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Sample records for geological repository system

  1. Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System Description Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.F. Loros

    2000-06-29

    The Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System provides supervisory control, monitoring, and selected remote control of primary and secondary repository operations. Primary repository operations consist of both surface and subsurface activities relating to high-level waste receipt, preparation, and emplacement. Secondary repository operations consist of support operations for waste handling and treatment, utilities, subsurface construction, and other selected ancillary activities. Remote control of the subsurface emplacement operations, as well as, repository performance confirmation operations are the direct responsibility of the system. In addition, the system monitors parameters such as radiological data, air quality data, fire detection status, meteorological conditions, unauthorized access, and abnormal operating conditions, to ensure a safe workplace for personnel. Parameters are displayed in a real-time manner to human operators regarding surface and subsurface conditions. The system performs supervisory monitoring and control for both important to safety and non-safety systems. The system provides repository operational information, alarm capability, and human operator response messages during emergency response situations. The system also includes logic control to place equipment, systems, and utilities in a safe operational mode or complete shutdown during emergency response situations. The system initiates alarms and provides operational data to enable appropriate actions at the local level in support of emergency response, radiological protection response, evacuation, and underground rescue. The system provides data communications, data processing, managerial reports, data storage, and data analysis. This system's primary surface and subsurface operator consoles, for both supervisory and remote control activities, will be located in a Central Control Center (CCC) inside one of the surface facility buildings. The system

  2. Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harwell, M. A.; Brandstetter, A.; Benson, G. L.; Raymond, J. R.; Brandley, D. J.; Serne, R. J.; Soldat, J. K.; Cole, C. R.; Deutsch, W. J.; Gupta, S. K.; Harwell, C. C.; Napier, B. A.; Reisenauer, A. E.; Prater, L. S.; Simmons, C. S.; Strenge, D. L.; Washburn, J. F.; Zellmer, J. T.

    1982-06-01

    As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario

  3. Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harwell, M. A.; Brandstetter, A.; Benson, G. L.; Bradley, D. J.; Serne, R. J.; Soldat, J. K; Cole, C. R.; Deutsch, W. J.; Gupta, S. K.; Harwell, C. C.; Napier, B. A.; Reisenauer, A. E.; Prater, L. S.; Simmons, C. S.; Strenge, D. L.; Washburn, J. F.; Zellmer, J. T.

    1982-06-01

    As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario

  4. Engineered barrier system and waste package design concepts for a potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short, D.W.; Ruffner, D.J.; Jardine, L.J.

    1991-10-01

    We are using an iterative process to develop preliminary concept descriptions for the Engineered Barrier System and waste-package components for the potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The process allows multiple design concepts to be developed subject to major constraints, requirements, and assumptions. Involved in the highly interactive and interdependent steps of the process are technical specialists in engineering, metallic and nonmetallic materials, chemistry, geomechanics, hydrology, and geochemistry. We have developed preliminary design concepts that satisfy both technical and nontechnical (e.g., programmatic or policy) requirements.

  5. Diffusive Transport of Sulphide through an Engineering Barrier System in a Deep Geological Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, S. A.; Sleep, B. E.; McKelvie, J. R. M.; Krol, M.

    2015-12-01

    Bentonite is a naturally occurring clay-rich sediment containing montmorillonite, a smectitic clay mineral that has a high cation exchange capacity and swells upon contact with water. Owing to these characteristics, highly compacted bentonite (HCB) is an often included component of engineered barrier systems (EBS) designed to protect used fuel containers (UFCs) in deep geological repositories (DGR) for high-level nuclear waste. The low water activity and high swelling pressure of HCB suppresses microbial activity and the related production of sulphide that could cause microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of UFCs The Canadian Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) has chosen a UFC that consists of an inner steel core and outer copper coating which is resistant to corrosion. However, under anaerobic conditions, MIC can still contribute to UFC corrosion if sulphides are present in the groundwater. Therefore the EBS consisting of bentonite blocks and pellets has been designed to impede the movement of sulphides to the UFC. In order to examine the effectiveness of the EBS, a 3D numerical model was developed capable of simulating the diffusive transport of sulphide within the NWMO EBS. The model was developed using COMSOL Multiphysics, a finite element software package and is parametric which allows the impact of different repository layouts to be assessed. The developed model was of the entire NWMO placement room, as well as, a stand-alone UFC and included conservative assumptions such as a fully saturated system and a constant concentration boundary condition. The results showed that the highest sulphide flux occurred at the semi-spherical end caps of the UFC. Further studies examined the effect of sulphide hotspots and fractures, representing possible EBS failure mechanisms. The model results highlight that even with conservative assumptions the chosen EBS will effectively protect the UFC from microbiologically influenced corrosion.

  6. Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. M. Curry

    2001-01-30

    The primary objective of the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (PDD) is to allocate the functions, requirements, and assumptions to the systems at Level 5 of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) architecture identified in Section 4. It provides traceability of the requirements to those contained in Section 3 of the ''Monitored Geologic Repository Requirements Document'' (MGR RD) (YMP 2000a) and other higher-level requirements documents. In addition, the PDD allocates design related assumptions to work products of non-design organizations. The document provides Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) technical requirements in support of design and performance assessment in preparing for the Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA) milestones. The technical requirements documented in the PDD are to be captured in the System Description Documents (SDDs) which address each of the systems at Level 5 of the CRWMS architecture. The design engineers obtain the technical requirements from the SDDs and by reference from the SDDs to the PDD. The design organizations and other organizations will obtain design related assumptions directly from the PDD. These organizations may establish additional assumptions for their individual activities, but such assumptions are not to conflict with the assumptions in the PDD. The PDD will serve as the primary link between the technical requirements captured in the SDDs and the design requirements captured in US Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The approved PDD is placed under Level 3 baseline control by the CRWMS Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) and the following portions of the PDD constitute the Technical Design Baseline for the MGR: the design characteristics listed in Table 1-1, the MGR Architecture (Section 4.1), the Technical Requirements (Section 5), and the Controlled Project Assumptions (Section 6).

  7. Monitored Geologic Repository Test Evaluation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.B. Skorska

    2002-01-02

    The Monitored Geologic Repository test & evaluation program will specify tests, demonstrations, examinations, and analyses, and describe procedures to conduct and document testing necessary to verify meeting Monitored Geologic Repository requirements for a safe and effective geologic repository for radioactive waste. This test program will provide assurance that the repository is performing as designed, and that the barriers perform as expected; it will also develop supporting documentation to support the licensing process and to demonstrate compliance with codes, standards, and regulations. This comprehensive program addresses all aspects of verification from the development of test requirements to the performance of tests and reporting of the test results. The ''Monitored Geologic Repository Test & Evaluation Plan'' provides a detailed description of the test program approach necessary to achieve the above test program objectives. This test plan incorporates a set of test phases focused on ensuring repository safety and operational readiness and implements a project-wide integrated product management team approach to facilitate test program planning, analysis, and implementation. The following sections provide a description of the individual test phases, the methodology for test program planning and analyses, and the management approach for implementing these activities.

  8. AEGIS technology demonstration for a nuclear waste repository in basalt. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dove, F.H.; Cole, C.R.; Foley, M.G.

    1982-09-01

    A technology demonstration of current performance assessment techniques as applied to a nuclear waste repository in the Columbia Plateau Basalts was conducted. Hypothetical repository coordinates were selected for an actual geographical setting on the Hanford Reservation in the state of Washington. Published hydrologic and geologic data used in the analyses were gathered in 1979 or earlier. The following report documents the technology demonstration in basalt. Available information has been used to establish the data base and initial hydrologic and geologic interpretations for this site-specific application. A simplified diagram of the AEGIS analyses is shown. Because an understanding of the dynamics of ground-water flow is essential to the development of release scenarios and consequence analyses, a key step in the demonstration is the systems characterization contained in the conceptual model. Regional and local ground-water movement patterns have been defined with the aid of hydrologic computer models. Hypothetical release scenarios have been developed and evaluated by a process involving expert opinion and a Geologic Simulation Model for basalt. (The Geologic Simulation Model can also be used to forecast future boundary conditions for the hydrologic simulation.) Chemical reactivity of the basalt with ground water will influence the leaching and transport of radionuclides; solubility equilibria based on available data are estimated with geochemical models. After the radionuclide concentrations are mathematically introduced into the ground-water movement patterns, waste movement patterns are outlined over elapsed time. Contaminant transport results are summarized for significant radionuclides that are hypothetically released to the accessible environment and to the biosphere.

  9. Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Curry

    2001-06-26

    The primary objective of the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (PDD) is to allocate the functions, requirements, and assumptions to the systems at Level 5 of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) architecture identified in Section 4. It provides traceability of the requirements to those contained in Section 3 of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Requirements Document (YMP RD) (YMP 2001a) and other higher-level requirements documents. In addition, the PDD allocates design related assumptions to work products of non-design organizations. The document provides Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) technical requirements in support of design and performance assessment in preparing for the Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA) milestones. The technical requirements documented in the PDD are to be captured in the System Description Documents (SDDs) which address each of the systems at Level 5 of the CRWMS architecture. The design engineers obtain the technical requirements from the SDDs and by reference from the SDDs to the PDD. The design organizations and other organizations will obtain design related assumptions directly from the PDD. These organizations may establish additional assumptions for their individual activities, but such assumptions are not to conflict with the assumptions in the PDD. The PDD will serve as the primary link between the technical requirements captured in the SDDs and the design requirements captured in US Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The approved PDD is placed under Level 3 baseline control by the CRWMS Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) and the following portions of the PDD constitute the Technical Design Baseline for the MGR: the design characteristics listed in Table 1-1, the MGR Architecture (Section 4.1), the Technical Requirements (Section 5), and the Controlled Project Assumptions (Section 6).

  10. Modelling of the reactive transport for rock salt-brine in geological repository systems based on improved thermodynamic database (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, W.; Alkan, H.; Xie, M.; Moog, H.; Sonnenthal, E. L.

    2009-12-01

    The release and migration of toxic contaminants from the disposed wastes is one of the main issues in long-term safety assessment of geological repositories. In the engineered and geological barriers around the nuclear waste emplacements chemical interactions between the components of the system may affect the isolation properties considerably. As the chemical issues change the transport properties in the near and far field of a nuclear repository, modelling of the transport should also take the chemistry into account. The reactive transport modelling consists of two main components: a code that combines the possible chemical reactions with thermo-hydrogeological processes interactively and a thermodynamic databank supporting the required parameters for the calculation of the chemical reactions. In the last decade many thermo-hydrogeological codes were upgraded to include the modelling of the chemical processes. TOUGHREACT is one of these codes. This is an extension of the well known simulator TOUGH2 for modelling geoprocesses. The code is developed by LBNL (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Univ. of California) for the simulation of the multi-phase transport of gas and liquid in porous media including heat transfer. After the release of its first version in 1998, this code has been applied and improved many times in conjunction with considerations for nuclear waste emplacement. A recent version has been extended to calculate ion activities in concentrated salt solutions applying the Pitzer model. In TOUGHREACT, the incorporated equation of state module ECO2N is applied as the EOS module for non-isothermal multiphase flow in a fluid system of H2O-NaCl-CO2. The partitioning of H2O and CO2 between liquid and gas phases is modelled as a function of temperature, pressure, and salinity. This module is applicable for waste repositories being expected to generate or having originally CO2 in the fluid system. The enhanced TOUGHREACT uses an EQ3/6-formatted database

  11. Russian Geologic Repository Technical Papers and Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardine, L

    2002-02-18

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been actively and continuously engaged in Russian geologic disposal activities since 1995. The first joint US-Russian meeting on Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium was held in January 1995 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The meeting resulted in the appointment of Dr. L. J. Jardine from LLNL and Dr. T. A. Gupalo from the All-Russian Research and Design Institute of Production Engineering (VNIPIPT) as the US-Russian Federation (RF) joint co-chairs for geologic disposal of plutonium-containing materials, respectively. The initial joint studies focused on the geologic disposal of plutonium-containing materials and immobilized plutonium waste forms. These studies started in 1995, and continue in 2002. The first joint work of LLNL and VNIPIPT was documented in the October 1996 Paris P8 Nuclear Experts Meeting [1]. In summary, LLNL has been actively and continuously involved in various ways since 1995 in developing and participating in the current Russian geologic disposal program activities near the Mayak and MCC K-26 sites. Figure 1 illustrates how these various LLNL activities have been integrated, coordinated, and focused on developing geologic disposal in Russia. The various LLNL contracts are shown in the figure with the specific LLNL contract number. Reference 13 provides a summary of the status in 2000 of the past Russian repository program activities for the K-26 and Mayak sites. Because of this unique continuous and direct participation in the RF geologic disposal program activities, LLNL has either obtained or generated numerous technical papers and reports documenting various aspects of the RF geologic repository activities for the two sites near the Minatom industrial sites at Mayak and K-26. As a result, LLNL decided to collect these unique documents into one referenceable set and generated this report. This report collects these technical papers, technical reports, plans, and proposals for

  12. The French Geological Repository Project Cigeo - 12023

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harman, Alain; Labalette, Thibaud; Dupuis, Marie-Claude; Ouzounian, Gerald [ANDRA, Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2012-07-01

    The French Agency for Radioactive Waste Management, ANDRA, was launched by law in 1991 to perform and develop the research programme for managing high level and intermediate level long-lived radioactive waste generated by the French nuclear fleet. After a 15-year intensive research programme, including the study of alternative solutions, an overall review and assessment of the results was organized, including a national public debate. As a result, the Parliament passed a Planning Act on radioactive waste management in 2006. Commissioning of a geological repository by 2025 was one of the most important decisions taken at that time. To reach this goal, a license application must be submitted and reviewed by the competent authorities by 2015. A detailed review and consultation process is, as well, defined in the Planning Act. Beside the legal framework the project needs to progress on two fronts. The first one is on siting. A significant milestone was reached in 2009 with the definition of a defined area to locate the underground repository facilities. This area was approved in March 2010 by the Government, after having collected the opinions and positions of all the interested parties, at both National and local levels. A new phase of dialogue with local players began to refine the implementation scenarios of surface facilities. The final site selection will be approved after a public debate planned for 2013. The second one is the industrial organization, planning and costing. The industrial project of this geological repository was called Cigeo (Centre Industriel de Stockage Geologique). Given the amount of work to be done to comply with the given time framework, a detailed organization with well-defined milestones must be set-up. Cigeo will be a specific nuclear facility, built and operated underground for over a hundred years. The consequence of this long duration is that the development of the repository facilities will take place in successive operational phases

  13. Development of geological disposal system; localization of element cost data and cost evaluation on the HLW repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Sik; Kim, Kil Jung; Yang, Young Jin; Kim, Sung Chun [KOPEC, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    To estimate Total Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) for Korea HLW Repository through localization of element cost data, we review and re-organize each basic element cost data for reference repository system, localize various element cost and finally estimate TSLCC considering economic parameters. As results of the study, TSLCC is estimated as 17,167,689 million won, which includes costs for site preparation, surface facilities, underground facilities and management/integration. Since HLW repository Project is an early stage of pre-conceptual design at present, the information of design and project information are not enough to perform cost estimate and cost localization for the Project. However, project cost structure is re-organized based on the local condition and Total System Life Cycle Cost is estimated using the previous cost data gathered from construction experience of the local nuclear power plant. Project results can be used as basic reference data to assume total construction cost for the local HLW repository and should be revised to more reliable cost data with incorporating detail project design information into the cost estimate in a future. 20 refs. (Author)

  14. 10 CFR 51.67 - Environmental information concerning geologic repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Environmental information concerning geologic repositories... information concerning geologic repositories. (a) In lieu of an environmental report, the Department of Energy... if it makes a substantial change in its proposed action that is relevant to environmental concerns...

  15. Performance assessment implementation plan for the geologic repository program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-01-01

    Performance assessment is a major constituent of the program being conducted in the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a geologic repository. Performance assessment is the set of activities needed for quantitative evaluations of repository-system performance to access compliance with regulations and to support the development of the geologic repository. To define the strategy for these evaluations, the DOE has developed this performance assessment strategy plan. This document discusses the need for such a strategy, the objectives and scope of the strategy plan, the relationship of the plan to other program plans. Additionally, it defines performance assessment and describes the roles of performance assessment in this program, discusses concepts and general strategies needed for performance assessment, outlines the content of the Safety Analysis Report, summarizes the requirements for the repository Environmental Impact Statement, discusses the requirements that apply to the site-suitability analyses and describes the site characterization. 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Systems study of the feasibility of high-level nuclear-waste fractionation for thermal stress control in a geologic repository: main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, R.W.; Elder, H.K.; McCallum, R.F.; Silviera, D.J.; Swanson, J.L.; Wiles, L.E.

    1983-06-01

    This study assesses the benefits and costs of fractionating the cesium and strontium (Cs/Sr) components in commercial high-level waste (HLW) to a separate waste stream for the purpose of reducing geologic-repository thermal stresses in the region of the HLW. System costs are developed for a broad range of conditions comparing the Cs/Sr fractionation concept with disposal of 10-year-old vitrified HLW and vitrified HLW aged to achieve (through decay) the same heat output as the fractionated high-level waste (FHLW). All comparisons are based on a 50,000 metric ton equivalent (MTE) system. The FHLW and the Cs/Sr waste are both disposed of as vitrified waste but emplaced in separate areas of a basalt repository. The FHLW is emplaced in high-integrity packages at relatively high waste loading but low heat loading, while the Cs/Sr waste is emplaced in minimum-integrity packages at relatively high heat loading in a separate region of the repository. System cost comparisons are based on minimum cost combinations of canister diameter, waste concentration, and canister spacing in a basalt repository. The effects on both long- and near-term safety considerations are also addressed. The major conclusion is that the Cs/Sr fractionation concept offers the prospect of a substantial total system cost advantage for HLW disposal if reduced HLW package temperatures in a basalt repository are desired. However, there is no cost advantage if currently designated maximum design temperatures are acceptable. Aging the HLW for 50 to 100 years can accomplish similar results at equivalent or lower costs. 37 figures, 58 tables.

  17. Systems study of the feasibility of high-level nuclear waste fractionation for thermal stress control in a geologic repository: appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, R.W.; Elder, H.K.; McCallum, R.F.; Silviera, D.J.; Swanson, J.L.; Wiles, L.E.

    1983-06-01

    This study assesses the benefits and costs of fractionating the cesium and strontium (Cs/Sr) components in commercial high-level waste (HLW) to a separate waste stream for the purpose of reducing geologic-repository thermal stresses in the region of the HLW. The major conclusion is that the Cs/Sr fractionation concept offers the prospect of a substantial total system cost advantage for HLW disposal if reduced HLW package temperatures in a basalt repository are desired. However there is no cost advantage if currently designated maximum design temperatures are acceptable. Aging the HLW for 50 to 100 years can accomplish similar results at equivalent or lower costs. Volume II contains appendices for: (1) thermal analysis supplement; (2) fractionation process experimental results supplement; (3) cost analysis supplement; and (4) radiological risk analysis supplement.

  18. MONITORED GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY LIFE CYCLE COST ESTIMATE ASSUMPTIONS DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.E. Sweeney

    2001-02-08

    The purpose of this assumptions document is to provide general scope, strategy, technical basis, schedule and cost assumptions for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) life cycle cost (LCC) estimate and schedule update incorporating information from the Viability Assessment (VA) , License Application Design Selection (LADS), 1999 Update to the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) estimate and from other related and updated information. This document is intended to generally follow the assumptions outlined in the previous MGR cost estimates and as further prescribed by DOE guidance.

  19. Scientific basis for a safety case of deep geological repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noseck, Ulrich; Becker, Dirk-Alexander; Brasser, Thomas [and others

    2012-11-15

    Within this project strategies and methods to build a safety case for deep geological repositories are further developed. This includes also the scientific fundamentals as a basis of the safety case. In the international framework the methodology of the Safety Case is frequently applied and continuously improved. According to definitions from IAEA and NEA the Safety Case is a compilation of arguments and facts, which describe, quantify and support the safety and the degree of confidence in the safety of the geological repository. The safety of the geological repository should be demonstrated by the safety case. The safety case is the basis for essential decisions during a repository programme. It comprises the results of safety assessments in combination with additional information like multiple lines of evidence and a discussion of robustness and quality of the repository, its design and the quality of all safety assessments including the basic assumptions. A crucial element of the Safety Case is the long-term safety analysis, i.e. the systematic analysis of the hazards connected with the facility and the capability of site and repository design to ensure the required safety functions and to fulfill the technical claims. Long-term safety analysis requires a powerful and qualified programme package, which contains appropriate hardware and software as well as well trained and experienced modellers performing the model calculations. The calculation tools used within safety cases need to be checked and verified and continuously adapted to the state-of-the-art science and technology. Especially it needs to be applicable to a real repository system. For the assessment of safety a deep process understanding is necessary. The R and D work performed within this project will contribute to the improvement of process and system understanding as well as to the further development of methods and strategies applied in the safety case. Emphasis was put on the following aspects

  20. Status and development of deep geological repository in Slovak republic from geological point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Franzen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During the operation of Slovak NPPs, production of approximately 2,300 metric tons of spent fuel expressed as heavy metal (18,654 spent fuel assemblies is expected. In addition, about 5000 metric tons of radioactive waste unfit for near surface repository at Mochovce and destined for a deep geological disposal. The safe and long-term solution of back-end fuel cycle is so highly required.One of the most favorable solutions is Deep Geological Repository (DGR. The site for a DGR, along with repository design and the engineered barrier system must ensure long-term safety of the disposal system.A preliminary set of site-selection criteria for a DGR was proposed in Slovakia, based on worldwide experience and consistent with IAEA recommendations. Main groups of criteria are: 1 geological and tectonic stability of prospective sites; 2 appropriate characteristics of host rock (lithological homogeneity, suitable hydrogeological and geochemical conditions, favourable geotechnical setting, absence of mineral resources, etc.; 3 conflict of interests (natural resources, natural and cultural heritage, protected resources of thermal waters, etc..Based on the previous geological investigations, three distinct areas (five localities were determined as the most prospective sites for construction of a DGR so far. Three of them are built by granitoids rock (Tribeč Mts., Veporske vrchy Mts. and Stolicke vrchy Mts., other consist of sedimentary rock formations (Cerova vrchovina Upland and Rimavska kotlina Basin. Objective for the next investigation stage is to perform more detailed geological characterization of the prospective sites.

  1. Radionuclide transport behavior in a generic geological radioactive waste repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Marco; Liu, Hui-Hai; Birkholzer, Jens T

    2015-01-01

    We performed numerical simulations of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport to study the influence of several factors, including the ambient hydraulic gradient, groundwater pressure anomalies, and the properties of the excavation damaged zone (EDZ), on the prevailing transport mechanism (i.e., advection or molecular diffusion) in a generic nuclear waste repository within a clay-rich geological formation. By comparing simulation results, we show that the EDZ plays a major role as a preferential flowpath for radionuclide transport. When the EDZ is not taken into account, transport is dominated by molecular diffusion in almost the totality of the simulated domain, and transport velocity is about 40% slower. Modeling results also show that a reduction in hydraulic gradient leads to a greater predominance of diffusive transport, slowing down radionuclide transport by about 30% with respect to a scenario assuming a unit gradient. In addition, inward flow caused by negative pressure anomalies in the clay-rich formation further reduces transport velocity, enhancing the ability of the geological barrier to contain the radioactive waste. On the other hand, local high gradients associated with positive pressure anomalies can speed up radionuclide transport with respect to steady-state flow systems having the same regional hydraulic gradients. Transport behavior was also found to be sensitive to both geometrical and hydrogeological parameters of the EDZ. Results from this work can provide useful knowledge toward correctly assessing the post-closure safety of a geological disposal system. © 2014, National Ground Water Association.

  2. Framing a bilateral US-Russian geologic repository initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardine, L J

    1998-09-08

    This document summarizes a framework for the development of a bilateral United States-Russian geologic repository initiative to enable cooperative work on the science and technology of geologic disposal of high-level nuclear wastes and fissile-containing materials. Three different types of integrated technical activities in Russia are employed to focus and organize a Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) FY00 initiative. We have specified the items for initial negotiations with the Russians for start-up activities in FY99 and early FY00. These first interactions will generate other activities which, by utilizing Russia's unique capabilities, may assist us in the development and validation of the US geologic repository program. The current International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) cooperative study of 30years of heat effects on underground hardrock rock media at the closed city of Krasnoyarsk-26 (Zheleznorgorsk) is but one example of such a Russian geologic repository analogue project that may assist the US geologic repository program.

  3. Scientific basis for a safety case of deep geological repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noseck, Ulrich; Becker, Dirk-Alexander; Brasser, Thomas [and others

    2012-11-15

    Within this project strategies and methods to build a safety case for deep geological repositories are further developed. This includes also the scientific fundamentals as a basis of the safety case. In the international framework the methodology of the Safety Case is frequently applied and continuously improved. According to definitions from IAEA and NEA the Safety Case is a compilation of arguments and facts, which describe, quantify and support the safety and the degree of confidence in the safety of the geological repository. The safety of the geological repository should be demonstrated by the safety case. The safety case is the basis for essential decisions during a repository programme. It comprises the results of safety assessments in combination with additional information like multiple lines of evidence and a discussion of robustness and quality of the repository, its design and the quality of all safety assessments including the basic assumptions. A crucial element of the Safety Case is the long-term safety analysis, i.e. the systematic analysis of the hazards connected with the facility and the capability of site and repository design to ensure the required safety functions and to fulfill the technical claims. Long-term safety analysis requires a powerful and qualified programme package, which contains appropriate hardware and software as well as well trained and experienced modellers performing the model calculations. The calculation tools used within safety cases need to be checked and verified and continuously adapted to the state-of-the-art science and technology. Especially it needs to be applicable to a real repository system. For the assessment of safety a deep process understanding is necessary. The R and D work performed within this project will contribute to the improvement of process and system understanding as well as to the further development of methods and strategies applied in the safety case. Emphasis was put on the following aspects

  4. An approach to improve Romanian geological repository planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei, Veronica [Romanian Association for Nuclear Energy, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Prisecaru, Ilie [University Politehnica of Bucharest, Bucharest (Romania)

    2016-04-15

    International standards recommend typical phases to be included within any national program for the development of a geological repository dedicated to disposal of the high level radioactive wastes generated in countries using nuclear power. However, these are not universally applicable and the content of each of these phases may need to be adapted for each national situation and regulatory and institutional framework. Several national geological repository programs have faced failures in schedules and have revised their programs to consider an adapted phased management approach. The authors have observed that in the case of those countries in the early phases of a geological repository program where boundary conditions have not been fully defined, international recommendations for handling delays/failures in the national program might not immediately help. This paper considers a case study of the influences of the national context risks on the current planning schedule of the Romanian national geological repository. It proposes an optimum solution for an integrated response to any significant adverse impact arising from these risks, enabling sustainable program planning.

  5. Analytical performance models for geologic repositories. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Fujita, A.; Kanki, T.; Kobayashi, A.; Lung, H.; Ting, D.; Sato, Y.; Zavoshy, S.J.

    1982-10-01

    This report presents analytical solutions of the dissolution and hydrogeologic transport of radionuclides in geologic repositories. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the equations resulting from these analyses. The subjects treated in this report are: solubility-limited transport with transverse dispersion (chapter 2); transport of a radionuclide chain with nonequilibrium chemical reactions (chapter 3); advective transport in a two-dimensional flow field (chapter 4); radionuclide transport in fractured media (chapter 5); a mathematical model for EPA's analysis of generic repositories (chapter 6); and dissolution of radionuclides from solid waste (chapter 7). Volume 2 contains chapters 5, 6, and 7.

  6. Geological disposal system development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Chul Hyung; Kuh, J. E.; Kim, S. K. and others

    2000-04-01

    Spent fuel inventories to be disposed of finally and design base spent fuel were determined. Technical and safety criteria for a geological repository system in Korea were established. Based on the properties of spent PWR and CANDU fuels, seven repository alternatives were developed and the most promising repository option was selected by the pair-wise comparison method from the technology point of view. With this option preliminary conceptual design studies were carried out. Several module, e.g., gap module, congruent release module were developed for the overall assessment code MASCOT-K. The prominent overseas databases such as OECD/NEA FEP list were are fully reviewed and then screened to identify the feasible ones to reflect the Korean geo-hydrological conditions. In addition to this the well known scenario development methods such as PID, RES were reviewed. To confirm the radiological safety of the proposed KAERI repository concept the preliminary PA was pursued. Thermo-hydro-mechanical analysis for the near field of repository were performed to verify thermal and mechanical stability for KAERI repository system. The requirements of buffer material were analyzed, and based on the results, the quantitative functional criteria for buffer material were established. The hydraulic and swelling property, mechanical properties, and thermal conductivity, the organic carbon content, and the evolution of pore water chemistry were investigated. Based on the results, the candidate buffer material was selected.

  7. Comparing Repository Types - Challenges and barriers for subject-based repositories, research repositories, national repository systems and institutional repositories in serving scholarly communication

    CERN Document Server

    Armbruster, Chris

    2010-01-01

    After two decades of repository development, some conclusions may be drawn as to which type of repository and what kind of service best supports digital scholarly communication, and thus the production of new knowledge. Four types of publication repository may be distinguished, namely the subject-based repository, research repository, national repository system and institutional repository. Two important shifts in the role of repositories may be noted. With regard to content, a well-defined and high quality corpus is essential. This implies that repository services are likely to be most successful when constructed with the user and reader uppermost in mind. With regard to service, high value to specific scholarly communities is essential. This implies that repositories are likely to be most useful to scholars when they offer dedicated services supporting the production of new knowledge. Along these lines, challenges and barriers to repository development may be identified in three key dimensions: a) identific...

  8. 10 CFR 60.131 - General design criteria for the geologic repository operations area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Repository Operations Area § 60.131 General design criteria for the geologic repository operations area. (a... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General design criteria for the geologic repository operations area. 60.131 Section 60.131 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF...

  9. Deep geological isolation of nuclear waste: numerical modeling of repository scale hydrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dettinger, M.D.

    1980-04-01

    The Scope of Work undertaken covers three main tasks, described as follows: (Task 1) CDM provided consulting services to the University on modeling aspects of the study having to do with transport processes involving the local groundwater system near the repository and the flow of fluids and vapors through the various porous media making up the repository system. (Task 2) CDM reviewed literature related to repository design, concentrating on effects of the repository geometry, location and other design factors on the flow of fluids within the repository boundaries, drainage from the repository structure, and the eventual transport of radionucldies away from the repository site. (Task 3) CDM, in a joint effort with LLL personnel, identified generic boundary and initial conditions, identified processes to be modeled, and recommended a modeling approach with suggestions for appropriate simplifications and approximations to the problem and identifiying important parameters necessary to model the processes. This report consists of two chapters and an appendix. The first chapter (Chapter III of the LLL report) presents a detailed description and discussion of the modeling approach developed in this project, its merits and weaknesses, and a brief review of the difficulties anticipated in implementing the approach. The second chapter (Chapter IV of the LLL report) presents a summary of a survey of researchers in the field of repository performance analysis and a discussion of that survey in light of the proposed modeling approach. The appendix is a review of the important physical processes involved in the potential hydrologic transport of radionuclides through, around and away from deep geologic nuclear waste repositories.

  10. Geologic, stratigraphic, thermal, and mechanical factors which influence repository design in the bedded salt environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, J.P.; Nair, O.; Ortman, D.; Rowe, J.

    1979-12-01

    This report describes the geologic, stratigraphic, thermal, and mechanical considerations applicable to repository design. The topics discussed in the report include: tectonic activity; geologic structure; stratigraphy; rock mechanical properties; and hydrologic properties.

  11. 10 CFR 60.111 - Performance of the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance of the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure. 60.111 Section 60.111 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL.... (1) The geologic repository operations area shall be designed to preserve the option of...

  12. Limits on the thermal energy release from radioactive wastes in a mined geologic repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, J.A.

    1983-03-01

    The theraml energy release of nuclear wastes is a major factor in the design of geologic repositories. Thermal limits need to be placed on various aspets of the geologic waste disposal system to avoid or retard the degradation of repository performance because of increased temperatures. The thermal limits in current use today are summarized in this report. These limits are placed in a hierarchial structure of thermal criteria consistent with the failure mechanism they are trying to prevent. The thermal criteria hierarchy is used to evaluate the thermal performance of a sample repository design. The design consists of disassembled BWR spent fuel, aged 10 years, close packed in a carbon steel canister with 15 cm of crushed salt backfill. The medium is bedded salt. The most-restrictive temperature for this design is the spent-fuel centerline temperature limit of 300/sup 0/C. A sensitivity study on the effects of additional cooling prior to disposal on repository thermal limits and design is performed.

  13. Present state of the art in the development of a geological radioactive waste repository in Ukraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shestopalov, V.M.; Rudenko, Yu.F; Boguslavskyy, A.S.; Shybetskyy, Yu.A. [Radio-Environmental Center, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 55b O.Gonchara St., Kyiv 01054 (Ukraine); Brewitz, W. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, GRS, mbH, Schwertnergasse 1, 50667 Koeln (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The prospects and advantages of the Chernobyl Exclusion zone (ChEZ) for geological repository allocation are considered. The initial data for analysis are: governmental policy, strategy and current practice of spent fuel, high-level and long-lived waste management as well as geological, hydrogeological, economical and social-demographic conditions of ChEZ. The conclusion about suitability of ChEZ geological and hydrogeological conditions for geological repository allocation has been made. High promise of borehole-type repository is shown. (authors)

  14. Multibarrier system preventing migration of radionuclides from radioactive waste repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olszewska Wioleta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Safety of radioactive waste repositories operation is associated with a multibarrier system designed and constructed to isolate and contain the waste from the biosphere. Each of radioactive waste repositories is equipped with system of barriers, which reduces the possibility of release of radionuclides from the storage site. Safety systems may differ from each other depending on the type of repository. They consist of the natural geological barrier provided by host rocks of the repository and its surroundings, and an engineered barrier system (EBS. The EBS may itself comprise a variety of sub-systems or components, such as waste forms, canisters, buffers, backfills, seals and plugs. The EBS plays a major role in providing the required disposal system performance. It is assumed that the metal canisters and system of barriers adequately isolate waste from the biosphere. The evaluation of the multibarrier system is carried out after detailed tests to determine its parameters, and after analysis including mathematical modeling of migration of contaminants. To provide an assurance of safety of radioactive waste repository multibarrier system, detailed long term safety assessments are developed. Usually they comprise modeling of EBS stability, corrosion rate and radionuclide migration in near field in geosphere and biosphere. The principal goal of radionuclide migration modeling is assessment of the radionuclides release paths and rate from the repository, radionuclides concentration in geosphere in time and human exposure to ionizing radiation

  15. National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase III: Implementation and operation of the repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    American Geological Institute

    2000-03-13

    The American Geological Institute's (AGI) National Geoscience Data Repository System (NGDRS) was initiated in response to the fact that billions of dollars worth of domestic geoscience data are in jeopardy of being irrevocably lost or destroyed as a consequence of the ongoing downsizing of the U.S. energy and minerals industry. Preservation and access to domestic geological and geophysical data are critical to the energy security and economic prosperity of the nation. There is a narrow window of opportunity to act before valuable data are destroyed. The data truly represent a national treasure and immediate steps must be taken to assure their preservation.

  16. Postclosure safety assessment of a deep geological repository for Canada's used nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, N.G.; Kremer, E.P.; Garisto, F.; Gierszewski, P.; Gobien, M.; Medri, C.L.D. [Nuclear Waste Management Organization, Toronto, ON (Canada); Avis, J.D. [Geofirma Engineering Ltd., Ottawa, ON (Canada); Chshyolkova, T.; Kitson, C.I.; Melnyk, W.; Wojciechowski, L.C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Pinawa, MB (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This paper reports on elements of a postclosure safety assessment performed for a conceptual design and hypothetical site for a deep geological repository for Canada's used nuclear fuel. Key features are the assumption of a copper used fuel container with a steel inner vessel, container placement in vertical in-floor boreholes, a repository depth of 500 m, and a sparsely fractured crystalline rock geosphere. The study considers a Normal Evolution Scenario together with a series of Disruptive Event Scenarios. The Normal Evolution Scenario is a reasonable extrapolation of present day site features and receptor lifestyles, while the Disruptive Event Scenarios examine abnormal and unlikely failures of the containment and isolation systems. Both deterministic and probabilistic simulations were performed. The results show the peak dose consequences occur far in the future and are well below the applicable regulatory acceptance criteria and the natural background levels. (author)

  17. Geological criteria for site selection of an LILW radioactive waste repository in the Philippines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurelio, Mario; Taguibao, Kristine Joy [National Institute of Geological Sciences, University of the Philippines, Quezon City (Philippines); Vargas, Edmundo; Palattao, Maria Visitacion; Reyes, Rolando; Nohay, Carl; Singayan, Alfonso [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Department of Science and Technology, Quezon City (Philippines)

    2013-07-01

    In the selection of sites for disposal facilities involving low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recommendations require that 'the region in which the site is located shall be such that significant tectonic and surface processes are not expected to occur with an intensity that would compromise the required isolation capability of the repository'. Evaluating the appropriateness of a site therefore requires a deep understanding of the geological and tectonic setting of the area. The Philippines sits in a tectonically active region frequented by earthquakes and volcanic activity. Its highly variable morphology coupled with its location along the typhoon corridor in the west Pacific region subjects the country to surface processes often manifested in the form of landslides. The Philippine LILW near surface repository project site is located on the north eastern sector of the Island of Luzon in northern Philippines. This island is surrounded by active subduction trenches; to the east by the East Luzon Trough and to the west by the Manila Trench. The island is also traversed by several branches of the Philippine Fault System. The Philippine LILW repository project is located more than 100 km away from any of these major active fault systems. In the near field, the project site is located less than 10 km from a minor fault (Dummon River Fault) and more than 40 km away from a volcanic edifice (Mt. Caguas). This paper presents an analysis of the potential hazards that these active tectonic features may pose to the project site. The assessment of such geologic hazards is imperative in the characterization of the site and a crucial input in the design and safety assessment of the repository. (authors)

  18. Knowledge, transparency, refutability, and consequences: Using models to evaluate geologic repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M. C.; Kavetski, D.; Clark, M. P.; Ye, M.; Tiedeman, C. R.; Arabi, M.; Lu, D.

    2012-04-01

    Current knowledge of a geologic repository includes knowledge about data and their errors; knowledge about possible physical, chemical, and biological processes, and their interactions; knowledge about possible hydrologic and geologic frameworks; knowledge about past and future changes in system dynamics and characteristics; and knowledge about potential future development and use of the repository. Model development and analysis methods ideally integrate all of this knowledge, produce the transparency and refutability acknowledged as necessary to useful models of any environmental system; and provide clear understanding of consequences for the geologic repository, including quantification of uncertainty. Yet many model development and analysis methods fail to achieve this goal. For example, many methods fail to properly account for data error and spend many model runs exploring unrealistic error assumptions that are rarely clearly presented to modelers and model users. Many methods expend huge computer resources to address nearly pathologic model nonlinearities which are often programming and numerical artifacts that fail to represent the intended system behavior. Finally, many methods are unfamiliar to people using model results so that transparency and refutability is not achieved by those most in need of understanding likely consequences. This work suggests that ideas for including data error (including epistemic error) in model development and analysis, referred to as error-based weighting, and ideas about addressing nonlinearity, referred to as robust models, can be used to greatly improve model transparency and refutability, and achieve greater and more defensible long-term understanding of system dynamics and consequences for geologic repositories. This talk will discuss error-based weighting and robust models, and outline a model development and analysis approach that uses 10s to 100s of model runs instead of the 1,000s to 100,000s of runs required by many

  19. Engineering for Operation of a Future Belgian Deep Geological Repository for ILW and HLW - 12379

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haverkamp, B.; Biurrun, E.; Nieder-Westermann, G.H. [DBE TECHNOLOGY GmbH, Peine (Germany); Van Humbeeck, H. [ONDRAF/NIRAS, Brussels (Belgium); Van Cotthem, Alain [Tractebel Engineering SA, Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-07-01

    In Belgium, an advanced conceptual design is being elaborated for deep geologic disposal of high level waste (HLW) and for low and intermediate level waste (LILW) not amenable for surface disposal. The concept is based on a shielded steel and concrete container for disposal of HLW, i.e., the Super-container. LILW will be disposed of in separately designed concrete caissons. The reference host rock is the Boom Clay, a poorly indurated clay formation in northeastern Belgium. Investigations into the potential host rock are conducted at the HADES underground research laboratory in Mol, Belgium. In 2009 the Belgian Agency for Management of Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Materials (ONDRAF/NIRAS) initiated a four year research project aimed at confirming the fundamental feasibility of building and operating a repository. The goal of the program is to demonstrate at a detailed conceptual level that the proposed geologic disposal system can be safely constructed, operated, and progressively closed. Part of the broader research efforts being conducted includes evaluations optimization of the waste transportation shaft, subsurface transportation system, ventilation system, and evaluation of backfilling and sealing concepts for the repository design. The potential for implementation of a waste retrieval strategy encompassing the first 100 years after emplacement is also considered. In the framework of a four year research program aimed at confirming the fundamental feasibility of building and operating a repository in poorly indurated clay design studies have been underway to optimize the waste transportation shaft, subsurface transportation system, and ventilation system. Additionally backfilling and sealing concepts proposed for the potential repository have been reviewed in conjunction with impacts related to the potential future inclusion of a retrievability requirement in governing regulations. The main engineering challenges in the Belgian repository concept are

  20. SUBSURFACE REPOSITORY INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.C. Randle

    2000-01-07

    The primary purpose of this document is to develop a preliminary high-level functional and physical control system architecture for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain. This document outlines an overall control system concept that encompasses and integrates the many diverse process and communication systems being developed for the subsurface repository design. This document presents integrated design concepts for monitoring and controlling the diverse set of subsurface operations. The Subsurface Repository Integrated Control System design will be composed of a series of diverse process systems and communication networks. The subsurface repository design contains many systems related to instrumentation and control (I&C) for both repository development and waste emplacement operations. These systems include waste emplacement, waste retrieval, ventilation, radiological and air monitoring, rail transportation, construction development, utility systems (electrical, lighting, water, compressed air, etc.), fire protection, backfill emplacement, and performance confirmation. Each of these systems involves some level of I&C and will typically be integrated over a data communications network throughout the subsurface facility. The subsurface I&C systems will also interface with multiple surface-based systems such as site operations, rail transportation, security and safeguards, and electrical/piped utilities. In addition to the I&C systems, the subsurface repository design also contains systems related to voice and video communications. The components for each of these systems will be distributed and linked over voice and video communication networks throughout the subsurface facility. The scope and primary objectives of this design analysis are to: (1) Identify preliminary system-level functions and interfaces (Section 6.2). (2) Examine the overall system complexity and determine how and on what levels the engineered process systems will be monitored, controlled, and

  1. Reliable predictions of waste performance in a geologic repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigford, T.H.; Chambre, P.L.

    1985-08-01

    Establishing reliable estimates of long-term performance of a waste repository requires emphasis upon valid theories to predict performance. Predicting rates that radionuclides are released from waste packages cannot rest upon empirical extrapolations of laboratory leach data. Reliable predictions can be based on simple bounding theoretical models, such as solubility-limited bulk-flow, if the assumed parameters are reliably known or defensibly conservative. Wherever possible, performance analysis should proceed beyond simple bounding calculations to obtain more realistic - and usually more favorable - estimates of expected performance. Desire for greater realism must be balanced against increasing uncertainties in prediction and loss of reliability. Theoretical predictions of release rate based on mass-transfer analysis are bounding and the theory can be verified. Postulated repository analogues to simulate laboratory leach experiments introduce arbitrary and fictitious repository parameters and are shown not to agree with well-established theory. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Preliminary concepts: materials management in an internationally safeguarded nuclear-waste geologic repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostenak, C.A.; Whitty, W.J.; Dietz, R.J.

    1979-11-01

    Preliminary concepts of materials accountability are presented for an internationally safeguarded nuclear-waste geologic repository. A hypothetical reference repository that receives nuclear waste for emplacement in a geologic medium serves to illustrate specific safeguards concepts. Nuclear wastes received at the reference repository derive from prior fuel-cycle operations. Alternative safeguards techniques ranging from item accounting to nondestructive assay and waste characteristics that affect the necessary level of safeguards are examined. Downgrading of safeguards prior to shipment to the repository is recommended whenever possible. The point in the waste cycle where international safeguards may be terminate depends on the fissile content, feasibility of separation, and practicable recoverability of the waste: termination may not be possible if spent fuels are declared as waste.

  3. Preclosure seismic design methodology for a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. Topical report YMP/TR-003-NP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This topical report describes the methodology and criteria that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to use for preclosure seismic design of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) of the proposed geologic repository operations area that are important to safety. Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 60 (10 CFR 60), Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Wastes in Geologic Repositories, states that for a license to be issued for operation of a high-level waste repository, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) must find that the facility will not constitute an unreasonable risk to the health and safety of the public. Section 60.131 (b)(1) requires that SSCs important to safety be designed so that natural phenomena and environmental conditions anticipated at the geologic repository operations area will not interfere with necessary safety functions. Among the natural phenomena specifically identified in the regulation as requiring safety consideration are the hazards of ground shaking and fault displacement due to earthquakes.

  4. Copper corrosion under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, F.; Ahonen, L.; Taxen, C.; Vuorinen, U.; Werme, L

    2002-01-01

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 20 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear disposal repository located in the Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long-term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature. Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion before and during saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer by groundwater, general and localized corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. Much has been learnt about the long-term corrosion behaviour of copper canisters over the past 20 years. The majority of the information reviewed here is drawn from the Swedish/Finnish and Canadian programmes. Despite differences in scientific approach, and canister and repository design, the results of these two programmes both suggest that copper provides an excellent corrosion barrier in an underground repository. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid. (orig.)

  5. Copper corrosion under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, F. [Integrity Corrosion Consulting Ltd, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Ahonen, L. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Taxen, C. [Swedish Corrosion Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Vuorinen, U. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Werme, L. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-12-01

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 20 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear disposal repository located in he Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long- term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature.Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion before and during saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer by groundwater, general and localized corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. Much has been learnt about the long-term corrosion behaviour of copper canisters over the past 20 years. The majority of the information reviewed here is drawn from the Swedish/Finnish and Canadian programmes. Despite differences in scientific approach, and canister and repository design, the results of these two programmes both suggest that copper provides an excellent corrosion barrier in an underground repository. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid.

  6. Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

    2003-11-15

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

  7. Analysis on the use of engineered barriers for geologic isolation of spent fuel in a reference salt site repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cloninger, M.O.; Cole, C.R.; Washburn, J.F.

    1980-12-01

    A perspective on the potential durability and effectiveness requirements for the waste form, container and other engineered barriers for geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel has been developed. This perspective is based on calculated potential doses to individuals who may be exposed to radioactivity released from a repository via a groundwater transport pathway. These potential dose commitments were calculated with an integrated geosphere transport and bioshpere transport model. A sensitivity analysis was accomplished by varying four important system parameters, namely the waste radionuclide release rate from the repository, the delay prior to groundwater contact with the waste (leach initiation), aquifer flow velocity and flow path length. The nuclide retarding capacity of the geologic media, a major determinant of the isolation effectiveness, was not varied as a parameter but was held constant for a particular reference site. This analysis is limited to looking only at engineered barriers whose net effect is either to delay groundwater contact with the waste form or to limit the rate of release of radionuclides into the groundwater once contact has occurred. The analysis considers only leach incident scenarios, including a water well intrusion into the groundwater near a repository, but does not consider other human intrusion events or catastrophic events. The analysis has so far been applied to a reference salt site repository system and conclusions are presented.Basically, in nearly all cases, the regional geology is the most effective barrier to release of radionuclides to the biosphere; however, for long-lived isotopes of carbon, technetium and iodine, which were poorly sorbed on the geologic media, the geology is not very effective once a leach incident is initiated.

  8. Siting regions for deep geological repositories. Why just here?; Standortgebiete fuer geologische Tiefenlager. Warum gerade hier?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieser, A

    2009-09-15

    This report helps to the popularization of the Nagra works accomplished for the management and disposal of the radioactive wastes in Switzerland. The programme for management and disposal of the radioactive wastes are extensively determined by regulations. Protection of mankind and environment is the primary objective. The basic storage process is considered as having been solved. The question addressed in the report is where the facility has to be built; the site selection procedure includes five steps: 1) according to their type the wastes have to be allocated to two different repositories: for low- and intermediate-level wastes (L/ILW), and for high-level and alpha-toxic wastes (HLW); 2) the safety concept for both repositories and the requirements on the geology have to be determined; 3) large suitable geological-tectonic zones must be found where repositories could be built; 4) in these geological zones a suitable host rock has to be identified; 5) the most important spatial geological conditions of the host rock (minimum depth with respect to surface erosion, maximum depth in terms of engineering requirements, lateral extent) have to be identified. Based on these criteria, three suitable siting regions for a HLW repository were found in the North of Switzerland. The preferred host rock is Opalinus clay because of its very low permeability; it is therefore an excellent barrier against nuclide transport. In the three proposed siting regions, Opalinus clay is present in sufficient volumes at a suitable depth. For a L/ILW repository six different possible siting regions were identified, five in Northern Switzerland and one in Central Switzerland. In the three siting regions found for a possible HLW repository, it would also be possible to built a combined repository for both HLW and L/ILW wastes.

  9. New Quantitative Study for Dissertations Repository System

    CERN Document Server

    Alshammari, Fahad H; Zaidan, M A; Hmood, Ali K; Zaidan, B B; Zaidan, A A

    2010-01-01

    In the age of technology, the information communication technology becomes very important especially in education field. Students must be allowed to learn anytime, anywhere and at their own place. The facility of library in the university should be developed. In this paper we are going to present new Quantitative Study for Dissertations Repository System and also recommend future application of the approach.

  10. Albedo Neutron Dosimetry in a Deep Geological Disposal Repository for High-Level Nuclear Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Bo; Becker, Frank

    2016-06-24

    Albedo neutron dosemeter is the German official personal neutron dosemeter in mixed radiation fields where neutrons contribute to personal dose. In deep geological repositories for high-level nuclear waste, where neutrons can dominate the radiation field, it is of interest to investigate the performance of albedo neutron dosemeter in such facilities. In this study, the deep geological repository is represented by a shielding cask loaded with spent nuclear fuel placed inside a rock salt emplacement drift. Due to the backscattering of neutrons in the drift, issues concerning calibration of the dosemeter arise. Field-specific calibration of the albedo neutron dosemeter was hence performed with Monte Carlo simulations. In order to assess the applicability of the albedo neutron dosemeter in a deep geological repository over a long time scale, spent nuclear fuel with different ages of 50, 100 and 500 years were investigated. It was found out, that the neutron radiation field in a deep geological repository can be assigned to the application area 'N1' of the albedo neutron dosemeter, which is typical in reactors and accelerators with heavy shielding.

  11. SUBSURFACE REPOSITORY INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.J. Fernado

    1998-09-17

    The purpose of this document is to develop preliminary high-level functional and physical control system architectures for the proposed subsurface repository at Yucca Mountain. This document outlines overall control system concepts that encompass and integrate the many diverse systems being considered for use within the subsurface repository. This document presents integrated design concepts for monitoring and controlling the diverse set of subsurface operations. The subsurface repository design will be composed of a series of diverse systems that will be integrated to accomplish a set of overall functions and objectives. The subsurface repository contains several Instrumentation and Control (I&C) related systems including: waste emplacement systems, ventilation systems, communication systems, radiation monitoring systems, rail transportation systems, ground control monitoring systems, utility monitoring systems (electrical, lighting, water, compressed air, etc.), fire detection and protection systems, retrieval systems, and performance confirmation systems. Each of these systems involve some level of I&C and will typically be integrated over a data communication network. The subsurface I&C systems will also integrate with multiple surface-based site-wide systems such as emergency response, health physics, security and safeguards, communications, utilities and others. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Identify preliminary system level functions and interface needs (Presented in the functional diagrams in Section 7.2). (2) Examine the overall system complexity and determine how and on what levels these control systems will be controlled and integrated (Presented in Section 7.2). (3) Develop a preliminary subsurface facility-wide design for an overall control system architecture, and depict this design by a series of control system functional block diagrams (Presented in Section 7.2). (4) Develop a series of physical architectures that

  12. Dissertations Repository System Using Context Module

    CERN Document Server

    Hmood, Ali K; Alanazi, Hamdan O; Alnaqeib, Rami; Al-Nabhani, Yahya

    2010-01-01

    Without a doubt, the electronic learning makes education quite flexible. Nowadays, all organizations and institutions are trying to avoid Monotony and the delay and inertia. As well the universities should be improving their systems continually to achieve success. Whereas, the students need to access the dissertations in the library. In this paper we will present Dissertations Repository System Using Context Module to allow the students to benefit the dissertations which is in the library flexibly.

  13. Developing the Tools for Geologic Repository Monitoring - Andra's Monitoring R and D Program - 12045

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buschaert, S.; Lesoille, S.; Bertrand, J.; Mayer, S.; Landais, P. [ANDRA, 1-7 rue Jean-Monnet, F-92298 Chatenay-Malabry cedex (France)

    2012-07-01

    The French Safety Guide recommends that Andra develop a monitoring program to be implemented during repository construction and conducted until (and possibly after) closure, in order to confirm expected behavior and enhance knowledge of relevant processes. To achieve this, Andra has developed an overall monitoring strategy and identified specific technical objectives to inform disposal process management on evolutions relevant to both the long term safety and reversible, pre-closure management of the repository. Andra has launched an ambitious R and D program to ensure that reliable, durable, metrologically qualified and tested monitoring systems will be available at the time of repository construction in order to respond to monitoring objectives. After four years of a specific R and D program, first observations are described and recommendations are proposed. The results derived from 4 years of Andra's R and D program allow three main observations to be shared. First, while other industries also invest in monitoring equipment, their obvious emphasis will always be on their specific requirements and needs, thus often only providing a partial match with repository requirements. Examples can be found for all available sensors, which are generally not resistant to radiation. Second, the very close scrutiny anticipated for the geologic disposal process is likely to place an unprecedented emphasis on the quality of monitoring results. It therefore seems important to emphasize specific developments with an aim at providing metrologically qualified systems. Third, adapting existing technology to specific repository needs, and providing adequate proof of their worth, is a lengthy process. In conclusion, it therefore seems prudent to plan ahead and to invest wisely in the adequate development of those monitoring tools that will likely be needed in the repository to respond to the implementers' and regulators' requirements, including those agreed and developed

  14. Derivation of parameters necessary for the evaluation of performance of sites for deep geological repositories with particular reference to bedded salt, Livermore, California. Volume I. Main text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, J.P.; Rawlings, G.E.; Soto, C.A.; Wood, D.F.; Chorley, D.W.

    1979-12-01

    A survey of parameters to be considered in the evaluation of sites for deep geologic nuclear waste repositories is presented. As yet, no comprehensive site selection procedure or performance evaluation approach has been adopted. A basis is provided for the development of parameters by discussing both site selection and performance evaluation. Three major groups of parameters are considered in this report: geologic, mining/rock mechanics, and hydrogeologic. For each type, the role of the parameter in the evaluation of repository sites is discussed. The derivation of the parameter by measurement, correlation, inference, or other method is discussed. Geologic parameters define the framework of the repository site and can be used in development of conceptual models and the prediction of long-term performance. Methods for deriving geological parameters include mapping, surveying, drilling, geophysical investigation, and historical and regional analysis. Rock mechanics/mining parameters are essential for the prediction of short-term performance and the development of initial conditions for modeling of long-term performance. Rock mechanics/mapping parameters can be derived by field or laboratory investigation, correlation, and theoretically or empirically based inference. Hydrogeologic parameters are the most important for assessment of long-term radionuclide confinement, since transport throughout the regional hydrogeologic system is the most likely mode of radionuclide escape from geologic repositories. Hydrogeologic parameters can be derived by hydrogeologic mapping and interpretation, hydrogeologic system modeling, field measurements, and lab tests. Procedures used in determination and statistical evaluation of geologic and rock mechanics parameters are discussed.

  15. Plugs for deposition tunnels in a deep geologic repository in granitic rock. Concepts and experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, D.A. (AECL, Chalk River (Canada)); Boergesson, L. (Clay Technology, Lund (Sweden)); Gunnarsson, D. (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co, Stockholm (Sweden)); Hansen, J. (Posiva Oy, Eurajoki (Finland))

    2009-11-15

    Regardless of the emplacement geometry selected in a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel, there will be a requirement for the access tunnels to remain open while repository operations are ongoing. The period of repository operation will stretch for many years (decades to more than a century depending on disposal concept and number of canisters to be installed). Requirements for extended monitoring of the repository before final closure may further extend the period over which the tunnels must remain open. The intersection of the emplacement rooms/drifts and the access tunnels needs to be physically closed in order to ensure that the canisters remain undisturbed and that no undesirable hydraulic conditions are allowed to develop within the backfilled volume. As a result of these requirements, generic guidelines and design concepts have been developed for 'Plugs' that are intended to provide mechanical restraint, physical security and hydraulic control functions over the short-term (repository operational and pre-closure monitoring periods). This report focuses on the role and requirements of plugs to be installed at emplacement room/ tunnel/drift entrances or in other locations within the repository that may require installation of temporary mechanical or hydraulic control structures. These plugs are not necessarily a permanent feature of the repository and may, if required, be removed for later installation of a permanent seal. Room/Drift plugs are also by their defined function, physically accessible during repository operation so their performance can be monitored and remedial actions taken if necessary (e.g. increased seepage past the plug). A considerable number of sealing demonstrations have been undertaken at several research laboratories that are focussed on development of technologies and materials for use in isolation of spent nuclear fuel and these are briefly reviewed in this report. Additionally, technologies developed for non

  16. Mathematical Modeling of a Cs(I – Sr(II – Bentonite – Magnetite Sorption System, Simulating the Processes Taking Place in a Deep Geological Repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Filipská

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The derivation of mathematical models of systems consisting of Cs(I or Sr(II and of bentonite (B, magnetite (M or their mixtures (B+M are described. The paper deals especially with modeling of the protonation and sorption processes occurring on the functional groups of the solid phase, namely on so called edge sites and layer sites. The two types of sites have different properties and, as a result, three types of Surface Complexation Models (SCM are used for edge sites, viz. two electrostatic SCMs: the Constant Capacitance Model (CCM and the Diffusion Double Layer Model (DLM, and one without electrostatic correction: the Chemical Model (CEM. The processes taking place on the layer sites are described by means of the Ion Exchange Model (IExM. In the course of modeling, the speciation of the given metal in the liquid (aqueous phase has to be taken into account. In principle, the model of protonation or sorption processes is based on the reactions occurring in the aqueous phase and on the surface of the solid phase, and comprises not only the equations of the equilibrium constants of the individual reactions, but also the mass and charge balance equations. The algorithm of the numerical solution is compatible with FAMULUS 3.5 (a Czech software product quite extensively used at Czech universities in the last decade, the bookcase codes of which are utilized. 

  17. THM Coupled Modeling in Near Field of an Assumed HLW Deep Geological Disposal Repository

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Zhenyao; Li Guoding; Li Shushen

    2004-01-01

    One of the most suitable ways under study for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) is isolation in deep geological repositories. It is very important to research the thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) coupled processes associated with an HLW disposal repository. Non-linear coupled equations, which are used to describe the THM coupled process and are suited to saturated-unsaturated porous media, are presented in this paper. A numerical method to solve these equations is put forward, and a finite element code is developed. This code is suited to the plane strain or axis-symmetry problem. Then this code is used to simulate the THM coupled process in the near field of an ideal disposal repository. The temperature vs. time, hydraulic head vs. time and stress vs. time results show that, in this assumed condition, the impact of temperature is very long (over 10 000 a) and the impact of the water head is short (about 90 d). Since the stress is induced by temperature and hydraulic head in this condition, the impact time of stress is the same as that of temperature. The results show that THM coupled processes are very important in the safety analysis of an HLW deep geological disposal repository.

  18. Logistics Modeling of Emplacement Rate and Duration of Operations for Generic Geologic Repository Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna; Hardin, Ernest

    2015-11-01

    This study identified potential geologic repository concepts for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and (2) evaluated the achievable repository waste emplacement rate and the time required to complete the disposal for these concepts. Total repository capacity is assumed to be approximately 140,000 MT of spent fuel. The results of this study provide an important input for the rough-order-of-magnitude (ROM) disposal cost analysis. The disposal concepts cover three major categories of host geologic media: crystalline or hard rock, salt, and argillaceous rock. Four waste package sizes are considered: 4PWR/9BWR; 12PWR/21BWR; 21PWR/44BWR, and dual purpose canisters (DPCs). The DPC concepts assume that the existing canisters will be sealed into disposal overpacks for direct disposal. Each concept assumes one of the following emplacement power limits for either emplacement or repository closure: 1.7 kW; 2.2 kW; 5.5 kW; 10 kW; 11.5 kW, and 18 kW.

  19. Standard guide for characterization of spent nuclear fuel in support of geologic repository disposal

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This guide provides guidance for the types and extent of testing that would be involved in characterizing the physical and chemical nature of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in support of its interim storage, transport, and disposal in a geologic repository. This guide applies primarily to commercial light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and spent fuel from weapons production, although the individual tests/analyses may be used as applicable to other spent fuels such as those from research and test reactors. The testing is designed to provide information that supports the design, safety analysis, and performance assessment of a geologic repository for the ultimate disposal of the SNF. 1.2 The testing described includes characterization of such physical attributes as physical appearance, weight, density, shape/geometry, degree, and type of SNF cladding damage. The testing described also includes the measurement/examination of such chemical attributes as radionuclide content, microstructure, and corrosion product c...

  20. Modeling of irradiated graphite (14)C transfer through engineered barriers of a generic geological repository in crystalline rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poskas, Povilas; Grigaliuniene, Dalia; Narkuniene, Asta; Kilda, Raimondas; Justinavicius, Darius

    2016-11-01

    There are two RBMK-1500 type graphite moderated reactors at the Ignalina nuclear power plant in Lithuania, and they are under decommissioning now. The graphite cannot be disposed of in a near surface repository, because of large amounts of (14)C. Therefore, disposal of the graphite in a geological repository is a reasonable solution. This study presents evaluation of the (14)C transfer by the groundwater pathway into the geosphere from the irradiated graphite in a generic geological repository in crystalline rocks and demonstration of the role of the different components of the engineered barrier system by performing local sensitivity analysis. The speciation of the released (14)C into organic and inorganic compounds as well as the most recent information on (14)C source term was taken into account. Two alternatives were considered in the analysis: disposal of graphite in containers with encapsulant and without it. It was evaluated that the maximal fractional flux of inorganic (14)C into the geosphere can vary from 10(-11)y(-1) (for non-encapsulated graphite) to 10(-12)y(-1) (for encapsulated graphite) while of organic (14)C it was about 10(-3)y(-1) of its inventory. Such difference demonstrates that investigations on the (14)C inventory and chemical form in which it is released are especially important. The parameter with the highest influence on the maximal flux into the geosphere for inorganic (14)C transfer was the sorption coefficient in the backfill and for organic (14)C transfer - the backfill hydraulic conductivity.

  1. Technical expertise on the safety of the proposed geological repository sites. Planning for geological deep repositories, step 1; Sicherheitstechnisches Gutachten zum Vorschlag geologischer Standortgebiete. Sachplan geologische Tiefenlager, Etappe 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-01-15

    On October 17, 2010, on request of those Swiss government institutions responsible for the disposal of radioactive wastes, the National Co-operative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA) presented its project concerning geological sites for the foreseen disposal of radioactive wastes to the Federal Authorities. According to the present disposal concept, two types of repository are foreseen: one for highly radioactive wastes (HAA) and the other for low radioactive and intermediate-level radioactive wastes (SMA). If a site fulfils the necessary conditions for both HAA as well as for SMA, a combined site for both types of waste may be chosen. As a qualified control authority in Switzerland, the Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) has to examine the quality of the NAGRA proposals from the point of view of the nuclear safety of the sites. The project for deep underground waste disposal first defines the process and the criteria according to which sites for the geological storage of all types of radioactive wastes in Switzerland have to be chosen. The choice is based on the actual knowledge of Swiss geology. After dividing the wastes into SMA and HAA, some large-scale areas are to be identified according to their suitability from the geological and tectonic points of view. NAGRA's division of waste into SMA and HAA is based on calculations of the long-term safety for a broad range of different rock types and geological situations and takes the different properties of all waste types into account. As a conclusion, a small portion of SMA has to be stored with {alpha}-toxic wastes in the HAA repository. The estimation of the total volume of wastes to be stored is based on 60 years of operation of the actual nuclear power plants, augmented with the wastes from possible replacement plants with a total power of 5 GW{sub e} during a further 60 years. The safety concept of the repository is based on passive systems using technical and natural barriers. The

  2. National Geoscience Data Repository System: Phase 2 final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The American Geological Institute (AGI) has completed Phase 2 of a project to establish a National Geoscience Data Repository System (NGDRS). The project`s primary objectives are to preserve geoscience data in jeopardy of being destroyed and to make that data available to those who have a need to use it in future investigations. These data are available for donation to the public as a result of the downsizing that has occurred in the major petroleum and mining companies in the US for the past decade. In recent years, these companies have consolidated domestic operations, sold many of their domestic properties and relinquished many of their leases. The scientific data associated with those properties are no longer considered to be useful assets and are consequently in danger of being lost forever. The national repository project will make many of these data available to the geoscience community for the first time. Phase 2 encompasses the establishment of standards for indexing and cataloging of geoscience data and determination of the costs of transferring data from the private sector to public-sector data repositories. Pilot projects evaluated the feasibility of the project for transfer of different data types and creation of a Web-based metadata supercatalog and browser. Also as part of the project, a national directory of geoscience data repositories was compiled to assess what data are currently available in existing facilities. The next step, Phase 3, will focus on the initiation of transfer of geoscience data from the private sector to the public domain and development of the web-based Geotrek metadata supercatalog.

  3. Deep geological repositories in the UK. Current underground planning and competency requirements for waste packaging systems; Geologisches Endlager in Grossbritannien. Stand der Planungen unter Tage und Anforderungen an endlagerfaehige Abfallgebinde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messer, Matthias [GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH, Essen (Germany). Projects UK

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear fission has been used for commercial electricity generation in the UK since 1956. This early (and world first) entry into the nuclear energy industry has created a huge challenge in the form of waste disposal and decommissioning, as many of the original facilities have left behind types of waste that by today's standards are both abnormal and also poorly documented. The UK has already agreed on the concept of using deep geological format ions for the permanent storage of this waste, and the material yet to be produced. However, the choice of site is still undecided. This paper outlines the main issues at stake and discusses the previous approach and future proposals for the construction of a permanent waste repository in the United Kingdom.

  4. Reducing the likelihood of future human activities that could affect geologic high-level waste repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-05-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes in deep geologic formations provides a means of isolating the waste from people until the radioactivity has decayed to safe levels. However, isolating people from the wastes is a different problem, since we do not know what the future condition of society will be. The Human Interference Task Force was convened by the US Department of Energy to determine whether reasonable means exist (or could be developed) to reduce the likelihood of future human unintentionally intruding on radioactive waste isolation systems. The task force concluded that significant reductions in the likelihood of human interference could be achieved, for perhaps thousands of years into the future, if appropriate steps are taken to communicate the existence of the repository. Consequently, for two years the task force directed most of its study toward the area of long-term communication. Methods are discussed for achieving long-term communication by using permanent markers and widely disseminated records, with various steps taken to provide multiple levels of protection against loss, destruction, and major language/societal changes. Also developed is the concept of a universal symbol to denote Caution - Biohazardous Waste Buried Here. If used for the thousands of non-radioactive biohazardous waste sites in this country alone, a symbol could transcend generations and language changes, thereby vastly improving the likelihood of successful isolation of all buried biohazardous wastes.

  5. Paleoclimate Impact on a Proposed Canadian Deep Geologic Repository for Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normani, S. D.; Sykes, J. F.; Yin, Y.

    2009-05-01

    A Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) for low and intermediate level radioactive waste has been proposed by Ontario Power Generation (OPG) for the Bruce site near Tiverton, Ontario Canada. As envisioned, the DGR is to be constructed at a depth of about 680 m below ground surface within the argillaceous Ordovician limestone of the Cobourg Formation. Within the geologic setting of southern Ontario, the Bruce site is located west of the Algonquin Arch within the Bruce Megablock, positioned along the eastern edge of the Michigan Basin. It is clear that to credibly address the long-term safety of a deep geologic repository, long-term climate change and in particular a glaciation scenario, must be incorporated into performance assessment modelling activities. In addition, by simulating flow system responses to the last Laurentide (North American) glacial episode, insight is gained into the role of significant past stresses (mechanical, thermal and hydrological) on determining the nature of present flow system conditions, and by extension, the likely impact of similar, future boundary condition changes on long-term flow system stability. The last Laurentide glacial episode was characterized by the following: occurred over a 120 000 year time period; included numerous cycles of glacial advance and retreat, with maximum ice thickness over a typical Ontario site reaching nearly 3 km; included extensive periods of transient, peri-glacial conditions during which permafrost could impact the subsurface, depending on location, to several hundreds of metres; and was accompanied by significant basal meltwater production near the end of the glacial episode. The impact of glaciation and deglaciation on density-dependent groundwater flow was investigated using results from the deterministic University of Toronto Glacial Systems Model (GSM) of continental ice-sheet evolution. The 18,500 km2 regional-scale domain extends from Lake Huron to Georgian Bay and includes 31 sedimentary strata that

  6. NWTS program criteria for mined geologic disposal of nuclear waste: repository performance and development criteria. Public draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-07-01

    This document, DOE/NWTS-33(3) is one of a series of documents to establish the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program criteria for mined geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. For both repository performance and repository development it delineates the criteria for design performance, radiological safety, mining safety, long-term containment and isolation, operations, and decommissioning. The US Department of Energy will use these criteria to guide the development of repositories to assist in achieving performance and will reevaluate their use when the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issues radioactive waste repository rules.

  7. Decommissioning and Closure of the Morsleben Deep Geological Repository - The Final Step

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ripkens, M.; Biurrun, E.

    2002-02-26

    In Germany, a deep geologic repository for low and intermediate-level waste has been in operation since 1971. This repository, which is located in the territory of former Eastern Germany, became a Federal Facility in the wake of German reunification in 1990. Since then, waste from all of Germany was disposed of until a stop ordered by BfS in 1998. The site is now in the process of being decommissioned and later closed down. This process includes updating the concept for guaranteeing appropriate waste isolation for as long as the waste remains a hazard. During the licensing procedure being currently conducted, in line with German requirements for repository sites, the site operator must provide convincing proof of the facility's long-term safety. Thereafter, implementation of the decommissioning and closure concept will follow. It is estimated that the licensing procedure will take until the year 2006. The decommissioning and closure process itself will require about 10 years. Reliable costs estimates are not yet available. This paper briefly covers the history of the Morsleben radioactive waste repository and provides a draft update on the status of the licensing procedure.

  8. Learning object repositories as knowledge management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demetrios G. Sampson

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past years, a number of international initiatives that recognize the importance of sharing and reusing digital educational resources among educational communities through the use of Learning Object Repositories (LORs have emerged. Typically, these initiatives focus on collecting digital educational resources that are offered by their creators for open access and potential reuse. Nevertheless, most of the existing LORs are designed more as digital repositories, rather than as Knowledge Management Systems (KMS. By exploiting KMSs functionalities in LORs would bare the potential to support the organization and sharing of educational communities’ explicit knowledge (depicted in digital educational resources constructed by teachers and/or instructional designers and tacit knowledge (depicted in teachers’ and students’ experiences and interactions of using digital educational resources available in LORs. Within this context, in this paper we study the design and the implementation of fourteen operating LORs from the KMSs’ perspective, so as to identify additional functionalities that can support the management of educational communities’ explicit and tacit knowledge. Thus, we propose a list of essential LORs’ functionalities, which aim to facilitate the organization and sharing of educational communities’ knowledge. Finally, we present the added value of these functionalities by identifying their importance towards addressing the current demands of web-facilitated educational communities, as well as the knowledge management activities that they execute.

  9. Nuclear Waste Facing the Test of Time: The Case of the French Deep Geological Repository Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirot-Delpech, Sophie; Raineau, Laurence

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to consider the socio-anthropological issues raised by the deep geological repository project for high-level, long-lived nuclear waste. It is based on fieldwork at a candidate site for a deep storage project in eastern France, where an underground laboratory has been studying the feasibility of the project since 1999. A project of this nature, based on the possibility of very long containment (hundreds of thousands of years, if not longer), involves a singular form of time. By linking project performance to geology's very long timescale, the project attempts "jump" in time, focusing on a far distant future, without understanding it in terms of generations. But these future generations remain measurements of time on the surface, where the issue of remembering or forgetting the repository comes to the fore. The nuclear waste geological storage project raises questions that neither politicians nor scientists, nor civil society, have ever confronted before. This project attempts to address a problem that exists on a very long timescale, which involves our responsibility toward generations in the far future.

  10. Virtual Field Geologic Trip System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Wang; Linfu Xue; Xiaojun Zhou

    2003-01-01

    Virtual Field Geologic Trip System (VFGTS) constructed by the technique of visualization can efficiently present geologic field information and widely used in the field of geologic education. This paper introduces the developing thinking of VFGTS and discusses the main implement processes. Building VFGTS mainly includes systemically gathering of field geological data, the building of virtual geological world, and displaying of virtual geologic world and human-computer interaction.

  11. Cigeo Project. The French deep geological repository project in clay host rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoorelbeke, Jean-Michel; Ozanam, Odile [Andra, National Radioactive Waste Management Agency, Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2015-07-01

    The French classification of waste is defined by the National management plan of radioactive materials and waste updated every three years. High level waste (HLW) and intermediate level long-lived waste (ILW) are planned to be disposed of in a deep geological repository subject to authorization (Cigeo Project). By law deep geological disposal is dedicated to end waste that cannot be disposed of at the surface or at low depth with regard to safety. HLW consists in vitrified fission products and minor actinides from spent fuel reprocessing. Intermediate level long-lived waste arises mainly from spent fuel reprocessing and from the maintenance and operation of reprocessing plants. The volume of existing waste was 40,000 m{sup 3} of ILW and 2,700 m{sup 3} of HLW at the end of 2010. The total prospective volume used for the repository design is estimated at 70,000 m{sup 3} of ILW and 10,000 m{sup 3} of HLW.

  12. Establish and Operate a Geologic Core and Sample Repository in Midland, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, Noel

    2000-08-14

    Shell Oil Company donated its proprietary core and sample repository to the Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin, in 1994. This collection of geologic materials is composed of 325,000 boxes of rocks and samples housed in a 32,700-ft{sup 2} warehouse in Midland, Texas. The material includes cores from more than 3,000 wells (75,000 boxes) and cuttings from more than 90,000 wells (260,000 boxes). In addition to the warehouse space, the repository consists of layout rooms, a processing room, and office space. The U.S. Department of Energy provided $375,000 under Grant Number DE-FG22-94BC14854 for organizing the collection, staffing the facility, and making the material available to the public for the first 5 years of operation. Shell Oil Company provided an endowment of $1.3 million to cover the cost of operating the facility after the fifth year of operation.

  13. Learning object repositories as knowledge management systems

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Over the past years, a number of international initiatives that recognize the importance of sharing and reusing digital educational resources among educational communities through the use of Learning Object Repositories (LORs) have emerged. Typically, these initiatives focus on collecting digital educational resources that are offered by their creators for open access and potential reuse. Nevertheless, most of the existing LORs are designed more as digital repositories, rather than as Knowled...

  14. Geoscientific Site Evaluation Approach for Canada's Deep Geological Repository for Used Nuclear Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Rico Castejon, M.; Hirschorn, S.; Ben Belfadhel, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is responsible for implementing Adaptive Phased Management, the approach selected by the Government of Canada for long-term management of used nuclear fuel generated by Canadian nuclear reactors. The ultimate objective of APM is the centralized containment and isolation of Canada's used nuclear fuel in a Deep Geological Repository in a suitable crystalline or sedimentary rock formation. In May 2010, the NWMO published and initiated a nine-step site selection process to find an informed and willing community to host a deep geological repository for Canada's used nuclear fuel. The site selection process is designed to address a broad range of technical and social, economic and cultural factors. The site evaluation process includes three main technical evaluation steps: Initial Screenings; Preliminary Assessments; and Detailed Site Characterizations, to assess the suitability of candidate areas in a stepwise manner over a period of many years. By the end of 2012, twenty two communities had expressed interest in learning more about the project. As of July 2015, nine communities remain in the site selection process. To date (July 2015), NWMO has completed Initial Screenings for the 22 communities that expressed interest, and has completed the first phase of Preliminary Assessments (desktop) for 20 of the communities. Phase 2 of the Preliminary Assessments has been initiated in a number of communities, with field activities such as high-resolution airborne geophysical surveys and geological mapping. This paper describes the approach, methods and criteria being used to assess the geoscientific suitability of communities currently involved in the site selection process.

  15. Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Application Repository Design and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    The Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Application Repository Design and Analysis document describes the STRS application repository for software-defined radio (SDR) applications intended to be compliant to the STRS Architecture Standard. The document provides information about the submission of artifacts to the STRS application repository, to provide information to the potential users of that information, and for the systems engineer to understand the requirements, concepts, and approach to the STRS application repository. The STRS application repository is intended to capture knowledge, documents, and other artifacts for each waveform application or other application outside of its project so that when the project ends, the knowledge is retained. The document describes the transmission of technology from mission to mission capturing lessons learned that are used for continuous improvement across projects and supporting NASA Procedural Requirements (NPRs) for performing software engineering projects and NASAs release process.

  16. How to Shape a Successful Repository Program: Staged Development of Geologic Repositories for High-Level Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaacs, T.

    2004-10-03

    Programs to manage and ultimately dispose of high-level radioactive wastes are unique from scientific and technological as well as socio-political aspects. From a scientific and technological perspective, high-level radioactive wastes remain potentially hazardous for geological time periods--many millennia--and scientific and technological programs must be put in place that result in a system that provides high confidence that the wastes will be isolated from the accessible environment for these many thousands of years. Of course, ''proof'' in the classical sense is not possible at the outset, since the performance of the system can only be known with assurance, if ever, after the waste has been emplaced for those geological time periods. Adding to this challenge, many uncertainties exist in both the natural and engineered systems that are intended to isolate the wastes, and some of the uncertainties will remain regardless of the time and expense in attempting to characterize the system and assess its performance.

  17. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the Oregon State University (OSU) College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences (CEOAS) Marine Geology Repository (MGR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon State University Marine Geology Repository (OSU-MGR) is a partner in the Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples (IMLGS) database, contributing...

  18. Web-based tribology design repository system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Tribology design is one of the most important parts of mechanical product design as thestrength design. Unfortunately, because tribology design knowledge is often m ulti-disciplinary,complicated and piecemeal, it is therefore difficult for a mechanical designer to capture the neededtribology design knowledge. The concept of tribology design repository is proposed in this paper totry to address this problem. This paper presents an object-oriented knowledge representation lan-guage based on the modeling of tribology design component and it makes the complicated tribol-ogy knowledge represented has such advantages as inheritance, encapsulation, and consistency.A web-based triblogy design repository is then established and it enables the edition, retrieve,sharing and reuse of corporate tribology design knowledge in the repository from the Internet.

  19. Tectonic risk forecasting through expert elicitation for geological repositories: the TOPAZ project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Junichi [NUMO, Tokyo (Japan); Kawamura, Hideki [Obayashi Corporation, Tokyo (Japan); Chapman, Neil [MCM Consulting, Baden (Switzerland)

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the development of a probabilistic methodology for the evaluation of tectonic hazards to geological repositories in Japan. The approach is a development of NUMO's ITM methodology, which produced probabilistic hazard maps for volcanism and rock deformation for periods up to about 100,000 years in a set of Case Studies that covered a large area of the country. To address potential regulatory requirements, the TOPAZ project has extended the ITM methodology to look into the period between 100,000 and 1 million years, where significant uncertainties begin to emerge about the tectonic framework within which quantitative forecasting can be made. Part of this methodology extension has been to adopt expert elicitation techniques to capture differing expert views as a means of addressing such uncertainties. This paper briefly outlines progress in this development work to date. (authors)

  20. A laboratory validation study of the time-lapse oscillatory pumping test for leakage detection in geological repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Alexander Y.; Lu, Jiemin; Islam, Akand

    2017-05-01

    Geologic repositories are extensively used for disposing byproducts in mineral and energy industries. The safety and reliability of these repositories are a primary concern to environmental regulators and the public. Time-lapse oscillatory pumping test (OPT) has been introduced recently as a pressure-based technique for detecting potential leakage in geologic repositories. By routinely conducting OPT at a number of pulsing frequencies, an operator may identify the potential repository anomalies in the frequency domain, alleviating the ambiguity caused by reservoir noise and improving the signal-to-noise ratio. Building on previous theoretical and field studies, this work performed a series of laboratory experiments to validate the concept of time-lapse OPT using a custom made, stainless steel tank under relatively high pressures. The experimental configuration simulates a miniature geologic storage repository consisting of three layers (i.e., injection zone, caprock, and above-zone aquifer). Results show that leakage in the injection zone led to deviations in the power spectrum of observed pressure data, and the amplitude of which also increases with decreasing pulsing frequencies. The experimental results are further analyzed by developing a 3D flow model, using which the model parameters are estimated through frequency domain inversion.

  1. Ontology-based Software Repository System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    and domains. Current State of the Art Improvements to the current state of the art for software reuse repositories are required ( Shiva & Shala, 2007...model of architecture. IEEE Software, 12(6), 42-50. Object Management Group. (2005). Reusable asset specification (Vers. 2.2). Shiva , S., & Shala

  2. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center (PCMSC) Samples Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The U.S. Geological Survey Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center (PCMSC) Samples Repository is a partner in the Index...

  3. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center (WHCMSC) Samples Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The U.S. Geological Survey Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center (WHCMSC) Samples Repository is a partner in the...

  4. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC) Samples Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The U.S. Geological Survey Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC) Samples Repository is a partner in the...

  5. VerSi. A method for the quantitative comparison of repository systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaempfer, T.U.; Ruebel, A.; Resele, G. [AF-Consult Switzerland Ltd, Baden (Switzerland); Moenig, J. [GRS Braunschweig (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Decision making and design processes for radioactive waste repositories are guided by safety goals that need to be achieved. In this context, the comparison of different disposal concepts can provide relevant support to better understand the performance of the repository systems. Such a task requires a method for a traceable comparison that is as objective as possible. We present a versatile method that allows for the comparison of different disposal concepts in potentially different host rocks. The condition for the method to work is that the repository systems are defined to a comparable level including designed repository structures, disposal concepts, and engineered and geological barriers which are all based on site-specific safety requirements. The method is primarily based on quantitative analyses and probabilistic model calculations regarding the long-term safety of the repository systems under consideration. The crucial evaluation criteria for the comparison are statistical key figures of indicators that characterize the radiotoxicity flux out of the so called containment-providing rock zone (einschlusswirksamer Gebirgsbereich). The key figures account for existing uncertainties with respect to the actual site properties, the safety relevant processes, and the potential future impact of external processes on the repository system, i.e., they include scenario-, process-, and parameter-uncertainties. The method (1) leads to an evaluation of the retention and containment capacity of the repository systems and its robustness with respect to existing uncertainties as well as to potential external influences; (2) specifies the procedures for the system analyses and the calculation of the statistical key figures as well as for the comparative interpretation of the key figures; and (3) also gives recommendations and sets benchmarks for the comparative assessment of the repository systems under consideration based on the key figures and additional qualitative

  6. United States of America activities relative to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiative: Records management for deep geologic repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, P.J.

    1997-03-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has conducted consultant and advisory meetings to prepare a Technical Document which is intended to provide guidance to all IAEA Member States (otherwise known as countries) that are currently planning, designing, constructing or operating a deep or near surface geological repository for the storage and protection of vitrified high-level radioactive waste, spent fuel waste and TRU-waste (transuranic). Eleven countries of the international community are presently in various stages of siting, designing, or constructing deep geologic repositories. Member States of the IAEA have determined that the principle safety of such completed and operation sites must not rely solely on long term institutional arrangements for the retention of information. It is believed that repository siting, design, operation and postoperation information should be gathered, managed and retained in a manner that will provide information to future societies over a very long period of time. The radionuclide life is 10,000 years thus the retention of information must outlive current societies, languages, and be continually migrated to new technology to assure retrieval. This presentation will provide an overview of the status of consideration and implementation of these issues within the United States efforts relative to deep geologic repository projects.

  7. Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of Bentonite Buffer in a Deep Geological HLW Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, S.; Cho, W. J.; Lee, J. O

    2008-08-15

    This work aims to investigate the influence of bentonite buffer and backfill, which will role as important engineered barriers, on the thermo-mechanical behaviors of a disposal system at a deep underground HLW repository. It will contribute to the disposal system development and performance assessment of the system. In this study, three-dimensional computer simulations were carried out with a consideration of the thermal and mechanical characteristics of the buffer and backfill for the investigation of the behavior of buffer and backfill under different disposal conditions. The understanding of the near field response to the variation of buffer and backfill properties will contribute to the development of an adequate buffer and backfill design in disposal conditions as well as the selection of a disposal site. The following conclusions could be drawn from the three-dimensional thermo-mechanical coupling analysis for investigating the possible influence of the bentonite buffer on the thermo-mechanical behavior around an underground repository, which is located at several hundred meters deep underground. o The bentonite swelling pressure can influence on the mechanical behavior of canister. Further detailed modeling is required in the future. o It is required to consider the water content and density of bentonite as important design parameters, because it was found that those influence the thermo-mechanical behavior of near field significantly. o A horizontal deposition hole and multi-level repository can results different maximum temperatures, stress concentration, and the required time for the maximum temperatures of canister, buffer, and rock compared to those of vertical deposition hole and single level repository. o Even though, the same laboratory results were used for driving the parameters for the plastic models used in the modeling, the mechanical behaviors were different. It is, therefore, required to use adequate plastic models for buffer and backfill

  8. Use of groundwater lifetime expectancy for the performance assessment of a deep geologic waste repository: 1. Theory, illustrations, and implications

    CERN Document Server

    Cornaton, F J; Normani, S D; Sudicky, E A; Sykes, J F

    2011-01-01

    Long-term solutions for the disposal of toxic wastes usually involve isolation of the wastes in a deep subsurface geologic environment. In the case of spent nuclear fuel, if radionuclide leakage occurs from the engineered barrier, the geological medium represents the ultimate barrier that is relied upon to ensure safety. Consequently, an evaluation of radionuclide travel times from a repository to the biosphere is critically important in a performance assessment analysis. In this study, we develop a travel time framework based on the concept of groundwater lifetime expectancy as a safety indicator. Lifetime expectancy characterizes the time that radionuclides will spend in the subsurface after their release from the repository and prior to discharging into the biosphere. The probability density function of lifetime expectancy is computed throughout the host rock by solving the backward-in-time solute transport adjoint equation subject to a properly posed set of boundary conditions. It can then be used to defi...

  9. Results From an International Simulation Study on Couples Thermal, Hydrological, and Mechanical (THM) Processes Near Geological Nuclear Waste Repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Rutqvist; D. Barr; J.T. Birkholzer; M. Chijimatsu; O. Kolditz; Q. Liu; Y. Oda; W. Wang; C. Zhang

    2006-08-02

    As part of the ongoing international DECOVALEX project, four research teams used five different models to simulate coupled thermal, hydrological, and mechanical (THM) processes near waste emplacement drifts of geological nuclear waste repositories. The simulations were conducted for two generic repository types, one with open and the other with back-filled repository drifts, under higher and lower postclosure temperatures, respectively. In the completed first model inception phase of the project, a good agreement was achieved between the research teams in calculating THM responses for both repository types, although some disagreement in hydrological responses is currently being resolved. In particular, good agreement in the basic thermal-mechanical responses was achieved for both repository types, even though some teams used relatively simplified thermal-elastic heat-conduction models that neglected complex near-field thermal-hydrological processes. The good agreement between the complex and simplified process models indicates that the basic thermal-mechanical responses can be predicted with a relatively high confidence level.

  10. Data Storing Proposal from Heterogeneous Systems into a Specialized Repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václavová Andrea

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze and to propose an appropriate system for processing and simultaneously storing a vast volume of structured and unstructured data. The paper consists of three parts. The first part addresses the issue of structured and unstructured data. The second part provides the detailed analysis of data repositories and subsequent evaluation indicating which system would be for the given type and volume of data optimal. The third part focuses on the use of gathered information to transfer data to the proposed repository.

  11. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 10. Repository preconceptual design studies: granite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Volume 10 ''Repository Preconceptual Design Studies: Granite,'' is one of a 23-volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-36, which supplements the ''Contribution to Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-44. The series provides a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. This document describes a preconceptual design for a nuclear waste storage facility in granite. The facility design consists of several chambers excavated deep within a geologic formation together with access shafts and supportive surface structures. The facility design provides for: receiving and unloading waste containers; lowering them down shafts to the mine level; transporting them to the proper storage area, and emplacing them in mined storage rooms. Drawings of the facility design are contained in TM-36/11, ''Drawings for Repository Preconceptual Design Studies: Granite.''

  12. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 8. Repository preconceptual design studies: salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Volume 8 ''Repository Preconceptual Design Studies: Salt,'' is one of a 23-volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-36, which supplements the ''Contribution to Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-44. The series provides a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. This document describes a preconceptual design for a nuclear waste storage facility in salt. The facility design consists of several chambers excavated deep within a geologic formation together with access shafts and supportive surface structures. The facility design provides for: receiving and unloading waste containers; lowering them down shafts to the mine level; transporting them to the proper storage area, and emplacing them in mined storage rooms. Drawings of the facility design are contained in TM-36/9, ''Drawings for Repository Preconceptual Design Studies: Salt.''

  13. Malaysian Education Index (MEI): An Online Indexing and Repository System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabilan, Muhammad Kamarul; Ismail, Hairul Nizam; Yaakub, Rohizani; Yusof, Najeemah Mohd; Idros, Sharifah Noraidah Syed; Umar, Irfan Naufal; Arshad, Muhammad Rafie Mohd.; Idrus, Rosnah; Rahman, Habsah Abdul

    2010-01-01

    This "Project Sheet" describes an on-going project that is being carried out by a group of educational researchers, computer science researchers and librarians from Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang. The Malaysian Education Index (MEI) has two main functions--(1) Online Indexing System, and (2) Online Repository System. In this brief…

  14. Need for USA high level waste (HLW) alternate geological repository (AGR) and for a different methodology to enhance its acceptance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Salomon, E-mail: slevy112@aol.co [3425 South Bascom Avenue, Suite 225, Campbell, CA 95008 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    In early February 2010, the administration stopped work and withdrew the Department of Energy (DOE) application for a construction permit for the Yucca Mountain geological repository from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Also, a 'blue ribbon' Commission was appointed to explore alternatives for storage, processing, and disposal, including evaluation of advanced fuel cycles and to provide a final report in 24 months. That decision, however, failed to recognize that: (1) the U.S. will need an early alternate geological repository (AGR) for its HLW irrespective of the findings of the 'blue ribbon' Commission; (2) the once-through spent fuel inventory from commercial nuclear power reactors will continue to rise and so will the damages against the government for its failure to remove spent fuel from reactors sites, as specified in contracts; (3) there are prepackaged DOE and nuclear weapons HLW ready for shipment to a repository which must be taken into account because of government penalties for failure to do so; (4) the current Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) needs to be modified to allow the early search and approval of Alternate Geological Repository (AGR) and for an interim centralized HLW storage facility to reduce government liabilities; and (5) the methodology used to license Yucca Mountain needs to undergo serious modifications, including a different non-politicized management and siting credo. This paper reviews and discusses all the preceding shortcomings and proposes significant changes to pursue AGR as soon as possible and to get site approval by the NRC first under a formal, stepwise, well-structured risk-informed decision approach as recommended.

  15. MRS system study for the repository: Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project; Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinagra, T.A. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA); Harig, R. [Parsons, Brinckerhoff, Quade and Douglas, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)

    1990-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), has initiated a waste management system study to identify the impacts of the presence or absence of a monitored retrievable storage facility (hereinafter referred to as ``MRS``) on system costs and program schedules. To support this study, life-cycle cost estimates and construction schedules have been prepared for the surface and underground facilities and operations geologic nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Nine different operating scenarios (cases) have been identified by OCRWM for inclusion in this study. For each case, the following items are determined: the repository design and construction costs, operating costs, closure and decommissioning costs, required staffing, construction schedules, uncertainties associated with the costs and schedules, and shipping cask and disposal container throughputs. This document contains A-D.

  16. MRS system study for the repository: Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project; Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinagra, T.A. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA); Harig, R. [Parsons, Brinckerhoff, Quade and Douglas, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)

    1990-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), has initiated a waste management system study to identify the impacts of the presence or absence of a monitored retrievable storage facility (hereinafter referred to as ``MRS``) on system costs and program schedules. To support this study, life-cycle cost estimates and construction schedules have been prepared for the surface and underground facilities and operations of a geologic nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Nine different operating scenarios (cases) have been identified by OCRWM for inclusion in this study. For each case, the following items are determined: the repository design and construction costs, operating costs, closure and decommissioning costs, required staffing, construction schedules, uncertainties associated with the costs and schedules, and shipping cask and disposal container throughputs. 6 refs., 83 figs., 57 tabs.

  17. Revision history aware repositories of computational models of biological systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickerson David P

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Building repositories of computational models of biological systems ensures that published models are available for both education and further research, and can provide a source of smaller, previously verified models to integrate into a larger model. One problem with earlier repositories has been the limitations in facilities to record the revision history of models. Often, these facilities are limited to a linear series of versions which were deposited in the repository. This is problematic for several reasons. Firstly, there are many instances in the history of biological systems modelling where an 'ancestral' model is modified by different groups to create many different models. With a linear series of versions, if the changes made to one model are merged into another model, the merge appears as a single item in the history. This hides useful revision history information, and also makes further merges much more difficult, as there is no record of which changes have or have not already been merged. In addition, a long series of individual changes made outside of the repository are also all merged into a single revision when they are put back into the repository, making it difficult to separate out individual changes. Furthermore, many earlier repositories only retain the revision history of individual files, rather than of a group of files. This is an important limitation to overcome, because some types of models, such as CellML 1.1 models, can be developed as a collection of modules, each in a separate file. The need for revision history is widely recognised for computer software, and a lot of work has gone into developing version control systems and distributed version control systems (DVCSs for tracking the revision history. However, to date, there has been no published research on how DVCSs can be applied to repositories of computational models of biological systems. Results We have extended the Physiome Model

  18. Experiences from risk communication in the siting of a geological repository for high level waste in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thegerstroem, C.; Engstroem, S. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    SKB is planning in the year 2001 to designate two siting alternatives for further site characterisation. The work in the municipalities of Oesthammar, Nykoeping, Oskarshamn and Tierp is taking place in an atmosphere of constructive discussions. There is a growing feeling in Sweden among broad categories of the public that the nuclear waste exists and should be taken care of by our generation, without many of these people ever getting positive to the use of nuclear energy. While the NIMBY syndrome might still have a good grip on some, there has never been a more constructive debate about the nuclear waste than now, even though there still is a lot of work to do. Siting a geological repository for high level waste puts our democratic system under hard tests. The decision making process is about openness, skills in interacting with the public, respect of people's fears and concerns and at last but not the least independent, competent and visible participation by other stakeholders (politicians locally and nationally, regulatory bodies etc). Good skills in risk communication are important ingredients that might facilitate SKB's task as a developer. Far more important however, is the trust we might get from past and present record of handling the waste and from the way we work and behave in the feasibility studies in the municipalities where SKB is involved.

  19. Modelling study to evaluate two variants for accessing a deep geological repository from the point of view of long-term safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poller, Andreas; Zuidema, Piet; Schneider, Jurg W. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra) Wettingen (Switzerland); Smith, Paul [Safety Assessment Management Switzerland GmbH, Klingnau (Switzerland); Mayer, Gerhard; Hayek, Mohamed [AF-Consult Switzerland Ltd, Baden (Switzerland)

    2013-07-01

    Siting a deep geological repository for radioactive waste essentially involves two interrelated steps: deciding on an appropriate geological environment for the underground facilities and selecting a suitable location for the associated surface facility. An acceptable solution is more easily achieved if some flexibility exists for siting the surface facility, irrespective of the exact position of the underground facilities. Such flexibility is available if a ramp is used as the main access route from the surface facility to the underground facilities. Another option is to use a combination of shafts and (sub)horizontal tunnels as the main access route. Both variants include shafts for ventilation, etc. In this paper, the two variants (i) main access via ramp and (ii) main access via shaft are compared in terms of long-term safety. To this end, the entire network of underground tunnels of a deep geological repository is implemented in an analytical resistor network flow model. Radionuclide release through the tunnel system and the host rock is then calculated with a numerical network transport model, using as input the results from the flow model. The results clearly indicate that, even in case of hypothetically deficient horizontal and sub-horizontal sealing elements, the choice between ramp and shaft as the main access route is irrelevant to long-term safety. (authors)

  20. Design of a high-level waste repository system for the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeza, J.L.; Boerigter, S.T.; Broadbent, G.E.; Cabello, E.D.; Duran, V.B.; Hollaway, W.R.; Karlberg, R.P.; Siegel, M.J.; Simonson, S.A.

    1988-05-12

    This report presents a conceptual design for a High Level Waste disposal system for fuel discharged by US commercial power reactors, using the Yucca Mountain repository site recently designated by federal legislation. Principal features of the resulting conceptual design include use of unit trains for periodic removal of old spent fuel from at-reactor storage facilities, buffer storage at the repository site using dual purpose transportation/storage casks, repackaging of the spent fuel from the dual purpose transportation/storage casks directly into special-alloy disposal canisters as intact fuel assemblies, without rod consolidation, emplacement into a repository of modular design, use of excavation techniques that minimize disturbance, both mechanical and chemical, to the geologic environment, a unit rail mounted vehicle for both the transportation and emplacement of the canister from the surface facilities to the underground repository, and a cost-effectiveness computer model of Yucca Mountain and an independent cost evaluation by members of the design team. 31 refs., 58 figs., 15 tabs.

  1. Design information verification (DIV) of operating geological repositories (SAGOR activity 3b)[Nuclear waste disposal; Security; Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myatt, J

    1998-02-01

    Following IAEA Advisory and Consultants Group meetings in September 1988 and in May 1991 respectively an IAEA multi-national Support Programme Task was initiated to consider the 'Development of Safeguards for Final Disposal of Spent Fuel in Geological Repositories' (SAGOR). A 'Technical Coordination Committee' (TCC) was set up with invited representatives from those Member State Support Programmes wishing to be involved. The joint programme, through the TCC, was given the task of studying the safeguards requirements in: conditioning plant (where the spent fuel is prepared for transfer to the repository); operating repositories (i.e. those in which the fuel is being emplaced); closed repositories. At the first meeting of the TCC in Washington in July 1994 the UK undertook to provide a study of the Design Information Verification (DIV) required in all three areas. For this activity the requirements, techniques and procedures for the Design Information Verification (DIV) of operating repositories have been considered. In completing the study the findings reported for activities 1b and 2b (descriptions of a Model Repository and Potential Diversion Paths, respectively) have been used in formulating any conclusions reached. As with any facility there are a number of stages in its lifetime. For the purposes of this report the operating life of a repository is deemed to extend from its inception to when it is finally closed and the ground surface returned to being a green field. Areas where repositories differ from other safeguarded activities are highlighted in the model facility described in SAGOR activity 1b/c. Their impact makes it inevitable that DIV will play a key role in safeguarding an operational repository. They include: continual expansion during its operational life (the only current possible exception is that being proposed in Finland), flexible design during construction as geological features may be exposed which require that the

  2. Characterizing the proposed geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada: hydrology and geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckless, John S.; Levich, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    This hydrology and geochemistry volume is a companion volume to the 2007 Geological Society of America Memoir 199, The Geology and Climatology of Yucca Mountain and Vicinity, Southern Nevada and California, edited by Stuckless and Levich. The work in both volumes was originally reported in the U.S. Department of Energy regulatory document Yucca Mountain Site Description, for the site characterization study of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as the proposed U.S. geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. The selection of Yucca Mountain resulted from a nationwide search and numerous committee studies during a period of more than 40 yr. The waste, largely from commercial nuclear power reactors and the government's nuclear weapons programs, is characterized by intense penetrating radiation and high heat production, and, therefore, it must be isolated from the biosphere for tens of thousands of years. The extensive, unique, and often innovative geoscience investigations conducted at Yucca Mountain for more than 20 yr make it one of the most thoroughly studied geologic features on Earth. The results of these investigations contribute extensive knowledge to the hydrologic and geochemical aspects of radioactive waste disposal in the unsaturated zone. The science, analyses, and interpretations are important not only to Yucca Mountain, but also to the assessment of other sites or alternative processes that may be considered for waste disposal in the future. Groundwater conditions, processes, and geochemistry, especially in combination with the heat from radionuclide decay, are integral to the ability of a repository to isolate waste. Hydrology and geochemistry are discussed here in chapters on unsaturated zone hydrology, saturated zone hydrology, paleohydrology, hydrochemistry, radionuclide transport, and thermally driven coupled processes affecting long-term waste isolation. This introductory chapter reviews some of the reasons for choosing to study Yucca Mountain as a

  3. Characterizing the proposed geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada--hydrology and geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckless, John S.; Levich, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    This hydrology and geochemistry volume is a companion volume to the 2007 Geological Society of America Memoir 199, The Geology and Climatology of Yucca Mountain and Vicinity, Southern Nevada and California, edited by Stuckless and Levich. The work in both volumes was originally reported in the U.S. Department of Energy regulatory document Yucca Mountain Site Description, for the site characterization study of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as the proposed U.S. geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. The selection of Yucca Mountain resulted from a nationwide search and numerous committee studies during a period of more than 40 yr. The waste, largely from commercial nuclear power reactors and the government's nuclear weapons programs, is characterized by intense penetrating radiation and high heat production, and, therefore, it must be isolated from the biosphere for tens of thousands of years. The extensive, unique, and often innovative geoscience investigations conducted at Yucca Mountain for more than 20 yr make it one of the most thoroughly studied geologic features on Earth. The results of these investigations contribute extensive knowledge to the hydrologic and geochemical aspects of radioactive waste disposal in the unsaturated zone. The science, analyses, and interpretations are important not only to Yucca Mountain, but also to the assessment of other sites or alternative processes that may be considered for waste disposal in the future. Groundwater conditions, processes, and geochemistry, especially in combination with the heat from radionuclide decay, are integral to the ability of a repository to isolate waste. Hydrology and geochemistry are discussed here in chapters on unsaturated zone hydrology, saturated zone hydrology, paleohydrology, hydrochemistry, radionuclide transport, and thermally driven coupled processes affecting long-term waste isolation. This introductory chapter reviews some of the reasons for choosing to study Yucca Mountain as a

  4. Geology of the Yucca Mountain Region, Chapter in Stuckless, J.S., ED., Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.S. Stuckless; D. O' Leary

    2006-09-25

    Yucca Mountain has been proposed as the site for the Nation's first geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. This chapter provides the geologic framework for the Yucca Mountain region. The regional geologic units range in age from late Precambrian through Holocene, and these are described briefly. Yucca Mountain is composed dominantly of pyroclastic units that range in age from 11.4 to 15.2 Ma. The proposed repository would be constructed within the Topopah Spring Tuff, which is the lower of two major zoned and welded ash-flow tuffs within the Paintbrush Group. The two welded tuffs are separated by the partly to nonwelded Pah Canyon Tuff and Yucca Mountain Tuff, which together figure prominently in the hydrology of the unsaturated zone. The Quaternary deposits are primarily alluvial sediments with minor basaltic cinder cones and flows. Both have been studied extensively because of their importance in predicting the long-term performance of the proposed repository. Basaltic volcanism began about 10 Ma and continued as recently as about 80 ka with the eruption of cones and flows at Lathrop Wells, approximately 10 km south-southwest of Yucca Mountain. Geologic structure in the Yucca Mountain region is complex. During the latest Paleozoic and Mesozoic, strong compressional forces caused tight folding and thrust faulting. The present regional setting is one of extension, and normal faulting has been active from the Miocene through to the present. There are three major local tectonic domains: (1) Basin and Range, (2) Walker Lane, and (3) Inyo-Mono. Each domain has an effect on the stability of Yucca Mountain.

  5. Geology and hydrogeology of the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada and the surrounding area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattson, S.R.; Broxton, D.E.; Crowe, B.M.; Buono, A.; Orkild, P.P.

    1989-07-01

    In late 1987 Congress issued an amendment to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 which directed the characterization of Yucca Mountain, Nevada as the only remaining potential site for the Nation`s first underground high-level radioactive waste repository. The evaluation of a potential underground repository is guided and regulated by policy established by the Department of Energy (DOE), Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Department of Transportation (DOT), and the US Congress. The Yucca Mountain Project is the responsibility of the DOE. The purpose of this field trip is to introduce the present state of geologic and hydrologic knowledge concerning this site. This report describes the field trip. 108 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. An Open Challenge Problem Repository for Systems Supporting Binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Felty

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A variety of logical frameworks support the use of higher-order abstract syntax in representing formal systems; however, each system has its own set of benchmarks. Even worse, general proof assistants that provide special libraries for dealing with binders offer a very limited evaluation of such libraries, and the examples given often do not exercise and stress-test key aspects that arise in the presence of binders. In this paper we design an open repository ORBI (Open challenge problem Repository for systems supporting reasoning with BInders. We believe the field of reasoning about languages with binders has matured, and a common set of benchmarks provides an important basis for evaluation and qualitative comparison of different systems and libraries that support binders, and it will help to advance the field.

  7. The convection cooling system of the Yakutsk permafrost seed repository

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vladimir N.Panin; Georgii P.Kuzmin

    2014-01-01

    Temperature is critical to maintaining seed viability under long term storage conditions. It has been common practice to use refrigeration systems to maintain required storage temperatures. A seed repository constructed in permafrost in Ya kutsk, Russia is the first seed storage facility that relies solely on natural cold. This paper describes the design and per formance of the cooling system of the repository. An innovative aspect of the cooling system is that it utilizes the patterns of temperature wave propagation in permafrost. Predicted and measured ground temperatures for the first year of operation are presented and analyzed. Results indicate that convection air cooling systems can be used to control the temperature regime in underground facilities in permafrost.

  8. Environmental and health impacts of February 14, 2014 radiation release from the nation's only deep geologic nuclear waste repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, P; Lemons, B G; Ballard, S; Hardy, R

    2015-08-01

    The environmental impact of the February 14, 2014 radiation release from the nation's only deep geologic nuclear waste repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was assessed using monitoring data from an independent monitoring program conducted by the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center (CEMRC). After almost 15 years of safe and efficient operations, the WIPP had one of its waste drums rupture underground resulting in the release of moderate levels of radioactivity into the underground air. A small amount of radioactivity also escaped to the surface through the ventilation system and was detected above ground. It was the first unambiguous release from the WIPP repository. The dominant radionuclides released were americium and plutonium, in a ratio that matches the content of the breached drum. The accelerated air monitoring campaign, which began following the accident, indicates that releases were low and localized, and no radiation-related health effects among local workers or the public would be expected. The highest activity detected was 115.2 μBq/m(3) for (241)Am and 10.2 μBq/m(3) for (239+240)Pu at a sampling station located 91 m away from the underground air exhaust point and 81.4 μBq/m(3) of (241)Am and 5.8 μBq/m(3) of (239+240)Pu at a monitoring station located approximately one kilometer northwest of the WIPP facility. CEMRC's recent monitoring data show that the concentration levels of these radionuclides have returned to normal background levels and in many instances, are not even detectable, demonstrating no long-term environmental impacts of the recent radiation release event at the WIPP. This article presents an evaluation of almost one year of environmental monitoring data that informed the public that the levels of radiation that got out to the environment were very low and did not, and will not harm anyone or have any long-term environmental consequence. In terms of radiological risk at or in the vicinity of the

  9. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 14. Repository preconceptual design studies: basalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-04-01

    This document describes a preconceptual design for a nuclear waste storage facility in basalt. The facility design consists of several chambers excavated deep within a geologic formation together with access shafts and supportive surface structures. The facility design provides for: receiving and unloading waste containers; lowering them down shafts to the mine level; transporting them to the proper storage area and emplacing them in mined storage rooms. Drawings of the facility design are contained in TM-36/15, ''Drawings for Repository Preconceptual Design Studies: Basalt.''

  10. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 12. Repository preconceptual design studies: shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-04-01

    This document describes a preconceptual design for a nuclear waste storage facility in shale. The facility design consists of several chambers excavated deep within a geologic formation together with access shafts and supportive surface structures. The facility design provides for: receiving and unloading waste containers; lowering them down shafts to the mine level; transporting them to the proper storage area, and emplacing them in mined storage rooms. Drawings of the facility design are contained in TM-36/13, ''Drawings for Repository Preconceptual Design Studies: Shale.''

  11. Design information verification (DIV) of closed geological repositories (SAGOR activity 3c)[Nuclear waste disposal; Security; Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myatt, J

    1998-02-01

    Following IAEA Advisory and Consultants Group meetings in September 1988 and in May 1991 respectively an IAEA multi-national Support Programme Task was initiated to consider the 'Development of Safeguards for Final Disposal of Spent Fuel in Geological Repositories' (SAGOR). A 'Technical Coordination Committee' (TCC) was set up with invited representatives from those Member State Support Programmes wishing to be involved. The joint programme, through the TCC, was given the task of studying the safeguards requirements in: conditioning plant (where the spent fuel is prepared for transfer to the repository); operating repositories (i.e., those in which the fuel is being emplaced); closed repositories. At the first meeting of the TCC in Washington in July 1994 the UK undertook to provide a study of the Design Information Verification (DIV) required in all three areas. For this activity the requirements, techniques and procedures for the Design Information Verification (DIV) of closed repositories have been considered. In completing the study the findings reported for activities 1b/c and 2c (descriptions of a Model Repository and Potential Diversion Paths, respectively) have been used in formulating any conclusions reached. It is also debatable as to whether this activity is strictly speaking DIV or is one of surveillance. As undeclared access can only be made to the emplacement areas of the repository by altering the physical makeup of the surrounding area; i.e. physically changing the 'design' of the surrounding area, however, this is deemed to be DIV. Although the techniques used appear to be those of surveillance they are being applied in this case as the tools of DIV. As with any facility there are a number of stages in its lifetime. For the purposes of this report the operating life of a repository is defined as being the time from inception to when it is finally decommissioned and sealed with the ground surface returned to being a

  12. Geologic uncertainty in a regulatory environment: An example from the potential Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautman, C. A.; Treadway, A. H.

    1991-11-01

    Regulatory geologists are concerned with predicting the performance of sites proposed for waste disposal or for remediation of existing pollution problems. Geologic modeling of these sites requires large-scale expansion of knowledge obtained from very limited sampling. This expansion induces considerable uncertainty into the geologic models of rock properties that are required for modeling the predicted performance of the site. One method for assessing this uncertainty is through nonparametric geostatistical simulation. Simulation can produce a series of equiprobable models of a rock property of interest. Each model honors measured values at sampled locations, and each can be constructed to emulate both the univariate histogram and the spatial covariance structure of the measured data. Computing a performance model for a number of geologic simulations allows evaluation of the effects of geologic uncertainty. A site may be judged acceptable if the number of failures to meet a particular performance criterion produced by these computations is sufficiently low. A site that produces too many failures may be either unacceptable or simply inadequately described. The simulation approach to addressing geologic uncertainty is being applied to the potential high-level nuclear waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, U.S.A. Preliminary geologic models of unsaturated permeability have been created that reproduce observed statistical properties reasonably well. A spread of unsaturated groundwater travel times has been computed that reflects the variability of those geologic models. Regions within the simulated models exhibiting the greatest variability among multiple runs are candidates for obtaining the greatest reduction in uncertainty through additional site characterization.

  13. The Geologic Basis for Volcanic Hazard Assessment for the Proposed High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Perry

    2002-10-15

    Studies of volcanic risk to the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain have been ongoing for 25 years. These studies are required because three episodes of small-volume, alkalic basaltic volcanism have occurred within 50 km of Yucca Mountain during the Quaternary. Probabilistic hazard estimates for the proposed repository depend on the recurrence rate and spatial distribution of past episodes of volcanism in the region. Several independent research groups have published estimates of the annual probability of a future volcanic disruption of the proposed repository, most of which fall in the range of 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -9} per year; similar conclusions were reached. through an extensive expert elicitation sponsored by the Department of Energy in 1995-1996. The estimated probability values are dominated by a regional recurrence rate of 10{sup -5} to 10{sup -6} volcanic events per year (equating to recurrence intervals of several hundred thousand years). The recurrence rate, as well as the spatial density of volcanoes, is low compared to most other basaltic volcanic fields in the western United States, factors that may be related to both the tectonic history of the region and a lithospheric mantle source that is relatively cold and not prone to melting. The link between volcanism and tectonism in the Yucca Mountain region is not well understood beyond a general association between volcanism and regional extension, although areas of locally high extension within the region may control the location of some volcanoes. Recently, new geologic data or hypotheses have emerged that could potentially increase past estimates of the recurrence rate, and thus the probability of repository disruption. These are (1) hypothesized episodes of anomalously high strain rate, (2) hypothesized presence of a regional mantle hotspot, and (3) new aeromagnetic data suggesting as many as twelve previously unrecognized volcanoes buried in alluvial-filled basins near

  14. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 22. Nuclear considerations for repository design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Y/OWI/TM-36/22, ''Nuclear Considerations for Repository Design,'' is one of a 23-volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-36, which supplements the ''Contribution to Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-44. The series provides a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. Included in this volume are baseline design considerations such as characteristics of canisters, drums, casks, overpacks, and shipping containers; maximum allowable and actual decay-heat levels; and canister radiation levels. Other topics include safeguard and protection considerations; occupational radiation exposure including ALARA programs; shielding of canisters, transporters and forklift trucks; monitoring considerations; mine water treatment; canister integrity; and criticality calculations.

  15. Seismic stability of the survey areas of potential sites for the deep geological repository of the spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaláb, Zdeněk; Šílený, Jan; Lednická, Markéta

    2017-07-01

    This paper deals with the seismic stability of the survey areas of potential sites for the deep geological repository of the spent nuclear fuel in the Czech Republic. The basic source of data for historical earthquakes up to 1990 was the seismic website [10]. The most intense earthquake described occurred on September 15, 1590 in the Niederroesterreich region (Austria) in the historical period; its reported intensity is Io = 8-9. The source of the contemporary seismic data for the period since 1991 to the end of 2014 was the website [11]. It may be stated based on the databases and literature review that in the period from 1900, no earthquake exceeding magnitude 5.1 originated in the territory of the Czech Republic. In order to evaluate seismicity and to assess the impact of seismic effects at depths of hypothetical deep geological repository for the next time period, the neo-deterministic method was selected as an extension of the probabilistic method. Each one out of the seven survey areas were assessed by the neo-deterministic evaluation of the seismic wave-field excited by selected individual events and determining the maximum loading. Results of seismological databases studies and neo-deterministic analysis of Čihadlo locality are presented.

  16. Radioactive waste disposal programme and siting regions for geological deep repositories. Executive summary. November 2008; Entsorgungsprogramm und Standortgebiete fuer geologische Tiefenlager. Zusammenfassung. November 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-11-15

    There are radioactive wastes in Switzerland. Since many decades they are produced by the operation of the five nuclear power plants, by medicine, industry and research. Important steps towards the disposal of these wastes are already realized; the corresponding activities are practised. This particularly concerns handling and packaging of the radioactive wastes, their characterization and inventory, as well as the interim storage and the inferred transportations. Preparatory works in the field of scientific research on deep geological repositories have allowed to acquire high level of technical and scientific expertise in that domain. The feasibility of building long-term safe geological repositories in Switzerland was demonstrated for all types of radioactive wastes; the demonstration was accepted by the Federal Council. There is enough knowledge to propose geological siting regions for further works. The financial funds already accumulated guaranty the financing of the dismantling of the power plants as well as building deep geological repositories for the radioactive wastes. The regulations already exist and the organisational arrangements necessary for the fruitful continuation of the works already done have been taken. The programme of the disposal of radioactive wastes also describes the next stages towards the timely realization of the deep repositories as well as the level of the financial needs. The programme is updated every five years, checked by the regulatory bodies and accepted by the Federal Council who reports to the parliament. The process of choosing a site, which will be completed in the next years, is detailed in the conceptual part of the programme for deep geological repositories. The NAGRA proposals are based exclusively on technical and scientific considerations; the global evaluation taking into account also political considerations has to be performed by the authorities and the Federal Council. The programme states that at the beginning of

  17. Axisymmetric analysis of multilayered thermoelastic media with application to a repository for heat-emitting high-level nuclear waste in a geological formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Datcheva, Maria; Schanz, Tom

    2016-08-01

    Comprehensive analytical solutions to 3-D axisymmetric problems for static response of multilayered thermoelastic media subjected to surface loads and containing sources are presented in this study. The solution strategy employs Laplace and Hankel transforms to the field variables. The problem is formulated in cylindrical coordinate system and in this coordinate system vector surface harmonics and generalized propagator matrix are introduced to find the solution for the problem for the behaviour of thermoelastic multilayered media subject to surface loads and containing heat sources. A high-order adaptive Gaussian quadrature method with continued fraction expansions is employed to approximate the integral solutions expressed in terms of semi-infinite Hankel-type integrals. It is the first time to apply the proposed solution method to investigate the behaviour of repository for heat-emitting high-level nuclear waste (HLW) in a geological formation where the HLW can be regarded as a decaying with time point heat source.

  18. Functions of an engineered barrier system for a nuclear waste repository in basalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coons, W.E.; Moore, E.L.; Smith, M.J.; Kaser, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    Defined in this document are the functions of components selected for an engineered barrier system for a nuclear waste repository in basalt. The definitions provide a focal point for barrier material research and development by delineating the purpose and operative lifetime of each component of the engineered system. A five-component system (comprised of waste form, canister, buffer, overpack, and tailored backfill) is discussed in terms of effective operation throughout the course of repository history, recognizing that the emplacement environment changes with time. While components of the system are mutually supporting, redundancy is provided by subsystems of physical and chemical barriers which act in concert with the geology to provide a formidable barrier to transport of hazardous materials to the biosphere. The operating philosophy of the conceptual engineered barrier system is clarified by examples pertinent to storage in basalt, and a technical approach to barrier design and material selection is proposed. A method for system validation and qualification is also included which considers performance criteria proposed by external agencies in conjunction with site-specific models and risk assessment to define acceptable levels of system performance.

  19. National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase III: Implementation and Operation of the Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    American Geological Institute

    1999-11-09

    The NGDRS steering committee met at Unocal's offices on October 1, 1998 in Sugar Land, Texas to review and discuss issues of data transfer and the continued development of the Stapleton prospect for establishment of a national core repository. Company representatives reaffirmed their commitment to donate geoscience data to the NGDRS once appropriate facilities are available.

  20. Modeling Biogeochemical Reactive Transport in Fractured Granites: Implications for the Performance of a Deep Geological Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinero, J.; Samper, J.; Pedersen, K.; Puigdomenech, I.

    2003-12-01

    Several countries around the world are considering deep repositories in fractured granitic formations for the final disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Evaluating the long term safety of such repositories requires sound conceptual and numerical models which are being developed from data and knowledge gained from in situ experiments carried out at deep underground laboratories such as that of Žsp” in Sweden. One of the key aspects for performance assessment concerns to groundwater redox conditions because: (a) the presence of oxygen will affect to the corrosion of canisters, (b) possible production of hydrogen sulphide from sulphate reduction will also have a negative effect on these metallic containers, and (c) several long-lived radionuclides are much more soluble and mobile under oxidizing conditions. Several projects have been performed at Žsp” to investigate different aspects of the groundwater redox evolution. The vast amount of in situ-generated information has been used in this work to set up coupled hydrobiogeochemical models. Numerical models account for saturated groundwater flow, solute transport by advection, dispersion and molecular diffusion, geochemical reactions involving both the liquid and solid phases, and microbially-catallyzed processes. For the Žsp” site, modelling results provide quantitative support for the following conclusions. (A) At the operational phase of the repository, shallow fresh groundwater could reach the depth of the underground facility. Shallow groundwaters loose dissolved oxygen during the infiltration through soil layers and then, respiration of dissolved organic matter is induced along the flow paths through the reduction of Fe(III)-bearing minerals of the fracture zones. Microbial anaerobic respiration of DOC provides additional reducing capacity at the depth of the tunnel. (B) After repository closure, atmospheric oxygen will remain trapped within the tunnel. Abiotic consumption of this oxygen has been

  1. Numerical investigation of high level nuclear waste disposal in deep anisotropic geologic repositories

    KAUST Repository

    Salama, Amgad

    2015-11-01

    One of the techniques that have been proposed to dispose high level nuclear waste (HLW) has been to bury them in deep geologic formations, which offer relatively enough space to accommodate the large volume of HLW accumulated over the years since the dawn of nuclear era. Albeit the relatively large number of research works that have been conducted to investigate temperature distribution surrounding waste canisters, they all abide to consider the host formations as homogeneous and isotropic. While this could be the case in some subsurface settings, in most cases, this is not true. In other words, subsurface formations are, in most cases, inherently anisotropic and heterogeneous. In this research, we show that even a slight difference in anisotropy of thermal conductivity of host rock with direction could have interesting effects on temperature fields. We investigate the effect of anisotropy angle (the angle the principal direction of anisotropy is making with the coordinate system) on the temperature field as well as on the maximum temperature attained in different barrier systems. This includes 0°, 30°, 45°, 60°, and 90°in addition to the isotropic case as a reference. We also consider the effect of anisotropy ratio (the ratio between the principal direction anisotropies) on the temperature fields and maximum temperature history. This includes ratios ranging between 1.5 and 4. Interesting patterns of temperature fields and profiles are obtained. It is found that the temperature contours are aligned more towards the principal direction of anisotropy. Furthermore the peak temperature in the buffer zone is found to be larger the smaller the anisotropy angle and vice versa. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Seismic stability of the survey areas of potential sites for the deep geological repository of the spent nuclear fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaláb Zdeněk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the seismic stability of the survey areas of potential sites for the deep geological repository of the spent nuclear fuel in the Czech Republic. The basic source of data for historical earthquakes up to 1990 was the seismic website [10]. The most intense earthquake described occurred on September 15, 1590 in the Niederroesterreich region (Austria in the historical period; its reported intensity is Io = 8-9. The source of the contemporary seismic data for the period since 1991 to the end of 2014 was the website [11]. It may be stated based on the databases and literature review that in the period from 1900, no earthquake exceeding magnitude 5.1 originated in the territory of the Czech Republic.

  3. The United States Polar Rock Repository: A geological resource for the Earth science community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunow, Annie M.; Elliot, David H.; Codispoti, Julie E.

    2007-01-01

    The United States Polar Rock Repository (USPRR) is a U. S. national facility designed for the permanent curatorial preservation of rock samples, along with associated materials such as field notes, annotated air photos and maps, raw analytic data, paleomagnetic cores, ground rock and mineral residues, thin sections, and microfossil mounts, microslides and residues from Polar areas. This facility was established by the Office of Polar Programs at the U. S. National Science Foundation (NSF) to minimize redundant sample collecting, and also because the extreme cold and hazardous field conditions make fieldwork costly and difficult. The repository provides, along with an on-line database of sample information, an essential resource for proposal preparation, pilot studies and other sample based research that should make fieldwork more efficient and effective. This latter aspect should reduce the environmental impact of conducting research in sensitive Polar Regions. The USPRR also provides samples for educational outreach. Rock samples may be borrowed for research or educational purposes as well as for museum exhibits.

  4. Impact of long-term climate change on a deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulton, G.S. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom); Kautsky, U.; Moren, L. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Wallroth, T. [Bergab Consulting Geologists (Sweden)

    2001-05-01

    The radioactivity of spent nuclear fuel will decay over a period of time (100,000 years or longer) in which we expect major environmental change. Climatically driven changes such as glaciation, permafrost and changes in sea level will affect the subsurface environment and must therefore be considered in performance and safety assessments. We regard the state of climate to be determined by the climate system, comprising the atmosphere, the biosphere, the oceans, the ice sheets and the surface of the lithosphere. Climate can change as a consequence of external forcing or as a consequence of the internal dynamics. The changes in the past show a complex cyclical pattern with repetitive periodicities and magnitudes of change. On the relatively long time scale which is of concern in this report climate changes are believed to be triggered by changes in insolation due to cyclical changes in the earth's orbit around the sun. This is referred to as the Milankovitch theory or the astronomical climate theory. A brief review of our knowledge of the climate system, proxy records and observations of past climate change is presented in the report. The most extreme departures from modern environmental conditions in Sweden have occurred during the cold, glacial cycles with ice sheets covering the whole of Sweden. As part of SKB's palaeohydrogeological research programme a time-dependent, thermo-mechanically coupled model of ice sheet behaviour has been developed in order to simulate past fluctuations of the Scandinavian ice sheet and forecast its future. The ice sheet model can calculate the temperature field and isostatic response of the underlying bedrock, subglacial and proglacial permafrost and the subglacial melt rates. By connecting the glaciation model with hydrogeological and rock mechanical models, the response of the subsurface to climate change can be investigated. In this report the climate-driven environmental changes are represented as a series of successive

  5. Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste (Volume 1) Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.A. Levich; J.S. Stuckless

    2006-09-25

    Yucca Mountain in Nevada represents the proposed solution to what has been a lengthy national effort to dispose of high-level radioactive waste, waste which must be isolated from the biosphere for tens of thousands of years. This chapter reviews the background of that national effort and includes some discussion of international work in order to provide a more complete framework for the problem of waste disposal. Other chapters provide the regional geologic setting, the geology of the Yucca Mountain site, the tectonics, and climate (past, present, and future). These last two chapters are integral to prediction of long-term waste isolation.

  6. Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste (Volume 1) Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.A. Levich; J.S. Stuckless

    2006-09-25

    Yucca Mountain in Nevada represents the proposed solution to what has been a lengthy national effort to dispose of high-level radioactive waste, waste which must be isolated from the biosphere for tens of thousands of years. This chapter reviews the background of that national effort and includes some discussion of international work in order to provide a more complete framework for the problem of waste disposal. Other chapters provide the regional geologic setting, the geology of the Yucca Mountain site, the tectonics, and climate (past, present, and future). These last two chapters are integral to prediction of long-term waste isolation.

  7. Operation of a Public Geologic Core and Sample Repository in Houstion, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Tinker; Beverly DeJarnett

    2007-07-31

    The Bureau of Economic Geology's Houston Research Center (HRC) is well established as a premier regional research center for geologic research serving not only Houston, but geoscientists from around Texas, the U. S., and even the world. As reported in the FY05 and FY06 technical progress reports to the DOE, the HRC provides a state-of-the-art core viewing facility, two fully equipped conference rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. In addition, the HRC currently now houses over 725,000 boxes of rock material (as of January 2008), and has space to hold approximately 300,000 more boxes. Use of the facility has remained strong; the number of patrons averaged over 100 per month from June 1, 2006 to October 2007, and 90,000 boxes of core were donated to, and received by, the HRC during this time. Usage is a combination of individuals describing core, groups of geoscientists holding seminars and workshops, and various industry and government-funded groups holding short courses, workshops, and seminars. These numbers are in addition to the numerous daily requests from patrons desiring to have rock material shipped offsite to their own offices. The BEG/HRC secured several substantial donations of rock materials and cash totaling approximately $2.2 million during the 2005-2006 operating period. All of these funds went directly into an endowment that UT is building in order to operate the HRC primarily off a portion of the interest generated by the fund. Specific details regarding the funds in the endowment are addressed in a table later in this report. Outreach during 2005 and 2006 included many technical presentations and several publications on the HRC. Several field trips to the facility were held for geoscience professionals and grade school students alike. Goals for the upcoming year involve securing a major donation of rock material and cash in order to approach full funding of the HRC endowment. Thanks to donations totaling

  8. OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTION, TEXAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott W. Tinker; Beverly Blakeney DeJarnett

    2006-04-14

    The Bureau of Economic Geology's Houston Research Center (HRC) is well established as a premier regional research center for geologic research serving not only Houston, but geoscientists from around Texas, the US, and even the world. As reported in the 2004-2005 technical progress report to the DOE, the HRC provides a state-of-the-art core viewing facility, two fully equipped conference rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. In addition, the HRC currently now houses over 600,000 boxes of rock material, and has space to hold approximately 300,000 more boxes. Use of the facility has remained strong during this fourth year of operation; the number of patrons averaged nearly 150 per month from June 1, to 2005 May 31, 2006. This usage is a combination of individuals describing core, groups of geoscientists holding seminars and workshops, and various industry and government-funded groups holding short courses, workshops, and seminars. These numbers are in addition to the numerous daily requests from patrons desiring to have rock material shipped offsite to their own offices. The BEG/HRC secured several substantial donations of rock materials and cash totaling approximately $2.2 million during the 2005-2006 operating period. All of these funds went directly into an endowment that will, when complete, endow the HRC in perpetuity. Specific details regarding the funds in the endowment are addressed in a table later in this report. Outreach during 2005 and 2006 included many technical presentations and several publications on the HRC. Several field trips to the facility were held for geoscience professionals and grade school students alike. Goals for the upcoming year include securing donations of rock material and cash to approach full funding of the HRC endowment. Thanks to donations totaling $2.2 million from Shea Homes (heritage Unocal rock material), Chevron and others this operating year, the HRC endowment now totals $8

  9. Operation of a Public Geologic Core and Sample Repository in Houstion, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Tinker; Beverly DeJarnett

    2007-07-31

    The Bureau of Economic Geology's Houston Research Center (HRC) is well established as a premier regional research center for geologic research serving not only Houston, but geoscientists from around Texas, the U. S., and even the world. As reported in the FY05 and FY06 technical progress reports to the DOE, the HRC provides a state-of-the-art core viewing facility, two fully equipped conference rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. In addition, the HRC currently now houses over 725,000 boxes of rock material (as of January 2008), and has space to hold approximately 300,000 more boxes. Use of the facility has remained strong; the number of patrons averaged over 100 per month from June 1, 2006 to October 2007, and 90,000 boxes of core were donated to, and received by, the HRC during this time. Usage is a combination of individuals describing core, groups of geoscientists holding seminars and workshops, and various industry and government-funded groups holding short courses, workshops, and seminars. These numbers are in addition to the numerous daily requests from patrons desiring to have rock material shipped offsite to their own offices. The BEG/HRC secured several substantial donations of rock materials and cash totaling approximately $2.2 million during the 2005-2006 operating period. All of these funds went directly into an endowment that UT is building in order to operate the HRC primarily off a portion of the interest generated by the fund. Specific details regarding the funds in the endowment are addressed in a table later in this report. Outreach during 2005 and 2006 included many technical presentations and several publications on the HRC. Several field trips to the facility were held for geoscience professionals and grade school students alike. Goals for the upcoming year involve securing a major donation of rock material and cash in order to approach full funding of the HRC endowment. Thanks to donations totaling

  10. OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTION, TEXAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott W. Tinker; Beverly Blakeney DeJarnett

    2006-04-14

    The Bureau of Economic Geology's Houston Research Center (HRC) is well established as a premier regional research center for geologic research serving not only Houston, but geoscientists from around Texas, the US, and even the world. As reported in the 2004-2005 technical progress report to the DOE, the HRC provides a state-of-the-art core viewing facility, two fully equipped conference rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. In addition, the HRC currently now houses over 600,000 boxes of rock material, and has space to hold approximately 300,000 more boxes. Use of the facility has remained strong during this fourth year of operation; the number of patrons averaged nearly 150 per month from June 1, to 2005 May 31, 2006. This usage is a combination of individuals describing core, groups of geoscientists holding seminars and workshops, and various industry and government-funded groups holding short courses, workshops, and seminars. These numbers are in addition to the numerous daily requests from patrons desiring to have rock material shipped offsite to their own offices. The BEG/HRC secured several substantial donations of rock materials and cash totaling approximately $2.2 million during the 2005-2006 operating period. All of these funds went directly into an endowment that will, when complete, endow the HRC in perpetuity. Specific details regarding the funds in the endowment are addressed in a table later in this report. Outreach during 2005 and 2006 included many technical presentations and several publications on the HRC. Several field trips to the facility were held for geoscience professionals and grade school students alike. Goals for the upcoming year include securing donations of rock material and cash to approach full funding of the HRC endowment. Thanks to donations totaling $2.2 million from Shea Homes (heritage Unocal rock material), Chevron and others this operating year, the HRC endowment now totals $8

  11. Geology and hydrology of the proposed Lyons, Kansas, radioactive waste repository site. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1971-03-01

    The five chapters cover: surface geology and ground-water hydrology, status report of 6-month study of subsurface rocks, study of salt sequence, heat transfer, and energy storage and radiation damage effect in rock salt. 64 figures, 9 tables. (DLC)

  12. Technical elements for the performance assessment of a high-level waste geologic repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, William Bradley

    Techniques for predicting various performance elements of a high level radioactive waste repository are developed and demonstrated. In the unsaturated Yucca Mountain repository site gaseous radionuclides traveling through open fractures will be retarded by absorption into pore-bound liquid. For small values of the modified Peclet number the fractured porous medium can be modeled as an equivalent continuum as demonstrated by discrete fracture analysis. The travel time for C-14(O2) from failed containers to the accessible environment is predicted to be hundreds to thousands of years and doses from above ground concentrations to be much lower than background radiation at sea level. A spent fuel source term is developed for episodic flooding of a partially-failed container. Solubility-limited, congruent, preferential and alteration-rate based release modes are considered. Transport is by advection with the mostly-intact container being credited with effectively blocking diffusive pathways. The possible benefits of limited oxygen entry into the container is also discussed. Calculated releases in response to assumed major flooding episodes are comparable to those of wet-drip models. A weapons-plutonium glass waste form might be driven to supercriticality by a flooding episode in the distant future if neutron poisons are first washed away as shown by a preliminary hydrodynamics-coupled reactor model. Criticality is approached from the undermoderated side as water enters the degraded waste form. Point neutronics equations track the event through self-shutdown by water expulsion. Calculated event magnitudes are comparable to those of documented criticality accidents. The fundamental problem of diffusion from a circular disc source at constant concentration located in the boundary of a semi-infinite media is solved numerically using coordinate transformation, grid scaling, and intelligent finite difference algorithms. The resulting time-dependent mass-transfer rate is

  13. Regional and Site-Scale Hydrogeologic Analyses of a Proposed Canadian Deep Geologic Repository for Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, J. F.; Normani, S. D.; Yin, Y.; Sykes, E. A.

    2009-05-01

    A Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) for Low and Intermediate Level radioactive waste has been proposed by Ontario Power Generation for the eastern edge of the Michigan Basin at the Bruce site, near Tiverton, Ontario, Canada. The DGR is to be constructed within the argillaceous Ordovician limestone of the Cobourg Formation at a depth of about 680 m below ground surface. This paper describes a regional-scale and linked site-scale geologic conceptual model for the DGR site and analyzes flow system evolution using the FRAC3DVS-OPG flow and transport model. The work illustrates the factors that influence the predicted long-term performance of the geosphere barrier and provides a framework for the assembly and integration of site-specific geoscientific data. The structural contours at the regional and site scale of the 31 sedimentary strata that may be present above the Precambrian crystalline basement rock were defined by the Ontario Petroleum Institute's Oil, Gas and Salt Resources Library borehole logs covering Southern Ontario and by site-specific data. The regional- scale domain encompasses an 18,500 km2 region extending from Lake Huron to Georgian Bay. The site- scale spatial domain encompasses an area of approximately 361 km2 with the repository at its centre. Its boundary conditions are determined using both the nested model approach and an embedment approach. The groundwater zone below the Devonian is characterized by units containing pore fluids with high concentrations of total dissolved solids that can exceed 300 g/l. Site-specific data indicate that the Ordovician is under-pressured relative to the surface elevation while the Cambrian is over-pressured. The computational sequence for the analyses involves the calculation of steady-state density independent flow that is used as the initial condition for the determination of pseudo-equilibrium for a density-dependent flow system that has an initial TDS distribution developed from observed data. Sensitivity

  14. Proposals of geological sites for L/ILW and HLW repositories. Geological background. Text volume; Vorschlag geologischer Standortgebiete fuer das SMA- und das HAA-Lager. Geologische Grundlagen. Textband

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-10-15

    On April 2008, the Swiss Federal Council approved the conceptual part of the Sectoral Plan for Deep Geological Repositories. The Plan sets out the details of the site selection procedure for geological repositories for low- and intermediate-level waste (L/ILW) and high-level waste (HLW). It specifies that selection of geological siting regions and sites for repositories in Switzerland will be conducted in three stages, the first one (the subject of this report) being the definition of geological siting regions within which the repository projects will be elaborated in more detail in the later stages of the Sectoral Plan. The geoscientific background is based on the one hand on an evaluation of the geological investigations previously carried out by Nagra on deep geological disposal of HLW and L/ILW in Switzerland (investigation programmes in the crystalline basement and Opalinus Clay in Northern Switzerland, investigations of L/ILW sites in the Alps, research in rock laboratories in crystalline rock and clay); on the other hand, new geoscientific studies have also been carried out in connection with the site selection process. Formulation of the siting proposals is conducted in five steps: A) In a first step, the waste inventory is allocated to the L/ILW and HLW repositories; B) The second step involves defining the barrier and safety concepts for the two repositories. With a view to evaluating the geological siting possibilities, quantitative and qualitative guidelines and requirements on the geology are derived on the basis of these concepts. These relate to the time period to be considered, the space requirements for the repository, the properties of the host rock (depth, thickness, lateral extent, hydraulic conductivity), long-term stability, reliability of geological findings and engineering suitability; C) In the third step, the large-scale geological-tectonic situation is assessed and large-scale areas that remain under consideration are defined. For the L

  15. Reference repository design concept for bedded salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, D.W.; Martin, R.W.

    1980-10-08

    A reference design concept is presented for the subsurface portions of a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt. General geologic, geotechnical, hydrologic and geochemical data as well as descriptions of the physical systems are provided for use on generic analyses of the pre- and post-sealing performance of repositories in this geologic medium. The geology of bedded salt deposits and the regional and repository horizon stratigraphy are discussed. Structural features of salt beds including discontinuities and dissolution features are presented and their effect on repository performance is discussed. Seismic hazards and the potential effects of earthquakes on underground repositories are presented. The effect on structural stability and worker safety during construction from hydrocarbon and inorganic gases is described. Geohydrologic considerations including regional hydrology, repository scale hydrology and several hydrological failure modes are presented in detail as well as the hydrological considerations that effect repository design. Operational phase performance is discussed with respect to operations, ventilation system, shaft conveyances, waste handling and retrieval systems and receival rates of nuclear waste. Performance analysis of the post sealing period of a nuclear repository is discussed, and parameters to be used in such an analysis are presented along with regulatory constraints. Some judgements are made regarding hydrologic failure scenarios. Finally, the design and licensing process, consistent with the current licensing procedure is described in a format that can be easily understood.

  16. OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTON, TEXAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott W. Tinker; Laura C. Zahm; Beverly Blakeney DeJarnett

    2004-04-01

    The Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG), building on an initial gift from BP, and with the continuing support of the Department of Energy (DOE), has established the first regional core and sample research center in Houston, Texas. The Houston Research Center (HRC) provides a state-of-the-art core layout facility, two fully equipped meeting rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. This document summarizes the activities, upkeep, increase in staff, and public impact on industry and the community that were accomplished at the Houston Research Center during its first two years of operation.

  17. OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTON, TEXAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott W. Tinker; Laura C. Zahm; Beverly Blakeney DeJarnett

    2004-04-01

    The Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG), building on an initial gift from BP, and with the continuing support of the Department of Energy (DOE), has established the first regional core and sample research center in Houston, Texas. The Houston Research Center (HRC) provides a state-of-the-art core layout facility, two fully equipped meeting rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. This document summarizes the activities, upkeep, increase in staff, and public impact on industry and the community that were accomplished at the Houston Research Center during its first two years of operation.

  18. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 16. Repository preconceptual design studies: BPNL waste forms in salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Volume 16, ''Repository Preconceptual Design Studies: BPNL Waste Forms in Salt,'' is one of a 23 volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-36, which supplements the ''Contribution to Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-44. The series provide a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. This document describes a preconceptual design for a nuclear waste storage facility in salt. The waste forms assumed to arrive at the repository were supplied by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories (BPNL). The facility design consists of several chambers excavated deep within a geologic formation together with access shafts and supportive surface structures. The facility design provides for: receiving and unloading waste containers; lowering them down shafts to the mine level; transporting them to the proper storage area and emplacing them in mined storage rooms. Drawings of the facility design are contained in TM-36/17, ''Drawings for Repository Preconceptual Design Studies: BPNL Waste Forms in Salt.''

  19. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 16. Repository preconceptual design studies: BPNL waste forms in salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Volume 16, ''Repository Preconceptual Design Studies: BPNL Waste Forms in Salt,'' is one of a 23 volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-36, which supplements the ''Contribution to Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-44. The series provide a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. This document describes a preconceptual design for a nuclear waste storage facility in salt. The waste forms assumed to arrive at the repository were supplied by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories (BPNL). The facility design consists of several chambers excavated deep within a geologic formation together with access shafts and supportive surface structures. The facility design provides for: receiving and unloading waste containers; lowering them down shafts to the mine level; transporting them to the proper storage area and emplacing them in mined storage rooms. Drawings of the facility design are contained in TM-36/17, ''Drawings for Repository Preconceptual Design Studies: BPNL Waste Forms in Salt.''

  20. National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase II. Final report, January 30, 1995--January 28, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    The American Geological Institute (AGI) has completed Phase II of a project to establish a National Geoscience Data Repository System (NGDRS). The project`s primary objectives are to preserve geoscience data in jeopardy of being destroyed and to make that data available to those who have a need to use it in future investigations. These data are available for donation to the public as a result of the downsizing that has occurred in the major petroleum and mining companies in the United States for the past decade. In recent years, these companies have consolidated domestic operations, sold many of their domestic properties and relinquished many of their leases. The scientific data associated with those properties are no longer considered to be useful assets and are consequently in danger of being lost forever. The national repository project will make many of these data available to the geoscience community for the first time. To address this opportunity, AGI sought support from the Department of Energy (DOE) in 1994 to initiate the NGDRS Phase I feasibility study to determine the types and quantity of data that companies would be willing to donate. The petroleum and mining companies surveyed indicated that they were willing to donate approximately five million well logs, one hundred million miles of seismic reflection data, millions of linear feet of core and cuttings, and a variety of other types of scientific data. Based on the positive results of the Phase I study, AGI undertook Phase II of the program in 1995. Funded jointly by DOE and industry, Phase II encompasses the establishment of standards for indexing and cataloging of geoscience data and determination of the costs of transferring data from the private sector to public-sector data repositories. Pilot projects evaluated the feasibility of the project for transfer of different data types and creation of a Web-based metadata supercatalog and browser.

  1. Fundamental aspects of stress corrosion cracking of copper relevant to the Swedish deep geologic repository concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskaran, Ganesh; Carcea, Anatolie; Ulaganathan, Jagan; Wang, Shengchun; Huang, Yin; Newman, Roger C. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Univ. of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2013-03-15

    Phosphorus-doped oxygen-free copper will be used as the outer barrier in canisters that will contain spent nuclear fuel in the proposed Swedish underground repository. The possibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a concern, in view of isolated reports of cracking or intergranular corrosion of pure copper in sulfide solutions. This concern was addressed in the present work using copper tensile specimens provided by SKB. Methods included slow strain rate testing, constant strain tensile testing, electrochemical and surface analytical studies of corrosion products, and electron backscatter diffraction analysis of grain orientation effects on corrosion. The base solutions were prepared from NaCl or synthetic sea water with addition of varying amounts of sodium sulfide at room temperature and 80 degree Celsius. No SCC was found in any of the testing, for a range of sulfide concentrations from 5-50 mM at room temperature or 8 C, including tests where small anodic or cathodic potential displacements were applied from the open-circuit (corrosion) potential. Neither was SCC found in constant-strain immersion testing with very large strain. The Cu2S corrosion product is generally very coarse, fragile, and easily spalled off in severe corrosion environments, i.e. high sulfide concentration, high temperature, less perfect de aeration, etc. But it could also consist of very fine grains, relatively compact and adherent, on particular grain orientations when it was formed on an electro polished surface in a very well-deaerated solution. These orientations have not yet been identified statistically, although some preference for thin, adherent films was noted on orientations close to (100). The notion that the corrosion reaction is always controlled by inward aqueous-phase diffusion of sulfide may thus not be unconditionally correct for this range of sulfide concentrations; however it is hard to distinguish the role of diffusion within pores in the film. In the actual

  2. OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTON, TEXAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott W. Tinker; Beverly Blakeney DeJarnett; Laura C. Zahm

    2005-04-01

    The Bureau of Economic Geology's Houston Research Center (HRC) is well established as a premier regional research center for geologic research serving not only Houston, but geoscientists from around Texas, the U. S., and even the world. As reported in the 2003-2004 technical progress report to the DOE, the HRC provides a state-of-the-art core viewing facility, two fully equipped conference rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. In addition, the HRC currently houses over 500,000 boxes of rock material, and has space to hold approximately 400,000 more boxes. Use of the facility has continued to increase during this third year of operation; over the past twelve months the HRC has averaged approximately 200 patrons per month. This usage is a combination of individuals describing core, groups of geoscientists holding seminars and workshops, and various industry and government-funded groups holding short courses, workshops, and seminars. The BEG/HRC secured several substantial donations of rock materials and/or cash during this operating period. All of these funds went directly into the endowment. Outreach during 2004 and 2005 included many technical presentations and several publications on the HRC. Several field trips to the facility were held for geoscience professionals and grade school students alike. Goals for the upcoming year involve securing more donations of rock material and cash in order to fully fund the HRC endowment. BEG will also continue to increase the number of patrons using the facility, and we will strive to raise awareness of the HRC's 100,000-volume geoscience technical library.

  3. Reversibility of La and Lu sorption onto smectites: Implications for the design of engineered barriers in deep geological repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galunin, Evgeny [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Alba, Maria D.; Aviles, Miguel A. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas - Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Santos, Maria J. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR, 86051-990 (Brazil); Vidal, Miquel, E-mail: miquel.vidal@ub.edu [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-12-30

    The sorption reversibility of La and Lu (considered as actinide analogues) onto a set of smectites (bentonite FEBEX; hectorite, HEC; MX80; saponite, SAP; Otay montmorillonite, SCa-3; and Texas montmorillonite, STx-1) was studied to estimate actinide retention by smectites that are candidates for use as engineered barriers in deep geological repositories. The sorption distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) and the reversibility parameters (desorption distribution coefficients (K{sub d,des}), adjusted distribution coefficients (K{sub d,adj}), and desorption rates (R{sub des})) were determined from batch tests in two ionic media: deionized water and Ca 0.02 mol L{sup -1}. The latter simulates possible conditions due to the presence of concrete leachates. The results varied greatly depending on the ionic medium, the lanthanide concentration and the clay structure. The high values of K{sub d,des} obtained (up to 1.1 x 10{sup 5} and 9.2 x 10{sup 4} L kg{sup -1} for La and Lu in water, and 2.8 x 10{sup 4} and 4.1 x 10{sup 4} L kg{sup -1} for La and Lu in the Ca medium) indicate the suitability of the tested smectites for lanthanide (and therefore, actinide) retention. Based on all the data, SCa-3, HEC and FEBEX clays are considered the best choices for water environments, whereas in Ca environments the suitable clays depended on the lanthanide considered.

  4. Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel in an Underground Geologic Repository - Volume 3: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, L.L.; Wilson, J.R. (INEEL); Sanchez, L.C.; Aguilar, R.; Trellue, H.R.; Cochrane, K. (SNL); Rath, J.S. (New Mexico Engineering Research Institute)

    1998-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management's (DOE/EM's) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), through a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), is conducting a systematic Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) of the disposal of SNFs in an underground geologic repository sited in unsaturated tuff. This analysis is intended to provide interim guidance to the DOE for the management of the SNF while they prepare for final compliance evaluation. This report presents results from a Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) that examined the potential consequences and risks of criticality during the long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel owned by DOE-EM. This analysis investigated the potential of post-closure criticality, the consequences of a criticality excursion, and the probability frequency for post-closure criticality. The results of the NDCA are intended to provide the DOE-EM with a technical basis for measuring risk which can be used for screening arguments to eliminate post-closure criticality FEPs (features, events and processes) from consideration in the compliance assessment because of either low probability or low consequences. This report is composed of an executive summary (Volume 1), the methodology and results of the NDCA (Volume 2), and the applicable appendices (Volume 3).

  5. OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTON TEXAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott W. Tinker

    2003-06-01

    In the spring of 2002, the Department of Energy provided an initial 1-year grant to the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) at The University of Texas at Austin (UT). The grant covered the one-year operational expenses of a worldclass core and cuttings facility located in Houston, Texas, that BP America donated to the BEG. The DOE investment of $300,000, matched by a $75,000 UT contribution, provided critical first-year funds that were heavily leveraged by the BP gift of $7.0 million in facilities and cash. DOE also provided a one-month extension and grant of $30,000 for the month of May 2003. A 5-year plan to grow a permanent endowment in order to manage the facility in perpetuity is well under way and on schedule. The facility, named the Houston Research Center, represents an ideal model for a strong Federal, university, and private partnership to accomplish a national good. This report summarizes the activities supported by the initial DOE grant during the first 13 months of operation and provides insight into the activities and needs of the facility in the second year of operation.

  6. OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTON TEXAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott W. Tinker

    2003-06-01

    In the spring of 2002, the Department of Energy provided an initial 1-year grant to the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) at The University of Texas at Austin (UT). The grant covered the one-year operational expenses of a worldclass core and cuttings facility located in Houston, Texas, that BP America donated to the BEG. The DOE investment of $300,000, matched by a $75,000 UT contribution, provided critical first-year funds that were heavily leveraged by the BP gift of $7.0 million in facilities and cash. DOE also provided a one-month extension and grant of $30,000 for the month of May 2003. A 5-year plan to grow a permanent endowment in order to manage the facility in perpetuity is well under way and on schedule. The facility, named the Houston Research Center, represents an ideal model for a strong Federal, university, and private partnership to accomplish a national good. This report summarizes the activities supported by the initial DOE grant during the first 13 months of operation and provides insight into the activities and needs of the facility in the second year of operation.

  7. Preliminary total-system analysis of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslinger, P.W.; Doremus, L.A.; Engel, D.W.; Miley, T.B.; Murphy, M.T.; Nichols, W.E.; White, M.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Langford, D.W.; Ouderkirk, S.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The placement of high-level radioactive wastes in mined repositories deep underground is considered a disposal method that would effectively isolate these wastes from the environment for long periods of time. This report describes modeling performed at PNL for Yucca Mountain between May and November 1991 addressing the performance of the entire repository system related to regulatory criteria established by the EPA in 40 CFR Part 191. The geologic stratigraphy and material properties used in this study were chosen in cooperation with performance assessment modelers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Sandia modeled a similar problem using different computer codes and a different modeling philosophy. Pacific Northwest Laboratory performed a few model runs with very complex models, and SNL performed many runs with much simpler (abstracted) models.

  8. Effects of silica redistribution on performance of high-level nuclear waste repositories in saturated geologic formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, A.; Pruess, K.

    1985-11-01

    Evaluation of the thermohydrological conditions near high-level waste packages is needed for the design of the waste canister and for overall repository design and performance assessment. Most available studies in this area have assumed that the hydrologic properties of the host rock do not change in response to the thermal, mechanical or chemical effects caused by waste emplacement. However, the ramifications of this simplifying assumption have not been substantiated. We have studied dissolution and precipitation of silica in thermally driven flow systems, including changes in formation porosity and permeability. Using numerical simulation, we compare predictions of thermohydrological conditions with and without inclusion of silica redistribution effects. Two cases were studied, namely, a canister-scale problem, a repository-wide thermal convection problem, and different pore models were employed for the permeable medium (fractures with uniform or non-uniform cross sections). We find that silica redistribution generally has insignificant effects on host rock and canister temperatures, pore pressures, or flow velocites.

  9. National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase III: Implementation and Operation of the Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    American Geological Institute

    1999-05-14

    The NGDRS steering committee met at Chevron's office on March 2, 1999 in Houston, Texas to review and discuss issues of data transfer and the future of the Stapleton prospect for establishment of a national core repository. Company representatives reaffirmed their commitment in principal to the NGDRS project. Given the downturn in oil prices and final results from the due diligence of the Stapleton property, AGI has decided to forego pursuing acquisition and build-out of the Stapleton Airport property. The major petroleum companies indicated that rising the $10-12 million endowment would be difficult in the current climate. The completion of the due diligence of the property also revealed major concerns about the environmental liability associated with the property, which would require indemnification of the AGI by the City of Denver. Given these complicating results, AGI officially terminated efforts regarding the Stapleton property effective March 31, 1999. Several steering committee members put forth a proposal that the companies make their non-proprietary holdings public and list them in the NGDRS GeoTrek metadata catalog. Most of these holdings are at C&M Storage in Schulemburg, Texas. The companies are discussing methods to allow for public access to these data with C&M.

  10. Use of groundwater lifetime expectancy for the performance assessment of a deep geologic radioactive waste repository:2. Application to a Canadian Shield environment

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Y -J; Normani, S D; Sykes, J F; Sudicky, E A

    2011-01-01

    Cornaton et al. [2007] introduced the concept of lifetime expectancy as a performance measure of the safety of subsurface repositories, based upon the travel time for contaminants released at a certain point in the subsurface to reach the biosphere or compliance area. The methodologies are applied to a hypothetical but realistic Canadian Shield crystalline rock environment, which is considered to be one of the most geologically stable areas on Earth. In an approximately 10\\times10\\times1.5 km3 hypothetical study area, up to 1000 major and intermediate fracture zones are generated from surface lineament analyses and subsurface surveys. In the study area, mean and probability density of lifetime expectancy are analyzed with realistic geologic and hydrologic shield settings in order to demonstrate the applicability of the theory and the numerical model for optimally locating a deep subsurface repository for the safe storage of spent nuclear fuel. The results demonstrate that, in general, groundwater lifetime exp...

  11. Results from an International Simulation Study on Coupled Thermal,Hydrological, and Mechanical (THM) Processes near Geological NuclearWaste Repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rutqvist, J.; Barr, D.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Chijimatsu, M.; Kolditz, O.; Liu, Q.-S; Oda, Y.; Wang, W.; Zhang, C.-Y.

    2007-10-23

    As part of the ongoing international DECOVALEX project, four research teams used five different models to simulate coupled thermal, hydrological, and mechanical (THM) processes near waste emplacement drifts of geological nuclear waste repositories. The simulations were conducted for two generic repository types, one with open and the other with back-filled repository drifts, under higher and lower postclosure temperatures, respectively. In the completed first model inception phase of the project, a good agreement was achieved between the research teams in calculating THM responses for both repository types, although some disagreement in hydrological responses is currently being resolved. In particular, good agreement in the basic thermal-mechanical responses was achieved for both repository types, even though some teams used relatively simplified thermal-elastic heat-conduction models that neglected complex near-field thermal-hydrological processes. The good agreement between the complex and simplified process models indicates that the basic thermal-mechanical responses can be predicted with a relatively high confidence level.

  12. SBR-Blood: systems biology repository for hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, Jens; Heuston, Elisabeth F; Mishra, Tejaswini; Keller, Cheryl A; Hardison, Ross C; Bodine, David M

    2016-01-04

    Extensive research into hematopoiesis (the development of blood cells) over several decades has generated large sets of expression and epigenetic profiles in multiple human and mouse blood cell types. However, there is no single location to analyze how gene regulatory processes lead to different mature blood cells. We have developed a new database framework called hematopoietic Systems Biology Repository (SBR-Blood), available online at http://sbrblood.nhgri.nih.gov, which allows user-initiated analyses for cell type correlations or gene-specific behavior during differentiation using publicly available datasets for array- and sequencing-based platforms from mouse hematopoietic cells. SBR-Blood organizes information by both cell identity and by hematopoietic lineage. The validity and usability of SBR-Blood has been established through the reproduction of workflows relevant to expression data, DNA methylation, histone modifications and transcription factor occupancy profiles. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. 10 CFR 63.112 - Requirements for preclosure safety analysis of the geologic repository operations area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... include: (a) A general description of the structures, systems, components, equipment, and process... of the performance of the structures, systems, and components to identify those that are important to... comprehensive identification of potential event sequences; (c) Data pertaining to the Yucca Mountain site,...

  14. Design information verification (DIV) of conditioning plant for geological repositories (SAGOR activity 3a)[Nuclear waste disposal; Security; Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myatt, J

    1998-02-01

    Following IAEA Advisory and Consultants Group meetings in September 1988 and in May 1991 respectively an IAEA multi-national Support Programme Task was initiated to consider the 'Development of Safeguards for Final Disposal of Spent Fuel in Geological Repositories' (SAGOR). A Technical Coordination Committee (TCC) was set up with invited representatives from those Member State Support Programmes wishing to be involved. The joint programme, through the TCC, was given the task of studying the safeguards requirements in: conditioning plant (where the spent fuel is prepared for transfer to the repository); operating repositories (i.e. those in which the fuel is being emplaced); closed repositories. At the first meeting of the TCC in Washington in July 1994 the UK undertook to provide a study of the Design Information Verification (DIV) required in all three areas. For this activity the requirements, techniques and procedures for the Design Information Verification (DIV) of conditioning plant have been considered. In completing the study the findings reported for Activities 1a and 2a (descriptions of a Model Facility and Potential Diversion Paths, respectively) have been used in formulating any conclusions reached. The findings of Activity 1a show that a conditioning plant will be far simpler in concept than is a reprocessing plant. From this it must be concluded that DIV is unlikely to present any significant problems; experience based on reprocessing plant shows that it can be done both efficiently and effectively using proven techniques. In section 3.2, however, a number of valuable techniques which are currently being developed are also described. These have potential for effecting better DIV and could provide further evidence that the declared designs are (or are not) being fully complied with. More general DIV requirements are described in section 4. Like the detailed considerations mentioned above, these are no different from those already being applied

  15. Effects of Fe(II) and hydrogen peroxide interaction upon dissolving UO2 under geologic repository conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amme, M; Bors, W; Michel, C; Stettmaier, K; Rasmussen, G; Betti, M

    2005-01-01

    Iron redox cycling is supposed to be one of the major mechanisms that control the geochemical boundary conditions in the near field of a geologic repository for UO2 spent nuclear fuel. This work investigates the impact of reactions between hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and iron (Fe2+/Fe3+) on UO2 dissolution. The reaction partners were contacted with UO2 in oxygen-free batch reactor tests. The interaction in absence of UO2 gives a stoichiometric redox reaction of Fe2+ and H2O2 when the reactants are present in equal concentration. Predomination of H202 results in its delayed catalytic decomposition. With UO2 present, its dissolution is controlled by either a slow mechanism (as typical for anoxic environments) or uranium peroxide precipitation, depending strongly on the reactant ratio. Uranium peroxide (UO4 x nH2O, m-studtite), detected on UO2 surfaces after exposure to H2O2, was not found on the surfaces exposed to solutions with stoichometric Fe(II)/ H2O2 ratios. This suggests that H2O2 was deactivated in redox reactions before a formation of UO4 took place. ESR measurements employing the spin trapping technique revealed only the DMPO-OH adduct within the first minutes after the reaction start (high initial concentrations of the OH radical); however, in the case of Fe(II) and H2O2 reacting at 10(-4) mol/L with UO2, dissolved oxygen and Fe2+ concentrations indicate the participation of further Fe intermediates and, therefore, Fenton redox activities.

  16. Maximum flood hazard assessment for OPG's deep geologic repository for low and intermediate level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimmrichter, P.; McClintock, J.; Peng, J. [AMEC plc., Toronto, ON (Canada); Leung, H. [Nuclear Waste Management Organization, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Ontario Power Generation (OPG) has entered a process to seek Environmental Assessment and licensing approvals to construct a Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) for Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste (L&ILW) near the existing Western Waste Management Facility (WWMF) at the Bruce nuclear site in the Municipality of Kincardine, Ontario. In support of the design of the proposed DGR project, maximum flood stages were estimated for potential flood hazard risks associated with coastal, riverine and direct precipitation flooding. The estimation of lake/coastal flooding for the Bruce nuclear site considered potential extreme water levels in Lake Huron, storm surge and seiche, wind waves, and tsunamis. The riverine flood hazard assessment considered the Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) within the local watersheds, and within local drainage areas that will be directly impacted by the site development. A series of hydraulic models were developed, based on DGR project site grading and ditching, to assess the impact of a Probable Maximum Precipitation (PMP) occurring directly at the DGR site. Overall, this flood assessment concluded there is no potential for lake or riverine based flooding and the DGR area is not affected by tsunamis. However, it was also concluded from the results of this analysis that the PMF in proximity to the critical DGR operational areas and infrastructure would be higher than the proposed elevation of the entrance to the underground works. This paper provides an overview of the assessment of potential flood hazard risks associated with coastal, riverine and direct precipitation flooding that was completed for the DGR development. (author)

  17. Total System Performance Assessment, 1993: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, R.W.; Dale, T.F.; McNeish, J.A.

    1994-03-01

    Total System Performance Assessments are an important component in the evaluation of the suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a potential site for a mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in the United States. The Total System Performance Assessments are conducted iteratively during site characterization to identify issues which should be addressed by the characterization and design activities as well as providing input to regulatory/licensing and programmatic decisions. During fiscal years 1991 and 1992, the first iteration of Total System Performance Assessment (hereafter referred to as TSPA 1991) was completed by Sandia National Laboratories and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Beginning in fiscal year 1993, the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor was assigned the responsibility to plan, coordinate, and contribute to the second iteration of Total System Performance Assessment (hereafter referred to as TSPA 1993). This document presents the objectives, approach, assumptions, input, results, conclusions, and recommendations associated with the Management and Operating Contractor contribution to TSPA 1993. The new information incorporated in TSPA 1993 includes (1) revised estimates of radionuclide solubilities (and their thermal and geochemical dependency), (2) thermal and geochemical dependency of spent fuel waste alteration and glass dissolution rates, (3) new distribution coefficient (k{sub d}) estimates, (4) revised estimates of gas-phase velocities and travel times, and (5) revised hydrologic modeling of the saturated zone which provides updated estimates of the advective flux through the saturated zone.

  18. A geological and geophysical data collection system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sudhakar, T.; Afzulpurkar, S.

    A geological and geophysical data collection system using a Personal Computer is described below. The system stores data obtained from various survey systems typically installed in a charter vessel and can be used for similar applications on any...

  19. Development of database systems for safety of repositories for disposal of radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yeong Hun; Han, Jeong Sang; Shin, Hyeon Jun; Ham, Sang Won; Kim, Hye Seong [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-15

    In the study, GSIS os developed for the maximizing effectiveness of the database system. For this purpose, the spatial relation of data from various fields that are constructed in the database which was developed for the site selection and management of repository for radioactive waste disposal. By constructing the integration system that can link attribute and spatial data, it is possible to evaluate the safety of repository effectively and economically. The suitability of integrating database and GSIS is examined by constructing the database in the test district where the site characteristics are similar to that of repository for radioactive waste disposal.

  20. FEBEX project: full-scale engineered barriers experiment for a deep geological repository for high level radioactive waste in crystalline host rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberid, J.; Barcala, J. M.; Campos, R.; Cuevas, A. M.; Fernandez, E. [Ciemat. Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    FEBEX has the multiple objective of demonstrating the feasibility of manufacturing, handling and constructing the engineered barriers and of developing codes for the thermo-hydro-mechanical and thermo-hydro-geochemical performance assessment of a deep geological repository for high level radioactive wastes. These objectives require integrated theoretical and experimental development work. The experimental work consists of three parts: an in situ test, a mock-up test and a series of laboratory tests. The experiments is based on the Spanish reference concept for crystalline rock, in which the waste capsules are placed horizontally in drifts surround by high density compacted bentonite blocks. In the two large-scale tests, the thermal effects of the wastes were simulated by means of heaters; hydration was natural in the in situ test and controlled in the mock-up test. The large-scale tests, with their monitoring systems, have been in operation for more than two years. the demonstration has been achieved in the in situ test and there are great expectation that numerical models sufficiently validated for the near-field performance assessment will be achieved. (Author)

  1. Repository Sealing Program Plan: repository in salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsall, P.C.; Coons, W.E.; Meyer, D.

    1983-01-01

    The isolation of nuclear wastes in deep, mined repositories will require the sealing of all penetrations such as shafts, tunnels, or boreholes into or nearby the repository. This Repository Sealing Program Plan describes the technical programs required to complete seal designs for a repository in salt prior to license application in 1988. The plan examines the current schematic seal designs for a repository in salt and identifies seven major technical programs which are required to advance the designs to the status required for licensing: (1) update designs to incorporate site-specific geologic and hydrologic characteristics; (2) reference designs to site-specific repository designs; (3) develop site-specific performance requirements; (4) salt consolidation testing and modeling; (5) materials development; (6) design analyses; (7) verification testing. Scedules for each of these programs are keyed to governing seal design and ONWI milestones. Conceptual seal designs will be completed in FY 84 and preliminary seal designs in FY 87.

  2. On the Durability of Nuclear Waste Forms from the Perspective of Long-Term Geologic Repository Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifeng Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available High solid/water ratios and slow water percolation cause the water in a repository to quickly (on a repository time scale reach radionuclide solubility controlled by the equilibrium with alteration products; the total release of radionuclides then becomes insensitive to the dissolution rates of primary waste forms. It is therefore suggested that future waste form development be focused on conditioning waste forms or repository environments to minimize radionuclide solubility, rather than on marginally improving the durability of primary waste forms.

  3. Methodology used for total system performance assessment of the potential nuclear waste repository at yucca mountain (USA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devonec, E.; Sevougian, S.D.; Mattie, P.D.; Mcneish, J.A. [Duke Engineering and Services, Town Center Drive, Las Vegas (United States); Mishra, S. [Duke Engineering and Services, Austin, TX (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors are currently evaluating a site in Nevada (Yucca Mountain) for disposal of high-level radioactive waste from U.S. commercial nuclear plants and U.S. government-owned facilities. The suitability of the potential geologic repository is assessed, based on its performance in isolating the nuclear waste from the environment. Experimental data and models representing the natural and engineered barriers are combined into a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) model. Because of the uncertainty in the current data and in the future evolution of the total system, simulations follow a probabilistic approach. Multiple realization simulations using Monte Carlo analysis are conducted over time periods of up to one million years, which estimates a range of possible behaviors of the repository. In addition to the nominal scenario, other exposure scenarios include the possibility of disruptive events such as volcanic eruption or intrusion, or accidental human intrusion. Sensitivity to key uncertain processes is analyzed. The influence of stochastic variables on the TSPA model output is assessed by ''uncertainty importance analysis'', e.g., regression analysis and classification tree analysis. Further investigation of the impact of parameters and assumptions is conducted through ''one-off analysis'', which consists in fixing a parameter at a particular value, using an alternative conceptual model, or in making a different assumption. Finally, robustness analysis evaluates the performance of the repository when various natural or engineered barriers are assumed to be degraded. The objective of these analyses is to evaluate the performance of the potential repository system under conditions ranging from expected to highly unlikely, though physically possible conditions. (author)

  4. Project JADE. Long-term function and safety. Comparison of repository systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgersson, Lars; Pers, K.; Wiborgh, M. [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-12-01

    A comparison of the KBS-3 V(ertical deposition), KBS-3 H(orizontal deposition) and MLH repository systems with regard to the long-term repository performance and the radionuclide migration is presented in the report. Several differences between the repository systems have been identified. The differences are mainly related to the: distance between canister and backfilled tunnels, excavated rock volumes, deposition hole direction. The overall conclusion is that the differences are in general quite small with regard to the repository function and safety. None of the differences are of such importance for the long-term repository performance and radionuclide migration that they discriminate any of the repository systems. The differences between the two KBS-3 systems are small. Based on this study, there is no reason to change from the reference system KBS-3 V to KBS-3 H. MLH has the potential to be a very robust system, especially in a long-term perspective. However, the MLH system will require extensive research, development, and analysis before it will be as confident as the reference repository system, KBS-3 V. Although the MLH and KBS-3 H systems are in some ways favourable compared to the reference system KBS-3 V, the overall conclusion is that the KBS-3 V system is still a very attractive system. A major advantage with KBS-3 V is that it is by far the most investigated and developed system. The JADE-project was initiated in 1996, and the main part of the study was carried out during 1997 and 1998. The JADE study is consequently based on presumptions that were valid a few years ago. Some of these presumptions have been modified since then. The new presumptions are however not judged to change the overall conclusions.

  5. Report to Congress on the potential use of lead in the waste packages for a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-12-01

    In the Report of the Senate Committee on Appropriations accompanying the Energy and Water Appropriation Act for 1989, the Committee directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the use of lead in the waste packages to be used in geologic repositories for spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. The evaluation that was performed in response to this directive is presented in this report. This evaluation was based largely on a review of the technical literature on the behavior of lead, reports of work conducted in other countries, and work performed for the waste-management program being conducted by the DOE. The initial evaluation was limited to the potential use of lead in the packages to be used in the repository. Also, the focus of this report is post closure performance and not on retrievability and handling aspects of the waste package. 100 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.

  6. The U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Collections Management System (GCMS)—A master catalog and collections management plan for U.S. Geological Survey geologic samples and sample collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is widely recognized in the earth science community as possessing extensive collections of earth materials collected by research personnel over the course of its history. In 2006, a Geologic Collections Inventory was conducted within the USGS Geology Discipline to determine the extent and nature of its sample collections, and in 2008, a working group was convened by the USGS National Geologic and Geophysical Data Preservation Program to examine ways in which these collections could be coordinated, cataloged, and made available to researchers both inside and outside the USGS. The charge to this working group was to evaluate the proposition of creating a Geologic Collections Management System (GCMS), a centralized database that would (1) identify all existing USGS geologic collections, regardless of size, (2) create a virtual link among the collections, and (3) provide a way for scientists and other researchers to obtain access to the samples and data in which they are interested. Additionally, the group was instructed to develop criteria for evaluating current collections and to establish an operating plan and set of standard practices for handling, identifying, and managing future sample collections. Policies and procedures promoted by the GCMS would be based on extant best practices established by the National Science Foundation and the Smithsonian Institution. The resulting report—USGS Circular 1410, “The U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Collections Management System (GCMS): A Master Catalog and Collections Management Plan for U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Samples and Sample Collections”—has been developed for sample repositories to be a guide to establishing common practices in the collection, retention, and disposal of geologic research materials throughout the USGS.

  7. Total system evaluation of gas generation and migration in the radioactive waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, K.; Fujiwara, A.; Tokuyama, S.; Adachi, T.; Saeki, T. [Radioactive Waste Management Funding and Research Center, Tokyo (Japan); Vomvoris, S. [NAGRA, Baden (Switzerland); Fukudome, K. [Kobe Steel Ltd. (Japan); Shimmura, A. [Obayashi Corp., Shinagawa Intercity Tower, Minato-ku (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    The carbon steel used in the nuclear waste repository under reductive condition reacts with ground water and generates hydrogen gas. It might accumulate and degrade performance of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS). It is highly important to evaluate the influence of gas generation and migration under the repository-like environment. Therefore, the Gas Generation Test is performed in Gas Evaluation Facility (GEF) in Japan and the Gas Migration Test (GMT) is performed in Nagra Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland. (author)

  8. Current challenges for high-resolution monitoring of deep geological repository boreholes using terrestrial laser scanner and photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrea, Dario; Savunen, Johanna; Abellan, Antonio; Derron, Marc-Henri; Mattila, Jussi; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2015-04-01

    The Onkalo site has been selected as final deep geological repository for the disposal of nuclear waste in Finland. Several exploratory boreholes, similar to those that will host the nuclear waste, are currently under construction in order to analyse various technical aspects of the disposal. Among them, an accurate monitoring of the deformation of each borehole is required. The present study aims at finding the most suitable technique for measuring and monitoring small scale (below mm) deformations of these boreholes with high confidence and accuracy. Two different close-range monitoring techniques are compared here: a phase-shift terrestrial laser scanning (Z+F 5006i) and photogrammetry (Canon EOS 6D&EF20mm + Adamtech 3DM Mine Mapping Suite 2.5). Both techniques are applied using multi temporal acquisitions. As for the data acquired by the terrestrial laser scanner, our study has revealed that parts of the 3D datasets are affected by an artificial distortion, with a maximum shift up to 6 mm, which is clearly below the required accuracy. The origin of this artifact is related with the data acquisition strategy: since the accuracy of the laser measurement is affected by the incidence angle, we observed that when the incidence angle is higher than 45°, the range is unsatisfactorily underestimated. Furthermore, we found another issue in the influence of the surface condition on range measurement, such as wet versus dry, or dark versus light colored rock surface. As for the photogrammetric data, we observed that, when compared to a theoretical cylinder, the 3D point cloud was affected by a sub-millimetric distortion. This distortion is due to the construction and georeferencing of the final 3D model. The error can reach up to +/- 0.8 mm in the border areas of the picture, which is significant value as a millimetric deformation should be detected. Up to now, the photogrammetric acquisitions have provided more accurate results than the laser scanning, but there is a

  9. Seismic Response of a Deep Underground Geologic Repository for Nuclear Waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, P.E.

    1998-11-02

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a deep underground nuclear waste repository certified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ,(EPA) to store transuranic defense-related waste contaminated by small amounts of radioactive materials. Located at a depth of about 655 meters below the surface, the facility is sited in southeastern New Mexico, about 40 Department of Energy underground facilities, waste disposal. kilometers east of the city of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The U.S. (DOE) managed the design and construction of the surface and and remains responsible for operation and closure following The managing and operating contractor for the DOE at the WIPP, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, maintains two rechmiant seismic monitoring systems located at the surface and in the underground. This report discusses two earthquakes detected by the seismic monitoring system, one a duratior magnitude 5.0 (Md) event located approximately 60 km east-southeast of the facility, and another a body-wave magnitude 5.6 (rob) event that occurred approximately 260 kilometers to the south-southeast.

  10. NATIONAL GEOSCIENCE DATA REPOSITORY SYSTEM PHASE III: IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION OF THE REPOSITORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus Milling

    2001-04-01

    The NGDRS has attained 72% of its targeted goal for cores and cuttings transfers, with over 12M linear feet of cores and cuttings now available for public use. Additionally, large-scale transfers of seismic data have been evaluated, but based on the recommendation of the NGDRS steering committee, cores have been given priority because of the vast scale of the seismic data problem relative to the available funding. The rapidly changing industry conditions have required that the primary core and cuttings preservation strategy evolve as well. A Steering Committee meeting held on November 30, 2000 focused on current achievements, how the situation in the petroleum industry affects the NGDRS activities, and the nature of the study by the National Research Council on data preservation. AGI remained actively involved in assisting the National Research Council with background materials and presentations for their panel convened to study the data preservation issue. The GeoTrek metadata catalog system continues to expand and attract new users. Current GeoTrek revision efforts are being retargeted given the identification of new open source technologies with will provide for a flexible, user-friendly GeoTrek, Version 3.

  11. Conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements for disposal of borosilicate glass defense high-level waste forms in salt geologic repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-06-01

    The conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements presented are applicable specifically to the normal borosilicate glass product of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). They provide preliminary numerical values for the defense high-level waste form parameters and properties identified in the waste form performance specification for geologic isolation in salt repositories. Subject areas treated include containment and isolation, operational period safety, criticality control, waste form/production canister identification, and waste package performance testing requirements. This document was generated for use in the development of conceptual waste package designs in salt. It will be revised as additional data, analyses, and regulatory requirements become available.

  12. Mined Geologic Disposal System Requirements Document. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This Mined Geologic Disposal System Requirements Document (MGDS-RD) describes the functions to be performed by, and the requirements for, a Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) (including SNF loaded in multi-purpose canisters (MPCs)) and commercial and defense high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in support of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). The purpose of the MGDS-RD is to define the program-level requirements for the design of the Repository, the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), and Surface Based Testing Facilities (SBTF). These requirements include design, operation, and decommissioning requirements to the extent they impact on the physical development of the MGDS. The document also presents an overall description of the MGDS, its functions (derived using the functional analysis documented by the Physical System Requirements (PSR) documents as a starting point), its segments as described in Section 3.1.3, and the requirements allocated to the segments. In addition, the program-level interfaces of the MGDS are identified. As such, the MGDS-RD provides the technical baseline for the design of the MGDS.

  13. Methodology Used for Total System Performance Assessment of the Potential Nuclear Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain (USA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Devibec; S.D. Sevougian; P.D. Mattie; J.A. McNeish; S. Mishra

    2001-03-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors are currently evaluating a site in Nevada (Yucca Mountain) for disposal of high-level radioactive waste from U.S. commercial nuclear plants and U.S. government-owned facilities. The suitability of the potential geologic repository is assessed, based on its performance in isolating the nuclear waste from the environment. Experimental data and models representing the natural and engineered barriers are combined into a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) model [1]. Process models included in the TSPA model are unsaturated zone flow and transport, thermal hydrology, in-drift geochemistry, waste package degradation, waste form degradation, engineered barrier system transport, saturated zone flow and transport, and biosphere transport. Because of the uncertainty in the current data and in the future evolution of the total system, simulations follow a probabilistic approach. Multiple realization simulations using Monte Carlo analysis are conducted over time periods of up to one million years, which estimates a range of possible behaviors of the repository. The environmental impact is measured primarily by the annual dose received by an average member of a critical population group residing 20 km down-gradient of the potential repository. In addition to the nominal scenario, other exposure scenarios include the possibility of disruptive events such as volcanic eruption or intrusion, or accidental human intrusion. Sensitivity to key uncertain processes is analyzed. The influence of stochastic variables on the TSPA model output is assessed by ''uncertainty importance analysis'', e.g., regression analysis and classification tree analysis. Further investigation of the impact of parameters and assumptions is conducted through ''one-off analysis'', which consists in fixing a parameter at a particular value, using an alternative conceptual model, or in making a different assumption

  14. Effect Of Up-Scaling On The Study Of The Steel/Bentonite Interface In A Deep Geological Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres Alvarez, Elena; Turrero, Maria Jesus; Martin, Pedro Luis; Escribano, Alicia [CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    Deep geological disposal is the most accepted management option for High Level Nuclear Wastes. The multi-barrier system for the isolation of high-level radioactive waste includes the concept of the spent fuel encapsulated in canisters of carbon steel. Corrosion phenomena affect the integrity of the canister and can modify the chemical environment either at the interface or in the bentonite pore water. The experimental studies conducted by CIEMAT are focused on the iron canister corrosion products interaction with the bentonite system and are based on a series of short term and medium term experiments conceived at different scales, from conventional laboratory experiments and experiments in cylindrical cells, to those specifically designed 3D mock up experiments, the so called 'GAME (Geochemical Mock up experiments) scale'. The results obtained from the up-scaling could be a useful tool to understand the key processes at the steel/bentonite interface and the later modelling work. (authors)

  15. FAIRDOMHub: a repository and collaboration environment for sharing systems biology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolstencroft, Katherine; Krebs, Olga; Snoep, Jacky L.; Stanford, Natalie J.; Bacall, Finn; Golebiewski, Martin; Kuzyakiv, Rostyk; Nguyen, Quyen; Owen, Stuart; Soiland-Reyes, Stian; Straszewski, Jakub; van Niekerk, David D.; Williams, Alan R.; Malmström, Lars; Rinn, Bernd; Müller, Wolfgang; Goble, Carole

    2017-01-01

    The FAIRDOMHub is a repository for publishing FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable) Data, Operating procedures and Models (https://fairdomhub.org/) for the Systems Biology community. It is a web-accessible repository for storing and sharing systems biology research assets. It enables researchers to organize, share and publish data, models and protocols, interlink them in the context of the systems biology investigations that produced them, and to interrogate them via API interfaces. By using the FAIRDOMHub, researchers can achieve more effective exchange with geographically distributed collaborators during projects, ensure results are sustained and preserved and generate reproducible publications that adhere to the FAIR guiding principles of data stewardship. PMID:27899646

  16. Geological hazard monitoring system in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaprindashvili, George

    2017-04-01

    Georgia belongs to one of world's most complex mountainous regions according to the scale and frequency of Geological processes and damage caused to population, farmlands, and Infrastructure facilities. Geological hazards (landslide, debrisflow/mudflow, rockfall, erosion and etc.) are affecting many populated areas, agricultural fields, roads, oil and gas pipes, high-voltage electric power transmission towers, hydraulic structures, and tourist complexes. Landslides occur almost in all geomorphological zones, resulting in wide differentiation in the failure types and mechanisms and in the size-frequency distribution. In Georgia, geological hazards triggered by: 1. Activation of highly intense earthquakes; 2. Meteorological events provoking the disaster processes on the background of global climatic change; 3. Large-scale Human impact on the environment. The prediction and monitoring of Geological Hazards is a very wide theme, which involves different researchers from different spheres. Geological hazard monitoring is essential to prevent and mitigate these hazards. In past years in Georgia several monitoring system, such as Ground-based geodetic techniques, Debrisflow Early Warning System (EWS) were installed on high sensitive landslide and debrisflow areas. This work presents description of Geological hazard monitoring system in Georgia.

  17. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. CIRMIS data system. Volume 3. Generator routines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrichs, D.R.; Argo, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    The Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program is developing and applying the methodology for assessing the far-field, long-term post-closure safety of deep geologic nuclear waste repositories. AEGIS is being performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) for the Department of Energy (DOE). One task within AEGIS is the development of methodology for analysis of the consequences (water pathway) from loss of repository containment as defined by various release scenarios. The various input parameters required in the analysis are compiled in data systems. The data are organized and prepared by various input subroutines for utilization by the hydraulic and transport codes. The hydrologic models simulate the groundwater flow systems and provide water flow directions, rates, and velocities as inputs to the transport models. Outputs from the transport models are basically graphs of radionuclide concentration in the groundwater plotted against time. After dilution in the receiving surface-water body (e.g., lake, river, bay), these data are the input source terms for the dose models, if dose assessments are required. The dose models calculate radiation dose to individuals and populations. CIRMIS (Comprehensive Information Retrieval and Model Input Sequence) Data System, a storage and retrieval system for model input and output data, including graphical interpretation and display is described. This is the third of four volumes of the description of the CIRMIS Data System.

  18. Staged Repository Development Programmes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaacs, T

    2003-10-01

    Programs to manage and ultimately dispose of high-level radioactive wastes are unique from scientific and technological as well as socio-political aspects. From a scientific and technological perspective, high-level radioactive wastes remain potentially hazardous for geological time periods-many millennia-and scientific and technological programs must be put in place that result in a system that provides high confidence that the wastes will be isolated from the accessible environment for these many thousands of years. Of course, ''proof'' in the classical sense is not possible at the outset, since the performance of the system can only be known with assurance, if ever, after the waste has been emplaced for those geological time periods. Adding to this challenge, many uncertainties exist in both the natural and engineered systems that are intended to isolate the wastes, and some of the uncertainties will remain regardless of the time and expense in attempting to characterize the system and assess its performance. What was perhaps underappreciated in the early days of waste management and repository program development were the unique and intense reactions that the institutional, political, and public bodies would have to repository program development, particularly in programs attempting to identify and then select sites for characterization, design, licensing, and ultimate development. Reactions in most nations were strong, focused, unrelenting, and often successful in hindering, derailing, and even stopping national repository programs. The reasons for such reactions and the measures to successfully respond to them are still evolving and continue to be the focus of many national program and political leaders. Adaptive Staging suggests an approach to repository program development that reflects the unique challenges associated with the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The step-wise, incremental, learn-as-you-go approach is intended to

  19. Using geologic conditions and multiattribute decision analysis to determine the relative favorability of selected areas for siting a high-level radioactive waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, W.; Edgar, D.E.; Baker, C.H.; Buehring, W.A.; Whitfield, R.G.; Van Luik, A.E.J.; Sood, M.K.; Flower, M.F.J.; Warren, M.F.; Jusko, M.J.; Peerenboom, J.P.; Bogner, J.E.

    1988-05-01

    A method is presented for determining the relative favorability of geologically complex areas for isolating high-level radioactive wastes. In applying the method to the northeastern region of the United States, seismicity and tectonic activity were the screening criteria used to divide the region into three areas of increasing seismotectonic risk. Criteria were then used to subdivide the area of lowest seismotectonic risk into six geologically distinct subareas including characteristics, surface-water and groundwater hydrology, potential human intrusion, site geometry, surface characteristics, and tectonic environment. Decision analysis was then used to identify the subareas most favorable from a geologic standpoint for further investigation, with a view to selecting a site for a repository. Three subareas (parts of northeastern Vermont, northern New Hampshire, and western Maine) were found to be the most favorable, using this method and existing data. However, because this study assessed relative geologic favorability, no conclusions should be drawn concerning the absolute suitability of individual subareas for high-level radioactive waste isolation. 34 refs., 7 figs., 20 tabs.

  20. Framework for evaluating the utility of incentive systems for radioactive waste repository siting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnes, S. A.; Soderstrom, J.; Sorensen, J.; Peelle, E.; Reed, J. H.; Bjornstad, D. J.; Copenhaver, E. D.

    The importance of social and institutional issues in siting radioactive waste repositories has been recognized in recent years. Within this set of issues, the siting of repositories over the objections of members of potential host communities is viewed as especially problematic. Incentives to potential host communities have been suggested as a means of increasing local support for and offsetting local opposition to such facilities. Incentives are classified according to their function as mitigation, compensation or reward. Analysis of results of a 1980 survey (conducted by John Kelly, Complex Systems Group, University of New Hampshire) of 420 rural Wisconsin residents indicates that incentives may achieve the purpose of increasing support for and decreasing opposition to accepting a repository. Criteria for evaluating the utility of incentives are identified. It is suggested that meaningful evaluations of incentives can only be performed by members of potential host communities.

  1. Albitization and quartz dissolution in Paleoproterozoic metagranite, central Sweden — Implications for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep geological repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Jesper; Stephens, Michael B.; Mattsson, Håkan; Möller, Charlotte

    2012-09-01

    Hydrothermal alteration resulting in albitization and quartz dissolution has been identified in Paleoproterozoic metagranites down to - 1000 m elevation at Forsmark, Sweden. The alteration features were discovered during investigations to locate a site for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep geological repository. In general, albitization occurs extensively, but it is also observed locally adjacent to minor intrusive bodies of amphibolite. The altered rocks show a marked decrease in K-feldspar and an increase in quartz relative to the unaltered equivalents, resulting in an epitonalitic composition. Plagioclase is metamorphic in character and generally richer in albite than in the unaltered rocks. It is inferred that albitization was triggered by the input of basic or intermediate melts into the crust during igneous activity close to the peak of regional metamorphism at 1.87-1.86 Ga. The mineralogy of the epitonalites gives rise to an increased thermal conductivity and, thereby, a positive influence for the design and safety of a deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel. However, the increased frequency of low conductive amphibolite in the albitized volumes, consistent with the proposed mechanism for alteration, gives a negative influence. In sharp contrast to the albitization, a majority of the occurrences of quartz dissolution, which resulted in the formation of episyenite, are located along fracture zones. Quartz dissolution took place between or after 1.8-1.7 Ga, when the bedrock was able to respond to deformation in a brittle manner. Most of the vugs left after the removal of quartz are, to a variable extent, refilled by hydrothermal assemblages, including quartz, albite, K-feldspar, hematite, chlorite and calcite. The geometry and spatial distribution of episyenite argue against an extreme fluid/rock ratio and it is inferred that the fluids had at least a moderate salinity with a temperature in excess of 300 °C. The dissolution process was

  2. Event-Driven Interoperability Framework For Interoperation In E-Learning Information Systems - Monitored Repository

    OpenAIRE

    Petrov, Milen

    2006-01-01

    M.Petrov "Event-Driven Interoperability Framework For Interoperation In E-Learning Information Systems - Monitored Repository", IADAT-e2006, 3rd International Conference on Education, Barcelona (Spain), July 12-14, 2006, ISBN: 84-933971-9-9, pp.198 - pp.202

  3. Final report on uncertainties in the detection, measurement, and analysis of selected features pertinent to deep geologic repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-07-10

    Uncertainties with regard to many facets of repository site characterization have not yet been quantified. This report summarizes the state of knowledge of uncertainties in the measurement of porosity, hydraulic conductivity, and hydraulic gradient; uncertainties associated with various geophysical field techniques; and uncertainties associated with the effects of exploration and exploitation activities in bedded salt basins. The potential for seepage through a depository in bedded salt or shale is reviewed and, based upon the available data, generic values for the hydraulic conductivity and porosity of bedded salt and shale are proposed.

  4. Preliminary scenarios and nuclide transport models for low-and intermediate-level repository system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Han, Kyong Won; Hwang, Yong Soo; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2001-02-01

    Through the study 11 scenarios with which nuclide release from the low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste could be simulated and assessed are selected, based upon FEPs identified. For each scenario, some practical methodologies as well as mathematical models involved in modling of nuclide transport in various media are also proposed. It is considered that such methodologies can play a great role when real repository system is constructed and operated in very near future. Real repository system is anticipated not to be quite different with the repository system postulated through this study. Even though there shows very complicated features for relevant parameters associated with various phisical-, geohydrological-, and geochemical situation and even human society as well, it is very necessary to propose the methodologies for a quantitative assessment of the performance of the repository in order to use them as a template on the practical point of view of preliminary safety assessment. Mathematical models proposed could be easily adopted by such common computer codes as, for example, MIMOSA and MASCOT-K.

  5. System for fracturing an underground geologic formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Jonathan L.; Tappan, Bryce C.; Seitz, Gerald J.; Bronisz, Lawrence E.

    2017-03-14

    An explosive system for fracturing an underground geologic formation adjacent to a wellbore can comprise a plurality of explosive units comprising an explosive material contained within the casing, and detonation control modules electrically coupled to the plurality of explosive units and configured to cause a power pulse to be transmitted to at least one detonator of at least one of the plurality of explosive units for detonation of the explosive material. The explosive units are configured to be positioned within a wellbore in spaced apart positions relative to one another along a string with the detonation control modules positioned adjacent to the plurality of explosive units in the wellbore, such that the axial positions of the explosive units relative to the wellbore are at least partially based on geologic properties of the geologic formation adjacent the wellbore.

  6. System for fracturing an underground geologic formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mace, Jonathan L.; Tappan, Bryce C.; Seitz, Gerald J.; Bronisz, Lawrence E.

    2017-03-14

    An explosive system for fracturing an underground geologic formation adjacent to a wellbore can comprise a plurality of explosive units comprising an explosive material contained within the casing, and detonation control modules electrically coupled to the plurality of explosive units and configured to cause a power pulse to be transmitted to at least one detonator of at least one of the plurality of explosive units for detonation of the explosive material. The explosive units are configured to be positioned within a wellbore in spaced apart positions relative to one another along a string with the detonation control modules positioned adjacent to the plurality of explosive units in the wellbore, such that the axial positions of the explosive units relative to the wellbore are at least partially based on geologic properties of the geologic formation adjacent the wellbore.

  7. Preconceptual systems and equipment for plugging of man-made accesses to a repository in basalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, C.L.; O' Rourke, J.E.; Allirot, D.; O' Connor, K.

    1980-09-01

    This report presents results of a study leading to preconceptual designs for plugging boreholes, shafts, and tunnels to a nuclear waste repository in basalt. Beginning design criteria include a list of preferred plug materials and plugging machines that were selected to suit the environmental conditions, and depths, diameters, and orientations of the accesses to a nuclear waste repository in the Columbia River basalts located in eastern Washington State. The environmental conditions are described. The fiscal year 1979-1980 Task II work is presented in two parts: preliminary testing of materials for plugging of man-made accesses to a repository in basalt (described in a separate report); and preconceptual systems and equipment for plugging of man-made accesses to a repository in basalt (described in this report). To fulfill the scope of the Task II work, Woodward-Clyde Consultants (WCC) was requested to: provide preconceptual systems for plugging boreholes, tunnels, and shafts in basalt; describe preconceptual borehole plugging equipment for placing the selected materials in man-made accesses; utilize the quality assurance program, program plan and schedule, and work plans previously developed for Task II; and prepare a preliminary report.

  8. The Swedish radiological environmental protection regulations applied in a review of a license application for a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Pål; Stark, Karolina; Xu, Shulan; Nordén, Maria; Dverstorp, Björn

    2017-04-17

    For the first time, a system for specific consideration of radiological environmental protection has been applied in a major license application in Sweden. In 2011 the Swedish Nuclear Fuel & Waste Management Co. (SKB) submitted a license application for construction of a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel at the Forsmark site. The license application is supported by a post-closure safety assessment, which in accordance with regulatory requirements includes an assessment of environmental consequences. SKB's environmental risk assessment uses the freely available ERICA Tool. Environmental media activity concentrations needed as input to the tool are calculated by means of complex biosphere modelling based on site-specific information gathered from site investigations, as well as from supporting modelling studies and projections of future biosphere conditions in response to climate change and land rise due to glacial rebound. SKB's application is currently being reviewed by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM). In addition to a traditional document review with an aim to determine whether SKB's models are relevant, correctly implemented and adequately parametrized, SSM has performed independent modelling in order to gain confidence in the robustness of SKB's assessment. Thus, SSM has used alternative stylized reference biosphere models to calculate environmental activity concentrations for use in subsequent exposure calculations. Secondly, an alternative dose model (RESRAD-BIOTA) is used to calculate doses to biota that are compared with SKB's calculations with the ERICA tool. SSM's experience from this review is that existing tools for environmental dose assessment are possible to use in order to show compliance with Swedish legislation. However, care is needed when site representative species are assessed with the aim to contrast them to generic reference organism. The alternative modelling of environmental concentrations resulted in much lower

  9. Information needs for characterization of high-level waste repository sites in six geologic media. Volume 1. Main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1985-05-01

    Evaluation of the geologic isolation of radioactive materials from the biosphere requires an intimate knowledge of site geologic conditions, which is gained through precharacterization and site characterization studies. This report presents the results of an intensive literature review, analysis and compilation to delineate the information needs, applicable techniques and evaluation criteria for programs to adequately characterize a site in six geologic media. These media, in order of presentation, are: granite, shale, basalt, tuff, bedded salt and dome salt. Guidelines are presented to assess the efficacy (application, effectiveness, and resolution) of currently used exploratory and testing techniques for precharacterization or characterization of a site. These guidelines include the reliability, accuracy and resolution of techniques deemed acceptable, as well as cost estimates of various field and laboratory techniques used to obtain the necessary information. Guidelines presented do not assess the relative suitability of media. 351 refs., 10 figs., 31 tabs.

  10. Swiss plans for deep geological repositories for radioactive wastes - Basics for communication at the localities affected; Sachplan geologische Tiefenlager. Forschungsprojekt 'Kommunikation mit der Gesellschaft': Grundlagen fuer die Kommunikation in den Standortregionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallego Carrera, D.; Renn, O.; Dreyer, M.

    2009-06-15

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) discusses the concept of how information concerning deep geological repositories for radioactive wastes should be presented and communicated to those in the areas which have been designated as potential sites for the repositories. Communication basics based on scientific knowledge in this area are discussed. The importance of a concept for general communication and risk-communication as a particular challenge are discussed. Trust and transparency are quoted as being indispensable in this connection. Ways of dealing with various target audiences and the media are examined. The report is concluded with a check-list that deals with important questions arising from the process of communicating information on deep geological repositories for radioactive wastes

  11. Long term radiological effects on plants and animals of a deep geological repository. SR-Site Biosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torudd, Jesper (Facilia AB (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    This study is part of the safety assessment of the planned repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, called SR-Site. The purpose of the report is to clarify whether the environment is protected against harmful effects of ionizing radiation after a possible future release of radioactive matter from the planned repository. According to the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM), biological diversity and sustainable use of biological resources must be protected, and the evaluation should pay special attention to threatened and endemic species as well as economically and culturally valuable species. The report shows the approach to, and results of, calculations of dose rates to organisms other than man. The calculations are based on modelled activity concentrations from a potential future radioactive release, provided by a separate modelling project. Calculations were performed with the ERICA Tool, a software programme developed by an EU research project. In the ERICA Tool, dose rates for site specific organisms (i.e., occurring at the site) were calculated using input data such as size dimensions and masses of organisms, ecosystems and habitats, concentration ratios for the studied elements (i.e. the ratio of accumulated element concentration in the body compared with the element concentration in the surrounding environment) and maximum activity concentrations of radionuclides from the modelled future release. The results are provided in terms of final dose rates for each studied organism. In accordance with rationales of the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the ERICA project, Representative (site-specific) Organisms from the planned site of the future repository were studied. Ideally, the organisms selected would meet the criteria defined by both SSM (species worth protecting) and by ICRP and ERICA (so-called Reference Organisms). Since activity concentrations for a number of radionuclides were missing for some of the studied

  12. Submission of content to a digital object repository using a configurable workflow system

    CERN Document Server

    Hense, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The prototype of a workflow system for the submission of content to a digital object repository is here presented. It is based entirely on open-source standard components and features a service-oriented architecture. The front-end consists of Java Business Process Management (jBPM), Java Server Faces (JSF), and Java Server Pages (JSP). A Fedora Repository and a mySQL data base management system serve as a back-end. The communication between front-end and back-end uses a SOAP minimal binding stub. We describe the design principles and the construction of the prototype and discuss the possibilities and limitations of work ow creation by administrators. The code of the prototype is open-source and can be retrieved in the project escipub at http://sourceforge.net

  13. Hydrogen transfer experiments and modelization in clay rocks for radioactive waste deep geological repository; Experimentation et modelisation du transfert d'hydrogene a travers des argiles de centre de stockage de dechets radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulin, P

    2008-10-15

    Gases will be generated by corrosion of high radioactive waste containers in deep geological repositories. A gas phase will be generated. Gas pressure will build up and penetrated the geological formation. If gases do not penetrate the geological barrier efficiently, the pressure build up may create a risk of fracturing and of creation of preferential pathways for radionuclide migration. The present work focuses on Callovo-Oxfordian argillites characterisation. An experiment, designed to measure very low permeabilities, was used with hydrogen/helium and analysed using the Dusty Gas Model. Argillites close to saturation have an accessible porosity to gas transfer that is lower than 0,1% to 1% of the porosity. Analysis of the Knudsen effect suggests that this accessible network should be made of 50 nm to 200 nm diameter pores. The permeabilities values were integrated to an ANDRA operating model. The model showed that the maximum pressure expected near the repository would be 83 bar. (author)

  14. A service-oriented national e-theses information system and repository

    OpenAIRE

    Houssos, Nikos; Stathopoulos, Panagiotis; Sarantopoulou, Joanna; Zavaliadis, Dimitris; Sachini, Evi

    2010-01-01

    Postreferred version This article provides an overview of important issues and design decisions involved in the development of an e-theses IT infrastructure, in particular the Greek National Archive of Doctoral Theses (HEDI). The adoption of the service-oriented architectural paradigm, the identification of appropriate services and systems for each task and the use of a mature open repository platform (DSpace) allow the successful management of a large e-theses archive with both prin...

  15. Repository performance confirmation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Francis D.

    2011-09-01

    Repository performance confirmation links the technical bases of repository science and societal acceptance. This paper explores the myriad aspects of what has been labeled performance confirmation in U.S. programs, which involves monitoring as a collection of distinct activities combining technical and social significance in radioactive waste management. This paper is divided into four parts: (1) A distinction is drawn between performance confirmation monitoring and other testing and monitoring objectives; (2) A case study illustrates confirmation activities integrated within a long-term testing and monitoring strategy for Yucca Mountain; (3) A case study reviews compliance monitoring developed and implemented for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant; and (4) An approach for developing, evaluating and implementing the next generation of performance confirmation monitoring is presented. International interest in repository monitoring is exhibited by the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme 'Monitoring Developments for Safe Repository Operation and Staged Closure' (MoDeRn) Project. The MoDeRn partners are considering the role of monitoring in a phased approach to the geological disposal of radioactive waste. As repository plans advance in different countries, the need to consider monitoring strategies within a controlled framework has become more apparent. The MoDeRn project pulls together technical and societal experts to assimilate a common understanding of a process that could be followed to develop a monitoring program. A fundamental consideration is the differentiation of confirmation monitoring from the many other testing and monitoring activities. Recently, the license application for Yucca Mountain provided a case study including a technical process for meeting regulatory requirements to confirm repository performance as well as considerations related to the preservation of retrievability. The performance confirmation plan developed as part

  16. Establishing MICHCARB, a geological carbon sequestration research and education center for Michigan, implemented through the Michigan Geological Repository for Research and Education, part of the Department of Geosciences at Western Michigan University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, David A. [Western Michigan University; Harrison, William B. [Western Michigan University

    2014-01-28

    The Michigan Geological Repository for Research and Education (MGRRE), part of the Department of Geosciences at Western Michigan University (WMU) at Kalamazoo, Michigan, established MichCarb—a geological carbon sequestration resource center by: • Archiving and maintaining a current reference collection of carbon sequestration published literature • Developing statewide and site-specific digital research databases for Michigan’s deep geological formations relevant to CO2 storage, containment and potential for enhanced oil recovery • Producing maps and tables of physical properties as components of these databases • Compiling all information into a digital atlas • Conducting geologic and fluid flow modeling to address specific predictive uses of CO2 storage and enhanced oil recovery, including compiling data for geological and fluid flow models, formulating models, integrating data, and running the models; applying models to specific predictive uses of CO2 storage and enhanced oil recovery • Conducting technical research on CO2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery through basic and applied research of characterizing Michigan oil and gas and saline reservoirs for CO2 storage potential volume, injectivity and containment. Based on our research, we have concluded that the Michigan Basin has excellent saline aquifer (residual entrapment) and CO2/Enhanced oil recovery related (CO2/EOR; buoyant entrapment) geological carbon sequestration potential with substantial, associated incremental oil production potential. These storage reservoirs possess at least satisfactory injectivity and reliable, permanent containment resulting from associated, thick, low permeability confining layers. Saline aquifer storage resource estimates in the two major residual entrapment, reservoir target zones (Lower Paleozoic Sandstone and Middle Paleozoic carbonate and sandstone reservoirs) are in excess of 70-80 Gmt (at an overall 10% storage efficiency factor; an approximately

  17. Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel in an Underground Geologic Repository--Volume 1: Executive Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, L.L.; Wilson, J.R.; Sanchez, L.Z.; Aguilar, R.; Trellue, H.R.; Cochrane, K.; Rath, J.S.

    1998-10-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management's (DOE/EM's) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), through a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), is conducting a systematic Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) of the disposal of SNFs in an underground geologic repository sited in unsaturated tuff. This analysis is intended to provide interim guidance to the DOE for the management of the SNF while they prepare for final compliance evaluation. This report presents results from a Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) that examined the potential consequences and risks of criticality during the long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel owned by DOE-EM. This analysis investigated the potential of post-closure criticality, the consequences of a criticality excursion, and the probability frequency for post-closure criticality. The results of the NDCA are intended to provide the DOE-EM with a technical basis for measuring risk which can be used for screening arguments to eliminate post-closure criticality FEPs (features, events and processes) from consideration in the compliance assessment because of either low probability or low consequences. This report is composed of an executive summary (Volume 1), the methodology and results of the NDCA (Volume 2), and the applicable appendices (Volume 3).

  18. Proposal for the classification of scenarios for deep geological repositories in probability classes; Vorschlag zur Einordnung von Szenarien fuer tiefe geologische Endlager in Wahrscheinlichkeitsklassen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beuth, Thomas

    2013-03-15

    The provided report was elaborated in the framework of the project 3609R03210 ''Research and Development for Proof of the long-term Safety of Deep Geological Repositories''. It contains a proposal for a methodology that enables the assignment of developed scenarios in the frame of Safety Cases to defined probability classes. The assignment takes place indirectly through the categorization of the defining relevant factors (so-called FEP: Features, Events and Processes) of the respective scenarios also in probability classes. Therefore, decision trees and criteria were developed for the categorization of relevant factors in classes. Besides the description of the methodology another focal point of the work was the application of the method taking into account a defined scenario. By means of the scenario the different steps of the method and the decision criteria were documented, respectively. In addition, potential subjective influences along the path of decisions regarding the assignment of scenarios in probability classes were identified.

  19. Development of Earthquake Ground Motion Input for Preclosure Seismic Design and Postclosure Performance Assessment of a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, NV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I. Wong

    2004-11-05

    This report describes a site-response model and its implementation for developing earthquake ground motion input for preclosure seismic design and postclosure assessment of the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The model implements a random-vibration theory (RVT), one-dimensional (1D) equivalent-linear approach to calculate site response effects on ground motions. The model provides results in terms of spectral acceleration including peak ground acceleration, peak ground velocity, and dynamically-induced strains as a function of depth. In addition to documenting and validating this model for use in the Yucca Mountain Project, this report also describes the development of model inputs, implementation of the model, its results, and the development of earthquake time history inputs based on the model results. The purpose of the site-response ground motion model is to incorporate the effects on earthquake ground motions of (1) the approximately 300 m of rock above the emplacement levels beneath Yucca Mountain and (2) soil and rock beneath the site of the Surface Facilities Area. A previously performed probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) (CRWMS M&O 1998a [DIRS 103731]) estimated ground motions at a reference rock outcrop for the Yucca Mountain site (Point A), but those results do not include these site response effects. Thus, the additional step of applying the site-response ground motion model is required to develop ground motion inputs that are used for preclosure and postclosure purposes.

  20. Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel in an Underground Geologic Repository--Volume 2: Methodology and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, L.L.; Wilson, J.R.; Sanchez, L.C.; Aguilar, R.; Trellue, H.R.; Cochrane, K.; Rath, J.S.

    1998-10-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management's (DOE/EM's) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), through a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), is conducting a systematic Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) of the disposal of SNFs in an underground geologic repository sited in unsaturated tuff. This analysis is intended to provide interim guidance to the DOE for the management of the SNF while they prepare for final compliance evaluation. This report presents results from a Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) that examined the potential consequences and risks of criticality during the long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel owned by DOE-EM. This analysis investigated the potential of post-closure criticality, the consequences of a criticality excursion, and the probability frequency for post-closure criticality. The results of the NDCA are intended to provide the DOE-EM with a technical basis for measuring risk which can be used for screening arguments to eliminate post-closure criticality FEPs (features, events and processes) from consideration in the compliance assessment because of either low probability or low consequences. This report is composed of an executive summary (Volume 1), the methodology and results of the NDCA (Volume 2), and the applicable appendices (Volume 3).

  1. The OPG/Kincardine hosting agreement for a deep geologic repository for OPG's low- and intermediate-level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellan, A.G.; Barker, D.E. [Ontario Power Generation, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: angelo.castellan@opg.com; diane.barker@opg.com

    2006-07-01

    A Hosting Agreement has been reached between Ontario Power Generation and the Municipality of Kincardine for the purpose of siting a long-term management facility for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste at the Western Waste Management Facility. Following an independent review of the feasibility of three options for a long-term facility at the site, including a review of the safety, geotechnical feasibility, social and economic effects and potential environmental effects, Kincardine passed a resolution indicating their preference for a Deep Geologic Repository. A Host Community Agreement has been negotiated based on this preference, and on information that had been gathered from municipal authorities at other locations that have hosted similar facilities. The Hosting Agreement includes financial compensation, totalling $35.7 million (Canadian 2004) to the Municipality of Kincardine and to four surrounding municipalities. The financial aspects include lump sum payments based on achieving specific project milestones as well as annual payments to each of the municipalities. The payments are indexed to inflation, and are also contingent on the municipalities acting reasonably and in good faith during the licencing process of the proposed facility. In addition to the fees, the Agreement includes provision for a Property Value Protection Plan that would provide residents with compensation in the event that there is depreciation in property value shown to directly result from a release from the proposed facility. New permanent OPG jobs supporting the project would be located at the site. OPG and Kincardine will support a centre of nuclear excellence. (author)

  2. Evaluation of behaviour and Safety in a geologic deep repository; Evaluacion del comportamiento y de la seguridad de un almacenamiento geologico profundo en granito

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    This report presents a comprehensive description of the post-closure radiological safety assessment of a repository for the spent fuel arisings resulting from the Spanish nuclear program. This Safety Assessment constitutes a first step within a systematical process that will permit, thorough successive approximations, to predict the performance of the different barriers of the disposal system, and its capability to comply with the assigned safety functions and with the established safety criteria. The primary bases for this Safety Assessment are the following: The disposal concept considers the storage of the fuel assemblies in carbon steel canisters of 10 cm of thickness, emplaced horizontally in galleries excavated in granite of 2,4 m of diameter and 500 m of length, using a bentonite thickness of 75 cm around canisters as buffer material. The repository is located in a granitic site defined with available data about surface characteristics of Spanish granites. The exercise uses a probabilistic approximation in order to cope with the uncertainties associated with the different imputs parameters. (Author)

  3. Thermodynamic Properties of Magnesium Chloride Hydroxide Hydrate (Mg3Cl(OH)5:4H2O, Phase 5), and Its importance to Nuclear Waste Isolation in Geological Repositories in Salt Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Y.; Deng, H.; Nemer, M. B.; Johnsen, S.

    2009-12-01

    -1, respectively. Phase 5, and its similar phase, phase 3 (Mg2Cl(OH)3:4H2O), could have a significant role in influencing the geochemical conditions in geological repositories for nuclear waste in salt formations where MgO or brucite is employed as engineered barriers, when Na-Mg-Cl dominated brines react with MgO or brucite. Based on our solubility constant for phase 5 in combination with the literature value for phase 3, we predict that the composition for the invariant point of phase 5 and phase 3 would be mMg = 1.70 and pmH = 8.93 in the Mg-Cl binary system. The recent WIPP Compliance Recertification Application PA Baseline Calculations indicate that phase 5 instead of phase 3 is indeed a stable phase when GWB equilibrates with actinide-source-term phases, brucite, magnesium carbonates, halite and anhydrite. 1. This research is funded by WIPP programs administered by the U.S. Department of Energy. 2. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Planning geological underground repositories - Communicating with society; Sachplan geologische Tiefenlager - Forschungsprojekt 'Kommunikation mit der Gesellschaft': Wissenschaftlicher Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenkel, W. [synergo, Mobilitaet-Politik-Raum, Zuerich (Switzerland); Gallego Carrera, D.; Renn, O.; Dreyer, M. [Dialogik gemeinnuetzige GmbH, Kommunikations- und Kooperationsforschung, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    The project 'Planning geological underground repositories: Communicating with society', financed by the Swiss Federal Office for Energy, aimed at identifying basic principles for an appropriate information and communication strategy in the process of finding an underground site to store radioactive wastes. The topic concerns an issue increasingly discussed in modern societies: How to improve the dialogue between science, infrastructure operators, public authorities, groups in civil society and the population to answer complex problems? Against this background, in the project the following questions were taken into account: (i) How can the dialogue between science, politics, economy, and the (non-)organised public be arranged appropriately? Which principles are to be considered in organising this process? How can distrust within the population be reduced and confidence in authorities and scientific expertise be increased? (ii) How can society be integrated in the process of decision-making so that this process is perceived as comprehensible, acceptable and legitimate? To answer these questions, an analysis method based on scientific theory and methodology was developed, which compares national participation and communication processes in finding underground storage sites in selected countries. Case studies have been carried out in Germany, Sweden, Belgium, and Switzerland. By using specific criteria to evaluate communication processes, the strong points as well as the drawbacks of the country-specific concepts of information, communication and participation have been analysed in a comparing dimension. By taking into account the outcomes, prototypical scenarios have been deduced that can serve as a basis for compiling a reference catalogue of measures, which is meant to support the Swiss communication strategy in the finding of an appropriate site for a nuclear waste repository. Following conclusions can be drawn from the international comparison: (i) Open

  5. Data Mining Learning Models and Algorithms on a Scada System Data Repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Rîşteiu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents three data mining techniques applied
    on a SCADA system data repository: Naijve Bayes, k-Nearest Neighbor and Decision Trees. A conclusion that k-Nearest Neighbor is a suitable method to classify the large amount of data considered is made finally according to the mining result and its reasonable explanation. The experiments are built on the training data set and evaluated using the new test set with machine learning tool WEKA.

  6. Systems engineering programs for geologic nuclear waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klett, R. D.; Hertel, Jr., E. S.; Ellis, M. A.

    1980-06-01

    The design sequence and system programs presented begin with general approximate solutions that permit inexpensive analysis of a multitude of possible wastes, disposal media, and disposal process properties and configurations. It then continues through progressively more precise solutions as parts of the design become fixed, and ends with repository and waste form optimization studies. The programs cover both solid and gaseous waste forms. The analytical development, a program listing, a users guide, and examples are presented for each program. Sensitivity studies showing the effects of disposal media and waste form thermophysical properties and repository layouts are presented as examples.

  7. GIS for the needs of the Radioactive Waste Repository Authority

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitka Mikšová

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA is a state organisation responsible for the management of activities related to the disposal of all existing and future radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel classed as a waste in Czech Republic. Worldwide, a deep geological repository is considered the highest degree of safety for a nuclear waste disposal. Such a repository has to be built in a stable geological environment ensuring the isolation of the stored radioactive waste from the surrounding environment for a long period of time. The selection of suitable site for the deep geological repository construction is a complicated and long term process. Considering this fact and also in respect to an assumed volume of varied datasets the GIS RAWRA was established to ensure convenient management and availability of data containing spatial information.The system is based on ESRI (ArcInfo including extensions, ArcSDE, ArcIMS, Leica Geosystems (Image Analysis and Microsoft software (MS SQL Server. Resulting datasets from six recommended potentially suitable sites for the location of a geological repository have been incorporated into the geodatabase to date. The necessary analysis was made using ESRI software tools and, in addition, custom applications were developed including the metadata editor, etc. This analysis was carried out with respect to existing geological and non-geological criteria defined for a nuclear waste repository. Finally, all six investigated sites with a total area of 240 km2 were reduced in area, each of them resulting in an area of approximately 10km2 for further detailed characterisation.

  8. A biosphere modeling methodology for dose assessments of the potential Yucca Mountain deep geological high level radioactive waste repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, B M; Smith, G M; Little, R H; Kessler, J

    1999-04-01

    Recent developments in performance standards for proposed high level radioactive waste disposal at Yucca Mountain suggest that health risk or dose rate limits will likely be part of future standards. Approaches to the development of biosphere modeling and dose assessments for Yucca Mountain have been relatively lacking in previous performance assessments due to the absence of such a requirement. This paper describes a practical methodology used to develop a biosphere model appropriate for calculating doses from use of well water by hypothetical individuals due to discharges of contaminated groundwater into a deep well. The biosphere model methodology, developed in parallel with the BIOMOVS II international study, allows a transparent recording of the decisions at each step, from the specification of the biosphere assessment context through to model development and analysis of results. A list of features, events, and processes relevant to Yucca Mountain was recorded and an interaction matrix developed to help identify relationships between them. Special consideration was given to critical/potential exposure group issues and approaches. The conceptual model of the biosphere system was then developed, based on the interaction matrix, to show how radionuclides migrate and accumulate in the biosphere media and result in potential exposure pathways. A mathematical dose assessment model was specified using the flexible AMBER software application, which allows users to construct their own compartment models. The starting point for the biosphere calculations was a unit flux of each radionuclide from the groundwater in the geosphere into the drinking water in the well. For each of the 26 radionuclides considered, the most significant exposure pathways for hypothetical individuals were identified. For 14 of the radionuclides, the primary exposure pathways were identified as consumption of various crops and animal products following assumed agricultural use of the contaminated

  9. Reflection seismology systems for planetary geology: A feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batenburg, P.A.W.; Gill, E.K.A.; Drijkoningen, G.G.; Foing, B.H.; Toxopeus, G.

    2009-01-01

    A feasibility study is conducted to determine whether reflection seismology systems can be used for planetary geology research. The focus is on systems with up to 20,000 seismic detectors, such as used today in Earth geological research and energy companies. The study follows a top-down systems engi

  10. Venus: Geology of Beta Regio rift system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikishin, A. M.; Borozdin, V. K.; Bobina, N. N.

    1992-01-01

    Beta Regio is characterized by the existence of rift structures. We compiled new geologic maps of Beta Regio according to Magellan data. There are many large uplifted tesserae on beta upland. These tesserae are partly buried by younger volcanic cover. We can conclude, using these observations, that Beta upland formed mainly due to lithospheric tectonic uplifting and was only partly constructed by volcanism. Theia Mons is the center of the Beta rift system. Many rift belts are distributed radially to Theia Mons. Typical widths of rifts are 40-160 km. Rift valleys are structurally represented by crustal grabens or half-grabens. There are symmetrical and asymmetrical rifts. Many rifts have shoulder uplifts up to 0.5-1 km high and 40-60 km wide. Preliminary analysis for rift valley structural cross sections lead to the conclusion that rifts originated due to 5-10 percent crustal extension. Many rifts traverse Beta upland and spread to the surrounding lowlands. We can assume because of these data that Beta rift system has an active-passive origin. It formed due to regional tectonic lithospheric extension. Rifting was accelerated by upper-mantle hot spot origination under the center of passive extension (under the Beta Regio).

  11. Geology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This database is an Arc/Info implementation of the 1:500,000 scale Geology Map of Kansas, M­23, 1991. This work wasperformed by the Automated Cartography section of...

  12. Development of database systems for safety of repositories for disposal of radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yeong Hoon; Han, Jeong Sang; Shin, Hyeon Joon; Ham, Sang Won; Moon, Sang Kee [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-03-15

    In this study, contents and survey and supervision items in each part are selected to avoid overlap between different parts referring national lows, criterion, and guidance related to atomic energy. The items consist of climatology, hydrology, geology, seismology, engineering geology, geochemistry, and civil and social parts. Based on these items, general study and systematic control related to the stability of disposal sites os established and as specific region required with the properties that is similar to properties of radioactive waste disposal sites, Ulsan region equipped with LPG underground storage facility was selected and its datum were surveyed and inputted. So propriety of established database system was proved.

  13. Procedural method for the development of scenarios in the operational phase following closure of final repositories in deep geological formations. Report on the working package 1. Development of the international status of science and technology concerning methods and tools for operational and long-term safety cases; Vorgehensweise bei der Szenarienentwicklung in der Nachverschlussphase von Endlagern in tiefen geologieschen Formationen. Bericht zum Arbeitspaket 1. Weiterentwicklung des internationalen Stands von Wissenschaft und Technik zu Methoden und Werkzeugen fuer Betriebs- und Langzeitsicherheitsnachweise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlmann, Stephan

    2016-09-15

    For the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes the disposal in deep geological formations is internationally favored. The safety cases include the scientific, technical, administrative and operational safety analyses and arguments, including the management system. According to IAEA the safety case includes site qualification, the design of the facility, construction and operation including an accident analysis, the closure phase and the post-closure phase. The safety case includes the evaluation of radiological risks for several scenarios. The report covers the methodology of scenario assumption in the post-closure phase of repositories in deep geological formations.

  14. Archive of information about geological samples available for research from the Ohio State University Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (BPCRC) Polar Rock Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Polar Rock Repository (PRR) operated by the Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (BPCRC) at the Ohio State University is a partner in the Index to Marine and...

  15. A Geology Sampling System for Small Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naids, Adam J.; Hood, Anthony D.; Abell, Paul; Graff, Trevor; Buffington, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    Human exploration of microgravity bodies is being investigated as a precursor to a Mars surface mission. Asteroids, comets, dwarf planets, and the moons of Mars all fall into this microgravity category and some are being discussed as potential mission targets. Obtaining geological samples for return to Earth will be a major objective for any mission to a small body. Currently, the knowledge base for geology sampling in microgravity is in its infancy. Humans interacting with non-engineered surfaces in microgravity environment pose unique challenges. In preparation for such missions a team at the NASA Johnson Space Center has been working to gain experience on how to safely obtain numerous sample types in such an environment. This paper describes the type of samples the science community is interested in, highlights notable prototype work, and discusses an integrated geology sampling solution.

  16. A Geology Sampling System for Microgravity Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Anthony; Naids, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Human exploration of microgravity bodies is being investigated as a precursor to a Mars surface mission. Asteroids, comets, dwarf planets, and the moons of Mars all fall into this microgravity category and some are been discussed as potential mission targets. Obtaining geological samples for return to Earth will be a major objective for any mission to a microgravity body. Currently the knowledge base for geology sampling in microgravity is in its infancy. Humans interacting with non-engineered surfaces in microgravity environment pose unique challenges. In preparation for such missions a team at the NASA Johnson Space Center has been working to gain experience on how to safely obtain numerous sample types in such an environment. This paper describes the type of samples the science community is interested in, highlights notable prototype work, and discusses an integrated geology sampling solution.

  17. Fundamentals of the NEA Thermochemical Database and its influence over national nuclear programs on the performance assessment of deep geological repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragoussi, Maria-Eleni; Costa, Davide

    2017-03-14

    For the last 30 years, the NEA Thermochemical Database (TDB) Project (www.oecd-nea.org/dbtdb/) has been developing a chemical thermodynamic database for elements relevant to the safety of radioactive waste repositories, providing data that are vital to support the geochemical modeling of such systems. The recommended data are selected on the basis of strict review procedures and are characterized by their consistency. The results of these efforts are freely available, and have become an international point of reference in the field. As a result, a number of important national initiatives with regard to waste management programs have used the NEA TDB as their basis, both in terms of recommended data and guidelines. In this article we describe the fundamentals and achievements of the project together with the characteristics of some databases developed in national nuclear waste disposal programs that have been influenced by the NEA TDB. We also give some insights on how this work could be seen as an approach to be used in broader areas of environmental interest.

  18. Geology of magma systems: background and review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterfreund, A.R.

    1981-03-01

    A review of basic concepts and current models of igneous geology is presented. Emphasis is centered on studies of magma generation, ascent, emplacement, evolution, and surface or near-surface activity. An indexed reference list is also provided to facilitate future investigations.

  19. Use of One-On Analysis to Evaluate Total System Performance of the Proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.J. Saulnier, Jr.; K.P. Lee; S. Mehta; S.D. Sevougian; D. Kalinich; J.A. McNeish

    2002-09-12

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is currently evaluating the future performance of the proposed U.S. high-level nuclear waste repository. Using the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) model, a stylized analysis was conducted to evaluate the relative importance of natural and engineered barriers to movement of radionuclides from the proposed repository. These stylized ''one-on'' analyses consist of sequentially adding features, components, and processes, associated with the natural and engineered barriers, incorporated within the TSPA model and evaluating the effect of these elements on repository performance, as measured by the total mean annual dose to a reasonably maximally exposed individual. The analyses are ''stylized'' in the sense that they are performed to gain insight only. They are not meant to represent a real physical system in most cases, and in some cases allow the TSPA model to simulate results using parameter ranges outside the normal bounds of the TSPA model. In particular, the analyses provide insight into the relative contributions of repository features and processes in a way that is not possible using the full TSPA performance-assessment model. For example, in the nominal scenario of the TSPA model, the contribution of the natural system is masked by the contribution of the engineered system.

  20. Repository seals requirements study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-03

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, managed by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) is conducting investigations to support the Viability Assessment and the License Application for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The sealing subsystem is part of the Yucca Mountain Waste Isolation System. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is currently evaluating the role of the sealing subsystem (shaft, ramp and exploratory borehole seals) in achieving the overall performance objectives for the Waste Isolation System. This report documents the results of those evaluations. This report presents the results of a repository sealing requirements study. Sealing is defined as the permanent closure of the shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes. Sealing includes those components that would reduce potential inflows above the repository, or that would divert flow near the repository horizon to allow vertical infiltration to below the repository. Sealing of such features as emplacement drifts was not done in this study because the current capability to calculate fracture flow into the drifts is not sufficiently mature. The objective of the study is to provide water or air flow performance based requirements for shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes located near the repository. Recommendations, as appropriate, are provided for developing plans, seals component testing, and other studies relating to sealing.

  1. Characterisation and modelling of mixing processes in groundwaters of a potential geological repository for nuclear wastes in crystalline rocks of Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Javier B; Gimeno, María J; Auqué, Luis F; Acero, Patricia

    2014-01-15

    This paper presents the mixing modelling results for the hydrogeochemical characterisation of groundwaters in the Laxemar area (Sweden). This area is one of the two sites that have been investigated, under the financial patronage of the Swedish Nuclear Waste and Management Co. (SKB), as possible candidates for hosting the proposed repository for the long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel. The classical geochemical modelling, interpreted in the light of the palaeohydrogeological history of the system, has shown that the driving process in the geochemical evolution of this groundwater system is the mixing between four end-member waters: a deep and old saline water, a glacial meltwater, an old marine water, and a meteoric water. In this paper we put the focus on mixing and its effects on the final chemical composition of the groundwaters using a comprehensive methodology that combines principal component analysis with mass balance calculations. This methodology allows us to test several combinations of end member waters and several combinations of compositional variables in order to find optimal solutions in terms of mixing proportions. We have applied this methodology to a dataset of 287 groundwater samples from the Laxemar area collected and analysed by SKB. The best model found uses four conservative elements (Cl, Br, oxygen-18 and deuterium), and computes mixing proportions with respect to three end member waters (saline, glacial and meteoric). Once the first order effect of mixing has been taken into account, water-rock interaction can be used to explain the remaining variability. In this way, the chemistry of each water sample can be obtained by using the mixing proportions for the conservative elements, only affected by mixing, or combining the mixing proportions and the chemical reactions for the non-conservative elements in the system, establishing the basis for predictive calculations.

  2. Internet-based information system of digital geological data providing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuon, Egor; Soukhanov, Mikhail; Markov, Kirill

    2015-04-01

    One of the Russian Federal аgency of mineral resources problems is to provide the geological information which was delivered during the field operation for the means of federal budget. This information should be present in the current, conditional form. Before, the leading way of presenting geological information were paper geological maps, slices, borehole diagrams reports etc. Technologies of database construction, including distributed databases, technologies of construction of distributed information-analytical systems and Internet-technologies are intensively developing nowadays. Most of geological organizations create their own information systems without any possibility of integration into other systems of the same orientation. In 2012, specialists of VNIIgeosystem together with specialists of VSEGEI started the large project - creating the system of providing digital geological materials with using modern and perspective internet-technologies. The system is based on the web-server and the set of special programs, which allows users to efficiently get rasterized and vectorised geological materials. These materials are: geological maps of scale 1:1M, geological maps of scale 1:200 000 and 1:2 500 000, the fragments of seamless geological 1:1M maps, structural zoning maps inside the seamless fragments, the legends for State geological maps 1:200 000 and 1:1 000 000, full author's set of maps and also current materials for international projects «Atlas of geological maps for Circumpolar Arctic scale 1:5 000 000» and «Atlas of Geologic maps of central Asia and adjacent areas scale 1:2 500 000». The most interesting and functional block of the system - is the block of providing structured and well-formalized geological vector materials, based on Gosgeolkart database (NGKIS), managed by Oracle and the Internet-access is supported by web-subsystem NGKIS, which is currently based on MGS-Framework platform, developed by VNIIgeosystem. One of the leading elements

  3. The Forecasting and Warning System of Geological Disasters in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YaoXuexiang; XuJing

    2004-01-01

    Geological disasters such as landslide and mudslide can be caused by many factors. Collaborations among different governmental agencies and multi-disciplines are necessary to establish a forecasting and warning system of geological disasters ( FWSGD). A FWSGD in China has been in operation since June 1 , 2003 as a joint project between the China Meteorological Administration (CMA) and the Ministry of Land and Resources ( MLR). This system has successfully shown very good social and economic benefits. The temporal-spatial distributions of China geological disasters and their causes have been analyzed in this paper. The FWSGD is described and its possible existing issues are also discussed. Authors suggest a new approach to study these disasters from interactions of the earth systems. Finally, a monitoring, forecasting, warning and preventing system for geological disasters in China is proposed.

  4. An ontology based information system for the management of institutional repository's collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsolakidis, A.; Kakoulidis, P.; Skourlas, C.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we discuss a simple methodological approach to create, and customize institutional repositories for the domain of the technological education. The use of the open source software platform of DSpace is proposed to build up the repository application and provide access to digital resources including research papers, dissertations, administrative documents, educational material, etc. Also the use of owl ontologies is proposed for indexing and accessing the various, heterogeneous items stored in the repository. Customization and operation of a platform for the selection and use of terms or parts of similar existing owl ontologies is also described. This platform could be based on the open source software Protégé that supports owl, is widely used, and also supports visualization, SPARQL etc. The combined use of the owl platform and the DSpace repository form a basis for creating customized ontologies, accommodating the semantic metadata of items and facilitating searching.

  5. Web-based system for radiological protection programs: a repository for research, consultation and information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Denise S.; Sordi, Gian Maria A.A., E-mail: gmsordi@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    In order to establish a Radiation Protection Plan or a Radiation Emergency Plan, Brazilian facilities should take into account all procedures based on national and international guidelines and recommendations. This information can be found in several documents published by different organizations over the past decades: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN). Therefore, this project aims the informatization of the radiological protection programs in a single system in order to offer unified programs and inter-related information in Portuguese, providing Brazilian facilities a complete repository for research, consultation and information, combining computer technology and radiological protection in order to enhance the best benefits from information technology. This research work includes programs about: (1) Monitoring of Workplace (Monitoring for External Radiation, Monitoring for Surface Contamination, Monitoring for Air Contamination) and (2) Individual Monitoring (Monitoring of External Exposure and Monitoring of Internal Exposure, Monitoring for Skin and Clothing). WEB platform tools and functionalities were developed according to target public needs, regarding new possibilities of media, mobile access, and information sharing. The servers processing power added to the technology of relational databases allow to integrate information from different sources, enabling complex queries with reduced response time. Moreover, taking into account this is a pioneer project with the prospect of long-term use, the challenge involves the combination of multiple computer technologies that allows a robust, effective and flexible system, which can be easily adapted to future technological innovations. (author)

  6. Experimental methodology to study radionuclide sorption and migration in geological formations and engineered barriers of waste repositories; Metodologia experimental para estudios de sorcion y migracion de radionucleidos en formaciones geologicas y barreras de almacenamientos de residuos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojo Sanz, H.

    2010-07-01

    In Spain, the waste management options include either the possibility of a final storage in a deep geological repository (DGR) or the centralized temporal surface disposal (CTS). DGRs are based in a multi-barrier concept with the geological barrier and including the vitrified waste, the metal containers and engineered barriers such as compacted bentonite and cement-based materials. On the other hand, CTS mainly considers concrete and cement to confine the metal canisters containing the waste. Radionuclide migration will mainly take place by the existence of chemical concentration gradients being thus diffusion the main transport mechanism or by the existence of hydraulic gradients due to the existence of water-conductive fractures. Radionuclide sorption/retention on the materials composing the natural and engineered barriers is the fundamental process controlling contaminant migration. The evaluation of sorption parameters and the understanding of the different mechanisms leading to radionuclide retention are very important issues. The study of diffusion processes is very relevant as well. This paper describes the main experimental methodologies applied to analyse radionuclide transport in the different barriers of radioactive repositories. Particularly we focused on obtaining of retention parameters as distribution coefficients, kd, or retardation factors, Rf, and diffusion coefficients of radionuclides. (Author) 6 refs.

  7. Development of an Intelligent Monitoring System for Geological Carbon Sequestration (GCS) Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, A. Y.; Jeong, H.; Xu, W.; Hovorka, S. D.; Zhu, T.; Templeton, T.; Arctur, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    To provide stakeholders timely evidence that GCS repositories are operating safely and efficiently requires integrated monitoring to assess the performance of the storage reservoir as the CO2 plume moves within it. As a result, GCS projects can be data intensive, as a result of proliferation of digital instrumentation and smart-sensing technologies. GCS projects are also resource intensive, often requiring multidisciplinary teams performing different monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) tasks throughout the lifecycle of a project to ensure secure containment of injected CO2. How to correlate anomaly detected by a certain sensor to events observed by other devices to verify leakage incidents? How to optimally allocate resources for task-oriented monitoring if reservoir integrity is in question? These are issues that warrant further investigation before real integration can take place. In this work, we are building a web-based, data integration, assimilation, and learning framework for geologic carbon sequestration projects (DIAL-GCS). DIAL-GCS will be an intelligent monitoring system (IMS) for automating GCS closed-loop management by leveraging recent developments in high-throughput database, complex event processing, data assimilation, and machine learning technologies. Results will be demonstrated using realistic data and model derived from a GCS site.

  8. Towards Interoperable Preservation Repositories: TIPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Caplan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Towards Interoperable Preservation Repositories (TIPR is a project funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services to create and test a Repository eXchange Package (RXP. The package will make it possible to transfer complex digital objects between dissimilar preservation repositories.  For reasons of redundancy, succession planning and software migration, repositories must be able to exchange copies of archival information packages with each other. Every different repository application, however, describes and structures its archival packages differently. Therefore each system produces dissemination packages that are rarely understandable or usable as submission packages by other repositories. The RXP is an answer to that mismatch. Other solutions for transferring packages between repositories focus either on transfers between repositories of the same type, such as DSpace-to-DSpace transfers, or on processes that rely on central translation services.  Rather than build translators between many dissimilar repository types, the TIPR project has defined a standards-based package of metadata files that can act as an intermediary information package, the RXP, a lingua franca all repositories can read and write.

  9. Characterisation and modelling of mixing processes in groundwaters of a potential geological repository for nuclear wastes in crystalline rocks of Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez, Javier B., E-mail: jgomez@unizar.es; Gimeno, María J., E-mail: mjgimeno@unizar.es; Auqué, Luis F., E-mail: lauque@unizar.es; Acero, Patricia, E-mail: patriace@unizar.es

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the mixing modelling results for the hydrogeochemical characterisation of groundwaters in the Laxemar area (Sweden). This area is one of the two sites that have been investigated, under the financial patronage of the Swedish Nuclear Waste and Management Co. (SKB), as possible candidates for hosting the proposed repository for the long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel. The classical geochemical modelling, interpreted in the light of the palaeohydrogeological history of the system, has shown that the driving process in the geochemical evolution of this groundwater system is the mixing between four end-member waters: a deep and old saline water, a glacial meltwater, an old marine water, and a meteoric water. In this paper we put the focus on mixing and its effects on the final chemical composition of the groundwaters using a comprehensive methodology that combines principal component analysis with mass balance calculations. This methodology allows us to test several combinations of end member waters and several combinations of compositional variables in order to find optimal solutions in terms of mixing proportions. We have applied this methodology to a dataset of 287 groundwater samples from the Laxemar area collected and analysed by SKB. The best model found uses four conservative elements (Cl, Br, oxygen-18 and deuterium), and computes mixing proportions with respect to three end member waters (saline, glacial and meteoric). Once the first order effect of mixing has been taken into account, water–rock interaction can be used to explain the remaining variability. In this way, the chemistry of each water sample can be obtained by using the mixing proportions for the conservative elements, only affected by mixing, or combining the mixing proportions and the chemical reactions for the non-conservative elements in the system, establishing the basis for predictive calculations. - Highlights: • Laxemar (Sweden) groundwater is the combined result

  10. 3D Geological Model for "LUSI" - a Deep Geothermal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Reza; Jansen, Gunnar; Mazzini, Adriano; Galvan, Boris; Miller, Stephen A.

    2016-04-01

    Geothermal applications require the correct simulation of flow and heat transport processes in porous media, and many of these media, like deep volcanic hydrothermal systems, host a certain degree of fracturing. This work aims to understand the heat and fluid transport within a new-born sedimentary hosted geothermal system, termed Lusi, that began erupting in 2006 in East Java, Indonesia. Our goal is to develop conceptual and numerical models capable of simulating multiphase flow within large-scale fractured reservoirs such as the Lusi region, with fractures of arbitrary size, orientation and shape. Additionally, these models can also address a number of other applications, including Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), CO2 sequestration (Carbon Capture and Storage CCS), and nuclear waste isolation. Fractured systems are ubiquitous, with a wide-range of lengths and scales, making difficult the development of a general model that can easily handle this complexity. We are developing a flexible continuum approach with an efficient, accurate numerical simulator based on an appropriate 3D geological model representing the structure of the deep geothermal reservoir. Using previous studies, borehole information and seismic data obtained in the framework of the Lusi Lab project (ERC grant n°308126), we present here the first 3D geological model of Lusi. This model is calculated using implicit 3D potential field or multi-potential fields, depending on the geological context and complexity. This method is based on geological pile containing the geological history of the area and relationship between geological bodies allowing automatic computation of intersections and volume reconstruction. Based on the 3D geological model, we developed a new mesh algorithm to create hexahedral octree meshes to transfer the structural geological information for 3D numerical simulations to quantify Thermal-Hydraulic-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) physical processes.

  11. Trust in Digital Repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Yakel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ISO 16363:2012, Space Data and Information Transfer Systems - Audit and Certification of Trustworthy Digital Repositories (ISO TRAC, outlines actions a repository can take to be considered trustworthy, but research examining whether the repository’s designated community of users associates such actions with trustworthiness has been limited. Drawing from this ISO document and the management and information systems literatures, this paper discusses findings from interviews with 66 archaeologists and quantitative social scientists. We found similarities and differences across the disciplines and among the social scientists. Both disciplinary communities associated trust with a repository’s transparency. However, archaeologists mentioned guarantees of preservation and sustainability more frequently than the social scientists, who talked about institutional reputation. Repository processes were also linked to trust, with archaeologists more frequently citing metadata issues and social scientists discussing data selection and cleaning processes. Among the social scientists, novices mentioned the influence of colleagues on their trust in repositories almost twice as much as the experts. We discuss the implications our findings have for identifying trustworthy repositories and how they extend the models presented in the management and information systems literatures.

  12. Studies relating to human intrusion into a repository. Report pertaining to work package 11. Preliminary safety case of the Gorleben site (VSG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beuth, Thomas; Buhmann, Dieter; Fischer-Appelt, Klaus; Moenig, Joerg; Ruebel, Andre; Wolf, Jens [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Koeln (Germany); Bollingerfehr, Wilhelm; Filbert, Wolfgang [DBE Technology GmbH, Peine (Germany); Charlier, Frank [international nuclear safety engineering gmbh (nse), Aachen (Germany); Baltes, Bruno

    2014-10-15

    The question of the long-term safety of a repository system is inseparably linked with the intensive technical examination of the possible future evolution of the site and the repository system e. g. as a result of climatic, geologic, waste-related and repository-related processes. Here, the possible evolutions to be considered are those that have the potential to have a negative impact on the intended, furthest-possible, immediate, and lasting isolation of the radioactive waste in a defined area around the underground workings of the repository mine in salt rock, which is referred to as the containment-providing rock zone (CPRZ).

  13. The role of natural analogs in the repository licensing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, W.M. [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The concept of a permanent geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste (NLW) is implicitly based on analogy to natural systems that have been stable for millions or billions of years. The time of radioactive and chemical toxicity of HLW exceeds the duration of human civilization, and it is impossible to demonstrate the accuracy of predictions of the behavior of engineered or social systems over such long periods.

  14. Earth System Stability Through Geologic Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, D.; Bowring, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Five times in the past 500 million years, mass extinctions haveresulted in the loss of greater than three-fourths of living species.Each of these events is associated with significant environmentalchange recorded in the carbon-isotopic composition of sedimentaryrocks. There are also many such environmental events in the geologicrecord that are not associated with mass extinctions. What makes themdifferent? Two factors appear important: the size of theenvironmental perturbation, and the time scale over which it occurs.We show that the natural perturbations of Earth's carbon cycle during thepast 500 million years exhibit a characteristic rate of change overtwo orders of magnitude in time scale. This characteristic rate isconsistent with the maximum rate that limits quasistatic (i.e., nearsteady-state) evolution of the carbon cycle. We identify this rate withmarginal stability, and show that mass extinctions occur on the fast,unstable side of the stability boundary. These results suggest thatthe great extinction events of the geologic past, and potentially a"sixth extinction" associated with modern environmental change, arecharacterized by common mechanisms of instability.

  15. A web-based 3D geological information visualization system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Renbo; Jiang, Nan

    2013-03-01

    Construction of 3D geological visualization system has attracted much more concern in GIS, computer modeling, simulation and visualization fields. It not only can effectively help geological interpretation and analysis work, but also can it can help leveling up geosciences professional education. In this paper, an applet-based method was introduced for developing a web-based 3D geological information visualization system. The main aims of this paper are to explore a rapid and low-cost development method for constructing a web-based 3D geological system. First, the borehole data stored in Excel spreadsheets was extracted and then stored in SQLSERVER database of a web server. Second, the JDBC data access component was utilized for providing the capability of access the database. Third, the user interface was implemented with applet component embedded in JSP page and the 3D viewing and querying functions were implemented with PickCanvas of Java3D. Last, the borehole data acquired from geological survey were used for test the system, and the test results has shown that related methods of this paper have a certain application values.

  16. Total System Performance Assessment, 1993: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository, B00000000-01717-2200-00099, Rev. 01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, R.W.; Dale, T.F.; McNeish, J.A. [INTERA, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Total System Performance Assessments are an important component in the evaluation of the suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a potential site for a mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in the United States. The Total System Performance Assessments are conducted iteratively during the site characterization to identify issues which should be addressed by the characterization and design activities as well as providing input to regulatory/licensing and programmatic decisions. During fiscal years 1991 and 1992, the first iteration of Total System Performance Assessment (hereafter referred to as TSPA 1991) was completed by Sandia National Laboratories and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Beginning in fiscal year 1993, the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor was assigned the responsibility to plan, coordinate, and contribute to the second iteration of Total System Performance Assessment (hereafter referred to as TSPA 1993). This document presents the objectives, approach, assumptions, input, results, conclusions, and recommendations associated with the Management and Operating Contractor contribution to TSPA 1993. A parallel effort was conducted by Sandia National Laboratories and is reported in Wilson et al. (1994, in press).

  17. Designing Learning Object Repositories as Systems for Managing Educational Communities Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Demetrios G.; Zervas, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    Over the past years, a number of international initiatives that recognize the importance of sharing and reusing digital educational resources among educational communities through the use of Learning Object Repositories (LORs) have emerged. Typically, these initiatives focus on collecting digital educational resources that are offered by their…

  18. Schematic designs for penetration seals for a repository in the Paradox Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsall, P.C.; Meyer, D.; Case, J.B.; Coons, W.E.

    1985-12-01

    The isolation of radioactive wastes in geologic repositories requires that human-made penetrations such as shafts, tunnels, or boreholes are adequately sealed. This report describes schematic seal designs for a repository in bedded salt referenced to the stratigraphy of the Paradox Basin. The designs are presented for extensive peer review and will be updated as conceptual designs if the Paraodx Basin is selected as a candidate repository site. The principal components used in the shaft seal system are concrete bulkheads interspersed with highly compacted bentonite-rich earth fill. In the repository-level tunnels and rooms, the principal material used in the seal system is crushed salt obtained from excavating the repository. It is anticipated that crushed salt will consolidate in response to closure of the repository rooms, to the degree that mechanical and hydrologic properties will eventually match those of undisturbed, intact salt. For Paradox Basin Cycle 6 salt, analyses indictate that this process will require approximately 300 years for a seal located at the base of one of the repository shafts (where there is little increase in temperature due to waste emplacement) and approximately 140 years for a seal located in a main passageway within the repository. These analyses are based on uncertain laboratory data regarding intact salt creep rates and crushed salt consolidation characteristics, and must be regarded as preliminary.

  19. Schematic designs for penetration seals for a repository in the Permian Basin. [Deaf Smith County, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsall, P.C.; Case, J.B.; Coons, W.E.; Franzone, J.G.; Meyer, D.

    1985-12-01

    The isolation of radioactive wastes in geologic repositories requires that human-made penetrations such as shafts, tunnels, or boreholes are adequately sealed. This report describes schematic seal designs for a repository in bedded salt referenced to the stratigraphy of the Permian Basin. The designs are presented for extensive peer review and will be updated as conceptual designs if the Permian Basin is selected as a candidate repository site. The principal material used in the seal system in the repository-level rooms and tunnels is crushed salt obtained from excavating the repository. It is anticipated that crushed salt will consolidate in response to closure of the repository rooms, to the degree that mechanical and hydrologic properties will eventually match those of undisturbed, intact salt. For Permian Basin Unit 4 salt, analyses indicate that this process will require approximately 700 years for a seal located at the base of one of the repository shafts (where there is little increase in temperature due to waste emplacement) and approximately 200 years for a seal located in a main passageway within the repository. These analyses are based on uncertain laboratory data regarding intact salt creep rates and crushed salt consolidation characteristics, and must be regarded as preliminary. Bulkheads composed of concrete, as well as bentonite-rich earth fill, are also included in the seal system as components which will have low permeability during the period required for salt consolidation.

  20. Integrated web-based viewing and secure remote access to a clinical data repository and diverse clinical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, R G; Saperia, D; Dulbandzhyan, R; Shabot, M M; Polaschek, J X; Jones, D T

    2001-01-01

    The advent of the World-Wide-Web protocols and client-server technology has made it easy to build low-cost, user-friendly, platform-independent graphical user interfaces to health information systems and to integrate the presentation of data from multiple systems. The authors describe a Web interface for a clinical data repository (CDR) that was moved from concept to production status in less than six months using a rapid prototyping approach, multi-disciplinary development team, and off-the-shelf hardware and software. The system has since been expanded to provide an integrated display of clinical data from nearly 20 disparate information systems.

  1. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. A conceptual simulation model for release scenario analysis of a hypothetical site in Columbia Plateau Basalts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stottlemyre, J.A.; Petrie, G.M.; Benson, G.L.; Zellmer, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    This report is a status report for an evolving methodology for release scenario development for underground nuclear waste repositories. As such, it is intended for use as a reference point and a preliminary description of an evolving geoscience methodology. When completed this methodology will be used as a tool in developing disruptive release scenarios for analyzing the long-term safety of geological nuclear waste repositories. While a basalt environment is used as an example, this report is not intended to reflect an actual site safety assessment for a repository in a media. It is rather intended to present a methodology system framework and to provide discussions of the geological phenomena and parameters that must be addressed in order to develop a methodology for potential release scenarios. It is also important to note that the phenomena, their interrelationships, and their relative importance along with the overall current structure of the model will change as new geological information is gathered through additional peer review, geotechnical input, site specific field work, and related research efforts.

  2. New Rapid Evaluation for Long-Term Behavior in Deep Geological Repository by Geotechnical Centrifuge—Part 2: Numerical Simulation of Model Tests in Isothermal Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Masataka; Nishimoto, Soshi; Okada, Tetsuji

    2017-01-01

    In high-level radioactive waste disposal repositories, there are long-term complex thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical (T-H-M) phenomena that involve the generation of heat from the waste, the infiltration of ground water, and swelling of the bentonite buffer. The ability to model such coupled phenomena is of particular importance to the repository design and assessments of its safety. We have developed a T-H-M-coupled analysis program that evaluates the long-term behavior around the repository (called "near-field"). We have also conducted centrifugal model tests that model the long-term T-H-M-coupled behavior in the near-field. In this study, we conduct H-M-coupled numerical simulations of the centrifugal near-field model tests. We compare numerical results with each other and with results obtained from the centrifugal model tests. From the comparison, we deduce that: (1) in the numerical simulation, water infiltration in the rock mass was in agreement with the experimental observation. (2) The constant-stress boundary condition in the centrifugal model tests may cause a larger expansion of the rock mass than in the in situ condition, but the mechanical boundary condition did not affect the buffer behavior in the deposition hole. (3) The numerical simulation broadly reproduced the measured bentonite pressure and the overpack displacement, but did not reproduce the decreasing trend of the bentonite pressure after 100 equivalent years. This indicates the effect of the time-dependent characteristics of the surrounding rock mass. Further investigations are needed to determine the effect of initial heterogeneity in the deposition hole and the time-dependent behavior of the surrounding rock mass.

  3. Illitization within bentonite engineered barrier system in clay repositories for nuclear waste and its effect on the swelling stress: a coupled THMC modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, L.; Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Liu, H. H.

    2014-12-01

    Geological repositories for disposal of high-level nuclear waste generally rely on a multi-barrier system to isolate radioactive waste from the biosphere. An engineered barrier system (EBS), which comprises in many design concepts a bentonite backfill, is widely used. Clay formations have been considered as a host rock throughout the world. Illitization, the transformation of smectite to illite, could compromise some beneficiary features of EBS bentonite and clay host rock such as sorption and swelling capacity. It is the major determining factor to establish the maximum design temperature of the repositories because it is believed that illitization could be greatly enhanced at temperatures higher than 100 oC. However, existing experimental and modeling studies on the occurrence of illitization and related performance impacts are not conclusive, in part because the relevant couplings between the thermal, hydrological, chemical, and mechanical (THMC) processes have not been fully represented in the models. Here we present a fully coupled THMC simulation study of a generic nuclear waste repository in a clay formation with a bentonite-backfilled EBS. Two scenarios were simulated for comparison: a case in which the temperature in the bentonite near the waste canister can reach about 200 oC and a case in which the temperature in the bentonite near the waste canister peaks at about 100 oC. The model simulations demonstrate that illitization is in general more significant under higher temperature. However, the quantity of illitization is affected by many chemical factors and therefore varies a great deal. The most important chemical factors are the concentration of K in the pore water as well as the abundance and dissolution rate of K-feldspar. For the particular case and bentonite properties studied, the reduction in swelling stress as a result of chemical changes vary from 2% up to 70% depending on chemical and temperature conditions, and key mechanical parameters. The

  4. Investigations of natural groundwater hazards at the proposed Yucca Mountain high level nuclear waste repository. Part A: Geology at Yucca Mountain. Part B: Modeling of hydro-tectonic phenomena relevant to Yucca Mountain. Annual report - Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymanski, J.S.; Schluter, C.M.; Livingston, D.E. [and others

    1993-05-01

    This document is an annual report describing investigations of natural groundwater hazards at the proposed Yucca Mountain, Nevada High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository.This document describes research studies of the origin of near surface calcite/silica deposits at Yucca Mountain. The origin of these deposits is controversial and the authors have extended and strengthened the basis of their arguments for epigenetic, metasomatic alteration of the tuffs at Yucca Mountain. This report includes stratigraphic, mineralogical, and geochronological information along with geochemical data to support the conclusions described by Livingston and Szymanski, and others. As part of their first annual report, they take this opportunity to clarify the technical basis of their concerns and summarize the critical geological field evidence and related information. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  5. Designing and implementing a geologic information system using a spatiotemporal ontology model for a geologic map of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jaehong; Nam, Kwang Woo; Ryu, Keun Ho

    2012-11-01

    A geologic information system was utilized for geologic mapping in Korea using a spatiotemporal ontology model. Five steps were required to make the GIS representation of the geologic map information. The first step was to limit the geologic mapping to Korean area. The second step was to extract the rock units with spatial objects from the geologic map and the geologic time units with temporal objects. The third step was to standardize the geologic terms in Korean and English for both the spatial and temporal objects. The fourth step was to conceptualize the classified objects in the geologic map units and the formation of guidelines for the specification of a spatiotemporal ontology model. Finally, we constructed a spatiotemporal retrieval system and an ontology system related to the geologic map of Korea, which were applied to the spatiotemporal ontology model. The spatiotemporal ontology model was defined as a sophisticated model that provides for the evolution from a data base to a knowledge base. This ontology model can be conceptualized as a well-defined set of terms used for expressing spatial objects in rock units and temporal objects in geologic time units, as well as a system of contents and structures. In addition, it includes symbology units such as color and pattern symbols mapped one-to-one with the spatiotemporal concepts. The existing information retrieval services provide information that is limited to the user's knowledge, whereas our geologic ontology system provides a broad range of information in graphical form, including locations and interrelationships. In this way, the information can be upgraded to the level of knowledge. A geologic term tree was designed, based on the existing classification schemes, with the goal of creating an accessible internet source.

  6. Comparison of ICRP2 and ICRP30 for estimating the dose and adverse health effects from potential radionuclide releases from a geologic waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Runkle, G.E.; Soldat, J.K.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of the calculated risk of adverse health effects from the radionuclides considered in the inventory of a high-level waste repository using the ICRP2 and ICRP30 internal dosimetry models. A CRPC (cancer risk per curie) index was calculated to compare the two models. The CRPC indices for the ICRP30 model are approximately 2 to 20 times higher than the ICRP2 indices for most radionuclides for ingestion intakes. However, the /sup 237/Np index is approximately 200 times greater for the ICRP30 model and the /sup 228/Ra and /sup 226/Ra indices are approximately 30 to 90 times greater for the ICRP2 model. Generally, there is closer agreement of the CRPC indices for the inhalation intakes. A scenario that considers a U-tube effect and withdrawal of water from wells downdip from the repository was analyzed. This analysis, based on a hypothetical waste disposal site, considered groundwater transport and environmental transport with subsequent uptake by the human via ingestion and inhalation. The ICRP30 risks are higher by approximately 20 at 10,000 years post closure for the ingestion pathway. However, the ICRP2 risks are higher by factors of approximately 2 to 10 at times greater than 50,000 years. Differences in the mathematical modeling assumptions, gut uptakes and other metabolic parameters between the two models account for most of the variability in the risk estimates.

  7. An update of the state-of-the-art report on the corrosion of copper under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Fraser (Integrity Corrosion Consulting Limited (Canada)); Lilja, Christina (Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (Sweden)); Pedersen, Karsten (Microbial Analytics Sweden AB (Sweden)); Pitkaenen, Petteri; Vaehaenen, Marjut (Posiva Oy (Finland))

    2010-12-15

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 30 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear waste repository located in the Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long-term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature. Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical and microbiological conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion during the operational phase and in the bentonite prior to saturation of the buffer by groundwater, general and localised corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. This report is an updated version of that originally published in 2001/2002. The original material has been supplemented by information from studies carried out over the last decade. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid

  8. An update of the state-of-the-art report on the corrosion of copper under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, F. [Integrity Corrosion Consulting Limited (Canada); Lilja, C. [Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Pedersen, K. [Microbial Analytics Sweden AB, Molnlycke (Sweden); Pitkaenen, P.; Vaehaenen, M.

    2012-07-15

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 30 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear waste repository located in the Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long-term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature. Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical and microbiological conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion during the operational phase and in the bentonite prior to saturation of the buffer by groundwater, general and localised corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. This report is an updated version of that originally published in 2001/2002. The original material has been supplemented by information from studies carried out over the last decade. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid. (orig.)

  9. Summary of four release consequence analyses for hypothetical nuclear waste repositories in salt and granite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, C.R.; Bond, F.W.

    1980-12-01

    Release consequence methology developed under the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) program has now been applied to four hypothetical repository sites. This paper summarizes the results of these four studies in order to demonstrate that the far-field methodology developed under the AEGIS program offers a practical approach to the post-closure safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories sited in deep continental geologic formations. The four studies are briefly described and compared according to the following general categories: physical description of the repository (size, inventory, emplacement depth); geologic and hydrologic description of the site and the conceptual hydrologic model for the site; description of release scenario; hydrologic model implementation and results; engineered barriers and leach rate modeling; transport model implementation and results; and dose model implementation and results. These studies indicate the following: numerical modeling is a practical approach to post-closure safety assessment analysis for nuclear waste repositories; near-field modeling capability needs improvement to permit assessment of the consequences of human intrusion and pumping well scenarios; engineered barrier systems can be useful in mitigating consequences for postulated release scenarios that short-circuit the geohydrologic system; geohydrologic systems separating a repository from the natural biosphere discharge sites act to mitigate the consequences of postulated breaches in containment; and engineered barriers of types other than the containment or absorptive type may be useful.

  10. A computer-based registration system for geological collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germeraad, J.H.; Freudenthal, M.; Boogaard, van den M.; Arps, C.E.S.

    1972-01-01

    The new computer-based registration system, a project of the National Museum of Geology and Mineralogy in the Netherlands, will considerably increase the accessibility of the Museum collection. This greater access is realized by computerisation of the data in great detail, so that an almost unlimite

  11. Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain. Volume 3: Total System Performance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-12-01

    This volume reports the development of TSPA for the VA. This first section defines the general process involved in developing any TSPA, it describes the overall TSPA process as implemented by programs in the US and elsewhere in the world, and discusses the acceptability of TSPA as a process or tool for analyzing a nuclear waste repository system. Section 2 discusses the more specific use of the TSPA process for the TSPA-VA for Yucca Mountain, including goals, approach, and methods. It also includes a very brief synopsis of TSPA-VA results. Section 3 briefly discusses each of the component models that comprise the TSPA-VA. Each TSPA component model represents a discrete set of processes. The TSPA-VA components are: unsaturated zone flow, thermal hydrology, near- field geochemical environment, waste package degradation, waste form alteration and mobilization, unsaturated zone transport, saturated zone flow and transport, and biosphere. For each of these components, this section introduces the conceptualization of each individual process, describes the data sources, and discusses model parameter development and computer methods used to simulate each component. Section 4 explains the mechanics of how the individual TSPA components were combined into a ''base case'' and then provides the ''expected value'' results of a deterministic base case analysis. Section 4 also contains a description of the probabilistic analyses and results that help determine the relative importance of the various TSPA components and the data used to describe the components. Section 5 addresses sensitivity studies run for each of the TSPA components to understand how uncertainty in various parameters within a component change the TSPA results. Section 6 presents the findings of the sensitivity studies run on the various components in Section 5, and prioritizes the findings of the entire set of uncertainty and sensitivity studies of the components relative

  12. ETD Management and Publishing in the ProQuest System and the University Repository: A Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail P. Clement

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION This study compares the two most popular ETD management and publishing systems used in the American higher education community today: the commercial ProQuest Dissertation Publishing system and the university repository. METHODS Characteristics of these systems are identified and categorized in order to determine the features, functions, and policies common to both, and those that uniquely characterize one or the other system. Performing such a head-to-head comparison provides valuable information and insights to decision makers responsible for managing or overhauling their university’s ETD program. RESULTS Comparison of characteristics shows the ProQuest system and the university repository both provide functional solutions for submitting, storing, disseminating, and archive ETDs using digital technology. Yet each system also has unique characteristics that distinguish it from the other. DISCUSSION & CONCLUSION The authors conclude that there is no single ‘best’ system for ETD management overall. Rather, it is up to decision makers at each institution to choose an approach that best fits their university’s values, goals and needs. Finally, the authors point out the need for a single portal for ETDs that allows for search and discovery of these unique works of scholarship wherever the full text resides. Future investigation into possible solutions for such an ETD portal would be a boon not only to universities and ETD authors, but to the broader community of researchers, students, professionals and interested citizenry who could benefit from easier access to this this growing corpus of knowledge.

  13. Distributed Web Service Repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Nawrocki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing availability and popularity of computer systems has resulted in a demand for new, language- and platform-independent ways of data exchange. That demand has in turn led to a significant growth in the importance of systems based on Web services. Alongside the growing number of systems accessible via Web services came the need for specialized data repositories that could offer effective means of searching of available services. The development of mobile systems and wireless data transmission technologies has allowed the use of distributed devices and computer systems on a greater scale. The accelerating growth of distributed systems might be a good reason to consider the development of distributed Web service repositories with built-in mechanisms for data migration and synchronization.

  14. The JABE project: geological studies with a backpack drilling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jago, Alban; van Vynckt, Delphine; de Crombrugghe, Guerric; Denies, Jonathan; Le Maire, Victor; Reydams, Marc

    Besides those geological surveys, we will also study how this drilling system could be used to fix some installations on the ground. As part of the JUMP mission we are also developing a cosmic ray detector and a radio telescope. Those experiments have to be securely fixed and this is what we will try to do using the backpack drilling system and EVA's suits. We shall report on the science and technical results, and implications for Earth-Mars compar-ative studies.

  15. CRIS and Institutional Repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Asserson

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available CRIS (Current Research Information Systems provide researchers, research managers, innovators, and others with a view over the research activity of a domain. IRs (institutional repositories provide a mechanism for an organisation to showcase through OA (open access its intellectual property. Increasingly, organizations are mandating that their employed researchers deposit peer-reviewed published material in the IR. Research funders are increasingly mandating that publications be deposited in an open access repository: some mandate a central (or subject-based repository, some an IR. In parallel, publishers are offering OA but replacing subscription-based access with author (or author institution payment for publishing. However, many OA repositories have metadata based on DC (Dublin Core which is inadequate; a CERIF (Common-European Research Information Format CRIS provides metadata describing publications with formal syntax and declared semantics thus facilitating interoperation or homogeneous access over heterogeneous sources. The formality is essential for research output metrics, which are increasingly being used to determine future funding for research organizations.

  16. The challenge of long-term participatory repository governance. Lessons learned for high level radioactive waste and spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landstroem, Catharina [East Anglia Univ., Norwich (United Kingdom). School of Environmental Sciences; Barbier, Jan-Willem [Antwerp Univ. (Belgium)

    2012-12-15

    Voluntaristic siting procedures for deep geological repositories are becoming increasingly common; they reconfigure the relationship of repositories and society in ways that have implications for the long-term governance of these facilities. This paper identifies three challenges emerging in relation to this question: principles of monitoring, repository content, and facility closure. This paper discusses them in a comparison with similar challenges being addressed in Belgian partnerships founded to facilitate the siting and design of a low- and intermediate level short lived waste repository. The empirical exploration confirms the importance of securing stakeholder engagement throughout the repository lifecycle, for which there is a need to develop knowledge about how to encourage long-term democratic governance systems.

  17. Development of an administrative record system and information repository system to support environmental cleanup at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprouse, B.S.

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of an administrative record (AR) file system for the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. This paper will focus on the background of the AR system and its implementation at the Hanford Site; the types of documents to be included in an AR file; the management system used to develop and implement the AR system; the unique characteristics of the AR system and the role of the information repositories. The objective of this session is to present the methodology used in developing an AR and information repository system so that common hurdles from various sites can be addressed and resolved similarly. Therefore unnecessary effort does not have to be put forth to resolve the same issues over and over again. The concepts described can be applied to all federal facility sites with a minimum amount of modification and revision. 9 refs.

  18. Online educational repositories for promoting agricultural knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.I. Costopoulou

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Towards promoting sustainable agriculture and economic growth, the development of the agricultural workforce and set up of innovative agricultural systems are required. Agricultural educational repositories are systems used for storing, reusing and sharing agricultural learning resources. They contribute to agricultural education at different educational levels and target groups. Thus, this paper firstly provides an overview of Institutional repositories (IRs and Open Access Archives (OAAs in Greece and agricultural repositories worldwide. Also, it describes the agricultural repositories that provide access to educational content in Greek and presents experiences from the establishment of Agricultural University of Athens’ (AUA repository.

  19. Faulty assumptions for repository requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutcliffe, W G

    1999-06-03

    Long term performance requirements for a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste are based on assumptions concerning water use and subsequent deaths from cancer due to ingesting water contaminated with radio isotopes ten thousand years in the future. This paper argues that the assumptions underlying these requirements are faulty for a number of reasons. First, in light of the inevitable technological progress, including efficient desalination of water, over the next ten thousand years, it is inconceivable that a future society would drill for water near a repository. Second, even today we would not use water without testing its purity. Third, today many types of cancer are curable, and with the rapid progress in medical technology in general, and the prevention and treatment of cancer in particular, it is improbable that cancer caused by ingesting contaminated water will be a sign&ant killer in the far future. This paper reviews the performance requirements for geological repositories and comments on the difficulties in proving compliance in the face of inherent uncertainties. The already tiny long-term risk posed by a geologic repository is presented and contrasted with contemporary every day risks. A number of examples of technological progress, including cancer treatments, are advanced. The real and significant costs resulting from the overly conservative requirements are then assessed. Examples are given of how money (and political capital) could be put to much better use to save lives today and in the future. It is concluded that although a repository represents essentially no long-term risk, monitored retrievable dry storage (above or below ground) is the current best alternative for spent fuel and high-level nuclear waste.

  20. Repository operational criteria comparative analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hageman, J.P.; Chowdhury, A.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1994-06-01

    The objective of the ``Repository Operational Criteria (ROC) Feasibility Studies`` (or ROC task) was to conduct comprehensive and integrated analyses of repository design, construction, and operations criteria in 10 CFR Part 60 regulations considering the interfaces among the components of the regulations and impacts of any potential changes to those regulations. The ROC task addresses regulatory criteria and uncertainties related to the preclosure aspects of the geologic repository. Those parts of 10 CFR Part 60 that require routine guidance or minor changes to the rule were addressed in Hageman and Chowdhury, 1992. The ROC task shows a possible need for further regulatory clarity, by major changes to the rule, related to the design bases and siting of a geologic repository operations area and radiological emergency planning in order to assure defense-in-depth. The analyses, presented in this report, resulted in the development and refinement of regulatory concepts and their supporting rationale for recommendations for potential major changes to 10 CFR Pan 0 regulations.

  1. Schematic designs for penetration seals for a reference repository in bedded salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsall, P.C.; Case, J.B.; Meyer, D.; Coons, W.E.

    1982-11-01

    The isolation of radioactive wastes in geologic repositories requires that man-made penetrations such as shafts, tunnels, or boreholes are adequately sealed. This report describes schematic seal designs for a repository in bedded salt referenced to the straitigraphy of southeastern New Mexico. The designs are presented for extensive peer review and will be updated as site-specific conceptual designs when a site for a repository in salt has been selected. The principal material used in the seal system is crushed salt obtained from excavating the repository. It is anticipated that crushed salt will consolidate as the repository rooms creep close to the degree that mechanical and hydrologic properties will eventually match those of undisturbed, intact salt. For southeastern New Mexico salt, analyses indicate that this process will require approximately 1000 years for a seal located at the base of one of the repository shafts (where there is little increase in temperature due to waste emplacement) and approximately 400 years for a seal located in an access tunnel within the repository. Bulkheads composed of contrete or salt bricks are also included in the seal system as components which will have low permeability during the period required for salt consolidation.

  2. Natural Analogues - One Way to Help Build Public Confidence in the Predicted Performance of a Mined Geologic Repository for Nuclear Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuckless, J. S.

    2002-02-26

    The general public needs to have a way to judge the predicted long-term performance of the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The applicability and reliability of mathematical models used to make this prediction are neither easily understood nor accepted by the public. Natural analogues can provide the average person with a tool to assess the predicted performance and other scientific conclusions. For example, hydrologists with the Yucca Mountain Project have predicted that most of the water moving through the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada will move through the host rock and around tunnels. Thus, seepage into tunnels is predicted to be a small percentage of available infiltration. This hypothesis can be tested experimentally and with some quantitative analogues. It can also be tested qualitatively using a variety of analogues such as (1) well-preserved Paleolithic to Neolithic paintings in caves and rock shelters, (2) biological remains preserved in caves and rock shelters, and (3) artifacts and paintings preserved in man-made underground openings. These examples can be found in materials that are generally available to the non-scientific public and can demonstrate the surprising degree of preservation of fragile and easily destroyed materials for very long periods of time within the unsaturated zone.

  3. Multiple-Code BenchMaek Simulation Stidy of Coupled THMC Processes IN the EXCAVATION DISTURBED ZONE Associated with Geological Nuclear Waste Repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Rutqvist; X. Feng; J. Hudson; L. Jing; A. Kobayashi; T. Koyama; P.Pan; H. Lee; M. Rinne; E. Sonnenthal; Y. Yamamoto

    2006-05-08

    An international, multiple-code benchmark test (BMT) study is being conducted within the international DECOVALEX project to analyze coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes in the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) around emplacement drifts of a nuclear waste repository. This BMT focuses on mechanical responses and long-term chemo-mechanical effects that may lead to changes in mechanical and hydrological properties in the EDZ. This includes time-dependent processes such as creep, and subcritical crack, or healing of fractures that might cause ''weakening'' or ''hardening'' of the rock over the long term. Five research teams are studying this BMT using a wide range of model approaches, including boundary element, finite element, and finite difference, particle mechanics, and elasto-plastic cellular automata methods. This paper describes the definition of the problem and preliminary simulation results for the initial model inception part, in which time dependent effects are not yet included.

  4. Climate considerations in long-term safety assessments for nuclear waste repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näslund, Jens-Ove; Brandefelt, Jenny; Liljedahl, Lillemor Claesson

    2013-05-01

    For a deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel planned in Sweden, the safety assessment covers up to 1 million years. Climate scenarios range from high-end global warming for the coming 100 000 years, through deep permafrost, to large ice sheets during glacial conditions. In contrast, in an existing repository for short-lived waste the activity decays to low levels within a few tens of thousands of years. The shorter assessment period, 100 000 years, requires more focus on climate development over the coming tens of thousands of years, including the earliest possibility for permafrost growth and freezing of the engineered system. The handling of climate and climate change in safety assessments must be tailor-made for each repository concept and waste type. However, due to the uncertain future climate development on these vast time scales, all safety assessments for nuclear waste repositories require a range of possible climate scenarios.

  5. Climate Considerations in Long-Term Safety Assessments for Nuclear Waste Repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naeslund, Jens-Ove; Brandefelt, Jenny; Claesson Liljedahl, Lillemor [Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB, Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: jens-ove.naslund@skb.se

    2013-05-15

    For a deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel planned in Sweden, the safety assessment covers up to 1 million years. Climate scenarios range from high-end global warming for the coming 100 000 years, through deep permafrost, to large ice sheets during glacial conditions. In contrast, in an existing repository for short-lived waste the activity decays to low levels within a few tens of thousands of years. The shorter assessment period, 100 000 years, requires more focus on climate development over the coming tens of thousands of years, including the earliest possibility for permafrost growth and freezing of the engineered system. The handling of climate and climate change in safety assessments must be tailor-made for each repository concept and waste type. However, due to the uncertain future climate development on these vast time scales, all safety assessments for nuclear waste repositories require a range of possible climate scenarios.

  6. Spatial Database Management System of China Geological Survey Extent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Jianguo; Chen Zhijun; Wang Quanming; Fang Yiping

    2003-01-01

    The spatial database management system of China geological survey extent is a social service system. Its aim is to help the government and the whole social public to expediently use the spatial database, such as querying, indexing, mapping and product outputting. The management system has been developed based on MAPGIS6. x SDK and Visual C++, considering the spatial database contents and structure and the requirements of users. This paper introduces the software structure, the data flow chart and some key techniques of software development.

  7. Iowa Geologic Sampling Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Point locations of geologic samples/files in the IGS repository. Types of samples include well cuttings, outcrop samples, cores, drillers logs, measured sections,...

  8. A preliminary total-system performance assessment for the potential repository site Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, M.L.; Barnard, R.W.; Dockerey, H.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gauthier, J.H. [Spectra Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    We present a preliminary performance assessment of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, U.S.A., as a potential site for a radioactive-waste repository. Models and results are discussed for four basic categories of processes and events: groundwater flow and aqueous transport, gas flow and gaseous transport, human intrusion, and basaltic volcanism. Calculated releases of radioactivity to the accessible environment are compared with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency requirements. The preliminary results show releases from human intrusion and volcanisms to fall well below the regulatory limits, though not all aspects of those categories have yet been considered. Calculated releases for nominal gaseous transport (of {sup 14}CO{sub 2}) are closest to the limits, indicating that models and data relating to gaseous releases may need to receive higher priority. (author) 15 figs., 33 refs.

  9. Software development for geologic information management system on open-pit production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, K.; Tian, A.; Ren, Z.; Pang, Y. [China University of Mining and Technomogy, Xuzhou (China). College of Mineral and Energy Resources

    2001-09-01

    A software, including geological data gathering and processing, deposit modelling, reserves calculating and mine map plotting, for geologic information management of open-pit production was developed. Based on the interactive technique, CAD, the object-oriented simulation, and the characteristics of geologic structures, all the geologic information databases and geologic mapping sub-systems have been established for open-pit production, planning and management. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Geological hazards: from early warning systems to public health toolkits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarasundera, Edgar; Hansell, Anna; Leibovici, Didier; Horwell, Claire J; Anand, Suchith; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2014-11-01

    Extreme geological events, such as earthquakes, are a significant global concern and sometimes their consequences can be devastating. Geographic information plays a critical role in health protection regarding hazards, and there are a range of initiatives using geographic information to communicate risk as well as to support early warning systems operated by geologists. Nevertheless we consider there to remain shortfalls in translating information on extreme geological events into health protection tools, and suggest that social scientists have an important role to play in aiding the development of a new generation of toolkits aimed at public health practitioners. This viewpoint piece reviews the state of the art in this domain and proposes potential contributions different stakeholder groups, including social scientists, could bring to the development of new toolkits.

  11. Preliminary subsurface hydrologic considerations: Columbia River Plateau Physiographic Province. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veatch, M.D.

    1980-04-01

    This report contains a discussion of the hydrologic conditions of the Columbia River Plateau physiographic province. The Columbia River Plateau is underlain by a thick basalt sequence. The Columbia River basalt sequence contains both basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds. These sedimentary interbeds, which are layers of sedimentary rock between lava flows, are the main aquifer zones in the basalt sequence. Permeable interflow zones, involving the permeable top and/or rubble bottom of a flow, are also water-transmitting zones. A number of stratigraphic units are present in the Pasco Basin, which is in the central part of the Columbia River Plateau. At a conceptual level, the stratigraphic sequence from the surface downward can be separated into four hydrostratigraphic systems. These are: (1) the unsaturated zone, (2) the unconfined aquifer, (3) the uppermost confined aquifers, and (4) the lower Yakima basalt hydrologic sequence. A conceptual layered earth model (LEM) has been developed. The LEM represents the major types of porous media (LEM units) that may be encountered at a number of places on the Columbia Plateau, and specifically in the Pasco Basin. The conceptual LEM is not representative of the actual three-dimensional hydrostratigraphic sequence and hydrologic conditions existing at any specific site within the Columbia Plateau physiographic province. However, the LEM may be useful for gaining a better understanding of how the hydrologic regime may change as a result of disruptive events that may interact with a waste repository in geologic media.

  12. The Strabo digital data system for Structural Geology and Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikoff, Basil; Newman, Julie; Walker, J. Doug; Williams, Randy; Michels, Zach; Andrews, Joseph; Bunse, Emily; Ash, Jason; Good, Jessica

    2017-04-01

    We are developing the Strabo data system for the structural geology and tectonics community. The data system will allow researchers to share primary data, apply new types of analytical procedures (e.g., statistical analysis), facilitate interaction with other geology communities, and allow new types of science to be done. The data system is based on a graph database, rather than relational database approach, to increase flexibility and allow geologically realistic relationships between observations and measurements. Development is occurring on: 1) A field-based application that runs on iOS and Android mobile devices and can function in either internet connected or disconnected environments; and 2) A desktop system that runs only in connected settings and directly addresses the back-end database. The field application also makes extensive use of images, such as photos or sketches, which can be hierarchically arranged with encapsulated field measurements/observations across all scales. The system also accepts Shapefile, GEOJSON, KML formats made in ArcGIS and QGIS, and will allow export to these formats as well. Strabo uses two main concepts to organize the data: Spots and Tags. A Spot is any observation that characterizes a specific area. Below GPS resolution, a Spot can be tied to an image (outcrop photo, thin section, etc.). Spots are related in a purely spatial manner (one spot encloses anther spot, which encloses another, etc.). Tags provide a linkage between conceptually related spots. Together, this organization works seamlessly with the workflow of most geologists. We are expanding this effort to include microstructural data, as well as to the disciplines of sedimentology and petrology.

  13. Geological Visualization System with GPU-Based Interpolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L.; Chen, K.; Lai, Y.; Chang, P.; Song, S.

    2011-12-01

    There has been a large number of research using parallel-processing GPU to accelerate the computation. In Near Surface Geology efficient interpolations are critical for proper interpretation of measured data. Additionally, an appropriate interpolation method for generating proper results depends on the factors such as the dense of the measured locations and the estimation model. Therefore, fast interpolation process is needed to efficiently find a proper interpolation algorithm for a set of collected data. However, a general CPU framework has to process each computation in a sequential manner and is not efficient enough to handle a large number of interpolation generally needed in Near Surface Geology. When carefully observing the interpolation processing, the computation for each grid point is independent from all other computation. Therefore, the GPU parallel framework should be an efficient technology to accelerate the interpolation process which is critical in Near Surface Geology. Thus in this paper we design a geological visualization system whose core includes a set of interpolation algorithms including Nearest Neighbor, Inverse Distance and Kriging. All these interpolation algorithms are implemented using both the CPU framework and GPU framework. The comparison between CPU and GPU implementation in the aspect of precision and processing speed shows that parallel computation can accelerate the interpolation process and also demonstrates the possibility of using GPU-equipped personal computer to replace the expensive workstation. Immediate update at the measurement site is the dream of geologists. In the future the parallel and remote computation ability of cloud will be explored to make the mobile computation on the measurement site possible.

  14. System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2006-04-24

    One way to reduce the effects of anthropogenic greenhousegases on climate is to inject carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrialsources into deep geological formations such as brine formations ordepleted oil or gas reservoirs. Research has and is being conducted toimprove understanding of factors affecting particular aspects ofgeological CO2 storage, such as performance, capacity, and health, safetyand environmental (HSE) issues, as well as to lower the cost of CO2capture and related processes. However, there has been less emphasis todate on system-level analyses of geological CO2 storage that considergeological, economic, and environmental issues by linking detailedrepresentations of engineering components and associated economic models.The objective of this study is to develop a system-level model forgeological CO2 storage, including CO2 capture and separation,compression, pipeline transportation to the storage site, and CO2injection. Within our system model we are incorporating detailedreservoir simulations of CO2 injection and potential leakage withassociated HSE effects. The platform of the system-level modelingisGoldSim [GoldSim, 2006]. The application of the system model is focusedon evaluating the feasibility of carbon sequestration with enhanced gasrecovery (CSEGR) in the Rio Vista region of California. The reservoirsimulations are performed using a special module of the TOUGH2 simulator,EOS7C, for multicomponent gas mixtures of methane and CO2 or methane andnitrogen. Using this approach, the economic benefits of enhanced gasrecovery can be directly weighed against the costs, risks, and benefitsof CO2 injection.

  15. Geologic characterization of Cuvette Centrale petroleum systems Congo-DRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicentelli, Maria Gabriela C.; Barbosa, Mauro; Rezende, Nelio G.A.M. [HRT Petroleum, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The Cuvette Centrale is an almost unexplored basin, which contains some petroleum system elements that indicate the presence of hydrocarbons. In this sense; this paper presents an exploratory alternative for this intracratonic basin. The interpretation of the limited gravimetric, magnetometric, geochemical and seismic available data allowed the identification of many huge structural features and also some areas with hydrocarbon potential for stratigraphic traps. The presence of several oil and gas seeps widespread around the Busira and Lokoro sub-basins indicate that at least one active petroleum system exist in the basin. Despite only four wells have been drilled in the basin, one of them presented oil shows during drilling. Geological correlations between Brazilian Paleozoic basins and Cuvette Centrale sedimentary sequences permitted to conclude that Cambro-Ordovician and Siluro-Devonian source rocks must be present and active in the Cuvette Centrale basin. The tectono-stratigraphic evolution history of the Cuvette Centrale from Neo proterozoic to Recent times shows extensional and compressional/transpressional alternating phases along the geological time. The most confident petroleum system expected in the Cuvette Centrale is characterized by the Cambrian Mamungi shale - source rock - and the Cambro-Ordovician. Upper Arenaceous Sequence - reservoirs, as observed in the MBandaka and Gilson wells and confirmed by surface geology in outcrops. Besides, other potential petroleum systems are expected to occur in the basin. One is characterized by the Neo proterozoic Itury Group source rock and reservoirs in the mature/over mature stage, the others are the Siluro-Devonian and Cretaceous source rocks and reservoirs, expected to occur with better maturity conditions only in the deeper parts of the basin. (author)

  16. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. CIRMIS data system. Volume 4. Driller's logs, stratigraphic cross section and utility routines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrichs, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    The Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program is developing and applying the methodology for assessing the far-field, long-term post-closure safety of deep geologic nuclear waste repositories. AEGIS is being performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) for the Department of Energy (DOE). One task within AEGIS is the development of methodology for analysis of the consequences (water pathway) from loss of repository containment as defined by various release scenarios. Analysis of the long-term, far-field consequences of release scenarios requires the application of numerical codes which simulate the hydrologic systems, model the transport of released radionuclides through the hydrologic systems to the biosphere, and, where applicable, assess the radiological dose to humans. The various input parameters required in the analysis are compiled in data systems. The data are organized and prepared by various input subroutines for use by the hydrologic and transport codes. The hydrologic models simulate the groundwater flow systems and provide water flow directions, rates, and velocities as inputs to the transport models. Outputs from the transport models are basically graphs of radionuclide concentration in the groundwater plotted against time. After dilution in the receiving surface-water body (e.g., lake, river, bay), these data are the input source terms for the dose models, if dose assessments are required. The dose models calculate radiation dose to individuals and populations. CIRMIS (Comprehensive Information Retrieval and Model Input Sequence) Data System is a storage and retrieval system for model input and output data, including graphical interpretation and display. This is the fourth of four volumes of the description of the CIRMIS Data System.

  17. New Rapid Evaluation for Long-Term Behavior in Deep Geological Repository by Geotechnical Centrifuge. Part 1: Test of Physical Modeling in Near Field Under Isotropic Stress-Constraint Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Soshi; Sawada, Masataka; Okada, Tetsuji

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the long-term geomechanical behavior of a geological repository for high-level radioactive waste disposal, using the centrifugal near-field model test. The model consisted of a sedimentary rock mass, bentonite buffer, and model overpack, and was enclosed within a pressure vessel. Tests were conducted with a centrifugal force field of 30 G under isotropic stress-constraint conditions with confining pressures of 5-10 MPa and injection of pore water up through a time period equivalent to about 165 years in the field. Our results showed that the measured values and the temporal changes in the displacement of the overpack, the soil pressure of the bentonite, and the strain of the rock mass were clearly dependent on the confining pressure. These data were not convergent during the test. Our data experimentally revealed that long-term behavior in the near field was changed by the geomechanical interaction between the deformation stress of the bedrock/disposal hole and the swelling behavior of the bentonite buffer.

  18. The ANSS Station Information System: A Centralized Station Metadata Repository for Populating, Managing and Distributing Seismic Station Metadata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, V. I.; Yu, E.; Acharya, P.; Jaramillo, J.; Chowdhury, F.

    2015-12-01

    Maintaining and archiving accurate site metadata is critical for seismic network operations. The Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) Station Information System (SIS) is a repository of seismic network field equipment, equipment response, and other site information. Currently, there are 187 different sensor models and 114 data-logger models in SIS. SIS has a web-based user interface that allows network operators to enter information about seismic equipment and assign response parameters to it. It allows users to log entries for sites, equipment, and data streams. Users can also track when equipment is installed, updated, and/or removed from sites. When seismic equipment configurations change for a site, SIS computes the overall gain of a data channel by combining the response parameters of the underlying hardware components. Users can then distribute this metadata in standardized formats such as FDSN StationXML or dataless SEED. One powerful advantage of SIS is that existing data in the repository can be leveraged: e.g., new instruments can be assigned response parameters from the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) Nominal Response Library (NRL), or from a similar instrument already in the inventory, thereby reducing the amount of time needed to determine parameters when new equipment (or models) are introduced into a network. SIS is also useful for managing field equipment that does not produce seismic data (eg power systems, telemetry devices or GPS receivers) and gives the network operator a comprehensive view of site field work. SIS allows users to generate field logs to document activities and inventory at sites. Thus, operators can also use SIS reporting capabilities to improve planning and maintenance of the network. Queries such as how many sensors of a certain model are installed or what pieces of equipment have active problem reports are just a few examples of the type of information that is available to SIS users.

  19. Design aspects of the Alpha Repository. I. Preliminary results of facility layout, room stability, and equipment selection efforts. Summary progress report RSI-0024

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnirk, P.F.; Grams, W.H.; Zeller, T.J.; Ellis, D.B.; Pariseau, W.G.; Fossum, A.F.; Ratigan, J.L.; Hansen, F.D.

    1975-04-14

    Results of preliminary analysis of the stability of mines in salt formations underlying Eddy and Lea Counties in New Mexico are presented. Methods and equipment for drilling canister emplacement holes in these formations were evaluated along with methods for excavating storage areas and transport of the excavated salt. Progress during the period is reported in chapters on geological and rock properties at the repository site, preliminary mine layout, basic requirements for repository usage, excavation geometries, drill selection, excavation systems, and safety requirements. (JRD)

  20. Geologic simulation model for a hypothetical site in the Columbia Plateau. [AEGIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrie, G.M.; Zellmer, J.T.; Lindberg, J.W.; Foley, M.G.

    1981-04-01

    This report describes the structure and operation of the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Geologic Simulation Model, a computer simulation model of the geology and hydrology of an area of the Columbia Plateau, Washington. The model is used to study the long-term suitability of the Columbia Plateau Basalts for the storage of nuclear waste in a mined repository. It is also a starting point for analyses of such repositories in other geologic settings. The Geologic Simulation Model will aid in formulating design disruptive sequences (i.e. those to be used for more detailed hydrologic, transport, and dose analyses) from the spectrum of hypothetical geological and hydrological developments that could result in transport of radionuclides out of a repository. Quantitative and auditable execution of this task, however, is impossible without computer simulation. The computer simulation model aids the geoscientist by generating the wide spectrum of possible future evolutionary paths of the areal geology and hydrology, identifying those that may affect the repository integrity. This allows the geoscientist to focus on potentially disruptive processes, or series of events. Eleven separate submodels are used in the simulation portion of the model: Climate, Continental Glaciation, Deformation, Geomorphic Events, Hydrology, Magmatic Events, Meteorite Impact, Sea-Level Fluctuations, Shaft-Seal Failure, Sub-Basalt Basement Faulting, and Undetected Features. Because of the modular construction of the model, each submodel can easily be replaced with an updated or modified version as new information or developments in the state of the art become available. The model simulates the geologic and hydrologic systems of a hypothetical repository site and region for a million years following repository decommissioning. The Geologic Simulation Model operates in both single-run and Monte Carlo modes.

  1. Slovac Republic repository of radioactive waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bartko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Slovac Republic Repository of Radioactive Waste (radwaste in place Mochovce presents a multi-barrier repository of the surface type designed as an ultimate storage of treated solid and fixed, low-and very low-level radwaste generated during the operation and decommissioning of the nuclear power plants, in research institutes, laboratories and hospitals in the Slovak Republic. The isolation of the radwaste and retardation of the radionuclides are provided by the barrier system of the repository. To assess the complete system and parts of one of the most important barriers – the multi-barrier ultimate shielding of the repository – the model of the ultimate shielding of the repository was designed. The monitoring results of the model “ in situ“ will be applicable for projecting the ultimate shielding of the repository.

  2. Performance assessment modeling of the proposed Genting Island repository facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imardjoko, Y.U. [Gadjah Mada Univ., Yogyakarta (Indonesia); Bullen, D.B. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Yatim, S. [National Atomic Energy Agency, Tangerang (Indonesia)

    1996-12-01

    Indonesia is about to enter the nuclear era with the construction of several nuclear power plants in the near future. Numerous issues, including disposal of high-level radioactive wastes, must be addressed to evaluate the impact of these plants on the environment. This paper reviews the Genting ocean island repository site development plan with respect to three main areas, the inventory of HLRW, the barrier systems (natural and engineered), and the physical condition of the site. The radionuclide inventory and waste form require analyses of the waste package that include selection of container materials, the type of engineered barrier and its predicted performance, and radionuclide release models. Parameters pertinent to the repository site includes information pertaining to the geology, hydrology, climatology, and water chemistry of the site. These data are important to aid in the prediction of the long-term performance of the site.

  3. Building didactic content repositories: method and tools

    OpenAIRE

    Jacek Marciniak

    2012-01-01

    The article presents the method and tools which allows to build repositories of didactic materials in SCORM using UCTS taxonomic system and Content Repository software. SCORM is a universal specification designed to create reusable materials in digital format. UCTS is a taxonomic model which allows to attribute didactic interpretations to content components. Content Repository is a web software designed to create, store and process didactic content in SCORM. The method was verified while crea...

  4. The Analytical Repository Source-Term (AREST) model: Description and documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebetrau, A.M.; Apted, M.J.; Engel, D.W.; Altenhofen, M.K.; Strachan, D.M.; Reid, C.R.; Windisch, C.F.; Erikson, R.L.; Johnson, K.I.

    1987-10-01

    The geologic repository system consists of several components, one of which is the engineered barrier system. The engineered barrier system interfaces with natural barriers that constitute the setting of the repository. A model that simulates the releases from the engineered barrier system into the natural barriers of the geosphere, called a source-term model, is an important component of any model for assessing the overall performance of the geologic repository system. The Analytical Repository Source-Term (AREST) model being developed is one such model. This report describes the current state of development of the AREST model and the code in which the model is implemented. The AREST model consists of three component models and five process models that describe the post-emplacement environment of a waste package. All of these components are combined within a probabilistic framework. The component models are a waste package containment (WPC) model that simulates the corrosion and degradation processes which eventually result in waste package containment failure; a waste package release (WPR) model that calculates the rates of radionuclide release from the failed waste package; and an engineered system release (ESR) model that controls the flow of information among all AREST components and process models and combines release output from the WPR model with failure times from the WPC model to produce estimates of total release. 167 refs., 40 figs., 12 tabs.

  5. Deep repository - Engineered barrier system. Erosion and sealing processes in tunnel backfill materials investigated in laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanden, Torbjoern; Boergesson, Lennart; Dueck, Ann; Goudarzi, Reza; Loennqvist, Margareta (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    SKB in Sweden and Posiva in Finland are developing and plan to implement similar disposal concepts for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Co-operation and joint development work between Posiva and SKB with the overall objective to develop backfill concepts and techniques for sealing and closure of the repository have been going on for several years. The investigation described in this report is intended to acquire more knowledge regarding the behavior of some of the candidate backfilling materials. Blocks made of three different materials (Friedland clay, Asha 230 or a bentonite/ballast 30/70 mixture) as well as different bentonite pellets have been examined. The backfill materials will be exposed to an environment simulating that in a tunnel, with high relative humidity and water inflow from the rock. The processes and properties investigated are: 1. Erosion properties of blocks and pellets (Friedland blocks, MX-80 pellets, Cebogel QSE pellets, Minelco and Friedland granules). 2. Displacements of blocks after emplacement in a deposition drift (Blocks of Friedland, Asha 230 and Mixture 30/70). 3. The ability of these materials to seal a leaking in-situ cast plug cement/rock but also other fractures in the rock (MX-80 pellets). 4. The self healing ability after a piping scenario (Blocks of Friedland, Asha 230 Mixture 30/70 and also MX-80 pellets). 5. Swelling and cracking of the compacted backfill blocks caused by relative humidity. The erosion properties of Friedland blocks were also investigated in Phase 2 of the joint SKBPosiva project 'Backfilling and Closure of the Deep Repository, BACLO, which included laboratory scale experiments. In this phase of the project (3) some completing tests were performed with new blocks produced for different field tests. These blocks had a lower density than intended and this has an influence on the erosion properties measured. The erosion properties of MX-80 pellets were also investigated earlier in the project but

  6. The Fermilab Lattice Information Repository

    CERN Document Server

    Ostiguy, Jean-Francois; McCusker-Whiting, Michele; Michelotti, Leo

    2005-01-01

    Fermilab is a large accelerator complex with six rings and sixteen transfer beamlines operating in various modes and configurations, subject to modifications, improvements and occasional major redesign. Over the years, it became increasingly obvious that a centralized lattice repository with the ability to track revisions would be of great value. To that end, we evaluated potentially suitable revision systems, either freely available or commercial, and decided that expecting infrequent users to become fully conversant with complex revision system software was neither realistic nor practical. In this paper, we discuss technical aspects of the recently introduced FNAL Accelerator Division's Lattice Repository, whose fully web-based interface hides the complexity of Subversion, a comprehensive open source revision system. In particular we emphasize how the architecture of Subversion was a key ingredient in the technical success of the repository's implementation.

  7. Testing geoscience data visualization systems for geological mapping and training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, J. W.; Huffman, J. N.; Forsberg, A. S.; Hurwitz, D. M.; Basilevsky, A. T.; Ivanov, M. A.; Dickson, J. L.; Senthil Kumar, P.

    2008-09-01

    Traditional methods of planetary geological mapping have relied on photographic hard copy and light-table tracing and mapping. In the last several decades this has given way to the availability and analysis of multiple digital data sets, and programs and platforms that permit the viewing and manipulation of multiple annotated layers of relevant information. This has revolutionized the ability to incorporate important new data into the planetary mapping process at all scales. Information on these developments and approaches can be obtained at http://astrogeology.usgs. gov/ Technology/. The processes is aided by Geographic Information Systems (GIS) (see http://astrogeology. usgs.gov/Technology/) and excellent analysis packages (such as ArcGIS) that permit co-registration, rapid viewing, and analysis of multiple data sets on desktop displays (see http://astrogeology.usgs.gov/Projects/ webgis/). We are currently investigating new technological developments in computer visualization and analysis in order to assess their importance and utility in planetary geological analysis and mapping. Last year we reported on the range of technologies available and on our application of these to various problems in planetary mapping. In this contribution we focus on the application of these techniques and tools to Venus geological mapping at the 1:5M quadrangle scale. In our current Venus mapping projects we have utilized and tested the various platforms to understand their capabilities and assess their usefulness in defining units, establishing stratigraphic relationships, mapping structures, reaching consensus on interpretations and producing map products. We are specifically assessing how computer visualization display qualities (e.g., level of immersion, stereoscopic vs. monoscopic viewing, field of view, large vs. small display size, etc.) influence performance on scientific analysis and geological mapping. We have been exploring four different environments: 1) conventional

  8. Collaborative repositories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Morten

    2009-01-01

    Textual and communicative competence lies at the heart of the skills of a professional linguistic mediator in general. Such skills are particularly important in specialized writing, which requires deep conceptual and contextual knowledge. One of the main objectives of the activities undertaken...... of such 'deep' knowledge within interdisciplinary and intersectoral 'knowledge clusters'. This paper presents concepts and systems for multilingual terminological and textual knowledge codification, representation, validation, management and sharing structured around the notion of genre following Bergenkotter...... & Huckin 1995; Bhatia 1997, 2004; Dudley-Evans 1997 and Swales 1990, 1994. These systems operationalize the different stages of the 'virtuous knowledge cycle' proposed by Nonaka and Takeuchi (1995) within a dynamic, multilingual specialized web-dictionary and a multilingual, genre-based corpus of medical...

  9. Hydrological and hydro-geological effects on wetlands and forest areas from the repository at Forsmark. Results from modelling with MIKE SHE; Hydrologiska och hydrogeologiska effekter paa vaatmarker och skogsomraaden av slutfoervarsanlaeggningen i Forsmark. Resultat fraan modellering med MIKE SHE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maartensson, Erik; Gustafsson, Lars-Goeran; Gustafsson, Ann-Marie; Aneljung, Maria; Sabel, Ulrika (DHI Sverige AB, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2010-06-15

    wet year. The surface-water depth in the studied wetland objects ranges from a few centimetres to half a metre. It is judged that a number of wetland objects may require water supply in order to maintain an undisturbed water level during groundwater withdrawal from the repository. According to the modelling results, the water-supply requirements are largest during spring and autumn. In one of the wetland objects, the water requirement is 3 L/s as an annual average for the type year 2006. Object-specific water balances and particle tracking calculations show that the inflow to the wetland objects mainly takes place through the Quaternary deposits. This is in accordance with the conceptual model, according to which there is a shallow groundwater flow system with many local recharge and discharge areas. The groundwater withdrawal from the repository implies that the water balance is changed for some of the studied wetland objects.

  10. Usefulness of systematic in situ gamma-ray surveys in the radiometric characterization of natural systems with poorly contrasting geological features (examples from NE of Portugal)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Pedro [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Unidade de Proteccao e Seguranca Radiologica, Estrada Nacional no10, Apartado 21, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Departamento de Geologia e CeGUL, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Edificio C6, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Mateus, Antonio [Departamento de Geologia e CeGUL, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Edificio C6, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Paiva, Isabel, E-mail: ipaiva@itn.p [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Unidade de Proteccao e Seguranca Radiologica, Estrada Nacional no10, Apartado 21, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Trindade, Romao [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Unidade de Proteccao e Seguranca Radiologica, Estrada Nacional no10, Apartado 21, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Santos, Pedro [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Unidade de Proteccao e Seguranca Radiologica, Estrada Nacional no10, Apartado 21, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Departamento de Geologia e CeGUL, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Edificio C6, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-02-15

    This paper focuses on the starting point of various studies that are being carried out in two possible locations being considered to host a hypothetical site for a repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) produced in Portugal in compliance with international requirements on the long-term safety of this kind of repository. Previous studies concerning the geology of the much larger geographical areas where these locations are included were fundamental in the choice of these locations and for the design of the survey strategy. One of the fundamental assessment studies during the site-selection is the overall radiological characterization of the locations and its relation to the geology. This paper pretends to show the adequability of using a fast and reasonably inexpensive survey technique such as in situ gamma-ray portable detectors, to access the radiometric response of the systems in study by providing the radiometric mapping of the areas. The existence of adequate radiometric maps represents a critical pre-requisite to constrain both the number and spatial distribution of samples to be collected for further analysis, sustaining as well the subsequent extrapolation of results needed to fully characterise the surveyed system. Both areas were surveyed using portable gamma-ray spectrometers with NaI(Tl) detectors. In situ gamma-ray measurements have clearly shown not only the poorly contrasting geological features, but also their differences representing: (i) a deformed/metamorphosed ophiolite complex and (ii) a monotonous meta-sedimentary sequence. The radiometric maps obtained have show heterogeneities that reflect mostly changes in rock-forming mineral assemblages, even in the presence of small variations of gamma radiation. These maps support objective criteria about the number/distribution of samples to be collected for subsequent comprehensive studies and reinforce the valuable contribution of in situ gamma spectrometry to assess, in

  11. Identification of structures, systems, and components important to safety at the potential repository at Yucca Mountain; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, D.J.; Miller, D.D. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Klamerus, L.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1991-10-01

    This study recommends which structures, systems, and components of the potential repository at Yucca Mountain are important to safety. The assessment was completed in April 1990 and uses the reference repository configuration in the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design Report and follows the methodology required at that time by DOE Procedure AP6.10-Q. Failures of repository items during the preclosure period are evaluated to determine the potential offsite radiation doses and associated probabilities. Items are important to safety if, in the event they fail to perform their intended function, an accident could result which causes a dose commitment greater than 0.5 rem to the whole body or any organ of an individual in an unrestricted area. This study recommends that these repository items include the structures that house spent fuel and high-level waste, the associated filtered ventilation exhaust systems, certain waste- handling equipment, the waste containers, the waste treatment building structure, the underground waste transporters, and other items listed in this report. This work was completed April 1990. 27 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. Natural geochemical analogues of the near field of high-level nuclear waste repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apps, J.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    United States practice has been to design high-level nuclear waste (HLW) geological repositories with waste densities sufficiently high that repository temperatures surrounding the waste will exceed 100{degrees}C and could reach 250{degrees}C. Basalt and devitrified vitroclastic tuff are among the host rocks considered for waste emplacement. Near-field repository thermal behavior and chemical alteration in such rocks is expected to be similar to that observed in many geothermal systems. Therefore, the predictive modeling required for performance assessment studies of the near field could be validated and calibrated using geothermal systems as natural analogues. Examples are given which demonstrate the need for refinement of the thermodynamic databases used in geochemical modeling of near-field natural analogues and the extent to which present models can predict conditions in geothermal fields.

  13. Extension of research data repository system to support direct compute access to biomedical datasets: enhancing Dataverse to support large datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Bill; Meyer, Peter A; Crosas, Mercè; Sliz, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Access to experimental X-ray diffraction image data is important for validation and reproduction of macromolecular models and indispensable for the development of structural biology processing methods. In response to the evolving needs of the structural biology community, we recently established a diffraction data publication system, the Structural Biology Data Grid (SBDG, data.sbgrid.org), to preserve primary experimental datasets supporting scientific publications. All datasets published through the SBDG are freely available to the research community under a public domain dedication license, with metadata compliant with the DataCite Schema (schema.datacite.org). A proof-of-concept study demonstrated community interest and utility. Publication of large datasets is a challenge shared by several fields, and the SBDG has begun collaborating with the Institute for Quantitative Social Science at Harvard University to extend the Dataverse (dataverse.org) open-source data repository system to structural biology datasets. Several extensions are necessary to support the size and metadata requirements for structural biology datasets. In this paper, we describe one such extension-functionality supporting preservation of file system structure within Dataverse-which is essential for both in-place computation and supporting non-HTTP data transfers.

  14. Siting Patterns of Nuclear Waste Repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Barry D.; Shelley, Fred M.

    1988-01-01

    Provides an inventory of international radioactive waste-management policies and repository siting decisions for North America, Central and South America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. This discussion stresses the important role of demographic, geologic, and political factors in siting decisions. (Author/BSR)

  15. A Study on the Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Behaviors in the Engineered Barrier System of a HLW Repository: Engineering-scale Validation Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae-Owan; Kwon, S. K.; Park, J. H.; Cho, W. J.; Lee, Jae-Owan

    2007-06-15

    The T-H-M processes in the engineered barrier system are one of the major issues in the performance assessment of a HLW repository. In this study, it was conducted to design and construct the engineering-scale test facility which was a third-scale of the reference disposal system, and to investigate THM behavior of the engineered barrier system using the test facility. The computer modeling and interpreting methodology for THM behavior were also developed.

  16. Risk methodology for geologic disposal of radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cranwell, R.M.; Campbell, J.E.; Ortiz, N.R. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Guzowski, R.V. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-04-01

    This report contains the description of a procedure for selecting scenarios that are potentially important to the isolation of high- level radioactive wastes in deep geologic formations. In this report, the term scenario is used to represent a set of naturally occurring and/or human-induced conditions that represent realistic future states of the repository, geologic systems, and ground-water flow systems that might affect the release and transport of radionuclides from the repository to humans. The scenario selection procedure discussed in this report is demonstrated by applying it to the analysis of a hypothetical waste disposal site containing a bedded-salt formation as the host medium for the repository. A final set of 12 scenarios is selected for this site. 52 refs., 48 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Framework system and research flow of uncertainty in 3D geological structure models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Uncertainty in 3D geological structure models has become a bottleneck that restricts the development and application of 3D geological modeling.In order to solve this problem during periods of accuracy assessment,error detection and dynamic correction in 3D geological structure models,we have reviewed the current situation and development trends in 3D geological modeling.The main context of uncertainty in 3D geological structure models is discussed.Major research issues and a general framework system of unce...

  18. Application of RgMap system on digital regional geological survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Digital geological mapping fundamentally broke through the traditional working pattern, successfully carried out the geological mapping digitalization. By using the RGMAP system to field digital geological mapping, the authors summarized the method of work and the work flow of the RGMAPGIS during the field geological survey. First, we prepared material, set up the PRB gallery, then put the geographic base map under the background maplayer and organizing the field hand map, forming the field factual datum map. At last, the geological space database is formed.

  19. Studies of neo-formed phases occurring during spent nuclear fuel dissolution in geological repository: influence of silicate ions; Etude des phases neoformees lors de la dissolution du combustible nucleaire en condition de stockage geologique: influence des ions silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robit-Pointeau, V

    2005-12-15

    Spent nuclear fuel alteration in deep storage conditions may proceed by local oxidising conditions at the fuel / water interface under influence of alpha irradiation. However, due to the strong redox buffer capacity of the near-field materials (especially the canister and the geological media), most of the near-field environment will remain reducing. Due to the relative high concentration in silica in such system, coffinite USiO{sub 4}.n(H{sub 2}O) may be a relevant phase to consider as it has been suggested from the natural analogues observations (Oklo). The aim of this work was to assess the relevance of coffinitisation of the spent fuel phenomena. The results of the experimental work contest the thermodynamic predictions. Instead of coffinite, a new U(IV)-Si phase has been observed in water simulating storage conditions. The thermodynamic data on coffinite validated by OECD are based on the average concentration of dissolved silica present in natural system containing uraninite and quartz. As the silica concentration in natural groundwaters is more probably controlled by minerals like chalcedony or silica gel, the coffinite present with uraninite in such systems, is probably not in equilibrium even in 2-billion years- old geological sites. Based on the results of this study, coffinitisation of the spent nuclear fuel in deep geological disposal is not anticipated to be a dominant short term process. (author)

  20. Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R): Transforming the Academic Fleet Into an Integrated Global Observing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbotte, S. M.; Ferrini, V.; Arko, R. A.; Chandler, C. L.; Maffei, A. R.; Miller, S. P.; Stocks, K.; Smith, S. R.; Bourassa, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    NSF-supported oceanographic research expeditions support diverse scientific investigations across all disciplines of ocean sciences, targeting important questions ranging from the impacts of global change on ocean chemistry and ecosystems, to the structure and dynamics of ocean circulation and the nature of volcanic and earthquake processes at the global plate boundaries. Research vessels coordinated by the University-National Oceanographic Laboratory System (UNOLS) are the primary oceanographic research platforms, and operate as essential mobile observing platforms for ocean science. Ships ranging from “global” to “local” class are capable of operating throughout the deep oceans and within coastal and inland waterways. Each vessel is equipped with a suite of sensors, including geophysical, water column, and meteorological sensors, that are available for continuous operation during each expedition. The “underway” datasets obtained from these sensors provide characterization of basic environmental conditions for the oceans and are of high value for later reuse for building global syntheses, climatologies, and historical time series of ocean properties. The recently funded Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) Project aims to develop a comprehensive plan for fleet-wide data management to ensure preservation and accessibility of our national oceanographic research data resources. The R2R Portal (www.rvdata.us) is being developed as a central shore-side data gateway through which underway data from oceanographic expeditions can be routinely cataloged and securely transmitted to the national long-term digital data archives including the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and the National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC). R2R will provide essential data documentation services for every expedition along with new tools to improve documentation of the wide array of shipboard data collection activities typical of modern expeditions. Protocols will be developed

  1. Design and evaluation of an Internet based data repository and visualization system for science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalphond, James M.

    In modern classrooms, scientific probes are often used in science labs to engage students in inquiry-based learning. Many of these probes will never leave the classroom, closing the door on real world experimentation that may engage students. Also, these tools do not encourage students to share data across classrooms or schools. To address these limitations, we have developed a web-based system for collecting, storing, and visualizing sensor data, as well as a hardware package to interface existing classroom probes. This system, The Internet System for Networked Sensor Experimentation (iSENSE), was created to address these limitations. Development of the system began in 2007 and has proceeded through four phases: proof-of-concept prototype, technology demonstration, initial classroom deployment, and classroom testing. User testing and feedback during these phases guided development of the system. This thesis includes lessons learned during development and evaluation of the system in the hands of teachers and students. We developed three evaluations of this practical use. The first evaluation involved working closely with teachers to encourage them to integrate activities using the iSENSE system into their existing curriculum. We were looking for strengths of the approach and ease of integration. Second, we developed three "Activity Labs," which teachers used as embedded assessments. In these activities, students were asked to answer questions based on experiments or visualizations already entered into the iSENSE website. Lastly, teachers were interviewed after using the system to determine what they found valuable. This thesis makes contributions in two areas. It shows how an iterative design process was used to develop a system used in a science classroom, and it presents an analysis of the educational impact of the system on teachers and students.

  2. Potential Biogenic Corrosion of Alloy 22, A Candidate Nuclear Waste Packaging Materials, Under Simulated Repository Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, J.M.; Martin, S.I.; Rivera, A.J.; Bedrossian, P.J.; Lian, T.

    2000-01-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy has been charged with assessing the suitability of a geologic nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), NV. Microorganisms, both those endogenous to the repository site and those introduced as a result of construction and operational activities, may contribute to the corrosion of metal nuclear waste packaging and thereby decrease their useful lifetime as barrier materials. Evaluation of potential Microbiological Influenced Corrosion (MIC) on candidate waste package materials was undertaken reactor systems incorporating the primary elements of the repository: YM rock (either non-sterile or presterilized), material coupons, and a continual feed of simulated YM groundwater. Periodically, both aqueous reactor efflux and material coupons were analyzed for chemical and surfacial characterization. Alloy 22 coupons exposed for a year at room temperature in reactors containing non-sterile YM rock demonstrated accretion of chromium oxide and silaceous scales, with what appear to be underlying areas of corrosion.

  3. Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkins, J.E.; Lee, J.H.; Lingineni, S.; Mishra, S; McNeish, J.A.; Sassani, D.C.; Sevougian, S.D.

    1995-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives of the US NRC and the US EPA. The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). Total system performance assessments require the explicit quantification of the relevant processes and process interactions. In addition assessments are useful to help define the most significant processes, the information gaps and uncertainties and therefore the additional information required for more robust and defensible assessment of the overall performance. The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993.

  4. Repository Rodeo Redux

    CERN Document Server

    Anez, Melissa; Donohue, Tim; Fyson, Will; Simko, Tibor; Wilcox, David

    2017-01-01

    You’ve got more repository questions and we’ve got more answers! Last year’s Repository Rodeo panel was a huge success, so we’re taking the show on the road to Brisbane for OR2017. Join representatives from the DSpace, Eprints, Fedora, Hydra, and Islandora communities as we (briefly) explain what each of our repositories actually does. We'll also talk about the directions of our respective technical and community developments, and related to the conference theme of Open: Innovation Knowledge Repositories, offer brief observations about the latest, most promising and/or most surprising innovations in our space. This panel will be a great opportunity for newcomers to Open Repositories to get a crash course on the major repository options and meet representatives from each of their communities. After a brief presentation from each representative, we'll open the session up for questions from the audience.

  5. Accessing Multi-Source Geological Data through Network in MORPAS Software System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei Hongbo; Hu Guangdao; Chen Jianguo; Li Zhenhua

    2003-01-01

    MORPAS is a special GIS (geographic information system) software system, based on the MAPGIS platform whose aim is to prospect and evaluate mineral resources quantificationally by synthesizing geological, geophysical, geochemical and remote sensing data. It overlays geological database management, geological background and geological abnormality analysis, image processing of remote sensing and comprehensive abnormality analysis, etc.. It puts forward an integrative solution for the application of GIS in basic-level units and the construction of information engineering in the geological field. As the popularization of computer networks and the request of data sharing, it is necessary to extend its functions in data management so that all its data files can be accessed in the network server. This paper utilizes some MAPGIS functions for the second development and ADO (access data object) technique to access multi-source geological data in SQL Server databases. Then remote visiting and congruous management will be realized in the MORPAS system.

  6. Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives set forward by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. As additional site and design information is generated, performance assessment analyses can be revised to become more representative of the expected conditions and remove some of the conservative assumptions necessitated by the incompleteness of site and design data. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993. These analyses have been documented in Barnard, Eslinger, Wilson and Andrews.

  7. Main Features for the Conceptualization of the Post-Closure Evolution Scenario of the Cigeo LIL-HL Waste Repository - 13105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landais, Patrick; Giffaut, Eric; Pepin, Guillaume; Plas, Frederic; Schumacher, S. [Andra, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay Malabry (France)

    2013-07-01

    In France, in order to commission the planned geological repository by 2025, a license application for the industrial project of this geological repository called Cigeo (Centre Industriel de Stockage Geologique) must be submitted and reviewed by the competent authorities by 2015. On the basis of its preliminary design set up in 2009 and on the associated requirements for long-term safety, an overall conceptual model has been developed in order to prepare the performance and safety analysis. The Cigeo repository makes use of the passive safety response characteristics of both the engineered and geological barriers that allow: - resisting water ingress, with repository designs favoring the limitation of the water flows; - limiting the release of radionuclides and chemical toxics; - delaying and mitigating the spread of radionuclides and chemical toxics. In order to evaluate the performance of the various elements, a conceptual model of the thermo-hydro-chemico-mechanical (THMC) evolution of the different components of the repository has been designed. It takes stock of a 20 years research effort which allowed data to be obtained from various surface geological campaigns, in-situ experiments in URLs and wastes characterization, and advances in numerical simulation to be utilised. Based on the best available knowledge to date, this conceptual model constitutes a robust basis for the definition and development of the long-term safety scenarios. It also helps identifying the residual uncertainties, and provides guidelines for additional research and system optimizations. (authors)

  8. ADVANCED NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE EFFECTS ON THE TREATMENT OF UNCERTAINTY IN THE LONG-TERM ASSESSMENT OF GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL SYSTEMS - EBS INPUT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, M; Blink, J A; Greenberg, H R; Sharma, M

    2012-04-25

    The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign within the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Technology (FCT) program has been tasked with investigating the disposal of the nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level nuclear waste (HLW) for a range of potential waste forms and geologic environments. The planning, construction, and operation of a nuclear disposal facility is a long-term process that involves engineered barriers that are tailored to both the geologic environment and the waste forms being emplaced. The UFD Campaign is considering a range of fuel cycles that in turn produce a range of waste forms. The UFD Campaign is also considering a range of geologic media. These ranges could be thought of as adding uncertainty to what the disposal facility design will ultimately be; however, it may be preferable to thinking about the ranges as adding flexibility to design of a disposal facility. For example, as the overall DOE-NE program and industrial actions result in the fuel cycles that will produce waste to be disposed, and the characteristics of those wastes become clear, the disposal program retains flexibility in both the choice of geologic environment and the specific repository design. Of course, other factors also play a major role, including local and State-level acceptance of the specific site that provides the geologic environment. In contrast, the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) repository license application (LA) is based on waste forms from an open fuel cycle (PWR and BWR assemblies from an open fuel cycle). These waste forms were about 90% of the total waste, and they were the determining waste form in developing the engineered barrier system (EBS) design for the Yucca Mountain Repository design. About 10% of the repository capacity was reserved for waste from a full recycle fuel cycle in which some actinides were extracted for weapons use, and the remaining fission products and some minor actinides were

  9. CAED Document Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Compliance Assurance and Enforcement Division Document Repository (CAEDDOCRESP) provides internal and external access of Inspection Records, Enforcement Actions, and...

  10. Administrative Data Repository (ADR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Administrative Data Repository (ADR) was established to provide support for the administrative data elements relative to multiple categories of a person entity...

  11. Efficacy of backfilling and other engineered barriers in a radioactive waste repository in salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claiborne, H.C.

    1982-09-01

    In the United States, investigation of potential host geologic formations was expanded in 1975 to include hard rocks. Potential groundwater intrusion is leading to very conservative and expensive waste package designs. Recent studies have concluded that incentives for engineered barriers and 1000-year canisters probably do not exist for reasonable breach scenarios. The assumption that multibarriers will significantly increase the safety margin is also questioned. Use of a bentonite backfill for surrounding a canister of exotic materials was developed in Sweden and is being considered in the US. The expectation that bentonite will remain essentially unchanged for hundreds of years for US repository designs may be unrealistic. In addition, thick bentonite backfills will increase the canister surface temperature and add much more water around the canister. The use of desiccant materials, such as CaO or MgO, for backfilling seems to be a better method of protecting the canister. An argument can also be made for not using backfill material in salt repositories since the 30-cm-thick space will provide for hole closure for many years and will promote heat transfer via natural convection. It is concluded that expensive safety systems are being considered for repository designs that do not necessarily increase the safety margin. It is recommended that the safety systems for waste repositories in different geologic media be addressed individually and that cost-benefit analyses be performed.

  12. Study of degenerate parabolic system modeling the hydrogen displacement in a nuclear waste repository

    CERN Document Server

    Caro, Florian; Saad, Mazen

    2012-01-01

    Our goal is the mathematical analysis of a two phase (liquid and gas) two components (water and hydrogen) system modeling the hydrogen displacement in a storage site for radioactive waste. We suppose that the water is only in the liquid phase and is incompressible. The hydrogen in the gas phase is supposed compressible and could be dissolved into the water with the Henry's law. The flow is described by the conservation of the mass of each components. The model is treated without simplified assumptions on the gas density. This model is degenerated due to vanishing terms. We establish an existence result for the nonlinear degenerate parabolic system based on new energy estimate on pressures.

  13. Study of degenerate parabolic system modeling the hydrogen displacement in a nuclear waste repository

    KAUST Repository

    Caro, Florian

    2013-09-01

    Our goal is the mathematical analysis of a two phase (liquid and gas) two components (water and hydrogen) system modeling the hydrogen displacement in a storage site for radioactive waste. We suppose that the water is only in the liquid phase and is incompressible. The hydrogen in the gas phase is supposed compressible and could be dissolved into the water with the Henry law. The flow is described by the conservation of the mass of each components. The model is treated without simplified assumptions on the gas density. This model is degenerated due to vanishing terms. We establish an existence result for the nonlinear degenerate parabolic system based on new energy estimate on pressures.

  14. 基于DSpace构建铁路机构知识库系统实践%Practice of establishing Railway Institutional Repository System based on DSpace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安源; 李雪山

    2011-01-01

    基于铁路机构知识库的实际情况和需求,介绍DSpace的基本结构,阐述基于DSpace进行铁路机构知识库建设的过程,并进行二次开发和定制,形成系统的雏形.实践证明,该系统具有功能丰富、可扩展、易定制以及易维护的特点.%Based on actual status and demand of railway institutional repository, this paper introduced the basic structure of DSpace, expounded the process of establishing railway institutional repository based on Dspace, and made secondary development and customization, which shaped the rudiment for the System. The practice showed that the System had the characteristics of abundant function, spreading, easy customizing and maintenance.

  15. Environmental Degradation of Materials for Nuclear Waste Repositories Engineered Barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, R B

    2006-12-24

    Several countries are considering geological repositories for the storage of nuclear waste. Most of the environments for these repositories will be reducing in nature, except for the repository in the US, which is going to be oxidizing. For the reducing repositories, alloys such as carbon steel, copper, stainless steels and titanium are being evaluated. For the repository in the US, some of the most corrosion resistant commercially available alloys are being investigated. This paper presents a summary of the behavior of the different materials under consideration for the repositories and the current understanding of the degradation modes of the proposed alloys in ground water environments from the point of view of general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking.

  16. Selection of Corrosion Resistant Materials for Nuclear Waste Repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.B. Rebak

    2006-08-28

    Several countries are considering geological repositories to dispose of nuclear waste. The environment of most of the currently considered repositories will be reducing in nature, except for the repository in the US, which is going to be oxidizing. For the reducing repositories, alloys such as carbon steel, stainless steels and titanium are being evaluated. For the repository in the US, some of the most corrosion resistant commercially available alloys are being investigated. This paper presents a summary of the behavior of the different materials under consideration for the repositories and the current understanding of the degradation modes of the proposed alloys in ground water environments from the point of view of general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking.

  17. Selection of Corrosion Resistant Materials for Nuclear Waste Repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, R B

    2006-06-01

    Several countries are considering geological repositories to dispose of nuclear waste. The environment of most of the currently considered repositories will be reducing in nature, except for the repository in the US, which is going to be oxidizing. For the reducing repositories alloys such as carbon steel, stainless steels and titanium are being evaluated. For the repository in the US, some of the most corrosion resistant commercially available alloys are being investigated. This paper presents a summary of the behavior of the different materials under consideration for the repositories and the current understanding of the degradation modes of the proposed alloys in ground water environments from the point of view of general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking.

  18. Status of Proposed Repository for Latin-American Spent Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrada, J.J.

    2004-10-04

    This report compiles preliminary information that supports the premise that a repository is needed in Latin America and analyzes the nuclear situation (mainly in Argentina and Brazil) in terms of nuclear capabilities, inventories, and regional spent-fuel repositories. The report is based on several sources and summarizes (1) the nuclear capabilities in Latin America and establishes the framework for the need of a permanent repository, (2) the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) approach for a regional spent-fuel repository and describes the support that international institutions are lending to this issue, (3) the current situation in Argentina in order to analyze the Argentinean willingness to find a location for a deep geological repository, and (4) the issues involved in selecting a location for the repository and identifies a potential location. This report then draws conclusions based on an analysis of this information. The focus of this report is mainly on spent fuel and does not elaborate on other radiological waste sources.

  19. Modeling and Simulation Resource Repository (MSRR)(System Engineering/Integrated M&S Management Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milroy, Audrey; Hale, Joe

    2006-01-01

    NASA s Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) is implementing a management approach for modeling and simulation (M&S) that will provide decision-makers information on the model s fidelity, credibility, and quality, including the verification, validation and accreditation information. The NASA MSRR will be implemented leveraging M&S industry best practices. This presentation will discuss the requirements that will enable NASA to capture and make available the "meta data" or "simulation biography" data associated with a model. The presentation will also describe the requirements that drive how NASA will collect and document relevant information for models or suites of models in order to facilitate use and reuse of relevant models and provide visibility across NASA organizations and the larger M&S community.

  20. An evaluation of repository-induced disturbances for a KBS-3 type repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, D.; McLeod, R.; McEwen, T. [QuantiSci, Melton Mowbray (United Kingdom)

    1998-03-01

    This report considers the potential physical and chemical perturbations caused by the excavation, operation and backfilling and sealing of a KBS-3 type repository for spent fuel in Sweden. Parts of the underground excavations are likely to remain open to the atmosphere for up to several decades. Time-dependent changes to the chemical environment and the properties of the geological formation will be occurring as well as the initial disturbance of construction and subsequent changes after backfilling. In addition, this report also discusses issues that arise from the co-disposal of spent fuel and intermediate level waste. The processes which are likely to act during each stage of a repository from construction through to backfilling and sealing have been reviewed and the degree to which these processes are understood and represented within the performance assessment is discussed. The areas of particular interest are: The coupling of thermal, hydrogeological and mechanical processes with particular reference to the development of the near-field; Understanding the transient process of re-saturation with particular reference to the buffer material surrounding the waste canisters, including chemical changes to the material; The impact of accidental events during the construction and operational phases of work and their possible consequence on the long term performance of the repository; Chemical issues relating to the co-disposal of spent fuel and intermediate level wastes within a single facility. When consideration of transient processes and coupling is discussed, it is apparent that numerical tools and a complete understanding to provide quantitative information is lacking. The importance of the engineered barrier system within the performance assessment for spent fuel disposal is recognised and the emphasis is placed on the understanding of the coupled processes in the evolution in the near-field of the geosphere 45 refs, 4 fig, 2 tabs

  1. Geology and total petroleum systems of the Paradox Basin, Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whidden, Katherine J.; Lillis, Paul G.; Anna, Lawrence O.; Pearson, Krystal M.; Dubiel, Russell F.

    2014-01-01

    The geological model for the development of the Total Petroleum Systems (TPSs) within the Paradox Basin formed the foundation of the recent U.S. Geological Survey assessment of undiscovered, technically recoverable resources in the basin. Five TPSs were defined, of which three have known production and two are hypothetical. These TPSs are based on geologic elements of the basin and the potential development of Precambrian, Devonian, Pennsylvanian, Permian-Mississippian, and Cretaceous source rock intervals.

  2. Final Systems Development Report for the Clark County Socioeconomic Impact Assessment of the Proposed High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain, NV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-06-18

    The Systems Development Report represents the third major step in the Clark County Socioeconomic Impact Assessment of the Proposed High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository at Yucca Mound Nevada. The first of these steps was to forge a Research Design that would serve as a guide for the overall research process. The second step was the construction of the Base Case, the purpose of which was to describe existing conditions in Clark County in the specified analytic areas of Economic-Demographic/Fiscal, Emergency Planning and Management, Transportation and Sociocultural analysis. The base case description will serve as a basis for assessing changes in these topic areas that might result from the Yucca Mountain project. These changes will be assessed by analyzing conditions with and without repository development in the county. Prior to performing such assessments, however, the snapshot type of data found in the base case must be operationalized or systematized to allow for more dynamic data utilization. In other words, a data system that can be used to analyze the consequences of the introduction of different variables (or variable values) in the Clark County context must be constructed. Such a system must be capable of being updated through subsequent data collection and monitoring efforts to both provide a rolling base case and supply information necessary to construct trend analyses. For example, during the Impact Assessment phase of the study process, the without repository analysis is accomplished by analyzing growth for the county given existing conditions and likely trends. These data are then compared to the with Yucca Mountain project conditions anticipated for the county. Similarly, once the emergency planning management and response needs associated with the repository are described, these needs will be juxtaposed against existing (and various future) capacity(ies) in order to determine the nature and magnitude of impacts in this analytic area. Analogous tasks

  3. Tectonic characterization of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, John W.; O'Leary, Dennis W.

    1993-01-01

    Tectonic characterization of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is needed to assess seismic and possible volcanic hazards that could affect the site during the preclosure (next 100 years) and the behavior of the hydrologic system during the postclosure (the following 10,000 years) periods. Tectonic characterization is based on assembling mapped geological structures in their chronological order of development and activity, and interpreting their dynamic interrelationships. Addition of mechanistic models and kinematic explanations for the identified tectonic processes provides one or more tectonic models having predictive power. Proper evaluation and application of tectonic models can aid in seismic design and help anticipate probable occurrence of future geologic events of significance to the repository and its design.

  4. Effect of precipitation, sorption and stable of isotope on maximum release rates of radionuclides from engineered barrier system (EBS) in deep repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekifarsani, A; Skachek, M A

    2009-10-01

    The basic function of the engineered barrier system (EBS) in geological disposal is to prevent or limit the release of radionuclides into the underground environment. For this purpose, the vitrified waste is contained in an overpack to isolate it from contact with groundwater for a certain initial period of time. However, it is impossible to ensure complete containment for all time. Therefore, the eventual release of nuclides must be minimized after the overpack fails (AEC, 1984. Radioactive waste processing and disposal measures; JNC, 2000a. Project to establish the scientific and technical basis for HLW disposal in Japan--first progress report-H3. Geological Environment in Japan, JNC TN1410 2000-002; JNC, 2000b. H12: project to establish the scientific and technical basis for HLW disposal in Japan--repository design and engineering technology, JNC TN1410 2000-003.). Low-permeability buffer material is installed between the overpack and the host rock to ensure that radionuclide release from the vitrified waste is limited by diffusive transport rather than advective transport in groundwater. Nuclides released from the waste form precipitate when their concentrations in the porewater result in their elemental solubility limits being exceeded. This limits the concentrations of many nuclides in the buffer and thus limits the release rates to the surrounding rock. High sorption coefficients act to delay the transport of certain nuclides during their migration through the buffer (PNC, development and management of the technical knowledge base for the geological disposal of HLW. Supporting report 2: repository engineering technology). The presence of isotopes of the same element has the effect of reducing the effective solubility of some nuclides; a lower nuclide concentration is required for precipitation to occur if the presence of any isotopes of the same element is taken into account. The calculated release rates of radionuclides from the EBS (per waste package) are

  5. Building didactic content repositories: method and tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Marciniak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the method and tools which allows to build repositories of didactic materials in SCORM using UCTS taxonomic system and Content Repository software. SCORM is a universal specification designed to create reusable materials in digital format. UCTS is a taxonomic model which allows to attribute didactic interpretations to content components. Content Repository is a web software designed to create, store and process didactic content in SCORM. The method was verified while creating E-archeology Content Repository which stores e-learning materials on protection and management of archeological heritage. The repository contains approximately 4500 Learning Objects in 5 languages and about 800 components of didactically useful e-learning components described in UCTS.

  6. Developing an Automatic Crawling System for Populating a Digital Repository of Professional Development Resources: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-ran; Yang, Chris; Tosaka, Yuji; Ping, Qing; Mimouni, Houda El

    2016-01-01

    This study is a part of the larger project that develops a sustainable digital repository of professional development resources on emerging data standards and technologies for data organization and management in libraries. Toward that end, the project team developed an automated workflow to crawl for, monitor, and classify relevant web objects…

  7. Schematic designs for penetration seals for a repository in Richton Dome. [Richton Dome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsall, P.C.; Case, J.B.; Meyer, D.; Franzone, J.G.; Coons, W.E.

    1985-12-01

    The isolation of radioactive wastes in geologic repositories requires that human-made penetrations such as shafts, tunnels, or boreholes are adequately sealed. This report describes schematic seal designs for a repository in dome salt referenced to the geology of the Richton Dome in Mississippi. The designs are presented for extensive peer review and will be updated as conceptual designs if the Richton Dome is selected as a candidate repository site. The principal components of the seal system are concrete bulkheads and dense earth backfill placed in salt and anhydrite horizons in the shafts and in the tunnels in the shaft pillar. Crushed salt backfill is placed throughout the disposal areas. Close to the waste, this backfill should consolidate in response to closure of the rooms, resulting in effective encapsulation of the waste within a period of about 1000 years. Analyses based on a limited amount of laboratory testing indicate that consolidation rates will be relatively slow at locations further removed from the waste. Rates of consolidation are slow because of the slow-creeping properties of the Richton Dome salt and because of the relatively shallow (1900 feet) repository depth.

  8. Generic repository design concepts and thermal analysis (FY11).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Robert (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Dupont, Mark (Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC); Blink, James A. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Fratoni, Massimiliano (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Greenberg, Harris (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Carter, Joe (Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC); Hardin, Ernest L.; Sutton, Mark A. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA)

    2011-08-01

    disposal system. Clay/shale, salt, and crystalline rock media are selected as the basis for reference mined geologic disposal concepts in this study, consistent with advanced international repository programs, and previous investigations in the U.S. The U.S. pursued deep geologic disposal programs in crystalline rock, shale, salt, and volcanic rock in the years leading up to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, or NWPA (Rechard et al. 2011). The 1987 NWPA amendment act focused the U.S. program on unsaturated, volcanic rock at the Yucca Mountain site, culminating in the 2008 license application. Additional work on unsaturated, crystalline rock settings (e.g., volcanic tuff) is not required to support this generic study. Reference disposal concepts are selected for the media listed above and for deep borehole disposal, drawing from recent work in the U.S. and internationally. The main features of the repository concepts are discussed in Section 4.5 and summarized in Table ES-1. Temperature histories at the waste package surface and a specified distance into the host rock are calculated for combinations of waste types and reference disposal concepts, specifying waste package emplacement modes. Target maximum waste package surface temperatures are identified, enabling a sensitivity study to inform the tradeoff between the quantity of waste per disposal package, and decay storage duration, with respect to peak temperature at the waste package surface. For surface storage duration on the order of 100 years or less, waste package sizes for direct disposal of SNF are effectively limited to 4-PWR configurations (or equivalent size and output). Thermal results are summarized, along with recommendations for follow-on work including adding additional reference concepts, verification and uncertainty analysis for thermal calculations, developing descriptions of surface facilities and other system details, and cost estimation to support system-level evaluations.

  9. Conceptual model for regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. Final draft, technical memorandum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, W.C.; Voorhees, M.L.; Prickett, T.A.

    1980-05-23

    This technical memorandum was prepared to: (1) describe a typical basalt radionuclide repository site, (2) describe geologic and hydrologic processes associated with regional radionuclide transport in basalts, (3) define the parameters required to model regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site, and (4) develop a ''conceptual model'' of radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. In a general hydrological sense, basalts may be described as layered sequences of aquifers and aquitards. The Columbia River Basalt, centered near the semi-arid Pasco Basin, is considered by many to be typical basalt repository host rock. Detailed description of the flow system including flow velocities with high-low hydraulic conductivity sequences are not possible with existing data. However, according to theory, waste-transport routes are ultimately towards the Columbia River and the lengths of flow paths from the repository to the biosphere may be relatively short. There are many physical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear processes with associated parameters that together determine the possible pattern of radionuclide migration in basalts and surrounding formations. Brief process descriptions and associated parameter lists are provided. Emphasis has been placed on the use of the distribution coefficient in simulating ion exchange. The use of the distribution coefficient approach is limited because it takes into account only relatively fast mass transfer processes. In general, knowledge of hydrogeochemical processes is primitive.

  10. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Repository Impact Evaluation FY-05 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halsey, W G

    2005-09-12

    An important long-term objective of advanced nuclear fuel cycle (AFC) technologies is to provide improvement in the long-term management of radioactive waste. Compared to a once-thru fuel cycle, it is possible to generate far less waste, and potentially easier waste to manage, with advanced fuel cycles. However, the precise extent and value of these benefits are complex and difficult to quantify. This document presents a status report of efforts within AFCI Systems Analysis to define and quantify the AFC benefits to geologic disposal, development of cooperative efforts with the US repository program, and participation with international evaluations of AFC impacts on waste management. The primary analysis of repository benefits is conducted by ANL. This year repository impact evaluations have included: (1) Continued evaluation of LWR recycle benefits in support of scenario analysis. (2) Extension of repository analyses to consider long-term dose reductions. (3) Developing the opportunity for cooperation with the U.S. repository program. (4) International cooperation with OECD-NEA.

  11. Conceptual model for regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. Final draft, technical memorandum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, W.C.; Voorhees, M.L.; Prickett, T.A.

    1980-05-23

    This technical memorandum was prepared to: (1) describe a typical basalt radionuclide repository site, (2) describe geologic and hydrologic processes associated with regional radionuclide transport in basalts, (3) define the parameters required to model regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site, and (4) develop a ''conceptual model'' of radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. In a general hydrological sense, basalts may be described as layered sequences of aquifers and aquitards. The Columbia River Basalt, centered near the semi-arid Pasco Basin, is considered by many to be typical basalt repository host rock. Detailed description of the flow system including flow velocities with high-low hydraulic conductivity sequences are not possible with existing data. However, according to theory, waste-transport routes are ultimately towards the Columbia River and the lengths of flow paths from the repository to the biosphere may be relatively short. There are many physical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear processes with associated parameters that together determine the possible pattern of radionuclide migration in basalts and surrounding formations. Brief process descriptions and associated parameter lists are provided. Emphasis has been placed on the use of the distribution coefficient in simulating ion exchange. The use of the distribution coefficient approach is limited because it takes into account only relatively fast mass transfer processes. In general, knowledge of hydrogeochemical processes is primitive.

  12. Status of LANL investigations of temperature constraints on clay in repository environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caporuscio, Florie A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cheshire, Michael C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Newell, Dennis L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; McCarney, Mary Kate [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-22

    The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign is presently evaluating various generic options for disposal of used fuel. The focus of this experimental work is to characterize and bound Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) conditions in high heat load repositories. The UFD now has the ability to evaluate multiple EBS materials, waste containers, and rock types at higher heat loads and pressures (including deep boreholes). The geologic conditions now available to the U.S.A. and the international community for repositories include saturated and reduced water conditions, along with higher pressure and temperature (P, T) regimes. Chemical and structural changes to the clays, in either backfill/buffer or clay-rich host rock, may have significant effects on repository evolution. Reduction of smectite expansion capacity and rehydration potential due to heating could affect the isolation provided by EBS. Processes such as cementation by silica precipitation and authigenic illite could change the hydraulic and mechanical properties of clay-rich materials. Experimental studies of these repository conditions at high P,T have not been performed in the U.S. for decades and little has been done by the international community at high P,T. The experiments to be performed by LANL will focus on the importance of repository chemical and mineralogical conditions at elevated P,T conditions. This will provide input to the assessment of scientific basis for elevating the temperature limits in clay barriers.

  13. Analogues to features and processes of a high-level radioactive waste repository proposed for Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Ardyth M.; Stuckless, John S.; with a Foreword by Abraham Van Luik, U.S. Department of Energy

    2010-01-01

    Natural analogues are defined for this report as naturally occurring or anthropogenic systems in which processes similar to those expected to occur in a nuclear waste repository are thought to have taken place over time periods of decades to millennia and on spatial scales as much as tens of kilometers. Analogues provide an important temporal and spatial dimension that cannot be tested by laboratory or field-scale experiments. Analogues provide one of the multiple lines of evidence intended to increase confidence in the safe geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Although the work in this report was completed specifically for Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as the proposed geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste under the U.S. Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the applicability of the science, analyses, and interpretations is not limited to a specific site. Natural and anthropogenic analogues have provided and can continue to provide value in understanding features and processes of importance across a wide variety of topics in addressing the challenges of geologic isolation of radioactive waste and also as a contribution to scientific investigations unrelated to waste disposal. Isolation of radioactive waste at a mined geologic repository would be through a combination of natural features and engineered barriers. In this report we examine analogues to many of the various components of the Yucca Mountain system, including the preservation of materials in unsaturated environments, flow of water through unsaturated volcanic tuff, seepage into repository drifts, repository drift stability, stability and alteration of waste forms and components of the engineered barrier system, and transport of radionuclides through unsaturated and saturated rock zones.

  14. Developing Criteria to Establish Trusted Digital Repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Faundeen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper details the drivers, methods, and outcomes of the U.S. Geological Survey’s quest to establish criteria by which to judge its own digital preservation resources as Trusted Digital Repositories. Drivers included recent U.S. legislation focused on data and asset management conducted by federal agencies spending $100M USD or more annually on research activities. The methods entailed seeking existing evaluation criteria from national and international organizations such as International Standards Organization (ISO, U.S. Library of Congress, and Data Seal of Approval upon which to model USGS repository evaluations. Certification, complexity, cost, and usability of existing evaluation models were key considerations. The selected evaluation method was derived to allow the repository evaluation process to be transparent, understandable, and defensible; factors that are critical for judging competing, internal units. Implementing the chosen evaluation criteria involved establishing a cross-agency, multi-disciplinary team that interfaced across the organization.

  15. Developing criteria to establish Trusted Digital Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faundeen, John L.

    2017-01-01

    This paper details the drivers, methods, and outcomes of the U.S. Geological Survey’s quest to establish criteria by which to judge its own digital preservation resources as Trusted Digital Repositories. Drivers included recent U.S. legislation focused on data and asset management conducted by federal agencies spending $100M USD or more annually on research activities. The methods entailed seeking existing evaluation criteria from national and international organizations such as International Standards Organization (ISO), U.S. Library of Congress, and Data Seal of Approval upon which to model USGS repository evaluations. Certification, complexity, cost, and usability of existing evaluation models were key considerations. The selected evaluation method was derived to allow the repository evaluation process to be transparent, understandable, and defensible; factors that are critical for judging competing, internal units. Implementing the chosen evaluation criteria involved establishing a cross-agency, multi-disciplinary team that interfaced across the organization. 

  16. Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain. Volume 2: Preliminary Design Concept for the Repository and Waste Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-12-01

    This volume describes the major design features of the Monitored Geologic Repository. This document is not intended to provide an exhaustive, detailed description of the repository design. Rather, this document summarizes the major systems and primary elements of the design that are radiologically significant, and references the specific technical documents and design analyses wherein the details can be found. Not all portions of the design are at the same level of completeness. Highest priority has been given to assigning resources to advance the design of the Monitored Geologic Repository features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation and for which there is no NRC licensing precedent. Those features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation, but for which there is an NRC precedent, receive second priority. Systems and features that have no impact on radiological safety or waste isolation receive the lowest priority. This prioritization process, referred to as binning, is discussed in more detail in Section 2.3. Not every subject discussed in this volume is given equal treatment with regard to the level of detail provided. For example, less detail is provided for the surface facility design than for the subsurface and waste package designs. This different level of detail is intentional. Greater detail is provided for those functions, structures, systems, and components that play key roles with regard to protecting radiological health and safety and that are not common to existing nuclear facilities already licensed by NRC. A number of radiological subjects are not addressed in the VA, (e.g., environmental qualification of equipment). Environmental qualification of equipment and other radiological safety considerations will be addressed in the LA. Non-radiological safety considerations such as silica dust control and other occupational safety considerations are considered equally important but are not addressed in

  17. Numerical modeling capabilities to predict repository performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    This report presents a summary of current numerical modeling capabilities that are applicable to the design and performance evaluation of underground repositories for the storage of nuclear waste. The report includes codes that are available in-house, within Golder Associates and Lawrence Livermore Laboratories; as well as those that are generally available within the industry and universities. The first listing of programs are in-house codes in the subject areas of hydrology, solute transport, thermal and mechanical stress analysis, and structural geology. The second listing of programs are divided by subject into the following categories: site selection, structural geology, mine structural design, mine ventilation, hydrology, and mine design/construction/operation. These programs are not specifically designed for use in the design and evaluation of an underground repository for nuclear waste; but several or most of them may be so used.

  18. GEOLOGICAL AND GEOTECHNICAL CITY KNOWLEDGE SYSTEM OF THE URBAN AREAS IN THE CENTRAL PART OF DENIZLI CITY

    OpenAIRE

    Kumsar, Halil; Sefer Beran ÇELİK; Kaya, Mustafa

    2004-01-01

    Geological and geotecnical investigations which are carried out at the first stage of a settlement place of a city play an important role on the development of urbanization. Engineering geology maps which are prepared by using the data of geological and geotechnical investigation guide urban plans and settlement. In this study a geological and geotechnical city information system of Denizli city (JEO-KBS) was developed by evaluating the Project data of the Geological, Geotechnical and Hydroge...

  19. Geologyy of the Yucca Mountain Site Area, Southwestern Nevada, Chapter in Stuckless, J.S., ED., Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste (Volume 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.R. Keefer; J.W. Whitney; D.C. Buesch

    2006-09-25

    Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada is a prominent, irregularly shaped upland formed by a thick apron of Miocene pyroclastic-flow and fallout tephra deposits, with minor lava flows, that was segmented by through-going, large-displacement normal faults into a series of north-trending, eastwardly tilted structural blocks. The principal volcanic-rock units are the Tiva Canyon and Topopah Spring Tuffs of the Paintbrush Group, which consist of volumetrically large eruptive sequences derived from compositionally distinct magma bodies in the nearby southwestern Nevada volcanic field, and are classic examples of a magmatic zonation characterized by an upper crystal-rich (> 10% crystal fragments) member, a more voluminous lower crystal-poor (< 5% crystal fragments) member, and an intervening thin transition zone. Rocks within the crystal-poor member of the Topopah Spring Tuff, lying some 280 m below the crest of Yucca Mountain, constitute the proposed host rock to be excavated for the storage of high-level radioactive wastes. Separation of the tuffaceous rock formations into subunits that allow for detailed mapping and structural interpretations is based on macroscopic features, most importantly the relative abundance of lithophysae and the degree of welding. The latter feature, varying from nonwelded through partly and moderately welded to densely welded, exerts a strong control on matrix porosities and other rock properties that provide essential criteria for distinguishing hydrogeologic and thermal-mechanical units, which are of major interest in evaluating the suitability of Yucca Mountain to host a safe and permanent geologic repository for waste storage. A thick and varied sequence of surficial deposits mantle large parts of the Yucca Mountain site area. Mapping of these deposits and associated soils in exposures and in the walls of trenches excavated across buried faults provides evidence for multiple surface-rupturing events along all of the major faults during

  20. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. Perspectives on the geological and hydrological aspects of long-term release scenario analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stottlemyre, J.A.; Wallace, R.W.; Benson, G.L.; Zellmer, J.T.

    1980-06-01

    Information that may be relevant to individuals involved with analyzing long-term release scenarios of specific repositories for nuclear waste is presented. The bulk of the information is derived from recent studies in West Germany and the United States. Emphasis is on the specific geological and hydrological phenomena that, alone or in concert, could potentially perturb the area around specific repository sites. Research is continuing on most of the topics discussed within this report. Because research is ongoing, statements and conclusions described in this document are subject to change. The main topics of this report are: (1) fracturing, (2) geohydrology, (3) magmatic activity, and (4) geomorphology. Therefore, the site-specific nature of the problem cannot be overemphasized. As an example of how one might combine the many synergistic and time-dependent parameters into a concise format the reader is referred to A Conceputal Simulation Model for Release Scenario Analysis of a Hypothetical Site in Columbia Plateau Basalts, PNL-2892. For additional details on the topics in this report, the reader is referred to the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) consultant report listed in the bibliography.

  1. Evaluasi Website Repositori Institusi Universitas Surabaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirul Ulum

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The  development  of  institutional  repositories  (IRs  in Indonesia within the broader framework of open access has significant impact on preserving intellectual capital and scholarly communication. Institutional  repositories  play  a  fundamental  role  in  centralizing, preserving,  and  making  accessible  institution’s  intellectual  capital. Evaluation of the system is to determine the functionality the system to meet the users need. Using a descriptive analysis this study wants to evaluate institutional repositories of University of Surabaya. The result is usefull for institution to develop the repository systems.

  2. Integrating the UPV Institutional Repository (RiuNet - DSpace) in the Courseware Management System (PoliformaT - Sakai) via the Digital Library Portal (PoliBuscador - MetaLib)

    OpenAIRE

    Ribes-Llopes, Inmaculada; Torres-Peris, Maria-Josep; García-Pau, Víctor

    2008-01-01

    This presentation deals on process of integration of the Universidad Politécnica de Valencia (UPV) institutional repository in the e-contents scenario. RiuNet, the institutional repository, has been developed in DSpace (manakin). It has been integrated in the Metalib portal called PoliBuscador. Thanks to this configuration RiuNet can be searchable from PoliformaT, the Courseware Management System of the UPV developed in Sakai. This communication presents problems, decisions and steps taken by...

  3. NIDDK Central Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIDDK Central Repository stores biosamples, genetic and other data collected in designated NIDDK-funded clinical studies. The purpose of the NIDDK Central...

  4. NIA Aging Cell Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — To facilitate aging research on cells in culture, the NIA provides support for the NIA Aging Cell Repository, located at the Coriell Institute for Medical Research...

  5. NIH Data Sharing Repositories

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of NIH-supported repositories that accept submissions of appropriate scientific research data from biomedical researchers. It includes resources that...

  6. Microbial processes in a clay repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canniere, Pierre de [Federal Agency of Nuclear Control (FANC), Brussels (Belgium); Meleshyn, Artur [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Braunschweig (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The safety of a deep geologic repository (DGR) for nuclear waste must be ensured for geological times exceeding human imagination taking into account large uncertainties. The long-term effects of complex biogeochemical processes potentially affecting the integrity and the long-term safety of engineered barriers might still be unknown. The aim of this presentation is to give a general overview of some microbial processes which have contributed to shape the Earth since probably billions of years and whose unexpected consequences for nuclear waste disposal should be appropriately tackled. (orig.)

  7. Trustworthy SNS for Institutional Repositories

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Sozo; Hori, Yuko; Ikeda, Daisuke

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, SNS (Social Networking Service) are attracting attention in the field of web services. SNS is the communication system which focuses on social relations between users, such as a friend and a group, named a community. Thus, SNS is useful for the institutional repositories in the sense that they can 1) increase the time and frequency of use by users, and 2) categorize or utilize the contents using the community information. However in SNS nowadays, the increase of spam messages...

  8. Locating a Radioactive Waste Repository in the Ring of Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apted, Mick; Berryman, Kelvin; Chapman, Neil; Cloos, Mark; Connor, Chuck; Kitayama, Kazumi; Sparks, Steve; Tsuchi, Hiroyuki

    2004-11-01

    The scientific, technical, and sociopolitical challenges of finding a secure site for a geological repository for radioactive wastes have created a long and stony path for many countries. Japan carried out many years of research and development before taking its first steps in site selection. The Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO) began looking for a high-level waste repository site (HLW, vitrified residue from reprocessing power reactor fuel) 2 years ago. Over the next 10-20 years, NUMO hopes to find a site to dispose of ~20,000 tons of HLW in a robustly engineered repository constructed at a depth of several hundred meters.

  9. Thermo-hydro-mechanical processes in the nearfield around a HLW repository in argillaceous formations. Vol. I. Laboratory investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chun-Liang; Czaikowski, Oliver; Rothfuchs, Tilmann; Wieczorek, Klaus

    2013-06-15

    All over the world, clay formations are being investigated as host medium for geologic disposal of radioactive waste because of their favourable properties, such as very low hydraulic conductivity against fluid transport, good sorption capacity for retardation of radionuclides, and high potential of self-sealing of fractures. The construction of a repository, the disposal of heat-emitting high-level radioactive waste (HLW), the backfilling and sealing of the remaining voids, however, will inevitably induce mechanical (M), hydraulic (H), thermal (T) and chemical (C) disturbances to the host formation and the engineered barrier system (EBS) over very long periods of time during the operation and post-closure phases of the repository. The responses and resulting property changes of the clay host rock and engineered barriers are to be well understood, characterized, and predicted for assessing the long-term performance and safety of the repository.

  10. MATHEMATICAL GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20070721 Dong Yaosong (National Key La-boratory of Geological Process and Mineral resources, Institute of Mathematical Geology and Remote Sensing, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074, China); Yang Yanchen Mutual Compensation of Nerval Net and Characteristic Analysis in Mineral Resources Exploration (Mineral Resources and Geology, ISSN1001-5663, CN45-1174/TD, 20(1), 2006, p.1-6, 3 illus., 6 tables, 5 refs.) Key words: prospecting and exploration of mineral, neural network systems

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>20041748 Chen Liang (China University of Geosciences, Nanjing , Jiangsu); Meng Gao-tou Application of Information Model on Geological Hazards Investigating and Zoning of Counties and Cities: Taking Xianju County, Zhejiang Province as an Example (Hydroge-ology & Engineering Geology, ISSN 1000-3665, CN11-2202/P, 30(5), 2003, p. 49 - 52, 4 illus. , 2 tables, 6 refs. ) Key words: geologic hazards, information systems

  12. Final repository for Denmark's low- and intermediate level radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, B.; Gravesen, P.; Petersen, S. S.; Binderup, M.

    2012-12-01

    Bertel Nilsson*, Peter Gravesen, Stig A. Schack Petersen, Merete Binderup Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Øster Voldgade 10, 1350 Copenhagen, Denmark, * email address bn@geus.dk The Danish Parliament decided in 2003 that the temporal disposal of the low- and intermediate level radioactive waste at the nuclear facilities at Risø should find another location for a final repository. The Danish radioactive waste must be stored on Danish land territory (exclusive Greenland) and must hold the entire existing radioactive waste, consisting of the waste from the decommissioning of the nuclear facilities at Risø, and the radioactive waste produced in Denmark from hospitals, universities and industry. The radioactive waste is estimated to a total amount of up to 10,000 m3. The Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, GEUS, is responsible for the geological studies of suitable areas for the repository. The task has been to locate and recognize non-fractured Quaternary and Tertiary clays or Precambrian bedrocks with low permeability which can isolate the radioactive waste from the surroundings the coming more than 300 years. Twenty two potential areas have been located and sequential reduced to the most favorable two to three locations taking into consideration geology, hydrogeology, nature protection and climate change conditions. Further detailed environmental and geology investigations will be undertaken at the two to three potential localities in 2013 to 2015. This study together with a study of safe transport of the radioactive waste and an investigation of appropriate repository concepts in relation to geology and safety analyses will constitute the basis upon which the final decision by the Danish Parliament on repository concept and repository location. The final repository is planned to be established and in operation at the earliest 2020.

  13. Construction of a technique plan repository and evaluation system based on AHP group decision-making for emergency treatment and disposal in chemical pollution accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Shenggang [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083 (China); College of Chemistry, Baotou Teachers’ College, Baotou 014030 (China); Cao, Jingcan; Feng, Li; Liang, Wenyan [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, Liqiu, E-mail: zhangliqiu@163.com [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Different chemical pollution accidents were simplified using the event tree analysis. • Emergency disposal technique plan repository of chemicals accidents was constructed. • The technique evaluation index system of chemicals accidents disposal was developed. • A combination of group decision and analytical hierarchy process (AHP) was employed. • Group decision introducing similarity and diversity factor was used for data analysis. - Abstract: The environmental pollution resulting from chemical accidents has caused increasingly serious concerns. Therefore, it is very important to be able to determine in advance the appropriate emergency treatment and disposal technology for different types of chemical accidents. However, the formulation of an emergency plan for chemical pollution accidents is considerably difficult due to the substantial uncertainty and complexity of such accidents. This paper explains how the event tree method was used to create 54 different scenarios for chemical pollution accidents, based on the polluted medium, dangerous characteristics and properties of chemicals involved. For each type of chemical accident, feasible emergency treatment and disposal technology schemes were established, considering the areas of pollution source control, pollutant non-proliferation, contaminant elimination and waste disposal. Meanwhile, in order to obtain the optimum emergency disposal technology schemes as soon as the chemical pollution accident occurs from the plan repository, the technique evaluation index system was developed based on group decision-improved analytical hierarchy process (AHP), and has been tested by using a sudden aniline pollution accident that occurred in a river in December 2012.

  14. Earthquakes - a danger to deep-lying repositories?; erdbeben: eine gefahr fuer tiefenlager?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-03-15

    This booklet issued by the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste NAGRA takes a look at geological factors concerning earthquakes and the safety of deep-lying repositories for nuclear waste. The geological processes involved in the occurrence of earthquakes are briefly looked at and the definitions for magnitude and intensity of earthquakes are discussed. Examples of damage caused by earthquakes are given. The earthquake situation in Switzerland is looked at and the effects of earthquakes on sub-surface structures and deep-lying repositories are discussed. Finally, the ideas proposed for deep-lying geological repositories for nuclear wastes are discussed.

  15. The intellectual information system for management of geological and technical arrangements during oil field exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, N. G.; Vasilyeva, E. E.; Evsyutkin, I. V.

    2017-01-01

    The intellectual information system for management of geological and technical arrangements during oil fields exploitation is developed. Service-oriented architecture of its software is a distinctive feature of the system. The results of the cluster analysis of real field data received by means of this system are shown.

  16. Performance analysis for waste repositories in the nordic countries. Report for project AFA-1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuori, S. [VTT Energy (Finland); Broden, K. [Studsvik RadWaste AB (Sweden); Carugati, S.; Brodersen, K. [Forskningscenter Risoe (Denmark); Walderhaug, T. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute (Iceland); Helgason, J. [Ekra Geological Consulting (Iceland); Sneve, M.; Hornkjoel, S. [Norwegian Radiation Protection (Norway); Backe, S. [IFE (Norway)

    1997-02-01

    The Nordic Nuclear Safety Research (NKS) project (AFA-1) focused on safety in the final disposal of long-lived low and medium level radioactive waste and its sub project (AFA-1.2), where this report has been produced, is dealing with the performance analysis of the engineered barrier system (near-field) of the repositories for low-and medium level wastes. The topic intentionally excludes the discussion of the characteristics of the geological host medium. Therefore a more generic discussion of the features of performance analysis is possible independent of the fact that different host media are considered in the Nordic countries. The different waste management systems existing and planned in the Nordic countries are shortly described in the report. In the report main emphasis is paid on the general repositories. Some of the phenomena and interactions relevant for a generic type of repository are discussed as well. Among the different approaches for the development of scenarios for safety and performance analyses one particular method - the Rock Engineering System (RES) - was chosen to be demonstratively tested in a brainstorming session, where the possible interactions and their safety significance were discussed employing a simplified and generic Nordic repository system as the reference system. As an overall impression, the AFA-project group concludes that the use of the RES approach is very easy to learn even during a short discussion session. The use of different ways to indicate the safety significance of various interactions in a graphical user interface increases the clarity. Within the project a simple software application was developed employing a generally available spread sheet programme. The developed tool allows an easy opportunity to link the cell specific comments readily available for the `reader` of the obtained results. A short review of the performance analyses carried out in the Nordic countries for actual projects concerning repositories for

  17. Evaluation of Groundwater Pathways and Travel Times From the Nevada Test Site to the Potential Yucca Mountain Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmann, K. F.; Zhu, J.; Ye, M.; Carroll, R. W.; Chapman, J. B.; Russell, C. E.; Shafer, D. S.

    2006-12-01

    Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada has been recommended as a deep geological repository for the disposal of spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste. If YM is licensed as a repository by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, it will be important to identify the potential for radionuclides to migrate from underground nuclear testing areas located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to the hydraulically downgradient repository area to ensure that monitoring does not incorrectly attribute repository failure to radionuclides originating from other sources. In this study, we use the Death Valley Regional Flow System (DVRFS) model developed by the U.S. Geological Survey to investigate potential groundwater migration pathways and associated travel times from the NTS to the proposed YM repository area. Using results from the calibrated DVRFS model and the particle tracking post-processing package MODPATH we modeled three-dimensional groundwater advective pathways in the NTS and YM region. Our study focuses on evaluating the potential for groundwater pathways between the NTS and YM withdrawal area and whether travel times for advective flow along these pathways coincide with the prospective monitoring time frame at the proposed repository. We include uncertainty in effective porosity as this is a critical variable in the determination of time for radionuclides to travel from the NTS region to the YM withdrawal area. Uncertainty in porosity is quantified through evaluation of existing site data and expert judgment and is incorporated in the model through Monte Carlo simulation. Since porosity information is limited for this region, the uncertainty is quite large and this is reflected in the results as a large range in simulated groundwater travel times.

  18. Salt repository project closeout status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-06-01

    This report provides an overview of the scope and status of the US Department of Energy (DOE`s) Salt Repository Project (SRP) at the time when the project was terminated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987. The report reviews the 10-year program of siting a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste in rock salt formations. Its purpose is to aid persons interested in the information developed during the course of this effort. Each area is briefly described and the major items of information are noted. This report, the three salt Environmental Assessments, and the Site Characterization Plan are the suggested starting points for any search of the literature and information developed by the program participants. Prior to termination, DOE was preparing to characterize three candidate sites for the first mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The sites were in Nevada, a site in volcanic tuff; Texas, a site in bedded salt (halite); and Washington, a site in basalt. These sites, identified by the screening process described in Chapter 3, were selected from the nine potentially acceptable sites shown on Figure I-1. These sites were identified in accordance with provisions of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. 196 refs., 21 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. Geology as an Historical Science: Its Perception within Science and the Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodick, Jeff; Orion, Nir

    For much of the 20th century, geology has largely been ignored as a pre-college science subject in many English-speaking nations. In this paper, we examine some of the historical based influences which have affected its status within the educational system. A key factor is that as a science, geology has sometimes been treated as being derived from physics. This is supported by episodes in which geology and physics have interacted. Thus, in the late 19th century, many geologists accepted Lord Kelvin's restricted calculation of the earth's age even though the fossil record spoke differently. More disturbing, are events in which geologists have attempted to replicate physics' methodology. Thus, Charles Lyell defined the principle of uniformitarianism on the basis of Newton's Vera Causa in which only those processes operating today would be accepted as geological causes. Lyell believed that uniformitarianism had to be defined as such, if geology, like physics was to be considered a valid, logically based science. However, the adoption of such restrictive principles is short sighted because it does not consider geology's unique defining characteristics, its historical interpretive nature. These characteristics complement the physical sciences, and also provide students with another route to scientific literacy, a major goal of Project 2061. The environmental crisis, with its large collection of interconnected variables, emphasizes that the systemic methodology of the earth sciences has much to contribute in the future to both science and education, specifically, and the welfare of the planet, generally.

  20. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. Geologic-simulation model for a hypothetical site in the Columbia Plateau. Volume 2: results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, M.G.; Petrie, G.M.; Baldwin, A.J.; Craig, R.G.

    1982-06-01

    This report contains the input data and computer results for the Geologic Simulation Model. This model is described in detail in the following report: Petrie, G.M., et. al. 1981. Geologic Simulation Model for a Hypothetical Site in the Columbia Plateau, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, Washington. The Geologic Simulation Model is a quasi-deterministic process-response model which simulates, for a million years into the future, the development of the geologic and hydrologic systems of the ground-water basin containing the Pasco Basin. Effects of natural processes on the ground-water hydrologic system are modeled principally by rate equations. The combined effects and synergistic interactions of different processes are approximated by linear superposition of their effects during discrete time intervals in a stepwise-integration approach.

  1. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems: the feasibility of computer interrogation of experts for WISAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wight, L.H.

    1980-05-01

    Simulation of the response of a waste repository to events that could initiate a fault tree to breach and failure is currently a keystone to the Battelle Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP). The repository simulation, which is part of the Disruptive Event Analysis Task, models the repository for its entire design life, one million years. This is clearly a challenging calculation, requiring input unlike any other response analysis by virtue of the long design life of the facility. What technology will provide design criteria for a million year design life. Answers to questions like this can, to some extent, be based on data, but always require some subjective judgments. The subjectivity, which is sometimes driven by inadequate or incomplete data or by a lack of understanding of the physical process, is therefore a crucial ingredient in an analysis of initiating events. Because of the variety of possible initiating events (glaciation, man-caused disruption, volcanism, etc.), many expert opinions will be solicited as input. The complexity of the simulation, the variety of experts involved, and the volume of applicable data all suggest that there may be a more direct, economical method to solicit the expert opinion. This report addresses the feasibility of such a system. Background information is presented that demonstrates the advantages of a computer interrogation system over conventional interrogation and assessment techniques. In the subsequent three sections the three elements - structure and decomposition, scaling, and synthesis - that are basic to any interrogation and assessment technique are reviewed. The interrelationship are schematically illustrated between these three fundamental elements and, therefore, serves as a useful guide to these three sections. Each of these three sections begins with a recommended approach to the particular element and ends with an illustration of representative dialogue.

  2. The Computational Materials Repository

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landis, David D.; Hummelshøj, Jens S.; Nestorov, Svetlozar

    2012-01-01

    The possibilities for designing new materials based on quantum physics calculations are rapidly growing, but these design efforts lead to a significant increase in the amount of computational data created. The Computational Materials Repository (CMR) addresses this data challenge and provides...

  3. Corticotropin, Repository Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.P. Acthar Gel® ... Corticotropin repository injection comes as a long acting gel to inject under the skin or into a ... prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, or herbal products you are taking or plan to take. ...

  4. Eastern Posavina as unique geologic and hydrogeologic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grba, Nenad; Krcmar, Dejan; Neubauer, Franz; Roncevic, Srdjan; Kragulj Isakovski, Marijana; Molnar Jazic, Jelena; Dalmacija, Bozo

    2016-04-01

    The geochemical survey on soils has huge significance for determining the anthropogenic source of metals in total metal content from sediments, that could origin from both sources. In order to obtain a complete picture, geological mapping and impact on specific area should be done. The investigated area included the eastern part of the Posavina Basin from the furthest north-western part of Jadar block terrane (sampling sites Zasavica Special Nature Reserve of the first category in the Ramsar List, Batrovci, Bosut and Jamena locality). In period between 2010 and 2014 all investigations were performed on samples from depth to 0.50 m. Sediment were analyzed for Ni, Zn, Cd, Cr, Cu and Pb by flame atomic absorption spectrometry-FAAS (Perkin Elmer, AAnalyst 700). The heavy metal content of this alluvial plain and loess terraces area are variable like Ni (14 - 47 mg/kg), Zn (70 - 265 mg/kg), Cd (2,7-4,0 mg/kg), Cr (4 - 32 mg/kg), Cu (28 - 68 mg/kg) and Pb (5 - 101 mg/kg). Except Cr, the most of the obtained range values were higher than Upper Continental Crust (UCC) from sedimentary and loess data (Rudnick and Gao, 2004)). Several studies collaborate to this hypothesis related to Chemical Proxy of Alteration (CPA, 60-95) from Jadar unit and neighbor representative catchment areas (Grba et al., 2014, Buggle et al., 2011and Šajnović, 2008). The direction of hillslope transport are as follow: from north it is Fruska Gora Mountain with serpentinite soils from ultramafic rocks, Cer Mountains mostly with a plutonic composition and from south and from east Bosnian Mountains mainly Majevica as part of Internal Dinarides Ophiolites mélange. Contributions of geochemical process have direct and dominant influence on concentrations of heavy metals in this region. Taking into account the background values for this region (Grba et al., 2014) anthropogenic impacts are small in extent, dominantly by zinc moderately to strongly polluted which have dual origin (geological and

  5. Geologic Framework Model Analysis Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Clayton

    2000-12-19

    The purpose of this report is to document the Geologic Framework Model (GFM), Version 3.1 (GFM3.1) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.1 and previous versions. The GFM represents a three-dimensional interpretation of the stratigraphy and structural features of the location of the potential Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository. The GFM encompasses an area of 65 square miles (170 square kilometers) and a volume of 185 cubic miles (771 cubic kilometers). The boundaries of the GFM were chosen to encompass the most widely distributed set of exploratory boreholes (the Water Table or WT series) and to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the unsaturated zone (UZ). The depth of the model is constrained by the inferred depth of the Tertiary-Paleozoic unconformity. The GFM was constructed from geologic map and borehole data. Additional information from measured stratigraphy sections, gravity profiles, and seismic profiles was also considered. This interim change notice (ICN) was prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model Process Model Report Revision 01 (CRWMS M&O 2000). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The GFM is one component of the Integrated Site Model (ISM) (Figure l), which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) Rock Properties Model (RPM); and (3) Mineralogic Model (MM). The ISM merges the detailed project stratigraphy into model stratigraphic units that are most useful for the primary downstream models and the

  6. Assessment of disruptive scenarios of a Canadian used fuel repository in crystalline rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gobien, M.; Garisto, F.; Hunt, N.; Kremer, E.P. [Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO), Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    The NWMO has recently extended its modelling capabilities by performing simulations for four disruptive scenarios that, to date, have not yet been examined in detail. These scenarios complement those considered in an existing postclosure safety assessment for a conceptual geological repository located in a hypothetical crystalline rock formation. The four new disruptive scenarios are: Shaft Seal Failure, Undetected Fault, Open or Poorly Sealed Borehole and Open Borehole Due to Inadvertent Human Intrusion. All simulations are based on the FRAC3DVS-OPG Site-Scale Model. The Site-Scale Model includes a simplified representation of the full repository and a portion of the surrounding sub-regional flow system. All transport simulations are performed with only the radionuclide I-129. Transport rates to the surface and a domestic water supply well are compared to the Reference Case results from an earlier case study documented in Reference. (author)

  7. GEOLOGICAL AND GEOTECHNICAL CITY KNOWLEDGE SYSTEM OF THE URBAN AREAS IN THE CENTRAL PART OF DENIZLI CITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil KUMSAR

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Geological and geotecnical investigations which are carried out at the first stage of a settlement place of a city play an important role on the development of urbanization. Engineering geology maps which are prepared by using the data of geological and geotechnical investigation guide urban plans and settlement. In this study a geological and geotechnical city information system of Denizli city (JEO-KBS was developed by evaluating the Project data of the Geological, Geotechnical and Hydrogeological Properties of Denizli Municipality Settlement Place which was carried out by the research team of the Geological Engineering Department of Pamukkale University. Topography, urban plan and distric maps are digitised into the system. A knowledge base system was written for evaluating geotechnical tests of field and loboratory, geophysical and geological data. Engineering geology maps were prepared in JEO-KBS system by using the data of the knowledge base system. It is possible to reach geological and geotechnical data on a defined point on the graphic screen of JEO-KBS. The developed city knowledge base system gives an important contribution to the municipalities for urban planning and re-evaluation of geological and geotechnical data.

  8. NATIONAL WATER INFORMATION SYSTEM OF THE U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Melvin D.

    1985-01-01

    National Water Information System (NWIS) has been designed as an interactive, distributed data system. It will integrate the existing, diverse data-processing systems into a common system. It will also provide easier, more flexible use as well as more convenient access and expanded computing, dissemination, and data-analysis capabilities. The NWIS is being implemented as part of a Distributed Information System (DIS) being developed by the Survey's Water Resources Division. The NWIS will be implemented on each node of the distributed network for the local processing, storage, and dissemination of hydrologic data collected within the node's area of responsibility. The processor at each node will also be used to perform hydrologic modeling, statistical data analysis, text editing, and some administrative work.

  9. A new classification scheme for deep geothermal systems based on geologic controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeck, I.

    2012-04-01

    A key element in the characterization, assessment and development of geothermal energy systems is the resource classification. Throughout the past 30 years many classifications and definitions were published mainly based on temperature and thermodynamic properties. In the past classification systems, temperature has been the essential measure of the quality of the resource and geothermal systems have been divided into three different temperature (or enthalpy) classes: low-temperature, moderate-temperature and high-temperature. There are, however, no uniform temperature ranges for these classes. It is still a key requirement of a geothermal classification that resource assessment provides logical and consistent frameworks simplified enough to communicate important aspects of geothermal energy potential to both non-experts and general public. One possible solution may be to avoid classifying geothermal resources by temperature and simply state the range of temperatures at the individual site. Due to technological development, in particular in EGS (Enhanced Geothermal Systems or Engineered Geothermal Systems; both terms are considered synonymously in this thesis) technology, currently there are more geothermal systems potentially economic than 30 years ago. An alternative possibility is to classify geothermal energy systems by their geologic setting. Understanding and characterizing the geologic controls on geothermal systems has been an ongoing focus on different scales from plate tectonics to local tectonics/structural geology. In fact, the geologic setting has a fundamental influence on the potential temperature, on the fluid composition, the reservoir characteristics and whether the system is a predominantly convective or conductive system. The key element in this new classification for geothermal systems is the recognition that a geothermal system is part of a geological system. The structural geological and plate tectonic setting has a fundamental influence on

  10. MATHEMATICAL GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20072288 Hong Quan(Ningbo Institute for Engineering Investigation,Ningbo 315012,China)Design of Information Management System for Engineering Investigation Maps Based on C/S Model(The Chinese Journal of Geological Hazard and Control,ISSN1003-8035,CN11-2852/P,17(1),2006,p.86-90,2 illus.,6 refs.)Key words:information systems,engineering geological map

  11. Site suitability criteria for solidified high level waste repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckman, R.A.; Holdsworth, T.; Towse, D.F.

    1979-03-07

    Activities devoted to development of regulations, criteria, and standards for storage of solidified high-level radioactive wastes are reported. The work is summarized in sections on site suitability regulations, risk calculations, geological models, aquifer models, human usage model, climatology model, and repository characteristics. Proposed additional analytical work is also summarized. (JRD)

  12. Oceanographic Data Repositories: An Analysis of the International Situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Couto Corrêa da Silva

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The preservation and organization of oceanographic research data enables the scientific community to consult and reuse information of different kinds, and this is made possible by the repositories, meaning the services that facilitate data storage and dissemination. This paper reviews the current situation of oceanographic data repositories across different countries and evaluates them according to a series of indicators. The writers propose that although interest in storing and reusing oceanographic data has increased in recent years, the repositories are still in the process of developing their systems for processing, disseminating and reusing data. The repositories also differ in terms of architecture and the organizational level of the content they offer.

  13. Advances in Geologic Disposal System Modeling and Application to Crystalline Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariner, Paul E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stein, Emily R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Frederick, Jennifer M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sevougian, S. David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hammond, Glenn Edward [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fascitelli, D. G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-09-22

    The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology (OFCT) is conducting research and development (R&D) on geologic disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high-level nuclear waste (HLW). Two of the high priorities for UFDC disposal R&D are design concept development and disposal system modeling (DOE 2011). These priorities are directly addressed in the UFDC Generic Disposal Systems Analysis (GDSA) work package, which is charged with developing a disposal system modeling and analysis capability for evaluating disposal system performance for nuclear waste in geologic media (e.g., salt, granite, clay, and deep borehole disposal). This report describes specific GDSA activities in fiscal year 2016 (FY 2016) toward the development of the enhanced disposal system modeling and analysis capability for geologic disposal of nuclear waste. The GDSA framework employs the PFLOTRAN thermal-hydrologic-chemical multi-physics code and the Dakota uncertainty sampling and propagation code. Each code is designed for massively-parallel processing in a high-performance computing (HPC) environment. Multi-physics representations in PFLOTRAN are used to simulate various coupled processes including heat flow, fluid flow, waste dissolution, radionuclide release, radionuclide decay and ingrowth, precipitation and dissolution of secondary phases, and radionuclide transport through engineered barriers and natural geologic barriers to the biosphere. Dakota is used to generate sets of representative realizations and to analyze parameter sensitivity.

  14. Publishers and repositories

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The impact of self-archiving on journals and publishers is an important topic for all those involved in scholarly communication. There is some evidence that the physics arXiv has had no impact on physics journals, while 'economic common sense' suggests that some impact is inevitable. I shall review recent studies of librarian attitudes towards repositories and journals, and place this in the context of IOP Publishing's experiences with arXiv. I shall offer some possible reasons for the mis-match between these perspectives and then discuss how IOP has linked with arXiv and experimented with OA publishing. As well as launching OA journals we have co-operated with Cornell and the arXiv on Eprintweb.org, a platform that offers new features to repository users. View Andrew Wray's biography

  15. Realization of client/server management information system of coal mine based on ODBC in geology and survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Q.; Mao, S.; Yang, F.; Han, Z. [Shandong University of Science and Technology (China). Geoscience Department

    2000-08-01

    The paper describes in detail the framework and the application theory of Open Database Connectivity (ODBC), the formation of a client/server system of geological and surveying management information system, and the connection of the various databases. Then systematically, the constitution and functional realization of the geological management information system are introduced. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Continental Scientific Drilling Program thermal regimes: comparative site assessment geology of five magma-hydrothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, F.; Waters, A.C. (eds.)

    1980-10-01

    The geology and salient aspects of geophysics and hydrogeochemistry of five high-grade geothermal systems in the USA are reviewed. On the basis of this information, a target location is suggested for a deep (5- to 8-km) borehole that will maximize the amount of scientific information to be learned at each of the five geothermal areas.

  17. Geology of the Alaska-Juneau lode system, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenhofel, William Stephens

    1952-01-01

    The Alaska-Juneau lode system for many years was one of the worlds leading gold-producing areas. Total production from the years 1893 to 1946 has amounted to about 94 million dollars, with principal values in contained gold but with some silver and lead values. The principal mine is the Alaska-Juneau mine, from which the lode system takes its name. The lode system is a part of a larger gold-bearing belt, generally referred to as the Juneau gold belt, along the western border of the Coast Range batholith. The rocks of the Alaska-Juneau lode system consist of a monoclinal sequence of steeply northeasterly dipping volcanic, state, and schist rocks, all of which have been metamorphosed by dynamic and thermal processes attendant with the intrusion of the Coast Range batholith. The rocks form a series of belts that trend northwest parallel to the Coast Range. In addition to the Coast Range batholith lying a mile to the east of the lode system, there are numerous smaller intrusives, all of which are sill-like in form and are thus conformable to the regional structure. The bedded rocks are Mesozoic in age; the Coast Range batholith is Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous in age. Some of the smaller intrusives pre-date the batholith, others post-date it. All of the rocks are cut by steeply dipping faults. The Alaska-Juneau lode system is confined exclusively to the footwall portion of the Perseverance slate band. The slate band is composed of black slate and black phyllite with lesser amounts of thin-bedded quartzite. Intrusive into the slate band are many sill-like bodies of rocks generally referred to as meta-gabbro. The gold deposits of the lode system are found both within the slate rocks and the meta-gabbro rocks, and particularly in those places where meta-gabbro bodies interfinger with slate. Thus the ore bodies are found in and near the terminations of meta-gabbro bodies. The ore bodies are quartz stringer-lodes composed of a great number of quartz veins from 6

  18. Field geology with a wearable computer: 1st results of the Cyborg Astrobiologist System

    OpenAIRE

    McGuire, Patrick C.; Gomez-Elvira, Javier; Rodriguez-Manfredi, Jose Antonio; Sebastian-Martinez, Eduardo; Ormo, Jens; Diaz-Martinez, Enrique; Oesker, Markus; Haschke, Robert; Ontrup, Joerg; Ritter, Helge

    2005-01-01

    We present results from the first geological field tests of the `Cyborg Astrobiologist', which is a wearable computer and video camcorder system that we are using to test and train a computer-vision system towards having some of the autonomous decision-making capabilities of a field-geologist. The Cyborg Astrobiologist platform has thus far been used for testing and development of these algorithms and systems: robotic acquisition of quasi-mosaics of images, real-time image segmentation, and r...

  19. Attenuation of elastic waves in bentonite and monitoring of radioactive waste repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biryukov, A.; Tisato, N.; Grasselli, G.

    2016-04-01

    Deep geological repositories, isolated from the geosphere by an engineered bentonite barrier, are currently considered the safest solution for high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) disposal. As the physical conditions and properties of the bentonite barrier are anticipated to change with time, seismic tomography was suggested as a viable technique to monitor the physical state and integrity of the barrier and to timely detect any unforeseen failure. To do so, the seismic monitoring system needs to be optimized, and this can be achieved by conducting numerical simulations of wave propagation in the repository geometry. Previous studies treated bentonite as an elastic medium, whereas recent experimental investigations indicate its pronounced viscoelastic behaviour. The aims of this contribution are (i) to numerically estimate the effective attenuation of bentonite as a function of temperature T and water content Wc, so that synthetic data can accurately reproduce experimental traces and (ii) assess the feasibility and limitation of the HLRW repository monitoring by simulating the propagation of sonic waves in a realistic repository geometry. A finite difference method was utilized to simulate the wave propagation in experimental and repository setups. First, the input of the viscoelastic model was varied to achieve a match between experimental and numerical traces. The routine was repeated for several values of Wc and T, so that quality factors Qp(Wc, T) and Qs(Wc, T) were obtained. Then, the full-scale monitoring procedure was simulated for six scenarios, representing the evolution of bentonite's physical state. The estimated Qp and Qs exhibited a minimum at Wc = 20 per cent and higher sensitivity to Wc, rather than T, suggesting that pronounced inelasticity of the clay has to be taken into account in geophysical modelling and analysis. The repository-model traces confirm that active seismic monitoring is, in principle, capable of depicting physical changes in the

  20. Will salt repositories be dry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredehoeft, John D.

    The National Academy of Science committee that considered geologic disposal of nuclear waste in the mid-1950s recommended salt as a repository medium, partly because of its high thermal conductivity and because it was believed to be “dry” (perhaps the appropriate thought is “impermeable”). Certainly, the fact that Paleozoic salt deposits exist in many parts of t h e world is evidence for very low rates of dissolution by moving groundwater. The fact that the dissolution rates were so small led many scientists to the conclusion that the salt beds were nearly impermeable. The major source of brine within the salt beds was thought to be fluid inclusions within salt crystals, which could migrate through differential solution toward a source of high heat. The idea that salt was uniformly “dry” was revised when exploratory drilling in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico encountered brines within the Castile Formation, an evaporite deposit below the Salado Formation. The brine reservoirs were thought to be isolated pockets of brine in an otherwise “impermeable” salt section.

  1. Analysis of computational vulnerabilities in digital repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdete Fernandes Belarmino

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Demonstrates the results of research that aimed to analyze the computational vulnerabilities of digital directories in public Universities. Argues the relevance of information in contemporary societies like an invaluable resource, emphasizing scientific information as an essential element to constitute scientific progress. Characterizes the emergence of Digital Repositories and highlights its use in academic environment to preserve, promote, disseminate and encourage the scientific production. Describes the main software for the construction of digital repositories. Method. The investigation identified and analyzed the vulnerabilities that are exposed the digital repositories using Penetration Testing running. Discriminating the levels of risk and the types of vulnerabilities. Results. From a sample of 30 repositories, we could examine 20, identified that: 5% of the repositories have critical vulnerabilities, 85% high, 25% medium and 100% lowers. Conclusions. Which demonstrates the necessity to adapt actions for these environments that promote informational security to minimizing the incidence of external and / or internal systems attacks.Abstract Grey Text – use bold for subheadings when needed.

  2. Viability assessment of a repository at Yucca Mountain: Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1998-12-01

    Based on the viability assessment, DOE believes that Yucca Mountain remains a promising site for a geologic repository and that work should proceed to support a decision in 2001 on whether to recommend the site to the President for development as a repository. Over 15 years, extensive research has validated many of the expectations of the scientists who first suggested that remote, desert regions of the Southwest are well-suited for a geologic repository. Engineered barriers can be designed to contain waste for thousands of years, and the natural barriers can delay and dilute any radioactive material that migrates from the waste packages. Current models indicate that the possible radiation exposure to future populations living nearby could be comparable to present-day exposure levels from natural background radiation. Design alternatives that may improve performance and reduce remaining uncertainties are now being evaluated. The performance of a geologic repository over such long time periods--longer than recorded human history--cannot be proven beyond all doubt. Forecasts about future geologic and climatic conditions and engineering estimates of how long the waste packages will remain intact cannot be directly validated. The mathematical models used in the performance assessment are subject to uncertainties that can be reduced but never completely eliminated. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's general standard for meeting geologic repository regulatory criteria and objectives is reasonable assurance. While considerable uncertainties remain today, DOE believes that reasonable assurance should be achievable in the licensing process after the planned work is completed. The DOE believes, therefore, that ongoing work at Yucca Mountain should proceed as planned.

  3. Viability assessment of a repository at Yucca Mountain: Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1998-12-01

    Based on the viability assessment, DOE believes that Yucca Mountain remains a promising site for a geologic repository and that work should proceed to support a decision in 2001 on whether to recommend the site to the President for development as a repository. Over 15 years, extensive research has validated many of the expectations of the scientists who first suggested that remote, desert regions of the Southwest are well-suited for a geologic repository. Engineered barriers can be designed to contain waste for thousands of years, and the natural barriers can delay and dilute any radioactive material that migrates from the waste packages. Current models indicate that the possible radiation exposure to future populations living nearby could be comparable to present-day exposure levels from natural background radiation. Design alternatives that may improve performance and reduce remaining uncertainties are now being evaluated. The performance of a geologic repository over such long time periods--longer than recorded human history--cannot be proven beyond all doubt. Forecasts about future geologic and climatic conditions and engineering estimates of how long the waste packages will remain intact cannot be directly validated. The mathematical models used in the performance assessment are subject to uncertainties that can be reduced but never completely eliminated. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's general standard for meeting geologic repository regulatory criteria and objectives is reasonable assurance. While considerable uncertainties remain today, DOE believes that reasonable assurance should be achievable in the licensing process after the planned work is completed. The DOE believes, therefore, that ongoing work at Yucca Mountain should proceed as planned.

  4. Borehole Geologic Data for the 216-Z Crib Facilities, A Status of Data Assembled through the Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Last, George V.; Mackley, Rob D.; Lanigan, David C.

    2006-09-25

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is assembling existing borehole geologic information to aid in determining the distribution and potential movement of contaminants released to the environment and to aid selection of remedial alternatives. This information is being assembled via the Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS), which is being developed as part of the Characterization of Systems Project, managed by PNNL, and the Remediation Decision Support Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project, managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc. The purpose of this particular study was to assemble the existing borehole geologic data pertaining to sediments underlying the 216-Z Crib Facilities and the Plutonium Finishing Plant Closure Zone. The primary objective for Fiscal Year 2006 was to assemble the data, complete log plots, and interpret the location of major geologic contacts for each major borehole in and around the primary disposal facilities that received carbon tetrachloride. To date, 154 boreholes located within or immediately adjacent to 19 of the 216-Z crib facilities have been incorporated into HBGIS. Borehole geologic information for the remaining three Z-crib facilities is either lacking (e.g. 216-Z-13, -14, and -15), or has been identified as a lesser priority to be incorporated at a later date.

  5. Video Playback Modifications for a DSpace Repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Gilbertson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on modifications to an institutional repository system using the open source DSpace software to support playback of digital videos embedded within item pages. The changes were made in response to the formation and quick startup of an event capture group within the library that was charged with creating and editing video recordings of library events and speakers. This paper specifically discusses the selection of video formats, changes to the visual theme of the repository to allow embedded playback and captioning support, and modifications and bug fixes to the file downloading subsystem to enable skip-ahead playback of videos via byte-range requests. This paper also describes workflows for transcoding videos in the required formats, creating captions, and depositing videos into the repository.

  6. Digital Preservation in the Context of Institutional Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockx-Yu, Helen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To discuss the issues and challenges of digital preservation facing institutional repositories and to illustrate the Joint Information Systems Committee's (JISC) view on institutional repositories and its key initiatives in helping UK institutions address these issues. Design/methodology/approach: A combination of published work and JISC…

  7. Repositories in an institutional context : Technical discussion Group 4

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    Repositories are starting to take their place within an institution¹s infrastructure, sitting alongside portals, course management systems, virtual research environments and others. But in considering how a repository can best serve an institution it is important to consider how this technology will integrate with existing systems, so that it doesn¹t become a standalone white elephant that is a nuisance to use. This breakout will consider the technical ways in which repositories can be presented as a system that is easy to use and interact with, from the searcher¹s, depositor¹s and administrator¹s perspectives. It will look at potential interaction through other institutional environments and seek to identify ways in which repositories can become a more integral part of the technical landscape. Bring along your examples of how repositories are being technically embedded within institutions to help share experience and ideas.

  8. Selection and Basic Properties of the Buffer Material for High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Zhijian

    2008-01-01

    Radioactive wastes arising from a wide range of human activities are in many different physical and chemical forms, contaminated with varying radioactivity. Their common features are the potential hazard associated with their radioactivity and the need to manage them in such a way as to protect the human environment. The geological disposal is regarded as the most reasonable and effective way to safely disposing high-level radioactive wastes in the world. The conceptual model of geological disposal in China is based on a multi-barrier system that combines an isolating geological environment with an engineered barrier system. The buffer is one of the main engineered barriers for HLW repository. It is expected to maintain its low water permeability, self-sealing property, radio nuclides adsorption and retardation properties, thermal conductivity, chemical buffering property,canister supporting property, and stress buffering property over a long period of time. Bentonite is selected as the main content of buffer material that can satisfy the above requirements. The Gaomiaozi deposit is selected as the candidate supplier for China's buffer material of high level radioactive waste repository. This paper presents the geological features of the GMZ deposit and basic properties of the GMZ Na-bentonite. It is a super-large deposit with a high content of montmorillonite (about 75%), and GMZ-1, which is Na-bentonite produced from GMZ deposit is selected as the reference material for China's buffer material study.

  9. Development of a definition, classification system, and model for cultural geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Lloyd W., III

    The concept for this study is based upon a personal interest by the author, an American Indian, in promoting cultural perspectives in undergraduate college teaching and learning environments. Most academicians recognize that merged fields can enhance undergraduate curricula. However, conflict may occur when instructors attempt to merge social science fields such as history or philosophy with geoscience fields such as mining and geomorphology. For example, ideologies of Earth structures derived from scientific methodologies may conflict with historical and spiritual understandings of Earth structures held by American Indians. Specifically, this study addresses the problem of how to combine cultural studies with the geosciences into a new merged academic discipline called cultural geology. This study further attempts to develop the merged field of cultural geology using an approach consisting of three research foci: a definition, a classification system, and a model. Literature reviews were conducted for all three foci. Additionally, to better understand merged fields, a literature review was conducted specifically for academic fields that merged social and physical sciences. Methodologies concentrated on the three research foci: definition, classification system, and model. The definition was derived via a two-step process. The first step, developing keyword hierarchical ranking structures, was followed by creating and analyzing semantic word meaning lists. The classification system was developed by reviewing 102 classification systems and incorporating selected components into a system framework. The cultural geology model was created also utilizing a two-step process. A literature review of scientific models was conducted. Then, the definition and classification system were incorporated into a model felt to reflect the realm of cultural geology. A course syllabus was then developed that incorporated the resulting definition, classification system, and model. This

  10. NASA Biological Specimen Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMonigal, K. A.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Sams, C. F.; Johnson, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Biological Specimen Repository (NBSR) was established in 2006 to collect, process, preserve and distribute spaceflight-related biological specimens from long duration ISS astronauts. This repository provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning may missions. The NBSR collects blood and urine samples from all participating ISS crewmembers who have provided informed consent. These biological samples are collected once before flight, during flight scheduled on flight days 15, 30, 60, 120 and within 2 weeks of landing. Postflight sessions are conducted 3 and 30 days after landing. The number of in-flight sessions is dependent on the duration of the mission. Specimens are maintained under optimal storage conditions in a manner that will maximize their integrity and viability for future research The repository operates under the authority of the NASA/JSC Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects to support scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment. The NBSR will institute guidelines for the solicitation, review and sample distribution process through establishment of the NBSR Advisory Board. The Advisory Board will be composed of representatives of all participating space agencies to evaluate each request from investigators for use of the samples. This process will be consistent with ethical principles, protection of crewmember confidentiality, prevailing laws and regulations, intellectual property policies, and consent form language. Operations supporting the NBSR are scheduled to continue until the end of U.S. presence on the ISS. Sample distribution is proposed to begin with selections on investigations beginning in 2017. The availability of the NBSR will contribute to the body of knowledge about the diverse factors of spaceflight on human physiology.

  11. IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION OF THE REPOSITORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus Milling

    2003-10-01

    The NGDRS has facilitated 85% of cores, cuttings, and other data identified available for transfer to the public sector. Over 12 million linear feet of cores and cuttings, in addition to large numbers of paleontological samples and are now available for public use. To date, with industry contributions for program operations and data transfers, the NGDRS project has realized a 6.5 to 1 return on investment to Department of Energy funds. Large-scale transfers of seismic data have been evaluated, but based on the recommendation of the NGDRS steering committee, cores have been given priority because of the vast scale of the seismic data problem relative to the available funding. The rapidly changing industry conditions have required that the primary core and cuttings preservation strategy evolve as well. Additionally, the NGDRS clearinghouse is evaluating the viability of transferring seismic data covering the western shelf of the Florida Gulf Coast. AGI remains actively involved in working to realize the vision of the National Research Council's report of geoscience data preservation. GeoTrek has been ported to Linux and MySQL, ensuring a purely open-source version of the software. This effort is key in ensuring long-term viability of the software so that is can continue basic operation regardless of specific funding levels. Work has been on a major revision of GeoTrek, using the open-source MapServer project and its related MapScript language. This effort will address a number of key technology issues that appear to be rising for 2003, including the discontinuation of the use of Java in future Microsoft operating systems. The recent donation of BPAmoco's Houston core facility to the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology has provided substantial short-term relief of the space constraints for public repository space.

  12. ECONOMIC GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>20080252 Zhai Yusheng(State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources,China University of Geosciences,Beijing 100083,China) Earth System,Me-tallogenic System to Exploration System(Earth Science Frontiers,ISSN1005-2321,CN11-3370/P,14(1),2007,p.172-181,6 illus.,18 refs.,with English abstract)

  13. Bedrock geologic map of the central block area, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, W.C.; Potter, C.J.; Sweetkind, D.S. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Dickerson, R.P.; San Juan, C.A. [Pacific Western Technologies Ltd., Denver, CO (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Bedrock geologic maps form the foundation for investigations that characterize and assess the viability of the potential high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This study was funded by the US Department of Energy Yucca Mountain Project to provide a detailed (1:6,000-scale) bedrock geologic map for the area within and adjacent to the potential repository area at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Prior to this study, the 1:12,000-scale map of Scott and Bon, (1984) was the primary source of bedrock geologic data for the Yucca Mountain Project. However, targeted detailed mapping within the central block at Yucca Mountain revealed structural complexities along some of the intrablock faults that were not evident at 1:12,000 (Scott and Bonk, 1984). As a result, this study was undertaken to define the character and extent of the dominant structural features in the vicinity of the potential repository. In addition to structural considerations, ongoing subsurface excavation and geologic mapping within the exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), development of a three-dimensional-framework geologic model, and borehole investigations required use of a constituent stratigraphic system to facilitate surface to underground comparisons. The map units depicted in this report correspond as closely as possible to the proposed stratigraphic nomenclature by Buesch and others (1996), as described here.

  14. Geologic and hydrologic controls on the economic potential of hydrothermal systems associated with upper crustal plutons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Philipp; Driesner, Thomas; Scott, Samuel; Lecumberri-Sanchez, Pilar

    2016-04-01

    Heat and mass transport in hydrothermal systems associated with upper crustal magmatic intrusions can result in resources with large economic potential (Kesler, 1994). Active hydrothermal systems can form high-enthalpy geothermal reservoirs with the possibility for renewable energy production. Fossil continental or submarine hydrothermal systems may have formed ore deposits at variable crustal depths, which can be mined near today's surface with an economic profit. In both cases, only the right combination of first-order geologic and hydrologic controls may lead to the formation of a significant resource. To foster exploration for these hydrothermal georesources, we need to improve our understanding of subsurface fluxes of mass and energy by combining numerical process modelling, observations at both active and fossil systems, as well as knowledge of fluid and rock properties and their interactions in natural systems. The presentation will highlight the role of non-linear fluid properties, phase separation, salt precipitation, fluid mixing, permeability structure, hydraulic fracturing and the transition from brittle to ductile rock behavior as major geologic and hydrologic controls on the formation of high-enthalpy and supercritical geothermal resources (Scott et al., 2015), and magmatic-hydrothermal mineral resources, such as porphyry copper, massive sulfide and epithermal gold deposits (Lecumberri-Sanchez et al., 2015; Weis, 2015). References: Kesler, S. E., 1994: Mineral Resources, economics and the environment, New York, McMillan, 391. Lecumberri-Sanchez, P., Steele-MacInnis, M., Weis, P., Driesner, T., Bodnar, R.J. (2015): Salt precipitation in magmatic-hydrothermal systems associated with upper crustal plutons. Geology, v. 43, p. 1063-1066, doi:10.1130/G37163.1 Scott, S., Driesner, T., Weis, P. (2015): Geologic controls on supercritical geothermal resources above magmatic intrusions. Nature Communications, 6:7837 doi: 10.1038/ncomms8837 Weis, P. (2015): The

  15. Refactoring Process Models in Large Process Repositories.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, B.; Reichert, M.U.

    2008-01-01

    With the increasing adoption of process-aware information systems (PAIS), large process model repositories have emerged. Over time respective models have to be re-aligned to the real-world business processes through customization or adaptation. This bears the risk that model redundancies are introdu

  16. Refactoring Process Models in Large Process Repositories.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, B.; Reichert, M.U.

    With the increasing adoption of process-aware information systems (PAIS), large process model repositories have emerged. Over time respective models have to be re-aligned to the real-world business processes through customization or adaptation. This bears the risk that model redundancies are

  17. Geology of the Beowawe geothermal system, Eureka and Lander Counties, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struhsacker, E.M.

    1980-07-01

    A geologic study is described undertaken to evaluate the nature of structural and stratigraphic controls within the Beowawe geothermal system, Eureka and Lander Counties, Nevada. This study includes geologic mapping at a scale of 1:24,000 and lithologic logs of deep Chevron wells. Two major normal fault systems control the configuration of the Beowawe geothermal system. Active hot springs and sinter deposits lie along the Malpais Fault zone at the base of the Malpais Rim. The Malpais Rim is one of several east-northeast-striking, fault-bounded cuestas in north central Nevada. A steeply inclined scarp slope faces northwest towards Whirlwind Valley. The general inclination of the volcanic rocks on the Malpais dip slope is 5/sup 0/ to 10/sup 0/ southeast.

  18. A WebGIS-Based Information System for Monitoring and Warning of Geological Disasters for Lanzhou City, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Miao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring and warning of geological disasters accurately and in a timely fashion would dramatically mitigate casualties and economic losses. This paper takes Lanzhou city as an example and designs a Web-based system, namely the information system for geological disaster monitoring and warning (ISGDMW. Presented are its framework, key developing technologies, database, and working flow. The information system adopts a Browser/Server (B/S structure and has three-tier architecture, combining in-situ monitoring instruments, the wireless sensor network, WebGIS techniques and the grey system theory. The framework of the ISGDMW can be divided into three categories: (1 in-situ monitoring system, it aims to monitor geological disaster sites and get state information of geological disaster sites; (2 database, manage in-situ monitoring data, antecedent field investigating data and basic data; (3 analyzing and warning system, analyze in-situ monitoring data, understand the deformation trend of the potential geological disaster, and release disaster warning information to the public. The ISGDMW allow the processes of geological disaster monitoring, in-situ monitoring data analysis, geological disaster warning to be implemented in an efficient and quick way, and can provide scientific suggestions to commanders for quick response to the possibility of geological disaster.

  19. Technical reliability of geological disposal for high-level radioactive wastes in Japan. The second progress report. Part 3. Safety assessment for geological disposal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    Based on the Advisory Committee Report on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Backend Policy submitted to the Japanese Government in 1997, JNC documents the progress of research and development program in the form of the second progress report (the first one published in 1992). It summarizes an evaluation of the technical reliability and safety of the geological disposal concept for high-level radioactive wastes (HLW) in Japan. The present document, the part 3 of the progress report, concerns safety assessment for geological disposal systems definitely introduced in part 1 and 2 of this series and consists of 9 chapters. Chapter I concerns the methodology for safety assessment while Chapter II deals with diversity and uncertainty about the scenario, the adequate model and the required data of the systems above. Chapter III summarizes the components of the geological disposal system. Chapter IV refers to the relationship between radioactive wastes and human life through groundwater, i.e. nuclide migration. In Chapter V is made a reference case which characterizes the geological environmental data using artificial barrier specifications. (Ohno. S.)

  20. Geology and photometric variation of solar system bodies with minor atmospheres: implications for solid exoplanets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yuka; Kimura, Jun; Dohm, James; Ohtake, Makiko

    2014-09-01

    A reasonable basis for future astronomical investigations of exoplanets lies in our best knowledge of the planets and satellites in the Solar System. Solar System bodies exhibit a wide variety of surface environments, even including potential habitable conditions beyond Earth, and it is essential to know how they can be characterized from outside the Solar System. In this study, we provide an overview of geological features of major Solar System solid bodies with minor atmospheres (i.e., the terrestrial Moon, Mercury, the Galilean moons, and Mars) that affect surface albedo at local to global scale, and we survey how they influence point-source photometry in the UV/visible/near IR (i.e., the reflection-dominant range). We simulate them based on recent mapping products and also compile observed light curves where available. We show a 5-50% peak-to-trough variation amplitude in one spin rotation associated with various geological processes including heterogeneous surface compositions due to igneous activities, interaction with surrounding energetic particles, and distribution of grained materials. Some indications of these processes are provided by the amplitude and wavelength dependence of variation in combinations of the time-averaged spectra. We also estimate the photometric precision needed to detect their spin rotation rates through periodogram analysis. Our survey illustrates realistic possibilities for inferring the detailed properties of solid exoplanets with future direct imaging observations. Key Words: Planetary environments-Planetary geology-Solar System-Extrasolar terrestrial planets.

  1. Coupled Multi-physical Simulations for the Assessment of Nuclear Waste Repository Concepts: Modeling, Software Development and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massmann, J.; Nagel, T.; Bilke, L.; Böttcher, N.; Heusermann, S.; Fischer, T.; Kumar, V.; Schäfers, A.; Shao, H.; Vogel, P.; Wang, W.; Watanabe, N.; Ziefle, G.; Kolditz, O.

    2016-12-01

    As part of the German site selection process for a high-level nuclear waste repository, different repository concepts in the geological candidate formations rock salt, clay stone and crystalline rock are being discussed. An open assessment of these concepts using numerical simulations requires physical models capturing the individual particularities of each rock type and associated geotechnical barrier concept to a comparable level of sophistication. In a joint work group of the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) and the German Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), scientists of the UFZ are developing and implementing multiphysical process models while BGR scientists apply them to large scale analyses. The advances in simulation methods for waste repositories are incorporated into the open-source code OpenGeoSys. Here, recent application-driven progress in this context is highlighted. A robust implementation of visco-plasticity with temperature-dependent properties into a framework for the thermo-mechanical analysis of rock salt will be shown. The model enables the simulation of heat transport along with its consequences on the elastic response as well as on primary and secondary creep or the occurrence of dilatancy in the repository near field. Transverse isotropy, non-isothermal hydraulic processes and their coupling to mechanical stresses are taken into account for the analysis of repositories in clay stone. These processes are also considered in the near field analyses of engineered barrier systems, including the swelling/shrinkage of the bentonite material. The temperature-dependent saturation evolution around the heat-emitting waste container is described by different multiphase flow formulations. For all mentioned applications, we illustrate the workflow from model development and implementation, over verification and validation, to repository-scale application simulations using methods of high performance computing.

  2. Petroleum Systems and Geologic Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas, Navarro and Taylor Groups, Western Gulf Province, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment is to develop geologically based hypotheses regarding the potential for additions to oil and gas reserves in priority areas of the United States. The USGS recently completed an assessment of undiscovered oil and gas potential of the Late Cretaceous Navarro and Taylor Groups in the Western Gulf Province in Texas (USGS Province 5047). The Navarro and Taylor Groups have moderate potential for undiscovered oil resources and good potential for undiscovered gas resources. This assessment is based on geologic principles and uses the total petroleum system concept. The geologic elements of a total petroleum system include hydrocarbon source rocks (source rock maturation, hydrocarbon generation and migration), reservoir rocks (sequence stratigraphy and petrophysical properties), and hydrocarbon traps (trap formation and timing). The USGS used this geologic framework to define one total petroleum system and five assessment units. Five assessment units were quantitatively assessed for undiscovered oil and gas resources.

  3. MATHEMATICAL GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>20131958 An Lili(China University of Geosciences,Beijing 100083,China);Chen JianpingIntegration and Exploitation of 3DDigital Mine Information System(Journal of Geology,ISSN1674-3636,CN32-1796/P,36(3),2012,p.280-284,2illus.,14refs.)Key words:geographic information system,Sichuan Province

  4. Design and production of the KBS-3 repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moren, Lena

    2010-12-15

    The report contains the common basis for a set of Production reports, presenting how the KBS-3 repository is designed, produced and inspected. The set of reports is included in the safety report for the KBS-3 repository and repository facility. The report presents the role of the Production reports within the safety report and their common purposes and objectives. An important part of the report is to present the background and sources to the principles to be applied in the design, the functions of the KBS-3 repository and the barrier functions the engineered barriers and rock. Further, the methodology to substantiate detailed design premises for the engineered barriers, underground openings and other parts of the KBS-3 repository is presented. The report also gives an overview of the KBS-3 system and its facilities and the production lines for the spent fuel, the engineered barriers and underground openings. Finally, an introduction to quality management, safety classification and their application is given

  5. Accelerator Physics Code Web Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, F.; Basset, R.; Bellodi, G.; Benedetto, E.; Dorda, U.; Giovannozzi, M.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pieloni, T.; Ruggiero, F.; Rumolo, G.; Schmidt, F.; Todesco, E.; Zotter, B.W.; /CERN; Payet, J.; /Saclay; Bartolini, R.; /RAL, Diamond; Farvacque, L.; /ESRF, Grenoble; Sen, T.; /Fermilab; Chin, Y.H.; Ohmi, K.; Oide, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Furman, M.; /LBL, Berkeley /Oak Ridge /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /SLAC /TRIUMF /Tech-X, Boulder /UC, San Diego /Darmstadt, GSI /Rutherford /Brookhaven

    2006-10-24

    In the framework of the CARE HHH European Network, we have developed a web-based dynamic accelerator-physics code repository. We describe the design, structure and contents of this repository, illustrate its usage, and discuss our future plans, with emphasis on code benchmarking.

  6. ACCELERATION PHYSICS CODE WEB REPOSITORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEI, J.

    2006-06-26

    In the framework of the CARE HHH European Network, we have developed a web-based dynamic accelerator-physics code repository. We describe the design, structure and contents of this repository, illustrate its usage, and discuss our future plans, with emphasis on code benchmarking.

  7. Scanning SQUID microscope system for geological samples: system integration and initial evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Hirokuni; Kawai, Jun; Miyamoto, Masakazu; Miyagi, Isoji; Sato, Masahiko; Noguchi, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Yuhji; Fujihira, Jun-ichi; Natsuhara, Nobuyoshi; Aramaki, Yoshiyasu; Masuda, Takashige; Xuan, Chuang

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a high-resolution scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope for imaging the magnetic field of geological samples at room temperature. In this paper, we provide details about the scanning SQUID microscope system, including the magnetically shielded box (MSB), the XYZ stage, data acquisition by the system, and initial evaluation of the system. The background noise in a two-layered PC permalloy MSB is approximately 40-50 pT. The long-term drift of the system is approximately ≥1 nT, which can be reduced by drift correction for each measurement line. The stroke of the XYZ stage is 100 mm × 100 mm with an accuracy of 10 µm, which was confirmed by laser interferometry. A SQUID chip has a pick-up area of 200 μm × 200 μm with an inner hole of 30 μm × 30 μm. The sensitivity is 722.6 nT/V. The flux-locked loop has four gains, i.e., ×1, ×10, ×100, and ×500. An analog-to-digital converter allows analog voltage input in the range of about ±7.5 V in 0.6-mV steps. The maximum dynamic range is approximately ±5400 nT, and the minimum digitizable magnetic field is 0.9 pT. The sensor-to-sample distance is measured with a precision line current, which gives the minimum of 200 µm. Considering the size of pick-up coil, sensor-to-sample distance, and the accuracy of XYZ stage, spacial resolution of the system is 200 µm. We developed the software used to measure the sensor-to-sample distance with line scan data, and the software to acquire data and control the XYZ stage for scanning. We also demonstrate the registration of the magnetic image relative to the optical image by using a pair of point sources placed on the corners of a sample holder outside of a thin section placed in the middle of the sample holder. Considering the minimum noise estimate of the current system, the theoretical detection limit of a single magnetic dipole is 1 × 10-14 Am2. The new instrument is a powerful tool that could be used in various

  8. Trusted Data Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaretta, D.

    2008-08-01

    Data is valuable, expensive to create, and may be impossible to re-create, so who can be trusted to look after it in the long term? This is a question which applies to all the types of digital data on which most astronomical research, and much of the rest of civilisation, depends. This talk will outline the work which has been, and continues to be, carried out to provide an answer to the question of how to judge whether any given data repository is up to the task and deserves to be funded. The OAIS Reference Model (ISO 14721) forms the basis of most serious work on digital preservation and the aim of the work described here is to build on OAIS to create an international standard on which an accreditation and certification process can be based. The talk will touch on some of the fundamental ideas about preservation of digital objects and on ways to detect preservation snakeoil salesmen.

  9. GEOTHERMICS GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>20140332 Jiang Lin(School of Earth and Space Sciences,Peking University,Beijing100871,China);Ji Jianqing Geologic Analysis on the Prospects of the Enhanced Geothermal System(EGS)in the Bohaiwan Basin(Geology and Prospecting,ISSN0495-5331,CN11-2043/P,49(1),2013,p.167-178,5illus.,4tables,41refs.)Key words:geothermal systems,Bohaiwan Basin Great amounts of thermal energy is stored ubiquitously in rocks with high tempera-

  10. Three-Dimensional Geologic Framework Model for a Karst Aquifer System, Hasty and Western Grove Quadrangles, Northern Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Kenzie J.; Hudson, Mark R.; Murray, Kyle E.; Mott, David N.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding ground-water flow in a karst aquifer benefits from a detailed conception of the three-dimensional (3D) geologic framework. Traditional two-dimensional products, such as geologic maps, cross-sections, and structure contour maps, convey a mental picture of the area but a stronger conceptualization can be achieved by constructing a digital 3D representation of the stratigraphic and structural geologic features. In this study, a 3D geologic model was created to better understand a karst aquifer system in the Buffalo National River watershed in northern Arkansas. The model was constructed based on data obtained from recent, detailed geologic mapping for the Hasty and Western Grove 7.5-minute quadrangles. The resulting model represents 11 stratigraphic zones of Ordovician, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian age. As a result of the highly dissected topography, stratigraphic and structural control from geologic contacts and interpreted structure contours were sufficient for effectively modeling the faults and folds in the model area. Combined with recent dye-tracing studies, the 3D framework model is useful for visualizing the various geologic features and for analyzing the potential control they exert on the ground-water flow regime. Evaluation of the model, by comparison to published maps and cross-sections, indicates that the model accurately reproduces both the surface geology and subsurface geologic features of the area.

  11. Influence analysis of Github repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yan; Zhang, Jun; Bai, Xiaomei; Yu, Shuo; Yang, Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    With the support of cloud computing techniques, social coding platforms have changed the style of software development. Github is now the most popular social coding platform and project hosting service. Software developers of various levels keep entering Github, and use Github to save their public and private software projects. The large amounts of software developers and software repositories on Github are posing new challenges to the world of software engineering. This paper tries to tackle one of the important problems: analyzing the importance and influence of Github repositories. We proposed a HITS based influence analysis on graphs that represent the star relationship between Github users and repositories. A weighted version of HITS is applied to the overall star graph, and generates a different set of top influential repositories other than the results from standard version of HITS algorithm. We also conduct the influential analysis on per-month star graph, and study the monthly influence ranking of top repositories.

  12. Construction of a technique plan repository and evaluation system based on AHP group decision-making for emergency treatment and disposal in chemical pollution accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shenggang; Cao, Jingcan; Feng, Li; Liang, Wenyan; Zhang, Liqiu

    2014-07-15

    The environmental pollution resulting from chemical accidents has caused increasingly serious concerns. Therefore, it is very important to be able to determine in advance the appropriate emergency treatment and disposal technology for different types of chemical accidents. However, the formulation of an emergency plan for chemical pollution accidents is considerably difficult due to the substantial uncertainty and complexity of such accidents. This paper explains how the event tree method was used to create 54 different scenarios for chemical pollution accidents, based on the polluted medium, dangerous characteristics and properties of chemicals involved. For each type of chemical accident, feasible emergency treatment and disposal technology schemes were established, considering the areas of pollution source control, pollutant non-proliferation, contaminant elimination and waste disposal. Meanwhile, in order to obtain the optimum emergency disposal technology schemes as soon as the chemical pollution accident occurs from the plan repository, the technique evaluation index system was developed based on group decision-improved analytical hierarchy process (AHP), and has been tested by using a sudden aniline pollution accident that occurred in a river in December 2012.

  13. Safety assessment for a KBS-3H spent nuclear fuel repository at Olkiluoto. Complementary evaluations of safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neall, Fiona; Pastina, Barbara; Snellman, Margit; Smith, Paul; Gribi, P.; Johnson, Lawrence

    2008-12-15

    The KBS-3H design is a variant of the more general KBS-3 method for the geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Finland and Sweden. In the KBS-3H design, multiple assemblies containing spent fuel are emplaced horizontally in parallel, approximately 300 m long, slightly inclined deposition drifts. The copper canisters, each with a surrounding layer of bentonite clay, are placed in perforated steel shells prior to deposition in the drifts; the assembly is called the 'supercontainer'. The other KBS-3 variant is the KBS-3V design, in which the copper canisters are emplaced vertically in individual deposition holes surrounded by bentonite clay but without steel supercontainer shells. SKB and Posiva have conducted a Research, Development and Demonstration programme over the period 2002-2007 with the overall aim of establishing whether KBS-3H represents a feasible alternative to KBS-3V. As part of this programme, the long-term safety of a KBS-3H repository has been assessed in the KBS-3H safety studies. In order to focus the safety studies, the Olkiluoto site in the municipality of Eurajoki, which is the proposed site for a spent fuel repository in Finland, was used as a hypothetical site for a KBS-3H repository. The present report is part of a portfolio of reports discussing the long-term safety of the KBS-3H repository. The overall outcome of the KBS-3H safety studies is documented in the summary report, 'Safety assessment for a KBS-3H repository for spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto'. The purpose and scope of the KBS-3H complementary evaluations of safety report is provided in Posiva's Safety Case Plan, which is based on Regulatory Guide YVL 8.4 and on international guidelines on complementary lines of argument to long-term safety that are considered an important element of a post-closure safety case for geological repositories. Complementary evaluations of safety require the use of evaluations, evidence and qualitative supporting arguments

  14. State Geological Survey Contributions to the National Geothermal Data System- Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, M. Lee [Executive Office of the State of Arizona, Tuczon (AZGS), AZ (United States).; Richard, Stephen M. [Executive Office of the State of Arizona, Tuczon (AZGS), AZ (United States).

    2015-03-13

    The State Geological Survey Contributions to the National Geothermal Data System project is built on the work of the project managed by Boise State University to design and build the National Geothermal Data System, by deploying it nationwide and populating it with data principally from State Geological Surveys through collaboration with the Association of American State Geologists (AASG). This project subsequently incorporated the results of the design-build and other DOE-funded projects in support of the NGDS. The NGDS (www.geothermaldata.org) provides free open access to millions of data records, images, maps, and reports, sharing relevant geoscience, production, and land use data in 30+ categories to propel geothermal development and production in the U.S. NGDS currently serves information gathered from hundreds of the U.S. Department of Energy sponsored development and research projects and geologic data feeds from 60+ data providers throughout all 50 states. These data are relevant to geothermal energy exploration and development, but also have broad applicability in other areas including natural resources (e.g., energy, minerals, water), natural hazards, and land use and management.

  15. Repository for high level wastes in Brazil: the Leitz HS 1350 platinum employed for helping the geological characterization of the candidate areas; Repositorio de rejeito de alto nivel (RANR) no Brasil: o emprego da platina Leitz HS 1350 no auxilio para caracterizacao geologica de areas candidatas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Tatiana A. Fernandes de; Oliveira, Elizabeth Kerpe de; Rios, Francisco Javier [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: tafl@cdtn.br

    2007-07-01

    One of the preliminary stages for the choice of the appropriated local is the geological study. The granitic rocks are the best choice for construction of high level radioactive wastes repository. In the minerals associated to the rock there are small quantities of imprisoned fluids denominated fluid inclusions (FI), were heating coming from the waste radioactive decays can cause crackling of the wastes and migration of the fluids to the heat source. These studies require to be in routine a ultra heating platin (up to 1350 degree C) calibrated, coupled to the petrographic microscope (microthermometry). The tests performed viewed the calibration and placing into routine the platin, by using analytical standards such as fusion temperature covering the heating range (the substances potassium dichromate, barium nitrate, lithium fluorate copper and other two standards of Chaixmeca platin). The Leitz Heating Stage 1350 platin is presently installed and operating at Laboratory of Fluid Inclusions and Metallogenesis of the CDTN/Brazil, for using of this technique. (author)

  16. Numerical model to simulate the isotopic and heat release and transport through the geosphere from a geological repository of radioactive wastes; Un modelo numerico para la simulacion de transporte de calor y liberacion de materia en un almacenamiento profundo de residuos radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidalgo Lopez, A. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this research is to simulate the isotopic and heat release and transport through the geosphere, from a geological repository of high level nuclear waste. in order to achieve it, different physical processes, that have to do with the problem, are considered: groundwater flow, radioactive decay, nuclide dissolution in groundwater, heat generation, mass and heat transport. Some of these phenomena are related among the, which allows to build a coupled model,which is the starting point to generate a FORTRAN code. The flow and transport models are developed in two spatial dimensions and are integrated in space by means of a finite volume method. The time integration is fulfilled by a {theta}-method. Moreover, the advection-diffusion equation is solved by two finite volume techniques. In the first one a linear interpolation is used whereas in the second it is used a quadratic one. Also, a consistency an stability study of both methods is carried out in order to compare their stability zones and the errors appearing. Stability is analysed by applying the von Neumann method, which is based upon Fourier series. Although it is a classical technique when dealing with finite-difference schemes, it is here applied to two finite volume schemes. (Author)

  17. Assessment of the impacts of spent fuel disassembly alternatives on the Nuclear Waste Isolation System. [Preparing and packaging spent fuel assemblies for geologic disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-07-01

    The objective of this report was to evaluate four possible alternative methods of preparing and packaging spent fuel assemblies for geologic disposal against the Reference Process of unmodified spent fuel. The four alternative processes were: (1) End fitting removal, (2) Fission gas venting and resealing, (3) Fuel bundle disassembly and close packing of fuel pins, and (4) Fuel shearing and immobilization. Systems analysis was used to develop a basis of comparison of the alternatives. Conceptual processes and facility layouts were devised for each of the alternatives, based on technology deemed feasible for the purpose. Assessments were made of 15 principal attributes from the technical, operational, safety/risk, and economic considerations related to each of the alternatives, including both the surface packaging and underground repository operations. Specific attributes of the alternative processes were evaluated by assigning a number for each that expressed its merit relative to the corresponding attribute of the Reference Process. Each alternative process was then ranked by summing the numbers for attributes in each of the four assessment areas and collectively. Fuel bundle disassembly and close packing of fuel pins was ranked the preferred method of disposal of spent fuel. 63 references, 46 figures, 46 tables.

  18. Performance assessments of nuclear waste repositories--A dialogue on their value and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Rodney C.; Tierney, Martin S.; Konikowe, Leonard F.; Rechard, Rob P.

    1999-01-01

    Performance Assessment (PA) is the use of mathematical models to simulate the long-term behavior of engineered and geologic barriers in a nuclear waste repository; methods of uncertainty analysis are used to assess effects of parametric and conceptual uncertainties associated with the model system upon the uncertainty in outcomes of the simulation. PA is required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as part of its certification process for geologic repositories for nuclear waste. This paper is a dialogue to explore the value and limitations of PA. Two “skeptics” acknowledge the utility of PA in organizing the scientific investigations that are necessary for confident siting and licensing of a repository; however, they maintain that the PA process, at least as it is currently implemented, is an essentially unscientific process with shortcomings that may provide results of limited use in evaluating actual effects on public health and safety. Conceptual uncertainties in a PA analysis can be so great that results can be confidently applied only over short time ranges, the antithesis of the purpose behind long-term, geologic disposal. Two “proponents” of PA agree that performance assessment is unscientific, but only in the sense that PA is an engineering analysis that uses existing scientific knowledge to support public policy decisions, rather than an investigation intended to increase fundamental knowledge of nature; PA has different goals and constraints than a typical scientific study. The “proponents” describe an ideal, sixstep process for conducting generalized PA, here called probabilistic systems analysis (PSA); they note that virtually all scientific content of a PA is introduced during the model-building steps of a PSA, they contend that a PA based on simple but scientifically acceptable mathematical models can provide useful and objective input to regulatory decision makers. The value of the results of any PA must lie between these two

  19. The Use of Sahris as a State Sponsored Digital Heritage Repository and Management System in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltshire, N. G.

    2013-07-01

    SAHRA has developed versions 1 and 2 of the South African Heritage Resources Information System (SAHRIS - http://www.sahra.org.za) in 2012 and 2013. The system has been rolled out since May 2012 to the national and provincial heritage authorities in South Africa in line with the National Heritage Resources Act (Act 25 of 1999). SAHRIS was developed using Drupal and Geoserver, both of which are free open source software packages. The three core functions of SAHRIS include: an online application system for developments that is integrated with a commenting module for public participation; a national sites archive of heritage sites; and a comprehensive collections management system for objects. With Geoserver, Openlayers and GMAP, users are provided with an online GIS platform that is integrated with most of the content types on SAHRIS. More than 21000 sites have already been migrated into SAHRIS along with over 4300 objects. The media and reports archive has already grown to 500 gigabytes, data storage is offered free of charge and so far 96 Terabytes of replicated storage have been installed. The distribution and dissemination of this content is facilitated by the adoption of The Creative Commons South Africa license. Lessons learnt from previous attempts to develop SAHRIS are covered briefly in light of the opportunities that have been opened up by the relatively recent maturation of FOSS content management systems. The current uptake of SAHRIS and the solutions to the challenges faced thus far are discussed before concluding with the implications for E-governance in South Africa.

  20. Three-Dimensional Geologic Characterization of Geothermal Systems: Astor Pass, Nevada, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siler, Drew L [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, University of Nevada, Reno; Mayhew, Brett [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, University of Nevada, Reno; Faulds, James E [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, University of Nevada, Reno

    2012-09-30

    Geothermal systems in the Great Basin, USA, are controlled by a variety of fault intersection and fault interaction areas. Understanding the specific geometry of the structures most conducive to geothermal circulation is crucial in order to both mitigate the costs of geothermal exploration (especially drilling) and to identify blind geothermal systems (no surface expression). Astor Pass, Nevada, one such blind geothermal system, lies near the boundary between two distinct structural domains, the Walker Lane and the Basin and Range, and exhibits characteristics of each setting. Both northwest-striking, left-stepping dextral faults of the Walker Lane and kinematically linked northerly striking normal faults associated with the Basin and Range are present at Astor Pass. Previous studies identified a blind geothermal system controlled by the intersection of northwest-striking dextral and north-northwest-striking normal faults. Wells drilled into the southwestern quadrant of the fault intersection yielded 94°C fluids, with geothermometers suggesting significantly higher maximum temperatures. Additional data, including reprocessed 2D seismic data and petrologic analysis of well cuttings, were integrated with existing and reinterpreted geologic maps and cross-sections to aid construction of a 3D geologic model. This comprehensive 3D integration of multiple data sets allows characterization of the structural setting of the Astor Pass blind geothermal system at a level of detail beyond what independent data interpretation can provide. Our analysis indicates that the blind geothermal system is controlled by two north- to northwest-plunging fault intersections.

  1. SR 97 - Waste, repository design and sites. Background report to SR 97 SKB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-10-01

    the site-specific configuration of the repositories in Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg. However, other sites of the repository for other long-lived waste are possible. The category of other long-lived waste also includes core components and reactor internals that have been situated close to the fuel core in the power reactors. Besides the waste from research and power reactors, the repository for other long-lived waste will also receive short-lived low- and intermediate-level waste that is produced after the closure of SFR 1 in Forsmark. SKB investigates the long-term safety of the repository for other long-lived waste in a separate safety report. A brief description of the waste intended to be disposed of in a deep repository is given in Chapter 2. Spent fuel equivalent to approximately 4,500 canisters is generated during operation of the nuclear reactors for 40 years. The BWR fuel SVEA 96 has been chosen as the reference fuel. The activity level in the reference fuel has been calculated for a period of 40 years after discharge from the reactor. The calculations include fission products, actinides and activation products. Chapter 3 follows with a description of the conceptual design of the repository system based on the KBS-3 method for deep geological disposal in Swedish crystalline bedrock. The engineered barriers consist chiefly of copper canisters with an insert of cast iron, buffer and tunnel backfill plus plugs. An account of the geoscientific properties of the different repository sites is given in Chapter 4. The account includes completed geoscientific investigations, geological/structural descriptions on a regional and local scale, descriptions of rock mechanics, hydrogeology and groundwater chemistry, and descriptions of the thermal properties of the different sites. Site-specific adaptation of the repositories is dealt with in the last chapter. The main factors that influence the layout of the repositories are rock stresses and the direction and properties of

  2. Comparison of potential radiological consequences from a spent-fuel repository and natural uranium deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wick, O.J.; Cloninger, M.O.

    1980-09-01

    A general criterion has been suggested for deep geological repositories containing spent fuel - the repositories should impose no greater radiological risk than due to naturally occurring uranium deposits. The following analysis investigates the rationale of that suggestion and determines whether current expectations of spent-fuel repository performance are consistent with such a criterion. In this study, reference spent-fuel repositories were compared to natural uranium-ore deposits. Comparisons were based on intrinsic characteristics, such as radionuclide inventory, depth, proximity to aquifers, and regional distribution, and actual and potential radiological consequences that are now occurring from some ore deposits and that may eventually occur from repositories and other ore deposits. The comparison results show that the repositories are quite comparable to the natural ore deposits and, in some cases, present less radiological hazard than their natural counterparts. On the basis of the first comparison, placing spent fuel in a deep geologic repository apparently reduces the hazard from natural radioactive materials occurring in the earth's crust by locating the waste in impermeable strata without access to oxidizing conditions. On the basis of the second comparison, a repository constructed within reasonable constraints presents no greater hazard than a large ore deposit. It is recommended that if the naturally radioactive environment is to be used as a basis for a criterion regarding repositories, then this criterion should be carefully constructed. The criterion should be based on the radiological quality of the waters in the immediate region of a specific repository, and it should be in terms of an acceptable potential increase in the radiological content of those waters due to the existence of the repository.

  3. Marine Engineering Geological Exploration Information System (MEGEIS): A GIS-based Application to Marine Resources Exploitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on the ArcGIS geographic information system and the ORACLE database management system, this paper reports our studies on the technology of Marine Engineering Geological Exploration Information System (MEGEIS). By analyzing system structure, designing function modules and discussing data management, this paper systematically proposes a framework of technology to integrate, manage, and analyze the seabed information comprehensively. Then, the technology is applied to the design and development of the Bohai Sea Oilfield Paradigm Area Information System. The system can not only meet the practical demands of marine resources exploration and exploitation in the Bohai Sea oilfield, but also serve as a preparatory work in theory and technology for the realization of the 'Digital Seabed'.

  4. Marine Engineering Geological Exploration Information System (MEGEIS): A GIS-based application to marine resources exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tianyun; Liu, Baohua; Zhai, Shikui; Liang, Ruicai; Zheng, Yanpeng

    2007-07-01

    Based on the ArcGIS geographic information system and the ORACLE database management system, this paper reports our studies on the technology of Marine Engineering Geological Exploration Information System (MEGEIS). By analyzing system structure, designing function modules and discussing data management, this paper systematically proposes a framework of technology to integrate, manage, and analyze the seabed information comprehensively. Then, the technology is applied to the design and development of the Bohai Sea Oilfield Paradigm Area Information System. The system can not only meet the practical demands of marine resources exploration and exploitation in the Bohai Sea oilfield, but also serve as a preparatory work in theory and technology for the realization of the ‘Digital Seabed’.

  5. Geology at Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-05-01

    Both advocates and critics disagree on the significance and interpretation of critical geological features which bear on the safety and suitability of Yucca Mountain as a site for the construction of a high-level radioactive waste repository. Critics believe that there is sufficient geological evidence to rule the site unsuitable for further investigation. Some advocates claim that there is insufficient data and that investigations are incomplete, while others claim that the site is free of major obstacles. We have expanded our efforts to include both the critical evaluations of existing geological and geochemical data and the collection of field data and samples for the purpose of preparing scientific papers for submittal to journals. Summaries of the critical reviews are presented in this paper.

  6. Open and regionalised spectrum repositories for emerging countries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Arcia-Moret, A

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available the motivations and challenges for collecting spectrum measurements in developing regions and discuss a scalable system for communities to gather and provide access to White Spaces information through open and regionalised repositories. We further discuss two...

  7. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the University of Minnesota National Lacustrine Core Repository (LacCore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Lacustrine Core Repository (LacCore), operated by the University of Minnesota is a partner in the Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples...

  8. MATHEMATICAL GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20071578 Chen Song(College of Civil Engi- neering,Hohai University,Nanjing 210098, China);Han Xuewei Monitoring Program System for the Foundation of Large Bridge (Hydrogeology & Engineering Geology, ISSN 1000-3665,CN 11-2202/P,32(5), 2005,p.44-47,5 illus.,3 refs.) Key words:bridges,footing

  9. CEBS--Chemical Effects in Biological Systems: a public data repository integrating study design and toxicity data with microarray and proteomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Michael; Stasiewicz, Stanley; Merrick, B Alex; Tomer, Kenneth; Bushel, Pierre; Paules, Richard; Stegman, Nancy; Nehls, Gerald; Yost, Kenneth J; Johnson, C Harris; Gustafson, Scott F; Xirasagar, Sandhya; Xiao, Nianqing; Huang, Cheng-Cheng; Boyer, Paul; Chan, Denny D; Pan, Qinyan; Gong, Hui; Taylor, John; Choi, Danielle; Rashid, Asif; Ahmed, Ayazaddin; Howle, Reese; Selkirk, James; Tennant, Raymond; Fostel, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    CEBS (Chemical Effects in Biological Systems) is an integrated public repository for toxicogenomics data, including the study design and timeline, clinical chemistry and histopathology findings and microarray and proteomics data. CEBS contains data derived from studies of chemicals and of genetic alterations, and is compatible with clinical and environmental studies. CEBS is designed to permit the user to query the data using the study conditions, the subject responses and then, having identified an appropriate set of subjects, to move to the microarray module of CEBS to carry out gene signature and pathway analysis. Scope of CEBS: CEBS currently holds 22 studies of rats, four studies of mice and one study of Caenorhabditis elegans. CEBS can also accommodate data from studies of human subjects. Toxicogenomics studies currently in CEBS comprise over 4000 microarray hybridizations, and 75 2D gel images annotated with protein identification performed by MALDI and MS/MS. CEBS contains raw microarray data collected in accordance with MIAME guidelines and provides tools for data selection, pre-processing and analysis resulting in annotated lists of genes of interest. Additionally, clinical chemistry and histopathology findings from over 1500 animals are included in CEBS. CEBS/BID: The BID (Biomedical Investigation Database) is another component of the CEBS system. BID is a relational database used to load and curate study data prior to export to CEBS, in addition to capturing and displaying novel data types such as PCR data, or additional fields of interest, including those defined by the HESI Toxicogenomics Committee (in preparation). BID has been shared with Health Canada and the US Environmental Protection Agency. CEBS is available at http://cebs.niehs.nih.gov. BID can be accessed via the user interface from https://dir-apps.niehs.nih.gov/arc/. Requests for a copy of BID and for depositing data into CEBS or BID are available at http://www.niehs.nih.gov/cebs-df/.

  10. Geologic Setting and Hydrogeologic Units of the Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System, Washington, Oregon, and Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Sue C.; Olsen, Theresa D.; Morgan, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System (CPRAS) covers approximately 44,000 square miles of northeastern Oregon, southeastern Washington, and western Idaho. The area supports a $6 billion per year agricultural industry, leading the Nation in production of apples and nine other commodities (State of Washington Office of Financial Management, 2007; U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2007). Groundwater availability in the aquifers of the area is a critical water-resource management issue because the water demand for agriculture, economic development, and ecological needs is high. The primary aquifers of the CPRAS are basalts of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) and overlying basin-fill sediments. Water-resources issues that have implications for future groundwater availability in the region include (1) widespread water-level declines associated with development of groundwater resources for irrigation and other uses, (2) reduction in base flow to rivers and associated effects on temperature and water quality, and (3) current and anticipated effects of global climate change on recharge, base flow, and ultimately, groundwater availability. As part of a National Groundwater Resources Program, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study of the CPRAS in 2007 with the broad goals of (1) characterizing the hydrologic status of the system, (2) identifying trends in groundwater storage and use, and (3) quantifying groundwater availability. The study approach includes documenting changes in the status of the system, quantifying the hydrologic budget for the system, updating the regional hydrogeologic framework, and developing a groundwater-flow simulation model for the system. The simulation model will be used to evaluate and test the conceptual model of the system and later to evaluate groundwater availability under alternative development and climate scenarios. The objectives of this study were to update the hydrogeologic framework for the CPRAS using the available

  11. Criticality issues with highly enriched fuels in a repository environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, L.L. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sanchez, L.C.; Rath, J.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents preliminary analysis of a volcanic tuff repository containing a combination of low enrichment commercial spent nuclear fuels (SNF) and DOE-owned SNF packages. These SNFs were analyzed with respect to their criticality risks. Disposal of SNF packages containing significant fissile mass within a geologic repository must comply with current regulations relative to criticality safety during transportation and handling within operational facilities. However, once the repository is closed, the double contingency credits for criticality safety are subject to unremediable degradation, (e.g., water intrusion, continued presence of neutron absorbers in proximity to fissile material, and fissile material reconfiguration). The work presented in this paper focused on two attributes of criticality in a volcanic tuff repository for near-field and far-field scenarios: (1) scenario conditions necessary to have a criticality, and (2) consequences of a nuclear excursion that are components of risk. All criticality consequences are dependent upon eventual water intrusion into the repository and subsequent breach of the disposal package. Key criticality parameters necessary for a critical assembly are: (1) adequate thermal fissile mass, (2) adequate concentration of fissile material, (3) separation of neutron poison from fissile materials, and (4) sufficient neutron moderation (expressed in units of moderator to fissile atom ratios). Key results from this study indicated that the total energies released during a single excursion are minimal (comparable to those released in previous solution accidents), and the maximum frequency of occurrence is bounded by the saturation and temperature recycle times, thus resulting in small criticality risks.

  12. Making the Postclosure Safety Case for the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Swift; A.V. Luik

    2006-08-28

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), in its advisory standard for geological repositories promulgated jointly with the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, explicitly distinguishes between the concepts of a safety case and a safety assessment. As defined in the advisory standard, the safety case is a broader set of arguments that provide confidence and substantiate the formal analyses of system safety made through the process of safety assessment. Although the IAEAYs definitions include both preclosure (i.e., operational) safety and post-closure performance in the overall safety assessment and safety case, the emphasis in here is on long-term performance after waste has been emplaced and the repository has been closed. This distinction between pre- and postclosure aspects of the repository is consistent with the U.S. regulatory framework defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Chapter 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 197, or 40 CFR 197) [2] and implemented by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (Chapter 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 63, or 10 CFR 63) [3]. The separation of the pre- and postclosure safety cases is also consistent with the way in which the U.S. Department of Energy has assigned responsibilities for developing the safety case. Bechtel SAIC Company is the Management and Operating contractor responsible for the design and operation of the Yucca Mountain facility and is therefore responsible for the preparation of the preclosure aspects of the safety case. Sandia National Laboratories has lead responsibility for scientific work evaluating post-closure performance, and therefore is responsible for developing the post-closure aspects of the safety case. In the context of the IAEA definitions, both preclosure and postclosure safety, including safety assessment and the safety case, will be documented in the license application being prepared for the

  13. Hydrothermal modeling for the efficient design of thermal loading in a nuclear waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Won-Jin, E-mail: wjcho@kaeri.re.kr; Kim, Jin-Seop; Choi, Heui-Joo

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Three-dimensional hydrothermal modeling for HLW repository is performed. • The model reduces the peak temperature in the repository by about 10 °C. • Decreasing the tunnel distance is more efficient to improve the disposal density. • The EDZ surrounding the deposition hole increases the peak temperature. • The peak temperature for the double-layer repository remains below the limit. - Abstract: The thermal analysis of a geological repository for nuclear waste using the three-dimensional hydrothermal model is performed. The hydrothermal model reduces the maximum peak temperature in the repository by about 10 °C compared to the heat conduction model with constant thermal conductivities. Decreasing the tunnel distance is more efficient than decreasing the deposition hole spacing to improve the disposal density for a given thermal load. The annular excavation damaged zone surrounding the deposition hole has a considerable effect on the peak temperature. The possibility of double-layer repository is analyzed from the viewpoint of the thermal constraints of the repository. The maximum peak temperature for the double-layer repository is slightly higher than that for the single-layer repository, but remains below the temperature limit.

  14. Geology and Photometric Variation of Solar System Bodies with Minor Atmospheres: Implications for Solid Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, Yuka; Dohm, James; Ohtake, Makiko

    2014-01-01

    A reasonable basis for future astronomical investigations of exoplanets lies in our best knowledge of the planets and satellites in the Solar System. Solar System bodies exhibit a wide variety of surface environments, even including potential habitable conditions beyond Earth, and it is essential to know how they can be characterized from outside the Solar System. In this study, we provide an overview of geological features of major Solar System solid bodies with minor atmospheres (i.e., the Terrestrial Moon, Mercury, the Galilean moons, and Mars) that affect surface albedo at local to global scale, and we survey how they influence point-source photometry in UV, visible, and near IR (i.e., the reflection-dominant range). We simulate them based on recent mapping products and also compile observed light curves where available. We show a 5-50% peak-to-trough variation amplitude in one spin rotation associated with various geological processes including heterogeneous surface compositions due to igneous activities...

  15. Theoretical geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikeš, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Theoretical geology Present day geology is mostly empirical of nature. I claim that geology is by nature complex and that the empirical approach is bound to fail. Let's consider the input to be the set of ambient conditions and the output to be the sedimentary rock record. I claim that the output can only be deduced from the input if the relation from input to output be known. The fundamental question is therefore the following: Can one predict the output from the input or can one predict the behaviour of a sedimentary system? If one can, than the empirical/deductive method has changes, if one can't than that method is bound to fail. The fundamental problem to solve is therefore the following: How to predict the behaviour of a sedimentary system? It is interesting to observe that this question is never asked and many a study is conducted by the empirical/deductive method; it seems that the empirical method has been accepted as being appropriate without question. It is, however, easy to argument that a sedimentary system is by nature complex and that several input parameters vary at the same time and that they can create similar output in the rock record. It follows trivially from these first principles that in such a case the deductive solution cannot be unique. At the same time several geological methods depart precisely from the assumption, that one particular variable is the dictator/driver and that the others are constant, even though the data do not support such an assumption. The method of "sequence stratigraphy" is a typical example of such a dogma. It can be easily argued that all the interpretation resulting from a method that is built on uncertain or wrong assumptions is erroneous. Still, this method has survived for many years, nonwithstanding all the critics it has received. This is just one example of the present day geological world and is not unique. Even the alternative methods criticising sequence stratigraphy actually depart from the same

  16. Research about the Control of Geological Structure on Karst Groundwater system in Zhangfang, Beijing,China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, X.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonate formations are intensively distributed throughout Zhangfang, fangshan, in West Mountain area in Beijing. Karst groundwater exits among the geological fracture network which is characterized by the different arrangements and levels in different types of fracture networks and structures. The influence of the tectonic environment on the dynamic change rule and the enrichment regulation of karst system is significant for the exploitation and protection of karst groundwater resources. From the control function of fault and fracture point of view, based on the developmental and distribution pattern of multi-episodic tectonism, this study analyzed fractures in the three-fold structural units characterized by NE-NW and NS trends and discussed the influence of multi-episodic tectonism on the groundwater flow system and rich water zones. The results showed that the geological fracture underwent two episodes of tectonism, thrusting nappe in the Jurassic and extension in the Cretaceous. The overprint of two episodes resulted in a number of faults with high hydraulic conductivity, which serve as conduits. The superiority joints groups are in the NE and NW directions, with conjugated characteristics. The high-angle or vertical dips directly benefit infiltration. The fractures in the intersection areas have formed groundwater runoff channels and strong space, controlling water-rich zones such as Baidai, Ganchi-Changgou and Gaozhuang-Shiwo. Magmatic rock and the aquiclude also contribute to the rich water zones and the location of springs, all of which have important significance for water supply. Keywords: system of Karst groundwater, geological structure, fracture network, hydrogeological flow field, Zhangfang karst area

  17. Safety case for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto. Assessment of radionuclide release scenarios for the repository system 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-12-15

    Assessment of Radionuclide Release Scenarios sits within Posiva Oy's Safety Case 'TURVA-2012' report portfolio and has the objective of presenting an assessment of the repository system scenarios leading to radionuclide releases that have been identified in Formulation of Radionuclide Release Scenarios. A base scenario, variant scenarios and disturbance scenarios are considered. For each scenario, a range of calculation cases, also identified in Formulation of Radionuclide Release Scenarios, has been analysed, complemented by Monte Carlo simulations, a probabilistic sensitivity analysis and other supporting calculations. The calculation cases and analyses take into account major uncertainties in the initial state of the barriers and possible paths for the evolution of the repository system identified in Performance Assessment. Quality control and assurance measures have been adopted to ensure transparency and traceability of the calculations performed and hence to promote confidence in the analysis of the calculation cases. The calculation cases each consider a single, failed canister, where three possible modes of failure are addressed: (1) the presence of an initial penetrating defect in the copper overpack of the canister, (2) corrosion of the copper overpack, which occurs most rapidly in scenarios in which buffer density is reduced, e.g. by erosion, (3) shear movement on a fracture intersecting a deposition hole. The likelihood and consequences of multiple canister failure occurring during the assessment time frame are also considered. In particular, the analyses consider: The likelihood and consequences of there being multiple canisters with initial penetrating defects; The consequences if canister failure due to corrosion following buffer erosion were to occur; and The low annual probability of there being an earthquake large enough to give rise to canister failure due to rock shear movements and the potential consequences of such an earthquake

  18. Lessons from Natural Analog Studies for Geologic Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, W. M.

    2009-12-01

    For over fifty years natural analog studies have provided lessons addressing scientific, technical, and social problems concerning geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste. Idealized concepts for permanent disposal environments evolved from an understanding of the geological, geochemical and hydrological characteristics of analogous rocks including natural salt deposits (as advocated by the US National Academy of Sciences in 1957), ancient cratonic rocks (as investigated at Lac du Bonnet, Canada, Aspö, Sweden, and Vienne, France), and marine sedimentary rock formations (as studied at Mol, Belgium, and Bure, France). Additional multidisciplinary studies have been conducted at natural sites that bear characteristics analogous to potential repository systems, notably at natural uranium (and thorium) deposits including Poços de Caldas, Brazil, Alligator Rivers, Australia, Peña Blanca, Mexico, and Oklo, Gabon. Researchers of natural analogs for geologic disposal have addressed technical uncertainties regarding processes that have transpired over large time and space scales, which are generally inaccessible to laboratory studies. Principal questions for nuclear waste disposal include the geochemical stability and alteration rates of radionuclide bearing minerals and the mechanisms and rates of transport of radionuclides in groundwater. In their most direct applications, natural analogs studies have been devoted to testing specific models for repository performance and the experimental data that support those models. Parameters used in predictive performance assessment modeling have been compared to natural system data, including mineral solubilities, sorption coefficients, diffusion rates, and colloid transport properties. For example, the rate of uraninite oxidation and the natural paragenesis of uranium mineral alteration at Peña Blanca have been compared favorably to results of experimental studies of spent fuel alteration related to the proposed repository

  19. 2008 State-of-the-art: Development of the Geological Disposal System for High Level Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Heui Joo; Lee, Jong Youl; Jung, Jong Tae; Kim, Sung Ki; Lee, Min Soo; Kook, Dong Hak

    2008-11-15

    This report is for grasping the current status of the time of high level radioactive waste(HLW) disposal and being useful for our conceptual repository design. We performed the analyses for the HLW disposal design of preceding countries. This analyses include design principles, and comparisons for the all characteristics of HLW source, disposal canister, buffer specification, and disposal systems. During the past 10 years, retrievability concept are getting more important with perceiving the waste as new resources and almost countries planning the disposal are concerning more complex designs including this new concept. According to this trend, our country also should investigate the compliance of retrievability with our own disposal design concept. Most countries applies 'Cost Estimation base on conceptual design' method on disposal cost estimation in compliance with their own situation. Even though several estimation conditions, e.g. disposal scale and estimation time, are different, our rough estimation values for the unit disposal cost of PWR and CANDU spent fuels are analogous to other countries' values.

  20. Research on Geo-information Data Model for Preselected Areas of Geological Disposal of High-level Radioactive Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, M.; Huang, S. T.; Wang, P.; Zhao, Y. A.; Wang, H. B.

    2016-11-01

    The geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (hereinafter referred to "geological disposal") is a long-term, complex, and systematic scientific project, whose data and information resources in the research and development ((hereinafter referred to ”R&D”) process provide the significant support for R&D of geological disposal system, and lay a foundation for the long-term stability and safety assessment of repository site. However, the data related to the research and engineering in the sitting of the geological disposal repositories is more complicated (including multi-source, multi-dimension and changeable), the requirements for the data accuracy and comprehensive application has become much higher than before, which lead to the fact that the data model design of geo-information database for the disposal repository are facing more serious challenges. In the essay, data resources of the pre-selected areas of the repository has been comprehensive controlled and systematic analyzed. According to deeply understanding of the application requirements, the research work has made a solution for the key technical problems including reasonable classification system of multi-source data entity, complex logic relations and effective physical storage structures. The new solution has broken through data classification and conventional spatial data the organization model applied in the traditional industry, realized the data organization and integration with the unit of data entities and spatial relationship, which were independent, holonomic and with application significant features in HLW geological disposal. The reasonable, feasible and flexible data conceptual models, logical models and physical models have been established so as to ensure the effective integration and facilitate application development of multi-source data in pre-selected areas for geological disposal.

  1. NIH Common Data Elements Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Common Data Elements (CDE) Repository has been designed to provide access to structured human and machine-readable definitions of data elements that have...

  2. VHA Data Sharing Agreement Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VHA Data Sharing Agreement Repository serves as a centralized location to collect and report on agreements that share VHA data with entities outside of VA. It...

  3. Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This repository contains Privacy Impact Assessments (PIA) that have been vetted/approved. Section 208 of the Electronic Government Act of 2002 (E-Gov Act) requires...

  4. Book Review: The Institutional Repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Galina

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available At a time when the future nature of scholarly communication and publishing are being debated this book serves as a useful reference guide for one of the key aspects- the institutional repository. Institutional repositories are a popular recent development for distributing and communicating research. They are a useful academic tool for administrating and publishing electronic resources produced by university members in order to increase access to these, both at an institutional and global level. However, there is still no general concensus about the characteristics of an institutional repository. What types of material are deposited? Who is responsible for building and maintaing a repository, how will copyright be managed, who will cover installation and maintenance costs? How will quality, integrity and preservation of the materials be assured?

  5. Development of teaching modules for geology and engineering coursework using terrestrial LiDAR scanning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbrough, L. D.; Katzenstein, K.

    2012-12-01

    Exposing students to active and local examples of physical geologic processes is beneficial to the learning process. Students typically respond with interest to examples that use state-of-the-art technologies to investigate local or regional phenomena. For lower cognitive level of learning (e.g. knowledge, comprehension, and application), the use of "close-to-home" examples ensures that students better understand concepts. By providing these examples, the students may already have a familiarity or can easily visit the location. Furthermore, these local and regional examples help students to offer quickly other examples of similar phenomena. Investigation of these examples using normal photographic techniques, as well as a more sophisticated 3-D Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) (AKA Terrestrial Laser Scanning or TLS) system, allows students to gain a better understanding of the scale and the mechanics of the geologic processes and hazards. The systems are used for research, teaching and outreach efforts and depending on departmental policies can be accessible to students are various learning levels. TLS systems can yield scans at sub-centimeter resolution and contain surface reflectance of targets. These systems can serve a number of learning goals that are essential for training geoscientists and engineers. While querying the data to answer geotechnical or geomorphologic related questions, students will develop skills using large, spatial databases. The upper cognitive level of learning (e.g. analysis, synthesis, and evaluation) is also promoted by using a subset of the data and correlating the physical geologic process of stream bank erosion and rock slope failures with mathematical and computer models using the scanned data. Students use the examples and laboratory exercises to help build their engineering judgment skills with Earth materials. The students learn not only applications of math and engineering science but also the economic and social implication

  6. International perspective on repositories for low level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Ulla; Pers, Karin; Almen, Ylva (SKB International AB (Sweden))

    2011-12-15

    represent a common type of locality for a repository, given that siting criteria are fulfilled. There is also a site that was selected without any association to existing nuclear sites or mines. This is the case for the French L'Aube repository. National repositories for disposal of all waste arising in that country are common, e.g. El Cabril in Spain and Low Level Repository close to Drigg in United Kingdom. The depth of the repositories varies from being on the surface to down to 650 metres below ground. The geological conditions of the different repositories are described as well as engineered barriers, geographical location and, if available, information on safety analysis. It can be noted that in the safety analysis of repositories located close to the coast (such as in Sweden, Finland and the United Kingdom), the effect of post-glacial land rise or coastal erosion is taken into special consideration. In general, the size of the repository reflects the size of the nuclear programmes in the respective country. The activity content of the facility, both the total and normalised figures against the volume capacities, are compared for groups of radionuclides

  7. Separating macroecological pattern and process: comparing ecological, economic, and geological systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Blonder

    Full Text Available Theories of biodiversity rest on several macroecological patterns describing the relationship between species abundance and diversity. A central problem is that all theories make similar predictions for these patterns despite disparate assumptions. A troubling implication is that these patterns may not reflect anything unique about organizational principles of biology or the functioning of ecological systems. To test this, we analyze five datasets from ecological, economic, and geological systems that describe the distribution of objects across categories in the United States. At the level of functional form ('first-order effects', these patterns are not unique to ecological systems, indicating they may reveal little about biological process. However, we show that mechanism can be better revealed in the scale-dependency of first-order patterns ('second-order effects'. These results provide a roadmap for biodiversity theory to move beyond traditional patterns, and also suggest ways in which macroecological theory can constrain the dynamics of economic systems.

  8. Separating macroecological pattern and process: comparing ecological, economic, and geological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonder, Benjamin; Sloat, Lindsey; Enquist, Brian J; McGill, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Theories of biodiversity rest on several macroecological patterns describing the relationship between species abundance and diversity. A central problem is that all theories make similar predictions for these patterns despite disparate assumptions. A troubling implication is that these patterns may not reflect anything unique about organizational principles of biology or the functioning of ecological systems. To test this, we analyze five datasets from ecological, economic, and geological systems that describe the distribution of objects across categories in the United States. At the level of functional form ('first-order effects'), these patterns are not unique to ecological systems, indicating they may reveal little about biological process. However, we show that mechanism can be better revealed in the scale-dependency of first-order patterns ('second-order effects'). These results provide a roadmap for biodiversity theory to move beyond traditional patterns, and also suggest ways in which macroecological theory can constrain the dynamics of economic systems.

  9. Geological interpretation of Mount Ciremai geothermal system from remote sensing and magneto-teluric analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Sumintadireja, Prihadi; Irawan, Dasapta E; Irawan, Diky; Fadillah, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    The exploration of geothermal system at Mount Ciremai has been started since the early 1980s and has just been studied carefully since the early 2000s. Previous studies have detected the potential of geothermal system and also the groundwater mechanism feeding the system. This paper will discuss the geothermal exploration based on regional scale surface temperature analysis with Landsat image to have a more detail interpretation of the geological setting and magneto-telluric or MT survey at prospect zones, which identified by the previous method, to have a more exact and in depth local scale structural interpretation. Both methods are directed to pin point appropriate locations for geothermal pilot hole drilling and testing. We used four scenes of Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper or ETM+ data to estimate the surface manifestation of a geothermal system. Temporal analysis of Land Surface Temperature or LST was applied and coupled with field temperature measurement at seven locations. By combining the TTM with ...

  10. Management of Indian Institutional Repositories

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The study investigates various issues concerning the management of institutional repositories (IRs) developed in India. Data collection done using a web based questionnaire, created using software provided by surveymonkey.com. The entire population i.e. all IRs identified in India were surveyed. It was observed that in 42.86% (6) of Institutional Repositories implementation programmes were headed by librarians. No special staff was appointed by any institution for carrying out different jobs...

  11. Isotope techniques for the research of groundwater in the potential site of China’s high-level waste repository

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭永海; 刘淑芬; 杨天笑; 姜桂林

    2001-01-01

    Using the isotope techniques, the groundwater origin, evolution and circulation in the potential site of China’s high-level waste repository are studied. The results indicate that both shallow groundwaters and deep groundwaters in the site area are of meteoric origin. The shallow groundwaters are mainly recharged by modern and local precipitation, and the deep groundwaters are originated from regional precipitation at higher elevation, or may be from the precipitation during the geological history period with lower temperature. Through the study we can also understand that the deep underground is a very low-permeability system where the groundwater flow-rates are very low.

  12. Institutional Repositories in India: A preliminary study

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This preliminary study investigates various aspects of institutional repositories (IR’s) developed in India. The present study has identified the existence of 16 functional IRs some of which were not registered in any of the directories such as ROAR, Open DOAR. The study explores the timeline involved in planning, pilot testing, to system implementation of IR, exploratory activities conducted before implementing IR, its anticipated benefits.

  13. Development of site suitability criteria for the high level waste repository for Lawrence Livermore Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-01

    Results of our mining, geological and geotechnical studies provided in support of the development of site suitability criteria for the high level waste repository are presented. The primary purpose of the work was the identification and development of appropriate geotechnical descriptors and coefficients required for the Site Suitability Repository Model. This model was developed by The Analytic Sciences Corporation (TASC) of Reading, Massachusetts and is not described in this report.

  14. Stability of ceramic waste forms in potential repository environments: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, R. J.; Palmer, R. A.

    1982-03-31

    Most scenarios for geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste include the eventual intrusion of groundwater into the repository. Reactions in the system and eventual release of the radionuclides, if any, will be controlled by the chemistry of the groundwater, the surrounding rock, the waste form, and any engineered barrier materials that are present, as well as by the temperature and pressure of the system. This report is a compilation and evaluation of the work completed to date on interactions within the waste-form/host-rock/groundwater system at various points in its lifetime. General results from leaching experiments are presented as a basis for comparison. The factors involved in studying the complete system are discussed so that future research may avoid some of the oversights of past research. Although relatively little hard data on prototype waste-form/repository-system interactions exist at this time, the available data and their implications are discussed. Sorption studies and models for predicting radionuclide migration are also presented, again with a study of the factors involved.

  15. Conceptual geologic model and native state model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulder, D.D.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual geologic model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system was developed by a review of the available literature. The hydrothermal system consists of a meteoric recharge area in the Mineral Mountains, fluid circulation paths to depth, a heat source, and an outflow plume. A conceptual model based on the available data can be simulated in the native state using parameters that fall within observed ranges. The model temperatures, recharge rates, and fluid travel times are sensitive to the permeability in the Mineral Mountains. The simulation results suggests the presence of a magma chamber at depth as the likely heat source. A two-dimensional study of the hydrothermal system can be used to establish boundary conditions for further study of the geothermal reservoir. 33 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Implementation method of Oil and Gas Geologic Information System with ArcGIS Engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    ComGIS is the mainstream of developing GIS currently. Developing Geographic Information System with the technology of components can reduce the difficulties of developing, improving the developing efficiency and enhancing the flexibility and opening of system. AxcObjects(AO) is based on the technology of COM, and ArcGIS Engine(AE) is a set of embedded AO which can extend to various platforms. Compared with AO, ArcGIS Engine can shorten the period of developing and improve the efficiency greatly. Having introduced the techniques of ArcObjects and ArcGIS Engine, we offer the method of developing GIS with Visual Basic and ArcGIS Engine with Oil and Gas Geologic Information System.

  17. Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS) Updated User’s Guide for Web-based Data Access and Export

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackley, Rob D.; Last, George V.; Allwardt, Craig H.

    2008-09-24

    The Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS) is a prototype web-based graphical user interface (GUI) for viewing and downloading borehole geologic data. The HBGIS is being developed as part of the Remediation Decision Support function of the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project, managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland, Washington. Recent efforts have focused on improving the functionality of the HBGIS website in order to allow more efficient access and exportation of available data in HBGIS. Users will benefit from enhancements such as a dynamic browsing, user-driven forms, and multi-select options for selecting borehole geologic data for export. The need for translating borehole geologic data into electronic form within the HBGIS continues to increase, and efforts to populate the database continue at an increasing rate. These new web-based tools should help the end user quickly visualize what data are available in HBGIS, select from among these data, and download the borehole geologic data into a consistent and reproducible tabular form. This revised user’s guide supersedes the previous user’s guide (PNNL-15362) for viewing and downloading data from HBGIS. It contains an updated data dictionary for tables and fields containing borehole geologic data as well as instructions for viewing and downloading borehole geologic data.

  18. Demystifying the institutional repository for success

    CERN Document Server

    Buehler, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Institutional repositories remain key to data storage on campus, fulfilling the academic needs of various stakeholders. Demystifying the Institutional Repository for Success is a practical guide to creating and sustaining an institutional repository through marketing, partnering, and understanding the academic needs of all stakeholders on campus. This title is divided into seven chapters, covering: traditional scholarly communication and open access publishing; the academic shift towards open access; what the successful institutional repository looks like; institutional repository collaboratio

  19. Fukushima Daiichi Information Repository FY13 Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Curtis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Phelan, Cherie [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schwieder, Dave [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station in Japan is one of the most serious in commercial nuclear power plant operating history. Much will be learned that may be applicable to the U.S. reactor fleet, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and supporting systems, and the international reactor fleet. For example, lessons from Fukushima Daiichi may be applied to emergency response planning, reactor operator training, accident scenario modeling, human factors engineering, radiation protection, and accident mitigation; as well as influence U.S. policies towards the nuclear fuel cycle including power generation, and spent fuel storage, reprocessing, and disposal. This document describes the database used to establish a centralized information repository to store and manage the Fukushima data that has been gathered. The data is stored in a secured (password protected and encrypted) repository that is searchable and available to researchers at diverse locations.

  20. ECONOMIC GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>20041200 Peng Yujing (Regional Geology and Mineral Resources Survey of Jilin Province, Changchun, Jilin); Chen Erzhen A Preliminary Study on the Ore -Forming Geologic Events (Jilin Geology, ISSN 1001-2427, CN22-1099/P, 22(3), 2003, p. 1 -11, 23, 1 illus. , 38 refs. ) Key words: geological eventAn ore - forming geologic event, as a

  1. A Standard-Driven Data Dictionary for Data Harmonization of Heterogeneous Datasets in Urban Geological Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G.; Wu, C.; Li, X.; Song, P.

    2013-12-01

    The 3D urban geological information system has been a major part of the national urban geological survey project of China Geological Survey in recent years. Large amount of multi-source and multi-subject data are to be stored in the urban geological databases. There are various models and vocabularies drafted and applied by industrial companies in urban geological data. The issues such as duplicate and ambiguous definition of terms and different coding structure increase the difficulty of information sharing and data integration. To solve this problem, we proposed a national standard-driven information classification and coding method to effectively store and integrate urban geological data, and we applied the data dictionary technology to achieve structural and standard data storage. The overall purpose of this work is to set up a common data platform to provide information sharing service. Research progresses are as follows: (1) A unified classification and coding method for multi-source data based on national standards. Underlying national standards include GB 9649-88 for geology and GB/T 13923-2006 for geography. Current industrial models are compared with national standards to build a mapping table. The attributes of various urban geological data entity models are reduced to several categories according to their application phases and domains. Then a logical data model is set up as a standard format to design data file structures for a relational database. (2) A multi-level data dictionary for data standardization constraint. Three levels of data dictionary are designed: model data dictionary is used to manage system database files and enhance maintenance of the whole database system; attribute dictionary organizes fields used in database tables; term and code dictionary is applied to provide a standard for urban information system by adopting appropriate classification and coding methods; comprehensive data dictionary manages system operation and security. (3

  2. The Academic Reward System is the Primary Influence Toward Faculty Non-Participation in Institutional Repositories. A review of: Davis, Phillip M., and Matthew J.L. Connolly. “Institutional Repositories: Evaluating the Reasons for Non‐Use of Cornell University’s Installation of DSpace.” D‐Lib Magazine 13.3/4 (2007. 16 Oct. 2007 .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Blythe

    2007-12-01

    -month study, but 50% of these deposited only one object, and only 32 IP addresses deposited 10 or more objects. Of the other IRs studied, the lowest number of communities is zero and the highest is 390, the number of collections ranged from 10 to 282, and the number of objects ranged from 500 to 32,676. In most statistical categories, Cornell fell in the midrange. The two repositories with the fewest communities and collections – zero communities and 18 collections in one instance, and 6 and 10 in the other – are the only two with no empty collections. The repository with the most communities and collections also had the most empty collections (58%. The repository with the most objects was the one with zero communities and only 18 collections; and the repository with the fewest objects was the one with only 6 communities and 10collections. The third largest IR, with 3111 objects, had far and away the highest rate of steady growth (16.7%; while the IR with the most objects had the highest rate of stairstep growth (56.3%, and was the only IR to have a higher percentage of growth in any category other than plateau. Interviews with faculty indicated that they do not make deposits to IRs for a number of reasons. Faculty considered their primary audience to be their peers, so access to their scholarship was largely considered a “nonissue” as it was adequately provided through personal Web pages, subject repositories, or journal literature. Likewise, long-term preservation was not an overarching area of concern. The chief factors for not using an IR, however, all revolved around restrictions brought on by the academic reward system. Questions of copyright and whether depositing objects qualifies as publishing, thereby hindering efforts to publish in journals, were paramount, as were fears that depositing scholarship alongside less rigorous works in a catch-all IR would diminish the work and the reputation of the scholar by association. Hesitancy to make work available before

  3. Building Scientific Data's list of recommended data repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufton, A. L.; Khodiyar, V.; Hrynaszkiewicz, I.

    2016-12-01

    When Scientific Data launched in 2014 we provided our authors with a list of recommended data repositories to help them identify data hosting options that were likely to meet the journal's requirements. This list has grown in size and scope, and is now a central resource for authors across the Nature-titled journals. It has also been used in the development of data deposition policies and recommended repository lists across Springer Nature and at other publishers. Each new addition to the list is assessed according to a series of criteria that emphasize the stability of the resource, its commitment to principles of open science and its implementation of relevant community standards and reporting guidelines. A preference is expressed for repositories that issue digital object identifiers (DOIs) through the DataCite system and that share data under the Creative Commons CC0 waiver. Scientific Data currently lists fourteen repositories that focus on specific areas within the Earth and environmental sciences, as well as the broad scope repositories, Dryad and figshare. Readers can browse and filter datasets published at the journal by the host repository using ISA-explorer, a demo tool built by the ISA-tools team at Oxford University1. We believe that well-maintained lists like this one help publishers build a network of trust with community data repositories and provide an important complement to more comprehensive data repository indices and more formal certification efforts. In parallel, Scientific Data has also improved its policies to better support submissions from authors using institutional and project-specific repositories, without requiring each to apply for listing individually. Online resources Journal homepage: http://www.nature.com/scientificdata Data repository criteria: http://www.nature.com/sdata/policies/data-policies#repo-criteria Recommended data repositories: http://www.nature.com/sdata/policies/repositories Archived copies of the list: https

  4. On Making and Identifying a "Copy"; Building Safety Systems with Dynamic Disseminations of Multimedia Digital Objects; MOAC - A Report on Integrating Museum and Archive Access in the Online Archive of California; DSpace: An Open Source Dynamic Digital Repository; iVia Open Source Virtual Library System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskin, Norman; Canos, Jose H.; Jaen, Javier; Lorente, Juan C.; Perez, Jennifer; Rinehart, Richard; Smith, MacKenzie; Barton, Mary; Branschofsky, Margaret; McClellan, Greg; Walker, Julie Harford; Mass, Mick; Stuve, Dave; Tansley, Robert; Mitchell, Steve; Mooney, Margaret; Paynter, Gordon W.; Mason, Julie; Ruscheinski, Johannes; Kedzierski, Artur; Humphreys, Keith

    2003-01-01

    Includes five articles that discuss copies in terms of metadata and digital rights management; safety oriented systems, a new type of decision support systems; MOAC (Museums and the Online Archive of California); DSpace, an open source digital repository; and iVia, an open source Internet subject portal or virtual library system. (LRW)

  5. Standard practice for prediction of the long-term behavior of materials, including waste forms, used in engineered barrier systems (EBS) for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes test methods and data analyses used to develop models for the prediction of the long-term behavior of materials, such as engineered barrier system (EBS) materials and waste forms, used in the geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and other high-level nuclear waste in a geologic repository. The alteration behavior of waste form and EBS materials is important because it affects the retention of radionuclides by the disposal system. The waste form and EBS materials provide a barrier to release either directly (as in the case of waste forms in which the radionuclides are initially immobilized), or indirectly (as in the case of containment materials that restrict the ingress of groundwater or the egress of radionuclides that are released as the waste forms and EBS materials degrade). 1.1.1 Steps involved in making such predictions include problem definition, testing, modeling, and model confirmation. 1.1.2 The predictions are based on models derived from theoretical considerat...

  6. Science strategy for Core Science Systems in the U.S. Geological Survey, 2013-2023

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristol, R. Sky; Euliss, Ned H.; Booth, Nathaniel L.; Burkardt, Nina; Diffendorfer, Jay E.; Gesch, Dean B.; McCallum, Brian E.; Miller, David M.; Morman, Suzette A.; Poore, Barbara S.; Signell, Richard P.; Viger, Roland J.

    2012-01-01

    Core Science Systems is a new mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) that grew out of the 2007 Science Strategy, “Facing Tomorrow’s Challenges: U.S. Geological Survey Science in the Decade 2007–2017.” This report describes the vision for this USGS mission and outlines a strategy for Core Science Systems to facilitate integrated characterization and understanding of the complex earth system. The vision and suggested actions are bold and far-reaching, describing a conceptual model and framework to enhance the ability of USGS to bring its core strengths to bear on pressing societal problems through data integration and scientific synthesis across the breadth of science.The context of this report is inspired by a direction set forth in the 2007 Science Strategy. Specifically, ecosystem-based approaches provide the underpinnings for essentially all science themes that define the USGS. Every point on earth falls within a specific ecosystem where data, other information assets, and the expertise of USGS and its many partners can be employed to quantitatively understand how that ecosystem functions and how it responds to natural and anthropogenic disturbances. Every benefit society obtains from the planet—food, water, raw materials to build infrastructure, homes and automobiles, fuel to heat homes and cities, and many others, are derived from or effect ecosystems.The vision for Core Science Systems builds on core strengths of the USGS in characterizing and understanding complex earth and biological systems through research, modeling, mapping, and the production of high quality data on the nation’s natural resource infrastructure. Together, these research activities provide a foundation for ecosystem-based approaches through geologic mapping, topographic mapping, and biodiversity mapping. The vision describes a framework founded on these core mapping strengths that makes it easier for USGS scientists to discover critical information, share and publish

  7. Science strategy for Core Science Systems in the U.S. Geological Survey, 2013-2023

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristol, R. Sky; Euliss, Ned H.; Booth, Nathaniel L.; Burkardt, Nina; Diffendorfer, Jay E.; Gesch, Dean B.; McCallum, Brian E.; Miller, David M.; Morman, Suzette A.; Poore, Barbara S.; Signell, Richard P.; Viger, Roland J.

    2012-01-01

    Core Science Systems is a new mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) that grew out of the 2007 Science Strategy, "Facing Tomorrow's Challenges: U.S. Geological Survey Science in the Decade 2007-2017." This report describes the vision for this USGS mission and outlines a strategy for Core Science Systems to facilitate integrated characterization and understanding of the complex earth system. The vision and suggested actions are bold and far-reaching, describing a conceptual model and framework to enhance the ability of USGS to bring its core strengths to bear on pressing societal problems through data integration and scientific synthesis across the breadth of science. The context of this report is inspired by a direction set forth in the 2007 Science Strategy. Specifically, ecosystem-based approaches provide the underpinnings for essentially all science themes that define the USGS. Every point on earth falls within a specific ecosystem where data, other information assets, and the expertise of USGS and its many partners can be employed to quantitatively understand how that ecosystem functions and how it responds to natural and anthropogenic disturbances. Every benefit society obtains from the planet - food, water, raw materials to build infrastructure, homes and automobiles, fuel to heat homes and cities, and many others, are derived from or effect ecosystems. The vision for Core Science Systems builds on core strengths of the USGS in characterizing and understanding complex earth and biological systems through research, modeling, mapping, and the production of high quality data on the nation's natural resource infrastructure. Together, these research activities provide a foundation for ecosystem-based approaches through geologic mapping, topographic mapping, and biodiversity mapping. The vision describes a framework founded on these core mapping strengths that makes it easier for USGS scientists to discover critical information, share and publish results, and

  8. Lead and zinc geochemical behavior based on geological characteristics in Parkam Porphyry Copper System, Kerman, Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seyyed; Saeed; Ghannadpour; Ardeshir; Hezarkhani

    2015-01-01

    Parkam(Sarah) porphyry system is located on the metallogenic belt of Kerman, Iran. Due to existence of some copper-rich resources in this region, finding out the exact statistical characteristics such as distribution of data population, mean, variance and data population behavior of elements like Cu, Mo, Pb and Zn is necessary for interpreting their geological behavior. For this reason, precise calculation of statistical characteristics of Pb and Zn grade datasets was performed and results were interpreted geologically. The natures of Pb and Zn distributions were initially identified and their distributions were normalized through statistical treatment. Subsequently, the variograms were calculated for each exploration borehole and show that both Pb and Zn geochemical variates are spatially correlated. According to the similarity of the behavior of Pb and Zn in these calculations, it is decided to measure their exact behavior applying K-means clustering method. K-means clustering results show that the Zn grade varies linearly relative to that of Pb values and their behavior is similar. Based on the geochemical behavior similarity of Pb and Zn, throughout the pervasive secondary hydrothermal activity, they are remobilized in the similar manner, from the deep to the shallow levels of the mineralization zones. However, statistical analysis suggests that hydrothermal activity associated with secondary waters in Parkam is effective in remobilizing and enriching both Pb and Zn since they have similar geochemical characteristics. However, the process does not result in generation of economic concentrations.

  9. MATHEMATICAL GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>20041769 Fang Rui (Department of Earth Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu); Wu Jichun Design and Implementation of New Spatial Database of Groundwa-ter (Hydrogeology & Engineering Geology, ISSN 1000-3665, CN11-2202/P, 30(5), 2003, p. 33 -36, 4 illus. , 1 table, 8 refs. ) Key words: groundwater, data basesBased on system of relational database, a data model of groundwater spatial information

  10. MATHEMATICAL GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20072979 Hang Bangming(Jiangning Branch,Nanjing Bureau of Land and Resources,Nanjing 211100,China);Hua Jianwei Application of 3-D GIS Technology in Environmental Supervision of Open Pit Mines(Jiangsu Geology,ISSN1003-6474,CN32-1258/P,30(4),2006,p.275-279,7 illus.,6 refs.)Key words:geographic information systems,mine environmentBased on a

  11. Geological safety aspects of nuclear waste disposalin in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahonen, L.; Hakkarainen, V.; Kaija, J.; Kuivamaki, A.; Lindberg, A.; Paananen, M.; Paulamaki, S.; Ruskeeniemi, T., e-mail: lasse.ahonen@gtk.fi

    2011-07-01

    The management of nuclear waste from Finnish power companies is based on the final geological disposal of encapsulated spent fuel at a depth of several hundreds of metres in the crystalline bedrock. Permission for the licence requires that the safety of disposal is demonstrated in a safety case showing that processes, events and future scenarios possibly affecting the performance of the deep repository are appropriately understood. Many of the safety-related issues are geological in nature. The Precambrian bedrock of Finland has a long history, even if compared with the time span considered for nuclear waste disposal, but the northern location calls for a detailed study of the processes related to Quaternary glaciations. This was manifested in an extensive international permafrost study in northern Canada, coordinated by GTK. Hydrogeology and the common existence of saline waters deep in the bedrock have also been targets of extensive studies, because water chemistry affects the chemical stability of the repository near-field, as well as radionuclide transport. The Palmottu natural analogue study was one of the international high-priority natural analogue studies in which transport phenomena were explored in a natural geological system. Currently, deep biosphere processes are being investigated in support of the safety of nuclear waste disposal. (orig.)

  12. ECONOMIC GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    20152392 Geng Shufang(Institute of Geology,Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences,Beijing 100037,China);Liu Ping Deep Geological Structure Constraints on Shallow Geology and Mineralization:A Study in the Land and Sea Areas of East China(Marine Geology&Quaternary Geology,ISSN0256-1492,CN37-1117/P,34(6),2014,p.49-61,8illus.,13refs.,with English abstract)

  13. Tectonic geomorphology of the Ryukyu Trench-Arc-Backarc System:geological-geophysical exploration and mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Mingzuo; LIU Lejun; ZHENG Yanpeng; LIU Baohua; WU Jinlong; XU Xiaowei

    2004-01-01

    Based on an analysis of full-cover multi-beam bathymetric data, seismic and sub-bottom profiling data, and other geological-geophysical data sets, the geomorphologic features of the Ryukyu trench-arc-backarc (T-A-BA) system are delineated, and a geomorphologic map of the system is compiled. The results show that the evolution and spatial distribution patterns of the geomorphologic types of the Ryukyu T-A-BA system are controlled mainly by tectonic movements. The tectonic geomorphologic characteristics of the Ryukyu Arc (RA) differ distinctly from those of the East China Sea (ECS) continental shelf and slope. In term of geological structures, RA consists of the Tokara volcanic ridge,the Ryukyu folded ridge, the fore-arc accretion-wedge ridge and the Amami Depression and the fore-arc depressions between the ridges, which is composed of a complex of alternating island-slope ridges and fault basins. The slope of the ECS is a passive continental margin with stepwise faults. The Okinawa Trough (OT) is a backarc rift in which tectonic movements are intensive, with active volcanic and hydrothermal eruptions and sea floor spreading. The development of geomorphic features of the OT is controlled by the central en echelon spreading axes, the faults along the ECS slope and the marginal faults to the west of the Tokara volcanic ridge.The geomorphic complex of the OT is arranged in the following pattern: the en echelon grabens and volcanic chains formed by rifting and spreading lie in the central part of the trough, the turbidite plains inclining eastwards-southeastwards from the slope foot of the ECS lie in the western-northwestern parts of the OT, and the volcaniclastic deposit plains inclining westward-northwestwards from the western slope foot of the RA lie in the eastern-southeastern parts of the OT. In term of tectonic geomorphology, the OT forms a natural division between the shelf of the ECS and the RA.

  14. Long-Term Information Management (LTIM) of Safeguards Data at Repositories: Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddal, Risa N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-01

    One of the challenges of implementing safeguards for geological repositories will be the long-term preservation of safeguards-related data for 100 years or more. While most countries considering the construction and operation of such facilities agree that safeguards information should be preserved, there are gaps with respect to standardized requirements, guidelines, timescales, and approaches. This study analyzes those gaps and explores research to clarify stakeholder needs, identify current policies, approaches, best practices and international standards, and explores existing safeguards information management infrastructure. The study also attempts to clarify what a safeguards data classification system might look like, how long data should be retained, and how information should be exchanged between stakeholders at different phases of a repository’s life cycle. The analysis produced a variety of recommendations on what information to preserve, how to preserve it, where to store it, retention options and how to exchange information in the long term. Key findings include the use of the globally recognized international records management standard, ISO15489, for guidance on the development of information management systems, and the development of a Key Information File (KIF). The KIF could be used to identify only the most relevant, high-level safeguards information and the history of decision making about the repository. The study also suggests implementing on-site and off-site records storage in digital and physical form; developing a safeguards data classification system; long-term records retention with periodic reviews every 5 to 10 years during each phase of the repository life cycle; and establishing transition procedures well in advance so that data shepherds and records officers can transfer information with incoming facility managers effectively and efficiently. These and other recommendations are further analyzed in this study.

  15. EEC Round Robin test on the repository system simulation - clay option. Final report EEC research contract No. Fl 1W-0116-l

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantale, C.; Castelli, S.; Donato, A.; Traverso, D.M.

    1989-06-01

    The objective of the 'Reporting System Simulation Test (RSST) was to define a test method for the evaluation of waste performances in various geological disposal scenarios, with the possibility to simulate various additional materials, like canister, backfilling, overpack and host rock. The test procedure for the clay-option needed to be developed, especially with reference to the solution preparation and Eh (redox potential) measurements. The necessity to work in an argon atmosphere glove box brings in some operational complications, mainly in the case of the Eh measurement, filtering and final volume determination. The reproducibility of the experimental data does not seem to be particularly good, probably due to the difficulties in standardizing the experimental procedure. An effort should be done to improve these aspects. The tightness of the container and the physical stability of the rock/backfill/grill with pins/synthetic interstitial claywater system are excellent. The leaching data reveal that the clay contribution to the final ionic concentration of the solution is not negligible and should be better evaluated. The overall data-set shows that the glass leach rate, as expressed by Boron mass loss, decreases with time.