductivity anomaly underground. Secondly, the contour maps of the ratio of vertical component and horizontal component variation amplitude ΔZ/ΔH in different periods reflects the changes of a high conductivity belt's direction and position. In addition, the induction arrows maps within the period of 2 - 256min also shows that on the two sides of the dividing line the induction vectors deviate from each other, and the amplitude and direction of vectors varies with periods regularly. In the light of this, we infer that a high conductivity belt probably exists, which stretches from the deep crust to uppermost mantle and changes with depth constantly with the reference of magnetotelluric sounding. In the end of this paper, the staggered grid finite difference method is used to model the simplified three-dimensional high conductivity anomaly, and the result shows magnetic field distributions are consistent with the observed geomagnetic short period variations characteristics in

  20. Satellite Geomagnetism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Stolle, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Observations of Earth’s magnetic field from space began more than 50 years ago. A continuous monitoring of the field using low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites, however, started only in 1999, and three satellites have taken highprecision measurements of the geomagnetic field during the past decade...... ability to characterize and understand the many sources that contribute to Earth’s magnetic field. In this review, we summarize investigations of Earth’s interior and environment that have been possible through the analysis of high-precision magnetic field observations taken by LEO satellites........ The unprecedented time-space coverage of their data opened revolutionary new possibilities for monitoring, understanding, and exploring Earth’s magnetic field. In the near future, the three-satellite constellation Swarm will ensure continuity of such measurement and provide enhanced possibilities to improve our...

  1. Solar dynamo and geomagnetic activity

    CERN Document Server

    Georgieva, Katya

    2010-01-01

    The correlation between geomagnetic activity and the sunspot number in the 11-year solar cycle exhibits long-term variations due to the varying time lag between the sunspot-related and non-sunspot related geomagnetic activity, and the varying relative amplitude of the respective geomagnetic activity peaks. As the sunspot-related and non-sunspot related geomagnetic activity are caused by different solar agents, related to the solar toroidal and poloidal fields, respectively, we use their variations to derive the parameters of the solar dynamo transforming the poloidal field into toroidal field and back. We find that in the last 12 cycles the solar surface meridional circulation varied between 5 and 20 m/s (averaged over latitude and over the sunspot cycle), the deep circulation varied between 2.5 and 5.5 m/s, and the diffusivity in the whole of the convection zone was ~10**12 m2/s. In the last 12 cycles solar dynamo has been operating in moderately diffusion dominated regime in the bulk of the convection zone....

  2. Geomagnetic Principal Magnetic Storms

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The abbreviations used for observatory names are as follows: GEOMAGNETIC OBSERVATORIES Code Station Geomagnetic Latitude ABG Alibag AMS Martin de Vivie. These data...

  3. Visualizing the deep end of sound: plotting multi-parameter results from infrasound data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perttu, A. B.; Taisne, B.

    2016-12-01

    Infrasound is sound below the threshold of human hearing: approximately 20 Hz. The field of infrasound research, like other waveform based fields relies on several standard processing methods and data visualizations, including waveform plots and spectrograms. The installation of the International Monitoring System (IMS) global network of infrasound arrays, contributed to the resurgence of infrasound research. Array processing is an important method used in infrasound research, however, this method produces data sets with a large number of parameters, and requires innovative plotting techniques. The goal in designing new figures is to be able to present easily comprehendible, and information-rich plots by careful selection of data density and plotting methods.

  4. Sperm whale long-range echolocation sounds revealed by ANTARES, a deep-sea neutrino telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, M; Caballé, A; van der Schaar, M; Solsona, A; Houégnigan, L; Zaugg, S; Sánchez, A M; Castell, J V; Solé, M; Vila, F; Djokic, D; Adrián-Martínez, S; Albert, A; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Ardid, M; Aubert, J-J; Avgitas, T; Baret, B; Barrios-Martí, J; Basa, S; Bertin, V; Biagi, S; Bormuth, R; Bouwhuis, M C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Busto, J; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Carr, J; Celli, S; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Coleiro, A; Coniglione, R; Costantini, H; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Deschamps, A; De Bonis, G; Distefano, C; Di Palma, I; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Drouhin, D; Eberl, T; El Bojaddaini, I; Elsässer, D; Enzenhöfer, A; Fehn, K; Felis, I; Fusco, L A; Galatà, S; Gay, P; Geißelsöder, S; Geyer, K; Giordano, V; Gleixner, A; Glotin, H; Gracia-Ruiz, R; Graf, K; Hallmann, S; van Haren, H; Heijboer, A J; Hello, Y; Hernandez-Rey, J J; Hößl, J; Hofestädt, J; Hugon, C; Illuminati, G; James, C W; de Jong, M; Jongen, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Katz, U; Kießling, D; Kouchner, A; Kreter, M; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lachaud, C; Lahmann, R; Lefèvre, D; Leonora, E; Loucatos, S; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Marinelli, A; Martínez-Mora, J A; Mathieu, A; Melis, K; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Moussa, A; Mueller, C; Nezri, E; Păvălaş, G E; Pellegrino, C; Perrina, C; Piattelli, P; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Racca, C; Riccobene, G; Roensch, K; Saldaña, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sanguineti, M; Sapienza, P; Schnabel, J; Schüssler, F; Seitz, T; Sieger, C; Spurio, M; Stolarczyk, Th; Sánchez-Losa, A; Taiuti, M; Trovato, A; Tselengidou, M; Turpin, D; Tönnis, C; Vallage, B; Vallée, C; Van Elewyck, V; Vivolo, D; Wagner, S; Wilms, J; Zornoza, J D; Zuñiga, J

    2017-04-12

    Despite dedicated research has been carried out to adequately map the distribution of the sperm whale in the Mediterranean Sea, unlike other regions of the world, the species population status is still presently uncertain. The analysis of two years of continuous acoustic data provided by the ANTARES neutrino telescope revealed the year-round presence of sperm whales in the Ligurian Sea, probably associated with the availability of cephalopods in the region. The presence of the Ligurian Sea sperm whales was demonstrated through the real-time analysis of audio data streamed from a cabled-to-shore deep-sea observatory that allowed the hourly tracking of their long-range echolocation behaviour on the Internet. Interestingly, the same acoustic analysis indicated that the occurrence of surface shipping noise would apparently not condition the foraging behaviour of the sperm whale in the area, since shipping noise was almost always present when sperm whales were acoustically detected. The continuous presence of the sperm whale in the region confirms the ecological value of the Ligurian sea and the importance of ANTARES to help monitoring its ecosystems.

  5. Sperm whale long-range echolocation sounds revealed by ANTARES, a deep-sea neutrino telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, M.; Caballé, A.; van der Schaar, M.; Solsona, A.; Houégnigan, L.; Zaugg, S.; Sánchez, A. M.; Castell, J. V.; Solé, M.; Vila, F.; Djokic, D.; Adrián-Martínez, S.; Albert, A.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Avgitas, T.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bormuth, R.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Celli, S.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coleiro, A.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Deschamps, A.; de Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; di Palma, I.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; El Bojaddaini, I.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Fehn, K.; Felis, I.; Fusco, L. A.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geißelsöder, S.; Geyer, K.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Glotin, H.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernandez-Rey, J. J.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; Illuminati, G.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; Jongen, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lachaud, C.; Lahmann, R.; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Loucatos, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Mathieu, A.; Melis, K.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Mueller, C.; Nezri, E.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Roensch, K.; Saldaña, M.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schnabel, J.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Taiuti, M.; Trovato, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Turpin, D.; Tönnis, C.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; van Elewyck, V.; Vivolo, D.; Wagner, S.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zuñiga, J.

    2017-04-01

    Despite dedicated research has been carried out to adequately map the distribution of the sperm whale in the Mediterranean Sea, unlike other regions of the world, the species population status is still presently uncertain. The analysis of two years of continuous acoustic data provided by the ANTARES neutrino telescope revealed the year-round presence of sperm whales in the Ligurian Sea, probably associated with the availability of cephalopods in the region. The presence of the Ligurian Sea sperm whales was demonstrated through the real-time analysis of audio data streamed from a cabled-to-shore deep-sea observatory that allowed the hourly tracking of their long-range echolocation behaviour on the Internet. Interestingly, the same acoustic analysis indicated that the occurrence of surface shipping noise would apparently not condition the foraging behaviour of the sperm whale in the area, since shipping noise was almost always present when sperm whales were acoustically detected. The continuous presence of the sperm whale in the region confirms the ecological value of the Ligurian sea and the importance of ANTARES to help monitoring its ecosystems.

  6. International Geomagnetic Reference Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Maus, S.; Beggan, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    The eleventh generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was adopted in December 2009 by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy Working Group V‐MOD. It updates the previous IGRF generation with a definitive main field model for epoch 2005.0, a main field...

  7. 10th Generation International Geomagnetic Reference Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Stefan; Macmillan, Susan

    2005-04-01

    The International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) released the 10th Generation International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) on 12 December 2004. This is the latest version of a standard mathematical description of the Earth's main magnetic field, and is used widely in studies of the Earth's deep interior, crust, ionosphere, and magnetosphere. The coefficients were finalized by a task force of IAGA, Division V, Working Group V-MOD: Geomagnetic Field Modeling. The IGRF is the product of a large collaborative effort between magnetic field modelers and the institutes around the world involved in collecting and disseminating magnetic field data from satellites and observatories. The IGRF is a series of mathematical models of the Earth's main field and its annual rate of change (secular variation). The sources of the main magnetic field are electric currents in the Earth and the magnetization of crustal rocks.

  8. Geomagnetically Induced Currents: Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Denny M.; Ngwira, Chigomezyo M.

    2017-10-01

    The geospace, or the space environment near Earth, is constantly subjected to changes in the solar wind flow generated at the Sun. The study of this environment variability is called Space Weather. Examples of effects resulting from this variability are the occurrence of powerful solar disturbances, such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The impact of CMEs on the Earth's magnetosphere very often greatly perturbs the geomagnetic field causing the occurrence of geomagnetic storms. Such extremely variable geomagnetic fields trigger geomagnetic effects measurable not only in the geospace but also in the ionosphere, upper atmosphere, and on and in the ground. For example, during extreme cases, rapidly changing geomagnetic fields generate intense geomagnetically induced currents (GICs). Intense GICs can cause dramatic effects on man-made technological systems, such as damage to high-voltage power transmission transformers leading to interruption of power supply, and/or corrosion of oil and gas pipelines. These space weather effects can in turn lead to severe economic losses. In this paper, we supply the reader with theoretical concepts related to GICs as well as their general consequences. As an example, we discuss the GIC effects on a North American power grid located in mid-latitude regions during the 13-14 March 1989 extreme geomagnetic storm. That was the most extreme storm that occurred in the space era age.

  9. Geomagnetic Indices Bulletin (GIB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Geomagnetic Indices Bulletin is a one page sheet containing the magnetic indices Kp, Ap, Cp, An, As, Am and the provisional aa indices. The bulletin is published...

  10. Geomagnetic aa Indices

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The geomagnetic aa indices are the continuation of the series beginning in the year 1868. A full description of these indices is given in the International...

  11. Geomagnetic Storm Sudden Commencements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Storm Sudden Commencements (ssc) 1868 to present: STORM1 and STORM2 Lists: (Some text here is taken from the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy...

  12. Geomagnetic storm and equatorial spread-F

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Becker-Guedes

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available In August 2000, a new ionospheric sounding station was established at Sao Jose dos Campos (23.2° S, 45.9° W; dip latitude 17.6° S, Brazil, by the University of Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP. Another ionospheric sounding station was established at Palmas (10.2° S, 48.2° W; dip latitude 5.5° S, Brazil, in April 2002, by UNIVAP in collaboration with the Lutheran University Center of Palmas (CEULP, Lutheran University of Brazil (ULBRA. Both the stations are equipped with digital ionosonde of the type known as Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosonde (CADI. In order to study the effects of geomagnetic storms on equatorial spread-F, we present and discuss three case studies, two from the ionospheric sounding observations at Sao Jose dos Campos (September and November 2000 and one from the simultaneous ionospheric sounding observations at Sao Jose dos Campos and Palmas (July 2003. Salient features from these ionospheric observations are presented and discussed in this paper. It has been observed that sometimes (e.g. 4-5 November 2000 the geomagnetic storm acts as an inhibitor (high strong spread-F season, whereas at other times (e.g. 11-12 July 2003 they act as an initiator (low strong spread-F season, possibly due to corresponding changes in the quiet and disturbed drift patterns during different seasons.

  13. The electric field in northern England and southern Scotland: implications for geomagnetically induced currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, A. J.; Whaler, K. A.

    2006-11-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) data, in the form of MT tensors, are used to estimate directly the size and spatial distribution of the electric field in northern England and southern Scotland with the aim of predicting the flow of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) in power networks in the region. MT and Geomagnetic Deep Sounding data from a number of different field campaigns, at a period of 750 s, are employed. The MT data are cast in the form of telluric vectors, which allow a joint hypothetical event analysis (HEA) of both Geomagnetic Deep Sounding and MT data. This analysis reveals qualitatively the pervasive effects of electric field distortion in the region. Two approaches are taken to understand how the spatial structure of the regional electromagnetic field is affected by local distortions, and what the origin of these distortions might be. The dimensionality, and form of electric field distortion, of the MT tensors is investigated using the Weaver et al. and Bahr classification schemes, and by examining the misfit of a galvanic distortion model as a function of rotation angle. At sites where the galvanic distortion model is found to be appropriate the regional MT tensors are recovered using tensor decomposition techniques. It is found that recovering the regional MT response reconciles the geometry of induced currents implied by the MT data with that of the Magnetic Variation anomalies. Lilley's central impedances are used to calculate rotationally invariant effective telluric responses. In the Southern Uplands the magnitude of the effective telluric response is approximately 0.25-0.5 mV km-1 nT-1, but as the Southern Uplands Fault is approached it rises steadily to 3 mV km-1 nT-1. In the Midland Valley, the effective telluric response is approximately 0.5 mV km-1 nT-1 which rises steadily to 2.5 mV km-1 nT-1 as the Southern Uplands and Highland Boundary Faults are approached to the southeast and northwest, respectively. Therefore, the increase in the magnitude

  14. Changes in 63Hz third-octave band sound levels over 42 months recorded at four deep-ocean observatories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaar, M. van der; Ainslie, M.A.; Robinson, S.P.; Prior, M.K.; André, M.

    2014-01-01

    The growing scientific and societal concerns about the effects of underwater sound on marine ecosystems have been recently recognised through the introduction of several international initiatives, like the International Quiet Ocean Experiment, aimed at measuring the environmental impact of ocean

  15. Geomagnetic Workshop, Canberra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, C. E.; Lilley, F. E. M.; Milligan, P. R.

    On May 14-15, 1985, 63 discerning geomagnetists flocked to Canberra to attend the Geomagnetic Workshop coorganized by the Australian Bureau of Mineral Resources (BMR) and the Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University (ANU). With an aurorally glowing cast that included an International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) president, former president, and division chairman, the Oriental Magneto-Banquet (which was the center of the meeting), was assured of success. As a cunning ploy to mask the true nature of this gastronomic extravagance from the probings of income tax departments, a presentation of scientific papers on Australian geomagnetism in its global setting was arranged.The Australian region, including New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, and a large sector of the Antarctic, covers one eighth of the Earth's surface and historically has played an important role in the study of geomagnetism. The region contains both the south magnetic and geomagnetic poles, and two Australian Antarctic stations (Casey and Davis) are situated in the region of the south polar cusp (see Figure 1).

  16. Geomagnetic Observations and Models

    CERN Document Server

    Mandea, Mioara

    2011-01-01

    This volume provides comprehensive and authoritative coverage of all the main areas linked to geomagnetic field observation, from instrumentation to methodology, on ground or near-Earth. Efforts are also focused on a 21st century e-Science approach to open access to all geomagnetic data, but also to the data preservation, data discovery, data rescue, and capacity building. Finally, modeling magnetic fields with different internal origins, with their variation in space and time, is an attempt to draw together into one place the traditional work in producing models as IGRF or describing the magn

  17. Combustion-derived substances in deep basins of Puget Sound: historical inputs from fossil fuel and biomass combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Li-Jung; Louchouarn, Patrick; Herbert, Bruce E; Brandenberger, Jill M; Wade, Terry L; Crecelius, Eric

    2011-04-01

    Reconstructions of 250 years historical inputs of two distinct types of black carbon (soot/graphitic black carbon (GBC) and char-BC) were conducted on sediment cores from two basins of the Puget Sound, WA. Signatures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also used to support the historical reconstructions of BC to this system. Down-core maxima in GBC and combustion-derived PAHs occurred in the 1940s in the cores from the Puget Sound Main Basin, whereas in Hood Canal such peak was observed in the 1970s, showing basin-specific differences in inputs of combustion byproducts. This system showed relatively higher inputs from softwood combustion than the northeastern U.S. The historical variations in char-BC concentrations were consistent with shifts in climate indices, suggesting an influence of climate oscillations on wildfire events. Environmental loading of combustion byproducts thus appears as a complex function of urbanization, fuel usage, combustion technology, environmental policies, and climate conditions.

  18. On regional geomagnetic charts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alldredge, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    When regional geomagnetic charts for areas roughly the size of the US were compiled by hand, some large local anomalies were displayed in the isomagnetic lines. Since the late 1960s, when the compilation of charts using computers and mathematical models was started, most of the details available in the hand drawn regional charts have been lost. One exception to this is the Canadian magnetic declination chart for 1980. This chart was constructed using a 180 degrees spherical harmonic model. -from Author

  19. Sound and sound sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Wahlberg, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    There is no difference in principle between the infrasonic and ultrasonic sounds, which are inaudible to humans (or other animals) and the sounds that we can hear. In all cases, sound is a wave of pressure and particle oscillations propagating through an elastic medium, such as air. This chapter...... is about the physical laws that govern how animals produce sound signals and how physical principles determine the signals’ frequency content and sound level, the nature of the sound field (sound pressure versus particle vibrations) as well as directional properties of the emitted signal. Many...... of these properties are dictated by simple physical relationships between the size of the sound emitter and the wavelength of emitted sound. The wavelengths of the signals need to be sufficiently short in relation to the size of the emitter to allow for the efficient production of propagating sound pressure waves...

  20. The 9th-Generation International Geomagnetic Reference Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macmillan, S.; Maus, S.; Bondar, T.; Chambodut, A.; Golovkov, V.; Holme, R.; Langlais, B.; Lesur, V.; Lowes, F.; Lühr, H.; Mai, W.; Mandea, M.; Olsen, N.; Rother, M.; Sabaka, T.; Thomson, A.; Wardinski, I.

    2003-12-01

    The International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy has recently released the 9th-Generation International Geomagnetic Reference Field-the latest version of a standard mathematical description of the Earth's main magnetic field used widely in studies of the Earth's deep interior, its crust and its ionosphere and magnetosphere. The coefficients were recently finalized at the XXIII General Assembly of the International Union of Geophysics and Geodesy, held at Sapporo in Japan in 2003 July. The IGRF is the product of a huge collaborative effort between magnetic field modellers and the institutes involved in collecting and disseminating magnetic field data from satellites and from observatories and surveys around the world.

  1. The 10th generation international geomagnetic reference field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, S.; Macmillan, S.; Chernova, T.; Choi, S.; Dater, D.; Golovkov, V.; Lesur, V.; Lowes, F.; Lühr, H.; Mai, W.; McLean, S.; Olsen, N.; Rother, M.; Sabaka, T.; Thomson, A.; Zvereva, T.; International Association of Geomagnetism, Aeronomy (IAGA), Division V, Working Group VMOD

    The International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) on 12 December 2004 released the 10th generation International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF)—the latest version of a standard mathematical description of the Earth's main magnetic field and used widely in studies of the Earth's deep interior, its crust, ionosphere and magnetosphere. The coefficients were finalised by a task force of IAGA. The IGRF is the product of a large collaborative effort between magnetic field modellers and the institutes involved in collecting and disseminating magnetic field data from satellites and observatories around the world.

  2. The 10th-Generation International Geomagnetic Reference Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    The International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) on 2004 December 12 has released the 10th-Generation International Geomagnetic Reference Field-the latest version of a standard mathematical description of the Earth's main magnetic field used widely in studies of the Earth's deep interior, its crust, ionosphere and magnetosphere. The coefficients were finalized by a task force of IAGA. The IGRF is the product of a large collaborative effort between magnetic field modellers and the institutes involved in collecting and disseminating magnetic field data from satellites and observatories around the world.

  3. Hazards of geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    Geomagnetic storms are large and sometimes rapid fluctuations in the Earth's magnetic field that are related to disturbances on the Sun's surface. Although it is not widely recognized, these transient magnetic disturbances can be a significant hazard to people and property. Many of us know that the intensity of the auroral lights increases during magnetic storms, but few people realize that these storms can also cause massive power outages, interrupt radio communications and satellite operations, increase corrosion in oil and gas pipelines, and lead to spuriously high rejection rates in the manufacture of sensitive electronic equipment. 

  4. Sound Hole Sound

    CERN Document Server

    Politzer, David

    2015-01-01

    The volume of air that goes in and out of a musical instrument's sound hole is related to the sound hole's contribution to the volume of the sound. Helmholtz's result for the simplest case of steady flow through an elliptical hole is reviewed. Measurements on multiple holes in sound box geometries and scales relevant to real musical instruments demonstrate the importance of a variety of effects. Electric capacitance of single flat plates is a mathematically identical problem, offering an alternate way to understand the most important of those effects. The measurements also confirm and illuminate aspects of Helmholtz's "bottle" resonator model as applied to musical instrument sound boxes and sound holes.

  5. Upper crust structure of eastern A'nyemaqên suture zone: Results of Barkam-Luqu-Gulang deep seismic sounding profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xian-kang; SUN Guo-wei; YANG Zhuo-xin; XU Zhao-fan; PAN Ji-shun; LIU Zhi; WANG Fu-yun; JIA Shi-xu; ZHAO Jin-ren; ZHANG Cheng-ke

    2007-01-01

    Barkam-Luqu-Gulang deep seismic sounding profile runs from north of Sichuan Province to south of Gansu Province. It is located at the northeastern edge of Tibetan Plateau and crosses eastern A'nyemaqên suture zone. The upper crust structures around eastern A'nyemaqên suture zone and its adjacent area are reconstructed based on the arrival times of refracted Pg and Sg waves by using finite difference method, ray tracing inversion, time-term method and travel-time curve analysis. The results show that the depth variation of basement along profile is very strong as indicated by Pg and Sg waves. The basement rose in Zoigê basin and depressed in eastern A'nyemaqên suture zone, and it gradually rose again northward and then depressed. The results also indicate that eastern A'nyemaqên suture zone behaves as inhomogeneous low velocity structures in the upper crust and is inclined toward the south. Hoh Sai Hu-Maqên fault, Wudu-Diebu fault and Zhouqu-Liangdang fault are characterized by low velocity distributions with various scales. The distinct variation in basement depth occurred near Hoh Sai Hu-Maqên fault and Zhouqu-Liangdang fault, which are main tectonic boundaries of A'nyemaqên suture zone.Wudu-Diebu fault, located at the depth variation zone of the basement, possibly has the same deep tectonic background with Zhouqu-Liangdang fault. The strongly depressed basement characterized by low velocity distribution and lateral inhomogeneity in A'nyemaqên suture zone implies crushed zone features under pinching action.

  6. An overview of the crustal structure of the Tibetan plateau after 35 years of deep seismic soundings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongjie; Deng, Yangfan; Teng, Jiwen; Wang, Chunyong; Gao, Rui; Chen, Yun; Fan, Weiming

    2011-03-01

    Since the pioneer wide-angle seismic profile along the Yadong-Gulu rift acquired in 1974 by the ex-Institute of Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), several research programs aimed to deep geophysics, performed thanks to the participation of Chinese national and international institutions, have been developed during last 35 years, including 23 wide-angle seismic profiles with total length of about 6000 km. These profiles are unevenly distributed, most of them in eastern Tibet and few profiles in western Tibet. In this paper, we make a summarized presentation of all these wide-angle seismic profiles and provide an overall view of the seismic velocity structure of the crust beneath the broad Tibetan plateau, which is the product of the continuous convergence and collision of the Indian and Eurasian plates since about 50 Ma ago. Different patterns of crustal thickness variation related to the tectonic blocks and along suture zones of the region are displayed. The crust thickness is confirmed to be about 70-75 km under southern Tibet, and 60-65 km under northern, northeastern and southeastern Tibet. The leading edge of the subducted lithosphere reaches the northern margin of the plateau and directly contacts with Tarim Basin. Westward of the 90°E boundary, the Indian crust is moving towards the northern edge of the plateau and collides with Tarim Basin at 80°E while reach the Bangong-Nujiang suture belt at 88°E; eastward of the 90°E boundary, the northern edge of the crust should be at 50-100 km south of Bangong-Nujiang suture. The results supply helpful constrains to understand the mechanism of the continent-continent collision and its consequences in the plateau and neighbouring areas.

  7. Bayesian inference in geomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, George E.

    1988-01-01

    The inverse problem in empirical geomagnetic modeling is investigated, with critical examination of recently published studies. Particular attention is given to the use of Bayesian inference (BI) to select the damping parameter lambda in the uniqueness portion of the inverse problem. The mathematical bases of BI and stochastic inversion are explored, with consideration of bound-softening problems and resolution in linear Gaussian BI. The problem of estimating the radial magnetic field B(r) at the earth core-mantle boundary from surface and satellite measurements is then analyzed in detail, with specific attention to the selection of lambda in the studies of Gubbins (1983) and Gubbins and Bloxham (1985). It is argued that the selection method is inappropriate and leads to lambda values much larger than those that would result if a reasonable bound on the heat flow at the CMB were assumed.

  8. Geomagnetic Observatory Database February 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (formerly National Geophysical Data Center) maintains an active database of worldwide geomagnetic observatory...

  9. On polar daily geomagnetic variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola De Michelis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to investigate the nature of the daily magnetic field perturbations produced by ionospheric and magnetospheric currents at high latitudes. We analyse the hourly means of the X and Y geomagnetic field components recorded by a meridian chain of permanent geomagnetic observatories in the polar region of the Northern Hemisphere during a period of four years (1995-1998 around the solar minimum. We apply a mathematical method, known as natural orthogonal component (NOC, which is capable of characterizing the dominant modes of the geomagnetic field daily variability through a set of empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs. Using the first two modes we reconstruct a two-dimensional equivalent current representation of the ionospheric electric currents, which contribute substantially to the geomagnetic daily variations. The obtained current structures resemble the equivalent current patterns of DP2 and DP1. We characterize these currents by studying their evolution with the geomagnetic activity level and by analysing their dependence on the interplanetary magnetic field. The obtained results support the idea of a coexistence of two main processes during all analysed period although one of them, the directly driven process, represents the dominant component of the geomagnetic daily variation.

  10. "Double low-points" anomaly in daily variation of vertical component of geomagnetic field before the MS8.0 Wenchuan earthquake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiuchang Hu; Wei Liu; Minrui Guo; Hua Zheng

    2009-01-01

    The "double low-points" anomaly in daily variation of vertical geomagnetic component was observed on May 9, 2008 at 13 geomagnetic observatories belonging to the geomagnetic observatory network center of China Earthquake Administration. These observatories distribute roughly on three belts with the intersection in western Sichuan. On May 12, three days after the anomaly appearance, the great MS8.0 Wenchuan earthquake occurred. The "double low-points" anomaly in daily variation of vertical geomagnetic component is an anomalous phenomenon of regional geomagnetism, which does exist objectively. The possible cause is the change of extrinsic eddy current system resulting in geomagnetic daily quiet variation (Sq), or the delay of several hours between the intrinsic and the extrinsic eddy current systems. The relationship between the "double low-points" anomaly of daily geomagnetic variation and the earthquake reveals that the former possibly reflects the accelera-tive alteration of earthquake gestation in the deep Earth.

  11. Extreme geomagnetically induced currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Ryuho; Ngwira, Chigomezyo

    2016-12-01

    We propose an emergency alert framework for geomagnetically induced currents (GICs), based on the empirically extreme values and theoretical upper limits of the solar wind parameters and of d B/d t, the time derivative of magnetic field variations at ground. We expect this framework to be useful for preparing against extreme events. Our analysis is based on a review of various papers, including those presented during Extreme Space Weather Workshops held in Japan in 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014. Large-amplitude d B/d t values are the major cause of hazards associated with three different types of GICs: (1) slow d B/d t with ring current evolution (RC-type), (2) fast d B/d t associated with auroral electrojet activity (AE-type), and (3) transient d B/d t of sudden commencements (SC-type). We set "caution," "warning," and "emergency" alert levels during the main phase of superstorms with the peak Dst index of less than -300 nT (once per 10 years), -600 nT (once per 60 years), or -900 nT (once per 100 years), respectively. The extreme d B/d t values of the AE-type GICs are 2000, 4000, and 6000 nT/min at caution, warning, and emergency levels, respectively. For the SC-type GICs, a "transient alert" is also proposed for d B/d t values of 40 nT/s at low latitudes and 110 nT/s at high latitudes, especially when the solar energetic particle flux is unusually high.

  12. On Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    1998-01-01

    A statistical description of Earth's broad scale, core-source magnetic field has been developed and tested. The description features an expected, or mean, spatial magnetic power spectrum that is neither "flat" nor "while" at any depth, but is akin to spectra advanced by Stevenson and McLeod. This multipole spectrum describes the magnetic energy range; it is not steep enough for Gubbins' magnetic dissipation range. Natural variations of core multipole powers about their mean values are to be expected over geologic time and are described via trial probability distribution functions that neither require nor prohibit magnetic isotropy. The description is thus applicable to core-source dipole and low degree non-dipole fields despite axial dipole anisotropy. The description is combined with main field models of modem satellite and surface geomagnetic measurements to make testable predictions of: (1) the radius of Earth's core, (2) mean paleomagnetic field intensity, and (3) the mean rates and durations of both dipole power excursions and durable axial dipole reversals. The predicted core radius is 0.7% above the 3480 km seismologic value. The predicted root mean square paleointensity (35.6 mu T) and mean Virtual Axial Dipole Moment (about 6.2 lx 1022 Am(exp 2)) are within the range of various mean paleointensity estimates. The predicted mean rate of dipole power excursions, as defined by an absolute dipole moment <20% of the 1980 value, is 9.04/Myr and 14% less than obtained by analysis of a 4 Myr paleointensity record. The predicted mean rate of durable axial dipole reversals (2.26/Myr) is 2.3% more than established by the polarity time-scale for the past 84 Myr. The predicted mean duration of axial dipole reversals (5533 yr) is indistinguishable from an observational value. The accuracy of these predictions demonstrates the power and utility of the description, which is thought to merit further development and testing. It is suggested that strong stable stratification

  13. Mantle superplumes induce geomagnetic superchrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eOlson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We use polarity reversal systematics from numerical dynamos to quantify the hypothesis that the modulation of geomagnetic reversal frequency, including geomagnetic superchrons, results from changes in core heat flux related to growth and collapse of lower mantle superplumes. We parameterize the reversal frequency sensitivity from numerical dynamos in terms of average core heat flux normalized by the difference between the present-day core heat flux and the core heat flux at geomagnetic superchron onset. A low-order polynomial fit to the 0-300 Ma Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS reveals that a decrease in core heat flux relative to present-day of approximately 30% can account for the Cretaceous Normal Polarity and Kiaman Reverse Polarity Superchrons, whereas the hyper-reversing periods in the Jurassic require a core heat flux equal to or higher than present-day. Possible links between GPTS transitions, large igneous provinces (LIPs, and the two lower mantle superplumes are explored. Lower mantle superplume growth and collapse induce GPTS transitions by increasing and decreasing core heat flux, respectively. Age clusters of major LIPs postdate transitions from hyper-reversing to superchron geodynamo states by 30-60 Myr, suggesting that superchron onset may be contemporaneous with LIP-forming instabilities produced during collapses of lower mantle superplumes.

  14. The geomagnetic field gradient tensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsiaros, Stavros; Olsen, Nils

    2012-01-01

    We develop the general mathematical basis for space magnetic gradiometry in spherical coordinates. The magnetic gradient tensor is a second rank tensor consisting of 3 × 3 = 9 spatial derivatives. Since the geomagnetic field vector B is always solenoidal (∇ · B = 0) there are only eight independe...... of the small-scale structure of the Earth’s lithospheric field....

  15. A New Theory of Geomagnetism

    OpenAIRE

    Sidharth, B. G.

    1999-01-01

    It is pointed out, that in the light of recent results on the semionic or anomalous behaviour of electrons below the Fermi temperature, the solid core of the earth which has been ignored so far, would contribute significantly to Geomagnetism and help explain the puzzling magnetic reversals.

  16. International Geomagnetic Reference Field—the tenth generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macmillan, Susan; Maus, Stefan

    2005-12-01

    The International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) 10th Generation was adopted in 2004 by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) Working Group V-MOD. It is the latest version of a standard mathematical description of the Earth's main magnetic field and is used widely in studies of the Earth's deep interior, its crust and its ionosphere and magnetosphere. This generation differs from the previous generation with the replacement of the secular-variation model for 2000.0-2005.0 with a main-field model at 2005.0 and a secular-variation model for 2005.0-2010.0. The IGRF is the product of a huge collaborative effort between magnetic field modellers and the institutes involved in collecting and disseminating magnetic field data from satellites and from observatories and surveys around the world. This paper lists the new coefficients and includes contour maps and pole positions.

  17. Extreme Geomagnetic Storms - 1868 - 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennerstrom, S.; Lefevre, L.; Dumbović, M.; Crosby, N.; Malandraki, O.; Patsou, I.; Clette, F.; Veronig, A.; Vršnak, B.; Leer, K.; Moretto, T.

    2016-05-01

    We present the first large statistical study of extreme geomagnetic storms based on historical data from the time period 1868 - 2010. This article is the first of two companion papers. Here we describe how the storms were selected and focus on their near-Earth characteristics. The second article presents our investigation of the corresponding solar events and their characteristics. The storms were selected based on their intensity in the aa index, which constitutes the longest existing continuous series of geomagnetic activity. They are analyzed statistically in the context of more well-known geomagnetic indices, such as the Kp and Dcx/Dst index. This reveals that neither Kp nor Dcx/Dst provide a comprehensive geomagnetic measure of the extreme storms. We rank the storms by including long series of single magnetic observatory data. The top storms on the rank list are the New York Railroad storm occurring in May 1921 and the Quebec storm from March 1989. We identify key characteristics of the storms by combining several different available data sources, lists of storm sudden commencements (SSCs) signifying occurrence of interplanetary shocks, solar wind in-situ measurements, neutron monitor data, and associated identifications of Forbush decreases as well as satellite measurements of energetic proton fluxes in the near-Earth space environment. From this we find, among other results, that the extreme storms are very strongly correlated with the occurrence of interplanetary shocks (91 - 100 %), Forbush decreases (100 %), and energetic solar proton events (70 %). A quantitative comparison of these associations relative to less intense storms is also presented. Most notably, we find that most often the extreme storms are characterized by a complexity that is associated with multiple, often interacting, solar wind disturbances and that they frequently occur when the geomagnetic activity is already elevated. We also investigate the semiannual variation in storm occurrence

  18. Heart attacks and geomagnetic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, E G; Armstrong, E; Lancashire, R; Wall, M; Haynes, R

    1979-10-18

    Malin and Srivastava reported a remarkable correlation between daily variations in the geomagnetic field strength and daily admissions to the cardio-thoracic wards of hospitals in Hyderabad and Secunderabad, for cardiac emergencies, during 1967--72. We have now carried out a similar enquiry in the West Midlands region of the UK for the years 1969--70, but were unable to confirm the Indian results.

  19. Geomagnetic Observations for Main Field Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzka, Jürgen; Chulliat, A.; Mandea, M.

    2010-01-01

    Direct measurements of the geomagnetic field have been made for more than 400 years, beginning with individual determinations of the angle between geographic and magnetic North. This was followed by the start of continuous time series of full vector measurements at geomagnetic observatories and t...... for magnetic field measurements on ground and in space and covers geomagnetic observatories, repeat stations, automatic observatories, satellites and historic observations. Special emphasis is laid on the global network of geomagnetic observatories....... and the beginning of geomagnetic repeat stations surveys in the 19th century. In the second half of the 20th century, true global coverage with geomagnetic field measurements was accomplished by magnetometer payloads on low-Earth-orbiting satellites. This article describes the procedures and instruments...

  20. Effect of a huge crustal conductivity anomaly on the H-component of geomagnetic variations recorded in central South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilha, Antonio L.; Alves, Livia R.; Silva, Graziela B. D.; Espinosa, Karen V.

    2017-04-01

    We describe here an analysis of the H-component of the geomagnetic field recorded in several temporary stations operating simultaneously in the central-eastern region of Brazil during nighttime pulsation events in 1994 and the sudden commencement of the St. Patrick's Day magnetic storm in 2015. A significant amplification in the amplitude of the geomagnetic variations is consistently observed in one of these stations. Magnetovariational analysis indicates that the amplification factor is period dependent with maximum amplitude around 100 s. Integrated magnetotelluric (MT) and geomagnetic depth soundings (GDS) have shown that this station is positioned just over a huge 1200-km-long crustal conductor (estimated bulk conductivity greater than 1 S/m). We propose that the anomalous signature of the geomagnetic field at this station is due to the high reflection coefficient of the incident electromagnetic wave at the interface with the very good conductor and by skin effects damping the electromagnetic wave in the conducting layers overlying the conductor. There are some indication from the GDS data that the conductor extends southward beneath the sediments of the Pantanal Basin. In this region is being planned the installation of a new geomagnetic observatory, but its preliminary data suggest anomalous geomagnetic variations. We understand that a detailed MT survey must be carried out around the chosen observatory site to evaluate the possible influence of induced currents on the local geomagnetic field.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Foley Sounds vs Real Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trento, Stefano; Götzen, Amalia De

    2011-01-01

    This paper is an initial attempt to study the world of sound effects for motion pictures, also known as Foley sounds. Throughout several audio and audio-video tests we have compared both Foley and real sounds originated by an identical action. The main purpose was to evaluate if sound effects...

  2. The Causes of Geomagnetic Storms During Solar Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    1998-01-01

    One of the oldest mysteries in geomagnetism is the linkage between solar and geomagnetic activity. The 11-year cycles of both the numbers of sunspots and Earth geomagnetic storms were first noted by Sabine (1852).

  3. Study of the mid-latitude ionospheric response to geomagnetic storms in the European region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berényi, Kitti Alexandra; Barta, Veronika; Kis, Arpad

    2016-07-01

    Geomagnetic storms affect the ionospheric regions of the terrestrial upper atmosphere through different physical and atmospheric processes. The phenomena that can be regarded as a result of these processes, generally is named as "ionospheric storm". The processes depend on altitude, segment of the day, the geomagnetic latitude and longitude, strength of solar activity and the type of the geomagnetic storm. We examine the data of ground-based radio wave ionosphere sounding measurements of European ionospheric stations (mainly the data of Nagycenk Geophysical Observatory) in order to determine how and to what extent a geomagnetic disturbance of a certain strength affects the mid-latitude ionospheric regions in winter and in summer. For our analysis we used disturbed time periods between November 2012 and June 2015. Our results show significant changing of the ionospheric F2 layer parameters on strongly disturbed days compared to quiet ones. We show that the critical frequencies (foF2) increase compared to their quiet day value when the ionospheric storm was positive. On the other hand, the critical frequencies become lower, when the storm was negative. In our analysis we determined the magnitude of these changes on the chosen days. For a more complete analysis we compare also the evolution of the F2 layer parameters of the European ionosonde stations on a North-South geographic longitude during a full storm duration. The results present the evolution of an ionospheric storm over a geographic meridian. Furthermore, we compared the two type of geomagnetic storms, namely the CME caused geomagnetic storm - the so-called Sudden impulse (Si) storms- and the HSS (High Speed Solar Wind Streams) caused geomagnetic storms -the so-called Gradual storms (Gs)- impact on the ionospheric F2-layer (foF2 parameter). The results show a significant difference between the effect of Si and of the Gs storms on the ionospheric F2-layer.

  4. Geomagnetism during solar cycle 23: Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Louis Zerbo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of more than 48 years of morphological analysis of yearly and monthly values of the sunspot number, the aa index, the solar wind speed and interplanetary magnetic field, we point out the particularities of geomagnetic activity during the period 1996–2009. We especially investigate the last cycle 23 and the long minimum which followed it. During this period, the lowest values of the yearly averaged IMF (3 nT and yearly averaged solar wind speed (364 km/s are recorded in 1996, and 2009 respectively. The year 2003 shows itself particular by recording the highest value of the averaged solar wind (568 km/s, associated to the highest value of the yearly averaged aa index (37 nT. We also find that observations during the year 2003 seem to be related to several coronal holes which are known to generate high-speed wind stream. From the long time (more than one century study of solar variability, the present period is similar to the beginning of twentieth century. We especially present the morphological features of solar cycle 23 which is followed by a deep solar minimum.

  5. Geomagnetism during solar cycle 23: Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbo, Jean-Louis; Amory-Mazaudier, Christine; Ouattara, Frédéric

    2013-05-01

    On the basis of more than 48 years of morphological analysis of yearly and monthly values of the sunspot number, the aa index, the solar wind speed and interplanetary magnetic field, we point out the particularities of geomagnetic activity during the period 1996-2009. We especially investigate the last cycle 23 and the long minimum which followed it. During this period, the lowest values of the yearly averaged IMF (3 nT) and yearly averaged solar wind speed (364 km/s) are recorded in 1996, and 2009 respectively. The year 2003 shows itself particular by recording the highest value of the averaged solar wind (568 km/s), associated to the highest value of the yearly averaged aa index (37 nT). We also find that observations during the year 2003 seem to be related to several coronal holes which are known to generate high-speed wind stream. From the long time (more than one century) study of solar variability, the present period is similar to the beginning of twentieth century. We especially present the morphological features of solar cycle 23 which is followed by a deep solar minimum.

  6. Imagining Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimshaw, Mark; Garner, Tom Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We make the case in this essay that sound that is imagined is both a perception and as much a sound as that perceived through external stimulation. To argue this, we look at the evidence from auditory science, neuroscience, and philosophy, briefly present some new conceptual thinking on sound...... that accounts for this view, and then use this to look at what the future might hold in the context of imagining sound and developing technology....

  7. Imagining Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimshaw, Mark; Garner, Tom Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We make the case in this essay that sound that is imagined is both a perception and as much a sound as that perceived through external stimulation. To argue this, we look at the evidence from auditory science, neuroscience, and philosophy, briefly present some new conceptual thinking on sound...... that accounts for this view, and then use this to look at what the future might hold in the context of imagining sound and developing technology....

  8. Electric Utility Industry Experience with Geomagnetic Disturbances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as a few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems' responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration.

  9. Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Taylor, E.R. Jr. [ABB Power Systems, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Tesche, F.M.

    1991-09-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems` responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

  10. Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Taylor, E.R. Jr. (ABB Power Systems, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Tesche, F.M.

    1991-09-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems' responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

  11. Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Taylor, E.R. Jr. (ABB Power Systems, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Tesche, F.M.

    1991-09-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems' responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

  12. Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Taylor, E.R. Jr. [ABB Power Systems, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Tesche, F.M.

    1991-09-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems` responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

  13. Geomagnetic Information Model for the Year 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Brkić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The finalization of the survey of the Basic Geomagnetic Network of the Republic of Croatia (BGNRC and completion of geomagnetic information models for the Institute for Research and Development of Defence Systems of the Ministry of Defence and the State Geodetic Administration (e.g. Brkić M., E. Jungwirth, D. Matika and Ž. Bačić, 2012, Geomagnetic Information and Safety, 3rd Conference of Croatian National Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction, National Protection and Rescue Directorate, Zagreb was followed in 2012 with validity confirmation of the GI2012 predictive model by geomagnetic observations in quiet conditions. The differences between the measured and modelled declination were found to be within the expected errors of the model. It needs to be pointed out that this was the first successful implementation of night surveying (especially suitable for geomagnetic surveys of airports in the Republic of Croatia.

  14. History of the geomagnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doell, Richard R.

    1969-01-01

    Direct measurements of the direction and strength of the earth's magnetic field have provided a knowledge of the field's form and behavior during the last few hundreds of years. For older times, however, it has been necessary to measure the magnetism of certain rocks to learn what the geomagnetic field was like. For example, when a lava flow solidifies (at temperatures near 1000??C) and cools through the Curie point of the magnetic minerals contained in it (around 500??C) it acquires a remanent magnetism that is (1) very weak, (2) very stablel, (3) paralle to the direction of the ambient geomagnetic field, and (4) proportional in intensity to the ambient field. Separating, by various analytical means, this magnetization from other 'unwanted' magnetizations has allowed paleomagnetists to study the historical and prehistorical behavior of the earth's field. It has been learned, for example, that the strength of the field was almost twice its present value 2000 years ago and that it has often completely reversed its polarity. Paleo-magnetists have also confirmed that most oceans are, geologically speaking, relatively new features, and that the continents have markedly changed their positions over the surface of the earth. ?? 1969 The American Institute of Physics.

  15. Centennial to millennial geomagnetic field variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muscheler Raimund

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Reconstructions of the geomagnetic field in the past represent a useful tool not only to investigate the geodynamo process, but also to estimate the effect of geomagnetic shielding for any studies on cosmogenic radionuclides and galactic cosmic rays. A number of new millennial-scale geomagnetic field reconstructions have been published over the last years, based on improved global archeo- and paleomagnetic data compilations. Here we review several spherical harmonic models and compare their dipole field predictions to reconstructions based on virtual axial dipole moments and virtual geomagnetic poles. Dipole intensity estimates from cosmogenic radionuclide production records, with suitable filtering to minimise the solar influence, have also been included in the comparison to provide independent information about variations in the strength of the geomagnetic field. However, due to differences among geomagnetic models and between 14C and 10Be production records this comparison is fairly inconclusive with respect to multi-centennial variations. Different geomagnetic dipole tilt reconstructions agree well for much of the Holocene, but dipole moment estimates still differ substantially. Recent spherical harmonic models for the past 3 and 10 kyrs have improved considerably compared to earlier versions. Nevertheless at present we recommend to test if any interpretation depends on the choice of model.

  16. Improved geomagnetic referencing in the Arctic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poedjono, B.; Beck, N.; Buchanan, A. C.; Borri, L.; Maus, S.; Finn, Carol; Worthington, Bill; White, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Geomagnetic referencing uses the Earth’s magnetic field to determine accurate wellbore positioning essential for success in today's complex drilling programs, either as an alternative or a complement to north-seeking gyroscopic referencing. However, fluctuations in the geomagnetic field, especially at high latitudes, make the application of geomagnetic referencing in those areas more challenging. Precise crustal mapping and the monitoring of real-time variations by nearby magnetic observatories is crucial to achieving the required geomagnetic referencing accuracy. The Deadhorse Magnetic Observatory (DED), located at Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, has already played a vital role in the success of several commercial ventures in the area, providing essential, accurate, real-time data to the oilfield drilling industry. Geomagnetic referencing is enhanced with real-time data from DED and other observatories, and has been successfully used for accurate wellbore positioning. The availability of real-time geomagnetic measurements leads to significant cost and time savings in wellbore surveying, improving accuracy and alleviating the need for more expensive surveying techniques. The correct implementation of geomagnetic referencing is particularly critical as we approach the increased activity associated with the upcoming maximum of the 11-year solar cycle. The DED observatory further provides an important service to scientific communities engaged in studies of ionospheric, magnetospheric and space weather phenomena.

  17. An Ensemble Algorithm Based Component for Geomagnetic Data Assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Sun and Weijia Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Geomagnetic data assimilation is one of the most recent developments in geomagnetic studies. It combines geodynamo model outputs and surface geomagnetic observations to provide more accurate estimates of the core dynamic state and provide accurate geomagnetic secular variation forecasting. To facilitate geomagnetic data assimilation studies, we develop a stand-alone data assimilation component for the geomagnetic community. This component is used to calculate the forecast error covariance matrices and the gain matrix from a given geodynamo solution, which can then be used for sequential geomagnetic data assimilation. This component is very flexible and can be executed independently. It can also be easily integrated with arbitrary dynamo models.

  18. Unsound Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knakkergaard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the change in premise that digitally produced sound brings about and how digital technologies more generally have changed our relationship to the musical artifact, not simply in degree but in kind. It demonstrates how our acoustical conceptions are thoroughly challenged...... by the digital production of sound and, by questioning the ontological basis for digital sound, turns our understanding of the core term substance upside down....

  19. Sound Absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  20. Minimax confidence intervals in geomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Philip B.

    1992-01-01

    The present paper uses theory of Donoho (1989) to find lower bounds on the lengths of optimally short fixed-length confidence intervals (minimax confidence intervals) for Gauss coefficients of the field of degree 1-12 using the heat flow constraint. The bounds on optimal minimax intervals are about 40 percent shorter than Backus' intervals: no procedure for producing fixed-length confidence intervals, linear or nonlinear, can give intervals shorter than about 60 percent the length of Backus' in this problem. While both methods rigorously account for the fact that core field models are infinite-dimensional, the application of the techniques to the geomagnetic problem involves approximations and counterfactual assumptions about the data errors, and so these results are likely to be extremely optimistic estimates of the actual uncertainty in Gauss coefficients.

  1. Solar wind and geomagnetism. Toward a standard classification of geomagnetic activity from 1868 to 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerbo, J.L. [Univ. Polytechnique de Bobo Dioulasso (Burkina Faso); UPMC/Polytechique/CNRS, UMR 7648, Saint-Maur-des-Fosses (France). LPP-Lab. de Physique des Plasmas; Mazaudier, C. Amory [UPMC/Polytechique/CNRS, UMR 7648, Saint-Maur-des-Fosses (France). LPP-Lab. de Physique des Plasmas; Ouattara, F. [Koudougou Univ. (Burkina Faso). Ecole Normale Superieure; Richardson, J.D. [M.I.T., Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for Space Research

    2012-07-01

    We examined solar activity with a large series of geomagnetic data from 1868 to 2009. We have revisited the geomagnetic activity classification scheme of Legrand and Simon (1989) and improve their scheme by lowering the minimum Aa index value for shock and recurrent activity from 40 to 20 nT. This improved scheme allows us to clearly classify about 80% of the geomagnetic activity in this time period instead of only 60% for the previous Legrand and Simon classification. (orig.)

  2. Differential rotation of geomagnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Zigang; XU Wenyao

    2003-01-01

    The latitudinal dependence of the westward drift in the main geomagnetic field is examined by using the correlation analysis of moving random pattern. The study reveals the characteristics in the differential rotation of the main field. The results show that the global geomagnetic field drifts westward with an average speed of 0.18°/a during 1900-2000. The westward drift rate is not symmetrical with respect to the equator. The maximum westward drift rate, 0.31°/a, occurs at the latitude --= -15°, forming a Rapid Westward Drift Belt (RDB) around this latitude. Going northward and southward from this belt, the drift rate decreases and reaches the minimum (0.12°/a) at --= 50° and the minimum (0.14°/a) at --= -56°, forming a Northern Hemisphere Slow Westward Drift Belt (N-SDB) and a Southern Hemisphere Slow Westward Drift Belt (S-SDB). Three phases can be detected in the evolution of the westward drift. In the first phase (1900-1940), the RDB dominates the global drift pattern. The westward drifts in this belt are much faster than those in other areas. In the second phase (1940-1960), the drift rates in the RDB are less than those in the first phase, while the drifts in the N-SDB and S-SDB are relatively large. In this phase, the differential rotation becomes less obvious. In the third phase (1960-2000), the westward drift in the RDB increases again and the differential rotation gradually becomes apparent.

  3. What happens when the geomagnetic field reverses?

    CERN Document Server

    Lemaire, Joseph F

    2012-01-01

    During geomagnetic field reversals the radiation belt high-energy proton populations become depleted. Their energy spectra become softer, with the trapped particles of highest energies being lost first, and eventually recovering after a field reversal. The radiation belts rebuild in a dynamical way with the energy spectra flattening on the average during the course of many millennia, but without ever reaching complete steady state equilibrium between successive geomagnetic storm events determined by southward turnings of the IMF orientation. Considering that the entry of galactic cosmic rays and the solar energetic particles with energies above a given threshold are strongly controlled by the intensity of the northward component of the interplanetary magnetic field, we speculate that at earlier epochs when the geomagnetic dipole was reversed, the entry of these energetic particles into the geomagnetic field was facilitated when the interplanetary magnetic field was directed northward. Unlike in other compleme...

  4. Digitized Historical Geomagnetic Publications in PDF format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A catalog of 732 historical geomagnetic publications that were at risk of loss have been digitized and converted in pdf documents.

  5. Geomagnetism solid Earth and upper atmosphere perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Basavaiah, Nathani

    2011-01-01

    This volume elaborates several important aspects of solid Earth geomagnetism. It covers all the basics of the subject, including biomagnetism and instrumentation, and offers a number of practical applications with carefully selected examples and illustrations.

  6. The geomagnetic main field and the geodynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Roberts, Paul H.

    1991-01-01

    Information available on the geomagnetic main field and the geodynamo is presented. Attention is given to the process of mapping the magnetic field, the last version of International Geomagnetic Reference Field Model, and maps of the magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary and their interpretation. Particular consideration is given to the existing geodynamo theories, with special relation given to the Braginsky and Meytlis theory of core turbulence in which the turbulence differs fundamentally from classical turbulence of Kolmogorov type.

  7. The International Geomagnetic Reference Field, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukstales, Kenneth S.; Love, Jeffrey J.

    2007-01-01

    This is a set of five world charts showing the declination, inclination, horizontal intensity, vertical component, and total intensity of the Earth's magnetic field at mean sea level at the beginning of 2005. The charts are based on the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) main model for 2005 and secular change model for 2005-2010. The IGRF is referenced to the World Geodetic System 1984 ellipsoid. Additional information about the USGS geomagnetism program is available at: http://geomag.usgs.gov/

  8. Geomagnetic disturbance effects on power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertson, V.D.; Bozoki, B.; Feero, W.E.; Kappenman, J.G.; Larsen, E.V.; Nordell, D.E.; Ponder, J.; Prabhakara, F.S.; Thompson, K.; Walling, R.

    1993-07-01

    In the northern hemisphere, the aurora borealis is visual evidence of simultaneous fluctuations in the earth's magnetic field (geomagnetic field). These geomagnetic disturbances (GMD's), or geomagnetic storms, can affect a number of man-made systems, including electric power systems. The GMD's are caused by the electromagnetic interaction of the solar wind plasma of protons and electrons with the geomagnetic field. These dynamic impulses in the solar wind are due to solar flares, coronal holes, and disappearing filaments, and reach the earth from one to six days after being emitted by a solar event. Instances of geomagnetic storms affecting telegraph systems were noted in England in 1846, and power system disturbances linked to GMD's were first reported in the United States in 1940. This Working Group report is a summary of the state of knowledge and research activity to the present time, and covers the GMD/Geomagnetically-induced currents (GIC) phenomena, transformer effects, the impact on generators, protective relay effects, and communication system effects. It also summarizes modeling and predicting GIC, measuring and monitoring GIC, mitigation methods, system operating guidelines during GMD's, and alerting and forecasting procedures and needs for the power industry.

  9. Estimating ionospheric currents by inversion from ground-based geomagnetic data and calculating geoelectric fields for studies of geomagnetically induced currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Villiers, J. S.; Pirjola, R. J.; Cilliers, P. J.

    2016-09-01

    This research focuses on the inversion of geomagnetic variation field measurements to obtain the source currents in the ionosphere and magnetosphere, and to determine the geoelectric fields at the Earth's surface. During geomagnetic storms, the geoelectric fields create geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) in power networks. These GIC may disturb the operation of power systems, cause damage to power transformers, and even result in power blackouts. In this model, line currents running east-west along given latitudes are postulated to exist at a certain height above the Earth's surface. This physical arrangement results in the fields on the ground being composed of a zero magnetic east component and a nonzero electric east component. The line current parameters are estimated by inverting Fourier integrals (over wavenumber) of elementary geomagnetic fields using the Levenberg-Marquardt technique. The output parameters of the model are the ionospheric current strength and the geoelectric east component at the Earth's surface. A conductivity profile of the Earth is adapted from a shallow layered-Earth model for one observatory, together with a deep-layer model derived from satellite observations. This profile is used to obtain the ground surface impedance and therefore the reflection coefficient in the integrals. The inputs for the model are a spectrum of the geomagnetic data for 31 May 2013. The output parameters of the model are spectrums of the ionospheric current strength and of the surface geoelectric field. The inverse Fourier transforms of these spectra provide the time variations on the same day. The geoelectric field data can be used as a proxy for GIC in the prediction of GIC for power utilities. The current strength data can assist in the interpretation of upstream solar wind behaviour.

  10. Ionospheric redistribution during geomagnetic storms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immel, T J; Mannucci, A J

    2013-12-01

    [1]The abundance of plasma in the daytime ionosphere is often seen to grow greatly during geomagnetic storms. Recent reports suggest that the magnitude of the plasma density enhancement depends on the UT of storm onset. This possibility is investigated over a 7year period using global maps of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) produced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The analysis confirms that the American sector exhibits, on average, larger storm time enhancement in ionospheric plasma content, up to 50% in the afternoon middle-latitude region and 30% in the vicinity of the high-latitude auroral cusp, with largest effect in the Southern Hemisphere. We investigate whether this effect is related to the magnitude of the causative magnetic storms. Using the same advanced Dst index employed to sort the TEC maps into quiet and active (Dststorm strength that corresponds closely to the TEC variation but follows it by 3-6h. For this and other reasons detailed in this report, we conclude that the UT-dependent peak in storm time TEC is likely not related to the magnitude of external storm time forcing but more likely attributable to phenomena such as the low magnetic field in the South American region. The large Dst variation suggests a possible system-level effect of the observed variation in ionospheric storm response on the measured strength of the terrestrial ring current, possibly connected through UT-dependent modulation of ion outflow.

  11. On Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2000-01-01

    A partial description of Earth's broad scale, core-source magnetic field has been developed and tested three ways. The description features an expected, or mean, spatial magnetic power spectrum that is approximately inversely proportional to horizontal wavenumber atop Earth's core. This multipole spectrum describes a magnetic energy range; it is not steep enough for Gubbins' magnetic dissipation range. Temporal variations of core multipole powers about mean values are to be expected and are described statistically, via trial probability distribution functions, instead of deterministically, via trial solution of closed transport equations. The distributions considered here are closed and neither require nor prohibit magnetic isotropy. The description is therefore applicable to, and tested against, both dipole and low degree non-dipole fields. In Part 1, a physical basis for an expectation spectrum is developed and checked. The description is then combined with main field models of twentieth century satellite and surface geomagnetic field measurements to make testable predictions of the radius of Earth's core. The predicted core radius is 0.7% above the 3480 km seismological value. Partial descriptions of other planetary dipole fields are noted.

  12. Sound Intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, M.J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1997-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  13. Sound Intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, M.J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1997-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique.......This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  14. Sound intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, Malcolm J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1998-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique.......This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  15. Bats Use Geomagnetic Field: Behavior and Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y.; Tian, L.; Zhang, B.; Zhu, R.

    2015-12-01

    It has been known that numerous animals can use the Earth's magnetic field for spatial orientation and long-distance navigation, nevertheless, how animals can respond to the magnetic field remain mostly ambiguous. The intensities of the global geomagnetic field varies between 23 and 66 μT, and the geomagnetic field intensity could drop to 10% during geomagnetic polarity reversals or geomagnetic excursions. Such dramatic changes of the geomagnetic field may pose a significant challenge for the evolution of magnetic compass in animals. For examples, it is vital whether the magnetic compass can still work in such very weak magnetic fields. Our previous experiment has demonstrated that a migratory bat (Nyctalus plancyi) uses a polarity compass for orientation during roosting when exposed to an artificial magnetic field (100 μT). Recently, we experimentally tested whether the N. plancyi can sense very weak magnetic fields that were even lower than those of the present-day geomagnetic field. Results showed: 1) the bats can sense the magnetic north in a field strength of present-day local geomagnetic field (51μT); 2) As the field intensity decreased to only 1/5th of the natural intensity (10 μT), the bats still responded by positioning themselves at the magnetic north. Notably, as the field polarity was artificially reversed, the bats still preferred the new magnetic north, even at the lowest field strength tested (10 μT). Hence, N. plancyi is able to detect the direction of a magnetic field with intensity range from twice to 1/5th of the present-day field strength. This allows them to orient themselves across the entire range of present-day global geomagnetic field strengths and sense very weak magnetic fields. We propose that this high sensitivity might have evolved in bats as the geomagnetic field strength varied and the polarity reversed tens of times over the past fifty million years since the origin of bats. The physiological mechanisms underlying

  16. Principles of major geomagnetic storms forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagnetko, Alexander; Applbaum, David; Dorman, Lev; Pustil'Nik, Lev; Sternlieb, Abraham; Zukerman, Igor

    According to NOAA Space Weather Scales, geomagnetic storms of scales G5 (3-hour index of geomagnetic activity Kp=9), G4 (Kp=8) and G3 (Kp=7) are dangerous for people technology and health (influence on power systems, on spacecraft operations, on HF radio-communications and others). To prevent these serious damages will be very important to forecast dangerous geomagnetic storms. In many papers it was shown that in principle for this forecasting can be used data on CR intensity and CR anisotropy changing before SC of major geomagnetic storms accompanied by sufficient Forbush-decreases (e.g., Dorman et al., 1995, 1999). In this paper we consider all types of observed precursor effects in CR what can be used for forecasting of great geomagnetic storms and possible mechanisms of these precursor effects origin. REFERENCES: Dorman L.I., et al. "Cosmic-ray forecasting features for big Forbush-decreases". Nuclear Physics B, 49A, 136-144 (1995). L.I.Dorman, et al, "Cosmic ray Forbush-decrease as indicators of space dangerous phenomenon and possible use of cosmic ray data for their pre-diction", Proc. of 26-th Intern. Cosmic Ray Conference, Salt Lake City, 6, 476-479 (1999).

  17. Anomalous phenomena on HF radio paths during geomagnetic disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagoveshchenskii, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    We analyze ionospheric oblique sounding data on three high-latitude and one high-latitude-midlatitude HF radio paths for February 15 and 16, 2014, when two substorms and one magnetic storm occurred. We investigate cases of anomalous propagation of signals: their reflection from sporadic layer Es, lateral reflections, type "M" or "N" modes, the presence of traveling ionospheric disturbances, and the diffusivity of signals and triplets. The most significant results are the following. In geomagnetically undisturbed times, sporadic Es-layers with reduced maximum observed frequencies (MOF Es) on three high-latitude paths were observed in both days. The values of MOF Es during disturbances are large, which leads to the screening of other oblique sounding signals reflected from the ionosphere. On all four paths, the most frequently traveling ionospheric disturbances due to the terminator were observed in quiet hours from 03:00 to 15:00 UT on the first day and from 06:00 to 13:00 UT on the second day of the experiment. In addition, both the sunset terminator and the magnetic storm on the high-latitude-mid-latitude path were found to generate traveling ionospheric disturbances jointly. No such phenomenon was found on high-latitude paths.

  18. The latitudinal distribution of the baseline geomagnetic field during the March 17, 2015 geomagnetic storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Tommaso; Piersanti, Mirko; Lepreti, Fabio; Vecchio, Antonio; De Michelis, Paola; Villante, Umberto; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    Geomagnetic storms (GS) are global geomagnetic disturbances that result from the interaction between magnetized plasma that propagates from the Sun and plasma and magnetic fields in the near-Earth space plasma environment. The Dst (Disturbance Storm Time) global Ring Current index is still taken to be the definitive representation for geomagnetic storm and is used widely by researcher. Recent in situ measurements by satellites passing through the ring-current region (i.e. Van Allen probes) and computations with magnetospheric field models showed that there are many other field contributions on the geomagnetic storming time variations at middle and low latitudes. Appling the Empirical Mode Decomposition [Huang et al., 1998] to magnetospheric and ground observations, we detect the different magnetic field contributions during a GS and introduce the concepts of modulated baseline and fluctuations of the geomagnetic field. In this work, we apply this method to study the latitudinal distribution of the baseline geomagnetic field during the St. Patrick's Day Geomagnetic Storm 2015 in order to detect physical informations concerning the differences between high-latitude and equatorial ground measurements.

  19. Quantifying Power Grid Risk from Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homeier, N.; Wei, L. H.; Gannon, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    We are creating a statistical model of the geophysical environment that can be used to quantify the geomagnetic storm hazard to power grid infrastructure. Our model is developed using a database of surface electric fields for the continental United States during a set of historical geomagnetic storms. These electric fields are derived from the SUPERMAG compilation of worldwide magnetometer data and surface impedances from the United States Geological Survey. This electric field data can be combined with a power grid model to determine GICs per node and reactive MVARs at each minute during a storm. Using publicly available substation locations, we derive relative risk maps by location by combining magnetic latitude and ground conductivity. We also estimate the surface electric fields during the August 1972 geomagnetic storm that caused a telephone cable outage across the middle of the United States. This event produced the largest surface electric fields in the continental U.S. in at least the past 40 years.

  20. Improvements in geomagnetic observatory data quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reda, Jan; Fouassier, Danielle; Isac, Anca

    2011-01-01

    between observatories and the establishment of observatory networks has harmonized standards and practices across the world; improving the quality of the data product available to the user. Nonetheless, operating a highquality geomagnetic observatory is non-trivial. This article gives a record...... of the current state of observatory instrumentation and methods, citing some of the general problems in the complex operation of geomagnetic observatories. It further gives an overview of recent improvements of observatory data quality based on presentation during 11th IAGA Assembly at Sopron and INTERMAGNET......Geomagnetic observatory practice and instrumentation has evolved significantly over the past 150 years. Evolution continues to be driven by advances in technology and by the need of the data user community for higher-resolution, lower noise data in near-real time. Additionally, collaboration...

  1. Mathematical Properties Relevant to Geomagnetic Field Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabaka, Terence J.; Hulot, Gauthier; Olsen, Nils

    2010-01-01

    properties of those spatial mathematical representations are also discussed, especially in view of providing a formal justification for the fact that geomagnetic field models can indeed be constructed from ground-based and satellite-born observations, provided those reasonably approximate the ideal......Geomagnetic field modeling consists in converting large numbers of magnetic observations into a linear combination of elementary mathematical functions that best describes those observations.The set of numerical coefficients defining this linear combination is then what one refers...... be directly measured. In this chapter, the mathematical foundation of global (as opposed to regional) geomagnetic field modeling is reviewed, and the spatial modeling of the field in spherical coordinates is focussed. Time can be dealt with as an independent variable and is not explicitly considered...

  2. Mathematical Properties Relevant to Geomagnetic Field Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabaka, Terence J.; Hulot, Gauthier; Olsen, Nils

    2014-01-01

    properties of those spatial mathematical representations are also discussed, especially in view of providing a formal justification for the fact that geomagnetic field models can indeed be constructed from ground-based and satellite-born observations, provided those reasonably approximate the ideal situation......Geomagnetic field modeling consists in converting large numbers of magnetic observations into a linear combination of elementary mathematical functions that best describes those observations. The set of numerical coefficients defining this linear combination is then what one refers...... be directly measured. In this chapter, the mathematical foundation of global (as opposed to regional) geomagnetic field modeling is reviewed, and the spatial modeling of the field in spherical coordinates is focused. Time can be dealt with as an independent variable and is not explicitly considered...

  3. International Geomagnetic Reference Field: the third generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddie, N.W.

    1982-01-01

    In August 1981 the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy revised the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). It is the second revision since the inception of the IGRF in 1968. The revision extends the earlier series of IGRF models from 1980 to 1985, introduces a new series of definitive models for 1965-1976, and defines a provisional reference field for 1975- 1980. The revision consists of: 1) a model of the main geomagnetic field at 1980.0, not continuous with the earlier series of IGRF models together with a forecast model of the secular variation of the main field during 1980-1985; 2) definitive models of the main field at 1965.0, 1970.0, and 1975.0, with linear interpolation of the model coefficients specified for intervening dates; and 3) a provisional reference field for 1975-1980, defined as the linear interpolation of the 1975 and 1980 main-field models.-from Author

  4. Progress in Studies of Geomagnetic Navigation of Animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Lanxiang; Pan Yongxin; Lin Wei; Wang Yinan; Zhang Shuyi

    2005-01-01

    @@ The geomagnetic field may play a key role in orientation and navigation of many long-distance migratory animals. Taking homing and migrating birds as examples, this paper reviews recent progress in studies of geomagnetic "compass" of animals.Moreover, we propose to address two aspects in future geomagnetic orientation research: ( 1 ) what are the true components of the "map"? (2) What are the magneto-receptors and which brain areas acquire and process the geomagnetic field information ?

  5. Toward a possible next geomagnetic transition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. De Santis

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The geomagnetic field is subject to possible reversals or excursions of polarity during its temporal evolution. Considering that: (a the typical average time between one reversal and the next (the so-called chron is around 300 000 yr, (b the last reversal occurred around 780 000 yr ago, (c more excursions (rapid changes of polarity can occur within the same chron and (d the geomagnetic field dipole is currently decreasing, a possible imminent geomagnetic reversal or excursion would not be completely unexpected. In that case, such a phenomenon would represent one of the very few natural hazards which are really global. The South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA is a great depression of the geomagnetic field at the Earth's surface, caused by a reverse magnetic flux in the terrestrial outer core. In analogy with critical point phenomena characterised by some cumulative quantity, we fit the surface extent of this anomaly over the last 400 yr with power or logarithmic functions in reverse time, also decorated by log-periodic oscillations, whose final singularity (a critical point tc reveals a great change in the near future (2034 ± 3 yr, when the SAA area reaches almost a hemisphere. An interesting aspect that has been recently found is the possible direct connection between the SAA and the global mean sea level (GSL. That the GSL is somehow connected with SAA is also confirmed from the similar result when an analogous critical-like fit is performed over GSL: the corresponding critical point (2033 ± 11 yr agrees, within the estimated errors, with the value found for SAA. From this result, we point out the intriguing conjecture that tc would be the time of no return, after which the geomagnetic field could fall into an irreversible process of a global geomagnetic transition that could be a reversal or excursion of polarity.

  6. Toward a possible next geomagnetic critical transition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamili, Enkelejda; De Santis, Angelo; Wu, Lixin

    2014-05-01

    The geomagnetic field is subject to possible reversals or excursions of polarity during its temporal evolution. Considering the characteristics of the recent geomagnetic field, a possible imminent geomagnetic reversal or excursion would not be completely unexpected. In that case, such a phenomenon would represent one of the very few natural hazards that are really global. The South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) is a great depression of the geomagnetic field strength at the Earth's surface, caused by a reverse magnetic flux in the terrestrial outer core. In analogy with critical point phenomena characterized by some cumulative quantity, we fit the surface extent of this anomaly over the last 400 yr with power law or logarithmic functions in reverse time, also decorated by log-periodic oscillations, whose final singularity (a critical point tc) reveals a great change in the near future (2034±3 yr), when the SAA area reaches almost a hemisphere. An interesting aspect that has recently been found is the possible direct connection between the SAA and the global mean sea level (GSL). That the GSL is somehow connected with SAA is also confirmed by the similar result when an analogous critical-like fit is performed over GSL: the corresponding critical point (2033±11 yr) agrees, within the estimated errors, with the value found for the SAA. From this result, we point out the intriguing conjecture that tc would be the time of no return, after which the geomagnetic field could fall into an irreversible process of a global geomagnetic transition that could be a reversal or excursion of polarity.

  7. Toward a possible next geomagnetic transition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, A.; Qamili, E.; Wu, L.

    2013-12-01

    The geomagnetic field is subject to possible reversals or excursions of polarity during its temporal evolution. Considering that: (a) in the last 83 million yr the typical average time between one reversal and the next (the so-called chron) is around 400 000 yr, (b) the last reversal occurred around 780 000 yr ago, (c) more excursions (rapid changes in polarity) can occur within the same chron and (d) the geomagnetic field dipole is currently decreasing, a possible imminent geomagnetic reversal or excursion would not be completely unexpected. In that case, such a phenomenon would represent one of the very few natural hazards that are really global. The South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) is a great depression of the geomagnetic field strength at the Earth's surface, caused by a reverse magnetic flux in the terrestrial outer core. In analogy with critical point phenomena characterized by some cumulative quantity, we fit the surface extent of this anomaly over the last 400 yr with power law or logarithmic functions in reverse time, also decorated by log-periodic oscillations, whose final singularity (a critical point tc) reveals a great change in the near future (2034 ± 3 yr), when the SAA area reaches almost a hemisphere. An interesting aspect that has recently been found is the possible direct connection between the SAA and the global mean sea level (GSL). That the GSL is somehow connected with SAA is also confirmed by the similar result when an analogous critical-like fit is performed over GSL: the corresponding critical point (2033 ± 11 yr) agrees, within the estimated errors, with the value found for the SAA. From this result, we point out the intriguing conjecture that tc would be the time of no return, after which the geomagnetic field could fall into an irreversible process of a global geomagnetic transition that could be a reversal or excursion of polarity.

  8. Unidentified Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzfeldt, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates how urban spaces and its noises are approached by radio reporters in the first decades of public radio production in Denmark. Focussing on the period before reel tape was incorporated in production by late 1940es, I ask how urban space and urban sounds are heard...... in Danish radio until early post-war years. Yet I trace early attempts at managing noisy urban conditions and demonstrate how reporters experimented with available technological repositories and developed techniques in order to make sense in and through urban environments. Inspired by Michel Serres idea...... of the parasite I analyse such techniques as ways of distinguishing between noise and meaningful sounds, and ultimately show how such ventures constituted auditory responses to modernity and let organised sound enter the public sphere....

  9. The study of the midlatitude ionospheric response to geomagnetic activity at Nagycenk Geophysical Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berényi, Kitti; Kis, Árpád; Barta, Veronika; Novák, Attila

    2016-04-01

    Geomagnetic storms affect the ionospheric regions of the terrestrial upper atmosphere, causing several physical and chemical atmospheric processes. The changes and phenomena, which can be seen as a result of these processes, generally called ionospheric storm. These processes depend on altitude, term of the day, and the strength of solar activity, the geomagnetic latitude and longitude. The differences between ionospheric regions mostly come from the variations of altitude dependent neutral and ionized atmospheric components, and from the physical parameters of solar radiation. We examined the data of the ground-based radio wave ionosphere sounding instruments of the European ionospheric stations (mainly the data of Nagycenk Geophysical Observatory), called ionosonde, to determine how and what extent a given strength of a geomagnetic disturbance affect the middle latitude ionospheric regions in winter. We chose the storm for the research from November 2012 and March 2015. As the main result of our research, we can show significant differences between the each ionospheric (F1 and F2) layer parameters on quiet and strong stormy days. When we saw, that the critical frequencies (foF2) increase from their quiet day value, then the effect of the ionospheric storm was positive, otherwise, if they drop, they were negative. With our analysis, the magnitude of these changes could be determined. Furthermore we demonstrated, how a full strong geomagnetic storm affects the ionospheric foF2 parameter during different storm phases. It has been showed, how a positive or negative ionospheric storm develop during a geomagnetic storm. For a more completed analysis, we compared also the evolution of the F2 layer parameters of the European ionosonde stations on a North-South geographic longitude during a full storm duration. Therefore we determined, that the data of the ionosonde at Nagycenk Geophysical Observatory are appropriate, it detects the same state of ionosphere like the

  10. Satellite data for geomagnetic field modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langel, R. A.; Baldwin, R. T.

    1992-06-01

    Satellite measurements of the geomagnetic fields began with the launch of Sputnik 3 in May of 1958 and have continued sporadically. Spacecraft making significant contributions to main field geomagnetism will be reviewed and the characteristics of their data discussed, including coverage, accuracy, resolution and data availability. Of particular interest are Vanguard 3; Cosmos 49, Ogo's -2, -4, and -6; Magsat; DE-2; and POGS. Spacecraft make measurements on a moving platfrom above the ionosphere as opposed to measurements from fixed observatories and surveys, both below the ionosphere. Possible future missions, such as Aristoteles and GOS are reviewed.

  11. Satellite Data for Geomagnetic Field Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langel, R. A.; Baldwin, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    Satellite measurements of the geomagnetic fields began with the launch of Sputnik 3 in May of 1958 and have continued sporadically. Spacecraft making significant contributions to main field geomagnetism will be reviewed and the characteristics of their data discussed, including coverage, accuracy, resolution and data availability. Of particular interest are Vanguard 3; Cosmos 49, Ogo's -2, -4, and -6; Magsat; DE-2; and POGS. Spacecraft make measurements on a moving platfrom above the ionosphere as opposed to measurements from fixed observatories and surveys, both below the ionosphere. Possible future missions, such as Aristoteles and GOS are reviewed.

  12. Anencephalus, drinking water, geomagnetism and cosmic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, V E

    1979-01-01

    The mortality rates from anencephalus from 1950-1969 in Canadian cities are shown to be strongly correlated with city growth rate and with horizontal geomagnetic flux, which is directly related to the intensity of cosmic radiation. They are also shown to have some association with the magnesium content of drinking water. Prior work with these data which showed associations with magnesium in drinking water, mean income, latitude and longitude was found to be inadequate because it dismissed the observed geographic associations as having little biological meaning, and because the important variables of geomagnetism and city growth rate were overlooked.

  13. Sound Settlements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peder Duelund; Hornyanszky, Elisabeth Dalholm; Larsen, Jacob Norvig

    2013-01-01

    Præsentation af projektresultater fra Interreg forskningen Sound Settlements om udvikling af bæredygtighed i det almene boligbyggerier i København, Malmø, Helsingborg og Lund samt europæiske eksempler på best practice......Præsentation af projektresultater fra Interreg forskningen Sound Settlements om udvikling af bæredygtighed i det almene boligbyggerier i København, Malmø, Helsingborg og Lund samt europæiske eksempler på best practice...

  14. Fluid Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    are tempo, time, voice, sound and music. Our goal is to bring analytical and performative awareness to academic means of expression, and the audio paper provides us with a new and experimental platform to do so. Our thoughts about and definition of the audio paper is explained in the first text of the issue...... by introducing a new format: The Audio Paper. The purpose of the audio paper is to extend the written academic text: to present discussions and explorations of a certain argument or problem in sound. The audio paper is an extension of expressive means: Not only words and syntax are means of expression – so...

  15. Sound Settlements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peder Duelund; Hornyanszky, Elisabeth Dalholm; Larsen, Jacob Norvig;

    2013-01-01

    Præsentation af projektresultater fra Interreg forskningen Sound Settlements om udvikling af bæredygtighed i det almene boligbyggerier i København, Malmø, Helsingborg og Lund samt europæiske eksempler på best practice...

  16. What causes geomagnetic activity during sunspot minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Kirov, Boian; Georgieva, Katya; Obridko, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    The average geomagnetic activity during sunspot minimum has been continuously decreasing in the last four cycles. The geomagnetic activity is caused by both interplanetary disturbances - coronal mass ejections and high speed solar wind streams, and the background solar wind over which these disturbances ride. We show that the geomagnetic activity in cycle minimum does not depend on the number and parameters of coronal mass ejections or high speed solar wind streams, but on the background solar wind. The background solar wind has two components: slower and faster. The source of the slower component is the heliospheric current sheet, and of the faster one the polar coronal holes. It is supposed that the geomagnetic activity in cycle minimum is determined by the thickness of the heliospheric current sheet which is related to the portions of time the Earth spends in slow and in fast solar wind. We demonstrate that it is also determined by the parameters of these two components of the background solar wind which v...

  17. Some aspects of geomagnetically conjugate phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rycroft, M.J.

    1987-12-01

    Both charged particles and waves convey information about the thermosphere, ionosphere and magnetosphere from the Northern to the Southern Hemisphere and vice versa, along geomagnetic flux tubes.The interhemispheric travel time of electrons or ions, being dependent upon L-value , pitch angle and energy (which may lie between less than or equal to 1 eV and greater than or equal to 1 MeV) may be many hours, ranging down to less than or equal to 1 s. However, the one-hop propagation time for magnetohydrodynamic or whistler mode waves generally lies between 10/sup 2/s and 1 s. Such times, therefore, give the time scales of transient phenomena that are geomagnetically conjugate and of changes in steady-state plasma processes occurring in geomagnetically conjugate regions. Contrasting examples are presented of conjugate physical phenomena, obtained using satellite, rocket, aircraft and ground-based observations; the latter capitalise upon the rather rare disposition of land - rather than ocean - at each end of a geophysically interesting flux tube. Particular attention is paid to the interactions between whistler mode waves and energetic electrons. Geomagnetic, radio, optical and plasma observations, taken together with model computations, provide a wealth of knowledge on conjugate phenomena and their dependence on conditions in the solar wind, substorms, L-value, etc... Finally, some suggestions are made for future lines of research.

  18. Geomagnetic referencing in the arctic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podjono, Benny; Beck, Nathan; Buchanan, Andrew; Brink, Jason; Longo, Joseph; Finn, Carol A.; Worthington, E. William

    2011-01-01

    Geomagnetic referencing is becoming an increasingly attractive alternative to north-seeking gyroscopic surveys to achieve the precise wellbore positioning essential for success in today's complex drilling programs. However, the greater magnitude of variations in the geomagnetic environment at higher latitudes makes the application of geomagnetic referencing in those areas more challenging. Precise, real-time data on those variations from relatively nearby magnetic observatories can be crucial to achieving the required accuracy, but constructing and operating an observatory in these often harsh environments poses a number of significant challenges. Operational since March 2010, the Deadhorse Magnetic Observatory (DED), located in Deadhorse, Alaska, was created through collaboration between the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and a leading oilfield services supply company. DED was designed to produce real-time geomagnetic data at the required level of accuracy, and to do so reliably under the extreme temperatures and harsh weather conditions often experienced in the area. The observatory will serve a number of key scientific communities as well as the oilfield drilling industry, and has already played a vital role in the success of several commercial ventures in the area, providing essential, accurate data while offering significant cost and time savings, compared with traditional surveying techniques.

  19. Geomagnetic storms: historical perspective to modern view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhina, Gurbax S.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    2016-12-01

    The history of geomagnetism is more than 400 years old. Geomagnetic storms as we know them were discovered about 210 years ago. There has been keen interest in understanding Sun-Earth connection events, such as solar flares, CMEs, and concomitant magnetic storms in recent times. Magnetic storms are the most important component of space weather effects on Earth. We give an overview of the historical aspects of geomagnetic storms and the progress made during the past two centuries. Super magnetic storms can cause life-threatening power outages and satellite damage, communication failures and navigational problems. The data for such super magnetic storms that occurred in the last 50 years during the space era is sparce. Research on historical geomagnetic storms can help to create a database for intense and super magnetic storms. New knowledge of interplanetary and solar causes of magnetic storms gained from spaceage observations will be used to review the super magnetic storm of September 1-2, 1859. We discuss the occurrence probability of such super magnetic storms, and the maximum possible intensity for the effects of a perfect ICME: extreme super magnetic storm, extreme magnetospheric compression, and extreme magnetospheric electric fields.

  20. Incorporation of geomagnetic data and services into EPOS infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejda, Pavel; Chambodut, Aude; Curto, Juan-Jose; Flower, Simon; Kozlovskaya, Elena; Kubašta, Petr; Matzka, Jürgen; Tanskanen, Eija; Thomson, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of the geomagnetic field has a long history across Europe that dates back to 1830', and is currently experiencing an increased interest within Earth observation and space weather monitoring. Our goals within EPOS-IP are to consolidate the community, modernise data archival and distribution formats for existing services and create new services for magnetotelluric data and geomagnetic models. Specific objectives are: • Enhance existing services providing geomagnetic data (INTERMAGNET- INTErnational Real-time MAGnetic observatory NETwork; World Data Centre for Geomagnetism; IMAGE- International Monitor for Auroral Geomagnetic Effects) and existing services providing geomagnetic indices (ISGI - International Service of Geomagnetic Indices). • Develop and enhance the geomagnetic community's metadata systems by creating a metadata database, filling it and putting in place processes to ensure that it is kept up to date in the future. • Develop and build access to magnetotelluric (MT) data including transfer functions and time series data from temporary, portable MT-arrays in Europe, as well as to lithospheric conductivity models derived from TM-data. • Develop common web and database access points to global and regional geomagnetic field and conductivity models. • Establish links from the geomagnetic data services, products and models to the Integrated Core Services. The immediate task in the current period is to identify data models of existing services, modify them and integrate into a common model of Geomagnetic Thematic Core Services.

  1. Solar cycle distribution of major geomagnetic storms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-Ming Le; Zi-Yu Cai; Hua-Ning Wang; Zhi-Qiang Yin; Peng Li

    2013-01-01

    We examine the solar cycle distribution of major geomagnetic storms (Dst ≤-100 nT),including intense storms at the level of-200 nT< Dst ≤-100 nT,great storms at-300 nT< Dst ≤-200 nT,and super storms at Dst ≤-300 nT,which occurred during the period of 1957-2006,based on Dst indices and smoothed monthly sunspot numbers.Statistics show that the majority (82%) of the geomagnetic storms at the level of Dst ≤-100 nT that occurred in the study period were intense geomagnetic storms,with 12.4% ranked as great storms and 5.6% as super storms.It is interesting to note that about 27% of the geomagnetic storms that occurred at all three intensity levels appeared in the ascending phase of a solar cycle,and about 73% in the descending one.Statistics also show that 76.9% of the intense storms,79.6% of the great storms and 90.9% of the super storms occurred during the two years before a solar cycle reached its peak,or in the three years after it.The correlation between the size of a solar cycle and the percentage of major storms that occurred,during the period from two years prior to maximum to three years after it,is investigated.Finally,the properties of the multi-peak distribution for major geomagnetic storms in each solar cycle is investigated.

  2. Making sound vortices by metasurfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Liping; Qiu, Chunyin, E-mail: cyqiu@whu.edu.cn; Lu, Jiuyang; Tang, Kun; Ke, Manzhu; Peng, Shasha [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Jia, Han [State Key Laboratory of Acoustics and Key Laboratory of Noise and Vibration Research, Institute of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Liu, Zhengyou [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Institute for Advanced Studies, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle, a metasurface structure is designed to generate a sound vortex beam in airborne environment. The metasurface is constructed by a thin planar plate perforated with a circular array of deep subwavelength resonators with desired phase and amplitude responses. The metasurface approach in making sound vortices is validated well by full-wave simulations and experimental measurements. Potential applications of such artificial spiral beams can be anticipated, as exemplified experimentally by the torque effect exerting on an absorbing disk.

  3. Making sound vortices by metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Liping; Lu, Jiuyang; Tang, Kun; Jia, Han; Ke, Manzhu; Peng, Shasha; Liu, Zhengyou

    2016-01-01

    Based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle, a metasurface structure is designed to generate a sound vortex beam in airborne environment. The metasurface is constructed by a thin planar plate perforated with a circular array of deep subwavelength resonators with desired phase and amplitude responses. The metasurface approach in making sound vortices is validated well by full-wave simulations and experimental measurements. Potential applications of such artificial spiral beams can be anticipated, as exemplified experimentally by the torque effect exerting on an absorbing disk.

  4. Fluid Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Explorations and analysis of soundscapes have, since Canadian R. Murray Schafer's work during the early 1970's, developed into various established research - and artistic disciplines. The interest in sonic environments is today present within a broad range of contemporary art projects and in arch...... are tempo, time, voice, sound and music. Our goal is to bring analytical and performative awareness to academic means of expression, and the audio paper provides us with a new and experimental platform to do so....... by introducing a new format: The Audio Paper. The purpose of the audio paper is to extend the written academic text: to present discussions and explorations of a certain argument or problem in sound. The audio paper is an extension of expressive means: Not only words and syntax are means of expression – so...

  5. The geomagnetic cutoff rigidities at high latitudes for different solar wind and geomagnetic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, W. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Space Weather; Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). College of Earth Sciences; Qin, G. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Space Weather

    2016-04-01

    Studying the access of the cosmic rays (CRs) into the magnetosphere is important to understand the coupling between the magnetosphere and the solar wind. In this paper we numerically studied CRs' magnetospheric access with vertical geomagnetic cutoff rigidities using the method proposed by Smart and Shea (1999). By the study of CRs' vertical geomagnetic cutoff rigidities at high latitudes we obtain the CRs' window (CRW) whose boundary is determined when the vertical geomagnetic cutoff rigidities drop to a value lower than a threshold value. Furthermore, we studied the area of CRWs and found out they are sensitive to different parameters, such as the z component of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), the solar wind dynamic pressure, AE index, and Dst index. It was found that both the AE index and Dst index have a strong correlation with the area of CRWs during strong geomagnetic storms. However, during the medium storms, only AE index has a strong correlation with the area of CRWs, while Dst index has a much weaker correlation with the area of CRWs. This result on the CRW can be used for forecasting the variation of the cosmic rays during the geomagnetic storms.

  6. Steady induction effects in geomagnetism. Part 1A: Steady motional induction of geomagnetic chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    1992-01-01

    Geomagnetic effects of magnetic induction by hypothetically steady fluid motion and steady magnetic flux diffusion near the top of Earth's core are investigated using electromagnetic theory, simple magnetic earth models, and numerical experiments with geomagnetic field models. The problem of estimating a steady fluid velocity field near the top of Earth's core which induces the secular variation indicated by broad-scale models of the observed geomagnetic field is examined and solved. In Part 1, the steady surficial core flow estimation problem is solved in the context of the source-free mantle/frozen-flux core model. In the first paper (IA), the theory underlying such estimates is reviewed and some consequences of various kinematic and dynamic flow hypotheses are derived. For a frozen-flux core, fluid downwelling is required to change the mean square normal magnetic flux density averaged over the core-mantle boundary. For surficially geostrophic flow, downwelling implies poleward flow. The solution of the forward steady motional induction problem at the surface of a frozen-flux core is derived and found to be a fine, easily visualized example of deterministic chaos. Geomagnetic effects of statistically steady core surface flow may well dominate secular variation over several decades. Indeed, effects of persistent, if not steady, surficially geostrophic core flow are described which may help explain certain features of the present broad-scale geomagnetic field and perhaps paleomagnetic secular variation.

  7. An investigation of the roles of geomagnetic and acoustic cues in whale navigation and orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Ann Nichole

    Many species of whales migrate annually between high-latitude feeding grounds and low-latitude breeding grounds. Yet, very little is known about how these animals navigate during these migrations. This thesis takes a first look at the roles of geomagnetic and acoustic cues in humpback whale navigation and orientation, in addition to documenting some effects of human-produced sound on beaked whales. The tracks of satellite-tagged humpback whales migrating from Hawaii to Alaska were found to have systematic deviations from the most direct route to their destination. For each whale, a migration track was modeled using only geomagnetic inclination and intensity as navigation cues. The directions in which the observed and modeled tracks deviated from the direct route were compared and found to match for 7 out of 9 tracks, which suggests that migrating humpback whales may use geomagnetic cues for navigation. Additionally, in all cases the observed tracks followed a more direct route to the destination than the modeled tracks, indicating that the whales are likely using additional navigational cues to improve their routes. There is a significant amount of sound available in the ocean to aid in navigation and orientation of a migrating whale. This research investigates the possibility that humpback whales migrating near-shore listen to sounds of snapping shrimp to detect the presence of obstacles, such as rocky islands. A visual tracking study was used, together with hydrophone recordings near a rocky island, to determine whether the whales initiated an avoidance reaction at distances that varied with the acoustic detection range of the island. No avoidance reaction was found. Propagation modeling of the snapping shrimp sounds suggested that the detection range of the island was beyond the visual limit of the survey, indicating that snapping shrimp sounds may be suited as a long-range indicator of a rocky island. Lastly, this thesis identifies a prolonged avoidance

  8. International Geomagnetic Reference Field: the seventh generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, C. E.

    A seventh-generation revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was adopted by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) at the XXI General Assembly of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics in July 1995. The new spherical harmonic models adopted are based on weighted averages of candidate models submitted by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the Russian Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionospheric, and Radio Wave Propagation - IZMIRAN, and jointly by the US Naval Oceanographic Office and the British Geological Survey. The revised IGRF specifies the Earth's main field from 1900 to 2000 and is declared to be definitive from 1945 to 1990. This paper lists the IGRF coefficients, describes the derivation of the new IGRF models, and examines aspects of the IGRF's accuracy, continuity, and behaviour during the 20th century.

  9. Trapping of strangelets in the geomagnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Paulucci, L; Medina-Tanco, G A

    2007-01-01

    Strangelets coming from the interstellar medium (ISM) are an interesting target to experiments searching for evidence of this hypothetic state of hadronic matter. We entertain the possibility of a {\\it trapped} strangelet population, quite analogous to ordinary nuclei and electron belts. For a population of strangelets to be trapped by the geomagnetic field, these incoming particles would have to fulfill certain conditions, namely having magnetic rigidities above the geomagnetic cutoff and below a certain threshold for adiabatic motion to hold. We show in this work that, for fully ionized strangelets, there is a narrow window for stable trapping. An estimate of the stationary population is presented and the dominant loss mechanisms discussed. It is shown that the population would be substantially enhanced with respect to the ISM flux (up to two orders of magnitude) due to quasi-stable trapping.

  10. A combined solar and geomagnetic index for thermospheric climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynczak, Martin G; Hunt, Linda A; Marshall, B Thomas; Russell, James M; Mertens, Christopher J; Thompson, R Earl; Gordley, Larry L

    2015-05-28

    Infrared radiation from nitric oxide (NO) at 5.3 µm is a primary mechanism by which the thermosphere cools to space. The Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the NASA Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics satellite has been measuring thermospheric cooling by NO for over 13 years. In this letter we show that the SABER time series of globally integrated infrared power (watts) radiated by NO can be replicated accurately by a multiple linear regression fit using the F10.7, Ap, and Dst indices. This allows reconstruction of the NO power time series back nearly 70 years with extant databases of these indices. The relative roles of solar ultraviolet and geomagnetic processes in determining the NO cooling are derived and shown to vary significantly over the solar cycle. The NO power is a fundamental integral constraint on the thermospheric climate, and the time series presented here can be used to test upper atmosphere models over seven different solar cycles.

  11. Modeling the ocean effect of geomagnetic storms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Kuvshinov, A.

    2004-01-01

    At coastal sites, geomagnetic variations for periods shorter than a few days are strongly distorted by the conductivity of the nearby sea-water. This phenomena, known as the ocean (or coast) effect, is strongest in the magnetic vertical component. We demonstrate the ability to predict the ocean...... if the oceans are considered. Our analysis also indicates a significant local time asymmetry (i.e., contributions from spherical harmonics other than P-I(0)), especially during the main phase of the storm....

  12. MAGSAT for geomagnetic studies over Indian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, R. G.; Bhargava, B. N.; Singh, B. P.; Rao, D. R. K.; Rangarajan, G. K.; Rajaram, R.; Roy, M.; Arora, B. R.; Seth, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Progress in the preparation of software for converting data tapes produced on an IBM system to data readable on a DEC-10 system, in the creation of awareness of the utility of MAGSAT data among users in India, and in making computer programs supplied by NASA operational on the DEC-10 system is reported. Papers presented to Indian users, at the IAGA fourth scientific assembly, at a symposium on interdisciplinary approaches to geomagnetism, and a paper published in Science Today are included.

  13. Geographical localisation of the geomagnetic secular variation

    OpenAIRE

    Aubert, Julien; Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils

    2013-01-01

    Directly observed changes in Earth’s magnetic field occur most prominently at low latitudes beneath the Atlantic hemisphere, while the Pacific is comparatively quiet. This striking hemispheric asymmetry in geomagnetic secular variation is a consequence of the geographical localisation of intense, westward moving, magnetic flux patches at the core surface. Despite its successes in explaining the main morphological properties of Earth’s magnetic field, self-consistent numerical modelling of the...

  14. Geomagnetic effects on the average surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballatore, P.

    Several results have previously shown as the solar activity can be related to the cloudiness and the surface solar radiation intensity (Svensmark and Friis-Christensen, J. Atmos. Sol. Terr. Phys., 59, 1225, 1997; Veretenenkoand Pudovkin, J. Atmos. Sol. Terr. Phys., 61, 521, 1999). Here, the possible relationships between the averaged surface temperature and the solar wind parameters or geomagnetic activity indices are investigated. The temperature data used are the monthly SST maps (generated at RAL and available from the related ESRIN/ESA database) that represent the averaged surface temperature with a spatial resolution of 0.5°x0.5° and cover the entire globe. The interplanetary data and the geomagnetic data are from the USA National Space Science Data Center. The time interval considered is 1995-2000. Specifically, possible associations and/or correlations of the average temperature with the interplanetary magnetic field Bz component and with the Kp index are considered and differentiated taking into account separate geographic and geomagnetic planetary regions.

  15. Geomagnetic Jerks in the Swarm Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William; Beggan, Ciaran; Macmillan, Susan

    2016-08-01

    The timely provision of geomagnetic observations as part of the European Space Agency (ESA) Swarm mission means up-to-date analysis and modelling of the Earth's magnetic field can be conducted rapidly in a manner not possible before. Observations from each of the three Swarm constellation satellites are available within 4 days and a database of close-to-definitive ground observatory measurements is updated every 3 months. This makes it possible to study very recent variations of the core magnetic field. Here we investigate rapid, unpredictable internal field variations known as geomagnetic jerks. Given that jerks represent (currently) unpredictable changes in the core field and have been identified to have happened in 2014 since Swarm was launched, we ask what impact this might have on the future accuracy of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). We assess the performance of each of the IGRF-12 secular variation model candidates in light of recent jerks, given that four of the nine candidates are novel physics-based predictive models.

  16. Neural mechanisms for sound localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterton, R B; Imig, T J

    1984-01-01

    Although the efforts to find a place map of sound direction within the auditory system of mammals has been reinspired by the recent discoveries in owl, progress to date has not been encouraging. Neither the inferior colliculus nor auditory cortex has yielded immediate evidence of such a map, despite ingenious and persistent efforts to find it. Thus, at present, the evidence suggests that a head-referenced map of auditory space is more likely to be found in structures more motor than sensory in function--in the deep layers of the superior colliculus or brainstem tegmentum, for example. Insofar as these structures have been implicated in eye, ear, and head orientation toward a sound source, one might expect that premotor units for orienting would be sensitive to sound direction and thus, collectively, constitute a map of auditory azimuth isomorphic to the map of motor azimuth. However, even for these structures, the possibility for significant variation among mammalian species exists. Because many candidate motor structures (such as the deep superior colliculus) receive input from the cerebral cortex, and because the role of auditory cortex in sound localization seems to vary widely among mammals (38, 51) an equal amount of variation in auditory-motor maps may also exist.

  17. Geomagnetic Earthquake Precursors Improvement Formulation on the basis of SKO (Skopje) and PAG (Intermagnet) Geomagnetic Data

    CERN Document Server

    Mavrodiev, Strachimir Chterev

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we show that the simple analysis of the local geomagnetic field behaviour can serve as reliable imminent precursor for regional seismic activity increasing. As the first step the problem was investigated using one- component Dubna fluxgate magnetometer. The result of 2001-2004 Sofia monitoring confirmed many old papers for connection between Earth tide (Sun- Moon tides as earthquakes trigger) and jump (Geomagnetic quake) of daily averaged one minute standart deviation of the geomagnetic field. The second step (2004-present), which included analisys of three-component Danish fluxgate magnetometer data, worked in Skopje Seismological observatory, confirmed the first step result. The analysis of INTERMAGNET data stations around which was happened stronger earthquakes also confirmed our result. The distribution of time difference between the times of such earthquakes and local daily averaged tide vector movement for impending tide extreme confirms our estimate that the increasing seismicity is reali...

  18. Geomagnetic excursions date early hominid migration to China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-09-01

    Global-scale geomagnetic reversals, which are periods when the direction of Earth's magnetic field flips, leave imprints in magnetic minerals present in sediments. But so do smaller-scale, even local, changes in Earth's magnetic field direction. Paleomagnetists believe that the smaller-scale events represent “failed reversals” and refer to them as “geomagnetic excursions.” Scientists use geomagnetic excursions in sedimentary basins as markers to tie together events of Earth's history across the globe.

  19. An Investigation of Geomagnetic Storms and Associated Cosmic Ray Intensity During Recent Solar Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Sonia

    2016-07-01

    Shocks driven by energetic coronal mass ejections (CME's) and other interplanetary (IP) transients are mainly responsible for initiating large and intense geomagnetic storms. Observational results indicate that galactic cosmic rays (CR) coming from deep surface interact with these abnormal solar and IP conditions and suffer modulation effects. The current solar cycle has provided a long list of these highly energetic events influencing the Earth's geomagnetic field up to a great extent. We have selected such intense geo-effective CME's occurred during recent solar cycle and studied their possible influence on cosmic ray intensity as well as on Earth' s geomagnetic field using the hourly values of IMF data obtained from the NSSD Center. Solar wind data obtained from various satellites are used in the studies which are available during the selected events period. The super neutron monitor data obtained from Kiel, Oulu and Huancayo stations, well distributed over different latitudes has been used in the present study. It is found that AP and AE indices show rise before the forward turnings of IMF and both the Dst index and cosmic ray intensity show a classic decrease. The analysis further indicates the significant role of the magnitudes of Bz component of IMF substantiating the earlier results. It is further inferred that the magnitude of these responses depends on BZ component of IMF being well correlated with solar maximum and minimum periods. Transient decrease in cosmic ray intensity with slow recovery is observed during the storm phase duration.

  20. Coronal mass ejections and geomagnetic storms: Seasonal variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.L.; Gosling, J.T.; McComas, D.J.

    1992-07-01

    The well-established semiannual geomagnetic cycle, with peak activity near the equinoxes, has been attributed to the angle between the solar rotation axis and the geomagnetic dipole, which modulates the GSM Bz component in the interplanetary magnetic field (MF). This effect is predicted to be accentuated in the shocked plasma ahead of fast coronal mass ejections (CMESs); its relevance to the internal fields of the ejecta is unclear. CMEs, particularly fast events driving interplanetary shocks, are the cause of almost all large geomagnetic storms near solar maximum. We use a set of CMEs identified by ISEE-3 observations of bidirectional electron streaming, plus IMF and geomagnetic data, to investigate the semiannual geomagnetic variation and its relation to CMEs. We find that the geomagnetic effectiveness of CMEs and post-shock solar wind is well-ordered by speed and by the southward component of the IMF in GSM coordinates, as well as by preexisting geomagnetic conditions. The post-shock seasonal effect, with geomagnetic effectiveness maximizing near April 5 for negative GSEQ By and near October 5 for positive GSEQ By, is identifiable in shock and shock/CME events, but not for CME events without leading shocks. When used to complement the more fundamental causal parameter of CME speed, the seasonal effect appears to have value for prediction of geomagnetic storms.

  1. Coronal mass ejections and geomagnetic storms: Seasonal variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.L.; Gosling, J.T.; McComas, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    The well-established semiannual geomagnetic cycle, with peak activity near the equinoxes, has been attributed to the angle between the solar rotation axis and the geomagnetic dipole, which modulates the GSM Bz component in the interplanetary magnetic field (MF). This effect is predicted to be accentuated in the shocked plasma ahead of fast coronal mass ejections (CMESs); its relevance to the internal fields of the ejecta is unclear. CMEs, particularly fast events driving interplanetary shocks, are the cause of almost all large geomagnetic storms near solar maximum. We use a set of CMEs identified by ISEE-3 observations of bidirectional electron streaming, plus IMF and geomagnetic data, to investigate the semiannual geomagnetic variation and its relation to CMEs. We find that the geomagnetic effectiveness of CMEs and post-shock solar wind is well-ordered by speed and by the southward component of the IMF in GSM coordinates, as well as by preexisting geomagnetic conditions. The post-shock seasonal effect, with geomagnetic effectiveness maximizing near April 5 for negative GSEQ By and near October 5 for positive GSEQ By, is identifiable in shock and shock/CME events, but not for CME events without leading shocks. When used to complement the more fundamental causal parameter of CME speed, the seasonal effect appears to have value for prediction of geomagnetic storms.

  2. The monster sound pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2017-03-01

    Producing a deep bass tone by striking a large 3 m (10 ft) flexible corrugated drainage pipe immediately grabs student attention. The fundamental pitch of the corrugated tube is found to be a semitone lower than a non-corrugated smooth pipe of the same length. A video (https://youtu.be/FU7a9d7N60Y) of the demonstration is included, which illustrates how an Internet keyboard can be used to estimate the fundamental pitches of each pipe. Since both pipes have similar end corrections, the pitch discrepancy between the smooth pipe and drainage tube is due to the corrugations, which lower the speed of sound inside the flexible tube, dropping its pitch a semitone.

  3. The Egyptian geomagnetic reference field to the Epoch, 2010.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Deebes

    2017-06-01

    The geomagnetic anomaly maps, the normal geomagnetic field maps with their corresponding secular variation maps, the normal geomagnetic field equations of the geomagnetic elements (EGRF and their corresponding secular variations equations, are outlined. The anomalous sites, as discovered from the anomaly maps are, only, mentioned. In addition, a correlation between the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF 2010.0 and the Egyptian Geomagnetic Reference Field (EGRF 2010 is indicated.

  4. Sound Search Engine Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    Sound search is provided by the major search engines, however, indexing is text based, not sound based. We will establish a dedicated sound search services with based on sound feature indexing. The current demo shows the concept of the sound search engine. The first engine will be realased June...

  5. Sound Search Engine Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    Sound search is provided by the major search engines, however, indexing is text based, not sound based. We will establish a dedicated sound search services with based on sound feature indexing. The current demo shows the concept of the sound search engine. The first engine will be realased June...

  6. NASA Space Sounds API

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has released a series of space sounds via sound cloud. We have abstracted away some of the hassle in accessing these sounds, so that developers can play with...

  7. Geomagnetic imprint of the Persani volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besutiu, Lucian; Seghedi, Ioan; Zlagnean, Luminita; Atanasiu, Ligia; Popa, Razvan-Gabriel; Pomeran, Mihai; Visan, Madalina

    2016-04-01

    The Persani small volume volcanism is located in the SE corner of the Transylvanian Depression, at the north-western edge of the intra-mountainous Brasov basin. It represents the south-easternmost segment of the Neogene-Quaternary volcanic chain of the East Carpathians. The alkaline basalt monogenetic volcanic field is partly coeval with the high-K calc-alkaline magmatism south of Harghita Mountains (1-1.6 Ma). Its eruptions post-dated the calc-alkaline volcanism in the Harghita Mountains (5.3-1.6 Ma), but pre-dated the high-K calc-alkaline emissions of Ciomadul volcano (1.0-0.03 Ma). The major volcanic forms have been mapped in previous geological surveys. Still, due to the small size of the volcanoes and large extent of tephra deposits and recent sediments, the location of some vents or other volcanic structures has been incompletely revealed. To overcome this problem, the area was subject to several near-surface geophysical investigations, including paleomagnetic research. However, due to their large-scale features, the previous geophysical surveys proved to be an inappropriate approach to the volcanological issues. Therefore, during the summers of 2014 and 2015, based on the high magnetic contrast between the volcanic rocks and the hosting sedimentary formations, a detailed ground geomagnetic survey has been designed and conducted, within central Persani volcanism area, in order to outline the presence of volcanic structures hidden beneath the overlying deposits. Additionally, information on the rock magnetic properties was also targeted by sampling and analysing several outcrops in the area. Based on the acquired data, a detailed total intensity scalar geomagnetic anomaly map was constructed by using the recent IGRF12 model. The revealed pattern of the geomagnetic field proved to be fully consistent with the direction of magnetisation previously determined on rock samples. In order to enhance the signal/noise ratio, the results were further processed by

  8. Analysis of geomagnetic secular variation during 1980-1985 and 1985- 1990, and geomagnetic models proposed for the 1991 revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddie, N.W.

    1992-01-01

    The secular variation of the main geomagnetic field during the periods 1980-1985 and 1985-1990 was analyzed in terms of spherical harmonics up to the eighth degree and order. Data from worldwide magnetic observatories and the Navy's Project MAGNET aerial surveys were used. The resulting pair of secular-variation models was used to update the Definitive Geomagnetic Reference Field (DGRF) model for 1980, resulting in new mainfield models for 1985.0 and 1990.0. These, along with the secular-variation model for 1985-1990, were proposed for the 1991 revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). -Author

  9. Interplanetary magnetic field and geomagnetic Dst variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, V. L.; Desai, U. D.

    1973-01-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field has been shown to influence the ring current field represented by Dst. Explorer 28 hourly magnetic field observations have been used with the hourly Dst values. The moderate geomagnetic storms of 60 gammas and quiet-time fluctuations of 10 to 30 gammas are correlated with the north to south change of the interplanetary field component perpendicular to the ecliptic. This change in the interplanetary field occurs one to three hours earlier than the corresponding change in the Dst field.

  10. Could Geoneutrinos Interact With the Geomagnetic Field?

    CERN Document Server

    Quintero, C A B

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we consider the possibility of interaction between geoneutrinos and the geomagnetic field, by adopting an approach based on the Dirac's equation with a non-minimal coupling that accounts for the magnetic interaction of the massive neutrinos. In our approach, we see that the magnetic interaction is controlled by a dimensionless parameter, $f\\simeq 10^{-1}$, and we estimate the mean value of this interaction to be of the order of $10^{-14}\\ MeV^{2}$.

  11. Properties of Pliocene sedimentary geomagnetic reversal records from the Mediterranean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linssen, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    In the history of the Earth the dipolar geomagnetic field has frequently reversed polarity. Though this property was already known early this century (Brunhes, 1906), nowadays the characteristics and the origin of polarity transitions are still largely unknown. The geomagnetic field and its

  12. Geomagnetic disturbances imprints in ground and satellite altitude observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahiat, Yasmina; Lamara, Souad; Zaourar, Naima; Hamoudi, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    The temporal evolution of the geomagnetic field and its variations have been repeatedly studied from both ground observatories and near-earth orbiting platforms. With the advent of the space ageand the launches of geomagnetic low altitude orbits satellites, a global coverage has been achieved. Since Magsat mission, more satellites were put into orbit and some of them are still collecting data enhancing the spatial and temporal descriptions of the field. Our study uses new data gathered by the latest SWARM satellite mission launched on November, 22nd 2013. It consists of a constellation of three identical satellites carrying on board high resolution and accuracy scientific equipment. Data from this constellation will allow better understanding the multiscale behavior of the geomagnetic field. Our goal is to analyze and interpret the geomagnetic data collected by this Swarm mission, for a given period and try to separate the external disturbances from internal contributions. We consider in the study the variation of the horizontal component H, for different virtual geomagnetic observatories at the satellite altitude. The analysis of data by Swarm orbital segments shows clearly the external disturbances of the magnetic field like that occurring on 27th of August 2014. This perturbation is shown on geomagnetic indexes and is related to a coronal mass ejection (CME). These results from virtual observatories are confirmed, by the equivalent analysis using ground observatories data for the same geographic positions and same epochs. Key words: Geomagnetic field, external field, geomagnetic index, SWARM mission, virtual observatories.

  13. Evaluation of candidate geomagnetic field models for IGRF-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thébault, Erwan; Finlay, Chris; Alken, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background: The 12th revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was issued in December 2014 by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) Division V Working Group V-MOD (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/IAGA/vmod/igrf.html). This revision comprises new spherical...

  14. Properties of Pliocene sedimentary geomagnetic reversal records from the Mediterranean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linssen, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    In the history of the Earth the dipolar geomagnetic field has frequently reversed polarity. Though this property was already known early this century (Brunhes, 1906), nowadays the characteristics and the origin of polarity transitions are still largely unknown. The geomagnetic field and its variatio

  15. Sound Ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Duffy

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Discussions about what constitutes ‘the rural’ invariably focus on notions of spatial location – of inhabiting spaces apart from that of the metropolitan. Deeply embedded in our images of what it means to be Australian, nonetheless our intellectual framing of ‘the rural’ as something outback and beyond has significant implications for our relations with these spaces. The relatively recent phenomenon of sea- and tree-changes has struck many unawares, and not simply because a good latté is so hard to find. Although a frivolous remark, such an apparent lack does shift our focus to a bodily scale of the rural; how is rural place re/made through our experiences of it? This article originates out of on-going research that explores the practice of listening and sound and the ways in which the body can draw attention to the intuitive, emotional, and psychoanalytical processes of subjectivity and place-making. Drawing on Nigel Thrift’s concept of an ecology of place, I suggest that contemporary heightened concerns with regards to loss and lack in rural Australia has led to a nascent emotional economy – one in which individual and intimate connections to the rural require a rethinking of how we live community and belonging. In such a terrain, what does it mean to be rural?

  16. Sound ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duffy, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Discussions about what constitutes ‘the rural’ invariably focus on notions of spatial location – of inhabiting spaces apart from that of the metropolitan. Deeply embedded in our images of what it means to be Australian, nonetheless our intellectual framing of ‘the rural’ as something outback and beyond has significant implications for our relations with these spaces. The relatively recent phenomenon of sea- and tree-changes has struck many unawares, and not simply because a good latté is so hard to find. Although a frivolous remark, such an apparent lack does shift our focus to a bodily scale of the rural; how is rural place re/made through our experiences of it? This article originates out of on-going research that explores the practice of listening and sound and the ways in which the body can draw attention to the intuitive, emotional, and psychoanalytical processes of subjectivity and place-making. Drawing on Nigel Thrift’s concept of an ecology of place, I suggest that contemporary heightened concerns with regards to loss and lack in rural Australia has led to a nascent emotional economy – one in which individual and intimate connections to the rural require a rethinking of how we live community and belonging. In such a terrain, what does it mean to be rural?

  17. Sound Ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Duffy

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Discussions about what constitutes ‘the rural’ invariably focus on notions of spatial location – of inhabiting spaces apart from that of the metropolitan. Deeply embedded in our images of what it means to be Australian, nonetheless our intellectual framing of ‘the rural’ as something outback and beyond has significant implications for our relations with these spaces. The relatively recent phenomenon of sea- and tree-changes has struck many unawares, and not simply because a good latté is so hard to find. Although a frivolous remark, such an apparent lack does shift our focus to a bodily scale of the rural; how is rural place re/made through our experiences of it? This article originates out of on-going research that explores the practice of listening and sound and the ways in which the body can draw attention to the intuitive, emotional, and psychoanalytical processes of subjectivity and place-making. Drawing on Nigel Thrift’s concept of an ecology of place, I suggest that contemporary heightened concerns with regards to loss and lack in rural Australia has led to a nascent emotional economy – one in which individual and intimate connections to the rural require a rethinking of how we live community and belonging. In such a terrain, what does it mean to be rural?

  18. The ionospheric response in the Brazilian sector during the super geomagnetic storm on 20 November 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker-Guedes, F.; Sahai, Y.; Fagundes, P. R.; Espinoza, E. S.; Pillat, V. G.; Lima, W. L. C.; Basu, Su.; Basu, Sa.; Otsuka, Y.; Shiokawa, K.; MacKenzie, E. M.; Pi, X.; Bittencourt, J. A.

    2007-05-01

    A very intense geomagnetic storm (superstorm) began with storm sudden commencement (SSC) at 08:03 UT on 20 November 2003, as a result of the coronal mass ejection (CME) by sunspot 484 hurled into space on 18 November 2003. The geomagnetic storm attained |Dst|max=472 nT at 20:00 UT (20 November). In this paper we present the simultaneous ionospheric sounding observations, using the Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosondes (CADIs), carried out from Palmas (PAL; 10.2° S, 48.2° W; dip latitude 5.5° S; a near equatorial station) and São José dos Campos (SJC; 23.2° S, 45.9° W; dip latitude 17.6° S; station located under the crest of equatorial ionospheric anomaly), Brazil. In addition, total electron content (TEC) measurements from several GPS receiving stations in the Brazilian sector during this storm are presented. The simultaneous ionospheric sounding observations carried out at SJC and PAL, and TEC observations on 3 consecutive days viz., 19 November (quiet), 20 November (disturbed) and 21 November (recovery phase) are presented. Salient features from the ionospheric observations in the Brazilian sector during the superstorm are discussed. The difference in the observed ionospheric response at the two stations (PAL and SJC) is considerable. This is not surprising given that PAL is close to the magnetic equator and SJC is near the crest of the equatorial ionospheric anomaly (EIA). It should be pointed out that soon after the SSC (about 4 h later), the F-region critical frequency (foF2), the F-region peak height (hpF2), and variations of virtual heights at different frequencies (iso-frequency plots) all show wavelike oscillations of the F-region during daytime at both the ionospheric sounding stations. Unusual rapid uplifting of F-region at PAL was observed during both the main and recovery phases of the storm.

  19. Calculating Speed of Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Shalabh

    2017-01-01

    Sound is an emerging source of renewable energy but it has some limitations. The main limitation is, the amount of energy that can be extracted from sound is very less and that is because of the velocity of the sound. The velocity of sound changes as per medium. If we could increase the velocity of the sound in a medium we would be probably able to extract more amount of energy from sound and will be able to transfer it at a higher rate. To increase the velocity of sound we should know the speed of sound. If we go by the theory of classic mechanics speed is the distance travelled by a particle divided by time whereas velocity is the displacement of particle divided by time. The speed of sound in dry air at 20 °C (68 °F) is considered to be 343.2 meters per second and it won't be wrong in saying that 342.2 meters is the velocity of sound not the speed as it's the displacement of the sound not the total distance sound wave covered. Sound travels in the form of mechanical wave, so while calculating the speed of sound the whole path of wave should be considered not just the distance traveled by sound. In this paper I would like to focus on calculating the actual speed of sound wave which can help us to extract more energy and make sound travel with faster velocity.

  20. Cosmic rays, geomagnetic field and climate changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, M.; Smart, D.

    The possibility of a connection between cosmic radiation and climate has intrigued scientists for the past several decades. The recent studies of Friis -Christensen and Svensmark has shown an observed variation of 3-4% of the global cloud cover between 1980 and 1995 that appeared to be directly correlated with the change in galactic cosmic radiation flux over the solar cycle. However, in studies of this type, not only the solar cycle modulation of cosmic radiation must be considered, but also the changes in the cosmic radiation impinging at the top of the atmosphere as a result of the long term evolution of the geomagnetic field. We present preliminary results of an on-going study of geomagnetic cutoff rigidities over a 400-year interval. These results show (1) the change in cutoff rigidity is sufficient large so that the change in cosmic radiation flux impacting the earth is approximately equal to the relative change in flux over a solar cycle, and (2) the changes in cutoff rigidity are non- uniform over the globe with both significant increases and decreases at mid-latitude locations.

  1. Resolving issues concerning Eskdalemuir geomagnetic hourly values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Macmillan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The hourly values of the geomagnetic field from 1911 to 1931 derived from measurements made at Eskdalemuir observatory in the UK, and available online from the World Data Centre for Geomagnetism at http://www.wdc.bgs.ac.uk/, have now been corrected. Previously they were 2-point averaged and transformed from the original north, east and vertical down values in the tables in the observatory yearbooks. This paper documents the course of events from discovering the post-processing done to the data to the final resolution of the problem. As it was through the development of a new index, the Inter-Hour Variability index, that this post-processing came to light, we provide a revised series of this index for Eskdalemuir and compare it with that from another European observatory. Conclusions of studies concerning long-term magnetic field variability and inferred solar variability, whilst not necessarily consistent with one another, are not obviously invalidated by the incorrect hourly values from Eskdalemuir. This series of events illustrates the challenges that lie ahead in removing any remaining errors and inconsistencies in the data holdings of different World Data Centres.

  2. The science of geomagnetically induced currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkkinen, A.

    2012-12-01

    Geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) phenomenon impacting long conductor systems on the ground can be considered as the end link of chain of complex physical processes comprising the Sun-Earth system. In this paper I briefly review the current status of our understanding of the physics of GIC and novel applications enabled by the new understanding. More specifically, I will demonstrate how we can follow the chain of physical processes from the solar corona down to the upper mantle of the Earth and to GIC. Further, I will show how state-of-the-art models enable predictive modeling of the entire chain of complex processes. The potential for severe societal consequences has been driving recent increasing interest in extreme GIC events. I will show how we have addressed the issue by generating 100-year GIC event scenarios. These scenarios are of substantial power grid industry interest and have been fed directly into further engineering analyses. I will review the results of our of 100-year geomagnetically induced current scenarios work and discuss some of the future directions in the field.

  3. Solar Wind Charge Exchange During Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Ina P.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Sibeck, David G.; Collier, Michael R.; Kuntz, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    On March 31st. 2001, a coronal mass ejection pushed the subsolar magnetopause to the vicinity of geosynchronous orbit at 6.6 RE. The NASA/GSFC Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMe) employed a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model to simulate the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction during the peak of this geomagnetic storm. Robertson et aL then modeled the expected 50ft X-ray emission due to solar wind charge exchange with geocoronal neutrals in the dayside cusp and magnetosheath. The locations of the bow shock, magnetopause and cusps were clearly evident in their simulations. Another geomagnetic storm took place on July 14, 2000 (Bastille Day). We again modeled X-ray emission due to solar wind charge exchange, but this time as observed from a moving spacecraft. This paper discusses the impact of spacecraft location on observed X-ray emission and the degree to which the locations of the bow shock and magnetopause can be detected in images.

  4. Research on Historical Records of Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhina, G. S.; Alex, S.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    In recent times, there has been keen interest in understanding Sun-Earth connection events, such as solar flares, CMEs and concomitant magnetic storms. Magnetic storms are the most dramatic and perhaps important component of space weather effects on Earth. Super-intense magnetic storms (defined here as those with Dst cause life-threatening power outages, satellite damage, communication failures and navigational problems. However, the data for such magnetic storms is rather scarce. For example, only one super-intense magnetic storm has been recorded (Dst=-640 nT, March 13, 1989) during the space-age (since 1958), although such storms may have occurred many times in the last 160 years or so when the regular observatory network came into existence. Thus, research on historical geomagnetic storms can help to create a good data base for intense and super-intense magnetic storms. From the application of knowledge of interplanetary and solar causes of storms gained from the spaceage observations applied to the super-intense storm of September 1-2, 1859, it has been possible to deduce that an exceptionally fast (and intense) magnetic cloud was the interplanetary cause of this geomagnetic storm with a Dst -1760 nT, nearly 3 times as large as that of March 13, 1989 super-intense storm. The talk will focus on super-intense storms of September 1-2, 1859, and also discuss the results in the context of some recent intense storms.

  5. A domino model for geomagnetic field reversals

    CERN Document Server

    Mori, N; Ferriz-Mas, A; Wicht, J; Mouri, H; Nakamichi, A; Morikawa, M

    2011-01-01

    We solve the equations of motion of a one-dimensional planar Heisenberg (or Vaks-Larkin) model consisting of a system of interacting macro-spins aligned along a ring. Each spin has unit length and is described by its angle with respect to the rotational axis. The orientation of the spins can vary in time due to random forcing and spin-spin interaction. We statistically describe the behaviour of the sum of all spins for different parameters. The term "domino model" in the title refers to the interaction among the spins. We compare the model results with geomagnetic field reversals and find strikingly similar behaviour. The aggregate of all spins keeps the same direction for a long time and, once in a while, begins flipping to change the orientation by almost 180 degrees (mimicking a geomagnetic reversal) or to move back to the original direction (mimicking an excursion). Most of the time the spins are aligned or anti-aligned and deviate only slightly with respect to the rotational axis (mimicking the secular v...

  6. Synthetic and sedimentary records of geomagnetic excursions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlag, P.; Thouveny, N.; Rochette, P.

    The geomagnetic excursion recorded in the sediments of Lac St.Front (Massif Central, France) is characterized by shallow and negative inclinations followed by a younger steep inclination interval (Vlag et al., 1996). In the corresponding interval of the nearby Lac du Bouchet only steep inclinations are found. Sedimentary records of the Mono Lake excursion show similar inclination patterns; ‘complete’ records of this excursion show a succession of a shallow by a steep inclination interval, while ‘incomplete’ records only show only steep inclinations (Coe and Liddicoat, 1994). Due to a non-instantaneous acquisition of the remanence, sedimentary records reflect only a smoothed geomagnetic signal. It will be shown that smoothing of a small low-intensity ‘reversed’ interval embedded in a non-antipodal normal field interval may result in records of a shallow inclination interval followed by a steep inclination interval, while further smoothing results in only steep inclinations. Realignment of magnetic grains by the stronger normal field can also produce such records and may explain why such an unusual large lock-in depth is required by the conventional smoothing model. Whatever the mechanism, the similarities between these synthetic records and the excursional records of Lac St. Front-Lac du Bouchet and Mono Lake suggest that the latter are more or less affected by vector addition of two non-antipodal directions.

  7. Geomagnetic storm effects on GPS based navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. S. Rama Rao

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The energetic events on the sun, solar wind and subsequent effects on the Earth's geomagnetic field and upper atmosphere (ionosphere comprise space weather. Modern navigation systems that use radio-wave signals, reflecting from or propagating through the ionosphere as a means of determining range or distance, are vulnerable to a variety of effects that can degrade the performance of the navigational systems. In particular, the Global Positioning System (GPS that uses a constellation of earth orbiting satellites are affected due to the space weather phenomena.

    Studies made during two successive geomagnetic storms that occurred during the period from 8 to 12 November 2004, have clearly revealed the adverse affects on the GPS range delay as inferred from the Total Electron Content (TEC measurements made from a chain of seven dual frequency GPS receivers installed in the Indian sector. Significant increases in TEC at the Equatorial Ionization anomaly crest region are observed, resulting in increased range delay during the periods of the storm activity. Further, the storm time rapid changes occurring in TEC resulted in a number of phase slips in the GPS signal compared to those on quiet days. These phase slips often result in the loss of lock of the GPS receivers, similar to those that occur during strong(>10 dB L-band scintillation events, adversely affecting the GPS based navigation.

  8. Geomagnetic control of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bremer

    Full Text Available Using observations with the ALOMAR SOUSY radar near Andenes (69.3°N, 16.0°E from 1994 until 1997 polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE have been investigated in dependence on geomagnetic K indices derived at the Auroral Observatory Tromsø (69.66°N, 18.94°E. During night-time and morning hours a significant correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the radar results and the geomagnetic K indices could be detected with a maximum correlation near midnight. The correlation becomes markedly smaller in the afternoon and early evening hours with a minimum near 17 UT. This diurnal variation is in reasonable agreement with riometer absorption at Ivalo (68.55°N, 27.28°E and can be explained by the diurnal variation of ionization due to precipitating high energetic particles. Therefore, a part of the diurnal PMSE variation is caused by this particle precipitation. The variability of the solar EUV variation, however, has no significant influence on the PMSE during the observation period.

    Keywords: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere - Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, precipitating - Radio science (remote sensing

  9. The Sound of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merwade, Venkatesh; Eichinger, David; Harriger, Bradley; Doherty, Erin; Habben, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    While the science of sound can be taught by explaining the concept of sound waves and vibrations, the authors of this article focused their efforts on creating a more engaging way to teach the science of sound--through engineering design. In this article they share the experience of teaching sound to third graders through an engineering challenge…

  10. Sounds Exaggerate Visual Shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeny, Timothy D.; Guzman-Martinez, Emmanuel; Ortega, Laura; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    While perceiving speech, people see mouth shapes that are systematically associated with sounds. In particular, a vertically stretched mouth produces a /woo/ sound, whereas a horizontally stretched mouth produces a /wee/ sound. We demonstrate that hearing these speech sounds alters how we see aspect ratio, a basic visual feature that contributes…

  11. The Sound of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merwade, Venkatesh; Eichinger, David; Harriger, Bradley; Doherty, Erin; Habben, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    While the science of sound can be taught by explaining the concept of sound waves and vibrations, the authors of this article focused their efforts on creating a more engaging way to teach the science of sound--through engineering design. In this article they share the experience of teaching sound to third graders through an engineering challenge…

  12. Sound reproduction system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, M.M.; De Vries, D.; Horbach, U.

    2002-01-01

    Arrangement of a sound reproduction system (1), including at least one input (2), a sound field generator (4), a loudspeaker panel (10); the at least one input (2) connected to the sound filed generator (4), and the sound filed (4) connected to the loudspeaker panel (10); the at least one input (2)

  13. The statistical model for the secondary quick reversals during the geomagnetic pole transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A statistical model for the quick reversals during a geomagnetic pole transition is put forward by combining the modern geomagnetic field and paleomagnetic field. The decrease of geomagnetic intensity determines the reversals, and the quick reversals are possibly caused by the interaction between g01 and the other geomagnetic components.

  14. The statistical model for the secondary quick reversals during the geomagnetic pole transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘青松; 朱日祥; 潘永信; 郭斌

    2000-01-01

    A statistical model for the quick reversals during a geomagnetic pole transition is put forward by combining the modern geomagnetic field and paleomagnetic field. The decrease of geomagnetic intensity determines the reversals, and the quick reversals are possibly caused by the interaction between g10 and the other geomagnetic components.

  15. Geomagnetic response to solar and interplanetary disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maris Georgeta

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The space weather discipline involves different physical scenarios, which are characterised by very different physical conditions, ranging from the Sun to the terrestrial magnetosphere and ionosphere. Thanks to the great modelling effort made during the last years, a few Sun-to-ionosphere/thermosphere physics-based numerical codes have been developed. However, the success of the prediction is still far from achieving the desirable results and much more progress is needed. Some aspects involved in this progress concern both the technical progress (developing and validating tools to forecast, selecting the optimal parameters as inputs for the tools, improving accuracy in prediction with short lead time, etc. and the scientific development, i.e., deeper understanding of the energy transfer process from the solar wind to the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system. The purpose of this paper is to collect the most relevant results related to these topics obtained during the COST Action ES0803. In an end-to-end forecasting scheme that uses an artificial neural network, we show that the forecasting results improve when gathering certain parameters, such as X-ray solar flares, Type II and/or Type IV radio emission and solar energetic particles enhancements as inputs for the algorithm. Regarding the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction topic, the geomagnetic responses at high and low latitudes are considered separately. At low latitudes, we present new insights into temporal evolution of the ring current, as seen by Burton’s equation, in both main and recovery phases of the storm. At high latitudes, the PCC index appears as an achievement in modelling the coupling between the upper atmosphere and the solar wind, with a great potential for forecasting purposes. We also address the important role of small-scale field-aligned currents in Joule heating of the ionosphere even under non-disturbed conditions. Our scientific results in

  16. Studies on the Geomagnetic Induction Vectors of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiao; Zhang, Huiqian; Huang, Qinghua

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the geomagnetic data of 16 stations, near 6 years for most, provided by the National Geomagnetic Center of China, were used to study on the geomagnetic induction vectors. The stations cover the whole North China and part of southwestern China, both of which has a complicate geological and tectonic background. This study will not only advance the understanding of regional tectonic variations, but also provide some suggestions on the construction for geomagnetic observation network of earthquake monitoring. The time series of geomagnetic induction vectors were obtained by the robust estimation method, which has been verified and compared with the ordinary least square and the weighted square method. A principle of selecting a specified period's results from the robust estimation method was defined. Then, the results with the period of 640s for all stations were selected by this principle. The long-term trends (more than six months at least) within the time series were extracted by the Fourier harmonic analysis. Consistent phase variations exist for most stations within a similar tectonic background. About one-month period variations in the most stations' results after removing the long-term trends were found. Spectrum analysis for the results and geomagnetic activity index showed that those phenomena may relate to the period of the global geomagnetic activity. A preference azimuth of the geomagnetic induction vectors was found in each station by statistical analysis on the time series. It pointed out the possible relatively high conductivity structures. Exactly, geomagnetic vectors of BJI, JIH, LYH and TAY station, which surround the basin of North China, suggested a relatively higher conductivity layer; that of stations around the Erdos block suggested a complicated structure. Three-dimension inversion by ModEM verifies our results.

  17. Geomagnetically Induced Currents in the Irish Power Network during Geomagnetic Storms

    CERN Document Server

    Blake, Seán P; Jones, Alan G; Hogg, Colin; Campanyà, Joan; Beggan, Ciarán; Thomson, Alan W P; Kelly, Gemma S; Bell, David

    2016-01-01

    Geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) are a well-known terrestrial space weather hazard. They occur in power transmission networks and are known to have adverse effects in both high and mid-latitude countries. Here, we study GICs in the Irish power transmission network (geomagnetic latitude 54.7--58.5$^{\\circ}$ N) during five geomagnetic storms (06-07 March 2016, 20-21 December 2015, 17-18 March 2015, 29-31 October 2003 and 13-14 March 1989). We simulate electric fields using a plane wave method together with two ground resistivity models, one of which is derived from magnetotelluric measurements (MT model). We then calculate GICs in the 220, 275 and 400~kV transmission network. During the largest of the storm periods studied, the peak electric field was calculated to be as large as 3.8~V~km\\textsuperscript{-1}, with associated GICs of up to 23~A using our MT model. Using our homogenous resistivity model, those peak values were 1.46~V~km\\textsuperscript{-1} and 25.8~A. We find that three 400 and 275~kV subs...

  18. Geomagnetically induced currents in the Irish power network during geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Seán. P.; Gallagher, Peter T.; McCauley, Joe; Jones, Alan G.; Hogg, Colin; Campanyà, Joan; Beggan, Ciarán. D.; Thomson, Alan W. P.; Kelly, Gemma S.; Bell, David

    2016-12-01

    Geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) are a well-known terrestrial space weather hazard. They occur in power transmission networks and are known to have adverse effects in both high-latitude and midlatitude countries. Here we study GICs in the Irish power transmission network (geomagnetic latitude 54.7-58.5°N) during five geomagnetic storms (6-7 March 2016, 20-21 December 2015, 17-18 March 2015, 29-31 October 2003, and 13-14 March 1989). We simulate electric fields using a plane wave method together with two ground resistivity models, one of which is derived from magnetotelluric measurements (magnetotelluric (MT) model). We then calculate GICs in the 220, 275, and 400 kV transmission network. During the largest of the storm periods studied, the peak electric field was calculated to be as large as 3.8 V km-1, with associated GICs of up to 23 A using our MT model. Using our homogenous resistivity model, those peak values were 1.46 V km-1 and 25.8 A. We find that three 400 and 275 kV substations are the most likely locations for the Irish transformers to experience large GICs.

  19. The Wavelet Property of the Geomagnetic Anomaly Signal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JiangfaLIN; GangWANG

    1997-01-01

    In this study,wavelet analysis is utilized to analyze the geomagnetic signals for oil-gas exploration,in order to show the relation between the wavelet property of the geomagnetic signals and the underground treasure.At firest,the global geomagentic anomaly signal in the oil exploration is given.Then.with the wavelet theory the geomagnetic signals of an oil-gas field is analyzed.The preliminary wavelet analysis shows that the underground oil-gas location can be determined with the help of its regional high frequency signal distributions.

  20. Magnetic rotation imaging method to measure the geomagnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A new imaging method for measuring the geomagnetic field based on the magnetic rotation effect is put forward. With the help of polarization property of the sunlight reflected from the ground and the magnetic rotation of the atmosphere, the geomagnetic field can be measured by an optical system installed on a satellite. According to its principle, the three-dimensional image of the geomagnetic field can be obtained. The measuring speed of this method is very high, and there is no blind spot and distortion. In this paper, the principle of this method is presented, and some key problems are discussed.

  1. Geomagnetic properties of Proxima Centauri b analogues

    CERN Document Server

    Zuluaga, Jorge I

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of a planet around the closest star, Proxima Centauri, could represent a quantum leap on the testability of models in exoplanet sciences. Unlike any other discovered exoplanet, models of planetary processes in Proxima b could be contrasted against near future telescopic observations and far future in-situ measurements. In this paper we study the geomagnetic properties of Proxima b analogues, namely, solid planets with masses close but larger than Earth's mass, periods of rotation of several days and habitable surface conditions. Assuming different planetary masses, bulk compositions and periods of rotations, we calculate for each planetary analogue its radius, heat flux, time of inner core formation, dynamo lifetime and minimum dipole magnetic moment. We find that most ($\\gtrsim$70\\%) Proxima b analogues develop intrinsic dynamos that last at least 3 Gyr, although only half of them are older than the present age of the host star ($4-6$ Gyr). Relying in our planetary evolution models, we p...

  2. GEOMAGNETIC CONJUGACY OF MODERN TECTONIC STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ya. Khachikyan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An earthquake is an element of the global electric circuit (GEC –  this new idea suggested in the space age is tested in our study. In the frame of the GEC concept, one may expect that tectonic structures of the northern and southern hemispheres may be magnetically conjugated. It is found that the midocean ridges of the southern hemisphere, located along the boundary of the Antarctic lithosphere plate, are magnetically conjugated with the areas of the junction of continental orogens and platforms in the northern hemisphere. The closest geomagnetic conjugacy exists between the southern boundary of Nazca lithospheric plate and the northern boundaries of Cocos and Caribbean lithospheric plates.

  3. Geomagnetism and paleomagnetism 1979-1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, M.

    My function, in writing these notes, is to bring you up to date in Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism, in as painless a manner as possible—without tears, as the French language texts for tourists used to promise. In writing this account of progress in the past quadrennium, I must first acknowledge that it is a personal and subjective viewpoint;; another reporter would surely emphasize other developments. Yet, there is some virture in writing of things, about which one knows something, so I leave to future reporters the task of redresssing the balance in matters covered.At the outset, one very sad event must be recorded. On April 3, 1981, Sir Edward Bullard died. His published work alone marks him as one of the leaders of geomagnetism in our times. Yet his contribution was much greater; many an American geophysicist, as well as a whole generation of British colleagues, have felt the benefit of his perceptive advice on their research. To those who saw him in the last few months of his life, his courage in the face of his illness was a remarkable example of fortitude. It is by now well known that the definitive paper, which he wrote with Malin, on secular variation at London, was only completed immediately before his death. The transmittal letter had been typed, but death prevented him from signing it. Bullard returned in this final paper to a topic to which he had contributed much. In it, he notes the role of Halley, who first described the phenomenon of westward drift, to which Bullard gave a new numerical precision, two and a half centuries later. I seem to remember Bullard saying in a lecture years ago that, while the Newtons of this world seem other than mortal, Halley was a scientist whose life and acheivements could encourage one's own efforts. Bullard, like Halley, inspires and encourages us.

  4. Basic Geomagnetic Network of the Republic of Croatia 2004 – 2012, with Geomagnetic Field Maps for 2009.5 epoch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Brkić

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available After more than half a century, scientific book Basic Geomagnetic Network of the Republic of Croatia 2004 – 2012, with Geomagnetic Field Maps for 2009.5 epoch describes the recent geomagnetic field on Croatian territory. A review of research in the past decade as well as the original solutions makes the book a document of contribution to geodesy and geomagnetism in Croatia.The book’s introduction gives an overview of two centuries of history and the strategic, security, economic and scientific significance of knowing the geomagnetic field on the Croatian territory. All the activities related to the updating of the geomagnetic information, which took place in the last decade, signified a big step toward the countries where geomagnetic survey is a mature scientific and technical discipline, and a scientific contribution to understanding of the nature of the Earth's magnetism.The declination, inclination and total intensity maps (along with the normal annual changes for the epoch 2009.5 are given in the Appendix. The book Basic Geomagnetic Network of the Republic of Croatia 2004 – 2012, with Geomagnetic Field Maps for 2009.5 epoch (ISBN 978-953-293-521-9 is published by the State Geodetic Administration of the Republic of Croatia. Beside editor in chief, M. Brkić, the authors are: E. Vujić, D. Šugar, E. Jungwirth, D. Markovinović, M. Rezo, M. Pavasović, O. Bjelotomić, M. Šljivarić, M. Varga and V. Poslončec-Petrić. The book contains 48 pages and 3 maps, and is published in 200 copies. CIP record is available in digital catalogue of the National and University Library in Zagreb under number 861937.

  5. What is sound energy ?

    CERN Document Server

    Loria, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Sounds are all around us, but what makes sound? How does it travel? What can it do? These questions and more will be answered as the science of sound energy is examined in depth. Readers will learn how the physical movement of objects creates sound, as well as the qualities of sound and how they vary, and are received. The uses of sound energy in various fields will be explored. Simple illustrations of sophisticated scientific concepts will enhance the young learner's understanding of the topic.

  6. An Impending geomagnetic transition? Hints from the past.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo eLAJ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The rapid decrease of the geomagnetic field intensity in the last centuries has led to speculations that an attempt to a reversal or an excursion might be under way. Here we investigate this hypothesis by examining past records of geomagnetic field intensity obtained from sedimentary cores and from the study of cosmogenic nuclides. The selected records describe geomagnetic changes with an unprecedented temporal resolution between 20 and 75 kyr B.P. We find that some aspects of the present-day geomagnetic field have some similarities with those documented for the Laschamp excursion 41 kyr ago. Under the assumption that the dynamo processes for an eventual future reversal or excursion would be similar to those of the Laschamp excursion, we tentatively suggest that, whilst irreversible processes that will drive the geodynamo into a polarity change may have already started, a reversal or an excursion should not be expected before 500 to 1000 years.

  7. Dependence of geosynchronous relativistic electron enhancements on geomagnetic parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitriev, A V

    2014-01-01

    Relativistic electron fluxes observed in geosynchronous orbit by GOES-8 in 1997 to 2000 were considered as a complex function of geomagnetic indices PC, Kp, and Dst as well as parameters of the magnetosphere size, subsolar Rs and terminator Rf magnetopause distances. A geosynchronous relativistic electron enhancement (GREE) is determined as daily maximal electron flux exceeding the upper root mean square deviation (RMSD) threshold of about 1500 (cm2s sr)-1. Comparison analysis of the GREE dynamics and geomagnetic conditions on the rising phase of current solar cycle revealed suppression of the relativistic electron enhancements by substantially increased strong geomagnetic activity in the solar maximum. Statistical consideration of a relationship between the GREEs and the geomagnetic parameters showed that the most important parameters controlling the geosynchronous relativistic electron enhancements were 4-day averaged Kp index, PC index and magnetopause termination distance Rf delayed respectively on 3 and ...

  8. Regional cosmic ray induced ionization and geomagnetic field changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Kovaltsov

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Cosmic ray induced ionization (CRII is an important factor of outer space influences on atmospheric properties. Variations of CRII are caused by two different processes – solar activity variations, which modulate the cosmic ray flux in interplanetary space, and changes of the geomagnetic field, which affects the cosmic ray access to Earth. Migration of the geomagnetic dipole axis may greatly alter CRII in some regions on a time scale of centuries and longer. Here we present a study of CRII regional effects of the geomagnetic field changes during the last millennium for two regions: Europe and the Far East. We show that regional effects of the migration of the geomagnetic dipole axis may overcome global changes due to solar activity variations.

  9. Statistical Study of False Alarms of Geomagnetic Storms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leer, Kristoffer; Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Veronig, A.

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are known to cause geomagnetic storms on Earth. However, not all CMEs will trigger geomagnetic storms, even if they are heading towards the Earth. In this study, front side halo CMEs with speed larger than 500 km/s have been identified from the SOHO LASCO catalogue....... A subset of these halo CMEs did not cause a geomagnetic storm the following four days and have therefore been considered as false alarms. The properties of these events are investigated and discussed here. Their statistics are compared to the geo-effective CMEs. The ability to identify potential false...... alarms is considered as an important factor when forecasting geomagnetic storms. It would therefore be very helpful if there were a signature in the solar data that could indicate that a CME is a false alarm. The strength and position of associated flares have been considered as possible candidates...

  10. Statistical Study of False Alarms of Geomagnetic Storms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leer, Kristoffer; Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Veronig, A.;

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are known to cause geomagnetic storms on Earth. However, not all CMEs will trigger geomagnetic storms, even if they are heading towards the Earth. In this study, front side halo CMEs with speed larger than 500 km/s have been identified from the SOHO LASCO catalogue....... A subset of these halo CMEs did not cause a geomagnetic storm the following four days and have therefore been considered as false alarms. The properties of these events are investigated and discussed here. Their statistics are compared to the geo-effective CMEs. The ability to identify potential false...... alarms is considered as an important factor when forecasting geomagnetic storms. It would therefore be very helpful if there were a signature in the solar data that could indicate that a CME is a false alarm. The strength and position of associated flares have been considered as possible candidates...

  11. The Study of Two Geomagnetic Jerks in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Suqin; Yang Dongmei; Li Qi; Zhao Yongfen

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes the first differences of the annual means (annual rate) for the Y and Z components of the geomagnetic field from nine magnetic observatories in China, measured from 1985 to 2003. The 1991 jerk was obvious in the Y component measured but not clear for the Z component. Rapid changes in the Z components were ubiquitous around 2000 -2001, but not seen for the Y component. External effects were removed from the monthly means by comparing the monthly mean of the geomagnetic field components at the observatories with the monthly time series of the Ap geomagnetic index. However, some examples were analyzed and showed whether external effects were removed or not, there was no marked distinction in determining the jerks in China for the Y component and the Z component of the geomagnetic field. Finally, the isolines of the first differences of the annual means were used to analyze the spatial and temporal distributions of the jerks.

  12. Geomagnetic Variation Data - 1-Minute Remote Geophysical Observatory Network (RGON)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data file was generated as part of the International Magnetospheric Study (IMS). The file consists of values of the geomagnetic components D, H, X, Y, Z, and R...

  13. Human physiological reaction to geomagnetic disturbances of solar origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Sv.; Stoilova, I.

    2002-12-01

    During the last two decades publications about the influence of geomagnetic activity on human health increase but there are not still strong evidences for this relationship. We performed measurements and observations of 86 working volunteers during the period of autumn and spring equinox. We examined systolic, diastolic blood pressure and pulse rate. We also collected data for some personal health condition complaints. Four-way analyses of variance (MANOVA method) were employed and the influence of factors geomagnetic activity level, sequence of the days of measurements with respect to the increased geomagnetic activity, medicaments and sex was investigated. We also performed three-way analyses of variance and investigated influence of atmospheric pressure, medicaments and sex on the physiological parameters under consideration. Our investigations indicate that most of the persons examined irrespectively to their health status could be sensitive to the geomagnetic changes, which influence directly self-confidence and working ability.

  14. Concerning long-term geomagnetic variations and space climatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-H. Glassmeier

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available During geomagnetic polarity transitions the surface magnetic field of the Earth decays to about 25% and less of its present value. This implies a shrinking of the terrestrial magnetosphere and posses the question of whether magnetospheric magnetic field variations scale in the same manner. Furthermore, the geomagnetic main field also controls the magnetospheric magnetic field and space weather conditions. Long-term geomagnetic variations are thus intimately related to space climate. We critically assess existing scaling relations and derive new ones for various magnetospheric parameters. For example, we find that ring current perturbations do not increase with decreasing dipole moment. And we derive a scaling relation for the polar electrojet contribution, indicating a weak increase with increasing internal field. From this we infer that the ratio between external and internal field contributions may be weakly enhanced during polarity transitions. Our scaling relations also provide more insight on the importance of the internal geomagnetic field contribution for space climate.

  15. Remote Sensing of Geomagnetic Field and Applications to Climate Prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Selvam, A M

    2000-01-01

    Observations show that geomagnetic field lines follow closely the atmosphericcirculation patterns and that geomagnetic field variations are precursors toclimate change . The exact mechanism for the observed close relationshipbetween global geomagnetic field and the tropospheric weather patterns is notclear. In this paper a universal theory of atmospheric eddy dynamics ispresented which shows that the global geomagnetic field, atmospheric electricfield and weather systems are manifestations of a semi permanent scaleinvariant hierarchical atmospheric eddy continuum. Quantitative equations arederived to show that the full continuum of atmospheric eddies exist as aunified whole and originate from buoyant energy supply from frictionalturbulence at the planetary surface . Large eddy growth occurs from turbulencescale by the universal period doubling route to chaos . The turbulent eddiesare carried upwards on the large eddy envelopes and vertical mixing occurs bythe turbulent eddy fluctuations resulting in downward ...

  16. Research on Stealthy Headphone Detector Based on Geomagnetic Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Ya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A kind of stealth headphone detector based on geomagnetic sensor has been developed to deal with the stealth headphones which are small, extremely stealthy and hard to detect. The U.S. PNI geomagnetic sensor is chosen to obtain magnetic field considering the strong magnetic performance of stealth headphones. The earth’s magnetic field at the geomagnetic sensor is eliminated by difference between two geomagnetic sensors, and then weak variations of magnetic field is detected. STM8S103K2 is chosen as the central controlling chip, which is connected to LED, buzzer and LCD 1602. As shown by the experimental results, the probe is not liable to damage by the magnetic field and the developed device has high sensitivity, low False Positive Rate (FAR and satisfactory reliability.

  17. Magnetic and Electric Fields Produced in the Sea During Geomagnetic Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boteler, D. H.; Pirjola, R. J.

    - To understand geomagnetic effects on systems with long conductors it is necessary to know the electric field those systems experience. For surface conductors such as power systems and pipelines this can easily be calculated from the magnetic field variations at the surface using the surface impedance of the earth. However, for calculating the electric fields in pipelines and submarine cables at the seafloor it is necessary to take account of the attenuating effect of the conducting seawater. Assuming that the fields are vertically propagating plane waves, we derive the transfer functions between the electric and magnetic fields at the seafloor and the magnetic field variations at the sea surface. These transfer functions are then used, with surface magnetic field data, to determine the power spectra of the seafloor magnetic and electric fields in a shallow sea (depth 100 m) and in the deep ocean (depth 5 km) for different values of the Kp magnetic activity index . For the period range considered (2 min to 3 hrs) the spectral characteristics of the seafloor magnetic and electric fields for a 100 m deep sea are very similar to those of the surface fields. For the deep ocean the seafloor spectra show a faster decrease in spectral density with increasing frequency compared to the surface fields. The results obtained are shown to be consistent with seafloor observations. Assessment of the seafloor electric fields produced by different levels of geomagnetic activity can be useful in the design of the power feed equipment for submarine cables and cathodic protection for undersea pipelines.

  18. Mapping the deep sea floor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian Hvidtfelt

    By the early 20th century, oceanographers intensified their efforts to map the deep sea. The great depth of the Philippine Trench was first observed by the German Planet Expedition in 1912. During World War II, the US naval vessel Cape Johnson used directional echo-sounding to obtain a depth of 10......,497 m. In 1951, the Danish Galathea Deep Sea Expedition from 1950 to 1952 verified the result of the Cape Johnson sounding. Today, the greatest depth in the Philippine Trench is the Galathea Depth of 10,540 m. The Galathea Expedition produced several echograms of the deepest parts of the Philippine...... Trench in order to map its bathymetric features. The resulting maps are presented in this poster. Unlike many other contemporary developments in deep sea topography and cartography that were shaped by the Cold War, the Galathea maps of the Philippine Trench were intimately connected with the expedition...

  19. Geomagnetic Variations of Near-polar Regions and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchistova, Z. B.; Kutinov, Y. G.

    In polar region geomagnetic variations play active role to non-linear tectonic processes. This analysis is based on spatial-time spectral representation of geomagnetic variation and wave migration transformation. Many perturbations in electromagnetic fields may because by external factors (e.g. magnetic storms, ionosphere anomalies and other phenomena related to solar activity) "trigging" tectonic processes but having no direct relation to the processes of their preparation. Geophysical processes are responsible for perturbations in Earth's rotation and orientation on wide range of time-scale, from less than a day of millions of years. The geological structure of some sites of Earth's crust promotes occurrence of wave guides a number of geophysical fields (acoustic, seismic, electromagnetic), usually of transportation of acoustic, seismic, electromagnetic energy in Earth's crust are coincide spatially. During last 250 mln years Arctic Segment has been developing as an autonomous region with circumpolar zonality of geomagnetic fields, and mass - and-energy transfer in its bowlers as well as shitting of lithospheric plates and expansion of ocean are caused by rotation forces under of expanding planet. The dynamic structure of the geomagnetic variations may be characteriz ed by the variations of the order-chaos state. The order manifest itself in the rhythmic change of the medium state. Analysis of amplitude and phase of geomagnetic variations can be information on ecological state of regions. Geomagnetic variations is intrincically a multiscale process in time and space. One of the most important features of geomagnetic variations is multicyclic character, whish predetermined both extent and character of geomagnetic show, and specific features. Recently, there are collected many facts, show dependence between the processes in the Earth's biosphere, the elements of it, gelio- geo- physical and meteorological factors. The recent experimental data gives us opportunity

  20. Synthesized size-sound sound symbolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lockwood, G.F.; Hagoort, P.; Dingemanse, M.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of sound symbolism have shown that people can associate sound and meaning in consistent ways when presented with maximally contrastive stimulus pairs of nonwords such as bouba/kiki (rounded/sharp) or mil/mal (small/big). Recent work has shown the effect extends to antonymic words from natura

  1. International Geomagnetic Reference Field—the eighth generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandea, Mioara; Macmillan, Susan

    2000-12-01

    The eighth generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was adopted in 1999 by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) Division V, Working Group 8. This differs from the previous generation by the addition of the IGRF 2000 which comprises a main-field model for the epoch 2000.0 and a predictive secular-variation model for 2000.0-2005.0. This paper lists the IGRF coefficients and includes contour maps computed using IGRF 2000.

  2. Ionospheric response to great geomagnetic storms during solar cycle 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merline Matamba, Tshimangadzo; Bosco Habarulema, John

    2016-07-01

    The analyses of ionospheric responses due to great geomagnetic storms i.e. Dst index Total Electron Content (TEC) and ionosonde data over Southern and Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes were used to study the ionospheric responses. A geomagnetic latitude region of ±30° to ±46° within a longitude sector of 15° to 40° was considered. Using a criteria of Dst Physical mechanisms related to (but not limited to) composition changes and electric fields will be discussed.

  3. Geomagnetic disturbance and the orientation of nocturnally migrating birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, F R

    1977-05-06

    Free-flying passerine migrants respond to natural fluctuations in the earth's magnetic field. The variability in flight directions of nocturnal migrants is significantly correlated with increasing geomagnetic disturbance as measured by both the K index and various components of the earth's magnetic field. The results indicate that such disturbances influence the orientation of free-flying migrants, but the evidence is not sufficient to show that geomagnetism is a cue in their orientation system.

  4. Early sound symbolism for vowel sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Ferrinne; Maurer, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    Children and adults consistently match some words (e.g., kiki) to jagged shapes and other words (e.g., bouba) to rounded shapes, providing evidence for non-arbitrary sound-shape mapping. In this study, we investigated the influence of vowels on sound-shape matching in toddlers, using four contrasting pairs of nonsense words differing in vowel sound (/i/ as in feet vs. /o/ as in boat) and four rounded-jagged shape pairs. Crucially, we used reduplicated syllables (e.g., kiki vs. koko) rather than confounding vowel sound with consonant context and syllable variability (e.g., kiki vs. bouba). Toddlers consistently matched words with /o/ to rounded shapes and words with /i/ to jagged shapes (p vowel sound and shape.

  5. Tsunami effects on the Z component of the geomagnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Klausner, Virginia; Mendes, Odim; Papa, Andres R R

    2011-01-01

    The vertical component (Z) of the geomagnetic field observed by ground-based observatories of the INTERMAGNET network has been used to analyze the effects of the movement of electrically conducting sea water through the geomagnetic field due to a propagation of a tsumani. The purpose of this work is to study the geomagnetic variations induced by the tsunamis occurred at 26 December, 2004, 27 February, 2010 and 11 March, 2011. For each case study, we selected four magnetic stations belonging to the INTERMAGNET programme that were influenced or more direct affected by the tsumani. To detect these disturbances in the geomagnetic data, the discrete wavelet technique have been used in four levels of decomposition. We were able to detect the localized behavior of the geomagnetic variations induced by the movement of electrically conducting sea-water through the geomagnetic field, i. e., the identification of transients related to the tsunamis. As well, using the minutely magnetogram data, it was able to localize th...

  6. Multifractal analysis of low-latitude geomagnetic fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. A. Bolzan

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The technique of large deviation multifractal spectrum has shown that the high-latitude (77.5° N, 69.2° W geomagnetic fluctuations can be described from direct dissipation process or loading-unloading regimes of the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling. In this paper, we analyze the H-component of low-latitude (22.4° S, 43.6° W geomagnetic field variability observed during the month of July 2000 at the Geomagnetic Observatory, Vassouras, RJ, Brazil. The variability pattern during this period is a mixture of quiet and disturbed days including the Bastille Day intense geomagnetic storm on 15 July. Due to the complexity of this data, we pursue a detailed analysis of the geomagnetic fluctuations in different time scales including a multifractal approach using the singular power spectrum deviations obtained from the wavelet transform modulus maxima (WTMM. The results suggest, as observed from high-latitude data, the occurrence of low-latitude multifractal processes driving the intermittent coupling between the solar wind-magnetosphere and geomagnetic field variations. On finer scales possible physical mechanisms in the context of nonlinear magnetosphere response are discussed.

  7. Globally strong geomagnetic field intensity circa 3000 years ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hoabin; Yu, Yongjae; Lee, Chan Hee; Kim, Ran Hee; Park, Jingyu; Doh, Seong-Jae; Kim, Wonnyon; Sung, Hyongmi

    2013-12-01

    High-fidelity geomagnetic field intensity determination was carried out using 191 baked fragments collected from 20 kilns or hearths with ages ranging between ∼1200 BC and ∼AD 1725 in South Korea. Geomagnetic field intensity variation displayed three narrow minima at ∼800-700 BC, ∼AD 700, and ∼AD 1600 and two maxima at ∼1200-1100 BC and ∼AD 1000-1100. In most time intervals, virtual axial dipole moment (VADM) variation is confined within 20% of the present VADM. However, geomagnetic field intensity circa 3000 yr ago is nearly 40% larger than the present value. Such high VADMs circa 3000 yr ago are in phase with those in other longitudinal bands in northern hemisphere centered at 5E (France), 30E (the Middle East) and 200E (Hawaii). Although strong geomagnetic field intensity circa 3000 yr ago is globally synchronous, the highest VADM occurs at slightly different time intervals in different locations. Hence it is possible that the globally strong geomagnetic field intensity circa 3000 yr ago reflects the migration of persistent hemispheric flux in northern hemisphere or an episode of geomagnetic field hemispheric asymmetry.

  8. Influence of geomagnetic activity and atmospheric pressure in hypertensive adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azcárate, T; Mendoza, B

    2017-03-30

    We performed a study of the systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure behavior under natural variables such as the atmospheric pressure and the horizontal geomagnetic field component. We worked with a group of eight adult hypertensive volunteers, four men and four women, with ages between 18 and 27 years in Mexico City during a geomagnetic storm in 2014. The data was divided by gender, age, and day/night cycle. We studied the time series using three methods: correlations, bivariate analysis, and superposed epoch (within a window of 2 days around the day of occurrence of a geomagnetic storm) analysis, between the systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the natural variables. The correlation analysis indicated a correlation between the systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the atmospheric pressure and the horizontal geomagnetic field component, being the largest during the night. Furthermore, the correlation and bivariate analyses showed that the largest correlations are between the systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the horizontal geomagnetic field component. Finally, the superposed epoch analysis showed that the largest number of significant changes in the blood pressure under the influence of geomagnetic field occurred in the systolic blood pressure for men.

  9. Effects of geomagnetic activity on the mesospheric electric fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Zadorozhny

    Full Text Available The results of three series of rocket measurements of mesospheric electric fields carried out under different geomagnetic conditions at polar and high middle latitudes are analysed. The measurements show a clear dependence of the vertical electric fields on geomagnetic activity at polar and high middle latitudes. The vertical electric fields in the lower mesosphere increase with the increase of geomagnetic indexes Kp and ∑Kp. The simultaneous increase of the vertical electric field strength and ion conductivity was observed in the mesosphere during geomagnetic disturbances. This striking phenomenon was displayed most clearly during the solar proton events of October, 1989 accompanied by very strong geomagnetic storm (Kp=8+. A possible mechanism of generation of the vertical electric fields in the mesosphere caused by gravitational sedimentation of charged aerosol particles is discussed. Simultaneous existence in the mesosphere of both the negative and positive multiply charged aerosol particles of different sizes is assumed for explanation of the observed V/m vertical electric fields and their behaviour under geomagnetically disturbed conditions.

    Keywords. Atmospheric composition and structure (aerosols and particles · Ionosphere (electric fields and currents · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (atmospheric electricity

  10. Influence of geomagnetic activity and atmospheric pressure in hypertensive adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azcárate, T.; Mendoza, B.

    2017-03-01

    We performed a study of the systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure behavior under natural variables such as the atmospheric pressure and the horizontal geomagnetic field component. We worked with a group of eight adult hypertensive volunteers, four men and four women, with ages between 18 and 27 years in Mexico City during a geomagnetic storm in 2014. The data was divided by gender, age, and day/night cycle. We studied the time series using three methods: correlations, bivariate analysis, and superposed epoch (within a window of 2 days around the day of occurrence of a geomagnetic storm) analysis, between the systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the natural variables. The correlation analysis indicated a correlation between the systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the atmospheric pressure and the horizontal geomagnetic field component, being the largest during the night. Furthermore, the correlation and bivariate analyses showed that the largest correlations are between the systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the horizontal geomagnetic field component. Finally, the superposed epoch analysis showed that the largest number of significant changes in the blood pressure under the influence of geomagnetic field occurred in the systolic blood pressure for men.

  11. Sound wave transmission (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    When sounds waves reach the ear, they are translated into nerve impulses. These impulses then travel to the brain where they are interpreted by the brain as sound. The hearing mechanisms within the inner ear, can ...

  12. Making fictions sound real

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Birger

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the role that sound plays in making fictions perceptually real to film audiences, whether these fictions are realist or non-realist in content and narrative form. I will argue that some aspects of film sound practices and the kind of experiences they trigger are related...... to basic rules of human perception, whereas others are more properly explained in relation to how aesthetic devices, including sound, are used to characterise the fiction and thereby make it perceptually real to its audience. Finally, I will argue that not all genres can be defined by a simple taxonomy...... of sounds. Apart from an account of the kinds of sounds that typically appear in a specific genre, a genre analysis of sound may also benefit from a functionalist approach that focuses on how sounds can make both realist and non-realist aspects of genres sound real to audiences....

  13. An Antropologist of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh

    2015-01-01

    PROFESSOR PORTRAIT: Sanne Krogh Groth met Holger Schulze, newly appointed professor in Musicology at the Department for Arts and Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen, to a talk about anthropology of sound, sound studies, musical canons and ideology....

  14. Modelling Hyperboloid Sound Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burry, Jane; Davis, Daniel; Peters, Brady;

    2011-01-01

    The Responsive Acoustic Surfaces workshop project described here sought new understandings about the interaction between geometry and sound in the arena of sound scattering. This paper reports on the challenges associated with modelling, simulating, fabricating and measuring this phenomenon using...

  15. A Quaternary Geomagnetic Instability Time Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, B. S.

    2013-12-01

    Reversals and excursions of Earth's geomagnetic field create marker horizons that are readily detected in sedimentary and volcanic rocks worldwide. An accurate and precise chronology of these geomagnetic field instabilities is fundamental to understanding several aspects of Quaternary climate, dynamo processes, and surface processes. For example, stratigraphic correlation between marine sediment and polar ice records of climate change across the cryospheres benefits from a highly resolved record of reversals and excursions. The temporal patterns of dynamo behavior may reflect physical interactions between the molten outer core and the solid inner core or lowermost mantle. These interactions may control reversal frequency and shape the weak magnetic fields that arise during successive dynamo instabilities. Moreover, weakening of the axial dipole during reversals and excursions enhances the production of cosmogenic isotopes that are used in sediment and ice core stratigraphy and surface exposure dating. The Geomagnetic Instability Time Scale (GITS) is based on the direct dating of transitional polarity states recorded by lava flows using the 40Ar/39Ar method, in parallel with astrochronologic age models of marine sediments in which O isotope and magnetic records have been obtained. A review of data from Quaternary lava flows and sediments yields a GITS comprising 10 polarity reversals and 27 excursions during the past 2.6 million years. Nine of the ten reversals bounding chrons and subchrons are associated with 40Ar/39Ar ages of transitionally-magnetized lava flows. The tenth, the Guass-Matuyama chron boundary, is tightly bracketed by 40Ar/39Ar dated ash deposits. Of the 27 well-documented excursions, 14 occurred during the Matuyama chron and 13 during the Brunhes chron; 19 have been dated directly using the 40Ar/39Ar method on transitionally-magnetized volcanic rocks and form the backbone of the GITS. Excursions are clearly not the rare phenomena once thought

  16. An Antropologist of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh

    2015-01-01

    PROFESSOR PORTRAIT: Sanne Krogh Groth met Holger Schulze, newly appointed professor in Musicology at the Department for Arts and Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen, to a talk about anthropology of sound, sound studies, musical canons and ideology.......PROFESSOR PORTRAIT: Sanne Krogh Groth met Holger Schulze, newly appointed professor in Musicology at the Department for Arts and Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen, to a talk about anthropology of sound, sound studies, musical canons and ideology....

  17. Man & Sound Environment 2010.

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Proceedings to the conference "Man and Sound Environment 2010" arranged by The sound Envirnment Center at Lund university. Ulf Landström, Swedish Noise Research Network & Frans Mossberg The Sound Environment Centre at Lund university. CONTENTS: Preface – Symposium “Man and Sound Environment 2010” The prevalence of noise problems. Gunn Marit Aasvang, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Department of Environmental Medicine, Nydalen, Oslo, Norway Effects of ...

  18. Broadcast sound technology

    CERN Document Server

    Talbot-Smith, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Broadcast Sound Technology provides an explanation of the underlying principles of modern audio technology. Organized into 21 chapters, the book first describes the basic sound; behavior of sound waves; aspects of hearing, harming, and charming the ear; room acoustics; reverberation; microphones; phantom power; loudspeakers; basic stereo; and monitoring of audio signal. Subsequent chapters explore the processing of audio signal, sockets, sound desks, and digital audio. Analogue and digital tape recording and reproduction, as well as noise reduction, are also explained.

  19. Researching home through sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Ida Wentzel

    2014-01-01

    sounds via the sense of hearing; i.e., by listening. Furthermore, I examine some of the methodological challenges associated with listening to a space (as sound), interpreting what is heard and then representing the sounds in a text. I also discuss the types of knowledge that may be created through...... auditory and visual approaches....

  20. Revised age estimates of Brunhes palaeomagnetic events - Support for a link between geomagnetism and eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampino, M. R.

    1981-01-01

    Revisions in the dates of reported geomagnetic excursions during the Brunhes Epoch are proposed in light of possible correlations between a section at Gioia Tauro, Italy, deep-sea cores, a core from Lake Biwa, Japan, and some lava flows. The anomalously long, double Blake Event reported at Gioia Tauro is here correlated with the Blake Event (approximately 110 kyr) and the Biwa 1 event (180 plus or minus 5 kyr); an hiatus may be present in the section between these two events. The alpha event at Gioia Tauro is correlated with the Biwa 2 event at about 295 kyr; the beta event with the 'Biwa 3' event at about 400 kyr; the gamma event with the Snake River event at 480 plus or minus 50; and the delta event, not recorded elsewhere, is estimated to have occurred at approximately 620 kyr. These proposed refinements in the age estimates of the excursions suggest an approximately 100 kyr cyclicity. If the events are real and the revised dating is correct, the timing of the geomagnetic events seems to coincide with times of peak eccentricity of the earth's orbit, suggesting a causal connection.

  1. Inner Core Rotation from Geomagnetic Westward Drift and a Stationary Spherical Vortex in Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, C. V.

    1999-01-01

    The idea that geomagnetic westward drift indicates convective leveling of the planetary momentum gradient within Earth's core is pursued in search of a differentially rotating mean state, upon which various oscillations and secular effects might be superimposed. The desired state conforms to roughly spherical boundary conditions, minimizes dissipative interference with convective cooling in the bulk of the core, yet may aide core cooling by depositing heat in the uppermost core and lower mantle. The variational calculus of stationary dissipation applied to a spherical vortex within the core yields an interesting differential rotation profile akin to spherical Couette flow bounded by thin Hartmann layers. Four boundary conditions are required. To concentrate shear induced dissipation near the core-mantle boundary, these are taken to be: (i) no-slip at the core-mantle interface; (ii) geomagnetically estimated bulk westward flow at the base of the core-mantle boundary layer; (iii) no-slip at the inner-outer core interface; and, to describe magnetic locking of the inner core to the deep outer core, (iv) hydrodynamically stress-free at the inner-outer core boundary. By boldly assuming the axial core angular momentum anomaly to be zero, the super-rotation of the inner core is calculated to be at most 1.5 degrees per year.

  2. Effects of Geomagnetic Storms and Sudden Stratospheric Warmings on Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q.; Gablehouse, R. D.; Gell, D. A.; Johnson, R. M.; Kafkalidis, J. F.; Killeen, T. L.; Niciejewski, R. J.; Ortland, D. A.; Skinner, W. R.; Solomon, S. C.

    2003-12-01

    Neutral winds in the MLT region are affected by dynamical influences from above and below. This is particular true at high latitudes, where solar forcing of the migrating tide may be smaller but other forcings play a big role. During geomagnetic storms, MLT neutral winds can be driven by magnetospheric convection through ion-neutral interactions. This is imparted onto the ionosphere as a cross polar cap potential forming an anti-sunward two-cell ion convection pattern which in turn drives the neutral winds in the polar MLT region. The question has always been how deep into the atmosphere the ion drift can affect the neutral wind. Scarcity of high-latitude data has hampered further understanding of the problem. Also, in the winter polar regions, the stratosphere from time to time experiences sudden warming events. While it is generally understood that these warmings are caused by troposphere planetary wave activity, there are still many unknown aspects to their excitation and propagation. There are also changes in the MLT region associated with these warming events. Moreover, this phenomena, although usually confined to the northern hemisphere, occurred in the southern hemisphere in 2002. We will use TIDI data to examine MLT neutral winds during the recent geomagnetic storm events in 2002 and 2003, and present data during the recent 2002 southern hemisphere warming event.

  3. Machine learning analysis of binaural rowing sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johard, Leonard; Ruffaldi, Emanuele; Hoffmann, Pablo F.

    2011-01-01

    Techniques for machine hearing are increasing their potentiality due to new application domains. In this work we are addressing the analysis of rowing sounds in natural context for the purpose of supporting a training system based on virtual environments. This paper presents the acquisition metho...... methodology and the evaluation of different machine learning techniques for classifying rowing-sound data. We see that a combination of principal component analysis and shallow networks perform equally well as deep architectures, while being much faster to train....

  4. Machine Learning Analysis of Binaural Rowing Sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippeschi Alessandro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Techniques for machine hearing are increasing their potentiality due to new application domains. In this work we are addressing the analysis of rowing sounds in natural context for the purpose of supporting a training system based on virtual environments. This paper presents the acquisition methodology and the evaluation of different machine learning techniques for classifying rowing-sound data. We see that a combination of principal component analysis and shallow networks perform equally well as deep architectures, while being much faster to train.

  5. The Contribution of a Geophysical Data Service: The International Service of Geomagnetic Indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Menvielle

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Geomagnetic indices are basic data in Solar-Terrestrial physics and in operational Space Weather activities. The International Service of Geomagnetic Indices (ISGI is in charge of the derivation and dissemination of the geomagnetic indices that are acknowledged by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA, an IUGG association. Institutes that are not part of ISGI started early in the Internet age to circulate on-line preliminary values of geomagnetic indices. In the absence of quality stamping, this resulted in a very confusing situation. The ISGI label was found to be the simplest and the safest way to insure quality stamping of circulated geomagnetic indices.

  6. The Complexity of Solar and Geomagnetic Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesnell, W. Dean

    2017-08-01

    How far in advance can the sunspot number be predicted with any degree of confidence? Solar cycle predictions are needed to plan long-term space missions. Fleets of satellites circle the Earth collecting science data, protecting astronauts, and relaying information. All of these satellites are sensitive at some level to solar cycle effects. Statistical and timeseries analyses of the sunspot number are often used to predict solar activity. These methods have not been completely successful as the solar dynamo changes over time and one cycle's sunspots are not a faithful predictor of the next cycle's activity. In some ways, using these techniques is similar to asking whether the stock market can be predicted. It has been shown that the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) can be more accurately predicted during periods when it obeys certain statistical properties than at other times. The Hurst exponent is one such way to partition the data. Another measure of the complexity of a timeseries is the fractal dimension. We can use these measures of complexity to compare the sunspot number with other solar and geomagnetic indices. Our concentration is on how trends are removed by the various techniques, either internally or externally. Comparisons of the statistical properties of the various solar indices may guide us in understanding how the dynamo manifests in the various indices and the Sun.

  7. Marine sediments and Beryllium-10 record of the geomagnetic moment variations during the Brunhes period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménabréaz, Lucie; Thouveny, Nicolas; Bourlès, Didier; Demory, François

    2010-05-01

    Over millennial time scales, the atmospheric production of the cosmonuclid 10Be (half-life 1.387 ± 0.012 Ma [Shmeleff et al., 2009; Korschinek et al., 2009]) is modulated by the geomagnetic field strength, following a negative power law (e.g. Lal, 1988; Masarik and Beer, 2009). With respect to paleomagnetic reconstructions, 10Be-derived paleointensity records can therefore constitute an alternative, global and independent reading of the dipole moment variations. During the last years, efforts have been made to extract a geomagnetic signal from single and stacked 10Be records in natural archives such as ice and marine sediments (e.g. Carcaillet et al., 2004; Christl et al., 2007; Muscheler et al., 2005). In marine sediments, the 10Be concentration results from complex interplay of several processes: cosmogenic production, adsorption on sediment particles, redistribution by fluviatile and oceanic transport, and deposition. Therefore, a correction procedure is required to consider both sediment redistribution and enhanced scavenging, which can alter the primary signatures. To reconstruct the succession of field intensity lows accompanying excursions during the Brunhes chron, we investigated authigenic 10Be/9Be record of marine sequences also studied for paleomagnetism and oxygen isotopes. Mid and low latitude sites were preferred in order to benefit from the most efficient modulation by the magnetospheric shielding. We present a high resolution authigenic 10Be/9Be record of the last 50 ka recovered from the Portuguese Margin, that deciphers the cosmonuclide 10Be overproduction created by the geomagnetic dipole low associated with the Laschamp excursion. This record is compared to other proxy records of the geomagnetic field variations for the same time interval: (1) the relative paleointensity (RPI) reconstructed from the same sediments and the GLOPIS-75 record (Laj et al., 2004), (2) the absolute VDM record based on absolute paleointensities measured on lava flows

  8. Sound visualization and manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Yang-Hann

    2013-01-01

    Unique in addressing two different problems - sound visualization and manipulation - in a unified way Advances in signal processing technology are enabling ever more accurate visualization of existing sound fields and precisely defined sound field production. The idea of explaining both the problem of sound visualization and the problem of the manipulation of sound within one book supports this inter-related area of study.  With rapid development of array technologies, it is possible to do much in terms of visualization and manipulation, among other technologies involved with the spatial dis

  9. History of the Munich-Maisach-Fürstenfeldbruck Geomagnetic Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffel, H. C.

    2015-07-01

    The Munich-Maisach-Fürstenfeldbruck Geomagnetic Observatory is one of the observatories with the longest recordings of the geomagnetic field. It started with hourly measurements on 1 August 1840. The founder of the observatory in Munich was Johann von Lamont (1805-1879), the Director of the Royal Bavarian Astronomical Observatory. He had been stimulated to build his own observatory by the initiative of the Göttingen Magnetic Union founded in 1834 by Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) and Carl Friedrich Gauss (1777-1855). Before 1840 fewer than five observatories existed; the most prominent ones were those in London and Paris. At the beginning Lamont used equipment delivered by Gauss in Göttingen, but soon started to build instruments of his own design. Among them was a nonmagnetic theodolite which allowed precise geomagnetic measurements to be made also in the field. During the 1850s Lamont carried out geomagnetic surveys and produced geomagnetic maps for Germany and many other European countries. At the end of the nineteenth century accurate geomagnetic measurements in Munich became more and more disturbed by the magnetic stray fields from electric tramways and industry. During this period the quality of the data suffered and the measurements had to be interrupted several times. After a provisional solution in Maisach, a village 25 km west of Munich, a final solution could be found in the vicinity of the nearby city of Fürstenfeldbruck. Here the measurements started again on 1 January 1939. Since the 1980s the observatory has been part of INTERMAGNET, an organization providing almost real-time geomagnetic data of the highest quality.

  10. A study of geomagnetic field variations along the 80° S geomagnetic parallel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepidi, Stefania; Cafarella, Lili; Francia, Patrizia; Piancatelli, Andrea; Pietrolungo, Manuela; Santarelli, Lucia; Urbini, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    The availability of measurements of the geomagnetic field variations in Antarctica at three sites along the 80° S geomagnetic parallel, separated by approximately 1 h in magnetic local time, allows us to study the longitudinal dependence of the observed variations. In particular, using 1 min data from Mario Zucchelli Station, Scott Base and Talos Dome, a temporary installation during 2007-2008 Antarctic campaign, we investigated the diurnal variation and the low-frequency fluctuations (approximately in the Pc5 range, ˜ 1-7 mHz). We found that the daily variation is clearly ordered by local time, suggesting a predominant effect of the polar extension of midlatitude ionospheric currents. On the other hand, the pulsation power is dependent on magnetic local time maximizing around magnetic local noon, when the stations are closer to the polar cusp, while the highest coherence between pairs of stations is observed in the magnetic local nighttime sector. The wave propagation direction observed during selected events, one around local magnetic noon and the other around local magnetic midnight, is consistent with a solar-wind-driven source in the daytime and with substorm-associated processes in the nighttime.

  11. Counter-streaming electrons at the geomagnetic equator near 9 earth radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpar, D. M.; Quinn, J. M.; Shelley, E. G.

    1988-01-01

    AMPTE/CEE observations are used to study short-lived, highly anisotropic electron distributions in the region of the equatorial magnetosphere bewtween 6.6 earth radii and the CCE apogee at 8.8 earth radii. Intense bursts of highly collimated counterstreaming electrons were observed at keV energies with durations of a few tens of seconds to a few minutes near the geomagnetic equator on L-shells that intersect the high-latitude ionosphere in the region normally associated with the auroral zone. It is found that the counterstreaming electrons at energies below the peak energy are accompanied by simultaneous deep depressions of the locally mirroring fluxes. It is suggested that these equatorial electrons may result from the release of auroral electrons trapped beneath the auroral accelerating potentials at lower altitudes along the same magnetic flux tubes.

  12. Historically Large Geomagnetic Storms and Potential Electric Power Grid Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappenman, J. G.

    2004-05-01

    While recent work has been done to examine the possible Dst Intensity of historically large geomagnetic storms, the impacts caused to modern day electric power grids from these storms occurs due to rapid rate-of-change of regional geomagnetic fields which in most cases are driven by large ionospheric electrojet current intensifications. These temporally and spatially dynamic disturbance morphologies are not well-characterized by Dst or other broad geomagnetic storm indices. For estimates of storm intensity that correctly scale the threat potential to electric power grids, it is necessary to describe the rate-of-change of geomagnetic field. The rate-of-change of the geomagnetic field (dB/dt usually measured in nT/min) creates at ground level a geoelectric field that causes the flow of geomagnetically-induced currents (GIC) through ground connection points in electric power grids. Therefore in general, the larger the dB/dt, the larger the resulting geo-electric field and GIC in exposed power grid infrastructures and the greater the operational impact these induced currents will have on the power grid. Both extensive modeling analysis and recent operational experience suggests that power grids are becoming more vulnerable to geomagnetic storms as they grow in size and complexity. Also, large power grid blackouts have occurred at relatively low geomagnetic storm intensities. For example, the regional disturbance intensity that triggered the Hydro Quebec collapse during the March 13, 1989 Superstorm only reached an intensity of 479 nT/min. Large numbers of power system impacts in the United States were also observed for intensities that ranged from 300 to 600 nT/min during this storm. Yet both recent and historical data indicate that storms with disturbance levels that range from 2000 nT/min to as much ~5000 nT/min may be possible over extensive regions at latitudes of concern for large continental power grids across North America and Europe. Large GIC have also been

  13. Intensity of the geomagnetic field in Europe for the last 3 ka: Influence of data quality on geomagnetic field modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavón-Carrasco, Francisco Javier; Gómez-Paccard, Miriam; Hervé, Gwenaël.; Osete, María. Luisa; Chauvin, Annick

    2014-06-01

    of the main challenges of paleomagnetic research is to obtain high-resolution geomagnetic field intensity reconstructions. For the last millennia, these reconstructions are mostly based on archeomagnetic data. However, the quality of the intensity data available in the databases is very variable, and the high scatter observed in the records clearly suggests that some of them might not be reliable. In this work we investigate how the geomagnetic field intensity reconstructions and, hence, our present knowledge of the geomagnetic field in the past, are affected by the quality of the data selected for modeling the Earth's magnetic field. For this purpose we rank the European archeointensity data in four quality categories following widely accepted paleomagnetic criteria based on the methodology used during the laboratory treatment of the samples and on the number of specimens retained to calculate the mean intensities. Four geomagnetic field regional models have been implemented by applying the revised spherical cap harmonic analysis to these four groups of input data. Geomagnetic field models strongly depend on the used data set. The model built using all the available data (without any preselection) appears to be the less accurate, indicating some internal inconsistencies of the data set. In addition, some features of this model are clearly dominated by the less reliable archeointensity data, suggesting that such features might not reflect real variations of the past geomagnetic field. On the contrary, the regional model built on selected high-quality intensity data shows a very consistent intensity pattern at the European scale, confirming that the main intensity changes observed in Europe in the recent history of the geomagnetic field occurred at the continental scale.

  14. Improving geomagnetic observatory data in the South Atlantic Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzka, Jürgen; Morschhauser, Achim; Brando Soares, Gabriel; Pinheiro, Katia

    2016-04-01

    The Swarm mission clearly proofs the benefit of coordinated geomagnetic measurements from a well-tailored constellation in order to recover as good as possible the contributions of the various geomagnetic field sources. A similar truth applies to geomagnetic observatories. Their scientific value can be maximised by properly arranging the position of individual observatories with respect to the geometry of the external current systems in the ionosphere and magnetosphere, with respect to regions of particular interest for secular variation, and with respect to regions of anomalous electric conductivity in the ground. Here, we report on our plans and recent efforts to upgrade geomagnetic observatories and to recover unpublished data from geomagnetic observatories at low latitudes in the South Atlantic Anomaly. In particular, we target the magnetic equator with the equatorial electrojet and low latitudes to characterise the Sq- and ring current. The observatory network that we present allows also to study the longitudinal structure of these external current systems. The South Atlantic Anomaly region is very interesting due to its secular variation. We will show newly recovered data and comparisons with existing data sets. On the technical side, we introduce low-power data loggers. In addition, we use mobile phone data transfer, which is rapidly evolving in the region and allows timely data access and quality control at remote sites that previously were not connected to the internet.

  15. Intermittency and multifractional Brownian character of geomagnetic time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Consolini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Earth's magnetosphere exhibits a complex behavior in response to the solar wind conditions. This behavior, which is described in terms of mutifractional Brownian motions, could be the consequence of the occurrence of dynamical phase transitions. On the other hand, it has been shown that the dynamics of the geomagnetic signals is also characterized by intermittency at the smallest temporal scales. Here, we focus on the existence of a possible relationship in the geomagnetic time series between the multifractional Brownian motion character and the occurrence of intermittency. In detail, we investigate the multifractional nature of two long time series of the horizontal intensity of the Earth's magnetic field as measured at L'Aquila Geomagnetic Observatory during two years (2001 and 2008, which correspond to different conditions of solar activity. We propose a possible double origin of the intermittent character of the small-scale magnetic field fluctuations, which is related to both the multifractional nature of the geomagnetic field and the intermittent character of the disturbance level. Our results suggest a more complex nature of the geomagnetic response to solar wind changes than previously thought.

  16. Features of the Geomagnetic Variations In the Moscow Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riabova, Svetlana; Spivak, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    The results of instrumental observations indicate the presence of significant amplitude variations in Earth's magnetic field. The data obtained in the research of geomagnetic variations allow us to not only establish and classify their sources, but also to form the basis for the improvement and development of new source models of magnetospheric and ionospheric disturbances, new methods of magnetotelluric and magnetovariational sensing and diagnostic methods of geodynamic state of the Earth's crust and the research of meteorological processes in the atmosphere. In this research we used the results of instrumental observations of geomagnetic field, carried out in the period of 2009 - 2015 at Geophysical Observatory "Mikhnevo" of Institute of Geosphere Dynamics of Russian Academy of Sciences. The observatory (54,960N; 37,774E) is located in the Moscow region. The analysis shows that in general the geophysical situation in the Moscow region is disturbed. The tendency to increasing in geomagnetic activity over time is established (the number of days with a perturbed state of the geomagnetic field is increased by 7.6 times during the period of 2009 - 2015). Repeatability of geomagnetic disturbances is characterized by clearly pronounced periodicity with characteristic periods of about 14, 27, 60, 182 and 365 days.

  17. Urban sound ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne Krogh Groth

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Within recent years, there has been a renewed focus on sound in urban environments. From sound installations in public space to sound festivals in alternative settings, we find a common interest in sound art relating to the urban environment. Artworks or interventions presented in such contexts share the characteristics of site specificity. However, this article will consider the artwork in a broader context by re-examining how sound installations relate to the urban environment. For that purpose, this article brings together ecology terms from acoustic ecology of the sound theories of the 1970s while developing them into recent definitions of ecology in urban studies. Finally, we unfold our framing of urban sound ecologies with three case analyses: a sound intervention in Berlin, a symphony for wind instruments in Copenhagen and a video walk in a former railway station in Kassel. The article concludes that the ways in which recent sound installations work with urban ecologies vary. While two of the examples blend into the urban environment, the other transfers the concert format and its mode of listening to urban space. Last, and in accordance with recent soundscape research, we point to how artists working with new information and media technologies create inventive ways of inserting sound and image into urban environments.

  18. The ionospheric response in the Brazilian sector during the super geomagnetic storm on 20 November 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Becker-Guedes

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available A very intense geomagnetic storm (superstorm began with storm sudden commencement (SSC at 08:03 UT on 20 November 2003, as a result of the coronal mass ejection (CME by sunspot 484 hurled into space on 18 November 2003. The geomagnetic storm attained |Dst|max=472 nT at 20:00 UT (20 November. In this paper we present the simultaneous ionospheric sounding observations, using the Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosondes (CADIs, carried out from Palmas (PAL; 10.2° S, 48.2° W; dip latitude 5.5° S; a near equatorial station and São José dos Campos (SJC; 23.2° S, 45.9° W; dip latitude 17.6° S; station located under the crest of equatorial ionospheric anomaly, Brazil. In addition, total electron content (TEC measurements from several GPS receiving stations in the Brazilian sector during this storm are presented. The simultaneous ionospheric sounding observations carried out at SJC and PAL, and TEC observations on 3 consecutive days viz., 19 November (quiet, 20 November (disturbed and 21 November (recovery phase are presented. Salient features from the ionospheric observations in the Brazilian sector during the superstorm are discussed. The difference in the observed ionospheric response at the two stations (PAL and SJC is considerable. This is not surprising given that PAL is close to the magnetic equator and SJC is near the crest of the equatorial ionospheric anomaly (EIA. It should be pointed out that soon after the SSC (about 4 h later, the F-region critical frequency (foF2, the F-region peak height (hpF2, and variations of virtual heights at different frequencies (iso-frequency plots all show wavelike oscillations of the F-region during daytime at both the ionospheric sounding stations. Unusual rapid uplifting of F-region at PAL was observed during both the main and recovery phases of the storm.

  19. Kristian Birkeland's pioneering investigations of geomagnetic disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, A.; Burke, W. J.

    2010-04-01

    More than 100 years ago Kristian Birkeland (1967-1917) addressed questions that had vexed scientists for centuries. Why do auroras appear overhead while the Earth's magnetic field is disturbed? Are magnetic storms on Earth related to disturbances on the Sun? To answer these questions Birkeland devised terrella simulations, led coordinated campaigns in the Arctic wilderness, and then interpreted his results in the light of Maxwell's synthesis of laws governing electricity and magnetism. After analyzing thousands of magnetograms, he divided disturbances into 3 categories: 1. Polar elementary storms are auroral-latitude disturbances now called substorms. 2. Equatorial perturbations correspond to initial and main phases of magnetic storms. 3. Cyclo-median perturbations reflect enhanced solar-quiet currents on the dayside. He published the first two-cell pattern of electric currents in Earth's upper atmosphere, nearly 30 years before the ionosphere was identified as a separate entity. Birkeland's most enduring contribution toward understanding geomagnetic disturbances flowed from his recognition that field-aligned currents must connect the upper atmosphere with generators in distant space. The existence of field-aligned currents was vigorously debated among scientists for more than 50 years. Birkeland's conjecture profoundly affects present-day understanding of auroral phenomena and global electrodynamics. In 1896, four years after Lord Kelvin rejected suggestions that matter passes between the Sun and Earth, and two years before the electron was discovered, Birkeland proposed current carriers are "electric corpuscles from the Sun" and "the auroras are formed by corpuscular rays drawn in from space, and coming from the Sun". It can be reasonably argued that the year 1896 marks the founding of space plasma physics. Many of Birkeland's insights were rooted in observations made during his terrella experiments, the first attempts to simulate cosmic phenomena within a

  20. Determination of geomagnetic archaeomagnitudes from clay pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Games, K. P.; Baker, M. E.

    1981-02-01

    Archaeomagnitude determinations of a selection of clay pipes dateable to AD 1645+/-10 as well as studies of pottery samples from the same site and of the same age have been made. Values of the magnitude of the ancient magnetic field (Banc), were obtained from two pottery sherds, two pipe bowls and three pipe stems. The values from the sherds and bowls agree within 2% and compare well with the average value of the magnitude of the magnetic field for the seventeenth century as determined by other archaeomagnetic studies. However, the pipe stems give values of Banc which are significantly less than those from the bowls and pottery. We have not yet been able to explain this and thus we suggest that reliable archaeomagnitude determinations can be made from the bowls of clay pipes but not from the stems. Nevertheless, this result provides a new source of material for investigating variations in the geomagnetic field strength over the past 400 yr. Clay pipes have been manufactured in England since the end of the sixteenth century. In the firing process some pipes were broken and disposed of without ever having been smoked. One such collection, discovered at Rainford, Lancashire, in 1978, consisted of a series of discrete dumps including pipes, kiln debris and a small collection of contemporary used earthenware sherds. The internal consideration of the dumps suggested a very short period of activity and archaeologists (P. Davey, personal communication) ascribe all the material to the period 1645+/-10 yr. With such well-dated material, we set out to check whether or not reliable archaeomagnitudes could be obtained from the pipes.

  1. Airport geomagnetic surveys in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berarducci, A.

    2006-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the United States military have requirements for design, location, and construction of compass calibration pads (compass roses), these having been developed through collaboration with US Geological Survey (USGS) personnel. These requirements are detailed in the FAA Advisory Circular AC 150/5300-13, Appendix 4, and in various military documents, such as Handbook 1021/1, but the major requirement is that the range of declination measured within 75 meters of the center of a compass rose be less than or equal to 30 minutes of arc. The USGS Geomagnetism Group has developed specific methods for conducting a magnetic survey so that existing compass roses can be judged in terms of the needed standards and also that new sites can be evaluated for their suitability as potentially new compass roses. First, a preliminary survey is performed with a total-field magnetometer, with differences over the site area of less than 75nT being sufficient to warrant additional, more detailed surveying. Next, a number of survey points are established over the compass rose area and nearby, where declination is to be measured with an instrument capable of measuring declination to within 1 minute of arc, such as a Gurley transit magnetometer, DI Flux theodolite magnetometer, or Wild T-0. The data are corrected for diurnal and irregular effects of the magnetic field and declination is determined for each survey point, as well as declination range and average of the entire compass rose site. Altogether, a typical survey takes about four days to complete. ?? 2006 Springer.

  2. Sound a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Goldsmith, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Sound is integral to how we experience the world, in the form of noise as well as music. But what is sound? What is the physical basis of pitch and harmony? And how are sound waves exploited in musical instruments? Sound: A Very Short Introduction looks at the science of sound and the behaviour of sound waves with their different frequencies. It also explores sound in different contexts, covering the audible and inaudible, sound underground and underwater, acoustic and electronic sound, and hearing in humans and animals. It concludes with the problem of sound out of place—noise and its reduction.

  3. Machine learning analysis of binaural rowing sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johard, Leonard; Ruffaldi, Emanuele; Hoffmann, Pablo F.

    2011-01-01

    Techniques for machine hearing are increasing their potentiality due to new application domains. In this work we are addressing the analysis of rowing sounds in natural context for the purpose of supporting a training system based on virtual environments. This paper presents the acquisition metho...... methodology and the evaluation of different machine learning techniques for classifying rowing-sound data. We see that a combination of principal component analysis and shallow networks perform equally well as deep architectures, while being much faster to train.......Techniques for machine hearing are increasing their potentiality due to new application domains. In this work we are addressing the analysis of rowing sounds in natural context for the purpose of supporting a training system based on virtual environments. This paper presents the acquisition...

  4. Sound Insulation between Dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory sound insulation requirements for dwellings exist in more than 30 countries in Europe. In some countries, requirements have existed since the 1950s. Findings from comparative studies show that sound insulation descriptors and requirements represent a high degree of diversity...... and initiate – where needed – improvement of sound insulation of new and existing dwellings in Europe to the benefit of the inhabitants and the society. A European COST Action TU0901 "Integrating and Harmonizing Sound Insulation Aspects in Sustainable Urban Housing Constructions", has been established and runs...... 2009-2013. The main objectives of TU0901 are to prepare proposals for harmonized sound insulation descriptors and for a European sound classification scheme with a number of quality classes for dwellings. Findings from the studies provide input for the discussions in COST TU0901. Data collected from 24...

  5. Sound insulation between dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory sound insulation requirements for dwellings exist in more than 30 countries in Europe. In some countries, requirements have existed since the 1950s. Findings from comparative studies show that sound insulation descriptors and requirements represent a high degree of diversity...... and initiate – where needed – improvement of sound insulation of new and existing dwellings in Europe to the benefit of the inhabitants and the society. A European COST Action TU0901 "Integrating and Harmonizing Sound Insulation Aspects in Sustainable Urban Housing Constructions", has been established and runs...... 2009-2013. The main objectives of TU0901 are to prepare proposals for harmonized sound insulation descriptors and for a European sound classification scheme with a number of quality classes for dwellings. Findings from the studies provide input for the discussions in COST TU0901. Data collected from 24...

  6. The sound of distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabaglia, Cristina D; Maglio, Sam J; Krehm, Madelaine; Seok, Jin H; Trope, Yaacov

    2016-07-01

    Human languages may be more than completely arbitrary symbolic systems. A growing literature supports sound symbolism, or the existence of consistent, intuitive relationships between speech sounds and specific concepts. Prior work establishes that these sound-to-meaning mappings can shape language-related judgments and decisions, but do their effects generalize beyond merely the linguistic and truly color how we navigate our environment? We examine this possibility, relating a predominant sound symbolic distinction (vowel frontness) to a novel associate (spatial proximity) in five studies. We show that changing one vowel in a label can influence estimations of distance, impacting judgment, perception, and action. The results (1) provide the first experimental support for a relationship between vowels and spatial distance and (2) demonstrate that sound-to-meaning mappings have outcomes that extend beyond just language and can - through a single sound - influence how we perceive and behave toward objects in the world. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Report of geomagnetic pulsation indices for space weather applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z.; Gannon, Jennifer L.; Rigler, Erin J.

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon of ultra-low frequency geomagnetic pulsations was first observed in the ground-based measurements of the 1859 Carrington Event and has been studied for over 100 years. Pulsation frequency is considered to be “ultra” low when it is lower than the natural frequencies of the plasma, such as the ion gyrofrequency. Ultra-low frequency pulsations are considered a source of noise in some geophysical analysis techniques, such as aeromagnetic surveys and transient electromagnetics, so it is critical to develop near real-time space weather products to monitor these geomagnetic pulsations. The proper spectral analysis of magnetometer data, such as using wavelet analysis techniques, can also be important to Geomagnetically Induced Current risk assessment.

  8. Wavelet Analysis on Solar Wind Parameters and Geomagnetic Indices

    CERN Document Server

    Katsavrias, Ch; Moussas, X

    2012-01-01

    The sun as an oscillator produces frequencies which propagate in the heliosphere, via solar wind, to the terrestrial magnetosphere. We searched for those frequencies in the parameters of the near Earth solar plasma and the geomagnetic indices for the past four solar cycles. The solar wind parameters used in this work are the interplanetary magnetic field, plasma beta, Alfven Mach number, solar wind speed, plasma temperature, plasma pressure, plasma density and the geomagnetic indices DST, AE, Ap and Kp. We found out that each parameter of the solar wind exhibit certain periodicities which di?erentiate in each cycle. Our results indicate intermittent periodicities in our data, some of them shared between the solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices.

  9. Variability modes in core flows inverted from geomagnetic field models

    CERN Document Server

    Pais, Maria A; Schaeffer, Nathanaël

    2014-01-01

    We use flows that we invert from two geomagnetic field models spanning centennial time periods (gufm1 and COV-OBS), and apply Principal Component Analysis and Singular Value Decomposition of coupled fields to extract the main modes characterizing their spatial and temporal variations. The quasi geostrophic flows inverted from both geomagnetic field models show similar features. However, COV-OBS has a less energetic mean flow and larger time variability. The statistical significance of flow components is tested from analyses performed on subareas of the whole domain. Bootstrapping methods are also used to extract robust flow features required by both gufm1 and COV-OBS. Three main empirical circulation modes emerge, simultaneously constrained by both geomagnetic field models and expected to be robust against the particular a priori used to build them. Mode 1 exhibits three large robust vortices at medium/high latitudes, with opposite circulation under the Atlantic and the Pacific hemispheres. Mode 2 interesting...

  10. Evidence for a new geomagnetic jerk in 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torta, J. Miquel; Pavón-Carrasco, Francisco Javier; Marsal, Santiago;

    2015-01-01

    The production of quasi-definitive data at Ebre observatory has enabled us to detect a new geomagnetic jerk in early 2014. This has been confirmed by analyzing data at several observatories in the European-African and Western Pacific-Australian sectors in the classical fashion of looking for the ......The production of quasi-definitive data at Ebre observatory has enabled us to detect a new geomagnetic jerk in early 2014. This has been confirmed by analyzing data at several observatories in the European-African and Western Pacific-Australian sectors in the classical fashion of looking...... for the characteristic V shape of the geomagnetic secular variation trend. A global model produced with the latest available satellite and observatory data supports these findings, giving a global perspective on both the jerk and a related secular acceleration pulse at the core-mantle boundary. We conclude that the jerk...

  11. Anomalous propagation of Omega VLF waves near the geomagnetic equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, A.; Kikuchi, T.; Nozaki, K.; Kurihara, N.; Kuratani, Y.; Ohse, M.

    1983-09-01

    Omega HAIKU, REUNION, and LIBERIA signals were received and anomalous propagation characteristics were obtained near the geomagnetic equator. Short-period fluctuations were found in the phase of the HAIKU 10.2 kHz signal in November 1979 and in the phase and amplitude of the HAIKU 13.6 kHz signal in November 1981. These cyclic fluctuations are in close correlation with the phase cycle slippings, which occur most frequently when the receiver is located at 6 S geomagnetic latitude. On the basis of anisotropic waveguide mode theory indicating much less attenuation in WE propagation than in EW propagation at the geomagnetic equator, it is concluded that the short-period fluctuations in the phase and amplitude are due to interference between the short-path and the long-path signals.

  12. Gravity and geomagnetic methods in geothermal exploration. Understanding and misunderstanding; Gravimetrie und Geomagnetik bei Geothermieprojekten. Verstaendnis und Missverstaendnis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernstson, Kord [Julius-Maximilians-Univ. Wuerzburg, Philosophische Fakultaet I, Hoechberg (Germany); Alt, Wolfgang [Buero fuer Geologie and Balneologie, Gessertshausen (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    To start with taking up clear position: There is not any doubt about the must of detailed seismics as the indisputably most meaningful geophysical method in deep geothermal exploration. But seismics is most expensive, and its practising is not everywhere possible without problems. Hence, here is a basic pleading for additional, lower-cost geophysical pe-site surveys, and it is futile to play off seismics against gravimetry/geomagnetics because both have a basically different methodical approach (travel time method - potential field method). Gravimetry and geomagnetics are inexpensive methods for pre-surveying the general tectonic style, main fault systems, strike directions and lithofacial variations. They serve for a reasonable selection and purchase of suitable profiles of an older 2D seismics and a reasonable selection of locations for a new 2D seismics. Performed as a detailed survey that may help preparing a 3D seismics and where applicable to reduce its volume. As the very advantage of at least gravity measurements we point to the fact that they can be conducted everywhere and without great and lenghty permission procedures. In the end and so doing a cost-effectiv quotation may result for the investor and contracting authorities. This implies of course the discussion about the amount of potential field methods or whether their application is reasonable at all. They do not fix all problems and anywhere, and it is strongly recommended against a standardised procedure anyway but to rely on expert knowledge vital in all geophysics. Whether and to what extent potential field methods are reasonable in the case of 5000 m deep aquifers depends on the specific posing of a question and particularly on the geological superstructure. Although geomagnetic measurements undoubtedly have the potential to contribute to larger-scale pre-site surveys their possibilities within the frame of the small-scale deep geothermics mostly focused on disturbing cultivation areas are to be

  13. InfoSound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Gopinath, B.; Haberman, Gary O.

    1990-01-01

    The authors explore ways to enhance users' comprehension of complex applications using music and sound effects to present application-program events that are difficult to detect visually. A prototype system, Infosound, allows developers to create and store musical sequences and sound effects...... helped users detect rapid, multiple-event sequences that were difficult to visually detect using text and graphical interfaces. The authors describe the architecture of InfoSound, the use of the system, and the lessons learned....

  14. Comfort in Sound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KIT GILLET

    2008-01-01

    @@ Drown your winter sorrows in sound with these three top surround-sound systems With winter here, it is time to start considering ways to improve your home entertainment options. While a good DVD or Blu-ray player and games console should keep you happily occupied without needing to leave the warmth of your apartment, investing in a cutting-edge surround sound system wiU ensure that winter passes without you even noticing.

  15. Forecast and restoration of geomagnetic activity indices by using the software-computational neural network complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhatov, Nikolay; Revunov, Sergey

    2010-05-01

    specially designed pre-list are created which perceived by software-computational neural network complex where each line the detailed description of each experiment is contained. In this case, it is possible to perform statistical studies of work ANN results. The modular architecture of application with the purpose to solve various problems to modify it is allows. The developed software complex with sets of databases in the form of arrays, plug and downloaded separately is worked. For a complex functioning at present time the number of simultaneously processable streams of events in the input data has been determined. Blocks of databases contain the numerical minute data for 30 geomagnetic storms during the period from 2000 to 2003: Solar wind parameter, an interplanetary magnetic field (from space craft "ACE") and geomagnetic indices (Dst, SYM, ASY, AU, AL). These data are received from http://cdaweb.gsfc.nasa.gov. Is it necessary, modified discrete data using the spline is provided. This complex for wide range of tasks for the general trend studies of nonlinear connection between the different parameters determining the causal relationships in the system «interplanetary space-magnetosphere-ionosphere» is used. With this the following studies are carried out: the search of nonlinear connection of auroral and mid-current systems with the parameters of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field, the restoration of geomagnetic activity indices, the forecast and restoration of F2 ionosphere layer critical frequencies, the forecast maximum observed frequencies on the traces of oblique HF ionospheric sounding with perturbation heliogeophysical parameters and others. Work is executed at partial support under grants of the RFBR 08-05-12051-OBR and 09-05-00495, and also program Ministry of Education and Science «Development of higher school scientific potential (2009-2010, project N 1623)».

  16. Deep frying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koerten, van K.N.

    2016-01-01

    Deep frying is one of the most used methods in the food processing industry. Though practically any food can be fried, French fries are probably the most well-known deep fried products. The popularity of French fries stems from their unique taste and texture, a crispy outside with a mealy soft inter

  17. Deep frying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koerten, van K.N.

    2016-01-01

    Deep frying is one of the most used methods in the food processing industry. Though practically any food can be fried, French fries are probably the most well-known deep fried products. The popularity of French fries stems from their unique taste and texture, a crispy outside with a mealy soft inter

  18. Urban Sound Ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh; Samson, Kristine

    2013-01-01

    share the characteristics of site specificity. However, this article will consider the artwork in a broader context by re-examining how sound installations relate to the urban environment. For that purpose, this article brings together ecology terms from acoustic ecology of the sound theories...... of the 1970s while developing them into recent definitions of ecology in urban studies. Finally, we unfold our framing of urban sound ecologies with three case analyses: a sound intervention in Berlin, a symphony for wind instruments in Copenhagen and a video walk in a former railway station in Kassel...

  19. Light and Sound

    CERN Document Server

    Karam, P Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Our world is largely defined by what we see and hear-but our uses for light and sound go far beyond simply seeing a photo or hearing a song. A concentrated beam of light, lasers are powerful tools used in industry, research, and medicine, as well as in everyday electronics like DVD and CD players. Ultrasound, sound emitted at a high frequency, helps create images of a developing baby, cleans teeth, and much more. Light and Sound teaches how light and sound work, how they are used in our day-to-day lives, and how they can be used to learn about the universe at large.

  20. Long-term rise in geomagnetic activity - A close connection between quiet days and storms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne

    2000-01-01

    Geomagnetic quiet days and magnetic storms are naturally believed to be due to very different solar wind conditions. In this study we however demonstrate that the long-term variation of geomagnetic quiet and disturbed days are surprisingly similar. By the use of daily averages of the geomagnetic...

  1. 77 FR 22312 - Geomagnetic Disturbances to the Bulk-Power System; Notice of Technical Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Geomagnetic Disturbances to the Bulk-Power System; Notice of Technical... Conference on Geomagnetic Disturbances to the Bulk-Power System on Monday, April 30, 2012, from 11 a.m. to 4... issues related to reliability of the Bulk-Power System as affected by geomagnetic disturbances....

  2. Deep learning

    CERN Document Server

    Goodfellow, Ian; Courville, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Deep learning is a form of machine learning that enables computers to learn from experience and understand the world in terms of a hierarchy of concepts. Because the computer gathers knowledge from experience, there is no need for a human computer operator to formally specify all the knowledge that the computer needs. The hierarchy of concepts allows the computer to learn complicated concepts by building them out of simpler ones; a graph of these hierarchies would be many layers deep. This book introduces a broad range of topics in deep learning. The text offers mathematical and conceptual background, covering relevant concepts in linear algebra, probability theory and information theory, numerical computation, and machine learning. It describes deep learning techniques used by practitioners in industry, including deep feedforward networks, regularization, optimization algorithms, convolutional networks, sequence modeling, and practical methodology; and it surveys such applications as natural language proces...

  3. Geomagnetic observations on Tristan da Cunha, South Atlantic Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzka, J.; Olsen, Nils; Maule, C. F.

    2009-01-01

    Few geomagnetic ground observations exist of the Earth's strongest core field anomaly, the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). The geomagnetic repeat station on the island Tristan da Cunha, located half-way between South Africa and South America at 37 degrees 05' S, 12 degrees 18' W, is therefore...... of crucial importance. We have conducted several sets of repeat station measurements during magnetically quiet conditions (Kp 2o or less) in 2004. The procedures are described and the results are compared to those from earlier campaigns and to the predictions of various global field models. Features...... and operate a magnetometer station on Tristan da Cunha during the Swarm magnetic satellite mission (2011-2014)....

  4. Gravitational and geomagnetic tidal source of earthquake triggering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, A.

    1989-12-01

    A relationship is presently established between large earthquakes and the earth's tides and external geomagnetic fields, in conjunction with a triggering mechanism having its bases in the large solar and lunar variations observed during a number of the shocks examined. A majority of these shocks are noted to be located within a latitude-belt which coincides with the intensity maximum of ionospheric currents. A local magnetostriction process in the rocks appears to be the triggering mechanism. The large number of earthquakes occurring during maximum solar activity may be related to the enhanced geomagnetic triggering effect of higher sunspot numbers.

  5. Towards an Integrated Geomagnetic Polarity Reversal Timescale for the Pleistocene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivera, Tiffany; Storey, Michael; Kuiper, Klaudia

    The development of the geomagnetic polarity timescale (GPTS) in the mid 20th century led to the greater understanding of seafloor spreading and plate tectonics (Heirtzler et al., 1968). Over 40 years later, the GPTS continues to be refined, particularly in terms of integrating multiple dating...... of various geologic events. Here, we review the ages of three Pleistocene geomagnetic polarity reversals: the Matuyama-Brunhes (ca. 0.78 Ma), the Cobb Mountain (ca. 1.2 Ma), and the Reunion (ca. 2.1 Ma) events. High-precision astronomically calibrated 40Ar/39Ar ages have been obtained via a Noblesse multi...

  6. International Geomagnetic Reference Field: the 12th generation

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The 12th generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was adopted in December 2014 by the Working Group V-MOD appointed by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA). It updates the previous IGRF generation with a definitive main field model for epoch 2010.0, a main field model for epoch 2015.0, and a linear annual predictive secular variation model for 2015.0-2020.0. Here, we present the equations defining the IGRF model, p...

  7. Ionospheric Effects of Geomagnetic Storms in Different Longitude Sectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. A. Zherebtsov; O.M. Pirog; N.M. Polekh

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyzes the state of the ionosphere during two geomagnetic storms of a different intensity evolving in different sectors of local time in different seasons. There were used the data from a network of ionospheric stations located in the opposite longitudinal sectors of 80°-150° E and 250°-310° E.This analysis has permitted us to conclude that the detected differences in the variations of the disturbances are likely to be determined by the local time difference of the geomagnetic storm development, its intensity and by the different illumination conditions of the ionosphere.

  8. H-alpha response to geomagnetic disturbed activity at Arecibo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Pedrina; Kerr, R.; Noto, J.; Brum, Christiano; Gonzalez, Sixto

    Configured with a spectral resolution of 0.0086 nm at 6563A, the low resolution Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI) installed at Arecibo Observatory sampled the geocoronal Balmer-alpha emission for sixty nights during new moon periods from September 2006 to September 2007. In this work two of these periods are analyzed according to the variability with the geomagnetic activity. With this purpose, the effect of the shadow height, local time and solar flux depen-dencies were found and isolated and only the possible variations due the geomagnetic activity were evaluated. The residuos of the relative H-alpha intensity and temperature are analyzed.

  9. International Geomagnetic Reference Field: the 12th generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thébault, Erwan; Finlay, Chris; Beggan, Ciarán D.

    2015-01-01

    The 12th generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was adopted in December 2014 by the Working Group V-MOD appointed by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA). It updates the previous IGRF generation with a definitive main field model for epoch...... for epoch 2015.0 and their predicted rates of change for 2015.0-2020.0. We also update the magnetic pole positions and discuss briefly the latest changes and possible future trends of the Earth’s magnetic field....

  10. Early Sound Symbolism for Vowel Sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrinne Spector

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Children and adults consistently match some words (e.g., kiki to jagged shapes and other words (e.g., bouba to rounded shapes, providing evidence for non-arbitrary sound–shape mapping. In this study, we investigated the influence of vowels on sound–shape matching in toddlers, using four contrasting pairs of nonsense words differing in vowel sound (/i/ as in feet vs. /o/ as in boat and four rounded–jagged shape pairs. Crucially, we used reduplicated syllables (e.g., kiki vs. koko rather than confounding vowel sound with consonant context and syllable variability (e.g., kiki vs. bouba. Toddlers consistently matched words with /o/ to rounded shapes and words with /i/ to jagged shapes (p < 0.01. The results suggest that there may be naturally biased correspondences between vowel sound and shape.

  11. Kristian Birkeland's pioneering investigations of geomagnetic disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Burke

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available More than 100 years ago Kristian Birkeland (1967–1917 addressed questions that had vexed scientists for centuries. Why do auroras appear overhead while the Earth's magnetic field is disturbed? Are magnetic storms on Earth related to disturbances on the Sun? To answer these questions Birkeland devised terrella simulations, led coordinated campaigns in the Arctic wilderness, and then interpreted his results in the light of Maxwell's synthesis of laws governing electricity and magnetism. After analyzing thousands of magnetograms, he divided disturbances into 3 categories:

    1. Polar elementary storms are auroral-latitude disturbances now called substorms.
    2. Equatorial perturbations correspond to initial and main phases of magnetic storms.
    3. Cyclo-median perturbations reflect enhanced solar-quiet currents on the dayside.

    He published the first two-cell pattern of electric currents in Earth's upper atmosphere, nearly 30 years before the ionosphere was identified as a separate entity. Birkeland's most enduring contribution toward understanding geomagnetic disturbances flowed from his recognition that field-aligned currents must connect the upper atmosphere with generators in distant space. The existence of field-aligned currents was vigorously debated among scientists for more than 50 years. Birkeland's conjecture profoundly affects present-day understanding of auroral phenomena and global electrodynamics. In 1896, four years after Lord Kelvin rejected suggestions that matter passes between the Sun and Earth, and two years before the electron was discovered, Birkeland proposed current carriers are "electric corpuscles from the Sun" and "the auroras are formed by corpuscular rays drawn in from space, and coming from the Sun". It can be reasonably argued that the year 1896 marks the founding of space plasma physics. Many of Birkeland's insights were rooted in observations made during his terrella

  12. WFMOS - Sounding the Dark Cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Bassett, B A; Nichol, R C; Bassett, Bruce A.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Nichol, Robert C.; Team, the WFMOS Feasibility Study Dark Energy

    2005-01-01

    Vast sound waves traveling through the relativistic plasma during the first million years of the universe imprint a preferred scale in the density of matter. We now have the ability to detect this characteristic fingerprint in the clustering of galaxies at various redshifts and use it to measure the acceleration of the expansion of the Universe. The Wide-Field Multi-Object Spectrograph (WFMOS) would use this test to shed significant light on the true nature of dark energy, the mysterious source of this cosmic acceleration. WFMOS would also revolutionise studies of the kinematics of the Milky Way and provide deep insights into the clustering of galaxies at redshifts up to z~4. In this article we discuss the recent progress in large galaxy redshift surveys and detail how WFMOS will help unravel the mystery of dark energy.

  13. Behavior of Plasma and Field Parameters and their Relationship with Geomagnetic Indices during Intense Geomagnetic Storms of Solar Cycle 23

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Pande, Seema; Pande, Bimal; Pandey, Kavita

    2010-01-01

    A correlative study between the geomagnetic indices and the peak values of various plasma and field parameters during rising, maximum and decay phases as well as during complete solar cycle 23 have been presented. We have also presented the lag/lead analysis between the maximum of Dst and peak values of plasma and field parameters and found that peak values of lag/lead time lies in the +/-10 hr interval. Three geomagnetic storms (GMSs) and associated solar sources observed during these phases of this solar cycle have also been studied and found that GMSs are associated with large flares and halo CMEs.

  14. Inferring agency from sound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoblich, G.K.; Repp, B.H.

    2009-01-01

    In three experiments we investigated how people determine whether or not they are in control of sounds they hear. The sounds were either triggered by participants’ taps or controlled by a computer. The task was to distinguish between self-control and external control during active tapping, and durin

  15. Notes on Sound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie Jones

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Bonnie Jones creates improvised and composed text-sound performances that explore the fluidity and function of electronic noise (field recordings, circuit bending and text (poetry, found, spoken. She is interested in how people perceive, “read” and interact with these sounds and texts given our current technological moment.

  16. The sounds of nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Norah; Deane, Cormac; Murphy, Padraig

    2017-07-01

    Public perceptions of nanotechnology are shaped by sound in surprising ways. Our analysis of the audiovisual techniques employed by nanotechnology stakeholders shows that well-chosen sounds can help to win public trust, create value and convey the weird reality of objects on the nanoscale.

  17. Hamiltonian Algorithm Sound Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    大矢, 健一

    2013-01-01

    Hamiltonian Algorithm (HA) is an algorithm for searching solutions is optimization problems. This paper introduces a sound synthesis technique using Hamiltonian Algorithm and shows a simple example. "Hamiltonian Algorithm Sound Synthesis" uses phase transition effect in HA. Because of this transition effect, totally new waveforms are produced.

  18. OMNIDIRECTIONAL SOUND SOURCE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1996-01-01

    A sound source comprising a loudspeaker (6) and a hollow coupler (4) with an open inlet which communicates with and is closed by the loudspeaker (6) and an open outlet, said coupler (4) comprising rigid walls which cannot respond to the sound pressures produced by the loudspeaker (6). According...

  19. Breaking the Sound Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tom; Boehringer, Kim

    2007-01-01

    Students in a fourth-grade class participated in a series of dynamic sound learning centers followed by a dramatic capstone event--an exploration of the amazing Trashcan Whoosh Waves. It's a notoriously difficult subject to teach, but this hands-on, exploratory approach ignited student interest in sound, promoted language acquisition, and built…

  20. Light and sound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王佩夫

    2002-01-01

    Light travels at a speed which is about a million times faster than the speed of sound.In one second,light travels about 300,000 km,but sound travels only 314m,you can get some idea of this difference(区别) by watching the start of a race.

  1. Waveform analysis of sound

    CERN Document Server

    Tohyama, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    What is this sound? What does that sound indicate? These are two questions frequently heard in daily conversation. Sound results from the vibrations of elastic media and in daily life provides informative signals of events happening in the surrounding environment. In interpreting auditory sensations, the human ear seems particularly good at extracting the signal signatures from sound waves. Although exploring auditory processing schemes may be beyond our capabilities, source signature analysis is a very attractive area in which signal-processing schemes can be developed using mathematical expressions. This book is inspired by such processing schemes and is oriented to signature analysis of waveforms. Most of the examples in the book are taken from data of sound and vibrations; however, the methods and theories are mostly formulated using mathematical expressions rather than by acoustical interpretation. This book might therefore be attractive and informative for scientists, engineers, researchers, and graduat...

  2. InfoSound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Gopinath, B.; Haberman, Gary O.

    1990-01-01

    The authors explore ways to enhance users' comprehension of complex applications using music and sound effects to present application-program events that are difficult to detect visually. A prototype system, Infosound, allows developers to create and store musical sequences and sound effects...... helped users detect rapid, multiple-event sequences that were difficult to visually detect using text and graphical interfaces. The authors describe the architecture of InfoSound, the use of the system, and the lessons learned....... with application events, and have real-time, continuous auditory control of sounds during application execution. InfoSound has been used to create auditory interfaces for two applications: a telephone network service simulation and a parallel computation simulation. The auditory interfaces in these applications...

  3. Magnetic local time dependence of geomagnetic disturbances contributing to the AU and AL indices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomita, S; Nose´, M; Iyemori, T;

    2010-01-01

    The Auroral Electrojet (AE) indices, which are composed of four indices (AU, AL, AE, and AO), are calculated from the geomagnetic field data obtained at 12 geomagnetic observatories that are located in geomagnetic latitude (GMLAT) of 61.7°-70°. The indices have been widely used to study magnetic...... activity in the auroral zone. In the present study, we examine magnetic local time (MLT) dependence of geomagnetic field variations contributing to the AU and AL indices. We use 1-min geomagnetic field data obtained in 2003. It is found that both AU and AL indices have two ranges of MLT (AU: 15:00-22:00MLT...

  4. The risk characteristics of solar and geomagnetic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolska, Katerina

    2016-04-01

    The main aim of this contribution is a deeper analysis of the influence of solar activity which is expected to have an impact on human health, and therefore on mortality, in particular civilization and degenerative diseases. We have constructed the characteristics that represent the risk of solar and geomagnetic activity on human health on the basis of our previous analysis of association between the daily numbers of death on diseases of the nervous system and diseases of the circulatory system and solar and geomagnetic activity in the Czech Republic during the years 1994 - 2013. We used long period daily time series of numbers of deaths by cause, long period time series of solar activity indices (namely R and F10.7), geomagnetic indicies (Kp planetary index, Dst) and ionospheric parameters (foF2 and TEC). The ionospheric parameters were related to the geographic location of the Czech Republic and adjusted for middle geographic latitudes. The risk characteristics were composed by cluster analysis in time series according to the phases of the solar cycle resp. the seasonal insolation at mid-latitudes or the daily period according to the impact of solar and geomagnetic activity on mortality by cause of death from medical cause groups of death VI. Diseases of the nervous system and IX. Diseases of the circulatory system mortality by 10th Revision of International Classification of Diseases WHO (ICD-10).

  5. Methodology for simulation of geomagnetically induced currents in power systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boteler David

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available To assess the geomagnetic hazard to power systems it is useful to be able to simulate the geomagnetically induced currents (GIC that are produced during major geomagnetic disturbances. This paper examines the methodology used in power system analysis and shows how it can be applied to modelling GIC. Electric fields in the area of the power network are used to determine the voltage sources or equivalent current sources in the transmission lines. The power network can be described by a mesh impedance matrix which is combined with the voltage sources to calculate the GIC in each loop. Alternatively the power network can be described by a nodal admittance matrix which is combined with the sum of current sources into each node to calculate the nodal voltages which are then used to calculate the GIC in the transmission lines and GIC flowing to ground at each substation. Practical calculations can be made by superposition of results calculated separately for northward and eastward electric fields. This can be done using magnetic data from a single observatory to calculate an electric field that is a uniform approximation of the field over the area of the power system. It is also shown how the superposition of results can be extended to use data from two observatories: approximating the electric field by a linear variation between the two observatory locations. These calculations provide an efficient method for simulating the GIC that would be produced by historically significant geomagnetic storm events.

  6. Estimation of geomagnetic activity using measure of anomalousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly Soloviev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we present a newly developed indicator for estimating geomagnetic activity. It is based on the magnitude of measure of anomalousness (MA of magnetometer recordings at a given time or interval. It is intended for automated estimation of geomagnetic activity level in the area of a specific magnetic station or in a given region using data of a set of stations. It reflects geomagnetic activity level at different observatories in a single scale [-1, 1], regardless of their latitudinal location and consequently typical disturbance amplitudes. To a certain extent MA indicator is an analog of traditional K index. However, a well-known shortcoming of the latter is its long, 3-hour update rate. Moreover, K index calculation requires subtraction of Sq variation that also causes delays. At the same time there is a demand for operational geomagnetic indices that have maximal time resolution and are available in near real-time. The proposed MA indicator aims to address the shortcomings of the traditional K index. The MA calculation may be implemented automatically with the same time resolution as the initial data are recorded.

  7. First results from the first Croatian geomagnetic observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandic, Igor; Herak, Davorka; Heilig, Balazs

    2013-04-01

    The first Croatian geomagnetic observatory was established in the area of the Nature Park Lonjsko Polje, after a century of sporadic efforts originating from the proposals of Andrija Mohorovicic. The location was chosen after exhaustive surveys of possible sites. It is located far enough from sources of civilization noise, and was found to be an area without magnetic anomalies and with a low field gradient. The construction of the observatory buildings was completed in the autumn of 2011. The furnishing and installation of instruments and test measurements were completed by the beginning of summer 2012, ever since we have continuous recordings of the geomagnetic elements. In the beginning of December 2012 the fluxgate magnetometer LEMI-035 (H,D,Z orientation) has been installed under the framework of the PLASMON project in cooperation with the Tihany Observatory (Hungary). Permanent data of high quality from our observatory will contribute to the monitoring of the Earth's magnetic field on the regional and global levels, thus enabling further development of geomagnetism in Croatia through collaboration with scientists from the other countries, participation in the international projects, eventual membership in the International Real-time Magnetic Observatory Network (INTERMAGNET), etc. The field elements for the epoch 2012,75 and the baselines are presented together with highlights of some recorded geomagnetic events so far. Furthermore, the comparison between the variation data recorded by the dIdD and the fluxgate LEMI-035 magnetometer is presented.

  8. An empirical model of the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Y.; Yumoto, K.; Cardinal, M.G.; Fraser, B.J.; Hattori, P.; Kakinami, Y.; Liu, J.Y.; Lynn, K.J.W.; Marshall, R.; McNamara, D.; Nagatsuma, T.; Nikiforov, V.M.; Otadoy, R.E.; Ruhimat, M.; Shevtsov, B.M.; Shiokawa, K.; Abe, S.; Uozumi, T.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2011-01-01

    An empirical model of the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation has been constructed based on geomagnetic data obtained from 21 stations along the 210 Magnetic Meridian of the Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network (CPMN) from 1996 to 2007. Using the least squares fitting method for geomagnetically quiet days (Kp ??? 2+), the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation at each station was described as a function of solar activity SA, day of year DOY, lunar age LA, and local time LT. After interpolation in latitude, the model can describe solar-activity dependence and seasonal dependence of solar quiet daily variations (S) and lunar quiet daily variations (L). We performed a spherical harmonic analysis (SHA) on these S and L variations to examine average characteristics of the equivalent external current systems. We found three particularly noteworthy results. First, the total current intensity of the S current system is largely controlled by solar activity while its focus position is not significantly affected by solar activity. Second, we found that seasonal variations of the S current intensity exhibit north-south asymmetry; the current intensity of the northern vortex shows a prominent annual variation while the southern vortex shows a clear semi-annual variation as well as annual variation. Thirdly, we found that the total intensity of the L current system changes depending on solar activity and season; seasonal variations of the L current intensity show an enhancement during the December solstice, independent of the level of solar activity. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. New insights on geomagnetic storms from observations and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordanova, Vania K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the response at Earth of the Sun's varying energy output and forecasting geomagnetic activity is of central interest to space science, since intense geomagnetic storms may cause severe damages on technological systems and affect communications. Episodes of southward (Bzgeomagnetic conditions are associated either with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and possess long and continuous negative IMF Bz excursions, or with high speed solar wind streams (HSS) whose geoeffectiveness is due to IMF Bz profiles fluctuating about zero with various amplitudes and duration. We show examples of ring current simulations during two geomagnetic storms representative of each interplanetary condition with our kinetic ring current atmosphere interactions model (RAM), and investigate the mechanisms responsible for trapping particles and for causing their loss. We find that periods of increased magnetospheric convection coinciding with enhancements of plasma sheet density are needed for strong ring current buildup. During the HSS-driven storm the convection potential is highly variable and causes small sporadic injections into the ring current. The long period of enhanced convection during the CME-driven storm causes a continuous ring current injection penetrating to lower L shells and stronger ring current buildup.

  10. Solar Activity, Different Geomagnetic Activity Levels and Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Svetla; Jordanova, Malina; Stoilova, Irina; Taseva, Tatiana; Maslarov, Dimitar

    Results on revealing a possible relationship between solar activity (SA) and geomagnetic activity (GMA) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) morbidity are presented. Studies were based on medical data covering the period from 1.12.1995 to 31.12.2004 and concerned daily distribution of patients with AMI diagnose (in total 1192 cases) from Sofia region on the day of admission at the hospital. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to check the significance of GMA intensity effect and the type of geomagnetic storms, those caused by Magnetic Clouds (MC) and by High Speed Solar Wind Streams (HSSWS), on AMI morbidity. Relevant correlation coefficients were calculated. Results revealed statistically significant positive correlation between considered GMA indices and AMI. ANOVA revealed that AMI number was signifi- cantly increased from the day before (-1st) till the day after (+1st) geomagnetic storms with different intensities. Geomagnetic storms caused by MC were related to significant increase of AMI number in comparison with the storms caused by HSSWS. There was a trend for such different effects even on -1st and +1st day.

  11. Towards an Integrated Geomagnetic Polarity Reversal Timescale for the Pleistocene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivera, Tiffany; Storey, Michael; Kuiper, Klaudia

    The development of the geomagnetic polarity timescale (GPTS) in the mid 20th century led to the greater understanding of seafloor spreading and plate tectonics (Heirtzler et al., 1968). Over 40 years later, the GPTS continues to be refined, particularly in terms of integrating multiple dating...

  12. The Use of Dispersion Relations For The Geomagnetic Transfer Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuello, A.; Queralt, P.; Ledo, J. J.

    The magnetotelluric responses are complex magnitudes, where real and imaginary parts contain the same information on the geoelectrical structure. It seems possible, from very general hypotheses on the geoelectrical models (causality, stability and passivity), to apply the Kramers-Krönig dispersion relations to the magnetotelluric responses (impedance, geomagnetic transfer functions,...). In particular, the applica- bility of these relations to the impedance is a current point of discussion, but there are not many examples of their application to the geomagnetic transfer functions (tipper). The aim of this paper is to study how the relations of dispersion are applied to the real and imaginary part of the geomagnetic transfer functions, and to check its validity. For this reason, we have considered data (or responses) from two- and three-dimensional structures, and for these data, we have taken two situations: 1.- Responses that have been synthetically generated from numerical modelling, that allows us to control the quality of the data. 2.- Responses obtained from fieldwork, that are affected by exper- imental error. Additionally, we have also explored the use of these relations to extrap- olate the geomagnetic transfer functions outside the interval of measured frequencies, in order to obtain constrains on the values of these extrapolated data. The results have shown that the dispersion relations are accomplished for the geomag- netic transfer functions, and they can offer information about how these responses are behaved outside (but near) the range of measured frequencies.

  13. Surface electric fields for North America during historical geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lisa H.; Homeier, Nichole; Gannon, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the impact of geomagnetic disturbances on the electric grid, we recreate surface electric fields from two historical geomagnetic storms—the 1989 “Quebec” storm and the 2003 “Halloween” storms. Using the Spherical Elementary Current Systems method, we interpolate sparsely distributed magnetometer data across North America. We find good agreement between the measured and interpolated data, with larger RMS deviations at higher latitudes corresponding to larger magnetic field variations. The interpolated magnetic field data are combined with surface impedances for 25 unique physiographic regions from the United States Geological Survey and literature to estimate the horizontal, orthogonal surface electric fields in 1 min time steps. The induced horizontal electric field strongly depends on the local surface impedance, resulting in surprisingly strong electric field amplitudes along the Atlantic and Gulf Coast. The relative peak electric field amplitude of each physiographic region, normalized to the value in the Interior Plains region, varies by a factor of 2 for different input magnetic field time series. The order of peak electric field amplitudes (largest to smallest), however, does not depend much on the input. These results suggest that regions at lower magnetic latitudes with high ground resistivities are also at risk from the effect of geomagnetically induced currents. The historical electric field time series are useful for estimating the flow of the induced currents through long transmission lines to study power flow and grid stability during geomagnetic disturbances.

  14. Possible helio-geomagnetic activity influence on cardiological cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsavrias, Christos

    Eruptive solar events as flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) occur during solar activ-ity periods. Energetic particles, fast solar wind plasma and electromagnetic radiation pass through interplanetary space, arrive on Earth's ionosphere-magnetosphere and produce various disturbances. It is well known the negative influence of geomagnetic substorms on the human technological applications on geospace. During the last 25 years, many studies concerning the possible influence on the human health are published. Increase of the Acute Coronary Syn-dromes and disorders of the Cardiac Rhythm, increase of accidents as well as neurological and psychological disorders (e.g. increase of suicides) during or near to the geomagnetic storms time interval are reported. In this study, we research the problem in Greece, focusing on patients with Acute Myocardial Infraction, hospitalized in the 2nd Cardiological Department of the General Hospital of Nikaea (Piraeus City), for the time interval 1997-2007 (23rd solar cycle) and also to the arrival of emergency cardiological cases to Emergency Department of two greek hospitals, the General Hospital of Lamia City and the General Hospital of Veria City during the selected months, with or without helio-geomagnetic activity, of the 23rd solar cycle. Increase of cases is recorded during the periods with increase helio-geomagnetic activity. The necessity of continuing the research for a longer period and with a bigger sample is high; so as to exact more secure conclusions.

  15. Assessment of extreme values in geomagnetic and geoelectric field variations for Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, L.; Trichtchenko, L.; Boteler, D. H.

    2016-07-01

    Disturbances of the geomagnetic field produced by space weather events can have an impact on power systems and other critical infrastructure. To mitigate these risks it is important to determine the extreme values of geomagnetic activity that can occur. More than 40 years of 1 min magnetic data recorded at 13 Canadian geomagnetic observatories have been analyzed to evaluate extreme levels in geomagnetic and geoelectric activities in different locations of Canada. The hourly ranges of geomagnetic field variations and hourly maximum in rate of change of the magnetic variations have been used as measures of geomagnetic activity. Geoelectric activity is estimated by the hourly peak amplitude of the geoelectric fields calculated with the use of Earth resistivity models specified for different locations in Canada. A generalized extreme value distribution was applied to geomagnetic and geoelectric indices to evaluate extreme geomagnetic and geoelectric disturbances, which could happen once per 50 and once per 100 years with 99% confidence interval. Influence of geomagnetic latitude and Earth resistivity models on the results for the extreme geomagnetic and geoelectric activity is discussed. The extreme values provide criteria for assessing the vulnerability of power systems and other technology to geomagnetic activity for design or mitigation purposes.

  16. On the Possibilities of Predicting Geomagnetic Secular Variation with Geodynamo Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Tangborn, Andrew; Sabaka, Terrance

    2004-01-01

    We use our MoSST core dynamics model and geomagnetic field at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) continued downward from surface observations to investigate possibilities of geomagnetic data assimilation, so that model results and current geomagnetic observations can be used to predict geomagnetic secular variation in future. As the first attempt, we apply data insertion technique to examine evolution of the model solution that is modified by geomagnetic input. Our study demonstrate that, with a single data insertion, large-scale poloidal magnetic field obtained from subsequent numerical simulation evolves similarly to the observed geomagnetic variation, regardless of the initial choice of the model solution (so long it is a well developed numerical solution). The model solution diverges on the time scales on the order of 60 years, similar to the time scales of the torsional oscillations in the Earth's core. Our numerical test shows that geomagnetic data assimilation is promising with our MoSST model.

  17. Geomagnetic Storms and Acute Myocardial Infarctions Morbidity in Middle Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, S.; Babayev, E. S.; Mustafa, F. R.; Stoilova, I.; Taseva, T.; Georgieva, K.

    2009-12-01

    Results of collaborative studies on revealing a possible relationship between solar activity (SA) and geomagnetic activity (GMA) and pre-hospital acute myocardial infarction (AMI) morbidity are presented. Studies were based on medical data from Bulgaria and Azerbaijan. Bulgarian data, covering the period from 01.12.1995 to 31.12.2004, concerned daily distribution of number of patients with AMI diagnose (in total 1192 cases) from Sofia Region on the day of admission at the hospital. Azerbaijani data contained 4479 pre-hospital AMI incidence cases for the period 01.01.2003-31.12.2005 and were collected from 21 emergency and first medical aid stations in Grand Baku Area (including Absheron Economical Region with several millions of inhabitants). Data were "cleaned" as much as possible from social and other factors and were subjected to medical and mathematical/statistical analysis. Medical analysis showed reliability of the used data. Method of ANalysis Of VAriance (ANOVA) was applied to check the significance of GMA intensity effect and the type of geomagnetic storms - those caused by magnetic clouds (MC) and by high speed solar wind streams (HSSWS) - on AMI incidences. Relevant correlation coefficients were calculated. Results were outlined for both considered data. Results obtained for the Sofia data showed statistically significant positive correlation between considered GMA indices and AMI occurrence. ANOVA revealed that AMI incidence number was significantly increased from the day before till the day after geomagnetic storms with different intensities. Geomagnetic storms caused by MC were related to significant increase of AMI number in comparison with the storms caused by HSSWS. There was a trend for such different effects even on -1st and +1st day for the period 1995-2004. Results obtained for the Baku data revealed trends similar to those obtained for Sofia data. AMI morbidity increment was observed on the days with higher GMA intensity and after these days

  18. Lung Sounds in Bronchial Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukio Nagasaka

    2012-01-01

    In lung sound analysis, the narrower the airways are, the higher the frequency of breathing sounds is, and, if a patient has higher than normal breathing sounds, i.e., bronchial sounds, he or she may have airway narrowing or airway inflammation. It is sometimes difficult to detect subtle changes in lung sounds; therefore, we anticipate that automated analysis of lung sounds will be used to overcome these difficulties in the near future.

  19. Properties of a Sound Wave

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    This interactive tutorial covers the following properties of sound wave: frequency, period, amplitude, total pressure, ambient pressure, and peak sound pressure. Students need to have a sound card on their computer and speakers to hear the sounds produced. The interactions in this tutorial include: Mouse over some text for visual explanations., Varying the frequency and amplitude of a sound wave, and be able to listen to the changing pitch of the sound., A short self-check quiz. PH2401 ...

  20. Photoacoustic Sounds from Meteors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, Richard; Tencer, John; Sweatt, William; Conley, Benjamin; Hogan, Roy; Boslough, Mark; Gonzales, GiGi; Spurný, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Concurrent sound associated with very bright meteors manifests as popping, hissing, and faint rustling sounds occurring simultaneously with the arrival of light from meteors. Numerous instances have been documented with −11 to −13 brightness. These sounds cannot be attributed to direct acoustic propagation from the upper atmosphere for which travel time would be several minutes. Concurrent sounds must be associated with some form of electromagnetic energy generated by the meteor, propagated to the vicinity of the observer, and transduced into acoustic waves. Previously, energy propagated from meteors was assumed to be RF emissions. This has not been well validated experimentally. Herein we describe experimental results and numerical models in support of photoacoustic coupling as the mechanism. Recent photometric measurements of fireballs reveal strong millisecond flares and significant brightness oscillations at frequencies ≥40 Hz. Strongly modulated light at these frequencies with sufficient intensity can create concurrent sounds through radiative heating of common dielectric materials like hair, clothing, and leaves. This heating produces small pressure oscillations in the air contacting the absorbers. Calculations show that −12 brightness meteors can generate audible sound at ~25 dB SPL. The photoacoustic hypothesis provides an alternative explanation for this longstanding mystery about generation of concurrent sounds by fireballs. PMID:28145486

  1. Tango in the Mid-Jurassic: 10,000-Yr Geomagnetic Field Reversals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, M.

    2001-12-01

    A continuous magnetostratigraphic signature of Layer 2A from Jurassic Quiet Zone (JQZ) oceanic crust now is known from two separate paleo-magnetic data sets. Measurement/demagnetization along the length of the entire core at 5-cm intervals generated ~100,000 data points, whereas a suite of 472 discrete samples also were taken from throughout the core. Both data sets display the same magnetization pattern, a series of repeated sinusoidal inclination changes downhole. Six inter-vals of maximum inclination (three positive, three negative) are obser-ved. Maximum inclination intervals of +/-40° are separated by regions of smoothly varying intermediate inclination values. Despite lack of azmuithal orientation of the core, downhole magnetic logging (Larson et al., in prep.) shows full ~360° directional change in the magnetization vector. Therefore, the maximum inclination regions represent polarity intervals of the geomagnetic field, and six polarity intervals in stacked sequence are contained in the upper 400 m thickness of Layer 2A at this site. The time duration spanned by these six reversals was estimated from recent seismic studies of young ocean crustal construction on the East Pacific Rise (EPR). Estimates of completion of construction of Layer 2A within 1-3 km from the rise crest and typical EPR half-spreading rates of 5-8 cm/yr suggest that the studied 400 m of ocean crust represents 37,000-60,000 years. The fast construction of EPR crust implies that the Middle Jurassic geomagnetic field was reversing at a phenomenal rate of 5000-10,000 years. These data establish that the `quiet' signature in the oldest portion of the lineated magnetic anomaly patterns in the ocean crust is due to exceedingly rapid reversals of the geomagnetic field, because succes-sive, superposed opposite-polarity magnetic signatures will essentially cancel one another out at the sea surface. The width of the 'quiet' magnetic signature in the western Pacific Ocean implies that the 5000

  2. Sound as artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Jeffrey L.

    A distinguishing feature of the discipline of archaeology is its reliance upon sensory dependant investigation. As perceived by all of the senses, the felt environment is a unique area of archaeological knowledge. It is generally accepted that the emergence of industrial processes in the recent past has been accompanied by unprecedented sonic extremes. The work of environmental historians has provided ample evidence that the introduction of much of this unwanted sound, or "noise" was an area of contestation. More recent research in the history of sound has called for more nuanced distinctions than the noisy/quiet dichotomy. Acoustic archaeology tends to focus upon a reconstruction of sound producing instruments and spaces with a primary goal of ascertaining intentionality. Most archaeoacoustic research is focused on learning more about the sonic world of people within prehistoric timeframes while some research has been done on historic sites. In this thesis, by way of a meditation on industrial sound and the physical remains of the Quincy Mining Company blacksmith shop (Hancock, MI) in particular, I argue for an acceptance and inclusion of sound as artifact in and of itself. I am introducing the concept of an individual sound-form, or sonifact , as a reproducible, repeatable, representable physical entity, created by tangible, perhaps even visible, host-artifacts. A sonifact is a sound that endures through time, with negligible variability. Through the piecing together of historical and archaeological evidence, in this thesis I present a plausible sonifactual assemblage at the blacksmith shop in April 1916 as it may have been experienced by an individual traversing the vicinity on foot: an 'historic soundwalk.' The sensory apprehension of abandoned industrial sites is multi-faceted. In this thesis I hope to make the case for an acceptance of sound as a primary heritage value when thinking about the industrial past, and also for an increased awareness and acceptance

  3. Effects of resistive bodies on DC electrical soundings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Alfano

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Some deep DC electrical soundings, performed in alpine and apenninic areas with the continuous polar dipole-dipole spread, show apparent resistivity curves with positive slopes. Measured values of apparent resistivity reach 30000 Wm. Applying the "surface charges" method we developed three dimensional mathematical models, by means of which we can state simple rules for determining the minimum extensions of the deep resistive bodies, fundamental information for a more precise interpretation of the field results.

  4. The sound handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Crook, Tim

    2013-01-01

    'Tim Crook has written an important and much-needed book, and its arrival on our shelves has come at a highly appropriate time.' Professor Seán Street, Bournemouth UniversityThe Sound Handbook maps theoretical and practical connections between the creation and study of sound across the multi-media spectrum of film, radio, music, sound art, websites, animation and computer games entertainment, and stage theatre. Using an interdisciplinary approach Tim Crook explores the technologies, philosophies and cultural issues involved in making a

  5. Sound Objects for SVG

    OpenAIRE

    Colbrant, Audrey; Lasorsa, Yohan; Lemordant, Jacques; Liodenot, David; Razafimahazo, Mathieu

    2010-01-01

    International audience; A sound object can be defined as a time structure of audio chunks whose duration is on the time scale of 100 ms to several seconds. Sound objects have heterogeneous and time-varying properties. They are the basic elements of any format for Interactive Audio (IA). We have designed an XML language, A2ML, for Interactive Audio which offers, concerning the sequencing of sounds, a level of capabilities similar to that of iXMF, the interactive audio file format defined by th...

  6. Sound as Popular Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The wide-ranging texts in this book take as their premise the idea that sound is a subject through which popular culture can be analyzed in an innovative way. From an infant’s gurgles over a baby monitor to the roar of the crowd in a stadium to the sub-bass frequencies produced by sound systems...... in the disco era, sound—not necessarily aestheticized as music—is inextricably part of the many domains of popular culture. Expanding the view taken by many scholars of cultural studies, the contributors consider cultural practices concerning sound not merely as semiotic or signifying processes but as material......, physical, perceptual, and sensory processes that integrate a multitude of cultural traditions and forms of knowledge. The chapters discuss conceptual issues as well as terminologies and research methods; analyze historical and contemporary case studies of listening in various sound cultures; and consider...

  7. A SOUND ECONOMIC FUTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    "Promoting sound and rapid development of the national economy"is China’s goal for economic development in the following five years,as put forward by Hu Jintao, General Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China(CPC), in his report to the 17th National Congress of the Party. China used to target"rapid and sound"economic growth.The fact that soundness is preferred to speed for China’s economic growth reflects an important change in the economic outlook of the CPC—China is beginning to value the quality of economic growth rather than the speed. How to attain the goal of sound and rapid development for the national economy is the subject of Hu’s eight-point proposal.

  8. The sound of activism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandstrom, B; Vetter, C

    2001-01-01

    ABSTRACT A longtime advocate for female empowerment and equality, Boden Sandstrom has worked for political change in many arenas. In the 1960s, she began a career as a librarian, but soon made activism her full-time job, working for feminist, leftist and socialist causes. In the 1970s, she found a way to turn her lifelong passion for music into a career as a sound engineer. Once established in that profession, she began donating her services to political events, marches, demonstrations, and rallies. After thirteen years of running her own company, called Woman Sound,Inc. (later City Sound Productions,Inc.), she turned to the study of ethnomusicology. She is now Program Manager and Lecturer for the Ethnomusicology Program at the University of Maryland, where she is also working on her doctorate in that subject. She continues to freelance as a sound engineer and serve as a technical producer for major events.

  9. Propagation of sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Magnus; Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    2017-01-01

    As an acoustic signal travels from the source to a receiver, it is affected by a variety of physical processes, all dictated by properties of the signal and the environment. The signal energy is weakened by geometric attenuation as well as absorption by the medium. The temporal and spectral...... properties can be modified by sound absorption, refraction, and interference from multi paths caused by reflections.The path from the source to the receiver may be bent due to refraction. Besides geometrical attenuation, the ground effect and turbulence are the most important mechanisms to influence...... communication sounds for airborne acoustics and bottom and surface effects for underwater sounds. Refraction becomes very important close to shadow zones. For echolocation signals, geometric attenuation and sound absorption have the largest effects on the signals....

  10. Sounds of Web Advertising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Iben Bredahl; Graakjær, Nicolai Jørgensgaard

    2010-01-01

    Sound seems to be a neglected issue in the study of web ads. Web advertising is predominantly regarded as visual phenomena–commercial messages, as for instance banner ads that we watch, read, and eventually click on–but only rarely as something that we listen to. The present chapter presents...... an overview of the auditory dimensions in web advertising: Which kinds of sounds do we hear in web ads? What are the conditions and functions of sound in web ads? Moreover, the chapter proposes a theoretical framework in order to analyse the communicative functions of sound in web advertising. The main...... argument is that an understanding of the auditory dimensions in web advertising must include a reflection on the hypertextual settings of the web ad as well as a perspective on how users engage with web content....

  11. Underwater Sound Reference Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Underwater Sound Reference Division (USRD) serves as the U.S. standardizing activity in the area of underwater acoustic measurements, as the National Institute...

  12. Underwater Sound Reference Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Underwater Sound Reference Division (USRD) serves as the U.S. standardizing activity in the area of underwater acoustic measurements, as the National Institute...

  13. It sounds good!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Both the atmosphere and we ourselves are hit by hundreds of particles every second and yet nobody has ever heard a sound coming from these processes. Like cosmic rays, particles interacting inside the detectors at the LHC do not make any noise…unless you've decided to use the ‘sonification’ technique, in which case you might even hear the Higgs boson sound like music. Screenshot of the first page of the "LHC sound" site. A group of particle physicists, composers, software developers and artists recently got involved in the ‘LHC sound’ project to make the particles at the LHC produce music. Yes…music! The ‘sonification’ technique converts data into sound. “In this way, if you implement the right software you can get really nice music out of the particle tracks”, says Lily Asquith, a member of the ATLAS collaboration and one of the initiators of the project. The ‘LHC...

  14. Equatorial Ionospheric Irregularities Observed in the South American Sector During the December 2006 Geomagnetic Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Y.; de Jesus, R.; Guarnieri, F. L.; Fagundes, P. R.; de Abreu, A. J.; Becker-Guedes, F.; Abalde, J. R.; Brunini, C.; Gende, M.; Cintra, T.; de Souza, V.; Pillat, V.; Lima, W.

    2009-05-01

    This investigation presents studies related to the observations of equatorial ionospheric irregularities in the ionospheric F-region in the South American sector during the intense geomagnetic storm in December 2006, during the period of low solar activity. The geomagnetic storm reached a minimum Dst of -147 nT at 0700 UT on 15 December. In this work ionospheric sounding data obtained between 13 and 16 December 2006 at Palmas (PAL; 10.2o S, 48.2o W; dip latitude 6.6o S) and São José dos Campos (SJC, 23.2o S, 45.9o W; dip latitude 17.6o S), Brazil, and Jicamarca (JIC, 12.0o S, 76.8o W; dip latitude 0.05o S), Peru, have been used. Also, vertical total electron content (VTEC) and phase fluctuations (TECU/min) from GPS observations obtained at Brasilia (BRAZ, 15.9o S, 47.9o W; dip latitude 11.7o S), Presidente Prudente (PPTE, 22.12° S, 51.4° W; dip latitude 14,9° S), Curitiba (PARA, 25.43o S, 49.21o W; dip latitude 18.4o S), Santa Maria (SMAR, 29.71o S, 53.07o W; dip latitude 19.6o S), Brazil, Bahia Blanca (VBCA, 38.7o S, 62.3o W; dip latitude 22.4o S) and Puerto Deseado (PDES, 47.7o S, 65.9o W, dip latitude 27.1o S), Argentina, during the period 13 to 16 December are presented. An unusual uplifting of the F-region during pre-reversal enhancement (PRE) on 14 December was possibly associated with a prompt penetration of electric field of magnetospheric origin after the storm sudden commencement (1414 UT on 14 December). On this geomagnetically disturbed night of 14-15 December, intense equatorial ionospheric irregularities were observed up to southern most GPS station PDES in Argentina. It should be mentioned that on the other nights viz., 12-13 and 13-14 December (both nights before the storm), and 15-16 December (recovery phase), the ionospheric irregularities are limited to only the Brazilian GPS stations. On the geomagnetically disturbed night of 14-15 December, strong oscillations were observed in the F-region base height possibly associated with Joule heating

  15. The Sounds of Sentences: Differentiating the Influence of Physical Sound, Sound Imagery, and Linguistically Implied Sounds on Physical Sound Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudschig, Carolin; Mackenzie, Ian Grant; Strozyk, Jessica; Kaup, Barbara; Leuthold, Hartmut

    2016-10-01

    Both the imagery literature and grounded models of language comprehension emphasize the tight coupling of high-level cognitive processes, such as forming a mental image of something or language understanding, and low-level sensorimotor processes in the brain. In an electrophysiological study, imagery and language processes were directly compared and the sensory associations of processing linguistically implied sounds or imagined sounds were investigated. Participants read sentences describing auditory events (e.g., "The dog barks"), heard a physical (environmental) sound, or had to imagine such a sound. We examined the influence of the 3 sound conditions (linguistic, physical, imagery) on subsequent physical sound processing. Event-related potential (ERP) difference waveforms indicated that in all 3 conditions, prime compatibility influenced physical sound processing. The earliest compatibility effect was observed in the physical condition, starting in the 80-110 ms time interval with a negative maximum over occipital electrode sites. In contrast, the linguistic and the imagery condition elicited compatibility effects starting in the 180-220 ms time window with a maximum over central electrode sites. In line with the ERPs, the analysis of the oscillatory activity showed that compatibility influenced early theta and alpha band power changes in the physical, but not in the linguistic and imagery, condition. These dissociations were further confirmed by dipole localization results showing a clear separation between the source of the compatibility effect in the physical sound condition (superior temporal area) and the source of the compatibility effect triggered by the linguistically implied sounds or the imagined sounds (inferior temporal area). Implications for grounded models of language understanding are discussed.

  16. Deep learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-01

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech.

  17. Ecological sounds affect breath duration more than artificial sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, Mauro; Santoro, Ilaria; Tamburini, Giorgia; Prpic, Valter; Sors, Fabrizio; Galmonte, Alessandra; Agostini, Tiziano

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that auditory rhythms affect both movement and physiological functions. We hypothesized that the ecological sounds of human breathing can affect breathing more than artificial sounds of breathing, varying in tones for inspiration and expiration. To address this question, we monitored the breath duration of participants exposed to three conditions: (a) ecological sounds of breathing, (b) artificial sounds of breathing having equal temporal features as the ecological sounds, (c) no sounds (control). We found that participants' breath duration variability was reduced in the ecological sound condition, more than in the artificial sound condition. We suggest that ecological sounds captured the timing of breathing better than artificial sounds, guiding as a consequence participants' breathing. We interpreted our results according to the Theory of Event Coding, providing further support to its validity, and suggesting its possible extension in the domain of physiological functions which are both consciously and unconsciously controlled.

  18. Steady induction effects in geomagnetism. Part 1C: Geomagnetic estimation of steady surficial core motions: Application to the definitive geomagnetic reference field models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    1993-01-01

    In the source-free mantle/frozen-flux core magnetic earth model, the non-linear inverse steady motional induction problem was solved using the method presented in Part 1B. How that method was applied to estimate steady, broad-scale fluid velocity fields near the top of Earth's core that induce the secular change indicated by the Definitive Geomagnetic Reference Field (DGRF) models from 1945 to 1980 are described. Special attention is given to the derivation of weight matrices for the DGRF models because the weights determine the apparent significance of the residual secular change. The derived weight matrices also enable estimation of the secular change signal-to-noise ratio characterizing the DGRF models. Two types of weights were derived in 1987-88: radial field weights for fitting the evolution of the broad-scale portion of the radial geomagnetic field component at Earth's surface implied by the DGRF's, and general weights for fitting the evolution of the broad-scale portion of the scalar potential specified by these models. The difference is non-trivial because not all the geomagnetic data represented by the DGRF's constrain the radial field component. For radial field weights (or general weights), a quantitatively acceptable explication of broad-scale secular change relative to the 1980 Magsat epoch must account for 99.94271 percent (or 99.98784 percent) of the total weighted variance accumulated therein. Tolerable normalized root-mean-square weighted residuals of 2.394 percent (or 1.103 percent) are less than the 7 percent errors expected in the source-free mantle/frozen-flux core approximation.

  19. Deep Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, Omer; Sadanandan, Sajith Kecheril; Wählby, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    Zebrafish ( Danio rerio) is an important vertebrate model organism in biomedical research, especially suitable for morphological screening due to its transparent body during early development. Deep learning has emerged as a dominant paradigm for data analysis and found a number of applications in computer vision and image analysis. Here we demonstrate the potential of a deep learning approach for accurate high-throughput classification of whole-body zebrafish deformations in multifish microwell plates. Deep learning uses the raw image data as an input, without the need of expert knowledge for feature design or optimization of the segmentation parameters. We trained the deep learning classifier on as few as 84 images (before data augmentation) and achieved a classification accuracy of 92.8% on an unseen test data set that is comparable to the previous state of the art (95%) based on user-specified segmentation and deformation metrics. Ablation studies by digitally removing whole fish or parts of the fish from the images revealed that the classifier learned discriminative features from the image foreground, and we observed that the deformations of the head region, rather than the visually apparent bent tail, were more important for good classification performance.

  20. Longitudinal differences observed in the ionospheric F-region during the major geomagnetic storm of 31 March 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sahai

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available A new ionospheric sounding station using a Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosonde (CADI was established for routine measurements by the "Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP" at São José dos Campos (23.2° S, 45.9° W, Brazil, in August 2000. A major geomagnetic storm with gradual commencement at about 01:00 UT was observed on 31 March 2001. In this paper, we present and discuss salient features from the ionospheric sounding measurements carried out at S. J. Campos on the three consecutive UT days 30 March (quiet, 31 March (disturbed and 1 April (recovery 2001. During most of the storm period, the foF2 values showed negative phase, whereas during the two storm-time peaks, large F-region height variations were observed. In order to study the longitudinal differences observed in the F-region during the storm, the simultaneous ionospheric sounding measurements carried out at S. J. Campos, El Arenosillo (37.1° N, 6.7° W, Spain, Okinawa (26.3° N, 127.8° E, Japan and Wakkanai (45.5° N, 141.7° E, Japan, during the period 30 March-1 April 2001, have been analyzed. A comparison of the observed ionospheric parameters (h'F and foF2 in the two longitudinal zones (1. Japanese and 2. Brazilian-Spanish shows both similarities and differences associated with the geomagnetic disturbances. Some latitudinal differences are also observed in the two longitudinal zones. In addition, global ionospheric TEC maps from the worldwide network of GPS receivers are presented, showing widespread TEC changes during both the main and recovery phases of the storm. The ionospheric sounding measurements are compared with the ASPEN-TIMEGCM model runs appropriate for the storm conditions. The model results produce better agreement during the quiet period. During the disturbed period, some of the observed F-region height variations are well reproduced by the model results. The model foF2 and TEC results differ considerably during the

  1. High-latitude geomagnetic studies (22-23 millihertz)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, A. (AT T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ (USA) City Univ. of New York, Brooklyn (USA)); Lanzerotti, L.J.; Maclennan, C.C.; Medford, L.V. (AT T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ (USA))

    1988-01-01

    Geomagnetic field measurements were initiated at Iqaluit (formerly Frobisher Bay) in the Northwest Territories of Canada during July 1985 (Wolfe et al. 1986). This site was selected because it was calculated to be in the conjugate area to the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station where extensive geomagnetic research has been conducted. The principal scientific objectives are to study the conjugacy of high-latitude magnetic fluctuations observed at Iqaluit and South Pole (L{approximately}13). In this report, the authors extend the previous report of Wolfe et al. (1987) and comment upon the conjugacy of the stations for magnetic field fluctuations in the Pc3 (22-33 millihertz) hydromagnetic regime and upon the penetration of hydromagnetic energy deeper into the magnetosphere on the local dayside.

  2. Estimation of cold plasma outflow during geomagnetic storms

    CERN Document Server

    Haaland, S; André, M; Maes, L; Baddeley, L; Barakat, A; Chappell, R; Eccles, V; Johnsen, C; Lybekk, B; Li, K; Pedersen, A; Schunk, R; Welling, D

    2016-01-01

    Low-energy ions of ionospheric origin constitute a significant contributor to the magnetospheric plasma population. Measuring cold ions is difficult though. Observations have to be done at sufficiently high altitudes and typically in regions of space where spacecraft attain a positive charge due to solar illumination. Cold ions are therefore shielded from the satellite particle detectors. Furthermore, spacecraft can only cover key regions of ion outflow during segments of their orbit, so additional complications arise if continuous longtime observations, such as during a geomagnetic storm, are needed. In this paper we suggest a new approach, based on a combination of synoptic observations and a novel technique to estimate the flux and total outflow during the various phases of geomagnetic storms. Our results indicate large variations in both outflow rates and transport throughout the storm. Prior to the storm main phase, outflow rates are moderate, and the cold ions are mainly emanating from moderately sized ...

  3. International Geomagnetic Reference Field: the 12th generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thébault, Erwan; Finlay, Christopher C.; Beggan, Ciarán D.; Alken, Patrick; Aubert, Julien; Barrois, Olivier; Bertrand, Francois; Bondar, Tatiana; Boness, Axel; Brocco, Laura; Canet, Elisabeth; Chambodut, Aude; Chulliat, Arnaud; Coïsson, Pierdavide; Civet, François; Du, Aimin; Fournier, Alexandre; Fratter, Isabelle; Gillet, Nicolas; Hamilton, Brian; Hamoudi, Mohamed; Hulot, Gauthier; Jager, Thomas; Korte, Monika; Kuang, Weijia; Lalanne, Xavier; Langlais, Benoit; Léger, Jean-Michel; Lesur, Vincent; Lowes, Frank J.; Macmillan, Susan; Mandea, Mioara; Manoj, Chandrasekharan; Maus, Stefan; Olsen, Nils; Petrov, Valeriy; Ridley, Victoria; Rother, Martin; Sabaka, Terence J.; Saturnino, Diana; Schachtschneider, Reyko; Sirol, Olivier; Tangborn, Andrew; Thomson, Alan; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars; Vigneron, Pierre; Wardinski, Ingo; Zvereva, Tatiana

    2015-05-01

    The 12th generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was adopted in December 2014 by the Working Group V-MOD appointed by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA). It updates the previous IGRF generation with a definitive main field model for epoch 2010.0, a main field model for epoch 2015.0, and a linear annual predictive secular variation model for 2015.0-2020.0. Here, we present the equations defining the IGRF model, provide the spherical harmonic coefficients, and provide maps of the magnetic declination, inclination, and total intensity for epoch 2015.0 and their predicted rates of change for 2015.0-2020.0. We also update the magnetic pole positions and discuss briefly the latest changes and possible future trends of the Earth's magnetic field.

  4. A new regard about Surlari National Geomagnetic Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimopolos, Laurentiu; Asimopolos, Natalia-Silvia; Pestina, Agata-Monica

    2010-05-01

    Geomagnetic field study in Romanian stations has started with irregular measurements in late XIXth century. In 1943, the foundation of Surlari National Geomagnetic Observatory (SNGO) marks the beginning of a new era in the systematic study of geomagnetic field by a continuous registration of its variations and by carrying out standard absolute measurements in a fundamental station. The location of the observatory meets the highest exigencies, being situated in physical-geological conditions of a uniform local field, at a reasonably long distance from human activities. Its laboratories observe strict conditions of non-magnetism, ensuring the possibility of absolute standard measurements (national magnetic standards) for all the units in the country, civil or military, which are endowed with equipment based on geomagnetic metrology. These basic conditions have allowed the observatory to become by developing its initial preoccupations a centre of complex geomagnetic research, constantly involved in national and international issues, promoting new themes in our country and bringing significant contributions. During the last two decades, infrastructure and equipment used in monitoring geomagnetic field at European and planetary level have experienced a remarkable development. New registering techniques have allowed a complete to automate of data acquisition, and sampling step and their precision increased by two classes of size. Systems of transmitting these data in real time to world collecting centres have resulted in the possibility of approaching globalize studies, suitable for following some phenomena at planetary scale. At the same time, a significant development in the procedures of processing primary data has been registered, based on standardized programmes. The new stage of this fundamental research, largely applicable in various fields, is also marked by the simultaneous observation of space-time distribution of terrestrial electromagnetic field by means of

  5. Acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons during small geomagnetic storms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B R; Millan, R M; Reeves, G D; Friedel, R H W

    2015-12-16

    Past studies of radiation belt relativistic electrons have favored active storm time periods, while the effects of small geomagnetic storms (Dst > -50 nT) have not been statistically characterized. In this timely study, given the current weak solar cycle, we identify 342 small storms from 1989 through 2000 and quantify the corresponding change in relativistic electron flux at geosynchronous orbit. Surprisingly, small storms can be equally as effective as large storms at enhancing and depleting fluxes. Slight differences exist, as small storms are 10% less likely to result in flux enhancement and 10% more likely to result in flux depletion than large storms. Nevertheless, it is clear that neither acceleration nor loss mechanisms scale with storm drivers as would be expected. Small geomagnetic storms play a significant role in radiation belt relativistic electron dynamics and provide opportunities to gain new insights into the complex balance of acceleration and loss processes.

  6. Geomagnetic field intensity in the middle jurassic - oligocene

    CERN Document Server

    Kurazhkovskii, A Yu; Klain, B I

    2014-01-01

    The present paper summarizes results of the studies on the intensity of geomagnetic field in the (167 - 23) Ma interval by sedimentary rocks of the Russian Plate and adjacent territories. The joint analysis of the data paleointensity obtained by sedimentary and thermomagnetized (from PINT12) rocks within this temporal interval is conducted. It is shown that the changes of the paleointensity were occurred chaotically. Alternating bursts and periods of quiet regime of the geomagnetic field are typical for intermittent processes and is a characteristic of the geological interval Jurassic-beginning of Paleogene. The distributions of the paleointensity corresponding to different intervals of geologic time were investigated. It is revealed that the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the paleointensity values is best approximated by a power function. The indices of the power functions varied depending on geologic time intervals.The analysis of the paleomagnetic data suggests that the medium in which the geoma...

  7. De-noising Diurnal Variation Data in Geomagnetic Field Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onovughe, E.

    2017-01-01

    Ground based geomagnetic observatory series have been used to investigate and describe the residuals between a continuous geomagnetic field model and observed diurnal variation for noise-removal of signal due to external field of magnetospheric ring current sources. In all the observatories studied, the residuals in the X-direction consistently show the noisiest signal. Results show that the residuals in the X-direction correlates closely with the RC-index, suggesting an origin from unmodelled external field variation. Notable cross-correlation is also seen between the residuals and the RC-index at zero-lag. Removal/reduction of this unmodelled signal enhances resolution of fine-scale detail in diurnal variation studies.

  8. PAMELA's measurements of geomagnetically trapped and albedo protons

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, A; Barbarino, G C; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Bottai, S; Bravar, U; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; Christian, E C; De Donato, C; de Nolfo, G A; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Formato, V; Galper, A M; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Koldobskiy, S; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Lee, M; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Martucci, M; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mergè, M; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Munini, R; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Panico, B; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Ryan, J M; Sarkar, R; Scotti, V; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stochaj, S; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G

    2015-01-01

    Data from the PAMELA satellite experiment were used to perform a detailed measurement of under-cutoff protons at low Earth orbits. On the basis of a trajectory tracing approach using a realistic description of the magnetosphere, protons were classified into geomagnetically trapped and re-entrant albedo. The former include stably-trapped protons in the South Atlantic Anomaly, which were analyzed in the framework of the adiabatic theory, investigating energy spectra, spatial and angular distributions; results were compared with the predictions of the AP8 and the PSB97 empirical trapped models. The albedo protons were classified into quasi-trapped, concentrating in the magnetic equatorial region, and un-trapped, spreading over all latitudes and including both short-lived (precipitating) and long-lived (pseudo-trapped) components. Features of the penumbra region around the geomagnetic cutoff were investigated as well. PAMELA observations significantly improve the characterization of the high energy proton populat...

  9. Exploiting the geomagnetic distortion of the inclined atmospheric showers

    CERN Document Server

    Billoir, Pierre; Blanco, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel approach for the determination of the nature of ultra-high energy cosmic rays by exploiting the geomagnetic deviation of muons in nearly horizontal showers. The distribution of the muons at ground level is well described by a simple parametrization providing a few shape parameters tightly correlated to $X^\\mu_\\mathrm{max}$, the depth of maximal muon production, which is a mass indicator tightly correlated to the usual parameter $X_\\mathrm{max}$, the depth of maximal development of the shower. We show that some constraints can be set on the predictions of hadronic models, especially by combining the geomagnetic distortion with standard measurement of the longitudinal profile. We discuss the precision needed to obtain significant results and we propose a schematic layout of a detector.

  10. Letter to the Editor: Geomagnetic storm effects at low latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Rastogi

    Full Text Available The geomagnetic horizontal (H field from the chain of nine observatories in India are used to study the storm-time and disturbance daily variations. The peak decrease in storm-time variation in H showed significant enhancements at the equatorial electrojet stations over and above the normally expected decrease due to the ring current effects corrected for geomagnetic latitudes. The disturbance daily variation of H at equatorial stations showed a large decrease around midday hours over and above the usual dawn-maximum and dusk-minimum seen at any mid-latitude stations around the world. These slow and persistent additional decreases of H of disturbance daily variation at equatorial latitudes could be the effect of a westward electric field due to the Disturbance Ionospheric dynamo coupled with abnormally large electrical conductivities in the E region over the equator.Key words. Ionosphere (electric fields and currents · Magnetospheric physics (electric fields; storms and substorms

  11. Evaluation of candidate geomagnetic field models for IGRF-11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Maus, S.; Beggan, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    The eleventh generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was agreed in December 2009 by a task force appointed by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) Division V Working Group V-MOD. New spherical harmonic main field models for epochs 2005.0 (DGRF...... coefficients is also reported. Maps of differences in the vertical field intensity at Earth’s surface between the candidates and weighted mean models are presented. Candidates with anomalous aspects are identified and efforts made to pinpoint both troublesome coefficients and geographical regions where large...... vector satellite data is demonstrated; based on internal consistency DGRF-2005 has a formal root mean square vector field error over Earth’s surface of 1.0 nT. Difficulties nevertheless remain in accurately forecasting field evolution only five years into the future....

  12. The ionospheric response to perturbation electric fields during the onset phase of geomagnetic storms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakowski, N.; Jungstand, A. (Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- and Raumfahrt, Neustrelitz (Germany)); Schlegel, K.; Kohl, H.; Rinnert, K. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Aeronomie, Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany))

    1992-07-01

    The generation and propagation of ionospheric storms are studied by analyzing EISCAT radar, and vertical sounding and total electron content data obtained under different geophysical conditions. Both case studies as well as the average storm pattern of percentage deviations of different ionospheric parameters from their corresponding reference values such as total electron content, F2-layer critical frequency, F2 layer critical height, and slab thickness indicate the action of a perturbation electric field during the first few hours of the onset of geomagnetic storms. Considering the onset phase of the storm on July 28-29, 1987 evidence has been found that high latitude electric fields may penetrate to lower latitudes before the ring current has developed. Different mechanisms are assumed to be responsible for daytime and nightime behaviour, respectively. The negative phase propagates equatorward with velocities in the order of 70-350 m/s following a strong heating of the thermosphere and ionosphere due to the auroral electrojet. 24 refs., 10 figs.

  13. The Textile Form of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Cecilie

    Sound is a part of architecture, and sound is complex. Upon this, sound is invisible. How is it then possible to design visual objects that interact with the sound? This paper addresses the problem of how to get access to the complexity of sound and how to make textile material revealing the form...... three-dimensional geometries of interfering spheres are created. Textiles are generally a very good sound dampening material. To dampen the sound most effective it should be placed where the sound energy is highest. To find these invisible spots of energy and to reveal the geometry of them, two...... experiments were carried out. One experiment was done in a laboratory with a sound measure instrument and textiles arranged in different positions and shapes. Here the high energy spots were located. The other experiment is ongoing and is an investigation of how textiles can take the shape of the sound...

  14. Ultra-thin metamaterial for perfect and omnidirectional sound absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez, Noé; Romero-García, Vicent; Pagneux, Vincent; Groby, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Using the concepts of slow sound and of critical coupling, an ultra-thin acoustic metamaterial panel for perfect and omnidirectional absorption is theoretically and experimentally conceived in this work. The system is made of a rigid panel with a periodic distribution of thin closed slits, the upper wall of which is loaded by Helmholtz Resonators (HRs). The presence of resonators produces a slow sound propagation shifting the resonance frequency of the slit to the deep sub-wavelength regime ($\\lambda/88$). By controlling the geometry of the slit and the HRs, the intrinsic visco-thermal losses can be tuned in order to exactly compensate the energy leakage of the system and fulfill the critical coupling condition to create the perfect absorption of sound in a large range of incidence angles due to the deep subwavelength behavior.

  15. Geomagnetic activity effects on plasma sheet energy conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamrin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article we use three years (2001, 2002, and 2004 of Cluster plasma sheet data to investigate what happens to localized energy conversion regions (ECRs in the plasma sheet during times of high magnetospheric activity. By examining variations in the power density, E·J, where E is the electric field and J is the current density obtained by Cluster, we have studied the influence on Concentrated Load Regions (CLRs and Concentrated Generator Regions (CGRs from variations in the geomagnetic disturbance level as expressed by the Kp, the AE, and the Dst indices. We find that the ECR occurrence frequency increases during higher magnetospheric activities, and that the ECRs become stronger. This is true both for CLRs and for CGRs, and the localized energy conversion therefore concerns energy conversion in both directions between the particles and the fields in the plasma sheet. A higher geomagnetic activity hence increases the general level of energy conversion in the plasma sheet. Moreover, we have shown that CLRs live longer during magnetically disturbed times, hence converting more electromagnetic energy. The CGR lifetime, on the other hand, seems to be unaffected by the geomagnetic activity level. The evidence for increased energy conversion during geomagnetically disturbed times is most clear for Kp and for AE, but there are also some indications that energy conversion increases during large negative Dst. This is consistent with the plasma sheet magnetically mapping to the auroral zone, and therefore being more tightly coupled to auroral activities and variations in the AE and Kp indices, than to variations in the ring current region as described by the Dst index.

  16. Space Weather Monitoring for ISS Geomagnetic Storm Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Parker, Linda Neergaard

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) space environments community utilizes near real time space weather data to support a variety of ISS engineering and science activities. The team has operated the Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) suite of plasma instruments (two Langmuir probes, a floating potential probe, and a plasma impedance probe) on ISS since 2006 to obtain in-situ measurements of plasma density and temperature along the ISS orbit and variations in ISS frame potential due to electrostatic current collection from the plasma environment (spacecraft charging) and inductive (vxB) effects from the vehicle motion across the Earth s magnetic field. An ongoing effort is to use FPMU for measuring the ionospheric response to geomagnetic storms at ISS altitudes and investigate auroral charging of the vehicle as it passes through regions of precipitating auroral electrons. This work is challenged by restrictions on FPMU operations that limit observation time to less than about a third of a year. As a result, FPMU campaigns ranging in length from a few days to a few weeks are typically scheduled weeks in advance for ISS engineering and payload science activities. In order to capture geomagnetic storm data under these terms, we monitor near real time space weather data from NASA, NOAA, and ESA sources to determine solar wind disturbance arrival times at Earth likely to be geoeffective (including coronal mass ejections and high speed streams associated with coronal holes) and activate the FPMU ahead of the storm onset. Using this technique we have successfully captured FPMU data during a number of geomagnetic storm periods including periods with ISS auroral charging. This presentation will describe the strategies and challenges in capturing FPMU data during geomagnetic storms, the near real time space weather resources utilized for monitoring the space weather environment, and provide examples of auroral charging data obtained during storm operations.

  17. Effect of Cross-Correlation on Geomagnetic Forecast Accuracies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Weijia; Wei, Zigang; Tangborn, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Surface geomagnetic observation can determine up to degree L = 14 time-varying spherical harmonic coefficients of the poloidal magnetic field. Assimilation of these coefficients to numerical dynamo simulation could help us understand better the dynamical processes in the Earth's outer core, and to provide more accurate forecast of geomagnetic secular variations (SV). In our previous assimilation studies, only the poloidal magnetic field in the core is corrected by the observations in the analysis. Unobservable core state variables (the toroidal magnetic field and the core velocity field) are corrected via the dynamical equations of the geodynamo. Our assimilation experiments show that the assimilated core state converges near the CMB, implying that the dynamo state is strongly constrained by surface geomagnetic observations, and is pulled closer to the truth by the data. We are now carrying out an ensemble of assimilation runs with 1000 years of geomagnetic and archeo/paleo magnetic record. In these runs the cross correlation between the toroidal and the poloidal magnetic fields is incorporated into the analysis. This correlation is derived from the physical boundary conditions of the toroidal field at the core-mantle boundary (CMB). The assimilation results are then compared with those of the ensemble runs without the cross-correlation, aiming at understanding two fundamental issues: the effect of the crosscorrelation on (1) the convergence of the core state, and (2) the SV prediction accuracies. The constrained dynamo solutions will provide valuable insights on interpreting the observed SV, e.g. the near-equator magnetic flux patches, the core-mantle interactions, and possibly other geodynamic observables.

  18. Geomagnetic Observatory Data for Real-Time Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, J. J.; Finn, C. A.; Rigler, E. J.; Kelbert, A.; Bedrosian, P.

    2015-12-01

    The global network of magnetic observatories represents a unique collective asset for the scientific community. Historically, magnetic observatories have supported global magnetic-field mapping projects and fundamental research of the Earth's interior and surrounding space environment. More recently, real-time data streams from magnetic observatories have become an important contributor to multi-sensor, operational monitoring of evolving space weather conditions, especially during magnetic storms. In this context, the U.S. Geological Survey (1) provides real-time observatory data to allied space weather monitoring projects, including those of NOAA, the U.S. Air Force, NASA, several international agencies, and private industry, (2) collaborates with Schlumberger to provide real-time geomagnetic data needed for directional drilling for oil and gas in Alaska, (3) develops products for real-time evaluation of hazards for the electric-power grid industry that are associated with the storm-time induction of geoelectric fields in the Earth's conducting lithosphere. In order to implement strategic priorities established by the USGS Natural Hazards Mission Area and the National Science and Technology Council, and with a focus on developing new real-time products, the USGS is (1) leveraging data management protocols already developed by the USGS Earthquake Program, (2) developing algorithms for mapping geomagnetic activity, a collaboration with NASA and NOAA, (3) supporting magnetotelluric surveys and developing Earth conductivity models, a collaboration with Oregon State University and the NSF's EarthScope Program, (4) studying the use of geomagnetic activity maps and Earth conductivity models for real-time estimation of geoelectric fields, (5) initiating geoelectric monitoring at several observatories, (6) validating real-time estimation algorithms against historical geomagnetic and geoelectric data. The success of these long-term projects is subject to funding constraints

  19. Solar eclipse effect on geomagnetic induction parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ádám

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The 11 August 1999 total solar eclipse had been studied using a large array of stations in Central Europe (Bencze et al., 2005. According to the result of this study, the amplitudes of the field line resonance (FLR-type pulsations decreased in and around the dark spot by about a factor of 2, and this decrease moved with the velocity of the dark spot in the same direction. This decrease was interpreted as a switch-off of the FLR-type pulsations, due to a change in the eigenperiod of the field line as a consequence of a change in the charged particle distribution along the field line. An effect was also found in the phase of the (magnetic or electric perpendicular components.

    At the Nagycenk (NCK observatory lying in the zone of totality, both magnetic and electric records were available. The magnetotelluric (MT sounding curve computed by the usual method for the eclipse interval (08:00-14:00 UT fits the previously known standard curve extremely well. During the eclipse, however, impedance values in the FLR period range were highly scattered. The scatter remained as long as the eclipse lasted. Coherence values between magnetic and electric components decreased significantly. In contrast, an earlier similar switch-off of the FLR-type activity on the same day did not cause a similar scatter, in spite of a comparably low coherence. Thus, the lack of FLR-type activity disturbed the usual MT connection between the magnetic and electric components during the eclipse.

    The induction vector (tipper, especially its real part, shows a clear effect of the eclipse in the FLR period range (24-29 s, too. Both at NCK and at Bad Bergzabern (BBZ, westernmost station and longest FLR period, a definite decrease in the real tipper was ascertained during the totality. The average direction of the tipper did not change.

    Concerning both parameters, a random effect cannot fully

  20. Early sound symbolism for vowel sounds

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrinne Spector; Daphne Maurer

    2013-01-01

    Children and adults consistently match some words (e.g., kiki) to jagged shapes and other words (e.g., bouba) to rounded shapes, providing evidence for non-arbitrary sound–shape mapping. In this study, we investigated the influence of vowels on sound–shape matching in toddlers, using four contrasting pairs of nonsense words differing in vowel sound (/i/ as in feet vs. /o/ as in boat) and four rounded–jagged shape pairs. Crucially, we used reduplicated syllables (e.g., kiki vs. koko) rather th...

  1. Geomagnetic Secular Variation Prediction with Thermal Heterogeneous Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Weijia; Tangborn, Andrew; Jiang, Weiyuan

    2011-01-01

    It has long been conjectured that thermal heterogeneity at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) affects the geodynamo substantially. The observed two pairs of steady and strong magnetic flux lobes near the Polar Regions and the low secular variation in the Pacific over the past 400 years (and perhaps longer) are likely the consequences of this CMB thermal heterogeneity. There are several studies on the impact of the thermal heterogeneity with numerical geodynamo simulations. However, direct correlation between the numerical results and the observations is found very difficult, except qualitative comparisons of certain features in the radial component of the magnetic field at the CMB. This makes it difficult to assess accurately the impact of thermal heterogeneity on the geodynamo and the geomagnetic secular variation. We revisit this problem with our MoSST_DAS system in which geomagnetic data are assimilated with our geodynamo model to predict geomagnetic secular variations. In this study, we implement a heterogeneous heat flux across the CMB that is chosen based on the seismic tomography of the lowermost mantle. The amplitude of the heat flux (relative to the mean heat flux across the CMB) varies in the simulation. With these assimilation studies, we will examine the influences of the heterogeneity on the forecast accuracies, e.g. the accuracies as functions of the heterogeneity amplitude. With these, we could be able to assess the model errors to the true core state, and thus the thermal heterogeneity in geodynamo modeling.

  2. Spurious behavior in volcanic records of geomagnetic field reversals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlut, Julie; Vella, Jerome; Valet, Jean-Pierre; Soler, Vicente; Legoff, Maxime

    2016-04-01

    Very large directional variations of magnetization have been reported in several lava flows recording a geomagnetic reversal. Such behavior could reflect real geomagnetic changes or be caused by artifacts due to post-emplacement alteration and/or non-ideal magnetic behavior. More recently, a high resolution paleomagnetic record from sediments pleads also for an extremely rapid reversal process during the last reversal. Assuming that the geomagnetic field would have moved by tens of degrees during cooling of moderate thickness lava flows implies brief episodes of rapid changes by a few degrees per day that are difficult to reconcile with the rate of liquid motions at the core surface. Systematical mineralogical bias is a most likely explanation to promote such behavior as recently reconsidered by Coe et al., 2014 for the rapid field changes recorded at Steens Mountain. We resampled three lava flows at La Palma island (Canarias) that are sandwiched between reverse polarity and normal polarity flows associated with the last reversal. The results show an evolution of the magnetization direction from top to bottom. Thermal demagnetization experiments were conducted using different heating and cooling rates. Similarly, continuous demagnetization and measurements. In both cases, we did not notice any remagnetization associated with mineralogical transformations during the experiments. Magnetic grain sizes do not show any correlation with the amplitude of the deviations. Microscopic observations indicate poor exsolution, which could suggests post-cooling thermochemical remagnetization processes.

  3. Global structure of ionospheric TEC anomalies driven by geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancheva, D.; Mukhtarov, P.; Andonov, B.

    2016-07-01

    This study examines the structure and variability of the ionospheric TEC anomalies driven by geomagnetic storms. For this purpose the CODE global ionospheric TEC data from four geomagnetically disturbed periods (29 October-1 November 2003, 7-10 November 2004, 14-15 December 2006, and 5-6 August 2011) have been considered. By applying the tidal analysis to the geomagnetically forced TEC anomalies we made an attempt to identify the tidal or stationary planetary wave (SPW) signatures that may contribute to the generation of these anomalies. It has been found that three types of positive anomalies with different origin and different latitudinal appearance are observed. These are: (i) anomalies located near latitudes of ±40° and related to the enhancement and poleward moving of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) crests; (ii) anomalies located near latitudes of ±60° and seen predominantly in the night-side ionosphere, and (iii) very high latitude anomalies having mainly zonally symmetric structure and related to the auroral heating and thermospheric expansion. The decomposition analysis revealed that these anomalies can be reconstructed as a result of superposition of the following components: zonal mean (ZM), diurnal migrating (DW1), zonally symmetric diurnal (D0), and stationary planetary wave 1 (SPW1).

  4. Remagnetization of lava flows spanning the last geomagnetic reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Jérôme; Carlut, Julie; Valet, Jean-Pierre; Goff, Maxime Le; Soler, Vicente; Lopes, Fernando

    2017-08-01

    Large directional changes of remanent magnetization within lava flows that cooled during geomagnetic reversals have been reported in several studies. A geomagnetic scenario implies extremely rapid geomagnetic changes of several degrees per day, thus difficult to reconcile with the rate of the earth's core liquid motions. So far, no complete rock magnetic model provides a clear explanation. We revisited lava flows sandwiched between an underlying reverse and an overlying normal polarity flow marking the last reversal in three distinct volcanic sequences of the La Palma Island (Canary archipelago, Spain) that are characterized by a gradual evolution of the direction of their remanent magnetization from bottom to top. Cleaning efficiency of thermal demagnetization was not improved by very rapid heating and cooling rates as well as by continuous demagnetization using a Triaxe magnetometer. We did not observe partial self-reversals and minor changes in magnetic grain sizes are not related to the within-flow directional changes. Microscopic observations indicate poor exsolution, which suggests post-cooling thermochemical remagnetization processes. This scenario is strongly reinforced by laboratory experiments that show large resistance to thermal demagnetization when thermoremanence was acquired over a long time period. We speculate that in the present situation exsolution was reactivated during in field reheating and yielded formation of new magnetite, yet magnetic domain state rearrangements could also play a role. Initial reheating when the overlying flow took place, albeit moderate (less than 200-300 °C), was enough to produce overlying components with significantly higher unblocking temperatures.

  5. Recent developments in the global geomagnetic observatory network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulliat, A.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic observatories provide precise and continuous measurements of geomagnetic variations over time scales ranging from one second to more than a century. They have been an essential observational infrastructure for geomagnetic research for about 170 years. A large fraction of magnetic observatories belong to INTERMAGNET (International Real-time Magnetic Observatory Network), a global network founded in the late 1980s which now includes about 115 observatories in 45 countries. INTERMAGNET magnetic observatories comply with strict data quality and timeliness standards and distribute their data through an integrated data information system. Recent years have seen a rapid expansion of the global network: new observatories have been installed in remote locations, such as oceanic islands (St Helena, Easter Island, Tristan da Cunha) or Antarctica (Dome C); ancient observatories have been upgraded to international standards (for example in China and Siberia). This has been prompted by the need to have a more geographically homogeneous network. In parallel, new data products (one second data and quasi-definitive data) are being made available, addressing a wide variety of research needs, and real timeliness is being improved for operational purposes such as space weather monitoring and forecasting. This presentation will provide an overview of these recent developments, focusing on those most relevant to the geomagnetic modeling community, and discuss their expected scientific benefits.

  6. Study on the Phenomenon of Geomagnetic Low-value Displacement before Moderately Strong Earthquakes in Gansu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Suping; Feng Jiangang

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes the distribution characteristics of geomagnetic low-value displacement in Gansu and its adjacent areas from 1995 to 2003 on the basis of the data of the daily amplitude minimum value time of the geomagnetic vertical component. It is shown that in addition to the changing rules of geomagnetic low-value displacement itself, there is a better correlation between geomagnetic low-value displacement and the occurrence of moderately strong earthquakes. There appeared to be geomagnetic low-value displacement before the moderately strong earthquakes in Gansu in the 9 years from 1995 to 2003. This result indicates that geomagnetic low-value displacement is of instructive significance for earthquake prediction to some extents.

  7. Geomagnetic Field Variation during Winter Storm at Localized Southern and Northern High Latitude

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Babita Devi; Smita Dubey; Shailendra Saini; Rajni Devi; Rashmi Wahi; Ajay Dhar; S. K. Vijay; A. K. Gwal

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents the effect of geomagnetic storm on geomagnetic field components at Southern (Maitri) and Northern (Kiruna) Hemispheres. The Indian Antarctic Station Maitri is located at geom. long. 66.03° S; 53.21° E whereas Kiruna is located at geom. long. 67.52° N; 23.38° E. We have studied all the geomagnetic storms that occurred during winter season of the year 2004–2005. We observed that at Southern Hemisphere the variation is large as compared to the Northern Hemisphere. Geomagnetic field components vary when the interplanetary magnetic field is oriented in southward direction. Geomagnetic field components vary in the main phase of the ring current. Due to southward orientation of vertical component of IMF reconnection takes place all across the dayside that transports plasma and magnetic flux which create the geomagnetic field variation.

  8. Changes in cosmic ray cut-off rigidities due to secular variations of the geomagnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bhattacharyya

    Full Text Available An analytical expression is derived for the cutoff rigidity of cosmic rays arriving at a point in an arbitrary direction, when the main geomagnetic field is approximated by that of an eccentric dipole. This expression is used to determine changes in geomagnetic cutoffs due to secular variation of the geomagnetic field since 1835. Effects of westward drift of the quadrupole field and decrease in the effective dipole moment are seen in the isorigidity contours. On account of the immense computer time required to determine the cutoff rigidities more accurately using the particle trajectory tracing technique, the present formulation may be useful in estimating the transmission factor of the geomagnetic field in cosmic ray studies, modulation of cosmogenic isotope production by geomagnetic secular variation, and the contribution of geomagnetic field variation to long term changes in climate through cosmic ray related modulation of the current flow in the global electric circuit.

  9. Meteor fireball sounds identified

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keay, Colin

    1992-01-01

    Sounds heard simultaneously with the flight of large meteor fireballs are electrical in origin. Confirmation that Extra/Very Low Frequency (ELF/VLF) electromagnetic radiation is produced by the fireball was obtained by Japanese researchers. Although the generation mechanism is not fully understood, studies of the Meteorite Observation and Recovery Project (MORP) and other fireball data indicate that interaction with the atmosphere is definitely responsible and the cut-off magnitude of -9 found for sustained electrophonic sounds is supported by theory. Brief bursts of ELF/VLF radiation may accompany flares or explosions of smaller fireballs, producing transient sounds near favorably placed observers. Laboratory studies show that mundane physical objects can respond to electrical excitation and produce audible sounds. Reports of electrophonic sounds should no longer be discarded. A catalog of over 300 reports relating to electrophonic phenomena associated with meteor fireballs, aurorae, and lightning was assembled. Many other reports have been cataloged in Russian. These may assist the full solution of the similar long-standing and contentious mystery of audible auroral displays.

  10. The geomagnetic field - An explanation for the microturbulence in coaxial gun plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, J. W.; Ahluwalia, H. S.

    1988-01-01

    The complexity introduced by the geomagnetic field in several regions of a coaxial gun plasma device is described. It is shown that the annihilation of the swept-up geomagnetic flux, trapped within the highly compressed turbulent plasma, provides an explanation for varied performance and experimental results. The results indicate that the device should be aligned along the direction of the local geomagnetic field or enclosed in a mu-metal shield.

  11. Global Empirical Model of the TEC Response to Geomagnetic Activity and Forcing from Below

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2014-0025 Global empirical model of the TEC response to geomagnetic activity and forcing from below Dora...April 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Global empirical model of the TEC response to geomagnetic activity and forcing from below 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...the global background TEC model c) Development of global empirical model of TEC response to geomagnetic activity d) On-line implementation of both

  12. Geomagnetic observatories: monitoring the Earth’s magnetic and space weather environment

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, Alan W.P.

    2014-01-01

    Geomagnetism research provides insight into the Earth’s properties and processes, from the core out to space. For this reason continuous geomagnetic field observations have been carried out in the UK for more than 170 years. Geomagnetism also has diverse applications, in navigation, maps, even smart phone apps, and in the monitoring and prediction of space weather impacts on technology. Modern instruments, together with digital sampling, real-time data processing and product dissemination, su...

  13. Study on geomagnetic effects of the March 9, 1997 solar eclipse in Mohe area, China*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯忠孝; 高金田; 任熙宪

    2002-01-01

    The geomagnetic effects of the total solar eclipse in Mohe area and the partial eclipse occurred on March 9, 1997 in China are analyzed in this paper. The geomagnetic effects of the eclipse widely distributed in China are obtained, which show H component decreases obviously and is symmetric along the latitude with a center near 33(N during the eclipse time. These results of solar eclipse geomagnetic effects are the newest in recent years obtained in the largest area in China.

  14. Magnetization of Steel Building Materials and Structures in the Natural Geomagnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Čermáková

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the physical basis of the magnetic properties of ferromagnetic materials and shows their relationships with external geomagnetic field. It graphically processes the experimental data detected by an HMR magnetometer. Taking into account the natural geomagnetic field under the effects of steel U profiles, variations of the natural geomagnetic field in a steel structure building are indicated and the potential existence of Sick Building Syndrome (SBS in these types of buildings is pointed out. 

  15. On multifractality of high-latitude geomagnetic fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Vörös

    Full Text Available In order to contribute to the understanding of solar wind-magnetosphere interactions the multifractal scaling properties of high-latitude geomagnetic fluctuations observed at the Thule observatory have been studied. Using the local observatory data and the present experimental knowledge only it seems hard to characterize directly the, presumably intermittent, mesoscale energy accumulation and dissipation processes taking place at the magnetotail, auroral region, etc. Instead a positive probability measure, describing the accumulated local geomagnetic signal energy content at the given time scales has been introduced and its scaling properties have been studied. There is evidence for the multifractal nature of the so defined intermittent field ε, a result obtained by using the recently introduced technique of large deviation multifractal spectra. This technique allows us to describe the geomagnetic fluctuations locally in time by means of singularity exponents α, which represent a generalization of the local degree of differentiability and characterize the power-law scaling dependence of the introduced measure on resolution. A global description of the geomagnetic fluctuations is insured by the spectrum of exponents f(α which represents a rate function quantifying the deviations of the observed singularities α from the expected value. The results show that there exists a multifractal counterpart of the previously reported spectral break and different types of f(α spectra describe the fluctuations in direct dissipation or loading-unloading regimes of the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction. On the time scale of substorms and storms the multi-fractal structure of the loading-unloading mode fluctuations seems to be analogous to the simple multiplicative P-model, while the f(α spectra in direct dissipation regime are close but not equal to the features of a uniform distribution. Larger deviations from the multiplicative

  16. Automatic prediction of solar flares and super geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hui

    Space weather is the response of our space environment to the constantly changing Sun. As the new technology advances, mankind has become more and more dependent on space system, satellite-based services. A geomagnetic storm, a disturbance in Earth's magnetosphere, may produce many harmful effects on Earth. Solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are believed to be the major causes of geomagnetic storms. Thus, establishing a real time forecasting method for them is very important in space weather study. The topics covered in this dissertation are: the relationship between magnetic gradient and magnetic shear of solar active regions; the relationship between solar flare index and magnetic features of solar active regions; based on these relationships a statistical ordinal logistic regression model is developed to predict the probability of solar flare occurrences in the next 24 hours; and finally the relationship between magnetic structures of CME source regions and geomagnetic storms, in particular, the super storms when the D st index decreases below -200 nT is studied and proved to be able to predict those super storms. The results are briefly summarized as follows: (1) There is a significant correlation between magnetic gradient and magnetic shear of active region. Furthermore, compared with magnetic shear, magnetic gradient might be a better proxy to locate where a large flare occurs. It appears to be more accurate in identification of sources of X-class flares than M-class flares; (2) Flare index, defined by weighting the SXR flares, is proved to have positive correlation with three magnetic features of active region; (3) A statistical ordinal logistic regression model is proposed for solar flare prediction. The results are much better than those data published in the NASA/SDAC service, and comparable to the data provided by the NOAA/SEC complicated expert system. To our knowledge, this is the first time that logistic regression model has been applied

  17. Sound & The Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, Holger

    2014-01-01

    How are those sounds you hear right now socially constructed and evaluated, how are they architecturally conceptualized and how dependant on urban planning, industrial developments and political decisions are they really? How is your ability to hear intertwined with social interactions and their ...... and their professional design? And how is listening and sounding a deeply social activity – constructing our way of living together in cities as well as in apartment houses? A radio feature with Nina Backmann, Jochen Bonz, Stefan Krebs, Esther Schelander & Holger Schulze......How are those sounds you hear right now socially constructed and evaluated, how are they architecturally conceptualized and how dependant on urban planning, industrial developments and political decisions are they really? How is your ability to hear intertwined with social interactions...

  18. Sound classification of dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    dwellings, facade sound insulation and installation noise. The schemes have been developed, implemented and revised gradually since the early 1990s. However, due to lack of coordination between countries, there are significant discrepancies, and new standards and revisions continue to increase the diversity....... Descriptors, range of quality levels, number of quality classes, class intervals, denotations and descriptions vary across Europe. The diversity is an obstacle for exchange of experience about constructions fulfilling different classes, implying also trade barriers. Thus, a harmonized classification scheme...... is needed, and a European COST Action TU0901 "Integrating and Harmonizing Sound Insulation Aspects in Sustainable Urban Housing Constructions", has been established and runs 2009-2013, one of the main objectives being to prepare a proposal for a European sound classification scheme with a number of quality...

  19. Predicting outdoor sound

    CERN Document Server

    Attenborough, Keith; Horoshenkov, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    1. Introduction  2. The Propagation of Sound Near Ground Surfaces in a Homogeneous Medium  3. Predicting the Acoustical Properties of Outdoor Ground Surfaces  4. Measurements of the Acoustical Properties of Ground Surfaces and Comparisons with Models  5. Predicting Effects of Source Characteristics on Outdoor Sound  6. Predictions, Approximations and Empirical Results for Ground Effect Excluding Meteorological Effects  7. Influence of Source Motion on Ground Effect and Diffraction  8. Predicting Effects of Mixed Impedance Ground  9. Predicting the Performance of Outdoor Noise Barriers  10. Predicting Effects of Vegetation, Trees and Turbulence  11. Analytical Approximations including Ground Effect, Refraction and Turbulence  12. Prediction Schemes  13. Predicting Sound in an Urban Environment.

  20. Sound Art Situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh Groth, Sanne; Samson, Kristine

    2017-01-01

    This article is an analysis of two sound art performances that took place June 2015 in outdoor public spaces in the social housing area Urbanplanen in Copenhagen, Denmark. The two performances were On the production of a poor acoustics by Brandon LaBelle and Green Interactive Biofeedback Environm......This article is an analysis of two sound art performances that took place June 2015 in outdoor public spaces in the social housing area Urbanplanen in Copenhagen, Denmark. The two performances were On the production of a poor acoustics by Brandon LaBelle and Green Interactive Biofeedback...... Environments (GIBE) by Jeremy Woodruff. In order to investigate the complex situation that arises when sound art is staged in such contexts, the authors of this article suggest exploring the events through approaching them as ‘situations’ (Doherty 2009). With this approach it becomes possible to engage...... integrated within the analysis, pursuing the most comprehensive interpretation of the pieces possible....

  1. The correlations of ions density with geomagnetic activity and solar dynamic pressure in cusp region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO JianGuang; SHI JianKui; ZHANG TieLong; LIU ZhenXing; A. FAZAKERLEY; H. R(E)ME; Ⅰ. DANDOURAS; E. LUCEK

    2007-01-01

    A statistical study of the properties of ions (O+, He+ and H+) measured by the Cluster-Ⅱ in cusp region as a function of the solar wind dynamic pressure and geomagnetic index Kp respectively was made during the summer and fall of 2001 -2003. The main results are that: (1) O+ ion density responds in a significant way to geomagnetic index Kp, and He+ ion density is not correlated with geomagnetic index Kp,both of them have a significant positive correlation with solar wind dynamic pressure; (2) H+ ion density is also observed to increase with solar wind dynamic pressure, and not correlated with geomagnetic index Kp.

  2. Enhancement in Surface Atmospheric Pressure Variability Associated with a Major Geomagnetic Storm

    CERN Document Server

    Selvam, A M; Athale, S U; Tinmaker, M I R

    1998-01-01

    Observational studies indicate that there is a close association between geomagnetic storm and meteorological parameters. Geomagnetic field lines follow closely the isobars of surface pressure . A Physical mechanism linking upper atmospheric geomagnetic storm disturbances with tropospheric weather has been proposed by the author and her group where it is postulated that vertical mixing by turbulent eddy fluctuations results in the net transport upward of positive charges originating from lower levels accompanied simultaneously by downward flow of negative charges from higher levels. The present study reports enhancement of high frequency (<15 days period) fluctuations in daily surface pressure during March 1989 in association with major geomagnetic storm (Ap index = 246) on 13 march 1989.

  3. Statistical analysis of extreme values for geomagnetic and geoelectric field variations for Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, Lidia; Trichtchenko, Larisa; Boteler, David

    2016-04-01

    Disturbances of the geomagnetic field produced by space weather events cause variable geoelectric fields at Earth's surface which drive electric currents in power systems, resulting in hazardous impacts on electric power transmission. In extreme cases, as during the magnetic storm in March 13, 1989, this can result in burnt-out transformers and power blackouts. To make assessment of geomagnetic and geoelectric activity in Canada during extreme space weather events, extreme value statistical analysis has been applied to more than 40 years of magnetic data from the Canadian geomagnetic observatories network. This network has archived digital data recordings for observatories located in sub-auroral, auroral, and polar zones. Extreme value analysis was applied to hourly ranges of geomagnetic variations as an index of geomagnetic activity and to hourly maximum of rate-of-change of geomagnetic field. To estimate extreme geoelectric fields, the minute geomagnetic data were used together with Earth conductivity models for different Canadian locations to calculate geoelectric fields. The extreme value statistical analysis was applied to hourly maximum values of the horizontal geoelectric field. This assessment provided extreme values of geomagnetic and geoelectric activity which are expected to happen once per 50 years and once per 100 years. The results of this analysis are designed to be used to assess the geomagnetic hazard to power systems and help the power industry mitigate risks from extreme space weather events.

  4. Worldwide Magnetograms with Geomagnetic Components D, H, Z, or X, Y, and Z

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (formerly National Geophysical Data Center) receives magnetograms from over 200 geomagnetic observatories....

  5. Re-Evaluation of Geomagnetic Field Observation Data at Syowa Station, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Takahashi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition has conducted geomagnetic observations at Syowa Station, Antarctica, since 1966. Geomagnetic variation data measured with a fluxgate magnetometer are not absolute but are relative to a baseline and show drift. To enhance the importance of the geomagnetic data at Syowa Station, therefore, it is necessary to correct the continuous variation data by using absolute baseline values acquired by a magnetic theodolite and proton magnetometer. However, the database of baseline values contains outliers. We detected outliers in the database and then converted the geomagnetic variation data to absolute values by using the reliable baseline values.

  6. Sound Employment in the Adapted Movie-Daisy Miller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钦白兰

    2009-01-01

    Daisy Miller is a 1974 Ameriean drama movie directed by Peter Bogdanovich.It iS an adaptation of the Henry James‘novella of the same name.The movie,conmimng many symbolic cinematic techniques,iS about a beautiful young American girl died of"Roman fever"in Europe.This paper is devoted to the cinematic sound employment in the movie-Daisy Miller,with a purpose to show how the movie employs different sounds,difierent from the novella.to activate its theme.From the cinematic sound perspective,the paper claims that as all adapted movie,cinematic sound employment deeps the thematic realization,subtly intriguing with James,for the audience.

  7. Monaural Sound Localization Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wightman, Frederic L.; Kistler, Doris J.

    1997-01-01

    Research reported during the past few decades has revealed the importance for human sound localization of the so-called 'monaural spectral cues.' These cues are the result of the direction-dependent filtering of incoming sound waves accomplished by the pinnae. One point of view about how these cues are extracted places great emphasis on the spectrum of the received sound at each ear individually. This leads to the suggestion that an effective way of studying the influence of these cues is to measure the ability of listeners to localize sounds when one of their ears is plugged. Numerous studies have appeared using this monaural localization paradigm. Three experiments are described here which are intended to clarify the results of the previous monaural localization studies and provide new data on how monaural spectral cues might be processed. Virtual sound sources are used in the experiments in order to manipulate and control the stimuli independently at the two ears. Two of the experiments deal with the consequences of the incomplete monauralization that may have contaminated previous work. The results suggest that even very low sound levels in the occluded ear provide access to interaural localization cues. The presence of these cues complicates the interpretation of the results of nominally monaural localization studies. The third experiment concerns the role of prior knowledge of the source spectrum, which is required if monaural cues are to be useful. The results of this last experiment demonstrate that extraction of monaural spectral cues can be severely disrupted by trial-to-trial fluctuations in the source spectrum. The general conclusion of the experiments is that, while monaural spectral cues are important, the monaural localization paradigm may not be the most appropriate way to study their role.

  8. Sound for digital video

    CERN Document Server

    Holman, Tomlinson

    2013-01-01

    Achieve professional quality sound on a limited budget! Harness all new, Hollywood style audio techniques to bring your independent film and video productions to the next level.In Sound for Digital Video, Second Edition industry experts Tomlinson Holman and Arthur Baum give you the tools and knowledge to apply recent advances in audio capture, video recording, editing workflow, and mixing to your own film or video with stunning results. This fresh edition is chockfull of techniques, tricks, and workflow secrets that you can apply to your own projects from preproduction

  9. Sound & The Senses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, Holger

    2012-01-01

    How are those sounds you hear right now technically generated and post-produced, how are they aesthetically conceptualized and how culturally dependant are they really? How is your ability to hear intertwined with all the other senses and their cultural, biographical and technological constructio...... over time? And how is listening and sounding a deeply social activity – constructing our way of living together in cities as well as in apartment houses? A radio feature with Jonathan Sterne, AGF a.k.a Antye Greie, Jens Gerrit Papenburg & Holger Schulze....

  10. Sound & The Studio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, Holger

    2011-01-01

    How are those sounds you hear right now technically generated and post-produced, how are they aesthetically conceptualized and how culturally dependant are they really? How is your ability to hear intertwined with all the other senses and their cultural, biographical and technological constructio...... over time? And how is listening and sounding a deeply social activity – constructing our way of living together in cities as well as in apartment houses? A radio feature with David Toop, Simon Zagorski-Thomas, Paul Théberge, Maria Hanáček & Holger Schulze....

  11. Sound & The Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, Holger

    2014-01-01

    How are those sounds you hear right now socially constructed and evaluated, how are they architecturally conceptualized and how dependant on urban planning, industrial developments and political decisions are they really? How is your ability to hear intertwined with social interactions and their ......How are those sounds you hear right now socially constructed and evaluated, how are they architecturally conceptualized and how dependant on urban planning, industrial developments and political decisions are they really? How is your ability to hear intertwined with social interactions...

  12. Sounds in context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weed, Ethan

    A sound is never just a sound. It is becoming increasingly clear that auditory processing is best thought of not as a one-way afferent stream, but rather as an ongoing interaction between interior processes and the environment. Even the earliest stages of auditory processing in the nervous system...... time-course of contextual influence on auditory processing in three different paradigms: a simple mismatch negativity paradigm with tones of differing pitch, a multi-feature mismatch negativity paradigm in which tones were embedded in a complex musical context, and a cross-modal paradigm, in which...

  13. Sound & The Studio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, Holger

    2011-01-01

    How are those sounds you hear right now technically generated and post-produced, how are they aesthetically conceptualized and how culturally dependant are they really? How is your ability to hear intertwined with all the other senses and their cultural, biographical and technological construction...... over time? And how is listening and sounding a deeply social activity – constructing our way of living together in cities as well as in apartment houses? A radio feature with David Toop, Simon Zagorski-Thomas, Paul Théberge, Maria Hanáček & Holger Schulze....

  14. Handbook for sound engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Ballou, Glen

    2013-01-01

    Handbook for Sound Engineers is the most comprehensive reference available for audio engineers. All audio topics are explored: if you work on anything related to audio you should not be without this book! The 4th edition of this trusted reference has been updated to reflect changes in the industry since the publication of the 3rd edition in 2002 -- including new technologies like software-based recording systems such as Pro Tools and Sound Forge; digital recording using MP3, wave files and others; mobile audio devices such as iPods and MP3 players. Over 40 topic

  15. Sound Symbolism in Basic Vocabulary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Wichmann

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between meanings of words and their sound shapes is to a large extent arbitrary, but it is well known that languages exhibit sound symbolism effects violating arbitrariness. Evidence for sound symbolism is typically anecdotal, however. Here we present a systematic approach. Using a selection of basic vocabulary in nearly one half of the world’s languages we find commonalities among sound shapes for words referring to same concepts. These are interpreted as due to sound symbolism. Studying the effects of sound symbolism cross-linguistically is of key importance for the understanding of language evolution.

  16. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein ... the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a serious problem ...

  17. See This Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas Bjørnsten

    2009-01-01

    Anmeldelse af udstillingen See This Sound på Lentos Kunstmuseum Linz, Østrig, som markerer den foreløbige kulmination på et samarbejde mellem Lentos Kunstmuseum og Ludwig Boltzmann Institute Media.Art.Research. Udover den konkrete udstilling er samarbejdet tænkt som en ambitiøs, tværfaglig...

  18. Creative Sound Dramatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Rebecca; Eick, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Sound propagation is not easy for children to understand because of its abstract nature, often best represented by models such as wave drawings and particle dots. Teachers Rebecca Hendrix and Charles Eick wondered how science inquiry, when combined with an unlikely discipline like drama, could produce a better understanding among their…

  19. Sound of Stockholm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh

    2013-01-01

    Med sine kun 4 år bag sig er Sound of Stockholm relativt ny i det internationale festival-landskab. Festivalen er efter sigende udsprunget af en større eller mindre frustration over, at den svenske eksperimentelle musikscenes forskellige foreninger og organisationer gik hinanden bedene, og...

  20. Urban Sound Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Morten

    2012-01-01

    This paper draws on the theories of Michel de Certeau and Gaston Bachelard to discuss how media architecture, in the form of urban sound interfaces, can help us perceive the complexity of the spaces we inhabit, by exploring the history and the narratives of the places in which we live...

  1. The Sounds of Metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grund, Cynthia M.

    2015-01-01

    Two, I propose that this framework allows for at least a theoretical distinction between the way in which extreme metal – e.g. black metal, doom metal, funeral doom metal, death metal – relates to its sound as music and the way in which much other music may be conceived of as being constituted...

  2. Sounding Natural in English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JosephDeVeto

    2004-01-01

    Chinese is a "tonal" language with four different "tones". In standard Chinese the words "soup", "sugar", "recline", and "burn" are all pronounced as "tang". The first tone could be represented as a straight line, like this: - which is a high, flat sound. The second tone could

  3. Exploring Sound with Insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Laura; Meyer, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Differences in insect morphology and movement during singing provide a fascinating opportunity for students to investigate insects while learning about the characteristics of sound. In the activities described here, students use a free online computer software program to explore the songs of the major singing insects and experiment with making…

  4. Sight/Sound System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Richard

    This guide explains the purpose, components, and use of the Sight/Sound System, which is an alternative reading instruction approach designed to meet the individual needs of learners of all ages who have poor decoding skills. Described in the first section are the ways in which the system works to accomplish the following goals: develop…

  5. The Universe of Sound

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Sound Scultor, Bill Fontana, the second winner of the Prix Ars Electronica Collide@CERN residency award, and his science inspiration partner, CERN cosmologist Subodh Patil, present their work in art and science at the CERN Globe of Science and Innovation on 4 July 2013 at 19:00.

  6. SoleSound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanotto, Damiano; Turchet, Luca; Boggs, Emily Marie;

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the design of SoleSound, a wearable system designed to deliver ecological, audio-tactile, underfoot feedback. The device, which primarily targets clinical applications, uses an audio-tactile footstep synthesis engine informed by the readings of pressure and inertial sensors...

  7. Sunny Norton Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A clear day over Norton Sound in the Bering Sea allowed SeaWiFS to capture this image of the phytoplankton bloom off the coast of Alaska. Credit: Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  8. Sound Propagation Considerations for a Deep-Ocean Acoustic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    reporting of tsunamis with amplitude below the auto-reporting threshold” [2]. The amount of data the BPR sends can be controlled to help meet the...the subsea network to a surface gateway node, such as a USV or moored buoy. The link could come either from the bottom-mounted sensor or from a

  9. MoSST DAS: The First Working Geomagnetic Data Assimilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Weijia; Wei, Zigang; Tangborn, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The Earth possesses an internal magnetic field (geomagnetic field) generated by convection in the outer core (geodynamo). Previous efforts have been focused along two distinct paths: (1) numerical geodynamo modeling to understand the origin of the geomagnetic field, and the mechanisms of geomagnetic secular variations (SV); and (2) geomagnetic field modeling to map the spatial/temporal variations of the field from geomagnetic data, and to derive core properties, e.g. inversion of core flow near the core-mantle boundary (CMB). Geomagnetic data assimilation is a new approach emerged over the past 5 years: surface observations are assimilated with geodynamo models for better understanding of the core dynamical state, and accurately prediction of SV. In collaboration with several geomagnetic research groups, we have developed the first working geomagnetic data assimilation system, Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent, and Three-dimensional (MoSST) DAS, that includes the MoSST numerical dynamo model; 7000 years of geomagnetic field maps from several field models utilizing satellite and ground observatory data, historical magnetic records and archeo/paleo magnetic data; and an ensemble based optimal interpolation (01) assimilation algorithm. With this system, we have demonstrated clearly that the assimilated core dynamical state is substantially different from those of pure geodynamo simulations. Ensemble assimilation runs also show the convergence of the assimilated solutions inside the core, suggesting that the simulation state is pulled closer to the truth via data assimilation. The forecasts from this system are also very accurate: the 5-year forecast of the geomagnetic field agrees very well with the observations; and the 5-year secular variation forecast is more accurate than the IGRF SV forecast models in the past. Using geomagnetic records up to 2009, we have made an SV forecast for the period from 2010-2015, and is a candidate SV model for IGRF-11.

  10. The Egyptian geomagnetic reference field to the Epoch, 2010.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deebes, H. A.; Abd Elaal, E. M.; Arafa, T.; Lethy, A.; El Emam, A.; Ghamry, E.; Odah, H.

    2017-06-01

    The present work is a compilation of two tasks within the frame of the project ;Geomagnetic Survey & Detailed Geomagnetic Measurements within the Egyptian Territory; funded by the ;Science and Technology Development Fund agency (STDF);. The National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics (NRIAG), has conducted a new extensive land geomagnetic survey that covers the whole Egyptian territory. The field measurements have been done at 3212 points along all the asphalted roads, defined tracks, and ill-defined tracks in Egypt; with total length of 11,586 km. In the present work, the measurements cover for the first time new areas as: the southern eastern borders of Egypt including Halayeb and Shlatin, the Quattara depresion in the western desert, and the new roads between Farafra and Baharia oasis. Also marine geomagnetic survey have been applied for the first time in Naser lake. Misallat and Abu-Simble geomagnetic observatories have been used to reduce the field data to the Epoch 2010. During the field measurements, whenever possible, the old stations occupied by the previous observers have been re-occupied to determine the secular variations at these points. The geomagnetic anomaly maps, the normal geomagnetic field maps with their corresponding secular variation maps, the normal geomagnetic field equations of the geomagnetic elements (EGRF) and their corresponding secular variations equations, are outlined. The anomalous sites, as discovered from the anomaly maps are, only, mentioned. In addition, a correlation between the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) 2010.0 and the Egyptian Geomagnetic Reference Field (EGRF) 2010 is indicated.

  11. About sound mufflers sound-absorbing panels aircraft engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudarev, A. S.; Bulbovich, R. V.; Svirshchev, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    The article provides a formula for calculating the frequency of sound absorbed panel with a perforated wall. And although the sound absorbing structure is a set of resonators Helmholtz, not individual resonators should be considered in acoustic calculations, and all the perforated wall panel. The analysis, showing how the parameters affect the size and sound-absorbing structures in the absorption rate.

  12. Baleen whale infrasonic sounds: Natural variability and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christopher W.

    2001-05-01

    Blue and fin whales (Balaenoptera musculus and B. physalus) produce very intense, long, patterned sequences of infrasonic sounds. The acoustic characteristics of these sounds suggest strong selection for signals optimized for very long-range propagation in the deep ocean as first hypothesized by Payne and Webb in 1971. This hypothesis has been partially validated by very long-range detections using hydrophone arrays in deep water. Humpback songs recorded in deep water contain units in the 20-l00 Hz range, and these relatively simple song components are detectable out to many hundreds of miles. The mid-winter peak in the occurrence of 20-Hz fin whale sounds led Watkins to hypothesize a reproductive function similar to humpback (Megaptera novaeangliae) song, and by default this function has been extended to blue whale songs. More recent evidence shows that blue and fin whales produce infrasonic calls in high latitudes during the feeding season, and that singing is associated with areas of high productivity where females congregate to feed. Acoustic sampling over broad spatial and temporal scales for baleen species is revealing higher geographic and seasonal variability in the low-frequency vocal behaviors than previously reported, suggesting that present explanations for baleen whale sounds are too simplistic.

  13. Baleen whale infrasonic sounds: Natural variability and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christopher W.

    2004-05-01

    Blue and fin whales (Balaenoptera musculus and B. physalus) produce very intense, long, patterned sequences of infrasonic sounds. The acoustic characteristics of these sounds suggest strong selection for signals optimized for very long-range propagation in the deep ocean as first hypothesized by Payne and Webb in 1971. This hypothesis has been partially validated by very long-range detections using hydrophone arrays in deep water. Humpback songs recorded in deep water contain units in the 20-l00 Hz range, and these relatively simple song components are detectable out to many hundreds of miles. The mid-winter peak in the occurrence of 20-Hz fin whale sounds led Watkins to hypothesize a reproductive function similar to humpback (Megaptera novaeangliae) song, and by default this function has been extended to blue whale songs. More recent evidence shows that blue and fin whales produce infrasonic calls in high latitudes during the feeding season, and that singing is associated with areas of high productivity where females congregate to feed. Acoustic sampling over broad spatial and temporal scales for baleen species is revealing higher geographic and seasonal variability in the low-frequency vocal behaviors than previously reported, suggesting that present explanations for baleen whale sounds are too simplistic.

  14. The Study of the Geomagnetic Variation for Sq current System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X.; Du, A.

    2012-04-01

    The solar quiet variation (Sq) with a period of 24 hrs is a typical one of the quiet variations. Sq is generally caused by atmospheric tide-dynamo in ionosphere and it is controlled by the electric field, electric conductivity in ionosphere and neutral wind in middle-high altitude atmosphere. In our work, the geomagnetic field data observed by 90 ground-based observatories is used to analyze the local time variation of Sq. Sq is derived from five quiet-day geomagnetic data in every month by the FFT method. According to the pattern of geomagnetic X component in Sq, there is a prenoon-postnoon (before noon and after noon) asymmetry. This asymmetry is obvious in spring, summer and winter. The X component at 12:00-13:00 LT is about 5 nT larger than it at 11:00-12:00 LT. The ratio between the X component of daily variable amplitude and Y component of daily variable amplitude in middle and low (high) latitude regions in summer is greater (smaller) than that in winter. Used the sphere harmonic analysis method, the Sq equivalent current system is obtained. From the pattern of Sq current system, the prenoon-postnoon asymmetry may be caused by the electric field in the high latitude region. This electric field has two effects: the one is that the electric field from high latitude maps to the low latitude region; the other is this electric field penetrate to the middle latitude region directly. The combined action of these two effects makes the prenoon-postnoon asymmetry of Sq. The asymmetry also has an obvious seasonal effect. It may relate to the polar Sq and DP2 in the high latitude region.

  15. An overset grid method for global geomagnetic induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Chester J.

    2014-07-01

    A new finite difference solution to the global geomagnetic induction problem is developed and tested, based on a modified Lorenz gauge of the magnetic vector and electric scalar potentials and implementing a novel, overset `Yin-Yang' grid that avoids unnecessary mesh refinement at the geographic poles. Previously used in whole-earth mantle convection models, the overset grid is built from a pair of partially overlapping mid-latitude latitude-longitude (lat/lon) grids, one of which is rotated with respect to the other for complete coverage of the sphere. Because of this symmetry, only one set of finite difference templates is required for global discretization of the governing Maxwell equations, a redundancy that is exploited for computational efficiency and multithreaded parallelization. Comparisons between solutions obtained by the proposed method show excellent agreement with those obtained by independent integral equation methods for 1-D, 2-D and 3-D problem geometries. The computational footprint of the method is minimized through a (non-symmetric) matrix-free BiCG-STAB iterative solver which computes finite difference matrix coefficients `on the fly' as needed, rather than pulling stored values from memory. Scaling of the matrix-free BiCG-STAB algorithm with problem size shows behaviour similar to that seen with the (symmetric) QMR algorithm used in the Cartesian case from which the present algorithm is based. The proposed method may therefore provide a competitive addition to the existing body of global-scale geomagnetic induction modelling algorithms, allowing for resource-efficient forward modelling as the kernel for large-scale computing such as inversion of geomagnetic response functions, computational hypothesis testing and parametric studies of mantle geodynamics and physiochemical state.

  16. Reversed polarity patches at the CMB and geomagnetic field reversal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Wenyao(徐文耀); WEI; Zigang(魏自刚)

    2002-01-01

    The International Geomagnetic Reference Field models (IGRF) for 1900-2000 are used to calculate the geomagnetic field distribution in the Earth' interior from the ground surface to the core-mantle boundary (CMB) under the assumption of insulated mantle. Four reversed polarity patches, as one of the most important features of the CMB field, are revealed. Two patches with +Z polarity (downward) at the southern African and the southern American regions stand out against the background of -Z polarity (upward) in the southern hemisphere, and two patches of -Z polarity at the North Polar and the northern Pacific regions stand out against the +Z background in the northern hemisphere. During the 1900-2000 period the southern African (SAF) patch has quickly drifted westward at a speed of 0.2-0.3°/a; meanwhile its area has expanded 5 times, and the magnetic flux crossing the area has intensified 30 times. On the other hand, other three patches show little if any change during this 100-year period. Extending upward, each of the reversed polarity patches at the CMB forms a chimney-shaped "reversed polarity column" in the mantle with the bottom at the CMB. The height of the SAF column has grown rapidly from 200km in 1900 to 900km in 2000. If the column grows steadily at the same rate in the future, its top will reach to the ground surface in 600-700 years. And then a reversed polarity patch will be observed at the Earth's surface, which will be an indicator of the beginning of a magnetic field reversal. On the basis of this study, one can describe the process of a geomagnetic polarity reversal, the polarity reversal may be observed firstly in one or several local regions; then the areas of these regions expand, and at the same time, other new reversed polarity regions may appear. Thus several poles may exist during a polarity reversal.

  17. K-type geomagnetic index nowcast with data quality control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Warnant

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available

    A nowcast system for operational estimation of a proxy K-type geomagnetic index is presented. The system is based on a fully automated computer procedure for real-time digital magnetogram data acquisition that includes screening of the dataset and removal of the outliers, estimation of the solar regular variation (SR of the geomagnetic field, calculation of the index, and issuing of an alert if storm-level activity is indicated. This is a time-controlled (rather than event-driven system that delivers the regular output of: the index value, the estimated quality flag, and eventually, an alert. The novel features provided are first, the strict control of the data input and processing, and second, the increased frequency of production of the index (every 1 h. Such quality control and increased time resolution have been found to be of crucial importance for various applications, e.g. ionospheric monitoring, that are of particular interest to us and to users of our service. The nowcast system operability, accuracy and precision have been tested with instantaneous measurements from recent years. A statistical comparison between the nowcast and the definitive index values shows that the average root-mean-square error is smaller than 1 KU. The system is now operational at the site of the Geophysical Centre of the Royal Meteorological Institute in Dourbes (50.1ºN, 4.6ºE, and it is being used for alerting users when geomagnetic storms take place.

  18. Continuous global geomagnetic field models for the past 3000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korte, Monika; Constable, Catherine

    2003-11-01

    Several global geomagnetic field models exist for recent decades, but due to limited data availability models for several centuries to millennia are rare. We present a continuous spherical harmonic model for almost 3 millennia from 1000 b.c. to 1800 a.d., based on a dataset of directional archaeo- and paleomagnetic data and axial dipole constraints. The model, named Continuous Archaeomagnetic and Lake Sediment Geomagnetic Model for the last 3k years (CALS3K.1), can be used to predict both the field and secular variation. Comparisons and tests with synthetic data lead to the conclusion that CALS3K.1 gives a good general, large-scale representation of the geomagnetic field, but lacks small-scale structure due to the limited resolution of the sparse dataset. In future applications the model can be used for comparisons with additional, new data for that time span. For better resolved regions, the agreement of data with CALS3K.1 will provide an idea about the general compatibility of the data with the field and secular variation in that region of the world. For poorly covered regions and time intervals we hope to iteratively improve the model by comparisons with and inclusion of new data. Animations and additional snapshot plots of model predictions as well as the model coefficients and a FORTRAN code to evaluate them for any time can be accessed under http://www.mahi.ucsd.edu/cathy/Holocene/holocene.html. The whole package is also stored in the Earthref digital archive at http://www.earthref.org/...

  19. Longitudinal and geomagnetic activity modulation of the equatorial thermosphere anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jiuhou; Thayer, Jeffrey P.; Forbes, Jeffrey M.

    2010-08-01

    In this paper we examine the detailed similarities and differences between the equatorial thermosphere anomaly (ETA) and the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) from 20 March to 6 April 2002, when both the ETA and the EIA are distinct in the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) observations. The characteristics of the ETA and the EIA are obtained from the CHAMP accelerometer, in situ electron density measurements, and total electron content (TEC) above the CHAMP satellite. Our results show that the trough locations of the ETA and the EIA in latitude show a good agreement, and both correspond well with the dip magnetic equator, while the ETA crests are usually located poleward of the EIA. Meanwhile, the latitudinal locations of the ETA crests exhibit strong hemispheric asymmetry and large variability during our study interval. The longitudinal variations between the EIA and the ETA show significant differences. The EIA crests from the CHAMP observations show strong wave 4 structures, but the primary component in the ETA is wave 1. Moreover, the ETA densities show strong variations in response to geomagnetic activity, whereas CHAMP in situ electron densities and TEC at the EIA do not reflect such large day-to-day variability. Therefore, a simple EIA-ETA relationship cannot explain the dependence of the longitudinal and geomagnetic activity modulation of the ETA and the EIA. The meridional ion drag, which is significantly modulated by enhanced equatorward winds during elevated geomagnetic activity, is probably responsible for some of the observed features in the ETA, although no unambiguous explanation for ETA formation yet exists.

  20. Data sonification and sound visualization

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    This article describes a collaborative project between researchers in the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory and the Computer Music Project of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The project focuses on the use of sound for the exploration and analysis of complex data sets in scientific computing. The article addresses digital sound synthesis in the context of DIASS (Digital Instrument for Additive Sound Synthesis) and sound visualization in a ...

  1. Measuring the `complexity’ of sound

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nandini Chatterjee Singh

    2011-11-01

    Sounds in the natural environment form an important class of biologically relevant nonstationary signals. We propose a dynamic spectral measure to characterize the spectral dynamics of such non-stationary sound signals and classify them based on rate of change of spectral dynamics. We categorize sounds with slowly varying spectral dynamics as simple and those with rapidly changing spectral dynamics as complex. We propose rate of spectral dynamics as a possible scheme to categorize sounds in the environment.

  2. Variations in the geomagnetic and gravitational background associated with two strong earthquakes of the May 2012 sequence in the Po Valley Plain (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straser, Valentino

    2013-04-01

    characteristics (duration, extension, intensity, etc..) compatible with: the classification by IAGA (International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy) of geomagnetic pulsations; emissions of an anthropic type; known natural emissions (Whistler, Chorus, lightning, electrophonic meteoric sounds, plasma, etc..). For this reason, since Radio anomalies are not related to known phenomena they were considered in this study as candidate seismic precursors. Most of the radio anomalies are observed below 32Hz and, generally, between 0.1 and 20Hz and occur in association with an intense increase in the geomagnetic background that precedes the occurrence of a seismic event.

  3. Active experiments in the ionosphere and geomagnetic field variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivokon, V. P.; Cherneva, N. V.; Khomutov, S. Y.; Serovetnikov, A. S.

    2014-11-01

    Variations of ionospheric-magnetospheric relation energy, as one of the possible outer climatology factors, may be traced on the basis of analysis of natural geophysical phenomena such as ionosphere artificial radio radiation and magnetic storms. Experiments on active impact on the ionosphere have been carried out for quite a long time in Russia as well. The most modern heating stand is located in Alaska; it has been used within the HAARP Program. The possibility of this stand to affect geophysical fields, in particular, the geomagnetic field is of interest.

  4. A proposed International Geomagnetic Reference Field for 1965- 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddie, N.W.; Fabiano, E.B.

    1982-01-01

    A set of spherical harmonic models describing the Earth's main magnetic field from 1965 to 1985 has been developed and is proposed as the next revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). A tenth degree and order spherical harmonic model of the main field was derived from Magsat data. A series of eighth degree and order spherical harmonic models of the secular variation of the main field was derived from magnetic observatory annual mean values. Models of the main field at 1965, 1970, 1975, and 1980 were obtained by extrapolating the main-field model using the secular variation models.-Authors spherical harmonic models Earth main magnetic field Magsat data

  5. Quiet geomagnetic field representation for all days and latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W.H.; Schiffmacher, E.R.; Arora, B.R.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a technique for obtaining the quiet-time geomagnetic field variation expected for all days of the year and distribution of latitudes from a limited set of selected quiet days within a year at a discrete set of locations. A data set of observatories near 75??E longitude was used as illustration. The method relies upon spatial smoothing of the decomposed spectral components. An evaluation of the fidelity of the resulting model shows correlation coefficients usually above 0.9 at the lower latitudes and near 0.7 at the higher latitudes with variations identified as dependent upon season and field element. -from Authors

  6. Just How Does Sound Wave?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, Bob

    2006-01-01

    When children first hear the term "sound wave" perhaps they might associate it with the way a hand waves or perhaps the squiggly line image on a television monitor when sound recordings are being made. Research suggests that children tend to think sound somehow travels as a discrete package, a fast-moving invisible thing, and not something that…

  7. Can the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini survive in the absence of the geomagnetic field?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Weronika; Idzikowski, Bogdan; Kowalski, Wojciech; Szymański, Bogdan; Kosicki, Jakub Z; Kaczmarek, Łukasz

    2017-01-01

    Earth's geomagnetic field has undergone critical changes in the past. Studies on the influence of the magnetic field on Earth's organisms are crucial for the understanding of evolution of life on Earth and astrobiological considerations. Numerous studies conducted both on plants and animals confirmed the significant influence of the geomagnetic field on the metabolism of living organisms. Water bears (Tardigrada), which are a mong the most resistant animals due to their cryptobiotic abilities, show significant resistance to a number of environmental stressors, but the influence of the geomagnetic field on their fitness has not been addressed before. In our studies, we used eutardigrade Hypsibius dujardini to analyse whether isolation from the geomagnetic field had an effect on mortality. We found that Hypsibius dujardini specimens demonstrated relatively high mortality during anhydrobiosis, also in control groups exposed to the normal geomagnetic field. Moreover, similar mortality was observed in anhydrobiotic specimens isolated from the geomagnetic field. However, a significant difference was noted between tardigrade survival and the moment of their isolation from the geomagnetic field. In particular, tardigrade mortality substantially increased in absence of a magnetic field during the process of entering anhydrobiosis and returning to active life. Our results suggest that these processes rely on complex metabolic processes that are critically influenced by the geomagnetic field.

  8. The geomagnetic observatory on Tristan da Cunha: Setup, operation and experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzka, Jürgen; Husøy, Bjørn-Ove; Berarducci, Alan;

    2011-01-01

    The island Tristan da Cunha is located in the South Atlantic Anomaly, and until recently the area has been one of the largest gaps in the global geomagnetic observatory network. As part of the Danish project SAADAN we set up a geomagnetic observatory on the island. Here we report on how we...

  9. Solar activity and human health at middle and low geomagnetic latitudes in Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Blanca; Sánchez de La Peña, Salvador

    2010-08-01

    The study of the possible effect of solar variability on living organisms is one of the most controversial issues of present day science. It has been firstly and mainly carried on high latitudes, while at middle and low latitudes this study is rare. In the present review we focused on the work developed at middle and low geomagnetic latitudes of America. At these geomagnetic latitudes the groups consistently dedicated to this issue are mainly two, one in Cuba and the other in Mexico. The Cuban and Mexican studies show that at such latitudes there are biological consequences to the solar/geomagnetic activity, coinciding in four points: (1) the male population behave differently from the female population, (2) the most vulnerable age group to geomagnetic perturbations is that of ⩾65 years old, (3) there is a tendency for myocardial infarctions (death or occurrence) to increase one day after a geomagnetic Ap index large value or during the day of the associated Forbush decrease, and (4) the myocardial infarctions (death or occurrence) increase as the geomagnetic perturbation increases. Additionally, the Cuban group found seasonal periodicities from their data, and also that increases of female myocardial infarctions occurred before and after the day of the geomagnetic disturbance. The Mexican group found that the male sex is more vulnerable to geomagnetic perturbations and that the myocardial infarction deaths present the conspicuous cycle of ˜7 days.

  10. Advanced Systems for Monitoring Underwater Sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Michael; Van Meter, Steven; Gilmore, Richard Grant; Sommer, Keith

    2007-01-01

    The term "Passive Acoustic Monitoring System" (PAMS) describes a developmental sensing-and-data-acquisition system for recording underwater sounds. The sounds (more precisely, digitized and preprocessed versions from acoustic transducers) are subsequently analyzed by a combination of data processing and interpretation to identify and/or, in some cases, to locate the sources of those sounds. PAMS was originally designed to locate the sources such as fish of species that one knows or seeks to identify. The PAMS unit could also be used to locate other sources, for example, marine life, human divers, and/or vessels. The underlying principles of passive acoustic sensing and analyzing acoustic-signal data in conjunction with temperature and salinity data are not new and not unique to PAMS. Part of the uniqueness of the PAMS design is that it is the first deep-sea instrumentation design to provide a capability for studying soniferous marine animals (especially fish) over the wide depth range described below. The uniqueness of PAMS also lies partly in a synergistic combination of advanced sensing, packaging, and data-processing design features with features adapted from proven marine instrumentation systems. This combination affords a versatility that enables adaptation to a variety of undersea missions using a variety of sensors. The interpretation of acoustic data can include visual inspection of power-spectrum plots for identification of spectral signatures of known biological species or artificial sources. Alternatively or in addition, data analysis could include determination of relative times of arrival of signals at different acoustic sensors arrayed at known locations. From these times of arrival, locations of acoustic sources (and errors in those locations) can be estimated. Estimates of relative locations of sources and sensors can be refined through analysis of the attenuation of sound in the intervening water in combination with water-temperature and salinity

  11. Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Sounding for Planetary Volatiles (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    EM sounding is divided by loss tangent penetrating radars) and >> 1 (inductive methods). The former have high resolution and responses dominated by dielectric permittivity. They have been useful for sounding the polar caps of Mars and are very promising to image the shells of icy satellites as well as the uppermost crusts of silicate bodies. The latter have poorer resolution but greater penetration depth, responses dominated by electrical conductivity, and are the subject of this talk. Low-frequency inductive methods are further divided by comparing the source-receiver separation to the skin depth. Large separations are parametric in frequency so that the variation of EM response with frequency is translated to change in conductivity with depth. Parametric soundings can exploit natural sources from the solar wind, magnetosphere, ionosphere, or atmosphere. Small source-sensor separations are geometric with transmitter-receiver positions: both conductivity and permittivity can be recovered as a function of frequency (a dielectric spectrum), but at greater resource requirements. Subsurface liquid water is an optimal low-frequency EM target because even small quantities of dissolved ions make it a powerful electrical conductor compared to dry, resistive, silicate crusts. Water at kms or even tens of kms can be detected using the magnetotelluric, geomagnetic-depth sounding, or wave-tilt methods: these are all natural-source soundings using different combinations of field components and receiver geometries. If natural sources are weak or absent, a transmitter can be used to obtain high SNR; the time-domain EM (TDEM) method has been used extensively for terrestrial groundwater exploration. Using a ballistically deployed 200-m diameter transmitter loop, TDEM can detect groundwater at depths of several km. If landed in a region of strong local crustal magnetism, the characteristic Larmor frequency of liquid water can be detected with a TDEM-like setup using nuclear magnetic

  12. Deep Learning for Space Weather Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, M.; Shah, Y.; Cheung, C. M. M.

    2016-12-01

    Through the use of our current fleet of in-orbit solar observatories, we have accumulated a vast amount of high quality solar event data which has greatly helped us to understand the underlying mechanisms of how the Sun works. However, we still lack an accurate and robust system for autonomously predicting solar eruptive events, which are known to cause geomagnetic storms, disturbances in electrical grids, radio black outs, increased drag on satellites, and increased radiation exposure to astronauts. We address the need for a flare prediction system by developing deep neural networks (DNNs) trained with solar data taken by the Helioseismic & Magnetic Imager (HMI) and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instruments onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory and X-ray flux data taken by the GOES satellites. We describe the architecture of the DNNs trained and compare the performance between different implementations.

  13. Absolute photoacoustic thermometry in deep tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Junjie; Ke, Haixin; Tai, Stephen; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Lihong V

    2013-12-15

    Photoacoustic thermography is a promising tool for temperature measurement in deep tissue. Here we propose an absolute temperature measurement method based on the dual temperature dependences of the Grüneisen parameter and the speed of sound in tissue. By taking ratiometric measurements at two adjacent temperatures, we can eliminate the factors that are temperature irrelevant but difficult to correct for in deep tissue. To validate our method, absolute temperatures of blood-filled tubes embedded ~9 mm deep in chicken tissue were measured in a biologically relevant range from 28°C to 46°C. The temperature measurement accuracy was ~0.6°C. The results suggest that our method can be potentially used for absolute temperature monitoring in deep tissue during thermotherapy.

  14. Relationship between isolated sleep paralysis and geomagnetic influences: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conesa, J

    1995-06-01

    This preliminary report, of a longitudinal study, looks at the relationship between geomagnetic activity and the incidence of isolated sleep paralysis over a 23.5-mo. period. The author, who has frequently and for the last 24 years experienced isolated sleep paralysis was the subject. In addition, incidence of lucid dreaming, vivid dreams, and total dream frequency were looked at with respect to geomagnetic activity. The data were in the form of dream-recall frequency recorded in a diary. These frequency data were correlated with geomagnetic activity k-index values obtained from two observatories. A significant correlation was obtained between periods of local geomagnetic activity and the incidence of isolated sleep paralysis. Specifically, periods of relatively quiet geomagnetic activity were significantly associated with an increased incidence of episodes.

  15. Lagged association between geomagnetic activity and diminished nocturnal pain thresholds in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galic, M A; Persinger, M A

    2007-10-01

    A wide variety of behaviors in several species has been statistically associated with the natural variations in geomagnetism. To examine whether changes in geomagnetic activity are associated with pain thresholds, adult mice were exposed to a hotplate paradigm once weekly for 52 weeks during the dark cycle. Planetary A index values from the previous 6 days of a given hotplate session were correlated with the mean response latency for subjects to the thermal stimulus. We found that hotplate latency was significantly (P geomagnetic intensity 3 days prior to testing. Therefore, if the geomagnetic activity was greater 3 days before a given hotplate trial, subjects tended to exhibit shorter response latencies, suggesting lower pain thresholds or less analgesia. These results are supported by related experimental findings and suggest that natural variations in geomagnetic intensity may influence nociceptive behaviors in mice.

  16. Pitch Based Sound Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Andreas Brinch; Hansen, Lars Kai; Kjems, U

    2006-01-01

    A sound classification model is presented that can classify signals into music, noise and speech. The model extracts the pitch of the signal using the harmonic product spectrum. Based on the pitch estimate and a pitch error measure, features are created and used in a probabilistic model with soft......-max output function. Both linear and quadratic inputs are used. The model is trained on 2 hours of sound and tested on publicly available data. A test classification error below 0.05 with 1 s classification windows is achieved. Further more it is shown that linear input performs as well as a quadratic......, and that even though classification gets marginally better, not much is achieved by increasing the window size beyond 1 s....

  17. Sound for Health

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    From astronomy to biomedical sciences: music and sound as tools for scientific investigation Music and science are probably two of the most intrinsically linked disciplines in the spectrum of human knowledge. Science and technology have revolutionised the way artists work, interact, and create. The impact of innovative materials, new communication media, more powerful computers, and faster networks on the creative process is evident: we all can become artists in the digital era. What is less known, is that arts, and music in particular, are having a profound impact the way scientists operate, and think. From the early experiments by Kepler to the modern data sonification applications in medicine – sound and music are playing an increasingly crucial role in supporting science and driving innovation. In this talk. Dr. Domenico Vicinanza will be highlighting the complementarity and the natural synergy between music and science, with specific reference to biomedical sciences. Dr. Vicinanza will take t...

  18. Sound in Ergonomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jebreil Seraji

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available The word of “Ergonomics “is composed of two separate parts: “Ergo” and” Nomos” and means the Human Factors Engineering. Indeed, Ergonomics (or human factors is the scientific discipline concerned with the understanding of interactions among humans and other elements of a system, and the profession that applies theory, principles, data and methods to design in order to optimize human well-being and overall system performance. It has applied different sciences such as Anatomy and physiology, anthropometry, engineering, psychology, biophysics and biochemistry from different ergonomics purposes. Sound when is referred as noise pollution can affect such balance in human life. The industrial noise caused by factories, traffic jam, media, and modern human activity can affect the health of the society.Here we are aimed at discussing sound from an ergonomic point of view.

  19. Optimal Sound Absorbing Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Min; Fu, Caixing; Sheng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Causal nature of the acoustic response, for any materials or structures, dictates an inequality that relates the absorption spectrum of the sample to its thickness. We present a general recipe for constructing sound-absorbing structures that can attain near-equality for the causal relation with very high absorption performance; such structures are denoted optimal. Our strategy involves using carefully designed acoustic metamaterials as backing to a thin layer of conventional sound absorbing material, e.g., acoustic sponge. By using this design approach, we have realized a 12 cm-thick structure that exhibits broadband, near-perfect flat absorption spectrum starting at around 400 Hz. From the causal relation, the calculated minimum sample thickness is 11.5 cm for the observed absorption spectrum. We present the theory that underlies such absorption performance, involving the evanescent waves and their interaction with a dissipative medium, and show the excellent agreement with the experiment.

  20. Wood for sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegst, Ulrike G K

    2006-10-01

    The unique mechanical and acoustical properties of wood and its aesthetic appeal still make it the material of choice for musical instruments and the interior of concert halls. Worldwide, several hundred wood species are available for making wind, string, or percussion instruments. Over generations, first by trial and error and more recently by scientific approach, the most appropriate species were found for each instrument and application. Using material property charts on which acoustic properties such as the speed of sound, the characteristic impedance, the sound radiation coefficient, and the loss coefficient are plotted against one another for woods. We analyze and explain why spruce is the preferred choice for soundboards, why tropical species are favored for xylophone bars and woodwind instruments, why violinists still prefer pernambuco over other species as a bow material, and why hornbeam and birch are used in piano actions.

  1. Rethinking the polar cap: Eccentric dipole structuring of ULF power at the highest corrected geomagnetic latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Kevin D.; Gerrard, Andrew J.; Lanzerotti, Louis J.; Weatherwax, Allan T.

    2016-09-01

    The day-to-day evolution and statistical features of Pc3-Pc7 band ultralow frequency (ULF) power throughout the southern polar cap suggest that the corrected geomagnetic (CGM) coordinates do not adequately organize the observed hydromagnetic spatial structure. It is shown that that the local-time distribution of ULF power at sites along CGM latitudinal parallels exhibit fundamental differences and that the CGM latitude of a site in general is not indicative of the site's projection into the magnetosphere. Thus, ULF characteristics observed at a single site in the polar cap cannot be freely generalized to other sites of similar CGM latitude but separated in magnetic local time, and the inadequacy of CGM coordinates in the polar cap has implications for conjugacy/mapping studies in general. In seeking alternative, observationally motivated systems of "polar cap latitudes," it is found that eccentric dipole (ED) coordinates have several strengths in organizing the hydromagnetic spatial structure in the polar cap region. ED latitudes appear to better classify the local-time ULF power in both magnitude and morphology and better differentiate the "deep polar cap" (where the ULF power is largely UT dependent and nearly free of local-time structure) from the "peripheral polar cap" (where near-magnetic noon pulsations dominate at lower and lower frequencies as one increases in ED latitude). Eccentric local time is shown to better align the local-time profiles in the magnetic east component over several PcX bands but worsen in the magnetic north component. It is suggested that a hybrid ED-CGM coordinate system might capture the strengths of both CGM and ED coordinates. It is shown that the local-time morphology of median ULF power at high-latitude sites is dominantly driven by where they project into the magnetosphere, which is best quantified by their proximity to the low-altitude cusp on the dayside (which is not necessarily quantified by a site's CGM latitude), and that

  2. The role of 3-D geomagnetic induction in the determination of the ionospheric currents from the ground geomagnetic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pulkkinen

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The geomagnetic field variations measured at the surface of the Earth are composed of both internal and external parts. The external field arises from the sources in the magnetosphere and ionosphere, whereas the internal field is generated by the currents induced within the Earth. The internal part may in some situations comprise a notable part of the measured total field and thus a blind usage of geomagnetic field recordings potentially produces significant errors to estimated ionospheric currents. In this paper the role of geomagnetic induction in auroral ionospheric studies is investigated by modeling the induction using simultaneously the realistic ionospheric source and a realistic three-dimensional Earth conductivity structure.

    The modeling results imply that the effects of the lateral ground conductivity anomalies on ionospheric equivalent current patterns are, though clearly detected, less severe than anticipated for fields varying with periods from 5 to 120min. However, the amplification of the determined currents caused by induction is significant, leading to an overestimation of up to 30% of the main current flow intensities, with the overestimation increasing sharply when moving away from the region of the main flow.

    In addition to the 3-D modeling, a simple method is introduced to help estimate the internal contribution to the measured variations of the IL index (local variant of the AL index. A test with the 26 June 1998 substorm event indicates that the method can help to extract the internal contribution from the IL index.

  3. Sounds in context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weed, Ethan

    are colored by contextual information. This can be longterm contextual information, such as knowledge of phonological or emotional categories, but can also be short-term local expectancies, such as the previous sound heard. In this paper, I present original electrophysiological data illustrating the early...... auditory processing of emotional speech was modulated by an accompanying visual context. I then discuss these results in terms of their implication for how we conceive of the auditory processing stream....

  4. Deep blast

    Science.gov (United States)

    From southern New Mexico to the Great Slave Lake of Canada, scientists from the United States and Canada recently detonated 10 underground chemical explosions to generate a clearer picture of the Earth's crust and upper mantle. Called Project Deep Probe, the experiment is designed to see through the crust and into the upper mantle to a depth of 300 miles.In the United States, Earth scientists from Rice University, Purdue University, and the University of Oregon are participating in the project. “Researchers hope to get a picture of the upper mantle beneath the Rocky Mountains and the Colorado Plateau, to understand the role the mantle played in formation and uplift,” says Alan Levander of Rice. To enhance that “picture,” 750 portable seismographs were placed along a roughly north-south line extending from Crownpoint, New Mexico to Edmonton, Alberta. The seismic recordings will be used to enhance weak seismic waves that penetrated the upper mantle.

  5. The Sounds of Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, Donald

    2009-11-01

    The popular concept of space is that it is a vacuum, with nothing of interest between the stars, planets, moons and other astronomical objects. In fact most of space is permeated by plasma, sometimes quite dense, as in the solar corona and planetary ionospheres, and sometimes quite tenuous, as is in planetary radiation belts. Even less well known is that these space plasmas support and produce an astonishing large variety of waves, the ``sounds of space.'' In this talk I will give you a tour of these space sounds, starting with the very early discovery of ``whistlers'' nearly a century ago, and proceeding through my nearly fifty years of research on space plasma waves using spacecraft-borne instrumentation. In addition to being of scientific interest, some of these sounds can even be described as ``musical,'' and have served as the basis for various musical compositions, including a production called ``Sun Rings,'' written by the well-known composer Terry Riley, that has been performed by the Kronos Quartet to audiences all around the world.

  6. [Normal and Adventitious Breath Sounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, U; Hildebrandt, O; Kerzel, S; Urban, C; Hoehle, L; Weissflog, A; Nikolaizik, W; Koehler, J; Sohrabi, K; Gross, V

    2016-06-01

    Auscultation of the lung is an inexpensive, noninvasive and easy-to-perform tool. It is an important part of the physical examination and is help ful to distinguish physiological respiratory sounds from pathophysiological events. Computerized lung sound analysis is a powerful tool for optimizing and quantifying electronic auscultation based on the specific lung sound spectral characteristics. The automatic analysis of respiratory sounds assumes that physiological and pathological sounds are reliably analyzed based on special algorithms. The development of automated long-term lungsound monitors enables objective assessment of different respiratory symptoms.

  7. On the slow time geomagnetic field modulation of galactic cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpala, Kingsley

    2016-07-01

    Cosmic rays of galactic origin are modulated by both heliospheric and geomagnetic conditions. The mutual (and mutually exclusive) contribution of both heliospheric and geomagnetic conditions to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) modulation is still an open question. While the rapid-time association of the galactic cosmic ray variation with different heliophysical and geophysical phenomena has been well studied, not so much attention has been paid to slow-time variations especially with regards to local effects. In this work, we employed monthly means of cosmic ray count rates from two mid latitude (Hermanus and Rome), and two higher latitude (Inuvik and Oulu) neutron monitors (NM), and compared their variability with geomagnetic stations that are in close proximity to the NMs. The data spans 1966 to 2008 and covers four (4) solar cycles. The difference (DeltaCR)between the mean count rate of all days and the mean of the five quietest days for each month was compared with the Dst-related disturbance (DeltaH) derived from the nearby geomagnetic stations. Zeroth- and First- correlation between the cosmic ray parameters and geomagnetic parameters was performed to ascertain statistical association and test for spurious association. Our results show that solar activity is generally strongly correlated (>0.75) with mean strength of GCR count rate and geomagnetic field during individual solar cycles. The correlation between mean strength of cosmic ray intensity and Geomagnetic field strength is spurious and is basically moderated by the solar activity. The signature of convection driven disturbances at high latitude geomagnetic stations was evident during the declining phase of the solar cycles close to the solar minimum. The absence of this feature in the slow-time varying cosmic ray count rates in all stations, and especially in the mid latitude geomagnetic stations suggest that the local geomagnetic disturbance contributes much less in modulating the cosmic ray flux.

  8. Comparison of Dst Forecast Models for Intense Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Eun-Young; Moon, Y.-J.; Gopalswamy, N.; Lee, D.-H.

    2012-01-01

    We have compared six disturbance storm time (Dst) forecast models using 63 intense geomagnetic storms (Dst Dst data and the predicted Dst during the geomagnetic storm period as well as the difference of the value of minimum Dst (Delta Dst(sub min)) and the difference in the absolute value of Dst minimum time (Delta t(sub Dst)) between the observed and the predicted. As a result, we found that the model by Temerin and Li gives the best prediction for all parameters when all 63 events are considered. The model gives the average values: the linear correlation coefficient of 0.94, the RMS error of 14.8 nT, the Delta Dst(sub min) of 7.7 nT, and the absolute value of Delta t(sub Dst) of 1.5 hour. For further comparison, we classified the storm events into two groups according to the magnitude of Dst. We found that the model of Temerin and Lee is better than the other models for the events having 100 Dst Dst <= 200 nT.

  9. Large Geomagnetic Storms Associated with Limb Halo Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Xie, Hong; Akiyama, Sachiko; Makela, Pertti

    2009-01-01

    Solar cycle 23 witnessed the observation of hundreds of halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs), thanks to the high dynamic range and extended field of view of the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission. More than two thirds of halo CMEs originating on the front side of the Sun have been found to be geoeffective (Dst = 45deg) have a 20% shorter delay time on the average. It was suggested that the geomagnetic storms due to limb halos must be due to the sheath portion of the interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) so that the shorter delay time can be accounted for. We confirm this suggestion by examining the sheath and ejecta portions of ICMEs from Wind and ACE data that correspond to the limb halos. Detailed examination showed that three pairs of limb halos were interacting events. Geomagnetic storms following five limb halos were actually produced by other disk halos. The storms followed by four isolated limb halos and the ones associated with interact...

  10. Development of KASI Geomagnetic Storm Forecast System using Coronagraph Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Ji-Hye; Choi, SeongHwan; Park, Jongyeob; Kim, Roksoon; Kim, Sujin; Kim, Jihun

    2017-08-01

    We present Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) Geomagnetic Storm Forecast System. The aim of the system is to calculate the CME arrival time and predict the geoeffectiveness of the CME. To implement the system, we use the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) C2 and C3 data, the HMI magnetogram data of Solar Dynamics Observatory(SDO), and CACTUS CME list. The system consists of servers, which are to download, process, and publish data, data handling programs and web service. We apply an image differencing technique on LASCO data to determine speed and earthward direction parameters of CMEs. KASI Geomagnetic Storm Forecast Model has installed and being tested at Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) of NASA/GSFC. We expect that users can predict CME arrival time and geoeffectiveness of the CME easily and fast using the system. In order to improve the forecast performance of the system, we plan to incorporate advanced coronagraph data which will be developed and installed on ISS by KASI and NASA in collaboration.

  11. Gravitational dynamos and the low-frequency geomagnetic secular variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, P.

    2007-01-01

    Self-sustaining numerical dynamos are used to infer the sources of low-frequency secular variation of the geomagnetic field. Gravitational dynamo models powered by compositional convection in an electrically conducting, rotating fluid shell exhibit several regimes of magnetic field behavior with an increasing Rayleigh number of the convection, including nearly steady dipoles, chaotic nonreversing dipoles, and chaotic reversing dipoles. The time average dipole strength and dipolarity of the magnetic field decrease, whereas the dipole variability, average dipole tilt angle, and frequency of polarity reversals increase with Rayleigh number. Chaotic gravitational dynamos have large-amplitude dipole secular variation with maximum power at frequencies corresponding to a few cycles per million years on Earth. Their external magnetic field structure, dipole statistics, low-frequency power spectra, and polarity reversal frequency are comparable to the geomagnetic field. The magnetic variability is driven by the Lorentz force and is characterized by an inverse correlation between dynamo magnetic and kinetic energy fluctuations. A constant energy dissipation theory accounts for this inverse energy correlation, which is shown to produce conditions favorable for dipole drift, polarity reversals, and excursions. PMID:18048345

  12. Signatures of core perturbations in geomagnetic field dynamics - preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, Agata; Mizerski, Krzysztof

    2017-04-01

    Earth's magnetic field is continuously evolving in time. Research is carried out in order to understand it's characteristics and also to describe types of perturbations which can exist in the Earth's liquid core. The aim of this work is to analyze the geomagnetic ground observatory data for the occurrence of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves described in literature traveling at the top of the Earth's liquid core. Hourly means data from 150 observatories collected from the World Data Center for Geomagnetism (WDC) were used in this work. Local topocentric magnetic field components: X (East), Y (North), Z (vertical), and also spherical coordinates: Br, Bθ, BΦ were analyzed. Hourly means were averaged to one day means and to one month means, missing values were interpolated by different methods. Fourier analysis and Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method were applied to extract periods of oscillations visible in datasets. Similar analysis was also made for data generated from the IGRF12 model for comparison. The times associated with peaks within these data were identified for all components and plotted versus colatitude and longitude to find possible travelling perturbations. Possible candidates of MHD waves for future investigation will be presented.

  13. A Combined Solar and Geomagnetic Index for Thermospheric Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Linda; Mlynczak, Marty

    2015-01-01

    Infrared radiation from nitric oxide (NO) at 5.3 Â is a primary mechanism by which the thermosphere cools to space. The SABER instrument on the NASA TIMED satellite has been measuring thermospheric cooling by NO for over 13 years. Physically, changes in NO emission are due to changes in temperature, atomic oxygen, and the NO density. These physical changes however are driven by changes in solar irradiance and changes in geomagnetic conditions. We show that the SABER time series of globally integrated infrared power (Watts) radiated by NO can be replicated accurately by a multiple linear regression fit using the F10.7, Ap, and Dst indices. This fit enables several fundamental properties of NO cooling to be determined as well as their variability with time, permitting reconstruction of the NO power time series back nearly 70 years with extant databases of these indices. The relative roles of solar ultraviolet and geomagnetic processes in determining the NO cooling are derived and shown to be solar cycle dependent. This reconstruction provides a long-term time series of an integral radiative constraint on thermospheric climate that can be used to test climate models.

  14. Power grid disturbances and polar cap index during geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauning, Peter

    2013-06-01

    The strong geomagnetic storm in the evening of 30 October 2003 caused high-voltage power grid disturbances in Sweden that expanded to produce hour-long power line outage in Malmö located in the southern part of the country. This was not a unique situation. The geomagnetic storm on 13 March 1989 caused extensive disruptions of high-voltage power circuits especially in the Province of Quebec, Canada, but also to a lesser degree in Scandinavia. Similar events have occurred earlier, among others, during the great storms of 13-14 July 1982 and 8-9 February 1986. These high-voltage power grid disturbances were related to impulsive magnetic variations accompanying extraordinarily intense substorm events. The events were preceded by lengthy intervals of unusually high values of the Polar Cap (PC) index caused by enhanced transpolar ionospheric convection. The transpolar convection transports magnetic flux from the dayside to nightside which causes equatorward displacements of the region of auroral activity enabling the substorms to hit vital power grids. During the 30 October 2003 event the intense solar proton radiation disabled the ACE satellite observations widely used to provide forecast of magnetic storm events. Hence in this case the alarmingly high PC index could provide useful warning of the storm as a back-up of the missing ACE-based forecast. In further cases, monitoring the PC index level could provide supplementary storm warnings to the benefit of power grid operators.

  15. Geomagnetic response to IMF and solar wind over different latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, A. M.; Tripathi, Sharad Chandra; Mansoori, Azad Ahmad; Waheed, Malik Abdul

    2016-07-01

    In this paper a study on the response of geomagnetic field characteristics to the solar wind variation during three solar cycles (SC 21, SC 22, SC 23) have been conducted in a long term scale. The difference in the response of two different latitudinal characteristic indices has been investigated. For the purpose we have considered the high latitude index AE and the mid-latitude aa index and both gives the knowledge about the perturbations in the geomagnetic field conditions. Eventually we can infer the idea about the ionospheric current system changes in response to the solar wind conditions. The variation found in the AE and aa indices have been found to follow a 11 year cycle as similar to the sunspot variation. Also the correlation between the annual means of the solar wind parameters velocity V, magnetic filed B and the composite parameters BV and BV ^{2 } have been calculated . A difference was found between the correlations obtained for the AE and aa indices. We could also see that the difference in correlation follows a cyclic pattern i.e. the large difference is found during the solar maxima while a small difference is observed during the minima.

  16. MagIC: Geomagnetic Applications from Earth History to Archeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, C.; Tauxe, L.; Koppers, A.; Minnett, R.; Jarboe, N.

    2016-12-01

    Major scientific challenges increasingly require an interdisciplinary approach, and highlight the need for open archives, incorporating visualization and analysis tools that are flexible enough to address novel research problems. Increasingly modern standards for publication are (or should be) demanding direct links to data, data citations, and adequate documentation that allow other researchers direct access to the fundamental measurements and analyses producing the results. Carefully documented metadata are essential and data models may need considerable complexity to accommodate re-use of observations originally collected with a different purpose in mind. The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) provides an online home for all kinds of paleo-, archeo-magnetic, rock, and environmental magnetic data, from documentation of fieldwork, through lab protocols, to interpretations in terms of geomagnetic history. Examples of their application to understanding geomagnetic field behavior, archeological dating, and voyages of exploration to discover America will be used to highlight best practices and illustrate unexpected benefits of data archived using best practices with the goal of maintaining high standards for reproducibility.

  17. Geomagnetic core field models in the satellite era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lesur, Vincent; Olsen, Nils; Thomson, Alan W. P.

    2011-01-01

    After a brief review of the theoretical basis and difficulties that modelers are facing, we present three recent models of the geomagnetic field originating in the Earth’s core. All three modeling approaches are using recent observatory and near-Earth orbiting survey satellite data. In each case ...... only up to degree 8 or 9. For higher time derivatives of core field models, only the very first degrees are robustly derived.......After a brief review of the theoretical basis and difficulties that modelers are facing, we present three recent models of the geomagnetic field originating in the Earth’s core. All three modeling approaches are using recent observatory and near-Earth orbiting survey satellite data. In each case...... the specific aims and techniques used by the modelers are described together with a presentation of the main results achieved. The three different modeling approaches are giving similar results. For a snap shot of the core magnetic field at a given epoch and observed at the Earth’s surface, the differences...

  18. The Activities at World Data Center for Geomagnetism Mumbai, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Doiphode

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The World Data Centre for Geomagnetism, Mumbai has functioned as a division of the Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai since its full fledged activities commenced in 1991 in coordination with the International Council of Scientific Unions (ICSU Panel on World Data Centres. Responsibility for the compilation of final hourly absolute values from nine of the Indian magnetic observatories and deposition of this data to the World Data Centres is undertaken at the centre. We have utilized the full advantage of technology advancement in upgrading our data preservation and conservation policy at various levels. In recent years, the centre has prioritized its activities related to digital preservation to ensure digital archiving of magnetic data from the traditional media and also digital conservation of very old hand written/printed data volumes and magnetograms. In view of the scientific importance of data from the Colaba-Alibag Magnetic Observatory, old magnetograms and data volumes are being converted to digital images for long term preservation. In the digital preservation process, the creation of metadata has become an important component in storing information related to old and current scientific records for future use. The centre also hosts a database driven website to make datasets available online to the global scientific community.

  19. Driving Plasmaspheric Electron Density Simulations During Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pascuale, S.; Kletzing, C.; Jordanova, V.; Goldstein, J.; Wygant, J. R.; Thaller, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We test global convection electric field models driving plasmaspheric electron density simulations (RAM-CPL) during geomagnetic storms with in situ measurements provided by the Van Allen Probes (RBSP). RAM-CPL is the cold plasma component of the ring-current atmosphere interactions suite (RAM-SCB) and describes the evolution of plasma density in the magnetic equatorial plane near Earth. Geomagnetic events observed by the RBSP satellites in different magnetic local time (MLT) sectors enable a comparison of local asymmetries in the input electric field and output densities of these simulations. Using a fluid MHD approach, RAM-CPL reproduces core plasmaspheric densities (L<4) to less than 1 order of magnitude difference. Approximately 80% of plasmapause crossings, defined by a low-density threshold, are reproduced to within a mean radial difference of 0.6 L. RAM-CPL, in conjunction with a best-fit driver, can be used in other studies as an asset to predict density conditions in locations distant from RBSP orbits of interest.

  20. Geomagnetically induced currents in Uruguay: Sensitivity to modelling parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraballo, R.

    2016-11-01

    According to the traditional wisdom, geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) should occur rarely at mid-to-low latitudes, but in the last decades a growing number of reports have addressed their effects on high-voltage (HV) power grids at mid-to-low latitudes. The growing trend to interconnect national power grids to meet regional integration objectives, may lead to an increase in the size of the present energy transmission networks to form a sort of super-grid at continental scale. Such a broad and heterogeneous super-grid can be exposed to the effects of large GIC if appropriate mitigation actions are not taken into consideration. In the present study, we present GIC estimates for the Uruguayan HV power grid during severe magnetic storm conditions. The GIC intensities are strongly dependent on the rate of variation of the geomagnetic field, conductivity of the ground, power grid resistances and configuration. Calculated GIC are analysed as functions of these parameters. The results show a reasonable agreement with measured data in Brazil and Argentina, thus confirming the reliability of the model. The expansion of the grid leads to a strong increase in GIC intensities in almost all substations. The power grid response to changes in ground conductivity and resistances shows similar results in a minor extent. This leads us to consider GIC as a non-negligible phenomenon in South America. Consequently, GIC must be taken into account in mid-to-low latitude power grids as well.

  1. Forbush decreases geomagnetic and atmospheric effects cosmogenic nuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flueckiger, E. O.

    1986-01-01

    An overview and synthesis is given of recent developments that have occurred in the areas of Forbush decreases, geomagnetic and atmospheric effects, and cosmogenic nuclides. Experimental evidence has been found for substantial differences in the effects of the various types of interplanetary perturbations on cosmic rays, and for a dependence of these effects on the three-dimensional configuration of the interplanetary medium. In order to fully understand and to be able to simulate the solar cosmic ray particle access to the polar regions of the earth we need accurate models of the magnetospheric magnetic field. These models must include all major magnetospheric current systems (in particular the field aligned currents), and they should represent magnetically quiet time periods as well as different levels of geomagnetic activity. In the evolution of magnetospheric magnetic field models, cosmic ray and magnetospheric physicists should work closely together since cosmic ray measurements are a powerful additional tool in the study of the perturbed magnetosphere. In the field of cosmogenic nuclides, finally, exciting new results and developments follow in rapid succession. Thanks to new techniques and new isotopes the analysis of cosmic ray history has entered into a new dimension.

  2. Solar Microwave and Geomagnetic Field Pulsations as Space Weather Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snegirev, S. D.; Fridman, V. M.; Sheiner, O. A.

    The procedure of short-term prediction of main solar flares was created on the basis of temporal behavior of long-period microwave pulsations [Kobrin et al., 1997]. At the same time it was shown that before these flares one could observe long-period (T > 20 min) pulsations of geomagnetic field [Kobrin et al, 1985]. The resemblance between microwave and geomagnetic pulsations (duration and temporal behaviour) allows us to propose the common nature of these variations: the reflection of solar energy accumulation and instabilities in solar centers of activity. To be an important factor of Space Weather above mentioned pulsations can be useful for constructing the procedures to predict the near Earth's conditions. This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Fundamental Research and Russian Federal Programm "Astronomy" (grant N 1.5.5.5). Kobrin M.M, Malygin V.I., Snegirev S.D. Plan. Space Sci., 33, N11, p. 1251 (1985). Kobrin M.M., Pakhomov V.V., Snegirev S.D., Fridman V.M., Sheiner O.A. Proc. Workshop `STPW-96', Tokyo: RCW, p. 200 (1997).

  3. A geomagnetically induced current warning system: model development and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, A.; Clarke, E.; Reay, S.; Thomson, A.

    Geomagnetically Induced Currents (GIC), which can flow in technological systems at the Earth's surface, are a consequence of magnetic storms and Space Weather. A well-documented practical problem for the power transmission industry is that GIC can affect the lifetime and performance of transformers within the power grid. Operational mitigation is widely considered to be one of the best strategies to manage the Space Weather and GIC risk. Therefore in the UK a magnetic storm warning and GIC monitoring and analysis programme has been under development by the British Geological Survey and Scottish Power plc (the power grid operator for Central Scotland) since 1999. Under the auspices of the European Space Agency's service development activities BGS is developing the capability to meet two key user needs that have been identified. These needs are, firstly, the development of a near real-time solar wind shock/ geomagnetic storm warning, based on L1 solar wind data and, secondly, the development of an integrated surface geo-electric field and power grid network model that should allow prediction of GIC throughout the power grid in near real time. While the final goal is a `seamless package', the components of the package utilise diverse scientific techniques. We review progress to date with particular regard to the validation of the individual components of the package. The Scottish power grid response to the October 2003 magnetic storms is also discussed and model and validation data are presented.

  4. Feedback control of sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafaely, Boaz

    This thesis is concerned with the development an application of feedback control techniques for active sound control. Both fixed and adaptive controllers are considered. The controller design problem for active sound control is formulated as a constrained optimisation problem with an H2 performance objective, of minimising the variance of the control error, and H2 and H∞ design constraints involving control power output, disturbance enhancement, and robust stability. An Internal Model Controller with an FIR control filter is assumed. Conventional H2 design methods for feedback controllers are studied first. Although such controllers can satisfy the design constraints by employing effort terms in the quadratic cost function, they do not achieve the best possible performance, and when adapted using LMS-based algorithms, they suffer from instabilities if the plant response varies significantly. Improved H2/H∞ design methods for fixed and adaptive controllers are then developed, which achieve the best H2 performance under the design constraints, offer an improved stability when made adaptive, and in general outperform the conventional H2 controllers. The H2/H∞ design problems employ convex programming to ensure a unique solution. The Sequential Quadratic Programming methods is used for the off-line design of fixed controllers, and penalty and barrier function methods, together with frequency domain LMS-based algorithms are employed in the H2/H∞ adaptive controllers. The controllers studied and developed here were applied to three active sound control systems: a noise-reducing headset, an active headrest, and a sound radiating panel. The emphasis was put on developing control strategies that improve system performance. First, a high performance controller for the noise-reducing headset was implemented in real-time, which combines analogue and adaptive digital controllers, and can thus reject disturbances which has both broad-band and periodic components. Then

  5. Electromagnetic Wave-filled Cavities Observed by the GEODESIC Sounding Rocket: A Direct Encounter with VLF Saucer Source Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabirzadeh, Rasoul

    The GEODESIC sounding rocket encountered hundreds of localized, VLF-wave-filled density depletions in an auroral return current region at altitudes between 900--1000 km. While these are similar to well-studied lower-hybrid "spikelets", which are electrostatic, many of the GEODESIC events exhibited strong VLF magnetic field enhancements as well. In the present study we show that these magnetic field fluctuations can be interpreted as the result of geomagnetic field-aligned electron currents driven by fluctuating electric fields parallel to the geomagnetic field lines. This observation suggests that the electromagnetic wave-filled cavities are signatures of unstable filaments of return current fluctuating at VLF frequencies. We argue that the cavities' spatial dimensions, their location inside the return current region and their total radiated power are consistent with the properties of VLF saucer source regions inferred from earlier satellite observations taken at higher altitudes.

  6. Interpolated Sounding and Gridded Sounding Value-Added Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Toto, T. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Standard Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility sounding files provide atmospheric state data in one dimension of increasing time and height per sonde launch. Many applications require a quick estimate of the atmospheric state at higher time resolution. The INTERPOLATEDSONDE (i.e., Interpolated Sounding) Value-Added Product (VAP) transforms sounding data into continuous daily files on a fixed time-height grid, at 1-minute time resolution, on 332 levels, from the surface up to a limit of approximately 40 km. The grid extends that high so the full height of soundings can be captured; however, most soundings terminate at an altitude between 25 and 30 km, above which no data is provided. Between soundings, the VAP linearly interpolates atmospheric state variables in time for each height level. In addition, INTERPOLATEDSONDE provides relative humidity scaled to microwave radiometer (MWR) observations.

  7. The Body of Sound: Sounding out the History of Science

    OpenAIRE

    Holger Schulze

    2012-01-01

    Sound affects and pervades our body in a physical as well as a phenomenological sense: a notion that may sound fairly trivial today. But for a long time in Western history ‘sound’ was no scientific entity. It was looked upon merely as the lower, material appearance of truly higher forces: of more ephemeral, angel-, spirit- or godlike structures – and later of compositional knowledge. To be interested in sound was to be defamed as being unscientific, noncompositional, unmanly. Which steps were...

  8. Effects of substorm electrojet on declination along concurrent geomagnetic latitudes in the northern auroral zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsen, Inge; Johnsen, Magnar G.; Løvhaug, Unni P.

    2016-10-01

    The geomagnetic field often experiences large fluctuations, especially at high latitudes in the auroral zones. We have found, using simulations, that there are significant differences in the substorm signature, in certain coordinate systems, as a function of longitude. This is confirmed by the analysis of real, measured data from comparable locations. Large geomagnetic fluctuations pose challenges for companies involved in resource exploitation since the Earth's magnetic field is used as the reference when navigating drilling equipment. It is widely known that geomagnetic activity increases with increasing latitude and that the largest fluctuations are caused by substorms. In the auroral zones, substorms are common phenomena, occurring almost every night. In principle, the magnitude of geomagnetic disturbances from two identical substorms along concurrent geomagnetic latitudes around the globe, at different local times, will be the same. However, the signature of a substorm will change as a function of geomagnetic longitude due to varying declination, dipole declination, and horizontal magnetic field along constant geomagnetic latitudes. To investigate and quantify this, we applied a simple substorm current wedge model in combination with a dipole representation of the Earth's magnetic field to simulate magnetic substorms of different morphologies and local times. The results of these simulations were compared to statistical data from observatories and are discussed in the context of resource exploitation in the Arctic. We also attempt to determine and quantify areas in the auroral zone where there is a potential for increased space weather challenges compared to other areas.

  9. Analysis of the Solar Diameter Variations at July, 1986 and the Geomagnetic Storm of March, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humberto Andrei, Alexandre; Garcia, Marcos A.; Papa, Andres R. R.; Calderari Boscardin, Sergio; Lousada Penna, Jucira; Sigismondi, Costantino

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we have a well-known event in scientific literature used to illustrate our investigation on the viability of the solar diameter variation be a precursor for the occurrence of sets of coronal mass ejections, and thus, for geomagnetic storms, as noted in previous works of our group, but now, in a time scale of a few days. The selected event was that of March 13, 1989, a strong geomagnetic storm that made the Hydro-Quebec power grid fall down by 9 hours, damaging the local economy in millions of dollars. At the same time we have investigated a time interval belonging to a solar minimum period, on July 1986, prior to the rising phase and solar maximum of Solar Cycle 22, to compare with the geomagnetic pattern, as well as with the solar diameter behavior along these periods of low solar and geomagnetic activity. We used the time series of the CERGA’s astrolabe (because its dataset is long enough as to comprise both time periods of the analysis), the geomagnetic index AP and the H geomagnetic component from the Tatuoca Magnetic Observatory (because it is near to the geomagnetic equator and with the extra aim of checking the sensitivity of its magnetometers to global events).

  10. Geomagnetic Field Reversals and Life on the Earth in Phanerozoic Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechersky, D. M.

    2014-10-01

    Global paleomagnetic and biostratigraphic data are generalized. As a result it is found out that the direct connection between geomagnetic reversals, biozones and maxima of mass extinction of a biota is absent. At the same time it is noted close to a synchronous total picture of consistent changes of biozones and geomagnetic polarity. It is explained by the general source - the Earth's diurnal rotation. The reversal polarity of a geomagnetic field prevailed during the Phanerozoic that is agreed with the Earth's counterclockwise rotation. Change of polarity of a field, most likely, is connected with acceleration or deceleration of rotation speed of the internal core relative to the Earth's mantle. Lack of direct interrelation between changes in the biosphere and geomagnetic field indicate a lack of influence of a field on life evolution on Earth. It follows also from the fact that life on Earth developed from primitive unicellular forms to mammals and the man and diversity of biota was grew against a close condition of a geomagnetic field during ~2,5 billion years and irrespective of numerous geomagnetic reversals. Main conclusion: evolutionary development of life on Earth doesn't depend both on large changes of a geomagnetic field, and on the extreme catastrophic events conducting to mass extinction of a biota.

  11. Geomagnetic activity influences the melatonin secretion at latitude 70 degrees N.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weydahl, A; Sothern, R B; Cornélissen, G; Wetterberg, L

    2001-01-01

    Factors other than light may affect variations in melatonin, including disturbances in the geomagnetic field. Such a possibility was tested in Alta, Norway, located at latitude 70 degrees N, where the aurora borealis is a result of large changes in the horizontal component (H) of the geomagnetic field. Geomagnetic disturbances are felt more strongly closer to the pole than at lower latitudes. Also noteworthy in Alta is the fact that the sun does not rise above the horizon for several weeks during the winter. To examine whether changes in geomagnetic activity influence the secretion of melatonin, saliva was collected from 25 healthy subjects in Alta several times during the day-night and at different times of the year. Single cosinor analyses yielded individual estimates of.the circadian amplitude and MESOR of melatonin. A 3-hour mean value for the local geomagnetic activity index, K, was used for approximately the same 24-hour span. A circadian rhythm was found to characterize both melatonin and K, the peak in K (23:24) preceding that of melatonin (06:08). During the span of investigation, a circannual variation also characterized both variables. Correlation analyses suggest that changes in geomagnetic activity had to be of a certain magnitude to affect the circadian amplitude of melatonin. If large enough (> 80 nT/3 h), changes in geomagnetic activity also significantly decreased salivary melatonin concentration.

  12. Geomagnetic storms, Forbush decreases of cosmic rays and total ozone at northern higher middle latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laštovička, Jan; Križan, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Space weather affects the Earth's atmosphere in many ways and through various phenomena. Among them, geomagnetic storms and the variability of the galactic cosmic ray flux belong to the most important ones as for the lower atmosphere. Here, we summarize our previous results on the effects of strong geomagnetic storms and strong Forbush decreases of galactic cosmic rays on the total ozone at the northern higher middle latitudes, and complete them with investigations of effects of geomagnetic storms not accompanied by Forbush decreases. The effects of strong geomagnetic storms and Forbush decreases occur only in the winter part of the year, under the high solar activity and the E-phase of QBO (E-max) conditions. The effects of storms seem to be a redistribution of ozone as a consequence of storm-related changes of circulation. No event contradicts the idea that the Forbush decreases are responsible for effects of geomagnetic storms on the lower atmosphere (troposphere and lower stratosphere) including total ozone. However, under the E-max conditions in the winter part of the year, only several Forbush decreases without geomagnetic storms and only one geomagnetic storm without the Forbush decrease occurred over more than 20 years.

  13. Effect of March 9, 2016 Total Solar Eclipse on geomagnetic field variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhimat, Mamat; Winarko, Anton; Nuraeni, Fitri; Bangkit, Harry; Aris, M. Andi; Suwardi; Sulimin

    2016-11-01

    During solar eclipse, solar radiation to the Earth is blocked by the Moon. Thus, the ionization process in the ionosphere is disrupted, as well as the variation of geomagnetic field. The disturbance of geomagnetic field is caused by electric current in the E layer of the ionosphere. At low latitude, the current which is dominant in quiet day is the Sq currents. The blocking of solar radiation cause decrement in electron density in the blocked region. The aim of the research is to find the effect of total solar eclipse to the geomagnetic field. The measurement of the geomagnetic field variation during total solar eclipse on March 9, 2016 was carried out at the Meteorological station of BMKG in Ternate (0° 49' 45.20 "N; 127° 22' 54.00" E). By eliminating the geomagnetic disturbance that occurred in a daily geomagnetic field variation, the pattern of quiet day which is usually in a shape of smooth curve became affected. During the total solar eclipse on March 9, 2016 from 00:30 until 02:00 UT, we found that the geomagnetic field variation of the quiet day decreased by -5 nT.

  14. Variations of angular elements of the geomagnetic field in Europe during the last 24 centuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burakov, K. S.; Nachasova, I. E.

    2011-05-01

    The analysis of variations in angular elements of the geomagnetic field during the period since 350 B.C. to the present day according to the findings from the study of thermal magnetization of baked archaeological samples from England, France, and East Europe showed that the key feature in the behavior of the geomagnetic inclination in all three regions is a millennial variation. The trend in the behavior of the inclination of the geomagnetic field can be regarded as a manifestation of a variation with a characteristic time scale of several thousand years. Despite the general likeness of variations in inclination and declination of the ancient geomagnetic field, they also exhibit a noticeable dissimilarity. The paths of the virtual geomagnetic pole reconstructed from the variations of angular elements of the geomagnetic field in East Europe indicate that the geomagnetic polar motion is quasi-cyclic. The duration of the first cycle was about 1000 years, while the second cycle has not been completed due to the change of the motion to the opposite direction in the middle of the XVII century.

  15. Online calculators for geomagnetic models at the National Geophysical Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, J. P.; Nair, M.; Maus, S.; McLean, S. J.

    2009-12-01

    NOAA’s National Geophysical Data Center at Boulder provides online calculators for geomagnetic field models. These models provide current and past values of the geomagnetic field on regional and global spatial scales. These calculators are popular among scientists, engineers and the general public across the world as a resource to compute geomagnetic field elements. We regularly update both the web interfaces and the underlying geomagnetic models. We have four different calculators to compute geomagnetic fields for different user applications. The declination calculators optionally use our World Magnetic Model (WMM) or the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) to provide geomagnetic declination as well as its annual rate of change for the chosen location. All seven magnetic field components for a single day or for a range of years from 1900-present can obtained using our Magnetic Field Calculator IGRFWMM. Users can also compute magnetic field values (current and past) over an area using the IGRFGrid calculator. The USHistoric calculator uses a US declination model to compute the declination for the conterminous US from 1750 - present (data permitting). All calculators allow the user to enter the location either as a Zip Code or by specifying the geographic latitude and longitude.

  16. Investigation of Characteristics of Large dB/dt for Geomagnetically Induced Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, D.; Ngwira, C.; Damas, M. C.

    2016-12-01

    When geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) flow through electrical networks, they become a potential threat for electrical power systems. Changes in the geomagnetic field (dB/dt) during severe geomagnetic disturbances are the main sources of GICs. These dB/dt phenomena were studied by selecting 24 strong geomagnetic storms with Dst ≤ - 150 nT. ACE spacecraft solar wind data: flow speed, proton density, By and Bz IMF components of the solar wind were correlated with measurements of the magnetic field detected on ground stations at different latitudes. This article reports characteristics of the solar wind during time intervals of large changes in the horizontal geomagnetic field with a threshold of dB/dt ≥ ± 20 nT/min for the 24 geomagnetic storms. The results of this investigation can help scientists to understand the mechanisms responsible for causing large magnetic field variations in order to predict and mitigate possible large events in the future, which is critical for our society that relies constantly on electricity for livelihood and security. In addition, this ongoing project will continue to investigate electron flux response before, during, and after large changes in geomagnetic field.

  17. Recycling Sounds in Commercials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Charlotte Rørdam

    2012-01-01

    such references to the past and ‘the good old days’ can be achieved through sounds. In particular, I will look at commercials for Danish non-dairy spreads, especially for OMA margarine. These commercials are notable in that they contain a melody and a slogan – ‘Say the name: OMA margarine’ – that have basically......: in general, the soundtracks of margarine commercials seem to merge into one, they are somewhat alike. The OMA commercials are no exception, but the OMA melody makes a distinction. In general the soundtracks of OMA margarine commercials (and the use of melody) seem to have shifted from using a predominantly...

  18. Sound of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    In my group we work with Molecular Dynamics to model several different proteins and protein systems. We submit our modelled molecules to changes in temperature, changes in solvent composition and even external pulling forces. To analyze our simulation results we have so far used visual inspection...... and statistical analysis of the resulting molecular trajectories (as everybody else!). However, recently I started assigning a particular sound frequency to each amino acid in the protein, and by setting the amplitude of each frequency according to the movement amplitude we can "hear" whenever two aminoacids...

  19. Facing Sound - Voicing Art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønstrup, Ansa

    2013-01-01

    This article is based on examples of contemporary audiovisual art, with a special focus on the Tony Oursler exhibition Face to Face at Aarhus Art Museum ARoS in Denmark in March-July 2012. My investigation involves a combination of qualitative interviews with visitors, observations of the audienc......´s interactions with the exhibition and the artwork in the museum space and short analyses of individual works of art based on reception aesthetics and phenomenology and inspired by newer writings on sound, voice and listening....

  20. Handbook for sound engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Ballou, Glen

    2015-01-01

    Handbook for Sound Engineers is the most comprehensive reference available for audio engineers, and is a must read for all who work in audio.With contributions from many of the top professionals in the field, including Glen Ballou on interpretation systems, intercoms, assistive listening, and fundamentals and units of measurement, David Miles Huber on MIDI, Bill Whitlock on audio transformers and preamplifiers, Steve Dove on consoles, DAWs, and computers, Pat Brown on fundamentals, gain structures, and test and measurement, Ray Rayburn on virtual systems, digital interfacing, and preamplifiers

  1. JINGLE: THE SOUNDING SYMBOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bysko Maxim V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the role of jingles in the industrial era, from the occurrence of the regular radio broadcasting, sound films and television up of modern video games, audio and video podcasts, online broadcasts, and mobile communications. Jingles are researched from the point of view of the theory of symbols: the forward motion is detected in the process of development of jingles from the social symbols (radio callsigns to the individual signs-images (ringtones. The role of technical progress in the formation of jingles as important cultural audio elements of modern digital civilization.

  2. Geomagnetic Storms and their Influence on the Human Brain Functional State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elchin S. Babayev

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of the influence of geomagnetic storms of various intensities on healthy adults' human brain activity and its functional state was conducted. Results of electroencephalogram (EEG investigations were used as the most objective method reflecting functional state of the human brain. Studies on the influence of geomagnetic storms on the human brain functional state of healthy adult women patients (permanent group in states of relaxation, photo-stimulation and hyper-ventilation have revealed a negative influence of severe geomagnetic storms on functional state of the human brain. As a rule, during periods of strong geomagnetic disturbances, indisposition, weakness and presence of indistinct localized headaches were recorded for majority of patients. Complex of nonspecific shifts on EEG reflects disorganization of functional activity of cortex of large hemispheres of the human brain at geomagnetically disturbed days, which is likely connected with dysfunction of integrative subcortical systems, with disbalance of its ascending synchronizing and desynchronizing influences. Imbalance of activating and deactivating mechanisms including dysfunctions of ergo- and tropho-tropic over-segmentary centers was registered. Strengthening cortical connections in the right cortical hemisphere and their short circuit on temporal sections during geomagnetically disturbed days were observed, while, in geomagnetically quiet days, a profile of correlation interrelations reflected weak internal- and inter-hemispheric connections. The threshold of convulsive (spasmodic readiness of the human brain is reduced, which is especially dangerous for risk group persons. It is established that, in general, weak and moderate geomagnetic storms exert stimulating influence while strong disturbances of geomagnetic conditions activate braking (inhibiting processes.

  3. Sound intensity radiated by Gaohu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Gaohu is one of the main bowed stringed instruments used in Guangdong music and Chinese native Orchestra. However its sound intensity has never been carefully measured. In this paper the sound power measurements of Gaohu were performed in a reverberation chamber according to the Chinese national standard. Two qualified musicians performed on their own instruments. The mean sound power levels and the dynamic ranges of Gaohu were investigated by four channel acoustic measuring equipments when single notes, music scale and melodies were performed under pp, mp, f and ff dynamics. Great differences were found when Gaohu performed single notes, while the sound power levels were quite close when music scale were performed under f dynamic to those when melodies were performed under normal dynamic mark, the sound power levels of Gaohu when music scale was performed under f dynamics were suggested as the typical and representative value of the sound intensities of Gaohu instrument.

  4. The Monster Sound Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2017-01-01

    Producing a deep bass tone by striking a large 3 m (10 ft) flexible corrugated drainage pipe immediately grabs student attention. The fundamental pitch of the corrugated tube is found to be a semitone lower than a non-corrugated smooth pipe of the same length. A video (https://youtu.be/FU7a9d7N60Y) of the demonstration is included, which…

  5. On the shape of the Geomagnetic Tail at Lunar distances: Preliminary Resuts from Artemis Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencturk Akay, Iklim; Kaymaz, Zerefsan; Sibeck, David G.

    2013-04-01

    Geomagnetic tail is one of the least investigated regions of the magnetosphere behind the Earth owing to the limited number of spacecraft and observations. It is the region where the geomagnetic dipole field lines of the Earth are organized by the solar wind stretching. The characteristics of the geomagnetic tail and its response to IMF were studied by the missions, ISEE-3, IMP-8, Wind, Geotail, visited geomagnetic tail at different distances. The structure of the geomagnetic tail is controlled by the IMF orientation and its own internal dynamics. Geomagnetic tail has different regions where the plasma and magnetic field characteristics are largely depend on the IMF orientation. These characteristics show differences at different tail distances. For example it is determined that the tail twists as result of the reconnection with IMF By and this twist is higher as one move away from the Earth toward the distant tail. Like a windsock, it is expected that the IMF control will increase toward the distant tail. Twisting also displaces the north and south lobes on the dawn and dusk sides. Tail length and the shape are also different for different IMF orientations. Flattening of the geomagnetic tail cross-section occurs during the strong IMF Bys. It becomes an ellipse in the yz plane as the IMF By stress causes the tail to be flattened on the top and bottom. Models estimate that the geomagnetic tail length can be 165 Re while Pioneer spacecraft detected geomagnetic tail as long as 100 Re. These findings are based on the very limited data from brief geomagnetic tail encounters of the spacecraft. Since August 2011, with the repositioning of the two of THEMIS spacecraft pair, ARTEMIS is giving a new opportunity to study the geomagnetic tail at the lunar distances, 60 Re. Using these observations, we will investigate the geomagnetic field shape and its IMF dependence at 60 Re. Based on the magnetopause locations at 60 Re, we will study the shape of the tail on the xy

  6. Multi-Instrument Observations of Geomagnetic Storms in the Arctic Ionosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durgonics, Tibor; Komjathy, Attila; Verkhoglyadova, Olga;

    We present a multi-instrumented approach for the analysis of the Arctic ionosphere during the 19 February 2014 highly complex, multiphase geomagnetic storm. The geomagnetic storm was the result of two powerful and subsequent Earth-directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The first one was launched...... from the solar corona on 16 February and the second one on 18 February. We focus on effects of such solar-originated geomagnetic disturbances on the high latitude ionosphere because our present understanding of the fundamental ionospheric processes – particularly during perturbed times – in this region...

  7. Fourier power spectra of the geomagnetic field for circular paths on the Earth's surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alldredge, L.R.; Benton, E.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Fourier power spectra of geomagnetic component values, synthesized from spherical harmonic models, have been computed for circular paths on the Earth's surface. They are not found to be more useful than is the spectrum of magnetic energy outside the Earth for the purpose of separating core and crustal sources of the geomagnetic field. The Fourier power spectra of N and E geomagnetic components along nearly polar great circle paths exhibit some unusual characteristics that are explained by the geometric perspective of Fourier series on spheres developed by Yee. -Authors

  8. Geophysical variables and behavior: XXI. Geomagnetic variation as possible enhancement stimuli for UFO reports preceding earthtremors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persinger, M A

    1985-02-01

    The contribution of geomagnetic variation to the occurrence of UFORs (reports of UFOs) within the New Madrid States during the 6-mo. increments before increases in the numbers of IV-V or less intensity earthquakes within the central USA was determined. Although statistically significant zero-order correlations existed between measures of earthquakes, UFORs and geomagnetic variability, the association between the latter two deteriorated markedly when their shared variance with earthquakes was held constant. These outcomes are compatible with the hypothesis that geomagnetic variability (or phenomena associated with it) may enhance UFORs but only if tectonic stress and strain are increasing within the region.

  9. The quasi-biennial variation in the geomagnetic field: a global characteristics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jiaming; Du, Aimin

    2016-04-01

    The periodicity of 1.5-3 years, namely the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), has been identified in the solar, geophysical, and atmospheric variability. Sugiura (1976) investigated the observatory annual means over 1900-1970 and confirmed the QBO in the geomagnetic field. At present, studying the quasi-biennial oscillation becomes substantial for separating the internal/external parts in the geomagnetic observations. For the internal field, two typical periodicities, namely the 6-year oscillation in the geomagnetic secular acceleration (SA) and the geomagnetic jerk (occurs in 1-2 years), have close period to the QBO. Recently, a global quasi-biennial fluctuation was identified in the geomagnetic core field model (Silva et al., 2012). Silva et al. speculated this 2.5 years signal to either external source remaining in the core field model or consequence of the methods used to construct the model. As more high-quality data from global observatories are available, it is a good opportunity to characterize the geomagnetic QBO in the global range. In this paper, we investigate the QBO in the observatory monthly geomagnetic field X, Y, and Z components spanning 1985-2010. We employ the observatory hourly means database from the World Data Center for Geomagnetism (WDC) for the investigation. Wavelet analysis is used to detect and identify the QBO, while Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis to obtain the statistics of the QBO. We apply the spherical harmonic analysis on QBO's amplitude, in order to quantify and separate internal and external sources. Three salient periods respectively at 2.9, 2.2, and 1.7 years, are identified in the amplitude spectrum over 1988-2008. The oscillation with the period of ~2.2 years is most prominent in all field components and further studied. In the X component the QBO is attenuated towards the polar regions, while in the Z component the amplitude of QBO increases with increasing of the geomagnetic latitude. At the high latitudes, the QBO

  10. Sources of the Geomagnetic Field and theModern Data That Enable Their Investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Hulot, Gauthier; Sabaka, Terence J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The geomagnetic field one canmeasure at the Earth’s surface or on board satellites is the sumof contributions frommany different sources.These sources have different physical origins and can be found both below (in the form of electrical currents and magnetized material) and above (only...... sets are available and analyzed in an adequate way, to produce the so-called geomagnetic field models.Here a general overview of the various sources that contribute to the observed geomagnetic field, and of the modern data that enable their investigation via such procedures is provided....

  11. The maverick heart sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Chance M; Miranda, William R; Newman, Darrell B

    2016-07-01

    An asymptomatic 29-year-old woman presented for prenatal counselling. She had a history of a heart murmur since childhood and a previous echocardiogram suggesting 'enlargement of the heart'. Physical exam revealed normal jugular venous pressure and contour. Precordial palpation was unremarkable. Auscultation, however, was abnormal; findings on inspiration and expiration are presented in Figure 1, sound clip. Based on the phonocardiogram and online supplementary audio clip, which of the following is correct? An early diastolic filling sound (S3) is heard, indicating increased right ventricular filling pressures.An ejection click without respiratory variation and a systolic ejection murmur are heard, consistent with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis.An ejection click with respiratory variation and a systolic ejection murmur are heard, consistent with pulmonic valve stenosis.A holosystolic murmur with inspiratory augmentation is heard, indicating tricuspid regurgitation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Multichannel spatial surround sound system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAO Dan; XIE Bosun

    2004-01-01

    Based on the consideration of being compatible with 5.1 channel horizontal surround sound system, a spatial surround sound system is proposed. Theoretical and experimental results show that the system has a wide listening area. It can not only recreate stable image in the front and rear direction, but also eliminate the defect of poor lateral image of 5.1 channel system. The system can be used to reproduce special 3D sound effect and the spaciousness of hall.

  13. Sound Localization in Multisource Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    D. (1997). Factors affecting the relative salience of sound localization cues. In Gilkey, R. and Anderson, T., editors, Binaural and Spatial Hearing...AFRL-RH-WP-TR-2009-0032 Sound Localization in Multisource Environments Nandini Iyer Douglas S. Brungart Brian D. Simpson Warfighter...From - To) October 2004 – September 2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sound Localization in Multisource Environments 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b

  14. Natural statistics of binaural sounds

    OpenAIRE

    Młynarski, Wiktor; Jost, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Binaural sound localization is usually considered a discrimination task, where interaural time (ITD) and level (ILD) disparities at pure frequency channels are utilized to identify a position of a sound source. In natural conditions binaural circuits are exposed to a stimulation by sound waves originating from multiple, often moving and overlapping sources. Therefore statistics of binaural cues depend on acoustic properties and the spatial configuration of the environment. In order to process...

  15. Statistics of Natural Binaural Sounds

    OpenAIRE

    Wiktor Młynarski; Jürgen Jost

    2014-01-01

    Binaural sound localization is usually considered a discrimination task, where interaural phase (IPD) and level (ILD) disparities at narrowly tuned frequency channels are utilized to identify a position of a sound source. In natural conditions however, binaural circuits are exposed to a stimulation by sound waves originating from multiple, often moving and overlapping sources. Therefore statistics of binaural cues depend on acoustic properties and the spatial configuration of the environment....

  16. Sounds like Team Spirit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Edward

    2002-01-01

    I recently accompanied my son Dan to one of his guitar lessons. As I sat in a separate room, I focused on the music he was playing and the beautiful, robust sound that comes from a well-played guitar. Later that night, I woke up around 3 am. I tend to have my best thoughts at this hour. The trouble is I usually roll over and fall back asleep. This time I was still awake an hour later, so I got up and jotted some notes down in my study. I was thinking about the pure, honest sound of a well-played instrument. From there my mind wandered into the realm of high-performance teams and successful projects. (I know this sounds weird, but this is the sort of thing I think about at 3 am. Maybe you have your own weird thoughts around that time.) Consider a team in relation to music. It seems to me that a crack team can achieve a beautiful, perfect unity in the same way that a band of brilliant musicians can when they're in harmony with one another. With more than a little satisfaction I have to admit, I started to think about the great work performed for you by the Knowledge Sharing team, including this magazine you are reading. Over the past two years I personally have received some of my greatest pleasures as the APPL Director from the Knowledge Sharing activities - the Masters Forums, NASA Center visits, ASK Magazine. The Knowledge Sharing team expresses such passion for their work, just like great musicians convey their passion in the music they play. In the case of Knowledge Sharing, there are many factors that have made this so enjoyable (and hopefully worthwhile for NASA). Three ingredients come to mind -- ingredients that have produced a signature sound. First, through the crazy, passionate playing of Alex Laufer, Michelle Collins, Denise Lee, and Todd Post, I always know that something startling and original is going to come out of their activities. This team has consistently done things that are unique and innovative. For me, best of all is that they are always

  17. Analysis of environmental sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keansub

    Environmental sound archives - casual recordings of people's daily life - are easily collected by MPS players or camcorders with low cost and high reliability, and shared in the web-sites. There are two kinds of user generated recordings we would like to be able to handle in this thesis: Continuous long-duration personal audio and Soundtracks of short consumer video clips. These environmental recordings contain a lot of useful information (semantic concepts) related with activity, location, occasion and content. As a consequence, the environment archives present many new opportunities for the automatic extraction of information that can be used in intelligent browsing systems. This thesis proposes systems for detecting these interesting concepts on a collection of these real-world recordings. The first system is to segment and label personal audio archives - continuous recordings of an individual's everyday experiences - into 'episodes' (relatively consistent acoustic situations lasting a few minutes or more) using the Bayesian Information Criterion and spectral clustering. The second system is for identifying regions of speech or music in the kinds of energetic and highly-variable noise present in this real-world sound. Motivated by psychoacoustic evidence that pitch is crucial in the perception and organization of sound, we develop a noise-robust pitch detection algorithm to locate speech or music-like regions. To avoid false alarms resulting from background noise with strong periodic components (such as air-conditioning), a new scheme is added in order to suppress these noises in the domain of autocorrelogram. In addition, the third system is to automatically detect a large set of interesting semantic concepts; which we chose for being both informative and useful to users, as well as being technically feasible. These 25 concepts are associated with people's activities, locations, occasions, objects, scenes and sounds, and are based on a large collection of

  18. Comparison Of The Global Analytic Models Of The Main Geomagnetic Field With The Stratospheric Balloon Magnetic Data 335

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkov, Yu.; Filippov, S.; Frunze, A.

    2013-12-01

    Three global analytical models of a main geomagnetic field constructed by satellite data are used: model IGRF, Daily Mean Spherical Harmonic Models (DMSHM), and model EMM/2010, and also scalar data of geomagnetic field and its gradients, received in stratospheric balloon gradient magnetic surveys at altitudes of ~30 km. At these altitudes the regional magnetic field is formed from all sources of the Earth's crust. It enables to receive along lengthy routes of surveys the fullest data on regional and longwave-lenght magnetic anomalies. Model DMSHM is used at extracting of magnetic anomalies for elimination of a secular variation up to significant value 0,2 nT. The model can be constructed within the limits of ± 1 months from the moment stratospheric balloon surveys with beneficial day terms with magnetic activity up to Kp MFE equal ±5 нТл. It is possible at presence acting for the period of stratospheric balloon magnetic survey of the satellite, for example, Swarm. On stratospheric balloon data it is shown, that model EMM/2010 unsatisfactorily displays MFE at altitude of 30 km. Hence, the qualitative model of the constant (main and anomaly) magnetic field cannot be constructed only with use of satellite and ground data. The improved model constant MFE, constructed according to satellite and stratospheric balloon magnetic surveys, developed up to a degree and the order m=n=720, will have a reliable data about regional crust magnetic field, hence, and about deep magnetic structure of the Earth's crust. The use gradient magnetic surveys aboard stratospheric balloons allows to find the places alternating approximately through 3000 km in which there are no magnetic anomalies. In these places probably to supervise satellite magnetic models for a range of altitude of 20-40 km, timed to stratospheric balloon magnetic surveys.

  19. Attitude dynamics and control of spacecraft using geomagnetic Lorentz force

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Aziz, Yehia A

    2014-01-01

    The attitude stabilization of a charged rigid spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) using torques due to Lorentz force in pitch and roll directions is considered. A spacecraft that generates an electrostatic charge on its surface in the Earth magnetic field will be subject to perturbations from Lorentz force. The Lorentz force acting on an electrostatically charged spacecraft may provide a useful thrust for controlling a spacecraft's orientation. We assume that the spacecraft is moving in the Earth's magnetic field in an elliptical orbit under the effects of the gravitational, geomagnetic and Lorentz torques. The magnetic field of the Earth is modeled as a non-tilted dipole. A model incorporating all Lorentz torques as a function of orbital elements has been developed on the basis of electric and magnetic fields. The stability of the spacecraft orientation is investigated both analytically and numerically. The existence and stability of equilibrium positions is investigated for different values of the charge to...

  20. Motility of magnetotactic bacteria/MTB to Geomagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidajatullah-Maksoed, Fatahillah

    2016-03-01

    Bacteria with motility directed by a local geomagnetic fields have been observed in marine sediments'' discussed by R. Blakemore, 1975. Magnetotactic bacteria/MTB discovered in 1963 by Salvatore Bellini. For ``off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope was used to correlates the physical & magnetic microstructure of magnetite nanocrystals in magnetotactic bacteria'' sought ``single-domain magnetite in hemopelagic sediments'' from JF Stolz. Otherwise, for potential source of bioproducts- product meant from result to multiplier -of magnetotactic bacteria[ACV Araujo, et.al, 2014 ] of marine drugs retrieved the `measurement of cellular chemotaxis with ECIS/Taxis, from KM Pietrosimone, 2012, whereas after ``earth magnetic field role on small living models'' are other interpretation of ``taxis'' as a movement of a cell instead usual ``tax'' for yew's taxus cuspidate, hired car & taxes in financial realms. Acknowledgements to HE. Mr. H. TUK SETYOHADI, Jl. Sriwijaya Raya 3, South-Jakarta, INDONESIA.