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Sample records for geographic hiv type

  1. Relevance Measures Using Geographic Scopes and Types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andogah, Geoffrey; Bouma, Gosse; Peters, C; Jikoun,; Mandl, T; Muller, H; Oard, DW; Penas, A; Petras,; Santos, D

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes two kinds of relevance measures to rank documents by geographic restriction: scope-based and type-based. The non-geographic and geographic relevance scores are combined using a weighted harmonic mean. The proposed relevance measures and weighting schemes are evaluated on GeoCLEF

  2. HIV care for geographically mobile populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Barbara S; Garduño, L Sergio; Reyes, Emily V; Valiño, Raziel; Rojas, Rita; Donastorg, Yeycy; Brudney, Karen; Hirsch, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between geographic mobility and risk for human immunodeficiency virus infection is well recognized, but what happens to those same individuals, once infected, as they transition to living with the infection? Does mobility affect their transition into medical care? If so, do mobile and nonmobile populations achieve similar success with antiretroviral treatment? The definition of mobility has changed over the centuries to encompass a complex phenotype including permanent migration, frequent travel, circular migration, and travel to and from treatment centers. The heterogeneity of these definitions leads to discordant findings. Investigations show that mobility has an impact on infection risk, but fewer data exist on the impact of geographic mobility on medical care and treatment outcomes. This review will examine existing data regarding the impact of geographic mobility on access to and maintenance in medical care and on adherence to antiretroviral therapy for those living with human immunodeficiency virus infection. It will also expand the concept of mobility to include data on the impact of the distance from residence to clinic on medical care and treatment adherence. Our conclusions are that the existing literature is limited by varying definitions of mobility and the inherent oversimplification necessary to apply a "mobility measure" in a statistical analysis. The impact of mobility on antiretroviral treatment outcomes deserves further exploration to both define the phenomenon and target interventions to these at-risk populations.

  3. A national, geographic database of CDC-funded HIV prevention services: development challenges and potential applications

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    Fogarty Kieran J

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From 2000–2002, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC funded a study that was designed to improve the information available to program planners about the geographic distribution of CDC-funded HIV prevention services provided by community-based organizations (CBOs. Program managers at CDC recognized the potential of a geographic information system (GIS to organize and analyze information about HIV prevention services and they made GIS a critical component of the study design. The primary objective of this study was to construct a national, geographically-referenced database of HIV prevention services provided by CDC-funded CBOs. We designed a survey instrument to collect information about the geographic service areas where CBOs provided HIV prevention services, then collected data from CBOs that received CDC funding for these services during fiscal year 2000. We developed a GIS database to link questionnaire responses with GIS map layers in a manner that would incorporate overlapping geographies, risk populations and prevention services. We collected geographic service area data in two formats: 1 geopolitical boundaries and 2 geographic distance. Results The survey response rate was 70.3%, i.e. 1,020 of 1,450 community-based organizations responded. The number of HIV prevention programs administered by each CBO ranged from 1 to 23. The survey provided information about 3,028 prevention programs, including descriptions of intervention types, risk populations, race and ethnicity, CBO location and geographic service area. We incorporated this information into a large GIS database, the HIV Prevention Services Database. The use of geopolitical boundaries provided more accurate results than geographic distance. The use of a reference map with the questionnaire improved completeness, accuracy and precision of service area data. Conclusion The survey instrument design and database development procedures that we used

  4. [HIV-2 infection in the world. A geographical perspective].

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    Remy, G

    1998-01-01

    The geographical distribution of HIV-2 is not fully understood. However, there is enough evidence to speculate about the origins and differentiation of this geographical pattern. Foci of infection probably developed in some African countries, such as Guinea-Bissau, Angola and Mozambique, in the 1970s. The decolonization of these countries led to the movement of people, and the virus, to historically associated countries such as Portugal, India and Brazil. In Ivory Coast, a focus was probably created due to the dismantling of the plantation economy, with all its demographic, cultural and social consequences. The virus was dispersed to countries close to the Guinea and Ivory Coast foci by the migration of workers and prostitutes. Thus, the diseases has spread from the Atlantic coast of Africa, where it was endemic-sporadic, to other more distant African countries and out of Africa into Europe and North America. The political emancipation of African countries is further increasing and diversifying human movements between countries. The infection has not created an epidemic, either within or outside Africa. This is due to the limited infectivity of the virus and the particular characteristics of the social and epidemiological system. The high-risk groups do not sustain an epidemic relay of the infection and subjects introducing the virus into new areas outside the African foci rarely set up a new autonomous circulation of the virus.

  5. HIV-2 infection throughout the world. A geographical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remy

    1998-11-01

    The geographical distribution of HIV-2 is not fully understood. However, there is enough evidence to speculate about the origins and differentiation of this geographical pattern. Foci of infection probably developed in some African countries, such as Guinea-Bissau, Angola and Mozambique, in the 1970s. The decolonization of these countries led to the movement of people, and the virus, to historically associated countries such as Portugal, India and Brazil. In Ivory Coast, a focus was probably created due to the dismantling of the plantation economy, with all its demographic, cultural and social consequences. The virus was dispersed to countries close to the Guinea and Ivory Coast foci by the migration of workers and prostitutes. Thus, the diseases has spread from the Atlantic coast of Africa, where it was endemic-sporadic, to other more distant African countries and out of Africa into Europe and North America. The political emancipation of African countries is further increasing and diversifying human movements between countries. The infection has not created an epidemic, either within or outside Africa. This is due to the limited infectivity of the virus and the particular characteristics of the social and epidemiological system. The high-risk groups do not sustain an epidemic relay of the infection and subjects introducing the virus into new areas outside the African foci rarely set up a new autonomous circulation of the virus.

  6. High prevalence of diverse forms of HIV-1 intersubtype recombinants in Central Myanmar: geographical hot spot of extensive recombination.

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    Takebe, Yutaka; Motomura, Kazushi; Tatsumi, Masashi; Lwin, Hla Htut; Zaw, Myint; Kusagawa, Shigeru

    2003-09-26

    To investigate the molecular epidemiology and genetic structure of HIV-1s causing the epidemic in Central Myanmar and to explore the genesis of HIV epidemic in this area. A molecular epidemiological investigation was conducted in 1999-2000 in the city of Mandalay among high-risk populations and the structural features of circulating HIV-1s were analyzed. HIV-1 genotypes of 59 specimens were screened based on gag (p17) and env (C2/V3) regions. Near full-length nucleotide sequences of HIV-1 isolates with subtype discordance were determined and their recombinant structures were characterized. Three lineages of HIV-1 strains, including CRF01_AE (27, 45.8%), subtype B' (Thailand variant of subtype B) (15, 25.4%) and subtype C (8, 13.6%), were distributed in Mandalay, while substantial portions (9, 15.3%) of specimens showed various patterns of subtype discordance in different regions of HIV-1 genomes. The study on six HIV-1 isolates with subtype discordance revealed that they were highly diverse types of unique recombinant forms (URFs) comprised of various combinations of three circulating subtypes. One URF was a particularly complex mosaic that contained 13 recombination breakpoints between three HIV-1 subtypes. Approximately half of recombinants showed 'pseudotype' virion structures, in which the external portions of envelope glycoproteins were exchanged with different lineages of HIV-1 strains, suggesting the potential selective advantage of 'pseudotype' viruses over parental strains. The study revealed the unique geographical hot spot in Central Myanmar where extensive recombination events appeared to be taking place continually. This reflects the presence of highly exposed individuals and social networks of HIV-1 transmission.

  7. How Do Social Capital and HIV/AIDS Outcomes Geographically Cluster and Which Sociocontextual Mechanisms Predict Differences Across Clusters?

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    Ransome, Yusuf; Dean, Lorraine T; Crawford, Natalie D; Metzger, David S; Blank, Michael B; Nunn, Amy S

    2017-09-01

    Place of residence has been associated with HIV transmission risks. Social capital, defined as features of social organization that improve efficiency of society by facilitating coordinated actions, often varies by neighborhood, and hypothesized to have protective effects on HIV care continuum outcomes. We examined whether the association between social capital and 2 HIV care continuum outcomes clustered geographically and whether sociocontextual mechanisms predict differences across clusters. Bivariate Local Moran's I evaluated geographical clustering in the association between social capital (participation in civic and social organizations, 2006, 2008, 2010) and [5-year (2007-2011) prevalence of late HIV diagnosis and linkage to HIV care] across Philadelphia, PA, census tracts (N = 378). Maps documented the clusters and multinomial regression assessed which sociocontextual mechanisms (eg, racial composition) predict differences across clusters. We identified 4 significant clusters (high social capital-high HIV/AIDS, low social capital-low HIV/AIDS, low social capital-high HIV/AIDS, and high social capital-low HIV/AIDS). Moran's I between social capital and late HIV diagnosis was (I = 0.19, z = 9.54, P social capital was lowest and HIV burden the highest, compared with clusters with high social capital and lowest HIV burden. The association between social participation and HIV care continuum outcomes cluster geographically in Philadelphia, PA. HIV prevention interventions should account for this phenomenon. Reducing geographic disparities will require interventions tailored to each continuum step and that address socioeconomic factors such as neighborhood median income.

  8. Geographical Patterns of HIV Sero-Discordancy in High HIV Prevalence Countries in Sub-Saharan Africa

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    Diego F. Cuadros

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Variation in the proportion of individuals living in a stable HIV sero-discordant partnership (SDP, and the potential drivers of such variability across sub Saharan Africa (SSA, are still not well-understood. This study aimed to examine the spatial clustering of HIV sero-discordancy, and the impact of local variation in HIV prevalence on patterns of sero-discordancy in high HIV prevalence countries in SSA. Methods: We described the spatial patterns of sero-discordancy among stable couples by analyzing Demographic and Health Survey data from Cameroon, Kenya, Lesotho, Tanzania, Malawi, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. We identified spatial clusters of SDPs in each country through a Kulldorff spatial scan statistics analysis. After a geographical cluster was identified, epidemiologic measures of sero-discordancy were calculated and analyzed. Results: Spatial clusters with significantly high numbers of SDPs were identified and characterized in Kenya, Malawi, and Tanzania, and they largely overlapped with the clusters with high HIV prevalence. There was a positive correlation between HIV prevalence and the proportion of SDPs among all stable couples across within and outside clusters. Conversely, there was a negative, but weak and not significant, correlation between HIV prevalence and the proportion of SDPs among all stable couples with at least one HIV-infected individual in the partnership. Discussion: There does not appear to be distinct spatial patterns for HIV sero-discordancy that are independent of HIV prevalence patterns. The variation of the sero-discordancy measures with HIV prevalence across clusters and outside clusters demonstrated similar patterns to those observed at the national level. The spatial variable does not appear to be a fundamental nor independent determinant of the observed patterns of sero-discordancy in high HIV prevalence countries in SSA.

  9. Assessing spatial patterns of HIV knowledge in rural Mozambique using geographic information systems.

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    Buehler, Charlotte P; Blevins, Meridith; Ossemane, Ezequiel B; González-Calvo, Lázaro; Ndatimana, Elisée; Vermund, Sten H; Sidat, Mohsin; Olupona, Omo; Moon, Troy D

    2015-03-01

    To conduct a cross-sectional mapping analysis of HIV knowledge in Zambézia Province, Mozambique, and to examine spatial patterns of HIV knowledge and associated household characteristics. A population-based cluster survey was administered in 2010; data were analysed from 201 enumeration areas in three geographically diverse districts: Alto Molócuè, Morrumbala and Namacurra. We assessed HIV knowledge scores (0-9 points) using previously validated assessment tools. Using geographic information systems (GIS), we mapped hot spots of high and low HIV knowledge. Our multivariable linear regression model estimated HIV knowledge associations with distance to nearest clinic offering antiretroviral therapy, respondent age, education, household size, number of children under five, numeracy, literacy and district of residence. We found little overall HIV knowledge in all three districts. People in Alto Molócuè knew comparatively most about HIV, with a median score of 3 (IQR 2-5) and 22 of 51 (43%) enumeration areas scoring ≥4 of 9 points. Namacurra district, closest to the capital city and expected to have the best HIV knowledge levels, had a median score of 1 (IQR 0-3) and only 3 of 57 (5%) enumeration areas scoring ≥4 points. More HIV knowledge was associated with more education, age, household size, numeracy and proximity to a health facility offering antiretroviral therapy. HIV knowledge is critical for its prevention and treatment. By pinpointing areas of poor HIV knowledge, programme planners can prioritize educational resources and outreach initiatives within the context of antiretroviral therapy expansion. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Uptake of combination antiretroviral therapy and HIV disease progression according to geographical origin in seroconverters in Europe, Canada, and Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarrin, Inma; Pantazis, Nikos; Gill, M John

    2012-01-01

    We examined differences by geographical origin (GO) in time from HIV seroconversion (SC) to AIDS, death, and initiation of antiretroviral therapy (cART).......We examined differences by geographical origin (GO) in time from HIV seroconversion (SC) to AIDS, death, and initiation of antiretroviral therapy (cART)....

  11. Identification of conserved subdominant HIV Type 1 CD8(+) T Cell epitopes restricted within common HLA Supertypes for therapeutic HIV Type 1 vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Ingrid; Kløverpris, Henrik; Jensen, Kristoffer Jarlov

    2012-01-01

    The high HIV-1 prevalence, up to 4.6% in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa, makes it a relevant location for testing of therapeutic vaccines. With the aim of performing a clinical study in Guinea-Bissau, after first testing the vaccine for safety in Denmark, Europe, we here describe the design...... of a universal epitope peptide-based T cell vaccine with relevance for any geographic locations. The two major obstacles when designing such a vaccine are the high diversities of the HIV-1 genome and of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I. We selected 15 CD8-restricted epitopes predicted......-specific, HLA-restricted T cell specificities using peptide-MHC class I tetramer labeling of CD8(+) T cells from HIV-1-infected individuals. The selected vaccine epitopes are infrequently targeted in HIV-1-infected individuals from both locations. Moreover, we HLA-typed HIV-1-infected individuals...

  12. HIV Infection and Geographically Bound Transmission of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis, Argentina

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    López, Beatriz; Ambroggi, Marta; Palmero, Domingo; Salvadores, Bernardo; Gravina, Elida; Mazzeo, Eduardo; Imaz, Susana; Barrera, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    During 2003–2009, the National Tuberculosis (TB) Laboratory Network in Argentina gave 830 patients a new diagnosis of multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB and 53 a diagnosis of extensively drug- resistant (XDR) TB. HIV co-infection was involved in nearly one third of these cases. Strain genotyping showed that 7 major clusters gathered 56% of patients within restricted geographic areas. The 3 largest clusters corresponded to epidemic MDR TB strains that have been undergoing transmission for >10 years. The indigenous M strain accounted for 29% and 40% of MDR and XDR TB cases, respectively. Drug-resistant TB trends in Argentina are driven by spread of a few strains in hotspots where the rate of HIV infection is high. To curb transmission, the national TB program is focusing stringent interventions in these areas by strengthening infection control in large hospitals and prisons, expediting drug resistance detection, and streamlining information-sharing systems between HIV and TB programs. PMID:23092584

  13. Emergence of recombinant forms in geographic regions with co-circulating HIV subtypes in the dynamic HIV-1 epidemic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ming [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Letiner, Thomas K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korber, Bette T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Foley, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We have reexamined the subtype designations of {approx}10,000 subtype A, B, C, G, and AG, BC, BF recombinant sequences, and compared the results of the new analysis with their published designations. Intersubtype recombinants dominate HIV epidemics in three different geographical regions. The circulating recombinant from (CRF) CRF02-AG, common in West Central Africa, appears to result from a recombination event that occurred early in the divergence between subtypes A and G, although additional more recent recombination events may have contributed to the breakpoint pattern in this recombinant lineage as well. The Chinese recombinant epidemic strains CRF07 and CRF08, in contrast, result from recent recombinations between more contemporary strains. Nevertheless, CRF07 and CRF08 contributed to many subsequent recombination events. The BF recombinant epidemics in two HIV-1 epicenters in South America are not independent and BF epidemics in South America have an unusually high fraction of unique recombinant forms (URFs) that have each been found only once and carry distinctive breakpoints. Taken together, these analyses reveal a complex and dynamic picture of the current HIV-1 epidemic, and suggest a means of grouping and tracking relationships between viruses through preservation of shared breakpints.

  14. The geographic distribution patterns of HIV-, HCV- and co-infections among drug users in a national methadone maintenance treatment program in Southwest China.

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    Zhou, Yi-Biao; Liang, Song; Wang, Qi-Xing; Gong, Yu-Han; Nie, Shi-Jiao; Nan, Lei; Yang, Ai-Hui; Liao, Qiang; Song, Xiu-Xia; Jiang, Qing-Wu

    2014-03-10

    HIV-, HCV- and HIV/HCV co-infections among drug users have become a rapidly emerging global public health problem. In order to constrain the dual epidemics of HIV/AIDS and drug use, China has adopted a methadone maintenance treatment program (MMTP) since 2004. Studies of the geographic heterogeneity of HIV and HCV infections at a local scale are sparse, which has critical implications for future MMTP implementation and health policies covering both HIV and HCV prevention among drug users in China. This study aimed to characterize geographic patterns of HIV and HCV prevalence at the township level among drug users in a Yi Autonomous Prefecture, Southwest of China. Data on demographic and clinical characteristics of all clients in the 11 MMTP clinics of the Yi Autonomous Prefecture from March 2004 to December 2012 were collected. A GIS-based geographic analysis involving geographic autocorrelation analysis and geographic scan statistics were employed to identify the geographic distribution pattern of HIV-, HCV- and co-infections among drug users. A total of 6690 MMTP clients was analyzed. The prevalence of HIV-, HCV- and co-infections were 25.2%, 30.8%, and 10.9% respectively. There were significant global and local geographic autocorrelations for HIV-, HCV-, and co-infection. The Moran's I was 0.3015, 0.3449, and 0.3155, respectively (P geographic autocorrelation analysis and the geographic scan statistical analysis showed that HIV-, HCV-, and co-infections in the prefecture exhibited significant geographic clustering at the township level. The geographic distribution pattern of each infection group was different. HIV-, HCV-, and co-infections among drug users in the Yi Autonomous Prefecture all exhibited substantial geographic heterogeneity at the township level. The geographic distribution patterns of the three groups were different. These findings imply that it may be necessary to inform or invent site-specific intervention strategies to better devote currently

  15. HIV type 2 epidemic in Spain: challenges and missing opportunities.

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    de Mendoza, Carmen; Cabezas, Teresa; Caballero, Estrella; Requena, Silvia; Amengual, María J; Peñaranda, María; Sáez, Ana; Tellez, Raquel; Lozano, Ana B; Treviño, Ana; Ramos, José M; Pérez, José L; Barreiro, Pablo; Soriano, Vicente

    2017-06-19

    : HIV type 2 (HIV-2) is a neglected virus despite estimates of 1-2 million people infected worldwide. HIV-2 is less efficiently transmitted than HIV-1 by sex and from mother to child. Although AIDS may develop in HIV-2 carriers, it takes longer than in HIV-1-infected patients. In contrast with HIV-1 infection, there is no global pandemic caused by HIV-2, as the virus is largely confined to West Africa. In a less extent and due to socioeconomic ties and wars, HIV-2 is prevalent in Portugal and its former colonies in Brazil, India, Mozambique and Angola. Globally, HIV-2 infections are steadily declining over time. A total of 338 cases of HIV-2 infection had been reported at the Spanish HIV-2 registry until December 2016, of whom 63% were men. Overall 72% were sub-Saharan Africans, whereas 16% were native Spaniards. Dual HIV-1 and HIV-2 coinfection was found in 9% of patients. Heterosexual contact was the most likely route of HIV-2 acquisition in more than 90% of cases. Roughly one-third presented with CD4 cell counts less than 200 cells/μl and/or AIDS clinical events. Plasma HIV-2 RNA was undetectable at baseline in 40% of patients. To date, one-third of HIV-2 carriers have received antiretroviral therapy, using integrase inhibitors 32 individuals. New diagnoses of HIV-2 in Spain have remained stable since 2010 with an average of 15 cases yearly. Illegal immigration from Northwestern African borders accounts for over 75% of new HIV-2 diagnoses. Given the relatively large community of West Africans already living in Spain and the continuous flux of immigration from endemic regions, HIV-2 infection either alone or as coinfection with HIV-1 should be excluded once in all HIV-seroreactive persons, especially when showing atypical HIV serological profiles, immunovirological disconnect (CD4 cell count loss despite undetectable HIV-1 viremia) and/or high epidemiological risks (birth in or sex partners from endemic regions).

  16. Dendritic cells are less susceptible to human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) infection than to HIV-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Duvall (Melody); K. Loré (Karin); H. Blaak (Hetty); D.A. Ambrozak (David); W.C. Adams (William); K. Santos (Kathlyn); C. Geldmacher (Christof); J.R. Mascola (John); A.J. McMichael (Andrew); A. Jaye (Assan); H. Whittle (Hilton); S.L. Rowland-Jones (Sarah); R.A. Koup (Richard)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractHuman immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of dendritic cells (DCs) has been documented in vivo and may be an important contributor to HIV-1 transmission and pathogenesis. HIV-1-specific CD4+T cells respond to HIV antigens presented by HIV-1-infected DCs and in this process

  17. Geographic information system-based screening for TB, HIV, and syphilis (GIS-THIS: a cross-sectional study.

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    Neela D Goswami

    Full Text Available To determine the feasibility and case detection rate of a geographic information systems (GIS-based integrated community screening strategy for tuberculosis, syphilis, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV.Prospective cross-sectional study of all participants presenting to geographic hot spot screenings in Wake County, North Carolina.The residences of tuberculosis, HIV, and syphilis cases incident between 1/1/05-12/31/07 were mapped. Areas with high densities of all 3 diseases were designated "hot spots." Combined screening for tuberculosis, HIV, and syphilis were conducted at the hot spots; participants with positive tests were referred to the health department.Participants (N = 247 reported high-risk characteristics: 67% previously incarcerated, 40% had lived in a homeless shelter, and 29% had a history of crack cocaine use. However, 34% reported never having been tested for HIV, and 41% did not recall prior tuberculin skin testing. Screening identified 3% (8/240 of participants with HIV infection, 1% (3/239 with untreated syphilis, and 15% (36/234 with latent tuberculosis infection. Of the eight persons with HIV, one was newly diagnosed and co-infected with latent tuberculosis; he was treated for latent TB and linked to an HIV provider. Two other HIV-positive persons had fallen out of care, and as a result of the study were linked back into HIV clinics. Of 27 persons with latent tuberculosis offered therapy, nine initiated and three completed treatment. GIS-based screening can effectively penetrate populations with high disease burden and poor healthcare access. Linkage to care remains challenging and will require creative interventions to impact morbidity.

  18. A Map-Based Service Supporting Different Types of Geographic Knowledge for the Public.

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    Zhou, Mengjie; Wang, Rui; Tian, Jing; Ye, Ning; Mai, Shumin

    2016-01-01

    The internet enables the rapid and easy creation, storage, and transfer of knowledge; however, services that transfer geographic knowledge and facilitate the public understanding of geographic knowledge are still underdeveloped to date. Existing online maps (or atlases) can support limited types of geographic knowledge. In this study, we propose a framework for map-based services to represent and transfer different types of geographic knowledge to the public. A map-based service provides tools to ensure the effective transfer of geographic knowledge. We discuss the types of geographic knowledge that should be represented and transferred to the public, and we propose guidelines and a method to represent various types of knowledge through a map-based service. To facilitate the effective transfer of geographic knowledge, tools such as auxiliary background knowledge and auxiliary map-reading tools are provided through interactions with maps. An experiment conducted to illustrate our idea and to evaluate the usefulness of the map-based service is described; the results demonstrate that the map-based service is useful for transferring different types of geographic knowledge.

  19. Size and type of places, geographical region, satisfaction with life, age, sex and place attachment

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    Mandal Alan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The topic of the article concerns the issue of place attachment and its determinants. An analysis of place attachment was performed in terms of place identity and place dependence (Williams, Vaske, 2003. Moreover, links between place attachment and selected geographical (size and type of place, geographical region, demographic (age, sex and psychological (satisfaction with life variables were investigated.

  20. Interleukin 18 stimulates HIV type 1 in monocytic cells.

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    Shapiro, L; Puren, A J; Barton, H A; Novick, D; Peskind, R L; Shenkar, R; Gu, Y; Su, M S; Dinarello, C A

    1998-10-13

    The cytokine interleukin (IL) 18 (formerly interferon gamma-inducing factor) induces the T helper type 1 response. In the present studies, IL-18 increased HIV type 1 (HIV-1) production from 5- to 30-fold in the chronically infected U1 monocytic cell line. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) activity by the addition of TNF-binding protein reduced IL-18-stimulated HIV-1 production by 48%. In the same cultures, IL-18-induced IL-8 was inhibited by 96%. Also, a neutralizing anti-IL-6 mAb reduced IL-18-induced HIV-1 by 63%. Stimulation of U1 cells with IL-18 resulted in increased production of IL-6, and exogenous IL-6 added to U1 cells increased HIV-1 production 4-fold over control. A specific inhibitor of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase reduced IL-18-induced HIV-1 by 73%, and a 50% inhibition was observed at 0.05 microM. In the same cultures, IL-8 was inhibited by 87%. By gel-shift and supershift analyses, increased binding activity of the transcription factor NF-kappaB was measured in nuclear extracts from U1 cells 1 h after exposure to IL-18. These results demonstrate induction of HIV-1 by IL-18 in a monocyte target associated with an intermediate role for TNF and IL-6, activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB.

  1. Type and severity of intimate partner violence and its relationship with PTSD in HIV-infected women.

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    Hansrod, Fatima; Spies, Georgina; Seedat, Soraya

    2015-01-01

    HIV has an impact on the presence and severity of both intimate partner violence (IPV) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in infected women. However, the relationship of type and severity of IPV with PTSD in this population has not been adequately explored. We focus on the association between the type and severity of IPV and HIV status and PTSD in a sample of South African women. One hundred and sixty-nine women (114 HIV-positive and 55 HIV-negative controls), matched for geographical area, education, and socio-economic status, were recruited from HIV clinics. Clinical and demographic data were collected, including data on childhood trauma, other traumatic life events, IPV, posttraumatic stress symptoms, problematic alcohol use, and depressive symptoms. HIV-positive women had significantly more depressive symptoms, alcohol abuse, and childhood trauma exposure as well as significantly higher rates of PTSD (25.4%) when compared with uninfected women (10.9%). No significant group differences in the rate, pattern, and severity of physical, sexual, psychological, injury, and negotiation IPV were found. In logistic regression analysis, the rate and severity category of IPV did not significantly predict PTSD in HIV-positive women when childhood trauma and life events were controlled for. Our results indicate the need for screening for alcohol abuse, PTSD and depressive symptoms at HIV wellness, and ARV clinics. The high rates of PTSD in HIV-positive women indicate the need for specialized programs to manage PTSD and minimize negative sequelae in this population. These results also highlight the need for improved screening and prevention of childhood trauma and IPV both in infected and uninfected women.

  2. HUMAN-IMMUNODEFICIENCY-VIRUS (HIV) TYPE-1 INFECTION STATUS AND IN-VITRO SUSCEPTIBILITY TO HIV-INFECTION AMONG HIGH-RISK HIV-1 SERONEGATIVE HEMOPHILIACS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LEDERMAN, MM; JACKSON, JB; KRONER, BL; WHITE, GC; EYSTER, ME; ALEDORT, LM; HILGARTNER, MW; KESSLER, CM; COHEN, AR; KIGER, KP; GOEDERT, JJ

    1995-01-01

    Blood samples were obtained from 16 hemophiliacs who had a 50%-94% defined risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV type 1 infection on the basis of treatment history and from 14 controls not at risk for HIV infection. HIV-1 was not detected in any of 12 patient samples by cocultivation nor in 14 p

  3. People living with HIV travel farther to access healthcare: a population-based geographic analysis from rural Uganda

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    Adam N Akullian

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The availability of specialized HIV services is limited in rural areas of sub-Saharan Africa where the need is the greatest. Where HIV services are available, people living with HIV (PLHIV must overcome large geographic, economic and social barriers to access healthcare. The objective of this study was to understand the unique barriers PLHIV face when accessing healthcare compared with those not living with HIV in a rural area of sub-Saharan Africa with limited availability of healthcare infrastructure. Methods: We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study of 447 heads of household on Bugala Island, Uganda. Multiple linear regression models were used to compare travel time, cost and distance to access healthcare, and log binomial models were used to test for associations between HIV status and access to nearby health services. Results: PLHIV travelled an additional 1.9 km (95% CI (0.6, 3.2 km, p=0.004 to access healthcare compared with those not living with HIV, and they were 56% less likely to access healthcare at the nearest health facility to their residence, so long as that facility lacked antiretroviral therapy (ART services (aRR=0.44, 95% CI (0.24 to 0.83, p=0.011. We found no evidence that PLHIV travelled further for care if the nearest facility supplies ART services (aRR=0.95, 95% CI (0.86 to 1.05, p=0.328. Among those who reported uptake of care at one of two facilities on the island that provides ART (81% of PLHIV and 68% of HIV-negative individuals, PLHIV tended to seek care at a higher tiered facility that provides ART, even when this facility was not their closest facility (30% of PLHIV travelled further than the closest ART facility compared with 16% of HIV-negative individuals, and travelled an additional 2.2 km (p=0.001 to access that facility, relative to HIV-negative individuals (aRR=1.91, 95% CI (1.00 to 3.65, p=0.05. Among PLHIV, residential distance was associated with access to facilities providing

  4. Geographic Distribution of Mating Types in Magnaporthe grisea and the Relationship Between Fertile Isolates in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Ying; Notteghem Jean Loup.; Milazzo Joёlle.; YUAN Xiao-ping; Adreit Henry; ZHAO Xin-hua; WANG Yan-li; Tharreau Didier.

    2002-01-01

    377 isolates of Magnaporthe grisea were collected from 17 provinces in China and their geographic distribution of mating types and their fertility was tested with four standard isolates, KA3 and TH12 (Mat1.1) and Guy11 and TH16 (Mat1.2) provided by CIRAD. 73 fertile isolates were tested with SCAR markers of 13 pairs of primers. Preliminary results showed that the geographic distribution of M. grisea existed among isolates collected from the same location as well as different locations and the genetic relationship between fertile isolates of the fungus in China. The existence of sexual reproduction of M. grisea was explored in the field as well.

  5. Frequency of human immunodeficiency virus type-2 in hiv infected patients in Maputo City, Mozambique

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    Bhatt Nilesh

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The HIV/AIDS pandemic is primarily caused by HIV-1. Another virus type, HIV-2, is found mainly in West African countries. We hypothesized that population migration and mobility in Africa may have facilitated the introduction and spreading of HIV-2 in Mozambique. The presence of HIV-2 has important implications for diagnosis and choice of treatment of HIV infection. Hence, the aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of HIV-2 infection and its genotype in Maputo, Mozambique. HIV-infected individuals (N = 1,200 were consecutively enrolled and screened for IgG antibodies against HIV-1 gp41 and HIV-2 gp36 using peptide-based enzyme immunoassays (pepEIA. Specimens showing reactivity on the HIV-2 pepEIA were further tested using the INNO-LIA immunoblot assay and HIV-2 PCR targeting RT and PR genes. Subtype analysis of HIV-2 was based on the protease gene. After screening with HIV-2 pepEIA 1,168 were non-reactive and 32 were reactive to HIV-2 gp36 peptide. Of this total, 30 specimens were simultaneously reactive to gp41 and gp36 pepEIA while two samples reacted solely to gp36 peptide. Only three specimens containing antibodies against gp36 and gp105 on the INNO-LIA immunoblot assay were found to be positive by PCR to HIV-2 subtype A. The proportion of HIV-2 in Maputo City was 0.25% (90%CI 0.01-0.49. The HIV epidemic in Southern Mozambique is driven by HIV-1, with HIV-2 also circulating at a marginal rate. Surveillance program need to improve HIV-2 diagnosis and consider periodical survey aiming to monitor HIV-2 prevalence in the country.

  6. Examining geographic and socio-economic differences in outpatient and inpatient consumer expenditures for treating HIV/AIDS in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obinna E Onwujekwe

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The expenditures on treatment of HIV/AIDS to households were examined to quantify the magnitude of the economic burden of HIV/AIDS to different population groups in Nigeria. The information will also provide a basis for increased action towards a reduction of the economic burden on many households when accessing antiretroviral therapy (ART. Methods: A household survey was administered in three states, Adamawa, Akwa Ibom and Anambra, from the South-East, North-East and South-South zones of Nigeria, respectively. A pretested interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from a minimum sample of 1200 people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV. Data were collected on the medical and non-medical expenditures that patients incurred to treat HIV/AIDS for their last treatment episode within three months of the interview date. The expenditures were for outpatient visits (OPV and inpatient stays (IPS. The incidence of catastrophic health expenditure (CHE on ART treatment services was computed for OPV and IPS. Data were disaggregated by socio-economic status (SES and geographic location of the households. Results: The average OPV expenditures incurred by patients per OPV for HIV/AIDS treatment was US$6.1 with variations across SES and urban-rural residence. More than 95% of the surveyed households spent money on transportation to a treatment facility and over 70% spent money on food for OPV. For medical expenditures, the urbanites paid more than rural dwellers. Many patients incurred CHE during outpatient and inpatient visits. Compared to urban dwellers, rural dwellers incurred more CHE for outpatient (p=0.02 and inpatient visits (p=0.002. Conclusions: Treatment expenditures were quite high, inequitable and catastrophic in some instances, hence further jeopardizing the welfare of the households and the PLHIV. Strategically locating fully functional treatment centres to make them more accessible to PLHIV will largely reduce

  7. Examining geographic and socio-economic differences in outpatient and inpatient consumer expenditures for treating HIV/AIDS in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwujekwe, Obinna E; Ibe, Ogochukwu; Torpey, Kwasi; Dada, Stephanie; Uzochukwu, Benjamin; Sanwo, Olusola

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The expenditures on treatment of HIV/AIDS to households were examined to quantify the magnitude of the economic burden of HIV/AIDS to different population groups in Nigeria. The information will also provide a basis for increased action towards a reduction of the economic burden on many households when accessing antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods A household survey was administered in three states, Adamawa, Akwa Ibom and Anambra, from the South-East, North-East and South-South zones of Nigeria, respectively. A pretested interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from a minimum sample of 1200 people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV). Data were collected on the medical and non-medical expenditures that patients incurred to treat HIV/AIDS for their last treatment episode within three months of the interview date. The expenditures were for outpatient visits (OPV) and inpatient stays (IPS). The incidence of catastrophic health expenditure (CHE) on ART treatment services was computed for OPV and IPS. Data were disaggregated by socio-economic status (SES) and geographic location of the households. Results The average OPV expenditures incurred by patients per OPV for HIV/AIDS treatment was US$6.1 with variations across SES and urban-rural residence. More than 95% of the surveyed households spent money on transportation to a treatment facility and over 70% spent money on food for OPV. For medical expenditures, the urbanites paid more than rural dwellers. Many patients incurred CHE during outpatient and inpatient visits. Compared to urban dwellers, rural dwellers incurred more CHE for outpatient (p=0.02) and inpatient visits (p=0.002). Conclusions Treatment expenditures were quite high, inequitable and catastrophic in some instances, hence further jeopardizing the welfare of the households and the PLHIV. Strategically locating fully functional treatment centres to make them more accessible to PLHIV will largely reduce expenditures for travel

  8. Deficiencies in the simulation of the geographic distribution of climate types by global climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianliang; Yan, Xiaodong

    2016-05-01

    The performances of General Circulation Models (GCMs) when checked with conventional methods (i.e. correlation, bias, root-mean-square error) can only be evaluated for each variable individually. The geographic distribution of climate type in GCM simulations, which reflects the spatial attributes of models and is related closely to the terrestrial biosphere, has not yet been evaluated. Thus, whether the geographic distribution of climate types was well simulated by GCMs was evaluated in this study for nine GCMs. The results showed that large areas of climate zones classified by the GCMs were allocated incorrectly when compared to the basic climate zones established by observed data. The percentages of wrong areas covered approximately 30-50 % of the total land area for most models. In addition, the temporal shift in the distribution of climate zones according to the GCMs was found to be inaccurate. Not only were the locations of shifts poorly simulated, but also the areas of shift in climate zones. Overall, the geographic distribution of climate types was not simulated well by the GCMs, nor was the temporal shift in the distribution of climate zones. Thus, a new method on how to evaluate the simulated distribution of climate types for GCMs was provided in this study.

  9. MALDI-TOF typing highlights geographical and fluconazole resistance clusters in Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhieb, C; Normand, A C; Al-Yasiri, M; Chaker, E; El Euch, D; Vranckx, K; Hendrickx, M; Sadfi, N; Piarroux, R; Ranque, S

    2015-06-01

    Utilizing matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectra for Candida glabrata typing would be a cost-effective and easy-to-use alternative to classical DNA-based typing methods. This study aimed to use MALDI-TOF for the typing of C. glabrata clinical isolates from various geographical origins and test its capacity to differentiate between fluconazole-sensitive and -resistant strains.Both microsatellite length polymorphism (MLP) and MALDI-TOF mass spectra of 58 C. glabrata isolates originating from Marseilles (France) and Tunis (Tunisia) as well as collection strains from diverse geographic origins were analyzed. The same analysis was conducted on a subset of C. glabrata isolates that were either susceptible (MIC ≤ 8 mg/l) or resistant (MIC ≥ 64 mg/l) to fluconazole.According to the seminal results, both MALDI-TOF and MLP classifications could highlight C. glabrata population structures associated with either geographical dispersal barriers (p typing to investigate C. glabrata infection outbreaks and predict the antifungal susceptibility profile of clinical laboratory isolates.

  10. Geographically structured populations of Cryptococcus neoformans Variety grubii in Asia correlate with HIV status and show a clonal population structure.

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    Kantarawee Khayhan

    Full Text Available Cryptococcosis is an important fungal disease in Asia with an estimated 140,000 new infections annually the majority of which occurs in patients suffering from HIV/AIDS. Cryptococcus neoformans variety grubii (serotype A is the major causative agent of this disease. In the present study, multilocus sequence typing (MLST using the ISHAM MLST consensus scheme for the C. neoformans/C. gattii species complex was used to analyse nucleotide polymorphisms among 476 isolates of this pathogen obtained from 8 Asian countries. Population genetic analysis showed that the Asian C. neoformans var. grubii population shows limited genetic diversity and demonstrates a largely clonal mode of reproduction when compared with the global MLST dataset. HIV-status, sequence types and geography were found to be confounded. However, a correlation between sequence types and isolates from HIV-negative patients was observed among the Asian isolates. Observations of high gene flow between the Middle Eastern and the Southeastern Asian populations suggest that immigrant workers in the Middle East were originally infected in Southeastern Asia.

  11. Development and implementation of an HIV/AIDS trials management system: a geographical information systems approach

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Busgeeth, K

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available transmission (e.g. condom use) are included, but those trials assessing interventions specific to other sexually transmitted infections are excluded, as are trials which only assess safety (so-called phase I trials). All identified trials are imported... of study Closed Open/Ongoing Planned Stopped early Design RCT CCT Systematic review Register status Pending Accepted Rejected Intervention Treatment Prevention Outcomes Morbidity Mortality/Survival Transmission (MTCT) Geographical co...

  12. Effect of HIV Infection on Human Papillomavirus Types Causing Invasive Cervical Cancer in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Gary M; de Vuyst, Hugo; Tenet, Vanessa; Plummer, Martyn; Tully, Stephen; Franceschi, Silvia

    2016-11-01

    HIV infection is known to worsen the outcome of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and may do so differentially by HPV type. Twenty-one studies were included in a meta-analysis of invasive cervical cancers (ICC) among women infected with HIV in Africa. Type-specific HPV DNA prevalence was compared with data from a similar meta-analysis of HIV-negative ICC using prevalence ratios (PR). HPV detection was similar in 770 HIV-positive (91.2%) and 3846 HIV-negative (89.6%) ICC, but HIV-positive ICC harbored significantly more multiple HPV infections (PR = 1.75, 95% confidence intervals: 1.18 to 2.58), which were significantly more prevalent in ICC tested from cells than from biopsies. HPV16 was the most frequently detected type in HIV-positive ICC (42.5%), followed by HPV18 (22.2%), HPV45 (14.4%), and HPV35 (7.1%). Nevertheless, HIV-positive ICC were significantly less frequently infected with HPV16 than HIV-negative ICC (PR = 0.88, 95% confidence intervals: 0.79 to 0.99). Other high-risk types were significantly more prevalent in HIV-positive ICC, but only for HPV18 was there a significantly higher prevalence of both single and multiple infections in HIV-positive ICC. Increases for other high-risk types were primarily accounted for by multiple infections. The proportion of HPV-positive ICC estimated attributable to HPV16/18 (71.8% in HIV positive, 73.4% in HIV negative) or HPV16/18/31/33/45/52/58 (88.8%, 89.5%) was not affected by HIV. HIV alters the relative carcinogenicity of HPV types, but prophylactic HPV16/18 vaccines may nevertheless prevent a similar proportion of ICC, irrespective of HIV infection.

  13. Timing of HIV Seroreversion Among HIV-Exposed, Breastfed Infants in Malawi: Type of HIV Rapid Test Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Emily R; Hudgens, Michael; Sheahan, Anna D; Miller, William C; Wheeler, Stephanie; Nelson, Julie A E; Dube, Queen; Van Rie, Annelies

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Rapid HIV serological tests are a cost-effective, point-of-care test among HIV exposed infants but cannot distinguish between maternal and infant antibodies. The lack of data on the timing of decay of maternal antibodies in young infants hinders the potential use of rapid tests in exposed infants. We aimed to determine the time to seroreversion for two commonly used rapid tests in a prospective cohort of HIV-exposed breastfeeding infants ages 3-18 months of life. Methods We collected data on the performance of two commonly used rapid tests (Determine and Unigold) in Malawi between 2008 and 2012 or at the University of North Carolina between 2014 and 2015. Time to seroreversion was estimated for both rapid tests using the Kaplan-Meier product limit estimator which allows for interval censored data. Results At 3 months of age, 3 % of infants had seroreverted according to Determine and 7 % had seroreverted according to Unigold. About one in four infants had achieved seroreversion by 4 months using Unigold, but only about one in twelve infants by 4 months when using Determine. More than 95 % of all infants had seroverted by 7 months according to Unigold and by 12 months according to the Determine assay. Discussion We show that the time of seroreversion depends greatly on the type of test used. Our results highlight the need for recommendations to specify the timing and type of test used in the context of infant HIV detection in resource-poor settings, and base the interpretation of test result on knowledge of time to seroreversion of the selected test.

  14. Frequent Intratype Neutralization by Plasma Immunoglobulin A Identified in HIV Type 2 Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Özkaya Şahin, Gülşen; Månsson, Fredrik; Palm, Angelica A.; Vincic, Elzbieta; da Silva, Zacarias; Medstrand, Patrik; Norrgren, Hans; Fenyö, Eva Maria; Jansson, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) is less transmissible and less pathogenic compared to HIV-1 and, when matched for CD4+ T cell count, the plasma viral load in HIV-2-infected individuals is approximately one log lower than in HIV-1-infected individuals. The explanation for these observations is elusive, but differences in virus controlling immunity generated in the two infections may be contributing factors. In the present study, we investigated neutralization by immunoglobulin A (I...

  15. Potent Intratype Neutralizing Activity Distinguishes Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 (HIV-2) from HIV-1

    OpenAIRE

    Özkaya Şahin, Gülşen; Holmgren, Birgitta; da Silva, Zacarias; Nielsen, Jens; Nowroozalizadeh, Salma; Esbjörnsson, Joakim; Månsson, Fredrik; Andersson, Sören; Norrgren, Hans; Aaby, Peter; Jansson, Marianne; Fenyö, Eva Maria

    2012-01-01

    HIV-2 has a lower pathogenicity and transmission rate than HIV-1. Neutralizing antibodies could be contributing to these observations. Here we explored side by side the potency and breadth of intratype and intertype neutralizing activity (NAc) in plasma of 20 HIV-1-, 20 HIV-2-, and 11 dually HIV-1/2 (HIV-D)-seropositive individuals from Guinea-Bissau, West Africa. Panels of primary isolates, five HIV-1 and five HIV-2 isolates, were tested in a plaque reduction assay using U87.CD4-CCR5 cells a...

  16. HIV prevalence in severely malnourished children admitted to nutrition rehabilitation units in Malawi: Geographical & seasonal variations a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maleta Kenneth

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe malnutrition in childhood associated with HIV infection presents a serious humanitarian and public health challenge in Southern Africa. The aim of this study was to collect country wide data on HIV infection patterns in severely malnourished children to guide the development of integrated care in a resource limited setting. Methods A cross sectional survey was conducted in 12 representative rural and urban Nutrition Rehabilitation Units (NRUs, from each of Malawi's 3 regions. All children and their caretakers admitted to each NRU over a two week period were offered HIV counselling and testing. Testing was carried out using two different rapid antibody tests, with PCR testing for discordant results. Children under 15 months were excluded, to avoid difficulties with interpretation of false positive rapid test results. The survey was conducted once in the dry/post-harvest season, and repeated in the rainy/hungry season. Results 570 children were eligible for study inclusion. Acceptability and uptake of HIV testing was high: 523(91.7% of carers consented for their children to take part; 368(70.6% themselves accepted testing. Overall HIV prevalence amongst children tested was 21.6%(95% confidence intervals, 18.2–25.5%. There was wide variation between individual NRUs: 2.0–50.0%. Geographical prevalence variations were significant between the three regions (p HIV prevalence was significantly higher in urban areas, 32.9%(95%CI 26.8–39.4% than in rural 13.2%(95%CI 9.5–17.6%(p NRU HIV prevalence rates were lower in the rainy/hungry season 18.4%(95%CI 14.7–22.7% than in the dry/post-harvest season 30.9%(95%CI 23.2–39.4% (p Conclusion There is a high prevalence of HIV infection in severely malnourished Malawian children attending NRUs with children in urban areas most likely to be infected. Testing for HIV is accepted by their carers in both urban and rural areas. NRUs could act as entry points to HIV treatment and

  17. Frequent intratype neutralization by plasma immunoglobulin a identified in HIV type 2 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkaya Şahin, Gülşen; Månsson, Fredrik; Palm, Angelica A; Vincic, Elzbieta; da Silva, Zacarias; Medstrand, Patrik; Norrgren, Hans; Fenyö, Eva Maria; Jansson, Marianne

    2013-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) is less transmissible and less pathogenic compared to HIV-1 and, when matched for CD4(+) T cell count, the plasma viral load in HIV-2-infected individuals is approximately one log lower than in HIV-1-infected individuals. The explanation for these observations is elusive, but differences in virus controlling immunity generated in the two infections may be contributing factors. In the present study, we investigated neutralization by immunoglobulin A (IgA), in parallel with IgG, purified from plasma of HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-1/HIV-2 dually (HIV-D) infected individuals. Neutralization was analyzed against HIV-1 and HIV-2 isolates using a plaque reduction assay. In HIV-2 infection, intratype-specific neutralization by IgA was frequently detected, although at a lesser magnitude then the corresponding IgG neutralizing titers. In contrast, neutralization by IgA could rarely be demonstrated in HIV-1 infection despite similar plasma IgA levels in both infections. In addition, IgA and IgG of HIV-D plasma neutralized the HIV-2 isolate more potently than the HIV-1 isolate, suggesting that the difference between neutralizing activity of plasma IgA and IgG depends on the virus itself. Taken together, these findings suggest that both IgA and IgG add to the potent intratype neutralizing activity detected in HIV-2 plasma, which may contribute to virus control in HIV-2 infection.

  18. Geographical and climatic limits of needle types of one- and two-needled pinyon pines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, K.L.; Fisher, J.; Arundel, S.T.; Cannella, J.; Swift, S.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The geographical extent and climatic tolerances of one- and two-needled pinyon pines (Pinus subsect. Cembroides) are the focus of questions in taxonomy, palaeoclimatology and modelling of future distributions. The identification of these pines, traditionally classified by one- versus two-needled fascicles, is complicated by populations with both one- and two-needled fascicles on the same tree, and the description of two more recently described one-needled varieties: the fallax-type and californiarum-type. Because previous studies have suggested correlations between needle anatomy and climate, including anatomical plasticity reflecting annual precipitation, we approached this study at the level of the anatomy of individual pine needles rather than species. Location: Western North America. Methods: We synthesized available and new data from field and herbarium collections of needles to compile maps of their current distributions across western North America. Annual frequencies of needle types were compared with local precipitation histories for some stands. Historical North American climates were modelled on a c. 1-km grid using monthly temperature and precipitation values. A geospatial model (ClimLim), which analyses the effect of climate-modulated physiological and ecosystem processes, was used to rank the importance of seasonal climate variables in limiting the distributions of anatomical needle types. Results: The pinyon needles were classified into four distinct types based upon the number of needles per fascicle, needle thickness and the number of stomatal rows and resin canals. The individual needles fit well into four categories of needle types, whereas some trees exhibit a mixture of two needle types. Trees from central Arizona containing a mixture of Pinus edulis and fallax-type needles increased their percentage of fallax-type needles following dry years. All four needle types occupy broader geographical regions with distinctive precipitation regimes

  19. Sources and types of information on self-care symptom management strategies for HIV and AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie Modeste, Regis R; Majeke, Sisana J

    2014-04-03

    It has been reported that South Africa has the highest number of people living with HIV worldwide, with more women being infected than men. Women living with HIV have been documented as experiencing various symptoms related to HIV and use various strategies to manage these symptoms. The objective of this study was to explore the sources and types of information regarding self-care symptom management strategies received by women living with HIV. The study was conducted at an HIV clinic in an urban area of KwaZulu-Natal. Individual in-depth interviews were completed with 11 women who were living with HIV,exploring the sources of information received on how they manage the HIV- (and/or AIDS-) related symptoms they experienced as well as the types of information received. The collecteddata were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The participants identified various sources, which mainly included groups of people who provided them with information on how to manage their HIV-related symptoms, namely healthcare providers, their personal networks and the community. The different sources offered different types of information, including the use of medication, complementary treatments and self-comforting activities. The study highlights that participants used multiple sources to get information about how to manage the experienced symptoms related to HIV, namely, healthcare providers, family and friends as well as themselves. It is to be noted that each source provided a preferred type of information.

  20. Sources and types of information on self-care symptom management strategies for HIV and AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regis R. Marie Modeste

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been reported that South Africa has the highest number of people living with HIV worldwide, with more women being infected than men. Women living with HIV have been documented as experiencing various symptoms related to HIV and use various strategies to manage these symptoms.Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the sources and types of information regarding self-care symptom management strategies received by women living with HIV.Method: The study was conducted at an HIV clinic in an urban area of KwaZulu-Natal. Individual in-depth interviews were completed with 11 women who were living with HIV,exploring the sources of information received on how they manage the HIV- (and/or AIDS- related symptoms they experienced as well as the types of information received. The collecteddata were analysed using qualitative content analysis.Results: The participants identified various sources, which mainly included groups of people who provided them with information on how to manage their HIV-related symptoms, namely healthcare providers, their personal networks and the community. The different sources offered different types of information, including the use of medication, complementary treatments and self-comforting activities.Conclusion: The study highlights that participants used multiple sources to get information about how to manage the experienced symptoms related to HIV, namely, healthcare providers, family and friends as well as themselves. It is to be noted that each source provided a preferred type of information.

  1. Identification of infection of an Australian resident with the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, J C; Dwyer, D E; Kazazi, F; Chew, C B; Dowton, D N; Randle, C; Singh, V; Dax, E M; Cunningham, A L

    1992-09-21

    To present the first confirmed case of human immunodeficiency virus infection type 2 (HIV-2) in an Australian resident. HIV-2 infection in a west African man resident in Sydney was diagnosed in 1992 at Westmead Hospital, Sydney, by serological testing. He was asymptomatic and the blood CD4 T-lymphocyte concentration was not significantly reduced. Infection was probably acquired before migration to Australia. The patient was initially tested for HIV-1 antibody as part of an application for permanent residency. He was in no obvious risk group or transmission category. His serum was repeatedly positive by Genetic Systems enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and borderline by Abbott EIA, was reactive to the HIV-2 peptide on a synthetic envelope peptide assay, and was strongly reactive to all HIV-2 specific viral protein bands on an HIV-2 western blot test. HIV-2 was isolated by co-cultivation of the patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cells and identified by hybridisation using HIV-2 specific oligonucleotide probes, with further confirmation by polymerase chain reaction. The patient was counselled regarding the clinical course and prognosis of HIV-2 infection, the possible indications for zidovudine therapy, modes of transmission of the virus and safer sex precautions. This is the first documented case of HIV-2 infection diagnosed in Australia and raises the possibility of other undetected cases. The cost effectiveness of general testing for HIV-2 needs to be assessed and formal epidemiological sentinel programs should be established to monitor specific Australian populations.

  2. Origin of HIV type 1 in colonial French Equatorial Africa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitnis, A; Rawls, D; Moore, J

    2000-01-01

    Sociocultural factors during the postcolonial period have been implicated as paramount in generating conditions that promoted both the origin and subsequent epidemic spread of HIV-1 in Africa. We suggest, however, that the origin of the disease may lie in the interaction between colonial practices (e.g., labor camps, nonsterile vaccination campaigns) and traditional bushmeat hunting in French Equatorial Africa. Both the epidemiology of HIV-2 and the colonial history of West Africa appear more complex, but similar conditions existed there and may have contributed to the origin of HIV-2. Focusing the search for the origins of HIV-1 and HIV-2 on this earlier time period may contribute to understanding the evolution of the HIV viruses and the dynamics of emerging diseases.

  3. Geographic variation of Trypanosoma cruzi discrete typing units from Triatoma infestans at different spatial scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, María Del Pilar; Cecere, María Carla; Lanati, Leonardo Alejandro; Lauricella, Marta Alicia; Schijman, Alejandro Gabriel; Gürtler, Ricardo Esteban; Cardinal, Marta Victoria

    2014-12-01

    We assessed the diversity and distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi discrete typing units (DTU) in Triatoma infestans populations and its association with local vector-borne transmission levels at various geographic scales. At a local scale, we found high predominance (92.4%) of TcVI over TcV in 68 microscope-positive T. infestans collected in rural communities in Santiago del Estero province in northern Argentina. TcV was more often found in communities with higher house infestation prevalence compatible with active vector-borne transmission. Humans and dogs were the main bloodmeal sources of the TcV- and TcVI-infected bugs. At a broader scale, the greatest variation in DTU diversity was found within the Argentine Chaco (227 microscope-positive bugs), mainly related to differences in equitability between TcVI and TcV among study areas. At a country-wide level, a meta-analysis of published data revealed clear geographic variations in the distribution of DTUs across countries. A correspondence analysis showed that DTU distributions in domestic T. infestans were more similar within Argentina (dominated by TcVI) and within Bolivia (where TcI and TcV had similar relative frequencies), whereas large heterogeneity was found within Chile. DTU diversity was lower in the western Argentine Chaco region and Paraguay (D=0.14-0.22) than in the eastern Argentine Chaco, Bolivia and Chile (D=0.20-0.68). Simultaneous DTU identifications of T. cruzi-infected hosts and triatomines across areas differing in epidemiological status are needed to shed new light on the structure and dynamics of parasite transmission cycles.

  4. Decline in HIV prevalence among young women in Zambia: national-level estimates of trends mask geographical and socio-demographic differences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nkomba Kayeyi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A decline in HIV incidence has been reported in Zambia and a number of other sub-Saharan countries. The trend of HIV prevalence among young people is a good marker of HIV incidence. In this study, different data sources are used to examine geographical and sub-population group differentials in HIV prevalence trends among men and women aged 15-24 years in Zambia. DESIGN AND METHODS: We analysed ANC data for women aged 15-24 years from 22 sentinel sites consistently covered in the period 1994-2008, and HIV data for young men and women aged 15-24 years from the ZDHS 2001/2 and 2007. In addition, we systematically reviewed peer-reviewed articles that have reported findings on HIV prevalence and incidence among young people. FINDINGS: Overall trends of the ANC surveillance data indicated a substantial HIV prevalence decline among young women in both urban and rural areas. However, provincial declines differed substantially, i.e. between 10% and 68% among urban women, and from stability to 86% among rural women. Prevalence declines were steeper among those with the highest educational attainments than among the least educated. The ZDHS data indicated a significant reduction in prevalence between the two survey rounds among young women only. Provincial-level ZDHS changes were difficult to assess because the sample sizes were small. ANC-based trend patterns were consistent with those observed in PMTCT-based data (2002-2006, whereas population-based surveys in a selected urban community (1995-2003 suggested that the ANC-based data underestimated the prevalence declines in the general populations of both young both men and women. CONCLUSION: The overall HIV prevalence declined substantially among young women in Zambia and this is interpreted as indicating a decline in HIV incidence. It is noteworthy that overall national trends masked substantial differences by place and by educational attainment, demonstrating critical limitations in the

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) Gag is trafficked in an AP-3 and AP-5 dependent manner

    OpenAIRE

    Alford, Justine E.; Marongiu, Michela; Gemma L Watkins; Anderson, Emma C.

    2016-01-01

    Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) types 1 and 2 are closely related lentiviruses with similar replication cycles, HIV-2 infection is associated with slower progression to AIDS, a higher proportion of long term non-progressors, and lower rates of transmission than HIV-1, likely as a consequence of a lower viral load during HIV-2 infection. A mechanistic explanation for the differential viral load remains unclear but knowledge of differences in particle production between HIV-1 and HI...

  6. Cytopathicity of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 (HIV-2) in Human Lymphoid Tissue Is Coreceptor Dependent and Comparable to That of HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Birgit; Penn, Michael L.; Palacios, Emil H.; Grant, Robert M.; Kirchhoff, Frank; Goldsmith, Mark A.

    2000-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) is markedly less pathogenic than HIV-1 in vivo. Individuals infected with HIV-2 exhibit a remarkably slow rate of disease development, and these clinical properties have been attributed presumptively to an “attenuated” phenotype of HIV-2 itself. Here, we investigated the impact of coreceptor usage on the cytopathicity of HIV-2 and compared its pathogenic potential with that of HIV-1 in a unique human lymphoid histoculture model. We found that HIV-2 strains, as well as closely related simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIV), displayed mildly or highly aggressive cytopathic phenotypes depending on their abilities to use the coreceptor CCR5 or CXCR4, respectively. A side-by-side comparison of primary X4 HIV-1 and HIV-2 strains revealed similar, high degrees of cytopathicity induced by both HIV types. Furthermore, we found that HIV-2 coreceptor specificity for CCR5 and CXCR4 determined the target cell population for T-cell depletion in lymphoid tissue. Finally, utilization of the alternate coreceptors BOB and Bonzo did not significantly increase the cytopathic properties of HIV-2. These findings demonstrate that coreceptor preference is a key regulator of target cell specificity and the cytopathic potential of HIV-2, with indistinguishable rules compared with HIV-1. Moreover, HIV-2 strains are not characterized by an intrinsically lower cytopathicity than HIV-1 strains. Therefore, direct cytopathic potential per se does not explain the unique behavior of HIV-2 in people, highlighting that other unknown factors need to be elucidated as the basis for their lesser virulence in vivo. PMID:11000231

  7. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 (HIV-2 Gag Is Trafficked in an AP-3 and AP-5 Dependent Manner.

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    Justine E Alford

    Full Text Available Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV types 1 and 2 are closely related lentiviruses with similar replication cycles, HIV-2 infection is associated with slower progression to AIDS, a higher proportion of long term non-progressors, and lower rates of transmission than HIV-1, likely as a consequence of a lower viral load during HIV-2 infection. A mechanistic explanation for the differential viral load remains unclear but knowledge of differences in particle production between HIV-1 and HIV-2 may help to shed light on this issue. In contrast to HIV-1, little is known about the assembly of HIV-2 particles, and the trafficking of HIV-2 Gag, the structural component of the virus, within cells. We have established that HIV-2 Gag accumulates in intracellular CD63 positive compartments, from which it may be delivered or recycled to the cell surface, or degraded. HIV-2 particle release was dependent on the adaptor protein complex AP-3 and the newly identified AP-5 complex, but much less so on AP-1. In contrast, HIV-1 particle release required AP-1 and AP-3, but not AP-5. AP-2, an essential component of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, which was previously shown to be inhibitory to HIV-1 particle release, had no effect on HIV-2. The differential requirement for adaptor protein complexes confirmed that HIV-1 and HIV-2 Gag have distinct cellular trafficking pathways, and that HIV-2 particles may be more susceptible to degradation prior to release.

  8. Necroptosis takes place in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1-infected CD4+ T lymphocytes.

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    Ting Pan

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection is characterized by progressive depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes and dysfunction of the immune system. The numbers of CD4+ T lymphocytes in the human body are maintained constantly by homeostatic mechanisms that failed during HIV-1 infection, resulting in progressive loss of CD4+ T cells mainly via apoptosis. Recently, a non-apoptotic form of necrotic programmed cell death, named necroptosis, has been investigated in many biological and pathological processes. We then determine whether HIV-1-infected cells also undergo necroptosis. In this report, we demonstrate that HIV-1 not only induces apoptosis, but also mediates necroptosis in the infected primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and CD4+ T-cell lines. Necroptosis-dependent cytopathic effects are significantly increased in HIV-1-infected Jurkat cells that is lack of Fas-associated protein-containing death domain (FADD, indicating that necroptosis occurs as an alternative cell death mechanism in the absence of apoptosis. Unlike apoptosis, necroptosis mainly occurs in HIV-infected cells and spares bystander damage. Treatment with necrostatin-1(Nec-1, a RIP1 inhibitor that specifically blocks the necroptosis pathway, potently restrains HIV-1-induced cytopathic effect and interestingly, inhibits the formation of HIV-induced syncytia in CD4+ T-cell lines. This suggests that syncytia formation is mediated, at least partially, by necroptosis-related processes. Furthermore, we also found that the HIV-1 infection-augmented tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α plays a key role in inducing necroptosis and HIV-1 Envelope and Tat proteins function as its co-factors. Taken together,necroptosis can function as an alternative cell death pathway in lieu of apoptosis during HIV-1 infection, thereby also contributing to HIV-1-induced cytopathic effects. Our results reveal that in addition to apoptosis, necroptosis also plays an important role in HIV-1-induced pathogenesis.

  9. 75 FR 22814 - Guidance for Industry: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ...: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV... memoranda entitled ``Revised Recommendations for the Prevention of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1...: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus...

  10. The Role of Geographic and Network Factors in Racial Disparities in HIV Among Young Men Who have Sex with Men: An Egocentric Network Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustanski, Brian; Birkett, Michelle; Kuhns, Lisa M; Latkin, Carl A; Muth, Stephen Q

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize and compare individual and sexual network characteristics of Black, White, and Latino young men who have sex with men (YMSM) as potential drivers of racial disparities in HIV. Egocentric network interviews were conducted with 175 diverse YMSM who described 837 sex partners within 167 sexual-active egos. Sexual partner alter attributes were summarized by ego. Descriptives of ego demographics, sexual partner demographics, and network characteristics were calculated by race of the ego and compared. No racial differences were found in individual engagement in HIV risk behaviors or concurrent sexual partnership. Racial differences were found in partner characteristics, including female gender, non-gay sexual orientations, older age, and residence in a high HIV prevalence neighborhood. Racial differences in relationship characteristics included type of relationships (i.e., main partner) and strength of relationships. Network characteristics also showed differences, including sexual network density and assortativity by race. Most racial differences were in the direction of effects that would tend to increase HIV incidence among Black YMSM. These data suggest that racial disparities in HIV may be driven and/or maintained by a combination of racial differences in partner characteristics, assortativity by race, and increased sexual network density, rather than differences in individual's HIV risk behaviors.

  11. Monoclonal antibody-based candidate therapeutics against HIV type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weizao; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2012-05-01

    Treatment of HIV-1 infection has been highly successful with small molecule drugs. However, resistance still develops. In addition, long-term use can lead to toxicity with unpredictable effects on health. Finally, current drugs do not lead to HIV-1 eradication. The presence of the virus leads to chronic inflammation, which can result in increased morbidity and mortality after prolonged periods of infection. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been highly successful during the past two decades for therapy of many diseases, primarily cancers and immune disorders. They are relatively safe, especially human mAbs that have evolved in humans at high concentrations to fight diseases and long-term use may not lead to toxicities. Several broadly neutralizing mAbs (bnmAbs) against HIV-1 can protect animals but are not effective when used for therapy of an established infection. We have hypothesized that HIV-1 has evolved strategies to effectively escape neutralization by full-size antibodies in natural infections but not by smaller antibody fragments. Therefore, a promising direction of research is to discover and exploit antibody fragments as potential candidate therapeutics against HIV-1. Here we review several bnmAbs and engineered antibody domains (eAds), their in vitro and in vivo antiviral efficacy, mechanisms used by HIV-1 to escape them, and strategies that could be effective to develop more powerful mAb-based HIV-1 therapeutics.

  12. Replication of type 2 diabetes candidate genes variations in three geographically unrelated Indian population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shafat; Chopra, Rupali; Manvati, Siddharth; Singh, Yoginder Pal; Kaul, Nabodita; Behura, Anita; Mahajan, Ankit; Sehajpal, Prabodh; Gupta, Subash; Dhar, Manoj K; Chainy, Gagan B N; Bhanwer, Amarjit S; Sharma, Swarkar; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a syndrome of multiple metabolic disorders and is genetically heterogeneous. India comprises one of the largest global populations with highest number of reported type 2 diabetes cases. However, limited information about T2D associated loci is available for Indian populations. It is, therefore, pertinent to evaluate the previously associated candidates as well as identify novel genetic variations in Indian populations to understand the extent of genetic heterogeneity. We chose to do a cost effective high-throughput mass-array genotyping and studied the candidate gene variations associated with T2D in literature. In this case-control candidate genes association study, 91 SNPs from 55 candidate genes have been analyzed in three geographically independent population groups from India. We report the genetic variants in five candidate genes: TCF7L2, HHEX, ENPP1, IDE and FTO, are significantly associated (after Bonferroni correction, ppopulation. Interestingly, SNP rs7903146 of the TCF7L2 gene passed the genome wide significance threshold (combined P value = 2.05E-08) in the studied populations. We also observed the association of rs7903146 with blood glucose (fasting and postprandial) levels, supporting the role of TCF7L2 gene in blood glucose homeostasis. Further, we noted that the moderate risk provided by the independently associated loci in combined population with Odds Ratio (OR)<1.38 increased to OR = 2.44, (95%CI = 1.67-3.59) when the risk providing genotypes of TCF7L2, HHEX, ENPP1 and FTO genes were combined, suggesting the importance of gene-gene interactions evaluation in complex disorders like T2D.

  13. The pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy of boosted saquinavir tablets in HIV type-1-infected pregnant women.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lugt, J. van der; Colbers, A.; Molto, J.; Hawkins, D.; Ende, M. van der; Vogel, M.; Wyen, C.; Schutz, M.; Koopmans, P.; Ruxrungtham, K.; Richter, C.; Burger, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pregnancy affects the pharmacokinetics of most protease inhibitors. Saquinavir, when administered in a tablet formulation, has not been studied extensively in this setting. METHODS: A pharmacokinetic, prospective, multicentre trial of HIV type-1-infected pregnant women treated with saqui

  14. Anti-HIV-1 activity of eight monofloral Iranian honey types.

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    Mandana Behbahani

    Full Text Available Monofloral Iranian honeys from eight floral sources were analyzed to determine their anti-HIV-1 activities as well as their effects on lymphocyte proliferation. The Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs used in this study were prepared from five healthy volunteers who were seronegative for HIV, HCV, HBV and TB. The anti-HIV-1 activity of eight different honeys was performed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay and high pure viral nucleic acid kit. The results demonstrated that monofloral honeys from Petro selinum sativum, Nigella sativa, Citrus sinensis, Zataria multiflora, Citrus aurantium and Zizyphus mauritiana flowers had potent anti-HIV-1 activity with half maximal effective concentration (EC50 values of 37.5, 88, 70, 88, 105 and 5 µg/ml respectively. However, monofloral Iranian honeys from Astragalus gummifer and Chamaemelum nobile flowers had weak anti-HIV-1 activity. The frequency and intensity of CD4 expression on PBMCs increased in the presence of all honey types. CD19 marker were also increased after the treatment with monofloral honeys from Z. multiflora and N. sativa. The anti-HIV-1 agent in monofloral honeys from P. sativum, N. sativa, Z. multiflora and Z. mauritiana flowers was detected by spectroscopic analysis as methylglyoxal. Time of drug addition studies demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal is higher on the late stage of HIV-1 infection. The result demonstrated that methylglyoxal isolated from monofloral honey types is a good candidate for preclinical evaluation of anti-HIV-1 therapies.

  15. Anti-HIV-1 activity of eight monofloral Iranian honey types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbahani, Mandana

    2014-01-01

    Monofloral Iranian honeys from eight floral sources were analyzed to determine their anti-HIV-1 activities as well as their effects on lymphocyte proliferation. The Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) used in this study were prepared from five healthy volunteers who were seronegative for HIV, HCV, HBV and TB. The anti-HIV-1 activity of eight different honeys was performed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and high pure viral nucleic acid kit. The results demonstrated that monofloral honeys from Petro selinum sativum, Nigella sativa, Citrus sinensis, Zataria multiflora, Citrus aurantium and Zizyphus mauritiana flowers had potent anti-HIV-1 activity with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values of 37.5, 88, 70, 88, 105 and 5 µg/ml respectively. However, monofloral Iranian honeys from Astragalus gummifer and Chamaemelum nobile flowers had weak anti-HIV-1 activity. The frequency and intensity of CD4 expression on PBMCs increased in the presence of all honey types. CD19 marker were also increased after the treatment with monofloral honeys from Z. multiflora and N. sativa. The anti-HIV-1 agent in monofloral honeys from P. sativum, N. sativa, Z. multiflora and Z. mauritiana flowers was detected by spectroscopic analysis as methylglyoxal. Time of drug addition studies demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal is higher on the late stage of HIV-1 infection. The result demonstrated that methylglyoxal isolated from monofloral honey types is a good candidate for preclinical evaluation of anti-HIV-1 therapies.

  16. Oligoclonal CD8 lymphocytes from persons with asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 infection inhibit HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toso, J F; Chen, C H; Mohr, J R; Piglia, L; Oei, C; Ferrari, G; Greenberg, M L; Weinhold, K J

    1995-10-01

    CD8 lymphocytes from asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected patients can suppress virus production from infected CD4 cells. Suppressive activity is separate and distinct from cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) reactivities and is likely mediated by a soluble factor(s). The majority of HIV-1 suppression studies have been done in the context of bulk CD8 cell cultures. In this study, viral suppression was characterized by clonal populations of CD8 cells derived from HIV-1-infected patients. Most of the suppressive clones were devoid of detectable CTL reactivity against env-, gag-, pol-, and nef-expressing targets. Among the suppressive clones derived from an individual patient, a marked heterogeneity was evident with respect to phenotypic markers, cytokine production, and T cell receptor V beta expression. These results suggest that noncytolytic virus suppression is oligoclonal in nature. Clones provide tools for future studies aimed at understanding the mechanism of suppression and identifying the suppressive factor.

  17. Decreased HIV type 1 transcription in CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes during suppressive antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Charlene; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Strain, Matthew C; Lada, Steven M; Yukl, Steven; Cockerham, Leslie R; Pilcher, Christopher D; Hecht, Frederick M; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Liegler, Teri; Richman, Douglas D; Deeks, Steven G; Pillai, Satish K

    2014-12-01

    Individuals who are heterozygous for the CCR5-Δ32 mutation provide a natural model to examine the effects of reduced CCR5 expression on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persistence. We evaluated the HIV reservoir in 18 CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes and 54 CCR5 wild-type individuals during suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Cell-associated HIV RNA levels (P=.035), RNA to DNA transcriptional ratios (P=.013), and frequency of detectable HIV 2-long terminal repeat circular DNA (P=.013) were significantly lower in CD4+ T cells from CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes. Cell-associated HIV RNA was significantly correlated with CCR5 surface expression on CD4+ T cells (r2=0.136; P=.002). Our findings suggest that curative strategies should further explore manipulation of CCR5.

  18. Louisiana Coastal Marsh Vegetative Type (poly), Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [marsh_veg_type_poly_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains vector line information. The original data set was collected through visual field observation by Greg Linscombe of LDWF and Robert H. Chabreck...

  19. Louisiana Coastal Marsh Vegetative Type, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [marsh_veg_type_pts_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains vector point information. The orignal data set was collected through visual field observation by Greg Linscombe of LDWF and Robert H. Chabreck...

  20. Herpes simplex virus type 2, genital ulcers and HIV-1 disease progression in postpartum women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison C Roxby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Co-infection with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 has been associated with increased HIV-1 RNA levels and immune activation, two predictors of HIV-1 progression. The impact of HSV-2 on clinical outcomes among HIV-1 infected pregnant women is unclear. METHODS: HIV-1 infected pregnant women in Nairobi were enrolled antenatally and HSV-2 serology was obtained. HIV-1 RNA and CD4 count were serially measured for 12-24 months postpartum. Survival analysis using endpoints of death, opportunistic infection (OI, and CD4<200 cells µL, and linear mixed models estimating rate of change of HIV-1 RNA and CD4, were used to determine associations between HSV-2 serostatus and HIV-1 progression. RESULTS: Among 296 women, 254 (86% were HSV-2-seropositive. Only 30 (10% women had prior or current genital ulcer disease (GUD; median baseline CD4 count was 422 cells µL. Adjusting for baseline CD4, women with GUD were significantly more likely to have incident OIs (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR 2.79, 95% CI: 1.33-5.85, and there was a trend for association between HSV-2-seropositivity and incident OIs (aHR 3.83, 95% CI: 0.93-15.83. Rate of change in CD4 count and HIV-1 RNA did not differ by HSV-2 status or GUD, despite a trend toward higher baseline HIV-1 RNA in HSV-2-seropositive women (4.73 log10 copies/ml vs. 4.47 log10 copies/ml, P = 0.07. CONCLUSIONS: HSV-2 was highly prevalent and pregnant HIV-1 infected women with GUD were significantly more likely to have incident OIs than women without GUD, suggesting that clinically evident HSV-2 is a more important predictor of HIV-1 disease progression than asymptomatic HSV-2.

  1. Syphilis and HIV co-infection. Epidemiology, treatment and molecular typing of Treponema pallidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salado-Rasmussen, Kirsten

    2015-12-01

    The studies included in this PhD thesis examined the interactions of syphilis, which is caused by Treponema pallidum, and HIV. Syphilis reemerged worldwide in the late 1990s and hereafter increasing rates of early syphilis were also reported in Denmark. The proportion of patients with concurrent HIV has been substantial, ranging from one third to almost two thirds of patients diagnosed with syphilis some years. Given that syphilis facilitates transmission and acquisition of HIV the two sexually transmitted diseases are of major public health concern. Further, syphilis has a negative impact on HIV infection, resulting in increasing viral loads and decreasing CD4 cell counts during syphilis infection. Likewise, HIV has an impact on the clinical course of syphilis; patients with concurrent HIV are thought to be at increased risk of neurological complications and treatment failure. Almost ten per cent of Danish men with syphilis acquired HIV infection within five years after they were diagnosed with syphilis during an 11-year study period. Interestingly, the risk of HIV declined during the later part of the period. Moreover, HIV-infected men had a substantial increased risk of re-infection with syphilis compared to HIV-uninfected men. As one third of the HIV-infected patients had viral loads >1,000 copies/ml, our conclusion supported the initiation of cART in more HIV-infected MSM to reduce HIV transmission. During a five-year study period, including the majority of HIV-infected patients from the Copenhagen area, we observed that syphilis was diagnosed in the primary, secondary, early and late latent stage. These patients were treated with either doxycycline or penicillin and the rate of treatment failure was similar in the two groups, indicating that doxycycline can be used as a treatment alternative - at least in an HIV-infected population. During a four-year study period, the T. pallidum strain type distribution was investigated among patients diagnosed by PCR

  2. Early childhood gut microbiomes show strong geographic differences among subjects at high risk for type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemppainen, Kaisa M; Ardissone, Alexandria N; Davis-Richardson, Austin G; Fagen, Jennie R; Gano, Kelsey A; León-Novelo, Luis G; Vehik, Kendra; Casella, George; Simell, Olli; Ziegler, Anette G; Rewers, Marian J; Lernmark, Åke; Hagopian, William; She, Jin-Xiong; Krischer, Jeffrey P; Akolkar, Beena; Schatz, Desmond A; Atkinson, Mark A; Triplett, Eric W

    2015-02-01

    Gut microbiome dysbiosis is associated with numerous diseases, including type 1 diabetes. This pilot study determines how geographical location affects the microbiome of infants at high risk for type 1 diabetes in a population of homogenous HLA class II genotypes. High-throughput 16S rRNA sequencing was performed on stool samples collected from 90 high-risk, nonautoimmune infants participating in The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study in the U.S., Germany, Sweden, and Finland. Study site-specific patterns of gut colonization share characteristics across continents. Finland and Colorado have a significantly lower bacterial diversity, while Sweden and Washington state are dominated by Bifidobacterium in early life. Bacterial community diversity over time is significantly different by geographical location. The microbiome of high-risk infants is associated with geographical location. Future studies aiming to identify the microbiome disease phenotype need to carefully consider the geographical origin of subjects. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  3. Detection of a human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle antigenically related to HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garry, R. F.; Fermin, C. D.; Hart, D. J.; Alexander, S. S.; Donehower, L. A.; Luo-Zhang, H.

    1990-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes. The loss of salivary and lacrimal gland function is accompanied by lymphocytic infiltration. Because similar symptoms and glandular pathology are observed in certain persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a search was initiated for a possible retroviral etiology in this syndrome. A human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle that is antigenically related to HIV was detected in lymphoblastoid cells exposed to homogenates of salivary tissue from patients with Sjogren's syndrome. Comparison of this retroviral particle to HIV indicates that they are distinguishable by several ultrastructural, physical, and enzymatic criteria.

  4. HIV-infected persons with type 2 diabetes show evidence of endothelial dysfunction and increased inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hove-Skovsgaard, Malene; Gaardbo, Julie Christine; Kolte, Lilian; Winding, Kamilla; Seljeflot, Ingebjørg; Svardal, Asbjørn; Berge, Rolf Kristian; Gerstoft, Jan; Ullum, Henrik; Trøseid, Marius; Nielsen, Susanne Dam

    2017-03-29

    Increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in both HIV infection and type 2 diabetes (T2D) compared to the general population has been described. Little is known about the combined effect of HIV infection and T2D on inflammation and endothelial function, both of which may contribute to elevated risk of CVD. Cross-sectional study including 50 HIV-infected persons on combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART), with HIV RNA inflammation (cut-off 3 mg/L). The marker of endothelial dysfunction asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) was measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), a microbiota-dependent, pro-atherogenic marker was measured using stable isotope dilution LC/MS/MS. The percentage of HIV + T2D+, HIV + T2D-, HIV-T2D+, and HIV-T2D- with hsCRP above cut-off was 50%, 19%, 47%, and 11%, respectively. HIV + T2D+ had elevated ADMA (0.67 μM (0.63-0.72) compared to HIV + T2D- (0.60 μM (0.57-0.64) p = 0.017), HIV-T2D+ (0.57 μM (0.51-63) p = 0.008), and HIV-T2D- (0.55 μM (0.52-0.58) p inflammation and evidence of endothelial dysfunction was found in HIV-infected persons with T2D. The effect on inflammation was mainly driven by T2D, while both HIV infection and T2D may contribute to endothelial dysfunction. Whether gut microbiota is a contributing factor to this remains to be determined.

  5. VH gene use by HIV type 1-associated lymphoproliferations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, V L; Hurt, M H; Herndier, B G; Fry, K E; McGrath, M S

    1997-01-20

    The pathogenesis of polyclonal HIV-associated lymphomas lacking traditional B cell cofactors (i.e., Epstein-Barr virus [EBV] infection, c-myc translocations) is poorly understood. A multistep pathogenesis model has been proposed in which polyclonal lymphomas represent an earlier stage in HIV-associated lymphomagenesis before the emergence of a dominant malignant clone. Chronically present antigens have been proposed as a likely stimulus for polyclonal B cell proliferation; if so, polyclonal lymphoma-associated immunoglobulins (Igs) should have molecular evidence of somatic hypermutation, a process by which antibody affinity maturation in response to chronic antigenic stimulation occurs. Molecular analyses of Ig heavy chain variable (V(H)) gene use by B cells in a polyclonal HIV-associated large cell lymphoma lacking EBV and c-myc rearrangement was undertaken. Eighteen randomly selected clones generated from RT-PCR yielded 15 unique V(H) sequences, all of which were most homologous to only three previously identified germline V(H)1 genes. Two sets of clones (consisting of three and two clones, respectively) had identical V(H) gene sequences, and one pair of clones had identical third complementarity determining regions (CDR3s) but different V(H) gene sequences; eight clones were difference in somatic hypermutations of Ig V(H) genes associated with malignant versus reactive B cell lymphoproliferations, and support an antigen-mediated multistep pathogenesis model of HIV-1-associated lymphomagenesis.

  6. Inhibition of HIV type 1 infection with a RANTES-IgG3 fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challita-Eid, P M; Klimatcheva, E; Day, B T; Evans, T; Dreyer, K; Rimel, B J; Rosenblatt, J D; Planelles, V

    1998-12-20

    The natural ligands for the chemokine receptors CCR5 (RANTES, MIP-1alpha, and MIP-1beta) and CXCR4 (SDF-1) can act as potent inhibitors of infection by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) at the level of viral entry. Unlike antibody-mediated inhibition, chemokine-mediated inhibition is broadly effective. Different HIV-1 strains can utilize the same coreceptor(s) for viral entry and, therefore, can be blocked by the same chemokine(s). HIV-1 strains that are highly resistant to neutralization by V3-specific antibodies are sensitive to inhibition by chemokines. Therefore, the use of chemokine-derived molecules constitutes a potential therapeutic approach to prevent infection by HIV-1. We have generated a fusion protein between RANTES and human IgG3 (RANTES-IgG3). The effectiveness of RANTES-IgG3 inhibition of infection by HIV-1 was similar to that of rRANTES. Inhibition of HIV-1 by RANTES-IgG3 was specific for CCR5-dependent but not CXCR4-dependent HIV-1 isolates. Fusion of a chemokine to an IgG moiety offers two desirable properties with respect to the recombinant chemokine alone. First, IgG fusion proteins have extended half-lives in vivo. Second, molecules with IgG heavy chain moieties may be able to cross the placenta and potentially induce fetal protection.

  7. Metabolic dysregulation and interventions in type 2 diabetes mellitus and HIV-lipodystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, J.P.H. van

    2005-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is on two aspects of metabolic dysregulation, type 2 diabetes mellitus and HIV-lipodystrophy, and the effects of insulin-sensitizing agents. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) have received increasing attenttion for the treatment of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. Currently, ther

  8. HPV types, HIV and invasive cervical carcinoma risk in Kampala, Uganda: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleter Bernhard

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the association of human papillomavirus (HPV with cervical cancer is well established, the influence of HIV on the risk of this disease in sub-Saharan Africa remains unclear. To assess the risk of invasive cervical carcinoma (ICC associated with HIV and HPV types, a hospital-based case-control study was performed between September 2004 and December 2006 in Kampala, Uganda. Incident cases of histologically-confirmed ICC (N=316 and control women (N=314, who were visitors or care-takers of ICC cases in the hospital, were recruited. Blood samples were obtained for HIV serology and CD4 count, as well as cervical samples for HPV testing. HPV DNA detection and genotyping was performed using the SPF10/DEIA/LiPA25 technique which detects all mucosal HPV types by DEIA and identifies 25 HPV genotypes by LiPA version 1. Samples that tested positive but could not be genotyped were designated HPVX. Odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated by logistic regression, adjusting for possible confounding factors. Results For both squamous cell carcinoma (SCC and adenocarcinoma of the cervix, statistically significantly increased ORs were found among women infected with HPV, in particular single HPV infections, infections with HPV16-related types and high-risk HPV types, in particular HPV16, 18 and 45. For other HPV types the ORs for both SCC and adenocarcinoma were not statistically significantly elevated. HIV infection and CD4 count were not associated with SCC or adenocarcinoma risk in our study population. Among women infected with high-risk HPV types, no association between HIV and SCC emerged. However, an inverse association with adenocarcinoma was observed, while decrease in CD4 count was not associated with ICC risk. Conclusions The ORs for SCC and adenocarcinoma were increased in women infected with HPV, in particular single HPV infections, infections with HPV16- and 18-related types, and high-risk HPV types

  9. Type 2 lepra reaction with HIV1 co-infection: a case report with interesting management implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, S; Amin, S S; Qaisar, S

    2011-01-01

    A patient co-infected with leprosy and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-type 1 who developed type 2 lepra reaction in the absence of antiretroviral therapy is presented. The reaction responded only after initiating anti retroviral therapy (ART) despite normal CD4+ counts. The present report suggests that type 2 reactions in leprosy and HIV co-infected patients may not always be the typical manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) and stresses the importance of considering concomitant HIV infection in refractory lepra reactions. Extensive research is required into the manifestations of HIV in leprosy patients.

  10. Cell-type specific requirements for thiol/disulfide exchange during HIV-1 entry and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantchev, Tzanko S; Paciga, Mark; Lankford, Carla R; Schwartzkopff, Franziska; Broder, Christopher C; Clouse, Kathleen A

    2012-12-03

    The role of disulfide bond remodeling in HIV-1 infection is well described, but the process still remains incompletely characterized. At present, the data have been predominantly obtained using established cell lines and/or CXCR4-tropic laboratory-adapted virus strains. There is also ambiguity about which disulfide isomerases/reductases play a major role in HIV-1 entry, as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and/or thioredoxin (Trx) have emerged as the two enzymes most often implicated in this process. We have extended our previous findings and those of others by focusing on CCR5-using HIV-1 strains and their natural targets--primary human macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes. We found that the nonspecific thiol/disulfide exchange inhibitor, 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB), significantly reduced HIV-1 entry and infection in cell lines, human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), and also phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Subsequent studies were performed using specific anti-PDI or Trx monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in HIV-1 envelope pseudotyped and wild type (wt) virus infection systems. Although human donor-to-donor variability was observed as expected, Trx appeared to play a greater role than PDI in HIV-1 infection of MDM. In contrast, PDI, but not Trx, was predominantly involved in HIV-1 entry and infection of the CD4+/CCR5+ T cell line, PM-1, and PHA-stimulated primary human T lymphocytes. Intriguingly, both PDI and Trx were present on the surface of MDM, PM-1 and PHA-stimulated CD4+ T cells. However, considerably lower levels of Trx were detected on freshly isolated CD4+ lymphocytes, compared to PHA-stimulated cells. Our findings clearly demonstrate the role of thiol/disulfide exchange in HIV-1 entry in primary T lymphocytes and MDM. They also establish a cell-type specificity regarding the involvement of particular disulfide isomerases/reductases in this process and may provide an explanation for differences

  11. Cell-type specific requirements for thiol/disulfide exchange during HIV-1 entry and infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stantchev Tzanko S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of disulfide bond remodeling in HIV-1 infection is well described, but the process still remains incompletely characterized. At present, the data have been predominantly obtained using established cell lines and/or CXCR4-tropic laboratory-adapted virus strains. There is also ambiguity about which disulfide isomerases/ reductases play a major role in HIV-1 entry, as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI and/or thioredoxin (Trx have emerged as the two enzymes most often implicated in this process. Results We have extended our previous findings and those of others by focusing on CCR5-using HIV-1 strains and their natural targets - primary human macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes. We found that the nonspecific thiol/disulfide exchange inhibitor, 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB, significantly reduced HIV-1 entry and infection in cell lines, human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM, and also phytohemagglutinin (PHA-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Subsequent studies were performed using specific anti-PDI or Trx monoclonal antibodies (mAb in HIV-1 envelope pseudotyped and wild type (wt virus infection systems. Although human donor-to-donor variability was observed as expected, Trx appeared to play a greater role than PDI in HIV-1 infection of MDM. In contrast, PDI, but not Trx, was predominantly involved in HIV-1 entry and infection of the CD4+/CCR5+ T cell line, PM-1, and PHA-stimulated primary human T lymphocytes. Intriguingly, both PDI and Trx were present on the surface of MDM, PM-1 and PHA-stimulated CD4+ T cells. However, considerably lower levels of Trx were detected on freshly isolated CD4+ lymphocytes, compared to PHA-stimulated cells. Conclusions Our findings clearly demonstrate the role of thiol/disulfide exchange in HIV-1 entry in primary T lymphocytes and MDM. They also establish a cell-type specificity regarding the involvement of particular disulfide isomerases/reductases in this

  12. Analysis of the C-polyhedrin genes from different geographical isolates of a type 5 cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinski, M S; Yu, Y; Heminway, B R; Beaudreau, G S

    1994-08-01

    The C-polyhedrin genes of two different geographic isolates of a type 5 cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (CPV) were cloned. A CPV infecting Orgyia pseudotsugata (OpCPV), isolated in the Pacific Northwest of the U.S.A., and a CPV infecting Heliothis armigera, isolated in South Africa, were studied. Both genes were found to be 883 nucleotides in length and encoded a predicted protein of 246 residues (M(r) of 28,890). Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of these two viruses with another type 5 geographic isolate, infecting Euxoa scandens (EsCPV; isolated in Eastern Canada), showed that there were only 17 nucleotide differences among the three genes. The only nucleotide variation that had an effect on the encoded protein was a deletion of nucleotide 774 in the gene of EsCPV. The deletion introduces a frameshift mutation resulting in the alteration of the carboxyl-terminal amino acid sequence. Sequence alignment of the OpCPV C-polyhedrin showed little homology to a type 1 CPV (infecting Bombyx mori) or with analogous proteins (N-polyhedrins) from two baculoviruses infecting O. pseudotsugata. Interestingly, most of the conserved residues between the N- and C-polyhedrins were either basic or aromatic amino acids.

  13. Immunological predictors of survival in HIV type 2-infected rural villagers in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaffar, Shabbar; Van der Loeff, Maarten Schim; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper;

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the association between beta2-microglobulin, neopterin, serum levels of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), CD4 count, and plasma viremia with survival in 133 HIV-2-infected villagers and 160 controls living in rural Guinea-Bissau. Subjects were recruite...

  14. Virulence Studies of Different Sequence Types and Geographical Origins of Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 in a Mouse Model of Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Auger

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Multilocus sequence typing previously identified three predominant sequence types (STs of Streptococcus suis serotype 2: ST1 strains predominate in Eurasia while North American (NA strains are generally ST25 and ST28. However, ST25/ST28 and ST1 strains have also been isolated in Asia and NA, respectively. Using a well-standardized mouse model of infection, the virulence of strains belonging to different STs and different geographical origins was evaluated. Results demonstrated that although a certain tendency may be observed, S. suis serotype 2 virulence is difficult to predict based on ST and geographical origin alone; strains belonging to the same ST presented important differences of virulence and did not always correlate with origin. The only exception appears to be NA ST28 strains, which were generally less virulent in both systemic and central nervous system (CNS infection models. Persistent and high levels of bacteremia accompanied by elevated CNS inflammation are required to cause meningitis. Although widely used, in vitro tests such as phagocytosis and killing assays require further standardization in order to be used as predictive tests for evaluating virulence of strains. The use of strains other than archetypal strains has increased our knowledge and understanding of the S. suis serotype 2 population dynamics.

  15. Multi-locus sequence typing of Ehrlichia ruminantium strains from geographically diverse origins and collected in Amblyomma variegatum from Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongejan Frans

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rickettsial bacterium Ehrlichia ruminantium is the causative agent of heartwater in ruminants. A better understanding of the population genetics of its different strains is, however, needed for the development of novel diagnostic tools, therapeutics and prevention strategies. Specifically, the development of effective vaccination policies relies on the proper genotyping and characterisation of field isolates. Although multi-locus sequence typing (MLST has been recently developed, only strains from geographically restricted collections have been analysed so far. The expansion of the MLST database to include global strains with different geographic origins is therefore essential. In this study, we used a panel of reference strains from geographically diverse origins and field samples of E. ruminantium detected from its vector, Amblyomma variegatum, in heartwater-endemic areas in Uganda. Results A total of 31 novel alleles (six, four, six, three, two, five, three, and two for gltA, groEL, lepA, lipA, lipB, secY, sodB, and sucA loci, respectively and 19 novel sequence types (STs were identified. Both neighbour-joining and minimum spanning tree analyses indicated a high degree of genetic heterogeneity among these strains. No association was observed between genotypes and geographic origins, except for four STs from West African countries. When we performed six different tests for recombination (GeneConv, Bootscan, MaxChi, Chimaera, SiScan, and 3Seq on concatenated sequences, four possible recombination events were identified in six different STs. All the recombination breakpoints were located near gene borders, indicating the occurrence of intergenic recombination. All four STs that localized to a distinct group in clustering analysis showed evidence of identical recombination events, suggesting that recombination may play a significant role in the diversification of E. ruminantium. Conclusions The compilation of MLST data set

  16. Abundant expression of HIV target cells and C-type lectin receptors in the foreskin tissue of young Kenyan men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirbod, Taha; Bailey, Robert C; Agot, Kawango; Moses, Stephen; Ndinya-Achola, Jeckoniah; Murugu, Ruth; Andersson, Jan; Nilsson, Jakob; Broliden, Kristina

    2010-06-01

    A biological explanation for the reduction in HIV-1 (HIV) acquisition after male circumcision may be that removal of the foreskin reduces the number of target cells for HIV. The expression of potential HIV target cells and C-type lectin receptors in foreskin tissue of men at risk of HIV infection were thus analyzed. Thirty-three foreskin tissue samples, stratified by Herpes simplex virus type 2 status, were obtained from a randomized, controlled trial conducted in Kenya. The samples were analyzed by confocal in situ imaging microscopy and mRNA quantification by quantitative RT-qPCR. The presence and location of T cells (CD3(+)CD4(+)), Langerhans cells (CD1a(+)Langerin/CD207(+)), macrophages (CD68(+) or CD14(+)), and submucosal dendritic cells (CD123(+)BDCA-2(+) or CD11c(+)DC-SIGN(+)) were defined. C-type lectin receptor expressing cells were detected in both the epithelium and submucosa, and distinct lymphoid aggregates densely populated with CD3(+)CD4(+) T cells were identified in the submucosa. Although the presence of lymphoid aggregates and mRNA expression of selected markers varied between study subjects, Herpes simplex virus type 2 serostatus was not the major determinant for the detected differences. The detection of abundant and superficially present potential HIV target cells and submucosal lymphoid aggregates in foreskin mucosa from a highly relevant HIV risk group demonstrate a possible anatomical explanation that may contribute to the protective effect of male circumcision on HIV transmission.

  17. Effects of multiple types of stigma on the probability of HIV disclosure to sex partners: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haochu; Li, Xiaoming; Zhang, Lei; Chow, Eric

    2016-08-05

    Previous review studies explored factors related to the process of HIV disclosure. However, none of these review studies specifically focused on the effects of stigma on HIV disclosure to sex partners. A comprehensive systematic review of empirical studies on the effects of stigma on HIV disclosure to sex partners was conducted until December 2014. Twenty-seven articles published in English-language journals were selected, and study characteristics and findings were evaluated. Inconsistent findings in the assessment of impacts of stigma on HIV disclosure to sex partners were documented. Three underlying plausible reasons were identified, and these included: (1) different types of stigma may have different effects on HIV disclosure to sex partners; (2) studies used different measurement strategies; and (3) varied personal backgrounds and health factors that can mitigate, facilitate or moderate the effect of stigma on HIV disclosure to sex partners. Studies with precise definition measurements of specific types of stigma used them appropriately in a matching context to provide more consistent research results. This review identifies the need for further investigation into how the HIV disclosure process is shaped by particular types of stigma, types of sex partners and demographic characteristics of people living with HIV/AIDS.

  18. About the melodic type of the song čubro maro and about its geographical diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Jelena L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a melodic type which has been recognized in three regions in Serbia: as a melodic pattern for two spring songs in the region of Crnorečje (Eastern Serbia; in a strižbajska, a službarska and in several wedding songs in the region of Preševo and Bujanovac (Southern Serbia; and in the old town of Prizren (Metohija region where the same melodic type has been recorded as the first part of numerous wedding songs. These groups of variants are similar in the course of the melody, in their ritual function monophony and ceremonial character. They differ on the level of form, meter ornamentation and, partly, of metric organization (number of syllables of the verse. The similarity of these melodies might be explained by the metanastic streams from the southern areas to the north. Migrations were permanent throughout the time of Turkish occupation (from the 15th century onwards. One of the oldest streams, which also led to the region of Crnorečje, had been formed in the regions of Kosovo and Metohija. The inhabitants from this region migrated both to the North - to different parts of North and East Serbia - and to the East - to the region of Preševo and Bujanovac. Also, the region of Preševo, together with two smaller river valleys (South Morava and Moravica, is considered to be a middle region between the two big river valleys of Morava and Vardar, significant as directions of migrations towards the North. It may be concluded that this melodic type was brought to the North by migrations as an important and still vital element of the old Southern Serbian ritual tradition. On the other hand, there is another group of variants within this melodic type diffused in other parts of Serbia, with the function of entertainment and in the physiognomy of the songs na bas - of newer rural Serbian vocal style. The trace of these variants should be investigated in the future.

  19. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Type 1 populations from human patients are clonal and display geographical genetic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Liam J; Tait, Andy; McCormack, Gillian; Sweeney, Lindsay; Black, Alana; Truc, Philippe; Likeufack, Anne C L; Turner, C Michael; MacLeod, Annette

    2008-12-01

    We have rigorously tested the hypothesis that Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Type 1 is composed of genetically homogenous populations by examining the parasite population present in Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) patients from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Cameroon (CAM). We amplified eight microsatellite markers by PCR directly from blood spots on FTA filters, thereby avoiding the significant parasite selection inherent in the traditional isolation techniques of rodent inoculation or in vitro culture. All microsatellite markers were polymorphic, although for four markers there was only polymorphism between the DRC and CAM populations, not within populations, suggesting very limited genetic exchange. Within the largest population from the DRC, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium is not evident at any loci. This evidence suggests a clonal population. However, there was significant sub-structuring between the DRC and CAM samples (F(ST) = 0.32), indicating that Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Type 1 has genetically distinct clades. The data combine to indicate that genetic exchange plays a very limited role. The finding of distinct clades in different places suggests the possibility that samples from humans with clinical signs represent clonal expansions from an underlying population that requires identifying and characterising.

  20. Geographical and Temporal Structures of Legionella pneumophila Sequence Types in Comunitat Valenciana (Spain), 1998 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Busó, Leonor; Coscollà, Mireia; Palero, Ferran; Camaró, María Luisa; Gimeno, Ana; Moreno, Pilar; Escribano, Isabel; López Perezagua, María Mar; Colomina, Javier; Vanaclocha, Herme; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an accidental human pathogen associated with aerosol formation in water-related sources. High recombination rates make Legionella populations genetically diverse, and nearly 2,000 different sequence types (STs) have been described to date for this environmental pathogen. The spatial distribution of STs is extremely heterogeneous, with some variants being present worldwide and others being detected at only a local scale. Similarly, some STs have been associated with disease outbreaks, such as ST578 or ST23. Spain is among the European countries with the highest incidences of reported legionellosis cases, and specifically, Comunitat Valenciana (CV) is the second most affected area in the country. In this work, we aimed at studying the overall diversity of Legionella pneumophila populations found in the period from 1998 to 2013 in 79 localities encompassing 23 regions within CV. To do so, we performed sequence-based typing (SBT) on 1,088 L. pneumophila strains detected in the area from both environmental and clinical sources. A comparison with the genetic structuring detected in a global data set that included 20 European and 7 non-European countries was performed. Our results reveal a level of diversity in CV that can be considered representative of the diversity found in other countries worldwide.

  1. Anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activities of halogenated gomisin J derivatives, new nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV type 1 reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihashi, T; Hara, H; Sakata, T; Mori, K; Higuchi, H; Tanaka, A; Kaji, H; Kaji, A

    1995-09-01

    Halogenated gomisin J (a derivative of lignan compound), represented by the bromine derivative 1506 [(6R, 7S, S-biar)-4,9-dibromo-3,10-dihydroxy-1,2,11,12-tetramethoxy-6, 7-dimethyl-5,6,7,8- tetrahydrodibenzo[a,c]cyclo-octene], was found to be a potent inhibitor of the cytopathic effects of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on MT-4 human T cells (50% effective dose, 0.1 to 0.5 microM). Gomisin J derivatives were active in preventing p24 production from acutely HIV-1-infected H9 cells. The selective indices (toxic dose/effective dose) of these compounds were as high as > 300 in some systems. 1506 was active against 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine-resistant HIV-1 and acted synergistically with AZT and 2',3'-ddC. 1506 inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) in vitro but not HIV-1 protease. From the time-of-addition experiment, 1506 was found to inhibit the early phase of the HIV life cycle. A 1506-resistant HIV mutant was selected and shown to possess a mutation within the RT-coding region (at position 188 [Tyr to Leu]). The mutant RT expressed in Escherichia coli was resistant to 1506 in the in vitro RT assay. Some of the HIV strains resistant to other nonnucleoside HIV-1 RT inhibitors were also resistant to 1506. Comparison of various gomisin J derivatives with gomisin J showed that iodine, bromine, and chlorine in the fourth and ninth positions increased RT inhibitory activity as well as cytoprotective activity.

  2. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of leptospiral strains isolated from two geographic locations of Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagavel, Murugesan; Princy Margreat, Alphonse Asirvatham; Arunkumar, Manivel; Prabhakaran, Shanmugarajan Gnanasekaran; Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Natarajaseenivasan, Kalimuthusamy

    2016-01-01

    Here the rodent carrier status for the transmission of human leptospirosis in Tiruchirappalli, district, Tamil Nadu, India was assessed. The predominantly circulating leptospiral STs were recognized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). A total of 113 rodents were trapped from different provinces of the Tiruchirappalli district. The most prevalent rodent was Bandicota bengalensis (37.2%), and of the total, 52.2% (n=59) rodents were found to be positive for leptospiral 16S rRNA. These results were validated with a leptospiral culture positivity of 45.8% (n=27). Three isolates from Chennai (2 rodents and 1 human) and 1 human isolate from Tiruchirappalli were included to understand the spatial variations and to track the source of human leptospirosis. The serogroup, serovar, and species level identification of all 31 isolates identified 28 to be Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Javanica and three as Leptospira interrogans serovar Autumnalis. MLST analysis defined all isolates to the existing ST profiles (ST145 and ST27) with the exception of 6 L. borgpetersenii (ST DR) isolates that showed variations in the sucA and pfkB loci. The DR ST was locally confined to Chatram province of Tiruchirappalli suggesting an epidemiological link. The predominant STs, ST145 and ST-DR form a group, indicating the presence of original strain that subsequently diverged evolutionarily into two STs. The variations between L. borgpetersenii in sucA and pfkB loci may be an indication that evolutionary changes transpired in Tiruchirappalli.

  3. Phenotypic resistance of resistant strains of HIV type-1 subtype B in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jue; WANG Zhe; WU Hao; LI Jing-yun; LU Jun-feng; DONG Hua-huang; BAO Zuo-yi; LIU Si-yang; LI Han-ping; ZHUANG Dao-min; LIU Yong-jian; LI Hong

    2006-01-01

    Background This study was aim to explore the characteristics of phenotypic resistance of resistant strains of HIV type-1 (HIV-1) subtype B and to compare the concordance between the phenotypic resistance and genotypic resistance. Methods The genotypic resistance assay for the HIV-1 clinical isolates was performed. One isolate without resistance mutation was chosen as a drug-sensitive reference strain and seven subtype B isolates with resistance mutations were phenotypically tested. Fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC50) between resistant and sensitive viruses were compared. The resistance extent was determined by the folds of the increased IC50. The concordance between the phenotypic resistance and genotypic resistance was also analyzed.Results IC50 of resistant isolates were 0.0006-0.1300 μmol/L for zidovudine (AZT), 0.0016-0.0390 μmol/L for lamivudine (3TC), 0.0104-0.4234 μmol/L for nevirapine (NVP), and 0.0163-0.1142 μmol/L for indinavir (IDV), respectively. Genotypic and phenotypic resistance assays indicated that the resistant strains were intermediately and highly resistant to nucleotide analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors and non-nucleotide analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The phenotypic assay was consistent with the genotypic assay. For measuring the potential resistance, the genotypic assay was more sensitive than the phenotypic. In evaluating the resistance to protease inhibitors, these two assays were discrepant.Conclusions Both the phenotypic and genotypic assays indicate that the resistant viruses exist in HIV-infected patients in China who have received treatment. Phenotypic and genotypic assays have high concordance, and the genotypic assay could replace the phenotypic assay to predict the HIV-1 resistance.

  4. HPV infection-associated anogenital cyto-colpo-histological findings and molecular typing in HIV-positive women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, F K; Rodrigues, C L L; Levi, J E; Mattosinho de Castro Ferraz, M G; Speck, N M G; Ribalta, J C L

    2015-12-21

    HIV and human papillomavirus (HPV) coinfection is increasing, especially in the anal canal (AC) and cervico-vaginal regions. We identified anal epithelium abnormalities related to high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) lesions in the lower genital tracts (LGTs) of HIV-positive women, described the HPV genotypes identified, and assessed the expression of E6/E7 oncogenes in coinfected patients. Ninety-eight women were enrolled in groups combining HIV status and presence or absence of HPV in the LGT. Anal and cervical smears were collected for cytology and HR-HPV assays using Cobas(®) and/or PapilloCheck(®). Samples with highly oncogenic HPV genotypes were confirmed by NucliSENS EasyQ(®). Forty-two HIV-positive (25-52; mean age 39.5) and 56 HIV-negative (18-58; mean age 35.7) patients were included. E2 and C1 groups presented AC alterations (P = 0.002); altered images for high-resolution anoscopy were higher in E1 and C2 (P HIV-negative and 58.62% were HIV-positive (P HIV-positive patients accounted for 29% of the anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (P = 0.015). The Cobas(®) positive result frequency was higher in three AC groups than in the other groups. There was variation in the number of HPV types in the cervico-vaginal samples among the study groups (P HIV-positive patients with HPV in the LGT. HR-HPV anal infections by various genotypes are common and are associated with cervical infections in HIV-positive patients. E6/E7 expression is apparently more common in the AC of HIV-positive women.

  5. Distributions and radiative forcings of various cloud types based on active and passive satellite datasets – Part 1: Geographical distributions and overlap of cloud types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on four year' 2B-CLDCLASS-Lidar (Radar-Lidar cloud classification product from CloudSat, we analyze the geographical distributions of different cloud types and their co-occurrence frequency across different seasons, moreover, utilize the vertical distributions of cloud type to further evaluate the cloud overlap assumptions. The statistical results show that more high clouds, altocumulus, stratocumulus or stratus and cumulus are identified in the Radar-Lidar cloud classification product compared to previous results from Radar-only cloud classification (2B-CLDCLASS product from CloudSat. In particularly, high clouds and cumulus cloud fractions increased by factors 2.5 and 4–7, respectively. The new results are in more reasonable agreement with other datasets (typically the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP and surface observer reports. Among the cloud types, altostratus and altocumulus are more popular over the arid/semi-arid land areas of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, respectively. These features weren't observed by using the ISCCP D1 dataset. For co-occurrence of cloud types, high cloud, altostratus, altocumulus and cumulus are much more likely to co-exist with other cloud types. However, stratus/stratocumulus, nimbostratus and convective clouds are much more likely to exhibit individual features. After considering the co-occurrence of cloud types, the cloud fraction based on the random overlap assumption is underestimated over the vast ocean except in the west-central Pacific Ocean warm pool. Obvious overestimations are mainly occurring over land areas in the tropics and subtropics. The investigation therefore indicates that incorporate co-occurrence information of cloud types based on Radar-Lidar cloud classification into the overlap assumption schemes used in the current GCMs possible be able to provide an better predictions for vertically projected total cloud fraction.

  6. Direct phenotypical and functional dysregulation of primary human B cells by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV type 1 in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Judith Perisé-Barrios

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 induces a general dysregulation of immune system. Dysregulation of B cell compartment is generally thought to be induced by HIV-related immune activation and lymphopenia. However, a direct influence of HIV-1 particles on B cells was recently proposed as the third pathway of B cells dysregulation. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated the direct and specific consequences of HIV-1 contact on activation, survival, proliferation and phenotype of primary B cells in vitro. Moreover, we examined expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID mRNA that is responsible for class switch recombination (CSR and somatic hypermutation (SHM. Here, we report that changes observed in cellular proliferation, phenotypes and activation of B cells could be caused by direct contact between HIV-1 particles and primary B cells in vitro. Finally, direct HIV-1-derived B cells activation led to the increase of AID mRNA expression and its subsequent CSR function was detected in vitro. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We showed that HIV-1 could directly induce primary B cells dysregulation triggering phenotypical and functional abilities of B cells in vitro that could explain in some extent early B-cell abnormalities in HIV disease.

  7. Induction of antibodies against epitopes inaccessible on the HIV type 1 envelope oligomer by immunization with recombinant monomeric glycoprotein 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Bolmstedt, A; Novotny, J

    1998-01-01

    An N-glycan (N306) at the base of the V3 loop of HIV-BRU gp120 is shielding a linear neutralization epitope at the tip of the V3 loop on oligomeric Env. In contrast, this epitope is readily antigenic on monomeric gp120. Immunization with recombinant monomeric HIV-BRU gp120 may thus be expected...... to elicit antibodies preferentially neutralizing mutant variants of HIV-BRU lacking the N306 glycan. Therefore, two guinea pigs were immunized with monomeric wild-type HIV-BRU gp120 possessing the N306 glycan and immune sera were tested for neutralization against target viruses HIV-BRU, -A308, and -A308T321....... HIV-A308 and HIV-A308T321 lack the N306 glycan; HIV-A308T321 contains an additional mutation at the tip of V3 rendering it resistant to MAb binding at this epitope. Both immune sera preferentially neutralized the two mutant virus variants lacking the N306 glycan, with a 10- to 20-fold increase...

  8. Induction of antibodies against epitopes inaccessible on the HIV type 1 envelope oligomer by immunization with recombinant monomeric glycoprotein 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Bolmstedt, A; Novotny, J

    1998-01-01

    An N-glycan (N306) at the base of the V3 loop of HIV-BRU gp120 is shielding a linear neutralization epitope at the tip of the V3 loop on oligomeric Env. In contrast, this epitope is readily antigenic on monomeric gp120. Immunization with recombinant monomeric HIV-BRU gp120 may thus be expected...... to elicit antibodies preferentially neutralizing mutant variants of HIV-BRU lacking the N306 glycan. Therefore, two guinea pigs were immunized with monomeric wild-type HIV-BRU gp120 possessing the N306 glycan and immune sera were tested for neutralization against target viruses HIV-BRU, -A308, and -A308T321....... HIV-A308 and HIV-A308T321 lack the N306 glycan; HIV-A308T321 contains an additional mutation at the tip of V3 rendering it resistant to MAb binding at this epitope. Both immune sera preferentially neutralized the two mutant virus variants lacking the N306 glycan, with a 10- to 20-fold increase...

  9. Human papillomavirus prevalence and type distribution in 3603 HIV-positive and HIV-negative women in the general population of Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dartell, Myassa Arkam; Rasch, Vibeke; Kahesa, Crispin

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the Prevention of Cervical Cancer in Tanzania (PROTECT) study is to assess the prevalence of oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) and to determine the type distribution among women in the general population according to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status, in preparation...

  10. Anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activities of halogenated gomisin J derivatives, new nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV type 1 reverse transcriptase.

    OpenAIRE

    Fujihashi, T; Hara, H.; Sakata, T.; Mori, K.; Higuchi, H.; Tanaka, A.; Kaji, H.; Kaji, A

    1995-01-01

    Halogenated gomisin J (a derivative of lignan compound), represented by the bromine derivative 1506 [(6R, 7S, S-biar)-4,9-dibromo-3,10-dihydroxy-1,2,11,12-tetramethoxy-6, 7-dimethyl-5,6,7,8- tetrahydrodibenzo[a,c]cyclo-octene], was found to be a potent inhibitor of the cytopathic effects of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on MT-4 human T cells (50% effective dose, 0.1 to 0.5 microM). Gomisin J derivatives were active in preventing p24 production from acutely HIV-1-infected H9 cell...

  11. Geographic Names

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS), developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Board of Geographic Names, provides...

  12. HIV type-1 group O infection in Gabon: low prevalence rate but circulation of genetically diverse and drug-resistant HIV type-1 group O strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liégeois, Florian; Boué, Vanina; Butel, Christelle; Mouinga-Ondémé, Augustin; Sica, Jeanne; Zamba, Chantal; Peeters, Martine; Delaporte, Eric; Rouet, François

    2013-07-01

    The goals of this study conducted in Gabon were to determine the prevalence rate of HIV-1 group O (HIV-1/O) infections and to characterize the genetic diversity of HIV-1/O strains as well as implications on antiretroviral (ARV) drug resistance. During 2010-2011, 1,176 samples from HIV-positive subjects were tested at the CIRMF (Centre International de Recherches Médicales de Franceville) retrovirology laboratory using an in-house serotyping assay. Plasma HIV-1/O RNA viral loads (VL) were determined using the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay. After full genome sequencing, drug resistance patterns were analyzed using two different algorithms (Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA et les hépatites virales and Stanford). Overall, four subjects (0.34%) were diagnosed as HIV-1/O infected. One subject, untreated by ARVs, died 2 months after HIV-1/O diagnosis. One was lost to follow-up. Two additional patients, treated with nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimens, showed CD4 counts Gabon, an accurate diagnosis and a reliable virological follow-up are required in Central Africa to optimize ARV treatments of HIV-1/O-infected patients.

  13. HIV-infected persons with type 2 diabetes show evidence of endothelial dysfunction and increased inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Skovsgaard, Malene; Gaardbo, Julie Christine; Kolte, Lilian

    2017-01-01

    contribute to elevated risk of CVD. METHODS: Cross-sectional study including 50 HIV-infected persons on combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART), with HIV RNA ...-N-oxide (TMAO), a microbiota-dependent, pro-atherogenic marker was measured using stable isotope dilution LC/MS/MS. RESULTS: The percentage of HIV + T2D+, HIV + T2D-, HIV-T2D+, and HIV-T2D- with hsCRP above cut-off was 50%, 19%, 47%, and 11%, respectively. HIV + T2D+ had elevated ADMA (0.67 μM (0...

  14. Phylogeny and Phylogeography of a Recent HIV-1 Subtype F Outbreak among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Spain Deriving from a Cluster with a Wide Geographic Circulation in Western Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Delgado

    Full Text Available We recently reported the rapid expansion of an HIV-1 subtype F cluster among men who have sex with men (MSM in the region of Galicia, Northwest Spain. Here we update this outbreak, analyze near full-length genomes, determine phylogenetic relationships, and estimate its origin. For this study, we used sequences of HIV-1 protease-reverse transcriptase and env V3 region, and for 17 samples, near full-length genome sequences were obtained. Phylogenetic analyses were performed via maximum likelihood. Locations and times of most recent common ancestors were estimated using Bayesian inference. Among samples analyzed by us, 100 HIV-1 F1 subsubtype infections of monophyletic origin were diagnosed in Spain, including 88 in Galicia and 12 in four other regions. Most viruses (n = 90 grouped in a subcluster (Galician subcluster, while 7 from Valladolid (Central Spain grouped in another subcluster. At least 94 individuals were sexually-infected males and at least 71 were MSM. Seventeen near full-length genomes were uniformly of F1 subsubtype. Through similarity searches and phylogenetic analyses, we identified 18 viruses from four other Western European countries [Switzerland (n = 8, Belgium (n = 5, France (n = 3, and United Kingdom (n = 2] and one from Brazil, from samples collected in 2005-2011, which branched within the subtype F cluster, outside of both Spanish subclusters, most of them corresponding to recently infected individuals. The most probable geographic origin and age of the Galician subcluster was Ferrol, Northwest Galicia, around 2007, while the Western European cluster probably emerged in Switzerland around 2002. In conclusion, a recently expanded HIV-1 subtype F cluster, the largest non-subtype B cluster reported in Western Europe, continues to spread among MSM in Spain; this cluster is part of a larger cluster with a wide geographic circulation in diverse Western European countries.

  15. HIV-infected persons with type 2 diabetes show evidence of endothelial dysfunction and increased inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Skovsgaard, Malene; Gaardbo, Julie Christine; Kolte, Lilian

    2017-01-01

    -N-oxide (TMAO), a microbiota-dependent, pro-atherogenic marker was measured using stable isotope dilution LC/MS/MS. RESULTS: The percentage of HIV + T2D+, HIV + T2D-, HIV-T2D+, and HIV-T2D- with hsCRP above cut-off was 50%, 19%, 47%, and 11%, respectively. HIV + T2D+ had elevated ADMA (0.67 μM (0...

  16. T cells detect intracellular DNA but fail to induce type I IFN responses: implications for restriction of HIV replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi K Berg

    Full Text Available HIV infects key cell types of the immune system, most notably macrophages and CD4+ T cells. Whereas macrophages represent an important viral reservoir, activated CD4+ T cells are the most permissive cell types supporting high levels of viral replication. In recent years, it has been appreciated that the innate immune system plays an important role in controlling HIV replication, e.g. via interferon (IFN-inducible restriction factors. Moreover, innate immune responses are involved in driving chronic immune activation and the pathogenesis of progressive immunodeficiency. Several pattern recognition receptors detecting HIV have been reported, including Toll-like receptor 7 and Retinoic-inducible gene-I, which detects viral RNA. Here we report that human primary T cells fail to induce strong IFN responses, despite the fact that this cell type does express key molecules involved in DNA signaling pathways. We demonstrate that the DNA sensor IFI16 migrates to sites of foreign DNA localization in the cytoplasm and recruits the signaling molecules stimulator of IFN genes and Tank-binding kinase, but this does not result in expression of IFN and IFN-stimulated genes. Importantly, we show that cytosolic DNA fails to affect HIV replication. However, exogenous treatment of activated T cells with type I IFN has the capacity to induce expression of IFN-stimulated genes and suppress HIV replication. Our data suggest the existence of an impaired DNA signaling machinery in T cells, which may prevent this cell type from activating cell-autonomous anti-HIV responses. This phenomenon could contribute to the high permissiveness of CD4+ T cells for HIV-1.

  17. Evolutionary Dynamics and Temporal/Geographical Correlates of Recombination in the Human Enterovirus Echovirus Types 9, 11, and 30▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliam Leitch, E. C.; Cabrerizo, M.; Cardosa, J.; Harvala, H.; Ivanova, O. E.; Kroes, A. C. M.; Lukashev, A.; Muir, P.; Odoom, J.; Roivainen, M.; Susi, P.; Trallero, G.; Evans, D. J.; Simmonds, P.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between virus evolution and recombination in species B human enteroviruses was investigated through large-scale genetic analysis of echovirus type 9 (E9) and E11 isolates (n = 85 and 116) from 16 European, African, and Asian countries between 1995 and 2008. Cluster 1 E9 isolates and genotype D5 and A E11 isolates showed evidence of frequent recombination between the VP1 and 3Dpol regions, the latter falling into 23 (E9) and 43 (E11) clades interspersed phylogenetically with 46 3Dpol clades of E30 and with those of other species B serotypes. Remarkably, only 2 of the 112 3Dpol clades were shared by more than one serotype (E11 and E30), demonstrating an extremely large and genetically heterogeneous recombination pool of species B nonstructural-region variants. The likelihood of recombination increased with geographical separation and time, and both were correlated with VP1 divergence, whose substitution rates allowed recombination half-lives of 1.3, 9.8, and 3.1 years, respectively, for E9, E11, and E30 to be calculated. These marked differences in recombination dynamics matched epidemiological patterns of periodic epidemic cycles of 2 to 3 (E9) and 5 to 6 (E30) years and the longer-term endemic pattern of E11 infections. Phylotemporal analysis using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method, which placed recombination events within the evolutionary reconstruction of VP1, showed a close relationship with VP1 lineage expansion, with defined recombination events that correlated with their epidemiological periodicity. Whether recombination events contribute directly to changes in transmissibility that drive epidemic behavior or occur stochastically during periodic population bottlenecks is an unresolved issue vital to future understanding of enterovirus molecular epidemiology and pathogenesis. PMID:20610722

  18. Evolutionary dynamics and temporal/geographical correlates of recombination in the human enterovirus echovirus types 9, 11, and 30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliam Leitch, E C; Cabrerizo, M; Cardosa, J; Harvala, H; Ivanova, O E; Kroes, A C M; Lukashev, A; Muir, P; Odoom, J; Roivainen, M; Susi, P; Trallero, G; Evans, D J; Simmonds, P

    2010-09-01

    The relationship between virus evolution and recombination in species B human enteroviruses was investigated through large-scale genetic analysis of echovirus type 9 (E9) and E11 isolates (n = 85 and 116) from 16 European, African, and Asian countries between 1995 and 2008. Cluster 1 E9 isolates and genotype D5 and A E11 isolates showed evidence of frequent recombination between the VP1 and 3Dpol regions, the latter falling into 23 (E9) and 43 (E11) clades interspersed phylogenetically with 46 3Dpol clades of E30 and with those of other species B serotypes. Remarkably, only 2 of the 112 3Dpol clades were shared by more than one serotype (E11 and E30), demonstrating an extremely large and genetically heterogeneous recombination pool of species B nonstructural-region variants. The likelihood of recombination increased with geographical separation and time, and both were correlated with VP1 divergence, whose substitution rates allowed recombination half-lives of 1.3, 9.8, and 3.1 years, respectively, for E9, E11, and E30 to be calculated. These marked differences in recombination dynamics matched epidemiological patterns of periodic epidemic cycles of 2 to 3 (E9) and 5 to 6 (E30) years and the longer-term endemic pattern of E11 infections. Phylotemporal analysis using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method, which placed recombination events within the evolutionary reconstruction of VP1, showed a close relationship with VP1 lineage expansion, with defined recombination events that correlated with their epidemiological periodicity. Whether recombination events contribute directly to changes in transmissibility that drive epidemic behavior or occur stochastically during periodic population bottlenecks is an unresolved issue vital to future understanding of enterovirus molecular epidemiology and pathogenesis.

  19. Evaluation of the false recent classification rates of multiassay algorithms in estimating HIV type 1 subtype C incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyo, Sikhulile; LeCuyer, Tessa; Wang, Rui; Gaseitsiwe, Simani; Weng, Jia; Musonda, Rosemary; Bussmann, Hermann; Mine, Madisa; Engelbrecht, Susan; Makhema, Joseph; Marlink, Richard; Baum, Marianna K; Novitsky, Vladimir; Essex, M

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory cross-sectional assays are useful for the estimation of HIV incidence, but are known to misclassify individuals with long-standing infection as recently infected. The false recent rate (FRR) varies widely across geographic areas; therefore, accurate estimates of HIV incidence require a locally defined FRR. We determined FRR for Botswana, where HIV-1 subtype C infection is predominant, using the BED capture enzyme immunoassay (BED), a Bio-Rad Avidity Index (BAI) assay (a modification of the Bio-Rad HIV1/2+O EIA), and two multiassay algorithms (MAA) that included clinical data. To estimate FRR, stored blood samples from 512 antiretroviral (ARV)-naive HIV-1 subtype C-infected individuals from a prospective cohort in Botswana were tested at 18-24 months postenrollment. The following FRR mean (95% CI) values were obtained: BED 6.05% (4.15-8.48), BAI 5.57% (3.70-8.0), BED-BAI 2.25% (1.13-4.0), and a combination of BED-BAI with CD4 (>200) and viral load (>400) threshold 1.43% (0.58-2.93). The interassay agreement between BED and BAI was 92.8% (95% CI, 90.1-94.5) for recent/long-term classification. Misclassification was associated with viral suppression for BED [adjusted OR (aOR) 10.31; p=0.008], BAI [aOR 9.72; p=0.019], and MAA1 [aOR 16.6; p=0.006]. Employing MAA can reduce FRR to <2%. A local FRR can improve cross-sectional HIV incidence estimates.

  20. Two double-blinded, randomized, comparative trials of 4 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope vaccines in HIV-1-infected individuals across a spectrum of disease severity: AIDS Clinical Trials Groups 209 and 214.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schooley, R T; Spino, C; Kuritzkes, D; Walker, B D; Valentine, F A; Hirsch, M S; Cooney, E; Friedland, G; Kundu, S; Merigan, T C; McElrath, M J; Collier, A; Plaeger, S; Mitsuyasu, R; Kahn, J; Haslett, P; Uherova, P; deGruttola, V; Chiu, S; Zhang, B; Jones, G; Bell, D; Ketter, N; Twadell, T; Chernoff, D; Rosandich, M

    2000-11-01

    The potential role of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific immune responses in controlling viral replication in vivo has stimulated interest in enhancing virus-specific immunity by vaccinating infected individuals with HIV-1 or its components. These studies were undertaken to define patient populations most likely to respond to vaccination, with the induction of novel HIV-1-specific cellular immune responses, and to compare the safety and immunogenicity of several candidate recombinant HIV-1 envelope vaccines and adjuvants. New lymphoproliferative responses (LPRs) developed in 350 cells/mm(3) and were usually strain restricted. Responders tended to be more likely than nonresponders to have an undetectable level of HIV-1 RNA at baseline (P=.067). Induction of new cellular immune responses by HIV-1 envelope vaccines is a function of the immunologic stage of disease and baseline plasma HIV-1 RNA level and exhibits considerable vaccine strain specificity.

  1. Mortality and morbidity among HIV type-1-infected patients during the first 5 years of a multicountry HIV workplace programme in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Borght, Stefaan F; Clevenbergh, Philippe; Rijckborst, Henk; Nsalou, Paul; Onyia, Ngozi; Lange, Joep M; de Wit, Tobias F Rinke; Van der Loeff, Maarten F Schim

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of an HIV workplace programme in sub-Saharan Africa. The international brewing company, Heineken, introduced an HIV workplace programme in its African subsidiaries in 2001. Beneficiaries from 16 sites in 5 countries were eligible. HIV type-1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals were assessed clinically and immunologically, and started highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) if they had AIDS or had a CD4+ T-cell count <300 cells/microl. In this cohort, study patients were followed-up for vital status, new AIDS events, CD4+ T-cell count and haemoglobin. Over the first 5 years of the programme, 431 adults were found to be HIV-1-infected. The mortality rate among those not yet taking HAART was 2.6 per 100 person-years of observation (pyo). By October 2006, 249 patients had started HAART at a median CD4+ T-cell count of 170 cells/microl; 59 (23.7%) patients were in CDC stage C. Among patients on HAART, 25 died and 7 were lost to follow-up. The mortality rate was 3.7 per 100 pyo overall, 14 per 100 pyo in the first 16 weeks and 2.5 per 100 pyo thereafter (P < 0.0001). At 4 years after start of treatment, 89% of patients were known to be alive. The CD4+ T-cell count increased by a median of 153 and 238 cells/microl after 1 and 4 years of HAART, respectively. In this HIV workplace programme in sub-Saharan Africa, long-term high survival was achieved.

  2. Immunogenicity of the recombinant adenovirus type 5 vector with type 35 fiber containing HIV-1 gag gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIN LEI LIU; SHUNAG QING YU; XIA FENG; XIAO LI WANG; HONG MEI LIU; XIAO MEI ZHANG; HONG XIA LI; LING ZHOU; YI ZENG

    2006-01-01

    The immune efficiency of a recombinant adenovirus type 5 with type 35 fiber containing HIV-1 gag gene (rAd5/F35-mod.gag) was investigated in BALB/c mice, in which the rAd5/F35-mod. gag was firstly identified with PCR, then transfected to 293 cells and the in vitro expression level of Gag protein was determined by Western blotting and indirect immuno-fluorescent assay. Mice were immunized with intramuscular injections of rAd5/F35-mod. gag, rAd5-mod. gag or DNA and were boosted after 3 weeks.To test the effect of pre-existing anti-viral immunity on immunization, mice were also injected with Ad5-GFP vector and then immunized 4 and 7 weeks later with Ad5/F35-mod. gag vector. The P24-specific IgG antibody in sera of immunized mice was determined by ELISA and the specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response was assayed by intracellular cytokine staining. It was demonstrated that the rAd5/F35-mod. gag vector could express efficiently the HIV Gag protein in 293 cells in vitro and induce strong HIVspecific immune responses in vivo. The strongest CTL and serum IgG response occurred when mice were immunized twice with injection of rAd5/F35 alone, but the anti-Ad5 antibody after primary infection with adenovirus could inhibit the specific immune responses induced by rAd5/F35 vector. It is concluded that single immunization with recombinant adenovirus rAd5/F35-mod. gag can induce specific CTL and serum IgG antibody responses in mice, but the immunogenicity of rAd5/F35 is comparably weaker than that of rAd5.

  3. What Is HIV/AIDS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS? Subscribe Translate Text Size Print What Is HIV/AIDS? Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. If left ... need medical treatment to prevent death. Where DId HIV Come From? Scientists identified a type of chimpanzee ...

  4. Frequent occurrence of chronic hepatitis B virus infection among West African HIV type-1-infected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouet, François; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Inwoley, André; Anaky, Marie-France; Fassinou, Patricia; Kpozehouen, Alphonse; Rouzioux, Christine; Blanche, Stéphane; Msellati, Philippe

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study, conducted in Ivory Coast, was to evaluate the prevalence and evolution of viral hepatitis in children coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) markers were retrospectively and longitudinally assessed among 280 HIV-1-infected children enrolled in the Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA et les Hépatites Virales B et C 1244/1278 cohort. Among these, 173 (61.8%) received highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), including lamivudine (3TC) for 122 children. Detection of the hepatitis B s antigen (HBsAg) was performed on specimens collected at inclusion and 6 months later. If results of both tests were positive, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)/hepatitis B e antibody (HBeAb) and HBV DNA levels were measured at inclusion and during follow-up. A fourth-generation HCV enzyme immunoassay was used for HCV screening at inclusion. In our pediatric cohort, no patients were infected with HCV, but the prevalence of HBsAg at inclusion was 12.1% (34 of 280; 95% confidence interval [CI], 8.6-16.6). Among the HBV-HIV-1-coinfected children, a high rate of positive HBeAg chronic hepatitis B (CHB) was noted at inclusion (82.4% [ 28 of 34]; 95% CI, 65.5%-93.2%) and after a median follow-up of 18 months (78.3%; 95% CI, 45.5%-92.7%), with no significant difference between children treated with HAART (with or without 3TC) and untreated ones. These children showed high HBV DNA levels (usually >8.0 log(10) copies/mL) and viral population consisting of nearly exclusively wild-type HBeAg-positive HBV strains, strongly suggesting that most of them were in the initial immunotolerant phase of chronic hepatitis B. In sub-Saharan Africa, children with chronic hepatitis B and who are treated with 3TC-based HAART are at risk of developing 3TC resistance. Further studies are required to guide the management of HBV-HIV-1-coinfected children.

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus type-2-A milder, kinder virus: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannangai, R; David, S; Sridharan, G

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-2 (HIV-2) belongs to the family retroviridae which is phylogenetically clusters with SIV SM from sooty mangabeys. This virus is morphologically similar to human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) but has got only a 40% homology at the nucleotide level. There is a distinct geographical distribution of HIV-2 unlike HIV-1. There are currently eight subtypes/groups identified with subtype/group A responsible for the majority of infections. HIV-2 shows a considerable difference in the course of the disease. Clinical, haematological and immunological evaluation of individuals infected with HIV-2 has shown the virus to be less pathogenic than HIV-1 although the exact mechanism underlying this difference is not well defined. Similar to HIV-1, the HIV-2 isolates also showed distinct replicative and cytopathic characteristics. The transmission rate for HIV-2 compared to HIV-1 is very low both by heterosexual route and mother to child transmission. The clinical signs and symptoms of immunodeficiency associated with HIV-2 are similar to the ones seen among the HIV-1-infected individuals and they can also progress to AIDS. It is naturally resistant to NNRTI and hence the diagnosis become important as it affects the treatment strategy. Similar to HIV-1, HIV-2 strains of infected individuals also show mutations that can cause drug resistance. The current evidence suggests that there is no protective effective for HIV-2 against HIV-1.

  6. Mosaic clade M human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope immunogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korber, Bette T.; Fischer, William; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.; Letvin, Norman; Hahn; Beatrice H.

    2011-05-31

    The present invention relates to mosaic clade M HIV-1 Env polypeptides and to compositions comprising same. The polypeptides of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  7. 趋势面分析法在艾滋病地理分布研究中的应用%Application of trend surface analysis method in geographical distribution of HIV/AIDS epidemic research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王璐; 罗静; 邓丹; 杨书; 张强

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the geographical distribution of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in C city .Methods Based on the theory of multiple regression analysis ,trend surface regression mathematical model was constructed .The latitude and longitude coordinates of different districts and data of HIV/AIDS were collected in the model and the results by ArcGIS software were got ,the trend sur-face analysis chart was drawed at last .Results HIV/AIDS infection rates trend surface regression mathematical model of C city was statistically significant difference(P< 0 .05) ,its goodness-of-fit was 53 .18% .Regions exsisted abnormal residual value and should be the paid attention to explore protective or risk factors in these regions .Conclusion The method can be used in the analy-sis of C city HIV/AIDS epidemic systematic variation in the geographic distribution and local district ,and provide some clues for the local epidemic prevention and controlling of HIV/AIDS .%目的:了解某市艾滋病疫情的地理分布特征。方法以多元回归分析理论为基础,构建趋势面回归数学模型,将不同区县的经纬度坐标及艾滋病感染数据代入模型,并根据模型方程计算结果,通过 A rcG IS软件,绘制趋势面分析图。结果某市艾滋病感染率趋势面回归数学模型有统计学意义( P<0.05),其拟合优度为53.18%。存在异常残差值的地区,应作为重点研究对象,探讨这些地区可能存在的某种保护因素或危险因素。结论该方法可用于分析某市艾滋病疫情的地理分布系统变异和局部变异情况,可为当地艾滋病的疫情防控提供一些线索。

  8. Impact of HIV type 1 DNA levels on spontaneous disease progression: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiara, Chrissa G; Nikolopoulos, Georgios K; Bagos, Pantelis G; Goujard, Cecile; Katzenstein, Terese L; Minga, Albert K; Rouzioux, Christine; Hatzakis, Angelos

    2012-04-01

    Several studies have reported the prognostic strength of HIV-1 DNA with variable results however. The aims of the current study were to estimate more accurately the ability of HIV-1 DNA to predict progression of HIV-1 disease toward acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or death, and to compare the prognostic information obtained by HIV-1 DNA with that derived from plasma HIV-1 RNA. Eligible articles were identified through a comprehensive search of Medline, ISI Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar. The analysis included univariate and bivariate random-effects models. The univariate meta-analysis of six studies involving 1074 participants showed that HIV-1 DNA was a strong predictive marker of AIDS [relative risk (RR): 3.01, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.88-4.82] and of all-cause mortality (RR: 3.49, 95% CI: 2.06-5.89). The bivariate model using the crude estimates of primary studies indicated that HIV-1 DNA was a significantly better predictor than HIV-1 RNA of either AIDS alone (ratio of RRs=1.47, 95% CI: 1.05-2.07) or of combined (AIDS or death) progression outcomes (ratio of RRs=1.51, 95% CI: 1.11-2.05). HIV-1 DNA is a strong predictor of HIV-1 disease progression. Moreover, there is some evidence that HIV-1 DNA might have better predictive value than plasma HIV-1 RNA.

  9. Effect of Different Types of Exercise in HIV + Mozambican Women Using Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangona, Lucília; Daca, Timóteo; Tchonga, Francisco; Bule, Odete; Bhatt, Nilesh; Jani, Ilesh; Damasceno, Albertino; Prista, António

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of two types of exercises interventions on the regularity and health-related physical fitness in HIV-infected individuals who use antiretroviral therapy (ART). A total of 53 HIV+ African women (mean age=39.5±8.4 years) on ART participated in the study. Subjects were randomly divided into 3 groups, namely, formal exercise (FEG), playful exercise (PEG) and control (CG). During 12 weeks, the exercise groups underwent a program of 1-hour duration with a frequency of 3 times a week. The FEG performed a protocol that included 20 minutes of exercise, cycling at 60 % of V̇O2peak, increasing to 75 % and 85 % in the 4th and 8th weeks, respectively, and a muscular endurance circuit consisted of 6 exercises at 15 repetitions per minute (RM). The PEG followed a program consisting of active games. Before and after the intervention the participants were submitted to a clinical evaluation including immunological parameters (CD4+), cardiovascular risk factors, physical fitness and anthropometry. Comparison of somatic variables before and after the program showed no exercise effect. Immunological and cardiovascular variables were also independent of the exercise group. The main effect was found in cardiorespiratory fitness: exercise groups increased significantly in V̇O2peak (FEG=14.7 %; PEG=11.1 %) with no significant differences in CG. The percentage of high attendance was identical between the two groups. It was concluded that there is no contraindication for exercise in this type of population and the beneficial effect was mainly in cardiorespiratory fitness, regardless of the type of exercise performed.

  10. A diverse population of Cryptococcus gattii molecular type VGIII in southern Californian HIV/AIDS patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmond J Byrnes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus gattii infections in southern California have been reported in patients with HIV/AIDS. In this study, we examined the molecular epidemiology, population structure, and virulence attributes of isolates collected from HIV/AIDS patients in Los Angeles County, California. We show that these isolates consist almost exclusively of VGIII molecular type, in contrast to the VGII molecular type isolates causing the North American Pacific Northwest outbreak. The global VGIII population structure can be divided into two molecular groups, VGIIIa and VGIIIb. Isolates from the Californian patients are virulent in murine and macrophage models of infection, with VGIIIa significantly more virulent than VGIIIb. Several VGIII isolates are highly fertile and produce abundant sexual spores that may serve as infectious propagules. The a and α VGIII MAT locus alleles are largely syntenic with limited rearrangements compared to the known VGI (a/α and VGII (α MAT loci, but each has unique characteristics including a distinct deletion flanking the 5' VGIII MATa alleles and the α allele is more heterogeneous than the a allele. Our studies indicate that C. gattii VGIII is endemic in southern California, with other isolates originating from the neighboring regions of Mexico, and in rarer cases from Oregon and Washington state. Given that >1,000,000 cases of cryptococcal infection and >620,000 attributable mortalities occur annually in the context of the global AIDS pandemic, our findings suggest a significant burden of C. gattii may be unrecognized, with potential prognostic and therapeutic implications. These results signify the need to classify pathogenic Cryptococcus cases and highlight possible host differences among the C. gattii molecular types influencing infection of immunocompetent (VGI/VGII vs. immunocompromised (VGIII/VGIV hosts.

  11. HIV-1-triggered release of type I IFN by plasmacytoid dendritic cells induces BAFF production in monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Alejandro M; Ouellet, Michel; Tremblay, Michel J

    2015-03-01

    HIV-1 infection leads to numerous B cell abnormalities, including hypergammaglobulinemia, nonspecific B cell activation, nonspecific class switching, increased cell turnover, breakage of tolerance, increased immature/transitional B cells, B cell malignancies, as well as a loss of capacity to generate and maintain memory, all of which contribute to a global impairment of the immune humoral compartment. Several cytokines and soluble factors, which are increased in sera of HIV-1-infected individuals, have been suggested to directly or indirectly contribute to these B cell dysfunctions, and one of these is the B cell-activating factor (BAFF). We report in this study that HIV-1 (X4- and R5-tropic) upregulates BAFF expression and secretion by human monocytes. Moreover, we show that the virus-mediated production of BAFF by monocytes relies on a type I IFN response by a small percentage of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) present in the monocyte cultures. HIV-1-induced type I IFN by pDCs triggers BAFF production in both classical and intermediate monocytes, but not in nonclassical monocytes, which nonetheless display a very strong basal BAFF production. We report also that basal BAFF secretion was higher in monocytes obtained from females compared with those from male donors. This study provides a novel mechanistic explanation for the increased BAFF levels observed during HIV-1 infection and highlights the importance of pDC/monocyte crosstalk to drive BAFF secretion. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Characterization of HIV-1 Infection and Innate Sensing in Different Types of Primary Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth A. Diget

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages play an important role in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV pathogenesis and contribute to establishment of a viral reservoir responsible for continuous virus production and virus transmission to T cells. In this study, we investigated the differences between various monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs generated through different differentiation protocols and evaluated different cellular, immunological, and virological properties. We found that elevated and persistent HIV-1 pWT/BaL replication could be obtained only in MDMs grown in RPMI containing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF. Interestingly, this MDM type was also most responsive to toll-like receptor stimulation. By contrast, all MDM types were activated to a comparable extent by intracellular DNA, and the macrophage serum-free medium-(Mac-SFM-differentiated MDMs responded strongly to membrane fusion through expression of CXCL10. Finally, we found that HIV infection of RPMI/M-CSF-differentiated MDMs induced low-grade expression of two interferon-stimulated genes in some donors. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the differentiation protocol used greatly influences the ability of MDMs to activate innate immune reactions and support HIV-1 replication. Paradoxically, the data show that the MDMs with the strongest innate immune response were also the most permissive for HIV-1 replication.

  13. Typing place names for geographical indexing Typage de noms toponymiques à des fins d’indexation géographique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Gaio

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an automatic annotation of spatial expressions enabling the improvement of the indexing process of geographic information from textual documents. The proposed method combines the use of specific intrasentential relationships and external resources: lexicons of specialized verbs, general thesauri, geographical ontology, and gazetteers. It relies on expanded spatial named entities recognition to deduce a symbolic representation expressed in terms of semantic features, on the one hand, and, to give them a numerical representation, on the other hand. Our method was integrated and tested in a fully automated process of spatial annotation and indexing dedicated to textual documents. Experiments were performed on a corpus of travelogues. They allowed us to show that our method, when integrated into adequate process flows, makes it possible both to expand the vocabulary of words used to define the concepts of a domain specific ontology and also to index more accurately spatial information in textual corpora.

  14. Inhibition of HIV type 1 infectivity by coexpression of a wild-type and a defective glycoprotein 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, O S; Losman, B; Schønning, Kristian;

    1998-01-01

    An amino acid substitution (D --> K) in the C3 region of HIV-1 gp120 has previously been shown to inhibit binding of virions to CD4+ cells. We have introduced the same mutation into the HIV-1 isolate LAV-I(BRU), in which the mutation is denoted D373K. Here we show that the D373K envelope protein ...

  15. Investigating signs of recent evolution in the pool of proviral HIV type 1 DNA during years of successful HAART

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mens, Helene; Pedersen, Anders G; Jørgensen, Louise B

    2007-01-01

    In order to shed light on the nature of the persistent reservoir of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), we investigated signs of recent evolution in the pool of proviral DNA in patients on successful HAART. Pro-viral DNA, corresponding to the C2-V3-C3 region of the HIV-1 env gene......, was collected from PBMCs isolated from 57 patients. Both "consensus" (57 patients) and clonal (7 patients) sequences were obtained from five time points spanning a 24-month period. The main computational strategy was to use maximum likelihood to fit a set of alternative phylogenetic models to the clonal data...

  16. Investigating signs of recent evolution in the pool of proviral HIV type 1 DNA during years of successful HAART

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mens, Helene; Pedersen, Anders G; Jørgensen, Louise B;

    2007-01-01

    In order to shed light on the nature of the persistent reservoir of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), we investigated signs of recent evolution in the pool of proviral DNA in patients on successful HAART. Pro-viral DNA, corresponding to the C2-V3-C3 region of the HIV-1 env gene......, and then determine the support for models that imply evolution between time points. Model fit and model-selection uncertainty was assessed using the Akaike information criterion (AIC) and Akaike weights. The consensus sequence data was also analyzed using a range of phylogenetic techniques to determine whether...

  17. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the prevalence, trends, and geographical distribution of HIV among Chinese female sex workers (2000–2011: implications for preventing sexually transmitted HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: The HIV epidemic has shown a gradual declining or stabilizing trend among Chinese FSWs. Intervention efforts should be diverted to high-risk subgroups of FSWs, such as drug-using and low-tier FSWs.

  18. HIV type 1 integrase polymorphisms in treatment-naive and treatment-experienced HIV type 1-infected patients in Thailand where HIV type 1 subtype A/E predominates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuphuakrat, Angsana; Pasomsub, Ekawat; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Chantratita, Wasun; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek

    2012-08-01

    Integrase inhibitor (INI) is a novel antiretroviral drug recommended for both treatment-naive and treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected patients. Limited data are available on INI resistance in Thailand, where HIV-1 subtype A/E predominates. We aimed to investigate INI resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) among treatment-naive patients and patients who experienced treatment failure with NNRTI-based or PI-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Thailand. One hundred and eight plasma samples of 58 treatment-naive and 50 treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected individuals were collected. The HIV-1 integrase coding region was sequenced. Polymorphisms were compared between subtype A/E and B circulating in Thailand and between treatment-naive and treatment-experienced groups. Resulting amino acids were interpreted for drug resistance according to Stanford algorithms. Ninety-seven samples were HIV-1 subtype A/E, 10 were subtype B, and one was subtype C. Age, gender, and CD4 cell counts were similar between treatment-naive and treatment-experienced groups, while the treatment-failure group showed a statistically significant longer awareness time of HIV-1 infection and lower viral load than the treatment-naive group. Major INI-RAM was not found in this study, but some minor INI-RAMs, such asV54I, L68I, L74M, T97A, and S230N, were found. Comparing INI-RAMs between subtype A/E and B, the prevalence of V54I and V72I was higher in subtype B than subtype E, while V201I was found in all sequences of subtype A/E. In subtype A/E, integrase polymorphisms were not different between treatment-naive and treatment-experienced groups. However, the number of amino acid substitutions was significantly higher in the treatment-experienced group (p=0.009). One NNRTI-based ART-treated patient was found to have potential low-level INI-RAMs. INI-RAMs are rare in both treatment-naive and treatment-experienced patients in Thailand. This suggested that INI should be active in patients who are naive to

  19. Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 in seronegative infants born to HIV-1-infected mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Reyes-Terán

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some individuals repeatedly exposed to Human Immunodeficiency Virus do not seroconvert and are resistant to HIV infection. Here, in a pediatric cohort of HIV seronegative infants born of HIV-infected mothers, we have studied eight non-breastfed children in whom viral DNA was detected in their PBMC. Our objective was to assess whether silent infection in these children can be explained by the presence of integrated viral DNA. Methods The presence of viral DNA was corroborated by nested PCR with primers for gag and the nef/LTR regions of HIV-1. Integration of HIV DNA into the host genome was assessed by an Alu-LTR PCR. Amplicons were sequenced and phylogenetic analyzes were done. Results HIV-1 DNA was detected in the earliest available PBMC sample from all eight infants, and two of them tested positive for HIV DNA at 2 years of age. Nested PCR resulted in the amplification of gag, nef/LTR and Alu-LTR fragments, which demostrated that HIV-1 DNA was integrated in the host cell genome. Each individual has a characteristic sequence pattern and is different from the LTR sequence of HXB2 prototype virus and other Mexican isolates. Conclusion HIV-1 DNA was observed in PBMC from HIV exposed seronegative children in this pediatric cohort.

  20. Geographic Tongue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cases, most often related to eating hot, spicy, salty or acidic foods Many people with geographic tongue ... sensitive oral tissues, including: Hot, spicy, acidic or salty foods Tobacco products Toothpaste that contains tartar-control ...

  1. Genetic diversification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as a function of prolonged geographic dissemination and as measured by binary typing and other genotyping methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, W; van Belkum, A; Kreiswirth, B; Verbrugh, H

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the extent of genome evolution among methicillin-resistant Staghylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. Three different collections of strains were analysed, comprising locally, nationally and internationally disseminated genotypes. Various genotyping assays displaying different levels of resolution were used. Geographically and temporally diverse MRSA strains comprised the international group. MRSA strains recovered during an outbreak in a New York City hospital and Portuguese MRSA isolates, all resembling the so-called Iberian clone, were included in the local and national collections, respectively. Genotypes were determined by genome scanning typing techniques and procedures which analyse specific DNA elements only. The outbreak strains showed subclonal variation, whereas the Portuguese isolates displayed an increased number of genotypes. Among the epidemiologically unrelated MRSA strains, the different genotyping techniques revealed a wide heterogeneity of types. Different typing techniques appeared to show different levels of resolution, which could be correlated with the extent of geographic spread; the more pronounced the spread, the higher the degree of genome evolution. Binary typing and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis are the typing methods of choice for determining (non)identity among strains that have a recent common ancestor and have undergone yet limited dissemination.

  2. Influences on HIV Testing among Young African-American Men Who Have Sex with Men and the Moderating Effect of the Geographic Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashburn, Andrew J.; Peterson, John L.; Bakeman, Roger; Miller, Robin L.; Clark, Leslie F.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the influence of demographic characteristics, risk behaviors, knowledge, and psychosocial variables on HIV testing among a sample (n = 551) of young African-American men who have sex with men (MSM) from three cities--Atlanta (n = 241), Birmingham (n = 174), and Chicago (n = 136). Among the entire sample of young men, age,…

  3. Molecular phylogenetics of transmitted drug resistance in newly diagnosed HIV Type 1 individuals in Denmark: a nation-wide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Audelin, Anne Margrethe; Gerstoft, Jan; Obel, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Highly active antiretroviral treatment is compromised by viral resistance mutations. Transmitted drug resistance (TDR) is therefore monitored closely, but follow-up studies of these patients are limited. Virus from 1405 individuals diagnosed with HIV-1 in Denmark between 2001 and 2009...... without resistance mutations. We observed no difference in progression of the infection between individuals infected with TDR and individuals infected with wild-type HIV-1. The prevalence of TDR is low in Denmark and transmission of dual-drug-resistant HIV-1 is infrequent. The TDR isolates were shown...... resulting in a prevalence of 6.1%, with no changes over time. The main resistance mutations were nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) mutation 215 revertants, as well as nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutation 103N/S and protease inhibitor (PI) mutations 90M and 85V...

  4. Molecular Phylogenetics of Transmitted Drug Resistance in Newly Diagnosed HIV Type 1 Individuals in Denmark, a Nation-Wide Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Audelin, Anne Margrethe; Gerstoft, Jan; Obel, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Highly active antiretroviral treatment is compromised by viral resistance mutations. Transmitted drug resistance (TDR) is therefore monitored closely, but follow-up studies of these patients are limited. Virus from 1405 individuals diagnosed with HIV-1 in Denmark between 2001 and 2009...... without resistance mutations. We observed no difference in progression of the infection between individuals infected with TDR and individuals infected with wild-type HIV-1. The prevalence of TDR is low in Denmark and transmission of dual-drug-resistant HIV-1 is infrequent. The TDR isolates were shown...... resulting in a prevalence of 6.1%, with no changes over time. The main resistance mutations were nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) mutation 215 revertants, as well as nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutation 103N/S and protease inhibitor (PI) mutations 90M and 85V...

  5. Introduction of HIV type 1 into an isolated population: molecular epidemiologic study from Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Tina V; Leitner, Thomas; Lohse, Nicolai

    2007-01-01

    Introduction of HIV-1 into a population may not always give rise to a subsequent epidemic. Greenland is an isolated and sparsely populated island in The Danish Kingdom. We aimed to estimate the number of introductions of HIV-1 into Greenland, the number of subsequent epidemics, and the countries...... from which the virus was introduced. Phylogenetic analyses were performed on three regions of HIV-1 (gag, pol, and env) in samples from 70 Greenlandic patients. Furthermore, we included gene sequences from contemporary Danish HIV-1-infected patients and sequences from the Los Alamos HIV Sequence...... Database. All Greenlandic sequences were subtype B except one sequence found to be a recombinant (probably CRF13). Sequence clusters in the phylogenetic trees indicated that there had been at least nine introductions of HIV-1 into Greenland. One cluster, supported by bootstrap values of 81, 76, and 96...

  6. Resistance to type 1 interferons is a major determinant of HIV-1 transmission fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Shilpa S.; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Sherrill-Mix, Scott; Learn, Gerald H.; Plenderleith, Lindsey; Smith, Andrew G.; Barbian, Hannah J.; Russell, Ronnie M.; Gondim, Marcos V. P.; Bahari, Catherine Y.; Shaw, Christiana M.; Li, Yingying; Decker, Timothy; Haynes, Barton F.; Shaw, George M.; Sharp, Paul M.; Borrow, Persephone; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2017-01-01

    Sexual transmission of HIV-1 is an inefficient process, with only one or few variants of the donor quasispecies establishing the new infection. A critical, and as yet unresolved, question is whether the mucosal bottleneck selects for viruses with increased transmission fitness. Here, we characterized 300 limiting dilution-derived virus isolates from the plasma, and in some instances genital secretions, of eight HIV-1 donor and recipient pairs. Although there were no differences in the amount of virion-associated envelope glycoprotein, recipient isolates were on average threefold more infectious (P = 0.0001), replicated to 1.4-fold higher titers (P = 0.004), were released from infected cells 4.2-fold more efficiently (P < 0.00001), and were significantly more resistant to type I IFNs than the corresponding donor isolates. Remarkably, transmitted viruses exhibited 7.8-fold higher IFNα2 (P < 0.00001) and 39-fold higher IFNβ (P < 0.00001) half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) than did donor isolates, and their odds of replicating in CD4+ T cells at the highest IFNα2 and IFNβ doses were 35-fold (P < 0.00001) and 250-fold (P < 0.00001) greater, respectively. Interestingly, pretreatment of CD4+ T cells with IFNβ, but not IFNα2, selected donor plasma isolates that exhibited a transmitted virus-like phenotype, and such viruses were also detected in the donor genital tract. These data indicate that transmitted viruses are phenotypically distinct, and that increased IFN resistance represents their most distinguishing property. Thus, the mucosal bottleneck selects for viruses that are able to replicate and spread efficiently in the face of a potent innate immune response. PMID:28069935

  7. Sugar-binding proteins potently inhibit dendritic cell human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and dendritic-cell-directed HIV-1 transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turville, Stuart G; Vermeire, Kurt; Balzarini, Jan; Schols, Dominique

    2005-11-01

    Both endocytic uptake and viral fusion can lead to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transfer to CD4+ lymphocytes, either through directional regurgitation (infectious transfer in trans [I-IT]) or through de novo viral production in dendritic cells (DCs) resulting in a second-phase transfer to CD4+ lymphocytes (infectious second-phase transfer [I-SPT]). We have evaluated in immature monocyte-derived DCs both pathways of transfer with regard to their susceptibilities to being blocked by potential microbicidal compounds, including cyanovirin (CNV); the plant lectins Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin, Galanthus nivalis agglutinin, Urtica dioica agglutinin, and Cymbidium hybrid agglutinin; and the glycan mannan. I-IT was a relatively inefficient means of viral transfer compared to I-SPT at both high and low levels of the viral inoculum. CNV was able to completely block I-IT at 15 microg/ml. All other compounds except mannan could inhibit I-IT by at least 90% when used at doses of 15 microg/ml. In contrast, efficient inhibition of I-SPT was remarkably harder to achieve, as 50% effective concentration levels for plant lectins and CNV to suppress this mode of HIV-1 transfer increased significantly. Thus, our findings indicate that I-SPT may be more elusive to targeting by antiviral drugs and stress the need for drugs affecting the pronounced inhibition of the infection of DCs by HIV-1.

  8. Hepatitis C virus and HIV seroprevalences, sociodemographic characteristics, behaviors and access to syringes among drug users, a comparison of geographical areas in France, ANRS-Coquelicot 2011 survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weill-Barillet, L; Pillonel, J; Semaille, C; Léon, L; Le Strat, Y; Pascal, X; Barin, F; Jauffret-Roustide, M

    2016-09-01

    People who use drugs (PWUDs) are at a high risk for hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but they have different characteristics depending on the local context. In France, seroprevalence, sociodemographic, and behavior information have only been studied at a national level rather than at a local level. The aim of this study was to describe and examine profile and drug use practice differences in seven French cities and departments and to assess whether these differences can explain HCV and HIV seroprevalence variations between French geographical areas. Data were collected from the cross-sectional ANRS-Coquelicot survey conducted for the second time in 2011 among drug users having injected or snorted drugs at least once in their life. Professional interviewers administrated a face-to-face questionnaire in six different areas in France: Paris, Marseille, Bordeaux, Lille, Strasbourg and the Seine-Saint-Denis department (Paris suburbs). Participants were asked to self-collect a fingerpick blood sample in order to search for the presence of anti-HIV and anti-HCV antibodies and to estimate seroprevalence in PWUDs. Overall, HCV and HIV seroprevalence was 44% [95% CI: 39.6-47.9] and 10% [95% CI: 7.5-12.6] respectively. The highest HCV seroprevalence was 56% in Marseille and the lowest was 24% in Bordeaux and for HIV the highest was 18% in Seine-Saint-Denis and the lowest was 0% in Lille. The population's age differed between areas and could mostly explain HCV seroprevalence variation but not exclusively. Profiles and practices, different in each area, can also explain this variation. In multivariate analysis, HCV seroprevalence was lower in Bordeaux (prevalence ratio [PR]=0.64), Strasbourg (PR=0.76), and Seine-Saint-Denis (PR=0.8) than in Paris. Nearly one-third of injectors declared having had difficulties to obtain syringes in the 6 previous months, but disparities existed between areas. HCV risk exposure in PWUDs remains high in France and

  9. Multi-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistant HIV type-1 in a patient from Sierra Leone failing stavudine, lamivudine and nevirapine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L. Hamers; A.M.J. Wensing; N.K.T. Back; M.S. Arcilla; J.P.H. Frissen

    2011-01-01

    We report a 33-year-old HIV type-1 (HIV-1)-infected male from Sierra Leone who harboured extensive drug resistance mutations to all nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and non-NRTIs, including the multi-NRTI-resistance Q151M complex, K65R, M184I and Y181I, after using standard first-

  10. Immunological responses during a virologically failing antiretroviral regimen are associated with in vivo synonymous mutation rates of HIV type-1 env

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mens, Helene; Jørgensen, Louise Bruun; Kronborg, Gitte

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the underlying causes of differences in immunological response to antiretroviral therapy during multidrug-resistant (MDR) HIV type-1 (HIV-1) infection. This study aimed to identify virological factors associated with immunological response during therapy failure...

  11. Immunological responses during a virologically failing antiretroviral regimen are associated with in vivo synonymous mutation rates of HIV type-1 env

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mens, Helene; Jørgensen, Louise Bruun; Kronborg, Gitte;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the underlying causes of differences in immunological response to antiretroviral therapy during multidrug-resistant (MDR) HIV type-1 (HIV-1) infection. This study aimed to identify virological factors associated with immunological response during therapy failure....

  12. Immunological responses during a virologically failing antiretroviral regimen are associated with in vivo synonymous mutation rates of HIV type-1 env

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mens, Helene; Jørgensen, Louise Bruun; Kronborg, Gitte;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the underlying causes of differences in immunological response to antiretroviral therapy during multidrug-resistant (MDR) HIV type-1 (HIV-1) infection. This study aimed to identify virological factors associated with immunological response during therapy failure...

  13. Longing for belonging: Adolescents' experiences of living with HIV in different types of families in Swaziland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shabalala, F.S.

    2017-01-01

    This study illuminates adolescents’ everyday life experiences of living with HIV in different family contexts in the Manzini region in Swaziland, and the tactics they used to navigate the social and health system environments in their management of the HIV illness and disease. A significant proporti

  14. The effect of cholecalciferol and calcitriol on biochemical bone markers in HIV type 1-infected males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich Christian; Kolte, Lilian; Hitz, Mette

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1-infected patients have an increased risk of osteoporosis and fractures. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the bone metabolism in HIV-1-infected patients exposed to calcitriol and cholecalciferol. We also investigated the relationship between T cells and bone markers. We...

  15. Impact of HIV Type 1 DNA Levels on Spontaneous Disease Progression: A Meta-Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsiara, Chrissa G; Nikolopoulos, Georgios K; Bagos, Pantelis G

    2012-01-01

    , and to compare the prognostic information obtained by HIV-1 DNA with that derived from plasma HIV-1 RNA. Eligible articles were identified through a comprehensive search of Medline, ISI Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar. The analysis included univariate and bivariate random-effects models...

  16. Nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope immunogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korber, Bette T; Fischer, William; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Letvin, Norman; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2015-04-21

    The present invention relates to nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M HIV-1 Env polypeptides and to compositions and vectors comprising same. The nucleic acids of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  17. Type I interferons and interferon regulatory factors regulate TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL in HIV-1-infected macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Huang

    Full Text Available TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL is a member of the TNF family that participates in HIV-1 pathogenesis through the depletion of CD4+ T cells. TRAIL is expressed on the cell membrane of peripheral immune cells and can be cleaved into a soluble, secreted form. The regulation of TRAIL in macrophages during HIV-1 infection is not completely understood. In this study, we investigated the mechanism(s of TRAIL expression in HIV-1-infected macrophages, an important cell type in HIV-1 pathogenesis. A human monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM culture system was infected with macrophage-tropic HIV-1(ADA, HIV-1(JR-FL, or HIV-1(BAL strains. TRAIL, predominantly the membrane-bound form, increased following HIV-1 infection. We found that HIV-1 infection also induced interferon regulatory factor (IRF-1, IRF-7 gene expression and signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1 activation. Small interfering RNA knockdown of IRF-1 or IRF-7, but not IRF-3, reduced STAT1 activation and TRAIL expression. Furthermore, the upregulation of IRF-1, IRF-7, TRAIL, and the activation of STAT1 by HIV-1 infection was reduced by the treatment of type I interferon (IFN-neutralizing antibodies. In addition, inhibition of STAT1 by fludarabine abolished IRF-1, IRF-7, and TRAIL upregulation. We conclude that IRF-1, IRF-7, type I IFNs, and STAT1 form a signaling feedback loop that is critical in regulating TRAIL expression in HIV-1-infected macrophages.

  18. Types and Characteristics of Childhood Sexual Abuse: How Do They Matter in HIV Sexual Risk Behaviors Among Women in Methadone Treatment in New York City?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrom, Malitta; Winham, Katherine; Gilbert, Louisa

    2016-01-01

    Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is often considered an important distal factor in HIV sexual risk behaviors; however, there are limited and mixed findings regarding this relationship among women experiencing substance use problems. In addition, research with this population of women has yet to examine differences in observed CSA-HIV sexual risk behaviors relationships by CSA type and characteristics. This study examines relationships between CSA coding, type, and characteristics and HIV sexual risk behaviors with main intimate partners among a random sample of 390 women in methadone treatment in New York City who completed individual interviews with trained female interviewers. Findings from logistic regression analyses indicate that CSA predicts substance use with sexual activity, with variations by CSA coding, type, and characteristics; however, the role of CSA is more limited than expected. Having a main partner with HIV risk mediates some relationships between CSA and drinking four or more drinks prior to sex. Intimate partner violence is the most consistent predictor of sexual risk behaviors. Other salient factors include polysubstance use, depression, social support, recent incarceration, relationship characteristics, and HIV status. This study contributes to understanding of relationships between CSA and HIV sexual risk behaviors and key correlates associated with HIV sexual risk behaviors among women in methadone treatment. It also highlights the complexity of measuring CSA and its association with sexual risk behaviors and the importance of comprehensive approaches to HIV prevention that address psychological, relational, situational, and substance use experiences associated with sexual risk behaviors among this population.

  19. The HIV-1 Epidemic: Low- to Middle-Income Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yiming; Williamson, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Low- to middle-income countries bear the overwhelming burden of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) epidemic in terms of the numbers of their citizens living with HIV/AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome), the high degrees of viral diversity often involving multiple HIV-1 clades circulating within their populations, and the social and economic factors that compromise current control measures. Distinct epidemics have emerged in different geographical areas. These epidemics differ in their severity, the population groups they affect, their associated risk behaviors, and the viral strains that drive them. In addition to inflicting great human cost, the high burden of HIV infection has a major impact on the social and economic development of many low- to middle-income countries. Furthermore, the high degrees of viral diversity associated with multiclade HIV epidemics impacts viral diagnosis and pathogenicity and treatment and poses daunting challenges for effective vaccine development. PMID:22393534

  20. Type I Interferon at the Interface of Antiviral Immunity and Immune Regulation: The Curious Case of HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Boasso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferon (IFN-I play a critical role in the innate immune response against viral infections. They actively participate in antiviral immunity by inducing molecular mechanisms of viral restriction and by limiting the spread of the infection, but they also orchestrate the initial phases of the adaptive immune response and influence the quality of T cell immunity. During infection with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1, the production of and response to IFN-I may be severely altered by the lymphotropic nature of the virus. In this review I consider the different aspects of virus sensing, IFN-I production, signalling, and effects on target cells, with a particular focus on the alterations observed following HIV-1 infection.

  1. c-Myb influences HIV type 1 gene expression and virus production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, M J; Ramsay, R G; Rhodes, D I; Deacon, N J

    2001-11-01

    c-Myb is expressed in proliferating T cells. Fifteen c-Myb-binding sites can be identified in the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR), suggesting that c-Myb may regulate HIV-1 gene expression and virus replication. Increasing the cellular levels of c-Myb by transient transfection of CEM cells resulted in a 10- to 20-fold activation of HIV-1 LTR-driven gene expression and mutation of one high-affinity Myb-binding site within the LTR reduced this activation by 60 to 70%. Conversely, inhibition of c-Myb expression in MT-2 cells by treatment with c-myb antisense oligonucleotides decreased HIV-1 replication by 85%, as measured by reverse transcriptase activity and cytopathic effects. The effect of c-myb antisense oligonucleotides on HIV-1 gene expression and virus particle production appeared to be independent of cell proliferation, but dependent on the presence of c-Myb activity mediated through the HIV-1 LTR. These data show that c-myb expression affects HIV-1 replication in CD4(+) T cells.

  2. Interleukin-27 is a potent inhibitor of cis HIV-1 replication in monocyte-derived dendritic cells via a type I interferon-independent pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Chen

    Full Text Available IL-27, a member of the IL-12 family of cytokines, plays an important and diverse role in the function of the immune system. Whilst generally recognized as an anti-inflammatory cytokine, in addition IL-27 has been found to have broad anti-viral effects. Recently, IL-27 has been shown to be a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 infection in CD4+ T cells and macrophages. The main objective of this study was to see whether IL-27 has a similar inhibitory effect on HIV-1 replication in dendritic cells (DCs. Monocytes were differentiated into immature DCs (iDCs and mature DCs (mDCs with standard techniques using a combination of GM-CSF, IL-4 and LPS. Following differentiation, iDCs were infected with HIV-1 and co-cultured in the presence or absence of IL-27. IL-27 treated DCs were shown to be highly potent inhibitors of cis HIV-1, particularly of CCR5 tropic strains. Of note, other IL-12 family members (IL-12, IL-23 and IL-35 had no effect on HIV-1 replication. Microarray studies of IL-27 treated DCs showed no up-regulation of Type I (IFN gene expression. Neutralization of the Type-I IFN receptor had no impact on the HIV inhibition. Lastly, IL-27 mediated inhibition was shown to act post-viral entry and prior to completion of reverse transcription. These results show for the first time that IL-27 is a potent inhibitor of cis HIV-1 infection in DCs by a Type I IFN independent mechanism. IL-27 has previously been reported to inhibit HIV-1 replication in CD4+ T cells and macrophages, thus taken together, this cytokine is a potent anti-HIV agent against all major cell types targeted by the HIV-1 virus and may have a therapeutic role in the future.

  3. Salmonellosis in garden birds in Scotland, 1995 to 2008: geographic region, Salmonella enterica phage type and bird species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennycott, T W; Mather, H A; Bennett, G; Foster, G

    2010-04-03

    Salmonellosis was diagnosed in garden birds from 198 incidents in Scotland between September 1995 and August 2008. Salmonellosis was essentially a disease of finches in the north of Scotland, but in the south of Scotland it was also a problem in house sparrows. Almost all of the incidents were caused by Salmonella Typhimurium phage types 40 or 56/variant, but regional variation in phage types was observed. In the north of Scotland, one phage type (DT 40) predominated, but in the south of Scotland two phage types were commonly isolated (DTs 40 and 56/variant, with the latter the more common of the two phage types). This regional difference was statistically significant for salmonellosis in greenfinches, chaffinches and 'other garden birds', but not for house sparrows. Different temporal patterns for different species of bird and different phage types were also observed within regions. These findings suggest that the epidemiology of salmonellosis in garden birds varies depending on the phage type of Salmonella and the species of garden bird, with additional regional differences depending on the wild bird populations and the phage types of Salmonella in circulation. An awareness of these differences will help when formulating guidelines aimed at reducing the impact of salmonellosis in garden birds.

  4. Vaccine-induced protection from infection of mice by chimeric human immunodeficiency virus type 1, EcoHIV/NL4-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Manisha; Hadas, Eran; Volsky, David J; Potash, Mary Jane

    2007-12-17

    EcoHIV/NL4-3 is a chimeric human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) that can productively infect mice. This study tests the utility of EcoHIV/NL4-3 infection to reveal protective immune responses to an HIV-1 vaccine. Immunocompetent mice were first immunized with VRC 4306 which encodes subtype B consensus sequences of gag, pol, and nef and then were infected by EcoHIV/NL4-3. Anti-Gag antibodies were sampled during immunization and infection. The extent of EcoHIV/NL4-3 infection in spleen cells and peritoneal macrophages was determined by quantitative real-time PCR (QPCR). Although antibody titres were not significantly different in control and vaccinated groups, VRC 4306 immunization induced protective responses that significantly reduced virus burden in both lymphocyte and macrophage compartments. These results indicate that EcoHIV/NL4-3 infection can be controlled by HIV-1 vaccine-induced responses, introducing a small animal model to test vaccine efficacy against HIV-1 infection.

  5. An example of genetically distinct HIV type 1 variants in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma during suppressive therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Dahl, V.; Gisslen, M.; Hagberg, L.; Peterson, J.; Shao, W.; Spudich, S.; Price, RW; Palmer, S.

    2014-01-01

    We sequenced the genome of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) recovered from 70 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens and 29 plasma samples and corresponding samples obtained before treatment initiation from 17 subjects receiving suppressive therapy. More CSF sequences than plasma sequences were hypermutants. We determined CSF sequences and plasma sequences in specimens obtained from 2 subjects after treatment initiation. In one subject, we found genetically distinct CSF and plasma seq...

  6. Rapid, Quantitative Mapping of Anti-HIV Type 1 Envelope Serum Antibody Specificities

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, Rebecca L.R.; Lindsay, Ross W.B.; Wilson, Aaron; Carpov, Alexei; Rabinovich, Svetlana; Hoffenberg, Simon; Caulfield, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    A new generation of extremely broad and potent neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) has been isolated from HIV-infected subjects. This has refocused interest in the sites of vulnerability targeted by these bNAbs and in the potential for designing Envelope (Env) immunogens that display these sites. Standard methods for evaluating HIV-1 vaccine candidates do not enable epitope mapping on the HIV Env spike, the target for NAbs. To meet the need for rapid analysis of Ab specificity, we designed a mult...

  7. Molecular Epidemiology of HIV Type 1 CRF02_AG in Cameroon and African Patients Living in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Véras, Nazle Mendonca Collaço; Santoro, Maria Mercedes; Gray, Rebecca R.; Tatem, Andrew J.; Presti, Alessandra Lo; Olearo, Flaminia; Cappelli, Giulia; Colizzi, Vittorio; Takou, Desiré; Torimiro, Judith; Russo, Gianluca; Callegaro, Annapaola; Salpini, Romina; D'Arrigo, Roberta; Perno, Carlo-Federico; Goodenow, Maureen M.; Ciccozzi, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Abstract HIV-1 CRF02_AG accounts for >50% of infected individuals in Cameroon. CRF02_AG prevalence has been increasing both in Africa and Europe, particularly in Italy because of migrations from the sub-Saharan region. This study investigated the molecular epidemiology of CRF02_AG in Cameroon by employing Bayesian phylodynamics and analyzed the relationship between HIV-1 CRF02_AG isolates circulating in Italy and those prevalent in Africa to understand the link between the two epidemics. Among 291 Cameroonian reverse transcriptase sequences analyzed, about 70% clustered within three distinct clades, two of which shared a most recent common ancestor, all related to sequences from Western Africa. The major Cameroonian clades emerged during the mid-1970s and slowly spread during the next 30 years. Little or no geographic structure was detected within these clades. One of the major driving forces of the epidemic was likely the high accessibility between locations in Southern Cameroon contributing to the mobility of the population. The remaining Cameroonian sequences and the new strains isolated from Italian patients were interspersed mainly within West and Central African sequences in the tree, indicating a continuous exchange of CRF02_AG viral strains between Cameroon and other African countries, as well as multiple independent introductions in the Italian population. The evaluation of the spread of CRF02_AG may provide significant insight about the future dynamics of the Italian and European epidemic. PMID:21453131

  8. Nucleic acids encoding modified human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M consensus envelope glycoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Barton F [Durham, NC; Gao, Feng [Durham, NC; Korber, Bette T [Los Alamos, NM; Hahn, Beatrice H [Birmingham, AL; Shaw, George M [Birmingham, AL; Kothe, Denise [Birmingham, AL; Li, Ying Ying [Hoover, AL; Decker, Julie [Alabaster, AL; Liao, Hua-Xin [Chapel Hill, NC

    2011-12-06

    The present invention relates, in general, to an immunogen and, in particular, to an immunogen for inducing antibodies that neutralizes a wide spectrum of HIV primary isolates and/or to an immunogen that induces a T cell immune response. The invention also relates to a method of inducing anti-HIV antibodies, and/or to a method of inducing a T cell immune response, using such an immunogen. The invention further relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding the present immunogens.

  9. 'Co-active coaching' could help HIV patients. New type of counseling involves goal-setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfinkel, M; Blumenthal, E

    2001-08-01

    A counseling technique that takes an action-oriented approach to helping people make major life changes, much used by business executives and other professionals in recent years, now appears to offer some value to HIV patients. Co-active coaching could be a solution to mild depression and inertia for some HIV-infected patients who have difficulty making decisions about how to spend a life-time living with the disease.

  10. Detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein by aptamer-based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Uda; Fatin, M. F.; Ruslinda, A. R.; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Uda, M. N. A.

    2017-03-01

    A study was conducted to detect the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) Tat protein using interdigitated electrodes. The measurements and images of the IDEs' finger gaps and the images of chitosan-carbon nanotubes deposited on top of the interdigitated electrodes were taken using the Scanning Electron Microscope. The detection of HIV-1 Tat protein was done using split aptamers and aptamer tail. Biosensors were chosen as diagnostic equipment due to their rapid diagnostic capabilities.

  11. Simultaneous and sensitive detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) drug resistant genotypes by multiplex oligonucleotide ligation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Giovanina M; Vlaskin, Tatyana A; Koth, Andrew; Vaz, Louise E; Dross, Sandra E; Beck, Ingrid A; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2013-09-01

    Oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) is a highly specific and relatively simple method to detect point mutations encoding HIV-1 drug-resistance, which can detect mutants comprising ≥2-5% of the viral population. Nevirapine (NVP), tenofovir (TDF) and lamivudine (3TC) are antiretroviral (ARV) drugs used worldwide for treatment of HIV infection and prevention of mother-to-child-transmission. Adapting the OLA to detect multiple mutations associated with HIV resistance to these ARV simultaneously would provide an efficient tool to monitor drug resistance in resource-limited settings. Known proportions of mutant and wild-type plasmids were used to optimize a multiplex OLA for detection of K103N, Y181C, K65R, and M184V in HIV subtypes B and C, and V106M and G190A in subtype C. Simultaneous detection of two mutations was impaired if probes annealed to overlapping regions of the viral template, but was sensitive to ≥2-5% when testing codons using non-overlapping probes. PCR products from HIV-subtype B- and C-infected individuals were tested by multiplex-OLA and compared to results of single-codon OLA. Multiplex-OLA detected mutations at codon pairs 103/181, 106/190 and 65/184 reliably when compared to singleplex-OLA in clinical specimens. The multiplex-OLA is sensitive and specific and reduces the cost of screening for NVP, TDF and/or 3TC resistance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Two types of nanoparticle-based bio-barcode amplification assays to detect HIV-1 p24 antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Huahuang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 p24 antigen is a major viral component of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 which can be used to identify persons in the early stage of infection and transmission of HIV-1 from infected mothers to infants. The detection of p24 is usually accomplished by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA with low detection sensitivity. Here we report the use of two bio-barcode amplification (BCA assays combined with polymerase chain reaction (PCR and gel electrophoresis to quantify HIV-1 p24 antigen. Method A pair of anti-p24 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs were used in BCA assays to capture HIV-1 p24 antigen in a sandwich format and allowed for the quantitative measurement of captured p24 using PCR and gel electrophoresis. The first 1 G12 mAb was coated on microplate wells or magnetic microparticles (MMPs to capture free p24 antigens. Captured p24 in turn captured 1D4 mAb coated gold nanoparticle probes (GNPs containing double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides. One strand of the oligonucleotides was covalently immobilized whereas the unbound complimentary bio-barcode DNA strand could be released upon heating. The released bio-barcode DNA was amplified by PCR, electrophoresed in agarose gel and quantified. Results The in-house ELISA assay was found to quantify p24 antigen with a limit of detection (LOD of 1,000 pg/ml and a linear range between 3,000 and 100,000 pg/ml. In contrast, the BCA-based microplate method yielded an LOD of 1 pg/ml and a linear detection range from 1 to 10,000 pg/ml. The BCA-based MMP method yielded an LOD of 0.1 pg/ml and a linear detection range from 0.1 to 1,000 pg/ml. Conclusions When combined with PCR and simple gel electrophoresis, BCA-based microplate and MMPs assays can be used to quantify HIV-1 p24 antigen. These methods are 3–4 orders of magnitude more sensitive than our in-house ELISA-based assay and may provide a useful approach to detect p24 in patients newly infected

  13. The porcine circovirus type 1 capsid gene promoter improves antigen expression and immunogenicity in a HIV-1 plasmid vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burger Marieta

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the promising avenues for development of vaccines against Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and other human pathogens is the use of plasmid-based DNA vaccines. However, relatively large doses of plasmid must be injected for a relatively weak response. We investigated whether genome elements from Porcine circovirus type 1 (PCV-1, an apathogenic small ssDNA-containing virus, had useful expression-enhancing properties that could allow dose-sparing in a plasmid vaccine. Results The linearised PCV-1 genome inserted 5' of the CMV promoter in the well-characterised HIV-1 plasmid vaccine pTHgrttnC increased expression of the polyantigen up to 2-fold, and elicited 3-fold higher CTL responses in mice at 10-fold lower doses than unmodified pTHgrttnC. The PCV-1 capsid gene promoter (Pcap alone was equally effective. Enhancing activity was traced to a putative composite host transcription factor binding site and a "Conserved Late Element" transcription-enhancing sequence previously unidentified in circoviruses. Conclusions We identified a novel PCV-1 genome-derived enhancer sequence that significantly increased antigen expression from plasmids in in vitro assays, and improved immunogenicity in mice of the HIV-1 subtype C vaccine plasmid, pTHgrttnC. This should allow significant dose sparing of, or increased responses to, this and other plasmid-based vaccines. We also report investigations of the potential of other circovirus-derived sequences to be similarly used.

  14. Delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to HIV Gag p24 relate to clinical outcome after peptide-based therapeutic immunization for chronic HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kran, Anne-Marte B; Sommerfelt, Maja A; Baksaas, Ingebjørg; Sørensen, Birger; Kvale, Dag

    2012-03-01

    Therapeutic immunization in chronic HIV infection aims to induce durable, HIV-specific immune responses capable of controlling disease progression, but immunological correlates of clinical efficacy are poorly defined. We have previously immunized 38 patients with a mixture of four short Gag p24-like conserved peptides (Vacc-4x) targeting skin dendritic cells. Antiretroviral treatment (ART) was initially stopped after completed immunizations and resumed post-protocol during regular clinical follow-up according to current guidelines. Four years after enrolment, Vacc-4x-specific cellular responses were evaluated in vivo by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin test, and in vitro by a T-cell proliferation assay. Kaplan-Meier product-limit estimates were used to analyse time until ART was resumed. Peptide-specific cellular immune responses induced by Vacc-4x had persisted 4 years after the last immunization in terms of unchanged DTH independent of ART and detectable proliferative T-cell responses which correlated to the native peptides (R = 0.73, p = 0.01). Circulating bifunctional (IFN-γ and IL-10) Vacc-4x-specific T-cell clones were detected in 43% of patients. Subjects with the strongest post-immunization DTH responses appeared to start ART later compared with DTH low responders (p = 0.07). These data suggest that DTH responses should be further evaluated as a new and convenient tool for predicting clinical efficacy in trials testing therapeutic immunizations.

  15. Genetic diversity and genetic structure of different types of natural populations in Osmanthus fragrans Lour. and the relationships with sex ratio, population structure, and geographic isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shaoqing; Wu, Shuai; Wang, Yiguang; Zhao, Hongbo; Zhang, Yuanyan

    2014-01-01

    Osmanthus fragrans Lour., an evergreen small tree, has the rare sexual system of androdioecy (coexistence of males and hermaphrodites), once with wide-spread natural distribution in the areas of the South Yangzi river basin. However, due to excessive human utilization, natural distribution became fragmented and the number and size of natural populations reduced sharply. With four different types of natural populations from the same region as research object, we aim to provide a comparative analysis on the relationships among genetic diversity, sexual system, population structure and size, and geographic isolation by ISSR. In genetic parameters of N e , H e , and I, the LQGC population had the highest value and the LQZGQ population had the lowest value. These indicated that LQGC population showed the highest genetic diversity, followed by QDH and JN population, and LQZGQ population exhibited the lowest genetic diversity. Genetic diversity in populations is closely related to population structure, reproduction mode, and sex ratio. However, there seems to be no obvious correlation between genetic diversity and population size. The results of AMOVA showed that genetic variations mostly occurred within populations. It indicates that no significant genetic differentiation among populations occurs, and geographic isolation has no significant effect on genetic diversity.

  16. Genetic Diversity and Genetic Structure of Different Types of Natural Populations in Osmanthus fragrans Lour. and the Relationships with Sex Ratio, Population Structure, and Geographic Isolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoqing Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osmanthus fragrans Lour., an evergreen small tree, has the rare sexual system of androdioecy (coexistence of males and hermaphrodites, once with wide-spread natural distribution in the areas of the South Yangzi river basin. However, due to excessive human utilization, natural distribution became fragmented and the number and size of natural populations reduced sharply. With four different types of natural populations from the same region as research object, we aim to provide a comparative analysis on the relationships among genetic diversity, sexual system, population structure and size, and geographic isolation by ISSR. In genetic parameters of Ne, He, and I, the LQGC population had the highest value and the LQZGQ population had the lowest value. These indicated that LQGC population showed the highest genetic diversity, followed by QDH and JN population, and LQZGQ population exhibited the lowest genetic diversity. Genetic diversity in populations is closely related to population structure, reproduction mode, and sex ratio. However, there seems to be no obvious correlation between genetic diversity and population size. The results of AMOVA showed that genetic variations mostly occurred within populations. It indicates that no significant genetic differentiation among populations occurs, and geographic isolation has no significant effect on genetic diversity.

  17. Interactive Study between Two Types of 1-[2-(Hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-naphthylmethylthymines and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Two different types of 1-[2-(hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-naphthylmethylthymines have been designed, synthesized and evaluated for their anti-HIV-1 activities in different cells lines. The binding free energy ((G) including steric and electrostatic between the two different ligands and reverse transcriptase Non-Nucleoside Binding Pocket (NNBP) have been docked and calculated to evaluate their accommodation circumstance on a SGI work station. The (G and anti-HIV-1 activity has been correlated in order to guide further drug design, which showed that the steric binding effect dominated in the whole binding action between the compounds and reverse transcriptase (RT). The results showed that more negative (G led to higher activity of compounds.

  18. Investigating signs of recent evolution in the pool of proviral HIV type 1 DNA during years of successful HAART

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mens, Helene; Pedersen, Anders G; Jørgensen, Louise B

    2007-01-01

    In order to shed light on the nature of the persistent reservoir of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), we investigated signs of recent evolution in the pool of proviral DNA in patients on successful HAART. Pro-viral DNA, corresponding to the C2-V3-C3 region of the HIV-1 env gene......, and then determine the support for models that imply evolution between time points. Model fit and model-selection uncertainty was assessed using the Akaike information criterion (AIC) and Akaike weights. The consensus sequence data was also analyzed using a range of phylogenetic techniques to determine whether...... there were temporal trends indicating ongoing replication and evolution. In summary, it was not possible to detect definitive signs of ongoing evolution in either the bulk-sequenced or the clonal data with the methods employed here, but our results could be consistent with localized expression of archival...

  19. Combined chronic blockade of hyper-active L-type calcium channels and NMDA receptors ameliorates HIV-1 associated hyper-excitability of mPFC pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodr, Christina E; Chen, Lihua; Dave, Sonya; Al-Harthi, Lena; Hu, Xiu-Ti

    2016-10-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection induces neurological and neuropsychological deficits, which are associated with dysregulation of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and other vulnerable brain regions. We evaluated the impact of HIV infection in the mPFC and the therapeutic potential of targeting over-active voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channels (L-channel) and NMDA receptors (NMDAR), as modeled in HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) rats. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to assess the membrane properties and voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) potentials (Ca(2+) influx) in mPFC pyramidal neurons. Neurons from HIV-1 Tg rats displayed reduced rheobase, spike amplitude and inwardly-rectifying K(+) influx, increased numbers of action potentials, and a trend of aberrant firing compared to those from non-Tg control rats. Neuronal hyper-excitation was associated with abnormally-enhanced Ca(2+) influx (independent of NMDAR), which was eliminated by acute L-channel blockade. Combined chronic blockade of over-active L-channels and NMDARs with open-channel blockers abolished HIV effects on spiking, aberrant firing and Ca(2+) potential half-amplitude duration, though not the reduced inward rectification. In contrast, individual chronic blockade of over-active L-channels or NMDARs did not alleviate HIV-induced mPFC hyper-excitability. These studies demonstrate that HIV alters mPFC neuronal activity by dysregulating membrane excitability and Ca(2+) influx through the L-channels. This renders these neurons more susceptible and vulnerable to excitatory stimuli, and could contribute to HIV-associated neuropathogenesis. Combined targeting of over-active L-channels/NMDARs alleviates HIV-induced dysfunction of mPFC pyramidal neurons, emphasizing a potential novel therapeutic strategy that may effectively decrease HIV-induced Ca(2+) dysregulation in the mPFC.

  20. Multi-locus sequence typing of Ehrlichia ruminantium strains from geographically diverse origins and collected in Amblyomma variegatum from Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Jongejan Frans; Zhou Lijia; Magona Joseph W; Nakao Ryo; Sugimoto Chihiro

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The rickettsial bacterium Ehrlichia ruminantium is the causative agent of heartwater in ruminants. A better understanding of the population genetics of its different strains is, however, needed for the development of novel diagnostic tools, therapeutics and prevention strategies. Specifically, the development of effective vaccination policies relies on the proper genotyping and characterisation of field isolates. Although multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) has been recentl...

  1. Geographical Tatoos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Cazetta

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with maps tattooed on bodies. My interest in studying the corporeality is inserted in a broader project entitled Geographies and (in Bodies. There is several published research on tattoos, but none in particular about tattooed maps. However some of these works interested me because they present important discussions in contemporary about body modification that helped me locate the body modifications most within the culture than on the nature. At this time, I looked at pictures of geographical tattoos available in several sites of the internet.

  2. Geographic and Temporal Trends in the Molecular Epidemiology and Genetic Mechanisms of Transmitted HIV-1 Drug Resistance: An Individual-Patient- and Sequence-Level Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Blanco, Jose Luis; Jordan, Michael R.; Taylor, Jonathan; Lemey, Philippe; Varghese, Vici; Hamers, Raph L.; Bertagnolio, Silvia; de Wit, Tobias F. Rinke; Aghokeng, Avelin F.; Albert, Jan; Avi, Radko; Avila-Rios, Santiago; Bessong, Pascal O.; Brooks, James I.; Boucher, Charles A. B.; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Busch, Michael P.; Bussmann, Hermann; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Chin, Bum Sik; D’Aquin, Toni T.; De Gascun, Cillian F.; Derache, Anne; Descamps, Diane; Deshpande, Alaka K.; Djoko, Cyrille F.; Eshleman, Susan H.; Fleury, Herve; Frange, Pierre; Fujisaki, Seiichiro; Harrigan, P. Richard; Hattori, Junko; Holguin, Africa; Hunt, Gillian M.; Ichimura, Hiroshi; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Katzenstein, David; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Kim, Jerome H.; Kim, Sung Soon; Li, Yanpeng; Lutsar, Irja; Morris, Lynn; Ndembi, Nicaise; NG, Kee Peng; Paranjape, Ramesh S.; Peeters, Martine; Poljak, Mario; Price, Matt A.; Ragonnet-Cronin, Manon L.; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Rolland, Morgane; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Smith, Davey M.; Soares, Marcelo A.; Soriano, Vincent V.; Ssemwanga, Deogratius; Stanojevic, Maja; Stefani, Mariane A.; Sugiura, Wataru; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Tanuri, Amilcar; Tee, Kok Keng; Truong, Hong-Ha M.; van de Vijver, David A. M. C.; Vidal, Nicole; Yang, Chunfu; Yang, Rongge; Yebra, Gonzalo; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Shafer, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Regional and subtype-specific mutational patterns of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance (TDR) are essential for informing first-line antiretroviral (ARV) therapy guidelines and designing diagnostic assays for use in regions where standard genotypic resistance testing is not affordable. We sought to understand the molecular epidemiology of TDR and to identify the HIV-1 drug-resistance mutations responsible for TDR in different regions and virus subtypes. Methods and Findings We reviewed all GenBank submissions of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase sequences with or without protease and identified 287 studies published between March 1, 2000, and December 31, 2013, with more than 25 recently or chronically infected ARV-naïve individuals. These studies comprised 50,870 individuals from 111 countries. Each set of study sequences was analyzed for phylogenetic clustering and the presence of 93 surveillance drug-resistance mutations (SDRMs). The median overall TDR prevalence in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), south/southeast Asia (SSEA), upper-income Asian countries, Latin America/Caribbean, Europe, and North America was 2.8%, 2.9%, 5.6%, 7.6%, 9.4%, and 11.5%, respectively. In SSA, there was a yearly 1.09-fold (95% CI: 1.05–1.14) increase in odds of TDR since national ARV scale-up attributable to an increase in non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance. The odds of NNRTI-associated TDR also increased in Latin America/Caribbean (odds ratio [OR] = 1.16; 95% CI: 1.06–1.25), North America (OR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.12–1.26), Europe (OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 1.01–1.13), and upper-income Asian countries (OR = 1.33; 95% CI: 1.12–1.55). In SSEA, there was no significant change in the odds of TDR since national ARV scale-up (OR = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.92–1.02). An analysis limited to sequences with mixtures at less than 0.5% of their nucleotide positions—a proxy for recent infection—yielded trends comparable to those obtained using the complete dataset. Four

  3. Geographic and temporal trends in the molecular epidemiology and genetic mechanisms of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance: an individual-patient- and sequence-level meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Yon Rhee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Regional and subtype-specific mutational patterns of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance (TDR are essential for informing first-line antiretroviral (ARV therapy guidelines and designing diagnostic assays for use in regions where standard genotypic resistance testing is not affordable. We sought to understand the molecular epidemiology of TDR and to identify the HIV-1 drug-resistance mutations responsible for TDR in different regions and virus subtypes.We reviewed all GenBank submissions of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase sequences with or without protease and identified 287 studies published between March 1, 2000, and December 31, 2013, with more than 25 recently or chronically infected ARV-naïve individuals. These studies comprised 50,870 individuals from 111 countries. Each set of study sequences was analyzed for phylogenetic clustering and the presence of 93 surveillance drug-resistance mutations (SDRMs. The median overall TDR prevalence in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA, south/southeast Asia (SSEA, upper-income Asian countries, Latin America/Caribbean, Europe, and North America was 2.8%, 2.9%, 5.6%, 7.6%, 9.4%, and 11.5%, respectively. In SSA, there was a yearly 1.09-fold (95% CI: 1.05-1.14 increase in odds of TDR since national ARV scale-up attributable to an increase in non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI resistance. The odds of NNRTI-associated TDR also increased in Latin America/Caribbean (odds ratio [OR] = 1.16; 95% CI: 1.06-1.25, North America (OR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.12-1.26, Europe (OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 1.01-1.13, and upper-income Asian countries (OR = 1.33; 95% CI: 1.12-1.55. In SSEA, there was no significant change in the odds of TDR since national ARV scale-up (OR = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.92-1.02. An analysis limited to sequences with mixtures at less than 0.5% of their nucleotide positions—a proxy for recent infection—yielded trends comparable to those obtained using the complete dataset. Four NNRTI SDRMs—K101E, K103N, Y181C, and

  4. New-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus among patients receiving HIV care at Newlands Clinic, Harare, Zimbabwe: retrospective cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimbetete, Cleophas; Mugglin, Catrina; Shamu, Tinei; Kalesan, Bindu; Bertisch, Barbara; Egger, Matthias; Keiser, Olivia

    2017-07-01

    To assess the incidence and associated factors of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) among people living with HIV (PLHIV) in Zimbabwe. We analysed data of all HIV-infected patients older than 16 years who attended Newlands Clinic between March 1, 2004 and April 29, 2015. The clinic considers patients whose random blood sugar is higher than 11.1 mmol/l and which is confirmed by a fasting blood sugar higher than 7.0 mmol/l to have T2DM. T2DM is also diagnosed in symptomatic patients who have a RBS >11.0 mmol/l. Risk factors for developing T2DM were identified using Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for confounding. Missing baseline BMI data were multiply imputed. Results are presented as adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Data for 4,110 participants were included: 67.2% were women; median age was 37 (IQR: 31-43) years. Median baseline CD4 count was 197 (IQR: 95-337) cells/mm(3) . The proportion of participants with hypertension at baseline was 15.5% (n=638). Over a median follow-up time of 4.7 (IQR: 2.1-7.2) years, 57 patients developed T2DM; the overall incidence rate was 2.8 (95% CI: 2.1-3.6) per 1000 person-years of follow-up. Exposure to PIs was associated with T2DM (HR: 1.80, 95% CI: 1.04-3.09). In the multivariable analysis, obesity (BMI>30 kg/m(2) ) (aHR=2.26, 95% CI: 1.17-4.36), age >40 years (aHR=2.16, 95% CI: 1.22-3.83) and male gender, (aHR=2.13, 95% CI: 1.22-3.72) were independently associated with the risk of T2DM. HIV-related factors (baseline CD4 cell count and baseline WHO clinical stage) were not independent risk factors for developing T2DM. Although the incidence of T2DM in this HIV cohort was lower than that has been observed in others, our results show that risk factors for developing T2DM among HIV-infected people are similar to those of the general population. HIV-infected patients in sub-Saharan Africa need a comprehensive approach to care that includes better health services for prevention, early

  5. HIV Type 1 Integrase Natural Polymorphisms in Viral Variants Circulating in FSU Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapovok, Ilya; Laga, Vita; Kazennova, Elena; Bobkova, Marina

    2017-08-15

    Natural variability of integrase (IN) across HIV-1 variants may influence the emergence of resistant viruses. The most apparent explanation of these fact is the IN polymorphism and the associated differences in codon usage, which, in turn, influence the probability and the terms of DRMs acquisition. Possible mechanisms by which polymorphisms affect DRMs emergence remain disputed and should still be clarified because these substitutions may be associated with a reduced activity of some INSTIs and may impact on ART regimen choice depending of HIV-1 subtype. The aim of this work was to assess the prevalence of naturally occurring polymorphisms within the HIV-1 integrase gene, which might influence the susceptibility to INSTIs, among the patients from Russia and former USSR countries, according to HIV-1 subtypes. A study involved 506 HIV-1 IN sequences of INSTI-naive patients from Russia, Ukraine, Armenia, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Belarus, and Georgia. Among them, 194 sequences were newly obtained in this study and 312 were downloaded from Los-Alamos database. The proviral DNA was sequenced using an in-house PCR protocol designed on the basis of a well-conserved integrase region in order to detect all HIV-1 variants. The phylogenetic analyses based on IN population sequencing found subtype A6 being the most prevalent (259) (51.2%) in the collection studied, followed by subtype G (36) (7.1%), AG-recombinants (148) (29.3%), subtype B (50) (9.9%), and CRF03_AB (5) (1,0%). The major INSTI resistance-associated mutations (DRMs) were found only in two A6 samples. The prevalence of minor/accessory substitutions depended on HIV-1 variants, while the most notable findings were L74I in subtype A6 (93.1%) and E157Q in subtype B (44.0%). Most of minor DRMs and polymorphic substitutions were concentrated in the central catalytic domain of the IN molecule. Both the DDE triad and HHCC zinc binding motifs were fully conserved. The results of the study suggest a very low

  6. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus from distinct geographic locations in China: an increasing prevalence of spa-t030 and SCCmec type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Liu, Zhengxiang; Duo, Libo; Xiong, Jie; Gong, Yanwen; Yang, Jiyong; Wang, Zhanke; Wu, Xuqin; Lu, Zhongyi; Meng, Xiangzhao; Zhao, Jingya; Zhang, Changjian; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Yulong; Zhang, Mengqiang; Han, Li

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus belongs to one of the most common bacteria causing healthcare and community associated infections in China, but their molecular characterization has not been well studied. From May 2011 to June 2012, a total of 322 non-duplicate S. aureus isolates were consecutively collected from seven tertiary care hospitals in seven cities with distinct geographical locations in China, including 171 methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and 151 MRSA isolates. All isolates were characterized by spa typing. The presence of virulence genes was tested by PCR. MRSA were further characterized by SCCmec typing. Seventy four and 16 spa types were identified among 168 MSSA and 150 MRSA, respectively. One spa type t030 accounted for 80.1% of all MRSA isolates, which was higher than previously reported, while spa-t037 accounted for only 4.0% of all MRSA isolates. The first six spa types (t309, t189, t034, t377, t078 and t091) accounted for about one third of all MSSA isolates. 121 of 151 MRSA isolates (80.1%) were identified as SCCmec type III. pvl gene was found in 32 MSSA (18.7%) and 5 MRSA (3.3%) isolates, with ST22-MSSA-t309 as the most commonly identified strain. Compared with non-epidemic MRSA clones, epidemic MRSA clones (corresponding to ST239) exhibited a lower susceptibility to rifampin, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, a higher prevalence of sea gene and a lower prevalence of seb, sec, seg, sei and tst genes. The increasing prevalence of multidrug resistant spa-t030 MRSA represents a major public health problem in China.

  7. Lead Screening for HIV of C-C Chemokine Receptor Type 5 Receptor Inhibited by Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Chieh Hung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, has become a serious world-wide problem because of this disease's rapid propagation and incurability. Recent research has pointed out that the C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5 is an important target for HIV infection. The traditional Chinese medicine (TCM database (http://tcm.cmu.edu.tw/ has been screened for molecular compounds that, by simulating molecular docking and molecular dynamics, may protect CCR5 against HIV. Saussureamine C, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, and abrine are selected based on the docking score being higher than Maraviroc and other TCM compounds. The molecular dynamics are helpful in the analysis and detection of protein-ligand interactions. According to the docking poses, hydrophobic interactions, and hydrogen bond variations, this research surmises TRP86, TYR108, GLN194, TYR251, and GLU283 are the main regions of important amino acids in CCR5. In addition to the detection of TCM compound efficacy, we suggest saussureamine C is better than the others for maintaining protein composition during protein-ligand interaction, based on the structural variation.

  8. Validation, replication, and sensitivity testing of Heckman-type selection models to adjust estimates of HIV prevalence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel J Clark

    Full Text Available A recent study using Heckman-type selection models to adjust for non-response in the Zambia 2007 Demographic and Health Survey (DHS found a large correction in HIV prevalence for males. We aim to validate this finding, replicate the adjustment approach in other DHSs, apply the adjustment approach in an external empirical context, and assess the robustness of the technique to different adjustment approaches. We used 6 DHSs, and an HIV prevalence study from rural South Africa to validate and replicate the adjustment approach. We also developed an alternative, systematic model of selection processes and applied it to all surveys. We decomposed corrections from both approaches into rate change and age-structure change components. We are able to reproduce the adjustment approach for the 2007 Zambia DHS and derive results comparable with the original findings. We are able to replicate applying the approach in several other DHSs. The approach also yields reasonable adjustments for a survey in rural South Africa. The technique is relatively robust to how the adjustment approach is specified. The Heckman selection model is a useful tool for assessing the possibility and extent of selection bias in HIV prevalence estimates from sample surveys.

  9. Clustering of cases of type 1 diabetes in high socioeconomic communes in Santiago de Chile: spatio-temporal and geographical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Avilés, Francisco; Carrasco, Elena; Icaza, Gloria; Pérez-Bravo, Francisco

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this study was to describe spatial and space-time patterns of type 1 diabetes in children less than 15 years old, diagnosed between 2000 and 2005 with residence in the Metropolitan Region of Chile. Knox and Mantel tests were used to detect space-time interaction between cases. An ecological Bayesian model adjusted by socioeconomic factor and year was proposed to estimate the incidence by communes. Initially, there was no space-time interaction between cases, but there is evidence of clustering effect in urban areas of the region. The incidence rate for the overall study period was estimated by 6.18/100,000 (95% CI: 5.69-6.70), with a significant annual trend of 8.2% (P 1). The geographical incidence could be explained by the human development index, as a socioeconomic factor. These results suggest that children living in communes with higher socioeconomic levels may be at higher risk of developing type 1 diabetes. Our findings support the hypothesis of an aetiological role of environmental factors in the onset of type 1 diabetes.

  10. Increased expression and dysregulated association of restriction factors and type I interferon in HIV, HCV mono- and co-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia-Wu; Liu, Feng-Liang; Mu, Dan; Deng, De-Yao; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2016-06-01

    Host restriction factors and type I interferon are important in limiting HIV and HCV infections, yet the role of HIV, HCV mono- and co-infection in regulating these antiviral genes expression is not clear. In this study, we measured the levels of TRIM5α, TRIM22, APOBEC3G, and IFN-α, -β mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 43 HIV mono-infected, 70 HCV mono-infected and 64 HIV/HCV co-infected patients along with 98 healthy controls. We also quantified HIV and HCV viral loads in mono- and co-infected patients. The results showed that HCV, HIV mono- and co-infection differentially increased TRIM22, APOBEC3G, and IFN-α, -β mRNA expression while the mRNA expression of TRIMα was upregulated only by HCV-mono infection. HIV/HCV co-infection was associated with higher viral load, compared to either HIV or HCV mono-infection. Additionally, we showed TRIMα and TRIM22 positively correlated with IFN-α, -β, which could be dysregulated by HIV, HCV mono- and co-infection. Furthermore, we found TRIM22 negatively correlated with HCV viral load in mono-infected patients and APOBEC3G positively correlated with HCV viral load in co-infected patients. Collectively, our findings suggest the potential role of restriction factors in restricting HIV, HCV mono- and co-infection in vivo, which appears to be a therapeutic target for potential drug discovery.

  11. Potent Suppression of Viral Infectivity by the Peptides That Inhibit Multimerization of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Vif Proteins*

    OpenAIRE

    YANG Bin; Gao, Ling; Lin LI; Lu, Zhixian; Fan, Xuejun; Patel, Charvi A.; Pomerantz, Roger J.; DuBois, Garrett C.; Zhang, Hui

    2002-01-01

    Virion infectivity factor (Vif) is essential for the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in vivo, but its function remains uncertain. Recently, we have shown that Vif proteins are able to form multimers, including dimers, trimers, or tetramers. Because the multimerization of Vif proteins is required for Vif function in the viral life cycle, we propose that it could be a novel target for anti-HIV-1 therapeutics. Through a phage peptide display method, we have identified ...

  12. Dyadic dynamics of HIV risk among transgender women and their primary male sexual partners: the role of sexual agreement types and motivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamarel, Kristi E; Reisner, Sari L; Darbes, Lynae A; Hoff, Colleen C; Chakravarty, Deepalika; Nemoto, Toru; Operario, Don

    2016-01-01

    Transgender women - individuals assigned a male sex at birth who identify as women, female, or on the male-to-female trans feminine spectrum - are at high-risk of HIV worldwide. Prior research has suggested that transgender women more frequently engage in condomless sex with primary cisgender (i.e., non-transgender) male partners compared with casual or paying partners, and that condomless sex in this context might be motivated by relationship dynamics such as trust and intimacy. The current study examined sexual agreement types and motivations as factors that shape HIV risk behaviors in a community sample of 191 transgender women and their cisgender primary male partners who completed a cross-sectional survey. Overall, 40% of couples had monogamous, 15% open, and 45% discrepant sexual agreements (i.e., partners disagreed on their type of agreement). Actor-partner interdependence models were fit to examine the influence of sexual agreement type and motivations on extra-dyadic HIV risk (i.e., condomless sex with outside partners) and intra-dyadic HIV serodiscordant risk (i.e., condomless sex with serodiscordant primary partners). For male partners, extra-dyadic risk was associated with their own and their partners' sexual agreement motives, and male partners who engaged in extra-dyadic HIV risk had an increased odds of engaging in HIV serodiscordant intra-dyadic risk. Study findings support inclusion of the male partners of transgender women into HIV prevention efforts. Future research is warranted to explore the interpersonal and social contexts of sexual agreement types and motivations in relationships between transgender women and their male partners to develop interventions that meet their unique HIV prevention needs.

  13. Geographical differences of HIV/AIDS epidemic characteristics in Guangxi from 1996 to 2012%1996-2012年广西艾滋病流行地理差异分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱秋映; 陈栏心; 董柏青; 唐振柱; 沈智勇; 刘伟; 李明丽; 吴兴华

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨广西1996—2012年艾滋病流行的地理差异,为针对性防控策略和措施的制定提供科学依据。方法以县(市、区)为基本统计单位,通过地理信息系统(GIS)软件的自然断点分级法,划分艾滋病累积报告感染率(CRIR)和累积报告发病率(CRI)的高、中、低流行区,对比分析各县的差异。结果累积报告感染率为高、中、低流行区的县分别有19、40、50个,相应区间分别为302.91/10万~700.98/10万、124.90/10万~302.90/10万、18.42/10万~124.89/10万;累积报告发病率为高、中、低流行区的县分别有13、35、61个,相应区间为159.79/10万~428.09/10万、64.69/10万~159.78/10万、7.23/10万~64.68/10万。以CRI为参照,CRIR与CRI高、中、低流行区的分布一致率分别为100.00%、82.86%、93.44%。广西艾滋病CRIR和CRI高、中、低流行区的分布呈“同心圆”状辐射递减及“孤点”现象。结论广西艾滋病流行有明显的地理差异性,其流行强度是地理、经济、社会、资源等各方面因素相互作用的结果,今后艾滋病防控策略研究应该融合更多的经济社会因素,以使防控更有成效。%Objective To explore the geographical differences of HIV/AIDS epidemic characteristics in Guangxi from 1996 to 2012, and provide scientific evidence for the targeted prevention and control strategies and measures. Methods The infected persons were seleted and counted up by county (city/district) as the basic statistical unit. The total of 109 counties (cities/districts) of Guangxi were classified into high, middle and low epidemic areas of HIV/AIDS according to cumulative reported infection rate(CRIR)and cumulative reported of incidence (CRI) by natural breakout classification method of the geographic information system (GIS) ,and compared the differences among different epidemic areas. Results Nineteen, forty, and fifty counties were classified

  14. SME-type carbapenem-hydrolyzing class A beta-lactamases from geographically diverse Serratia marcescens strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queenan, A M; Torres-Viera, C; Gold, H S; Carmeli, Y; Eliopoulos, G M; Moellering, R C; Quinn, J P; Hindler, J; Medeiros, A A; Bush, K

    2000-11-01

    Three sets of carbapenem-resistant Serratia marcescens isolates have been identified in the United States: 1 isolate in Minnesota in 1985 (before approval of carbapenems for clinical use), 5 isolates in Los Angeles (University of California at Los Angeles [UCLA]) in 1992, and 19 isolates in Boston from 1994 to 1999. All isolates tested produced two beta-lactamases, an AmpC-type enzyme with pI values of 8.6 to 9.0 and one with a pI value of approximately 9.5. The enzyme with the higher pI in each strain hydrolyzed carbapenems and was not inhibited by EDTA, similar to the chromosomal class A SME-1 beta-lactamase isolated from the 1982 London strain S. marcescens S6. The genes encoding the carbapenem-hydrolyzing enzymes were cloned in Escherichia coli and sequenced. The enzyme from the Minnesota isolate had an amino acid sequence identical to that of SME-1. The isolates from Boston and UCLA produced SME-2, an enzyme with a single amino acid change relative to SME-1, a substitution from valine to glutamine at position 207. Purified SME enzymes from the U. S. isolates had beta-lactam hydrolysis profiles similar to that of the London SME-1 enzyme. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that the isolates showed some similarity but differed by at least three genetic events. In conclusion, a family of rare class A carbapenem-hydrolyzing beta-lactamases first described in London has now been identified in S. marcescens isolates across the United States.

  15. Genotypic characterization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in Greece. Multicentre Study on HIV-1 Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasioulas, G; Paraskevis, D; Paparizos, V; Lazanas, M; Karafoulidou, A; Hatzakis, A

    1998-05-20

    The HIV-1 subtype distribution in 83 HIV-1-seropositive individuals living in Greece was investigated by using the heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA), DNA sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis. The results revealed that partial HIV-1 gp120 sequences from 71 (86%) patients were subtype B, 5 (6%) were subtype A, 4 were subtype D (5%), 2 (2%) were subtype C, and 1 (1%) was subtype I. The subtype I isolate was documented in an intravenous drug user. A high prevalence (90-100%) of B isolates among intravenous drug users, hemophiliacs, and homosexual men was observed, in contrast to heterosexuals, among whom non-B subtypes seemed to be common (42.9%, p Greek population subtype B is the most frequent (94%), in contrast to the high prevalence (57%) of non-B isolates found in emigrants living in Greece (p Greek individual not traveling abroad was also documented. The broad HIV-1 diversity in Greece may be explained by population movements, such as migration and traveling.

  16. Immunological predictors of survival in HIV type 2-infected rural villagers in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaffar, Shabbar; Van der Loeff, Maarten Schim; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    %, and plasma viral load were associated independently with survival in multivariate analyses. Neopterin and suPAR did not reach statistical significance. These findings suggest that immune activation is central to the pathogenesis of HIV. They also have important implications for resource-poor settings where...

  17. Polymorphism, recombination, and mutations in HIV type 1 gag-infecting Peruvian male sex workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabar, Carlos Augusto; Salvatierra, Javier; Quijano, Eberth

    2008-11-01

    HIV genetic diversity in female sex workers (FSW) has been previously described in Peru; however this information is not yet available for male sex workers (MSW). Therefore, purified peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA from 147 HIV-infected subjects identified as MSW and FSW was used to amplify a 460-bp fragment corresponding to the p24-p7 region of the gag gene. The PCR product was digested with restriction enzymes to identify genetic polymorphism. Later, a random group of samples (n = 19) was sequenced to perform phylogenetic analysis, intragenic recombination analysis, and deleterious mutations leading to a nonfunctional protein in conservative regions of the Gag protein. RFLP analysis revealed 11 genetic variants for AluI and five for MspI. A group of nonsex workers (NSW) used for comparison showed different RFLP genetic variant distributions. Of interest, nine cases of mixed genetic variants were observed for MSW, one case for FSW, and none for NSW. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all HIV-1 species were subtype B. Intragenic recombination analysis showed a B/C recombination case from an FSW (boostrap = 1000; p value < 0.05). Of interest, deleterious mutations were observed in three cases of conservative D2 zinc domains for Gag 3/19 and one case of the high homology region (1/19). This study shows that gag of HIV circulating from MSW has high genetic polymorphism involving deleterious mutations in conserved domains from the p24-p7 gag region.

  18. Plasma concentrations of generic lopinavir/ritonavir in HIV type-1-infected individuals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lugt, J. van der; Lange, J.; Avihingsanon, A.; Ananworanich, J.; Sealoo, S.; Burger, D.M.; Gorowara, M.; Phanuphak, P.; Ruxrungtham, K.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Generic drugs can contribute to access to treatment for HIV-infected patients. However quality and safety remains an issue of concern. Therefore, we evaluated minimal plasma concentrations and short-term safety of a generic lopinavir/ritonavir 200/50 mg tablet formulation. METHODS: In a

  19. Vitamin D deficiency among HIV type 1-infected individuals in the Netherlands: effects of antiretroviral therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukel, CJ van den Bout-va; Fievez, L.; Michels, M.; Sweep, F.C.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.; Bosch, M.E.; Burger, D.M.; Bravenboer, B.; Koopmans, P.P.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin D regulates bone metabolism but has also immunoregulatory properties. In HIV-infected patients bone disorders are increasingly observed. Furthermore, low 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) levels have been associated with low CD4(+) counts, immunological hyperactivity, and AIDS progression rates. Few studies h

  20. Vitamin D deficiency among HIV type 1-infected individuals in the Netherlands: effects of antiretroviral therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukel, CJ van den Bout-va; Fievez, L.; Michels, M.; Sweep, F.C.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.; Bosch, M.E.; Burger, D.M.; Bravenboer, B.; Koopmans, P.P.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin D regulates bone metabolism but has also immunoregulatory properties. In HIV-infected patients bone disorders are increasingly observed. Furthermore, low 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) levels have been associated with low CD4(+) counts, immunological hyperactivity, and AIDS progression rates. Few studies h

  1. Lipidomic dataset of plasma from patients infected with wild type and nef-deficient HIV-1 strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Meikle

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that HIV protein nef plays a key role in impairing cellular and systemic cholesterol metabolism in HIV disease, but clinical support for these findings is lacking. Here we present the data of comparative lipidomic analysis (330 lipid species of plasma samples from HIV-negative subjects, patients infected with WT HIV-1 strain and patients infected with nef-deficient strain of HIV-1. We determine which effects of HIV on plasma lipidome are explained by the presence of nef. The data can be used to evaluate cardiovascular risk in HIV disease and to assess the role of nef in HIV-induced disturbances in systemic lipid metabolism. The full impact of nef deficiency on lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in HIV-infected patients is presented in the accompanying study “Lipid Metabolism in Patients Infected with Nef-deficient HIV-1 Strain” [1].

  2. Young women engaged in sex work in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, have high incidence of HIV and sexually transmitted infections, and amphetamine-type stimulant use: new challenges to HIV prevention and risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Marie-Claude; Sansothy, Neth; Sapphon, Vonthanak; Phal, Serey; Sichan, Keo; Stein, Ellen; Evans, Jennifer; Maher, Lisa; Kaldor, John; Vun, Mean Chhi; Page, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    To estimate prevalence and incidence of HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STI) and associated risk factors among young women working as sex workers (SWs) in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. A prospective study of young (freelance. Sociodemographics, sexual risk, and use of amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) ("yama" and "crystal") were assessed by self-report. HIV and STI (Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae) testing were conducted on blood and urine specimens, respectively. Baseline prevalences of HIV, C. trachomatis, and N. gonorrhoeae were 23%, 11.5%, and 7.8%, respectively. HIV incidence was 3.6 per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2%-11.1%); STI incidence was 21.2 per 100 person-years (95% CI, 12.6%-35.8%). At baseline, 26.5% reported recent ATS use. HIV infection was associated with freelance SW (adjusted odds ratio, 5.85; 95% CI, 1.59-21.58) and younger age of first sex (≤15 years; adjusted odds ratio, 3.06; 95% CI, 1.01-8.46). Incident STI was associated with duration (per year) of SW (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.1; 95% CI, 1.1-1.2) and recent yama use (adjusted hazard ratio, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.5-10.3). HIV and STI infection rates were high among SWs working in various settings; freelancers had highest risk. ATS use was associated with incident STI. Venue of sex work and drug prevention should be considered in prevention programs.

  3. HIV Triggers a cGAS-Dependent, Vpu- and Vpr-Regulated Type I Interferon Response in CD4+ T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolien Vermeire

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Several pattern-recognition receptors sense HIV-1 replication products and induce type I interferon (IFN-I production under specific experimental conditions. However, it is thought that viral sensing and IFN induction are virtually absent in the main target cells of HIV-1 in vivo. Here, we show that activated CD4+ T cells sense HIV-1 infection through the cytosolic DNA sensor cGAS and mount a bioactive IFN-I response. Efficient induction of IFN-I by HIV-1 infection requires proviral integration and is regulated by newly expressed viral accessory proteins: Vpr potentiates, while Vpu suppresses cGAS-dependent IFN-I induction. Furthermore, Vpr also amplifies innate sensing of HIV-1 infection in Vpx-treated dendritic cells. Our results identify cGAS as mediator of an IFN-I response to HIV-1 infection in CD4+ T cells and demonstrate that this response is modulated by the viral accessory proteins Vpr and Vpu. Thus, viral innate immune evasion is incomplete in the main target cells of HIV-1.

  4. Cytomegalovirus upregulates expression of CCR5 in central memory cord blood mononuclear cells, which may facilitate in utero HIV type 1 transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Erica L; Howard, Chanie L; Thurman, Joy; Pontiff, Kyle; Johnson, Elan S; Chakraborty, Rana

    2015-01-15

    Administration of combination antiretroviral therapy to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected pregnant women significantly reduces vertical transmission. In contrast, maternal co-opportunistic infection with primary or reactivated cytomegalovirus (CMV) or other pathogens may facilitate in utero transmission of HIV-1 by activation of cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs). Here we examine the targets and mechanisms that affect fetal susceptibility to HIV-1 in utero. Using flow cytometry, we demonstrate that the fraction of CD4(+)CD45RO(+) and CD4(+)CCR5(+) CBMCs is minimal, which may account for the low level of in utero HIV-1 transmission. Unstimulated CD4(+) CBMCs that lack CCR5/CD45RO showed reduced levels of HIV-1 infection. However, upon in vitro stimulation with CMV, CBMCs undergo increased proliferation to upregulate the fraction of T central memory cells and expression of CCR5, which enhances susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in vitro. These data suggest that activation induced by CMV in vivo may alter CCR5 expression in CD4(+) T central memory cells to promote in utero transmission of HIV-1.

  5. Potent and synergistic neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 primary isolates by hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin combined with monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 2G12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascola, J R; Louder, M K; VanCott, T C; Sapan, C V; Lambert, J S; Muenz, L R; Bunow, B; Birx, D L; Robb, M L

    1997-10-01

    Three antibody reagents that neutralize primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates were tested for magnitude and breadth of neutralization when used alone or in double or triple combinations. Hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin (HIVIG) is derived from the plasma of HIV-1-infected donors, and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 2F5 and 2G12 bind to distinct regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. The antibodies were initially tested against a panel of 15 clade B HIV-1 isolates, using a single concentration that is achievable in vivo (HIVIG, 2,500 microg/ml; MAbs, 25 microg/ml). Individual antibody reagents neutralized many of the viruses tested, but antibody potency varied substantially among the viruses. The virus neutralization produced by double combinations of HIVIG plus 2F5 or 2G12, the two MAbs together, or the triple combination of HIVIG, 2F5, and 2G12 was generally equal to or greater than that predicted by the effect of individual antibodies. Overall, the triple combination displayed the greatest magnitude and breadth of neutralization. Synergistic neutralization was evaluated by analyzing data from dose-response curves of each individual antibody reagent compared to the triple combination and was demonstrated against each of four viruses tested. Therefore, combinations of polyclonal and monoclonal anti-HIV antibodies can produce additive or synergistic neutralization of primary HIV-1 isolates. Passive immunotherapy for treatment or prophylaxis of HIV-1 should consider mixtures of potent neutralizing antibody reagents to expand the magnitude and breadth of virus neutralization.

  6. Monocytotropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants detectable in all stages of HIV-1 infection lack T-cell line tropism and syncytium-inducing ability in primary T-cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuitemaker, H; Kootstra, N A; de Goede, R E; de Wolf, F; Miedema, F; Tersmette, M

    1991-01-01

    We previously demonstrated a correlation between the presence of syncytium-inducing (SI) human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants showing tropism for cell line H9 and the occurrence of rapid CD4 cell decline and progression to AIDS. In contrast, in stable asymptomatic individuals, we detected only isolates with low replication rates that were non-syncytium-inducing (NSI) and nontropic for the H9 cell line. Here, we investigated the monocytotropism of established HIV-1 isolates with a panel of isolates and with biological HIV-1 clones with distinct phenotypes. Moreover, the prevalence and biological phenotypes of monocytotropic HIV-1 variants in the course of HIV-1 infection were analyzed in comparative primary isolation studies on peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). In cell-free infection studies with MDM from eight blood donors, 13 of 17 NSI isolates but only 4 of 14 SI isolates were able to infect MDM. NSI isolates also infected significantly more different donors than SI variants (median, 3 of 8 versus 0 of 8). This enhanced monocytotropism of NSI isolates was confirmed in experiments with biological HIV-1 clones with distinct phenotypes recovered from the same donor. To investigate the prevalence and biological phenotypes of monocytotropic variants in different stages of HIV-1 infection, sequential isolates from peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples from nine asymptomatic individuals, five of whom progressed to AIDS and seven of whom had a known time of seroconversion, were recovered by cocultivation with both PBL and MDM. Monocytotropic variants were obtained from 37 of 42 time points. All monocytotropic variants were NSI in PBL culture and non-T-cell-line tropic, even when SI, T-cell-line-tropic HIV-1 variants could be recovered from the same patient sample by cocultivation with PBL. We conclude that monocytotropic HIV-1 variants mostly have an NSI phenotype in PBL and, in contrast to SI variants, are

  7. Genetic characterization of three CRF01_AE full-length HIV type 1 sequences from Fujian Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Hai-long; YAN Yan-sheng; YAN Ping-ping; ZHENG Jian; WU Shou-li; CHENG Ge; LIN Xun; ZHENG Wu-xiong; XIE Mei-rong; ZHANG Jian-ming

    2006-01-01

    Background One of the major characteristics of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is its unusually high degree of genetic variability, which involves in genetic diagnosis, subtyping, vaccine design, and epidemiology. HIV-1 CRF01_AE is a main prevalent HIV-1 recombinant strain in China. In this study, three full-length CRF01_AE genomes from Fujian Province, China were cloned, sequenced, and analyzed; and the further genetic diversity defining and epidemiologic analysis were carried out.Methods Proviral DNA was extracted from non-cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells, the near full-length HIV-1 genome was amplified and the PCR products were cloned into Pcr-XL-TOPO vector and sequenced. 5'-long terminal repeat (LTR) and 3'-LTRs were amplified by additional independent PCR and cloned into Pmd18t vector. Gene-based phylogenic tree was constructed and genetic distances were calculated by MEGA 3.1. Simplot was used for Bootscan analysis.Results The phylogeny and genetic distance analysis of the three near full-length sequences confirmed that these three samples clustered with CRF01_AE isolates, more close to Thailand CRF01_AE strain CM240, and were distantly related to African CRF01_AE strain 90CF402. Analysis of their genomic organization revealed the presence of nine potential open reading frames. There were no major deletions, rearrangements, or insertions in the three sequences, but an in-frame stop codon was found in tat gene of Fj051. LTRs of the three sequences contained a few nucleotides mutation. We did not find new mosaic recombinant in the three sequences. The V3 motif was GPGQ in all the three sequences, and there were only few amino acids differences in all three V3 loop sequences.Conclusion This report reveals the background of the three full-length CRF01_AE genomes, the most dominantly circulating HIV-1 strain in Fujian Province, China. The work is essential for the design and development of an effective AIDS vaccine for the region.

  8. The power of siblings and caregivers: under-explored types of social support among children affected by HIV and AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharer, Melissa; Cluver, Lucie; Shields, Joseph J.; Ahearn, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Children affected by HIV and AIDS have significantly higher rates of mental health problems than unaffected children. There is a need for research to examine how social support functions as a source of resiliency for children in high HIV-prevalence settings such as South Africa. The purpose of this research was to explore how family social support relates to depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress (PTS). Using the ecological model as a frame, data were drawn from a 2011 cross-sectional study of 1380 children classified as either orphaned by AIDS and/or living with an AIDS sick family member. The children were from high-poverty, high HIV-prevalent rural and urban communities in South Africa. Social support was analyzed in depth by examining the source (e.g. caregiver, sibling) and the type (e.g. emotional, instrumental, quality). These variables were entered into multiple regression analyses to estimate the most parsimonious regression models to show the relationships between social support and depression, anxiety, and PTS symptoms among the children. Siblings emerged as the most consistent source of social support on mental health. Overall caregiver and sibling support explained 13% variance in depression, 12% in anxiety, and 11% in PTS. Emotional support was the most frequent type of social support associated with mental health in all regression models, with higher levels of quality and instrumental support having the strongest relation to positive mental health outcomes. Although instrumental and quality support from siblings were related to positive mental health, unexpectedly, the higher the level of emotional support received from a sibling resulted in the child reporting more symptoms of depression, anxiety, and PTS. The opposite was true for emotional support provided via caregivers, higher levels of this support was related to lower levels of all mental health symptoms. Sex was significant in all regressions, indicating the presence of

  9. Seroprevalence of Herpes Simplex virus types 1 and 2 and their association with CD4 count among HIV-positive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irna Sufiawati

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Herpes simplex virus (HSV is a common cause of viral opportunistic infections among HIV-positive patients. Frequent, more severe and prolonged episodes of recurrent HSV infection can be a source of significant morbidity and mortality among HIV-positive patients with advanced immunosuppression, reflected by low CD4 count. However, conflicting results have also been reported. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the seroprevalence of HSV type 1 (HSV-1 and type 2 (HSV-2 in HIV-positive patients compare with the rate in HIV-negative patients, and to evaluate their association with CD4 count. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted among 145 subjects consisting of 80 HIV-positive and 65 HIV-negative patients attending the top referral hospital in Bandung, West Java, Indonesia. The serum obtained was assayed for the presence of HSV-1 and HSV-2 IgG antibodies using ELISA kits. Data were analyzed using a Chi-square test, t-tests and analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: There were no significant differences in HSV-1 seroprevalence between HIV-positive patients (71% and HIV-negative patients (66%. HSV-2 seroprevalence was significantly higher in HIV-positive patients (30% than HIV-negative patients (5%. The titers of HSV-1 IgG antibodies in HIV-positive patients (mean 24.63 ± 19.06 IDU were significantly lower than those of HIV-negative patients (mean 44.62 ± 33.22 IDU. In contrast, HSV-2 IgG antibody titers in HIV-positive patients (mean 13.31 ± 20.28 IDU were significantly higher than HIV-negative patients (mean 4.42 ± 10.99 IDU. There was no significant correlation between HSV-1 and HSV-2 seropositivity and CD4 count among HIV-positive patients. However, most of HSV-2 seropositive patients had CD4 count < 200 cells/mm3. Conclusion: Seroprevalence of HSV-1 and HSV-2 among HIV-positive patients was high with no correlation with CD4 count.Latar belakang: Herpes simplex virus (HSV adalah penyebab infeksi virus

  10. Cervicovaginal human papillomavirus (HPV)-infection before and after hysterectomy: evidence of different tissue tropism for oncogenic and nononcogenic HPV types in a cohort of HIV-positive and HIV-negative women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Burk, Robert D; Zhong, Ye; Minkoff, Howard; Massad, L Stewart; Xue, Xiaonan; Watts, D Heather; Anastos, Kathryn; Palefsky, Joel M; Levine, Alexandra M; Colie, Christine; Castle, Philip E; Strickler, Howard D

    2012-09-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is detected in nearly all cervical cancers and approximately half of vaginal cancers. However, vaginal cancer is an order of magnitude less common than cervical cancer, not only in the general population but also among women with HIV/AIDS. It is interesting therefore that recent studies found that HPV was common in both normal vaginal and cervical tissue, with higher prevalence of nononcogenic HPV types in the vagina. In our investigation, we prospectively examined HPV infection in 86 HIV-positive and 17 HIV-negative women who underwent hysterectomy during follow-up in a longitudinal cohort. Cervicovaginal lavage specimens were obtained semi-annually and tested for HPV DNA by polymerase chain reaction. To address possible selection biases associated with having a hysterectomy, subjects acted as their own comparison group--before versus after hysterectomy. The average HPV prevalence was higher in HIV-positive than HIV-negative women both before (59% vs. 12%; p < 0.001) and after hysterectomy (56% vs. 6%; p < 0.001). Multivariate random effects models (within-individual comparisons) demonstrated significantly lower HPV prevalence [odds ratio (OR) = 0.71; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.59-0.85) after hysterectomy. The association of HPV prevalence with hysterectomy was similar among HIV-positive and HIV-negative women. However, hysterectomy had greater effects on oncogenic (OR = 0.48; 95% CI = 0.35-0.66) than nononcogenic HPV types (OR = 0.89; 95% CI = 0.71-1.11; P(interaction) = 0.002). Overall, we observed greater reductions in oncogenic than nononcogenic HPV prevalence after hysterectomy. If correct, these data could suggest that oncogenic HPV have greater tropism for cervical compared to vaginal epithelium, consistent with the lower incidence of vaginal than cervical cancer.

  11. Raltegravir with optimized background therapy for resistant HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steigbigel, Roy T; Cooper, David A; Kumar, Princy N;

    2008-01-01

    for the length of follow-up, cancers were detected in 3.5% of raltegravir recipients and in 1.7% of placebo recipients. The overall frequencies of drug-related adverse events were similar in the raltegravir and placebo groups. CONCLUSIONS: In HIV-infected patients with limited treatment options, raltegravir plus......BACKGROUND: Raltegravir (MK-0518) is an inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase active against HIV-1 susceptible or resistant to older antiretroviral drugs. METHODS: We conducted two identical trials in different geographic regions to evaluate the safety and efficacy...... of raltegravir, as compared with placebo, in combination with optimized background therapy, in patients infected with HIV-1 that has triple-class drug resistance in whom antiretroviral therapy had failed. Patients were randomly assigned to raltegravir or placebo in a 2:1 ratio. RESULTS: In the combined studies...

  12. Geographic Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, William F; Delmerico, Alan M

    2009-01-01

    spatial data and related phenomena. The capabilities of GIS are much more than just mapping, although map production is one of the most utilized features. GIS applications are relevant in a tremendous number of areas ranging from basic geographic inventories to simulation models.This chapter presents a general overview of geographic information system topics. The purpose is to provide the reader with a basic understanding of a GIS, the types of data that are needed, the basic functionality of these systems, the role of spatial analysis, and an example in the form of a case study. The chapter is designed to provide advanced students and experts outside of the field of GIS sufficient information to begin to utilize GIS and spatial analytic concepts, but it is not designed to be the sole basis for becoming a GIS expert. There is a tremendous level of sophistication related to the digital cartographic databases and manipulation of those databases underlying the display and use of GIS that is more appropriately a part of geographic information science (i.e., basic research issues associated with geographic data including technical as well as theoretical aspects such as the impact on society [1]) rather than being relevant to this chapter. The utilization of GIS for conducting spatial analysis is the guiding theme for the chapter.

  13. "You just can't trust everybody": the impact of sexual risk, partner type and perceived partner trustworthiness on HIV-status disclosure decisions among HIV-positive black gay and bisexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Jason D P; Eversman, Michael; Voisin, Dexter R

    2017-08-01

    HIV remains an intractable public health concern in the USA, with infection rates notably concentrated among Black gay and bisexual men. Status disclosure by HIV-positive individuals can be an important aspect of risk reduction but doing so poses dilemmas concerning privacy, stigma and self-protection, especially among populations subjected to multiple types of stigmatisation. Understanding the factors related to the disclosure process can help to inform prevention efforts. Using exploratory in-depth interviews, this qualitative study examines the disclosure process among a sample of twenty HIV-positive Black gay and bisexual men (mean age = 40) recruited through a non-profit health centre in a mid-western city in the USA. Data were analysed using a thematic analysis approach with HIV-disclosure as an a priori sensitising concept. Fears of stigma and secondary disclosure within social networks were critical barriers to talking about HIV with sexual partners and disclosure decisions involved a complex process centred on three primary themes: degree of sexual risk, partner type and perceived partner trustworthiness. The unique combinations of these contextual factors resulted in increased or decreased likelihood of disclosure. A conceptual model explicating a potential process by which these contextual factors influence disclosure decisions is presented.

  14. Drug resistance mutations and genetic diversity in adults treated for HIV type 1 infection in Mauritania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall-Malick, F-Zahra; Tchiakpé, Edmond; Ould Soufiane, Sid'Ahmed; Diop-Ndiaye, Halimatou; Mouhamedoune Baye, Abderrahmane; Ould Horma Babana, Abdallah; Touré Kane, Coumba; Lo, Baidy; Mboup, Souleymane

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the drug resistance mutationprofile observed in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy with virological failure and to document the HIV-1 genetic diversity in Mauritania. Eighty-six subjects were included and 65 samples were amplified successfully and sequenced. HIV-1 genotyping was performed using the Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le SIDA AC11 resistance procedure. The median treatment duration was 32 months (range: 6-88) and the median viral load, 5 log10 copies/ml (range: 3.13-7). Fifty-nine patients (90.8%) were on first line regimens including 32.0% (19/59) on triomune fixed-dose and six on second-line therapy with NonNucleoside Reverse Transcriptase plus a protease inhibitor. Forty-seven patients (72.3%) had at least one drug resistance mutation including 73.0% (43/59) on first-line therapy. For the second-line, one out of six patients presented resistance mutations and only one presented PI DRM. Overall, the most common DRMs detected were M184V/I (n = 32; 49.2%), K103N (n = 28; 43%), and Y181C (n = 13; 20%). Thymidine Analog Mutations (TAMs) were found in 26.0% (n = 17) of strains and the most common was T215Y (n = 11, 16.9%). Phylogenetic analysis revealed 17 HIV-1 variants with the predominance of CRF02_AG (n = 42; 64.6%). A high rate of DRM was found in this study and shows the potential need for a structured virological surveillance including viral load quantification and genotyping. Further studies may also be needed in regards to the great variability of HIV-1 strains in Mauritania. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Alteration of CD44 expression in HIV type 1-infected T cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordanengo, V; Limouse, M; Doglio, A; Lesimple, J; Lefebvre, J C

    1996-11-20

    CD44 is known to interfere in HIV replication and to participate in many physiological processes such as lymphocyte binding to high endothelial venules of lymphoid tissue, lymph nodes, and mucosal endothelium. The T cell lines MOLT-4 and CEM, and CEM subclones were infected with the HIV-1 LAI strain and monitored for the expression of CD44 during the course of chronic virus production until the infected cells were at the stage of latent infection. The levels of CD44 protein expression were quantified using cell surface immunostaining and biotinylation. The maturation of CD44 molecules was evaluated by metabolic sulforadiolabeling and CD44 mRNA was visualized by Northern blot analysis. We show a downmodulation of CD44 expression in infected T cell lines and subclones. This phenomenon was most evident at the stage of latent infection. Then, CD44 molecules were undetectable at both the protein and mRNA levels in latently infected CEM cells and CEM subclones. In addition, the 97-kDa standard CD44 isoform showed a shift upward, while detectable during the stage of chronic virus production. In latently infected MOLT-4 cells, the CD44 protein levels were dramatically decreased; CD44 mRNA was detected, but the sizes differed from the mRNA in uninfected cells. Since CD44 is known to regulate in part lymphocyte homing and HIV replication, the alterations that were observed in the expression of this molecule could interfere with the particular homing of HIV-infected cells and/or viral latency.

  16. Relationship type, condom use and HIV/AIDS risks among men who have sex with men in six Chinese cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Travis S K; Laidler, Karen Joe; Pang, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    This study is the first to examine the role of partner type in sexual practices of men who have sex with men (MSM) in China. Using cross-sectional self-administered questionnaires (N=692) with MSM in six Chinese cities (Shanghai, Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Xi'an, Dalian and Beijing) in 2008, this paper examines MSM's sexual practices, particularly condom use with different male and female partner types. We categorise sexual partner relationships into five types: partner/spouse, boyfriend/girlfriend, acquaintance, stranger and sex worker and hypothesise that the greater the affective distance between the partners, the greater the likelihood of engaging with intimate act and the lesser likelihood condom use. Results show that respondents had more MSM than heterosexual experiences. Relationships tended to be short-term, multiple (more than two) and concurrent (simultaneously two or more) principally with other men and to a lesser degree with women. Findings reveal that affective distance varied with partner types. Respondents performed more intimate acts (e.g., kissing, caressing) with intimate or stable partners (partner/spouse, boyfriend/girlfriend) than casual or unknown partners (acquaintance, stranger, sex worker). Condom use decreased when the affective distance with a partner increased. We conclude that partner type is a key factor of HIV infection among MSM in China; short-term, multiple and concurrent relationships are clear risk factors. Future research should focus on the subjective varied meanings of relationships, the idea of trust and the dynamics with different relationships to understand HIV infection of MSM in China.

  17. Rescue of HIV-1 release by targeting widely divergent NEDD4-type ubiquitin ligases and isolated catalytic HECT domains to Gag.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric R Weiss

    Full Text Available Retroviruses engage the ESCRT pathway through late assembly (L domains in Gag to promote virus release. HIV-1 uses a PTAP motif as its primary L domain, which interacts with the ESCRT-I component Tsg101. In contrast, certain other retroviruses primarily use PPxY-type L domains, which constitute ligands for NEDD4-type ubiquitin ligases. Surprisingly, although HIV-1 Gag lacks PPxY motifs, the release of HIV-1 L domain mutants is potently enhanced by ectopic NEDD4-2s, a native isoform with a naturally truncated C2 domain that appears to account for the residual titer of L domain-defective HIV-1. The reason for the unique potency of the NEDD4-2s isoform has remained unclear. We now show that the naturally truncated C2 domain of NEDD4-2s functions as an autonomous Gag-targeting module that can be functionally replaced by the unrelated Gag-binding protein cyclophilin A (CypA. The residual C2 domain of NEDD4-2s was sufficient to transfer the ability to stimulate HIV-1 budding to other NEDD4 family members, including the yeast homologue Rsp5, and even to isolated catalytic HECT domains. The isolated catalytic domain of NEDD4-2s also efficiently promoted HIV-1 budding when targeted to Gag via CypA. We conclude that the regions typically required for substrate recognition by HECT ubiquitin ligases are all dispensable to stimulate HIV-1 release, implying that the relevant target for ubiquitination is Gag itself or can be recognized by divergent isolated HECT domains. However, the mere ability to ubiquitinate Gag was not sufficient to stimulate HIV-1 budding. Rather, our results indicate that the synthesis of K63-linked ubiquitin chains is critical for ubiquitin ligase-mediated virus release.

  18. Mortality and morbidity among HIV type-1-infected patients during the first 5 years of a multicountry HIV workplace programme in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.F. van der Borght; P. Clevenbergh; H. Rijckborst; P. Nsalou; N. Onyia; J.M. Lange; T.F. Rinke de Wit; M.F.S. van der Loeff

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of an HIV workplace programme in sub-Saharan Africa. METHODS: The international brewing company, Heineken, introduced an HIV workplace programme in its African subsidiaries in 2001. Beneficiaries from 16 sites in 5 countries were eligible. H

  19. Construction and characterization of HIV type 1 CRF07_BC infectious molecular clone from men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan-Ling; Bai, Wen-Wei; Qu, Fan-Wei; Ma, Hua; Jiang, Run-Sheng; Shen, Bao-Sheng

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the biological characterization of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) CRF07_BC infection among men who have sex with men (MSM). From November 2011 to November 2013, a total of 66 blood samples were collected from MSM with acute HIV-1 infection with CRF07_BC subgroup strains. Deletion in the gag p6 region was detected by sequence alignment and comparative analysis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HNXX1301-1307 samples were separated by density gradient centrifugation. Nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) was used to amplify the viral DNA. The near full-length HIV-1 DNA products were ligated to the long terminal repeat (LTR) vector plasmid (07BCLTR) to construct a full-length HIV clone. The molecular clone was transfected into HEK-293T cells, TZM-b1 cells and patients' PBMCs. The pregenome of an infectious molecular clone of HIV-1 (pNL4-3) was amplified, and a subclone with CRF07_BC was developed to construct the full-length chimeric molecular clone pNL4-3/07BCLTR. Detection of p24 antigen and luciferase activity was used to measure the in vitro infectivity of pNL4-3/07BCLTR. Among the 66 MSM patients infected with CRF07_BC strains, deletion mutations of the Gag P6 proteins were found in 7 of 18CRF07_BC strains; deletion mutations of 2-13 amino acids in different regions were discovered in 6 strains; and the remaining 42 strains did not show deletions. Seven strains with amino acids deficiency in the P6 protein accounted for 27% of all strains and 75% of all deletion genotype strains. A total of 186 full-length molecular clones of CRF07_BC were constructed. There were 5, 9, 10 and 11 clones of HNXX1302, HNXX1304, HNXX1305 and HNXX1306 that resulted in p24-positive supernatant when transfected into HEK-293T cells. Full-length clones of HNXX1302, HNXX1304, HNXX1305 and HNXX1306 showed slight infection in the transfected TZM-b1 cells, as judged by the fluorescence values of TZM-b1 cells 48h post-transfection. However, we were unable to

  20. Modulation of HIV-1 infectivity and cyclophilin A-dependence by Gag sequence and target cell type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dam Elisabeth

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 Gag proteins are essential for virion assembly and viral replication in newly infected cells. Gag proteins are also strong determinants of viral infectivity; immune escape mutations in the Gag capsid (CA protein can markedly reduce viral fitness, and interactions of CA with host proteins such as cyclophilin A (CypA and TRIM5α can have important effects on viral infectivity. Little information, however, is available concerning the extent that different primary Gag proteins affect HIV-1 replication in different cell types, or the impact on viral replication of differences in the expression by target cells of proteins that interact with CA. To address these questions, we compared the infectivity of recombinant HIV-1 viruses expressing Gag-protease sequences from primary isolates in different target cells in the presence or absence of agents that disrupt cyclophilin A – CA interactions and correlated these results with the viral genotype and the expression of cyclophilin A and TRIM5α by the target cells. Results Viral infectivity was governed by the nature of the Gag proteins in a target cell-specific fashion. The treatment of target cells with agents that disrupt CypA-CA interactions often produced biphasic dose-response curves in which viral infectivity first increased and subsequently decreased as a function of the dose used. The extent that treatment of target cells with high-dose CypA inhibitors impaired viral infectivity was dependent on several factors, including the viral genotype, the nature of the target cell, and the extent that treatment with low-dose CypA inhibitors increased viral infectivity. Neither the presence of polymorphisms in the CA CypA-binding loop, the level of expression of CypA, or the level of TRIM5α expression could, alone, explain the differences in the shape of the dose-response curves observed or the extent that high-dose CypA inhibitors reduced viral infectivity. Conclusion Multiple

  1. Predictors of CD4(+) T-Cell Counts of HIV Type 1–Infected Persons After Virologic Failure of All 3 Original Antiretroviral Drug Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costagliola, Dominique; Ledergerber, Bruno; van Sighem, Ard

    2013-01-01

    Low CD4(+) T-cell counts are the main factor leading to clinical progression in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. We aimed to investigate factors affecting CD4(+) T-cell counts after triple-class virological failure.......Low CD4(+) T-cell counts are the main factor leading to clinical progression in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. We aimed to investigate factors affecting CD4(+) T-cell counts after triple-class virological failure....

  2. The influence of human papillomavirus type and HIV status on the lymphomononuclear cell profile in patients with cervical intraepithelial lesions of different severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donadi Eduardo A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunological alterations are implicated in the increased prevalence of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HG-SIL and persistent human papillomavirus (HPV infection. This study evaluated the expression of CD4, CD8, CD25 (IL-2Rα and CD28 antigens from SIL biopsies, stratified by HIV status and HPV-type. Biopsies specimens from 82 (35 HIV+ women with a normal cervix, low-grade (LG-SIL or high-grade lesions (HG-SIL were studied. CD molecule expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and HPV detection/typing performed using PCR techniques. Results CD4 stromal staining was increased in patients with HPV18. Women with HPV16 infection showed decreased: a CD8 and CD25 stromal staining, b CD25 staining in LG-SIL epithelium and in HG-SIL stroma. In HIV- women samples, CD28 epithelial staining and CD8 stromal staining surrounding metaplastic epithelium were less intense and even absent, as compared to HIV+ women. Both epithelial and stromal CD8 staining was more intense in the HG-SIL/HIV+ group than in the HG-SIL/HIV- group. Positive correlations were observed between CD4/CD25, CD4/CD28 and CD25/CD28 in the stroma and CD25/CD28 in the epithelium. Conclusion HIV status and HPV-type may influence the lymphomononuclear cell profile present in the spectrum of cervical lesions. The knowledge of the infiltrating cell profile in cervical tumours may help the development of specific anti-tumoural strategies.

  3. DNA and Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Vaccines Encoding Multiple Cytotoxic and Helper T-Lymphocyte Epitopes of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Are Safe but Weakly Immunogenic in HIV-1-Uninfected, Vaccinia Virus-Naive Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Mark J.; deCamp, Allan; Hay, Christine Mhorag; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Noonan, Elizabeth; Livingston, Brian D.; Fuchs, Jonathan D.; Kalams, Spyros A.; Cassis-Ghavami, Farah L.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated a DNA plasmid-vectored vaccine and a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccine (MVA-mBN32), each encoding cytotoxic and helper T-lymphocyte epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial in 36 HIV-1-uninfected adults using a heterologous prime-boost schedule. HIV-1-specific cellular immune responses, measured as interleukin-2 and/or gamma interferon production, were induced in 1 (4%) of 28 subjects after the first MVA-mBN32 immunization and in 3 (12%) of 25 subjects after the second MVA-mBN32 immunization. Among these responders, polyfunctional T-cell responses, including the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha and perforin, were detected. Vaccinia virus-specific antibodies were induced to the MVA vector in 27 (93%) of 29 and 26 (93%) of 28 subjects after the first and second immunizations with MVA-mBN32. These peptide-based vaccines were safe but were ineffective at inducing HIV-1-specific immune responses and induced much weaker responses than MVA vaccines expressing the entire open reading frames of HIV-1 proteins. PMID:22398243

  4. Adhesion and fusion efficiencies of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) surface proteins

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In about half of patients infected with HIV-1 subtype B, viral populations shift from utilizing the transmembrane protein CCR5 to CXCR4, as well as or instead of CCR5, during late stage progression of the disease. How the relative adhesion efficiency and fusion competency of the viral Env proteins relate to infection during this transition is not well understood. Using a virus-cell fusion assay and live-cell single-molecule force spectroscopy, we compare the entry competency of viral clones t...

  5. HIV Life Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content HIV Replication Cycle Antiretroviral Drug Discovery and Development Need Help? Call 1-800-448-0440 (1 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email The HIV Life Cycle Last Reviewed: August 18, 2017 Key Points HIV gradually destroys the immune system by attacking and killing a type of white ...

  6. Multiple low-grade sarcomas of fibroblastic type in the setting of HIV and acquired epidermodysplasia verruciformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosal, Jacquelyn; Nelson, Ann M; Shelling, Michael; Romaguera, Rita; Poulos, Evangelos; Alonso-Llamazares, Javier

    2014-10-01

    A 46-year-old white male with a history of HIV (CD4 245), acquired epidermodysplasia verruciformis, anal carcinoma in situ, hepatitis B and C presented with 3 asymptomatic, nontender, firm pink/skin-colored nodules involving the arm, left lateral leg, and right third finger. One year later, he developed a similar lesion on his right medial lower leg. Excisional biopsy of one of the lesions showed an atypical spindle cell neoplasm of the dermis compatible with a low-grade sarcoma of fibroblastic origin. Testing for human herpes virus-8, 23 human papillomavirus types, Epstein-Barr virus, and FUS fusion protein were negative. The patient underwent diagnostic imaging with computed tomography scans of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis along with positron emission tomography scan to ensure that there was no other occult primary tumor, all of which were negative. The lesions were excised and have not recurred with 3 years of follow-up. The best histopathologic term for these lesions is multiple low-grade sarcomas of fibroblastic phenotype. They have been proven to be nonaggressive, with little or no metastatic potential. This is a neoplastic process that has not been well defined in the literature. To our knowledge, there are no previous reports of these lesions occurring in multiple sites or in an HIV-positive patient.

  7. HIV type 1 genetic diversity and genotypic drug susceptibility in the Republic of Moldova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandrea, I; Descamps, D; Collin, G; Robertson, D L; Damond, F; Dimitrienco, V; Gheorghita, S; Pecec, M; Simon, F; Brun-Vézinet, F; Apetrei, C

    2001-09-01

    HIV-1 genetic diversity and, for the first time, genotypic drug susceptibility was investigated for strains circulating in the Republic of Moldova (of the former Soviet Union). Eighty-three samples from adults recently infected by intravenous drug use (IDU) (n = 60), heterosexual contact (n = 8), and from blood donors (n = 15) that tested positive from 1997 to 1998, and originating from different regions of Moldova were serotyped. By group-specific and subtype-specific peptide ELISA, patients were infected by serotype A (n = 65), serotype B (n = 1), or were nontypable (n = 17). Heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA) confirmed 11 subtype A and the one subtype B infection. Analyses of pol and env sequences for six of the IDUs confirmed that they were infected with subtype A strain. These strains clustered tightly with subtype A strains isolated from the former Soviet Union in phylogenetic analysis. No mutations associated with drug resistance were detected. The Republic of Moldova is culturally more closely related to Romania (where subtype F dominates the epidemic), but depends economically on Russia (where subtype A is established among IDUs). Thus, our results suggest that the spread of HIV in this region is driven by drug networks rather than being due to cultural similarities.

  8. Adhesion and fusion efficiencies of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) surface proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M.; Rabi, S. Alireza; Nedellec, Rebecca; Daniels, Brian R.; Mullins, James I.; Mosier, Donald E.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Wirtz, Denis

    2013-10-01

    In about half of patients infected with HIV-1 subtype B, viral populations shift from utilizing the transmembrane protein CCR5 to CXCR4, as well as or instead of CCR5, during late stage progression of the disease. How the relative adhesion efficiency and fusion competency of the viral Env proteins relate to infection during this transition is not well understood. Using a virus-cell fusion assay and live-cell single-molecule force spectroscopy, we compare the entry competency of viral clones to tensile strengths of the individual Env-receptor bonds of Env proteins obtained from a HIV-1 infected patient prior to and during coreceptor switching. The results suggest that the genetic determinants of viral entry were predominantly enriched in the C3, HR1 and CD regions rather than V3. Env proteins can better mediate entry into cells after coreceptor switch; this effective entry capacity does not correlate with the bond strengths between viral Env and cellular receptors.

  9. Absence of primary integrase resistance mutations in HIV type 1-infected patients in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Héctor R; Garzaro, Domingo; Fabbro, Rona; Martinez, Nahir; Ossenkop, John; Torres, Jaime R; Gutiérrez, Cristina R; Pujol, Flor H

    2010-08-01

    The preexistence of mutations to integrase inhibitors in HIV-1-infected Venezuelan patients was evaluated. The integrase region of the HIV-1 genome was amplified by nested-PCR and sequenced in 57 isolates from both naive (n = 24) and treated patients who received protease and/or reverse transcriptase inhibitors (PI and RTI, n = 33), but were never exposed to integrase inhibitors. Only one primary integrase resistance mutation, not conferring drug resistance by itself, was found among these patients, although several minor viral mutations, equally distributed among naive and PI- and RTI-treated patients, were also found. In the limited number of samples, no relation was found among the presence of resistance mutations to PI or RTI and the presence of minor mutations to integrase. The absence of resistance to integrase inhibitors may be related to the recent introduction of these drugs in our country. The availability of in-house assays allows for a more comprehensive surveillance of drug resistance to integrase inhibitors in Venezuela.

  10. Adhesion and fusion efficiencies of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) surface proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M; Rabi, S Alireza; Nedellec, Rebecca; Daniels, Brian R; Mullins, James I; Mosier, Donald E; Siliciano, Robert F; Wirtz, Denis

    2013-10-22

    In about half of patients infected with HIV-1 subtype B, viral populations shift from utilizing the transmembrane protein CCR5 to CXCR4, as well as or instead of CCR5, during late stage progression of the disease. How the relative adhesion efficiency and fusion competency of the viral Env proteins relate to infection during this transition is not well understood. Using a virus-cell fusion assay and live-cell single-molecule force spectroscopy, we compare the entry competency of viral clones to tensile strengths of the individual Env-receptor bonds of Env proteins obtained from a HIV-1 infected patient prior to and during coreceptor switching. The results suggest that the genetic determinants of viral entry were predominantly enriched in the C3, HR1 and CD regions rather than V3. Env proteins can better mediate entry into cells after coreceptor switch; this effective entry capacity does not correlate with the bond strengths between viral Env and cellular receptors.

  11. Inhibition of HIV type 1 infectivity by coexpression of a wild-type and a defective glycoprotein 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, O S; Losman, B; Schønning, Kristian;

    1998-01-01

    model: when virion formation is saturated with envelope protein, expression and incorporation of a defective envelope protein imply a corresponding dilution of wild-type protein on the surface of virions. The cooperative function of wild-type envelope proteins is subsequently compromised, and a trans...

  12. HIV Type 1 Nef Is Released from Infected Cells in CD45+ Microvesicles and Is Present in the Plasma of HIV-Infected Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, A.D.; Campbell-Sims, T.C.; Khan, M.; Lang, M.; Huang, M.B.; Bond, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract HIV-1 Nef has been demonstrated to be integral for viral persistence, infectivity, and the acceleration of disease pathogenesis (AIDS) in humans. Nef has also been detected in the plasma of HIV-infected individuals and is released from infected cells. The form in which Nef is released from infected cells is unknown. However, Nef is a myristoylated protein and has been shown to interact with the intracellular vesicular trafficking network. Here we show that Nef is released in CD45-containing microvesicles. This microvesicular Nef (mvNef) is detected in the plasma of HIV-infected individuals at relatively high concentrations (10 ng/ml). It is also present in tissue culture supernatants of Jurkat cells infected with HIVMN. Interestingly, plasma mvNef levels in HIV+ patients did not significantly correlate with viral load or CD4 count. Microvesicular Nef levels persisted in the plasma of HIV-infected individuals despite the use of antiretroviral therapy, even in individuals with undetectable viral loads. Using cell lines, we found Nef microvesicles induce apoptosis in Jurkat T-lymphocytes but had no observed effect on the U937 monocytic cell line. Given the large amount of mvNef present in the plasma of HIV-infected individuals, the apoptotic effect of mvNef on T cells, and the observed functions of extracellular soluble Nef in vitro, it seems likely that in vivo mvNef may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of AIDS. PMID:20964480

  13. [Spatial Distribution of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Berlin: Application of a Geographically Weighted Regression Analysis to Identify Location-Specific Risk Groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauhl, Boris; Pieper, Jonas; Schweikart, Jürgen; Keste, Andrea; Moskwyn, Marita

    2017-02-16

    Understanding which population groups in which locations are at higher risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) allows efficient and cost-effective interventions targeting these risk-populations in great need in specific locations. The goal of this study was to analyze the spatial distribution of T2DM and to identify the location-specific, population-based risk factors using global and local spatial regression models. To display the spatial heterogeneity of T2DM, bivariate kernel density estimation was applied. An ordinary least squares regression model (OLS) was applied to identify population-based risk factors of T2DM. A geographically weighted regression model (GWR) was then constructed to analyze the spatially varying association between the identified risk factors and T2DM. T2DM is especially concentrated in the east and outskirts of Berlin. The OLS model identified proportions of persons aged 80 and older, persons without migration background, long-term unemployment, households with children and a negative association with single-parenting households as socio-demographic risk groups. The results of the GWR model point out important local variations of the strength of association between the identified risk factors and T2DM. The risk factors for T2DM depend largely on the socio-demographic composition of the neighborhoods in Berlin and highlight that a one-size-fits-all approach is not appropriate for the prevention of T2DM. Future prevention strategies should be tailored to target location-specific risk-groups. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Cross-clade conservation of HIV type 1 Nef immunodominant regions recognized by CD8+ T cells of HIV type 1 CRF02_AG-infected Ivorian (West Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inwoley, André; Recordon-Pinson, Patricia; Dupuis, Marion; Gaston, Jessintha; Genête, Mathieu; Minga, Albert; Letourneur, Franck; Rouet, François; Choppin, Jeannine; Fleury, Hervé; Guillet, Jean-Gérard; Andrieu, Muriel

    2005-07-01

    Most HIV vaccine trials in the world are conducted with clade B while most circulating viral strains in Africa are non-B subtypes. We determined whether CD8+ T cells from HIV-1 intersubtype CRF02_AG-infected Ivorian individuals were able to recognize clade B epitopes. CD8+ T cell responses of nine HIV-1 intersubtype CRF02_AG-infected Ivorian patients and nine HIV-1 subtype B-infected French patients were studied using pools of HIV-1 clade B peptides (110 well-defined HIV CD8+ T cell epitopes) in an ELISPOT IFN-gamma assay. There was no difference in the number of recognized peptide pools between Ivorian and French cohorts (mean of four pools in both cases). Ivorian individuals had generated CD8+ T cell responses cross-reactive against HIV-1 subtype B and some individual peptides had been identified. Furthermore, sequence analysis of nef HIV genes of the Ivorian patients and nef cloning in two patients revealed very few variations between HIV- 1 intersubtype CRF02_AG and subtype B in nef immunodominant regions included in HIV clade B lipopeptide vaccines, currently tested in France.

  15. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Viral Protein R (Vpr)-Mediated Cell Cycle Arrest: An Analysis of Current Mechanistic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-08

    with vpr + , but not vpr - , experimental HIV strains became tetraploid . The presence of both multi- and mono-nucleated sub-populations of these 8N...the direct binding of Vpr with human 14-3-3 isoforms. This group performed a series of yeast two- hybrid screens, using wild-type and two mutant Vpr

  16. Global dispersal pattern of HIV type 1 subtype CRF01-AE : A genetic trace of human mobility related to heterosexual sexual activities centralized in southeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angelis, Konstantinos; Albert, Jan; Mamais, Ioannis; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Hatzakis, Angelos; Hamouda, Osamah; Struck, Daniel; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Wensing, Annemarie M J; Alexiev, Ivailo; Åsjö, Birgitta; Balotta, Claudia; Camacho, Ricardo J.; Coughlan, Suzie; Griskevicius, Algirdas; Grossman, Zehava; Horban, Andrzej; Kostrikis, Leondios G.; Lepej, Snjezana; Liitsola, Kirsi; Linka, Marek; Nielsen, Claus; Otelea, Dan; Paredes, Roger; Poljak, Mario; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elisabeth; Schmit, Jean Claude; Sönnerborg, Anders; Staneková, Danica; Stanojevic, Maja; Boucher, Charles A B; Kaplan, Lauren; Vandamme, Anne Mieke; Paraskevis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype CRF01-AE originated in Africa and then passed to Thailand, where it established a major epidemic. Despite the global presence of CRF01-AE, little is known about its subsequent dispersal pattern. Methods. We assembled a global data set

  17. Risk factors for anal human papillomavirus infection type 16 among HIV-positive men who have sex with men in San Francisco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Alexandra L.; Efird, Jimmy T.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Berry, J. Michael; Jay, Naomi; Palefsky, Joel M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) are at high risk of anal cancer compared with the general population. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, particularly HPV 16, is causally associated with anal cancer. However, risk factors for anal HPV 16 infection are poorly understood. We determined the prevalence and risk factors for anal HPV 16 infection in a population of HIV-positive MSM, most of whom were being treated with antiretroviral therapy. Design Cross-sectional data from the baseline visit of a 4-year prospective cohort study. Methods 348 HIV-positive MSM were recruited in San Francisco and received a detailed sexual behavior risk-factor questionnaire. An anal swab was used to collect specimens for HPV type-specific DNA testing using L1 HPV DNA PCR. We used log-binomial multivariable models to determine risk factors for anal HPV 16 infection. Results 92% of HIV-positive MSM had at least one anal HPV type, 80% had at least one oncogenic HPV type and 42% had HPV 16. Non-Hispanic white race and higher level of education were associated with a decreased risk of HPV 16 infection. A higher number of total male partners was associated with HPV 16 (RR: 1.6, 95%CI 1.1–2.4, p=0.01) for 201–1000 partners compared with 1–200. Injection drug use (IDU) was independently associated with anal HPV 16 infection (RR: 1.5, 95%CI 1.2–1.9, p=0.003). Conclusions The prevalence of anal HPV infection, including HPV 16, is high in HIV-positive MSM. HIV-positive MSM should be counseled about the risk associated with increased partners and IDU. PMID:23614994

  18. Protein–Protein Interaction between Surfactant Protein D and DC-SIGN via C-Type Lectin Domain Can Suppress HIV-1 Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eswari Dodagatta-Marri

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Surfactant protein D (SP-D is a soluble C-type lectin, belonging to the collectin (collagen-containing calcium-dependent lectin family, which acts as an innate immune pattern recognition molecule in the lungs at other mucosal surfaces. Immune regulation and surfactant homeostasis are salient functions of SP-D. SP-D can bind to a range of viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens and trigger clearance mechanisms. SP-D binds to gp120, the envelope protein expressed on HIV-1, through its C-type lectin or carbohydrate recognition domain. This is of importance since SP-D is secreted by human mucosal epithelial cells and is present in the female reproductive tract, including vagina. Another C-type lectin, dendritic cell (DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN, present on the surface of the DCs, also binds to HIV-1 gp120 and facilitates viral transfer to the lymphoid tissues. DCs are also present at the site of HIV-1 entry, embedded in vaginal or rectal mucosa. In the present study, we report a direct protein–protein interaction between recombinant forms of SP-D (rfhSP-D and DC-SIGN via their C-type lectin domains. Both SP-D and DC-SIGN competed for binding to immobilized HIV-1 gp120. Pre-incubation of human embryonic kidney cells expressing surface DC-SIGN with rfhSP-D significantly inhibited the HIV-1 transfer to activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In silico analysis revealed that SP-D and gp120 may occupy same sites on DC-SIGN, which may explain the reduced transfer of HIV-1. In summary, we demonstrate, for the first time, that DC-SIGN is a novel binding partner of SP-D, and this interaction can modulate HIV-1 capture and transfer to CD4+ T cells. In addition, the present study also reveals a novel and distinct mechanism of host defense by SP-D against HIV-1.

  19. Evaluating HIV Prevention Programs: Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Antibodies as Biomarker for Sexual Risk Behavior in Young Adults in Resource-Poor Countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Behling

    Full Text Available Measuring effectiveness of HIV prevention interventions is challenged by bias when using self-reported knowledge, attitude or behavior change. HIV incidence is an objective marker to measure effectiveness of HIV prevention interventions, however, because new infection rates are relatively low, prevention studies require large sample sizes. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 is similarly transmitted and more prevalent and could thus serve as a proxy marker for sexual risk behavior and therefore HIV infection.HSV-2 antibodies were assessed in a sub-study of 70,000 students participating in an education intervention in Western Province, Kenya. Feasibility of testing for HSV-2 antibodies was assessed comparing two methods using Fisher's exact test. Three hundred and ninety four students (aged 18 to 22 years were randomly chosen from the cohort and tested for HIV, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis. Out of these, 139 students were tested for HSV-2 with ELISA and surveyed for sexual risk behavior and 89 students were additionally tested for HSV-2 with a point-of-contact (POC test.Prevalence rates were 0.5%, 1.8%, 0.3% and 2.3% for HIV, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis, respectively. Prevalence of HSV-2 antibodies was 3.4 % as measured by POC test (n=89 and 14.4 % by ELISA (n=139. Specificity of the POC test compared with ELISA was 100%, and the sensitivity only 23.1%. Associations between self-reported sexual behavior and HSV-2 serostatus could not be shown.Associations between self-reported sexual risk behavior and HSV-2 serostatus could not be shown, probably due to social bias in interviews since its transmission is clearly linked. HSV-2 antibody testing is feasible in resource-poor settings and shows higher prevalence rates than other sexually transmitted diseases thus representing a potential biomarker for evaluation of HIV prevention interventions.

  20. Evaluating HIV Prevention Programs: Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Antibodies as Biomarker for Sexual Risk Behavior in Young Adults in Resource-Poor Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behling, Juliane; Chan, Adrienne K; Zeh, Clement; Nekesa, Carolyne; Heinzerling, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    Measuring effectiveness of HIV prevention interventions is challenged by bias when using self-reported knowledge, attitude or behavior change. HIV incidence is an objective marker to measure effectiveness of HIV prevention interventions, however, because new infection rates are relatively low, prevention studies require large sample sizes. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is similarly transmitted and more prevalent and could thus serve as a proxy marker for sexual risk behavior and therefore HIV infection. HSV-2 antibodies were assessed in a sub-study of 70,000 students participating in an education intervention in Western Province, Kenya. Feasibility of testing for HSV-2 antibodies was assessed comparing two methods using Fisher's exact test. Three hundred and ninety four students (aged 18 to 22 years) were randomly chosen from the cohort and tested for HIV, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis. Out of these, 139 students were tested for HSV-2 with ELISA and surveyed for sexual risk behavior and 89 students were additionally tested for HSV-2 with a point-of-contact (POC) test. Prevalence rates were 0.5%, 1.8%, 0.3% and 2.3% for HIV, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis, respectively. Prevalence of HSV-2 antibodies was 3.4 % as measured by POC test (n=89) and 14.4 % by ELISA (n=139). Specificity of the POC test compared with ELISA was 100%, and the sensitivity only 23.1%. Associations between self-reported sexual behavior and HSV-2 serostatus could not be shown. Associations between self-reported sexual risk behavior and HSV-2 serostatus could not be shown, probably due to social bias in interviews since its transmission is clearly linked. HSV-2 antibody testing is feasible in resource-poor settings and shows higher prevalence rates than other sexually transmitted diseases thus representing a potential biomarker for evaluation of HIV prevention interventions.

  1. Interleukin-1- and type I interferon-dependent enhanced immunogenicity of an NYVAC-HIV-1 Env-Gag-Pol-Nef vaccine vector with dual deletions of type I and type II interferon-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaloye, Julie; Filali-Mouhim, Abdelali; Cameron, Mark J; Haddad, Elias K; Harari, Alexandre; Goulet, Jean-Pierre; Gomez, Carmen E; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Esteban, Mariano; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Roger, Thierry; Sékaly, Rafick-Pierre; Calandra, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    NYVAC, a highly attenuated, replication-restricted poxvirus, is a safe and immunogenic vaccine vector. Deletion of immune evasion genes from the poxvirus genome is an attractive strategy for improving the immunogenic properties of poxviruses. Using systems biology approaches, we describe herein the enhanced immunological profile of NYVAC vectors expressing the HIV-1 clade C env, gag, pol, and nef genes (NYVAC-C) with single or double deletions of genes encoding type I (ΔB19R) or type II (ΔB8R) interferon (IFN)-binding proteins. Transcriptomic analyses of human monocytes infected with NYVAC-C, NYVAC-C with the B19R deletion (NYVAC-C-ΔB19R), or NYVAC-C with B8R and B19R deletions (NYVAC-C-ΔB8RB19R) revealed a concerted upregulation of innate immune pathways (IFN-stimulated genes [ISGs]) of increasing magnitude with NYVAC-C-ΔB19R and NYVAC-C-ΔB8RB19R than with NYVAC-C. Deletion of B8R and B19R resulted in an enhanced activation of IRF3, IRF7, and STAT1 and the robust production of type I IFNs and of ISGs, whose expression was inhibited by anti-type I IFN antibodies. Interestingly, NYVAC-C-ΔB8RB19R induced the production of much higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor [TNF], interleukin-6 [IL-6], and IL-8) than NYVAC-C or NYVAC-C-ΔB19R as well as a strong inflammasome response (caspase-1 and IL-1β) in infected monocytes. Top network analyses showed that this broad response mediated by the deletion of B8R and B19R was organized around two upregulated gene expression nodes (TNF and IRF7). Consistent with these findings, monocytes infected with NYVAC-C-ΔB8RB19R induced a stronger type I IFN-dependent and IL-1-dependent allogeneic CD4(+) T cell response than monocytes infected with NYVAC-C or NYVAC-C-ΔB19R. Dual deletion of type I and type II IFN immune evasion genes in NYVAC markedly enhanced its immunogenic properties via its induction of the increased expression of type I IFNs and IL-1β and make it an attractive candidate HIV

  2. Characterization of the gp120 of circulating HIV type 1 in a group of infected Chinese blood/plasma donors with asymptomatic and symptomatic stages of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yue; Craigo, Jodi K; Ding, Ming; Guo, Yan; Shen, Shengli; Zhou, Yushen; Wu, Hao; Gupta, Phalguni

    2006-11-01

    The C2-V5 regions of the HIV envelope gene were cloned and sequenced from DNA samples of four asymptomatic and five AIDS patients from a cohort of HIV-1-infected Chinese plasma and blood donors. Sequence analysis revealed that regardless of the stage of disease, all the patient's HIV-1 belonged to either clade B' or circulating recombinant form 15 (CRF15) subtype. However, since these blood donors were infected at a time when circulating CRF15 was not known in that region, it is likely these HIV-1 types belong to clade B'. However, the C2-V5 sequences from AIDS patients clustered differently in the phylogenetic tree than those present in asymptomatic patients and showed a significantly higher divergence and lower diversity compared to those from asymptomatic patients. In addition, more syncytia-inducing viral genotypes were present in AIDS patients than in asymptomatic patients. These results contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of circulating HIV-1 in infected Chinese plasma and blood donors, warrant additional investigation of the possible presence of CRF15 in Chinese blood donors, and may have important implications in the future design of therapeutic strategies for treating these infected patients.

  3. Progress of bis(heteroaryl)piperazines (BHAPs) as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Since the first case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) was reported in 1981, AIDS, as the global disease affecting 33.2 million people in 2007, has always been an unsolved problem worldwide. Reverse transcriptase (RT) is a crucial enzyme in the life cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and thereby has been the prime drugs target for antiretroviral (ARV) therapy against AIDS. To date, two classes of RT inhibitors (RTIs), e.g., nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), and a lot of compounds tested as RTIs have been described. To our knowledge, bis(heteroaryl)piperazines (BHAPs) have been considered as one class of promising NNRTIs, such as structurally and chemically related NNRTI delavirdine, which was approved by the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in 1997. In this mini-review, we make attempts to report the progress of synthesis and structure-activity relationship (SAR) of BHAPs, in the meantime, the synergistic inhibition of HIV-1 replication by combining delavirdine with other HIV-1 inhibitors is also discussed. It will pave the way for the design and development of BHAPs as anti-HIV-1 agents in AIDS chemotherapy in the future.

  4. Comparison of the artus HIV-1 QS-RGQ and VERSANT HIV-1 RNA 1.0 assays for quantitative detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in plasma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvir, Roee; Canducci, Filippo; Racca, Sara; Rolla, Serena; Stucchi, Sonia; Clementi, Massimo

    2015-07-01

    Several integrated diagnostic platforms to quantify human immunodeficiency virus type-1 viremia have been developed in recent years. We evaluated the performances of the Artus HIV-1 QS-RGQ assay, using the complete QIAsymphony RGQ workflow. 192 clinical plasma specimens and external control panel samples were analyzed, using the Artus assay and the routine Siemens VERSANT HIV-1 RNA 1.0 assay. Three samples were excluded due to amplification inhibition. Among the remaining 189 specimens, 130 samples were detected as positive (above the limit of detection by both assays; median log10 difference: 0.01) and 18 samples were detected as negative. Eight samples (4.2%), all slightly above the limit of detection of the Versant assay, were negative with the Artus assay. The remaining 33 samples (beside 3 negative by Artus assay) were positive by both assays, but below the limit of detection at least in one of them. Results from the external panel samples showed a mean Log10 variation of -0.18 and -0.45 for the Versant and the Artus assays, respectively. As both assays showed highly correlated results, the QIAsymphony RGQ system, using the Artus HIV-1 QS-RGQ assay, could be considered a potential platform for HIV-1 RNA quantification in plasma.

  5. Geographical networks: geographical effects on network properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kong-qing YANG; Lei YANG; Bai-hua GONG; Zhong-cai LIN; Hong-sheng HE; Liang HUANG

    2008-01-01

    Complex networks describe a wide range of sys-tems in nature and society. Since most real systems exist in certain physical space and the distance between the nodes has influence on the connections, it is helpful to study geographi-cal complex networks and to investigate how the geographical constrains on the connections affect the network properties. In this paper, we briefly review our recent progress on geo-graphical complex networks with respect of statistics, mod-elling, robustness, and synchronizability. It has been shown that the geographical constrains tend to make the network less robust and less synchronizable. Synchronization on random networks and clustered networks is also studied.

  6. Introduction of an single nucleodite polymorphism-based "Major Y-chromosome haplogroup typing kit" suitable for predicting the geographical origin of male lineages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brión, María; Sanchez, Juan J; Balogh, Kinga

    2005-01-01

    The European Consortium "High-throughput analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms for the forensic identification of persons--SNPforID", has performed a selection of candidate Y-chromosome single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for making inferences on the geographic origin of an unknown sampl...

  7. The effect of cholecalciferol and calcitriol on biochemical bone markers in HIV type 1-infected males: results of a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Ulrich Christian; Kolte, Lilian; Hitz, Mette; Schierbeck, Louise Lind; Nielsen, Susanne Dam; Benfield, Thomas; Jensen, Jens-Erik Beck

    2013-04-01

    HIV-1-infected patients have an increased risk of osteoporosis and fractures. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the bone metabolism in HIV-1-infected patients exposed to calcitriol and cholecalciferol. We also investigated the relationship between T cells and bone markers. We conducted a placebo-controlled randomized study running for 16 weeks including 61 HIV-1-infected males, of whom 51 completed the protocol. Nineteen participants were randomized to daily treatment with (A) 0.5-1.0 μg calcitriol and 1,200 IU (30 μg) cholecalciferol, 17 participants to (B) 1,200 IU cholecalciferol, and 15 participants to (C) placebo. At baseline and after 16 weeks, we determined collagen type 1 trimeric cross-linked peptide (CTx), procollagen type 1 N-terminal peptide (P1NP), parathyroid hormone (PTH), ionized calcium, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D]. We determined naive CD4(+) and CD8(+), activated CD4(+) and CD8(+), and regulatory CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low) T lymphocytes. Baseline levels of P1NP and CTx correlated (coefficient 0.5, pcholecalciferol, the mean levels of P1NP (pcholecalciferol induced biochemical indications of bone formation in HIV-1 patients.

  8. Prothymosin α variants isolated from CD8+ T cells and cervicovaginal fluid suppress HIV-1 replication through type I interferon induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Avelino; Yen, Benjamin; Gusella, Gabriele Luca; Thomas, Albert G; Mullen, Michael P; Aberg, Judith; Chen, Xintong; Hoshida, Yujin; van Bakel, Harm; Schadt, Eric; Basler, Christopher F; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Mosoian, Arevik

    2015-05-01

    Soluble factors from CD8(+) T cells and cervicovaginal mucosa of women are recognized as important in controlling human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and transmission. Previously, we have shown the strong anti-HIV-1 activity of prothymosin α (ProTα) derived from CD8(+) T cells. ProTα is a small acidic protein with wide cell distribution, to which several functions have been ascribed, depending on its intracellular or extracellular localization. To date, activities of ProTα have been attributed to a single protein known as isoform 2. Here we report the isolation and identification of 2 new ProTα variants from CD8(+) T cells and cervicovaginal lavage with potent anti-HIV-1 activity. The first is a splice variant of the ProTα gene, known as isoform CRA_b, and the second is the product of a ProTα gene, thus far classified as a pseudogene 7. Native or recombinant ProTα variants potently restrict HIV-1 replication in macrophages through the induction of type I interferon. The baseline expression of interferon-responsive genes in primary human cervical tissues positively correlate with high levels of intracellular ProTα, and the knockdown of ProTα variants by small interfering RNA leads to downregulation of interferon target genes. Overall, these findings suggest that ProTα variants are innate immune mediators involved in immune surveillance.

  9. HIV Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS HIV Transmission Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ...

  10. Clustering patterns of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proteins reveal imprints of immune evasion on HIV-1 global variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusim, K.; Kesmir, Can; Gaschen, B.;

    2002-01-01

    for amino acids that do not serve as C-terminal anchor residues. Finally, CTL epitopes are more highly concentrated in alpha-helical regions of proteins. Based on amino acid sequence characteristics, in a blinded fashion, we predicted regions in HIV regulatory and accessory proteins that would be likely...

  11. A quantum mechanic/molecular mechanic study of the wild-type and N155S mutant HIV-1 integrase complexed with diketo acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Cláudio Nahum; Martí, Sergio; Castillo, Raquel; Andrés, Juan; Moliner, Vicent; Tuñón, Iñaki; Silla, Estanislao

    2008-04-01

    Integrase (IN) is one of the three human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) enzymes essential for effective viral replication. Recently, mutation studies have been reported that have shown that a certain degree of viral resistance to diketo acids (DKAs) appears when some amino acid residues of the IN active site are mutated. Mutations represent a fascinating experimental challenge, and we invite theoretical simulations for the disclosure of still unexplored features of enzyme reactions. The aim of this work is to understand the molecular mechanisms of HIV-1 IN drug resistance, which will be useful for designing anti-HIV inhibitors with unique resistance profiles. In this study, we use molecular dynamics simulations, within the hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach, to determine the protein-ligand interaction energy for wild-type and N155S mutant HIV-1 IN, both complexed with a DKA. This hybrid methodology has the advantage of the inclusion of quantum effects such as ligand polarization upon binding, which can be very important when highly polarizable groups are embedded in anisotropic environments, for example in metal-containing active sites. Furthermore, an energy terms decomposition analysis was performed to determine contributions of individual residues to the enzyme-inhibitor interactions. The results reveal that there is a strong interaction between the Lys-159, Lys-156, and Asn-155 residues and Mg(2+) cation and the DKA inhibitor. Our calculations show that the binding energy is higher in wild-type than in the N155S mutant, in accordance with the experimental results. The role of the mutated residue has thus been checked as maintaining the structure of the ternary complex formed by the protein, the Mg(2+) cation, and the inhibitor. These results might be useful to design compounds with more interesting anti-HIV-1 IN activity on the basis of its three-dimensional structure.

  12. An exploratory trial of cyclooxygenase type 2 inhibitor in HIV-1 infection: downregulated immune activation and improved T cell-dependent vaccine responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, Frank O; Torheim, Eirik A; Dahm, Anders E A; Aaberge, Ingeborg S; Lind, Andreas; Holm, Malin; Aandahl, Einar M; Sandset, Per M; Taskén, Kjetil; Kvale, Dag

    2011-07-01

    Chronic HIV infection is characterized by chronic immune activation and dysfunctional T cells with elevated intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP), which inhibits the T cell activation capability. cAMP may be induced by prostaglandin E(2) following lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced upregulation of cyclooxygenase type 2 (COX-2) in monocytes due to the elevated LPS levels in patients with chronic HIV infection. This hypothesis was tested using celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor, for 12 weeks in HIV-infected patients without antiretroviral treatment in a prospective, open, randomized exploratory trial. Thirty-one patients were randomized in the trial; 27 completed the study, including 13 patients on celecoxib. Celecoxib reduced chronic immune activation in terms of CD38 density on CD8(+) T cells (-24%; P = 0.04), IgA levels (P = 0.04), and a combined score for inflammatory markers (P < 0.05). Celecoxib further reduced the inhibitory surface receptor programmed death 1 (PD-1) on CD8(+) T cells (P = 0.01), including PD-1 on the HIV Gag-specific subset (P = 0.02), enhanced the number of CD3(+) CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(lo/-) Treg or activated cells (P = 0.02), and improved humoral memory recall responses to a T cell-dependent vaccine (P = 0.04). HIV RNA (P = 0.06) and D dimers (P = 0.07) tended to increase in the controls, whereas interleukin-6 (IL-6) possibly decreased in the treatment arm (P = 0.10). In conclusion, celecoxib downmodulated the immune activation related to clinical progression of chronic HIV infection and improved T cell-dependent functions in vivo.

  13. The National Map - geographic names

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Lou; Carswell, William J.

    2009-01-01

    The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS), developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the U.S. Board on Geographic Names (BGN), contains information about the official names for places, features, and areas in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, the territories and outlying areas of the United States, including Antarctica. It is the geographic names component of The National Map. The BGN maintains working relationships with State names authorities to cooperate in achieving the standardization of geographic names. The GNIS contains records on more than 2 million geographic names in the United States - from populated places, schools, reservoirs, and parks to streams, valleys, springs, ridges, and every feature type except roads and highways. Entries include information such as the federally-recognized name and variant names and spellings for the feature; former names; the status of the name as determined by the BGN; county or counties in which each named feature is located; geographic coordinates that locate the approximate center of an aerial feature or the mouth and source of a linear feature, such as a stream; name of the cell of the USGS topographic map or maps on which the feature may appear; elevation figures derived from the National Elevation Dataset; bibliographic code for the source of the name; BGN decision dates and historical information are available for some features. Data from the GNIS are used for emergency preparedness, mapmaking, local and regional planning, service delivery routing, marketing, site selection, environmental analysis, genealogical research, and other applications.

  14. Social Media and HIV: A Systematic Review of Uses of Social Media in HIV Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, Tamara; Grewe, Mary Elisabeth; Conserve, Donaldson F; Gliwa, Catherine; Roman Isler, Malika

    2015-11-02

    Social media, including mobile technologies and social networking sites, are being used increasingly as part of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention and treatment efforts. As an important avenue for communication about HIV, social media use may continue to increase and become more widespread. The objective of this paper is to present a comprehensive systematic review of the current published literature on the design, users, benefits, and limitations of using social media to communicate about HIV prevention and treatment. This review paper used a systematic approach to survey all literature published before February 2014 using 7 electronic databases and a manual search. The inclusion criteria were (1) primary focus on communication/interaction about HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), (2) discusses the use of social media to facilitate communication, (3) communication on the social media platform is between individuals or a group of individuals rather than the use of preset, automated responses from a platform, (4) published before February 19, 2014, and (5) all study designs. The search identified 35 original research studies. Thirty studies had low or unclear risk of at least one of the bias items in the methodological quality assessment. Among the 8 social media platform types described, short message service text messaging was most commonly used. Platforms served multiple purposes including disseminating health information, conducting health promotion, sharing experiences, providing social support, and promoting medication adherence. Social media users were diverse in geographic location and race/ethnicity; studies commonly reported users aged 18-40 years and users with lower income. Although most studies did not specify whether use was anonymous, studies reported the importance of anonymity in social media use to communicate about HIV largely due to the stigma associated with HIV. The ability to share and receive information about HIV was

  15. Social Media and HIV: A Systematic Review of Uses of Social Media in HIV Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewe, Mary Elisabeth; Conserve, Donaldson F; Gliwa, Catherine; Roman Isler, Malika

    2015-01-01

    Background Social media, including mobile technologies and social networking sites, are being used increasingly as part of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention and treatment efforts. As an important avenue for communication about HIV, social media use may continue to increase and become more widespread. Objective The objective of this paper is to present a comprehensive systematic review of the current published literature on the design, users, benefits, and limitations of using social media to communicate about HIV prevention and treatment. Methods This review paper used a systematic approach to survey all literature published before February 2014 using 7 electronic databases and a manual search. The inclusion criteria were (1) primary focus on communication/interaction about HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), (2) discusses the use of social media to facilitate communication, (3) communication on the social media platform is between individuals or a group of individuals rather than the use of preset, automated responses from a platform, (4) published before February 19, 2014, and (5) all study designs. Results The search identified 35 original research studies. Thirty studies had low or unclear risk of at least one of the bias items in the methodological quality assessment. Among the 8 social media platform types described, short message service text messaging was most commonly used. Platforms served multiple purposes including disseminating health information, conducting health promotion, sharing experiences, providing social support, and promoting medication adherence. Social media users were diverse in geographic location and race/ethnicity; studies commonly reported users aged 18-40 years and users with lower income. Although most studies did not specify whether use was anonymous, studies reported the importance of anonymity in social media use to communicate about HIV largely due to the stigma associated with HIV. The ability to share and

  16. HIV-2 infection: Where are we today?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayana A Ingole

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The choice of antiretroviral therapy for HIV-2 differs from that for HIV-1, underscoring the importance of differentiating between the two. Aims: The current study was planned to find out the prevalence of HIV-2 infection at our center and to find out the utility of the current diagnostic algorithm in identifying the type of HIV infection. Setting and Design: Retrospective analysis in a tertiary care teaching institute over a period of three years. Materials and Methods: All patients diagnosed as HIV infected using NACO/WHO HIV testing strategy III were included in the study. They were classified as HIV-1 infected, HIV-2 infected and HIV-1 and HIV-2 co-infected based on their test results. For discordant samples, immunoblotting result from National Reference Laboratory was considered as final. Statistical Analysis Used: Comparison between HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1+2 positive groups for age, gender, route of transmission was made using chi squared test. P value < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: Of the total of 66,708 patients tested, 5,238 (7.9% were positive for HIV antibodies. 7.62%, 0.14%, 0.08% and 0.004% were HIV-1, HIV-2, HIV-1 and HIV-2 co-infected and HIV type indeterminate (HIV-1 Indeterminate, 2+ respectively. The current algorithm could not differentiate between the types of HIV infection (as HIV-1 or HIV-2 in 63 (1.2% cases. Conclusion: In areas like the Indian subcontinent, where epidemic of both HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections are ongoing, it is important to modify the current diagnostic algorithms to diagnose and confirm HIV-2 infections.

  17. XTT formazan widely used to detect cell viability inhibits HIV type 1 infection in vitro by targeting gp41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Ernst, Justin T; Hamilton, Andrew D; Debnath, Asim K; Jiang, Shibo

    2002-09-20

    XTT can be metabolically reduced by mitochondrial dehydrogenase in viable cells to a water-soluble formazan product. Thus XTT has been widely used to evaluate cell viability and to screen anti-HIV agents and the cytotoxicity of these agents. The present studies demonstrated that XTT formazan derived from XTT in cell culture significantly inhibits the fusion of HIV-1-infected cells with uninfected cells. Synthetic XTT formazan effectively inhibited the replication of laboratory-adapted and primary HIV-1 isolates and cell-to-cell fusion with low cytotoxicity. It blocks the six-helix bundle formation between peptides derived from the N- and C-terminal heptad repeat regions of the gp41 ectodomain (designated N- and C-peptides, respectively). Analysis by a computer-aided docking program indicates that XTT formazan may bind to the highly conserved hydrophobic pocket on the surface of the central trimeric coiled coil of gp41. These results suggest that XTT formazan inhibits HIV-1 entry by targeting the alpha-helical coiled-coil domain of gp41. This small molecular nonpeptide antiviral compound can be used as a lead for designing more effective HIV-1 entry inhibitors targeting the fusion stage of HIV-1 infection. But because XTT formazan itself has anti-HIV-1 activity, caution should be exercised when XTT is used to evaluate HIV-1 infectivity.

  18. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... frequently suffer dangerous weight loss, diarrhea, and a type of cancer called Kaposi's sarcoma. 1 Some hopeful ... of abuse and HIV both affect the brain. Research has shown that HIV causes greater injury to ...

  19. Immunogenicity of a polyvalent HIV-1 candidate vaccine based on fourteen wild type gp120 proteins in golden hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorbani Masoud

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the major obstacles in the design of an effective vaccine against HIV-1 is the hypervariability of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. Most HIV-1 vaccine candidates have utilized envelope glycoprotein from a single virus isolate, but to date, none of them elicited broadly reactive humoral immunity. Herein, we hypothesised that a cocktail of HIV-1 gp120 proteins containing multiple epitopes may increase the breadth of immune responses against HIV-1. We compared and evaluated the immunogenicity of HIV-1 vaccines containing either gp120 protein alone or in combinations of four or fourteen gp120s from different primary HIV-1 isolates in immunized hamsters. Results We amplified and characterized 14 different gp120s from primary subtype B isolates with both syncytium and non-syncytium inducing properties, and expressed the proteins in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cell lines. Purified proteins were used either alone or in combinations of four or fourteen different gp120s to vaccinate golden hamsters. The polyvalent vaccine showed higher antibody titers to HIV-1 subtype B isolates MN and SF162 compared to the groups that received one or four gp120 proteins. However, the polyvalent vaccine was not able to show higher neutralizing antibody responses against HIV-1 primary isolates. Interestingly, the polyvalent vaccine group had the highest proliferative immune responses and showed a substantial proportion of cross-subtype CD4 reactivity to HIV-1 subtypes B, C, and A/E Conclusion Although the polyvalent approach achieved only a modest increase in the breadth of humoral and cellular immunity, the qualitative change in the vaccine (14 vs. 1 gp120 resulted in a quantitative improvement in vaccine-induced immunity.

  20. Molecular epidemiology of HIV transmission in a dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, C Y; Ciesielski, C A; Myers, G; Bandea, C I; Luo, C C; Korber, B T; Mullins, J I; Schochetman, G; Berkelman, R L; Economou, A N

    1992-05-22

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission from infected patients to health-care workers has been well documented, but transmission from an infected health-care worker to a patient has not been reported. After identification of an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient who had no known risk factors for HIV infection but who had undergone an invasive procedure performed by a dentist with AIDS, six other patients of this dentist were found to be HIV-infected. Molecular biologic studies were conducted to complement the epidemiologic investigation. Portions of the HIV proviral envelope gene from each of the seven patients, the dentist, and 35 HIV-infected persons from the local geographic area were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. Three separate comparative genetic analyses--genetic distance measurements, phylogenetic tree analysis, and amino acid signature pattern analysis--showed that the viruses from the dentist and five dental patients were closely related. These data, together with the epidemiologic investigation, indicated that these patients became infected with HIV while receiving care from a dentist with AIDS.

  1. Effects of genital ulcer disease and herpes simplex virus type 2 on the efficacy of male circumcision for HIV prevention: Analyses from the Rakai trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald H Gray

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Randomized trials show that male circumcision (MC reduces the incidence of HIV and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 infections, and symptomatic genital ulcer disease (GUD. We assessed the role of GUD and HSV-2 in the protection against HIV afforded by MC. METHODS AND FINDINGS: HIV-uninfected men were randomized to immediate (n = 2,756 or delayed MC (n = 2,775 in two randomized trials in Rakai, Uganda. GUD symptoms, HSV-2 status, and HIV acquisition were determined at enrollment and at 6, 12, and 24 mo of follow up. Ulcer etiology was assessed by PCR. We estimated the prevalence and prevalence risk ratios (PRRs of GUD in circumcised versus uncircumcised men and assessed the effects of HSV-2 serostatus as a risk-modifying factor for GUD. We estimated the proportion of the effect of MC on HIV acquisition that was mediated by symptomatic GUD, and by HSV-2 infection. Circumcision significantly reduced symptomatic GUD in HSV-2-seronegative men (PRR = 0.51, 95% [confidence interval] CI 0.43-0.74, HSV-2-seropositive men (PRR = 0.66, 95% CI 0.51-0.69, and in HSV-2 seroconverters (PRR = 0.48, 95% CI 0.30-0.79. The proportion of acute ulcers due to HSV-2 detected by PCR was 48.0% in circumcised men and 39.3% in uncircumcised men (chi(2p = 0.62. Circumcision reduced the risk of HIV acquisition in HSV-2 seronegative men (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.34, 95% CI 0.15-0.81, and potentially in HSV-2 seroconverters (IRR = 0.56, 95% CI 0.19-1.57; not significant, but not in men with prevalent HSV-2 at enrollment (IRR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.49-1.60. The proportion of reduced HIV acquisition in circumcised men mediated by reductions in symptomatic GUD was 11.2% (95% CI 5.0-38.0, and the proportion mediated by reduced HSV-2 incidence was 8.6% (95% CI -1.2 to 77.1. CONCLUSIONS: Circumcision reduced GUD irrespective of HSV-2 status, but this reduction played only a modest role in the protective effect of circumcision on HIV acquisition.

  2. Macronutrient Supplementation and Food Prices in HIV Treatment12

    OpenAIRE

    Sztam, Kevin A.; Fawzi, Wafaie W.; Duggan, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Infection caused by HIV and malnutrition have a complex interaction and often coexist geographically. Malnutrition has synergistic immune effects and HIV affects nutritional status. HIV care and treatment programs are compelled to confront this dual burden to optimize HIV outcomes. In this article, we review the published literature concerning intervention studies in adults and children and the effect of food prices on HIV treatment programs. While the evidence base is relatively incomplete f...

  3. Geographical information systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möller, Bernd

    2004-01-01

    The chapter gives an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) with particular focus on their application within environmental management.......The chapter gives an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) with particular focus on their application within environmental management....

  4. Geographical information systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möller, Bernd

    2004-01-01

    The chapter gives an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) with particular focus on their application within environmental management.......The chapter gives an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) with particular focus on their application within environmental management....

  5. Near full-length genomic characterization of a HIV type 1 BC recombinant strain from Manipur, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Roni; Sarkar, Kamalesh; Singh, N Brajachand; Singh, Y Manihar; Chakrabarti, Sekhar

    2012-10-01

    Genetic complexity of HIV-1 is brought about by recombination between HIV-1 subtypes which leads to the development of epidemiologically significant founder strains. In the present study, the near full-length genome sequence of an HIV-1 isolate from an injecting drug user of Manipur (India) was determined, which evidenced the presence of a novel HIV-1 BC recombinant strain. Near full-length genome was amplified by polymerase chain reaction using primer walking approach. The recombination break points were detected using bootscan and simplot analyses. This isolate exhibited a mosaic structure consisting of subtype C backbone with subtype B insertions at the upstream of pol gene (3026-3259) and the downstream of env gene which spanned till the nef gene (8183-8961). Phylogenetic relationships determined with neighbor-joining trees, revealed that the subtype C sequences clustered with sequences from Indian subtype C HIV-1 strains, and the subtype B sequences clustered with HIV-1 subtype B strains from Thailand. This finding may create a complex scenario of HIV-1 epidemic among the injecting drug users of Manipur in near future.

  6. Identification of personal lubricants that can cause rectal epithelial cell damage and enhance HIV type 1 replication in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begay, Othell; Jean-Pierre, Ninochka; Abraham, Ciby J; Chudolij, Anne; Seidor, Samantha; Rodriguez, Aixa; Ford, Brian E; Henderson, Marcus; Katz, David; Zydowsky, Thomas; Robbiani, Melissa; Fernández-Romero, José A

    2011-09-01

    Over-the-counter personal lubricants are used frequently during vaginal and anal intercourse, but they have not been extensively tested for biological effects that might influence HIV transmission. We evaluated the in vitro toxicity anti-HIV-1 activity and osmolality of popular lubricants. A total of 41 lubricants were examined and compared to Gynol II and Carraguard as positive and negative controls for toxicity, respectively. Cytotoxicity was assessed using the XTT assay. The MAGI assay with R5 and X4 HIV-1 laboratory strains was used to evaluate antiviral activity. The effect of the lubricants on differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayers (transepithelial electrical resistance, TEER) was also measured. None of the lubricants tested showed significant activity against HIV-1. Surprisingly, four of them, Astroglide Liquid, Astroglide Warming Liquid, Astroglide Glycerin & Paraben-Free Liquid, and Astroglide Silken Secret, significantly enhanced HIV-1 replication (plubricants were found to be hyperosmolar and the TEER value dropped approximately 60% 2 h after exposure to all lubricants tested. Cells treated with Carraguard, saline, and cell controls maintained about 100% initial TEER value after 2-6 h. We have identified four lubricants that significantly increase HIV-1 replication in vitro. In addition, the epithelial damage caused by these and many other lubricants may have implications for enhancing HIV transmission in vivo. These data emphasize the importance of performing more rigorous safety testing on these products.

  7. Transmission of nevirapine-resistant HIV type 1 via breast milk to infants after single-dose nevirapine in Beira, Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micek, Mark A; Dross, Sandra; Blanco, Ana Judith; Beck, Ingrid A; Matunha, Laurinda; Seidel, Kristy; Montoya, Pablo; Matediana, Eduardo; Gantt, Soren; Gloyd, Stephen; Frenkel, Lisa

    2014-08-15

    Acquisition of nevirapine (NVP)-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by breast-feeding infants after receipt of single-dose NVP to prevent mother-to-child transmission is not well defined. A prospective observational study of 307 infants evaluated the rate of breast milk transmission of NVP-resistant HIV and the concentrations of mutants over time. NVP resistance was detected in 9 of 24 infants (37.5%; 95% confidence interval, 18.8%-59.4%) infected via breast milk. Eight had a pure mutant HIV population at the time infection was first detected, and majority mutant populations persisted in all 6 infants with follow-up specimens. Infection of breast-feeding infants with NVP-resistant HIV resulted in mutants persisting as the dominant virus, which may indefinitely compromise treatment with NVP-based antiretroviral regimens. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Anti-HIV-1 activity of propolis in CD4(+) lymphocyte and microglial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekker, Genya; Hu, Shuxian; Spivak, Marla; Lokensgard, James R; Peterson, Phillip K

    2005-11-14

    An urgent need for additional agents to treat human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection led us to assess the anti-HIV-1 activity of the natural product propolis in CD4(+) lymphocytes and microglial cell cultures. Propolis inhibited viral expression in a concentration-dependent manner (maximal suppression of 85 and 98% was observed at 66.6 microg/ml propolis in CD4(+) and microglial cell cultures, respectively). Similar anti-HIV-1 activity was observed with propolis samples from several geographic regions. The mechanism of propolis antiviral property in CD4(+) lymphocytes appeared to involve, in part, inhibition of viral entry. While propolis had an additive antiviral effect on the reverse transcriptase inhibitor zidovudine, it had no noticeable effect on the protease inhibitor indinavir. The results of this in vitro study support the need for clinical trials of propolis or one or more of its components in the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtypes in HIV/HCV co-infected and HIV-1 mono-infected individuals in Guangdong Province%广东省HIV/HCV共感染者及单纯HIV感染者HIV-1基因亚型分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁小珍; 陈伟烈; 卓丽

    2013-01-01

    目的 了解广东地区HIV/HCV共感染患者和单纯HIV感染患者的感染途径及HIV-1病毒基因亚型分布特征,为艾滋病的治疗与预防提供实验室数据.方法 采用巢式RT-PCR对广东地区51例HIV/HCV共感染患者和48例单纯HIV感染患者HIV-1 ENV基因c2v3区域及GAG基因p17区域进行扩增,PCR产物测序后所获得序列进行HIV-1病毒基因亚型分析.结果 HIV/HCV共感染患者主要感染途径为静脉注射毒品,约占82%,其HIV-1有4种基因亚型,不同亚型以及比例分别为CRF01_AE (54.9%)、CRF07_BC (33.3%)、CRF08_BC(4%)和B '型(7.8%),CRF01_AE亚型为经静脉注射毒品感染的HIV/HCV共感染患者的主要H1V-1基因亚型,约占54.7%:单纯HIV感染患者主要感染途径为性,约占77%,其HIV-1有5种基因亚型,不同亚型及比例分剐为CRF01 _AE (77.1%)、CRF07_BC(10.4%)、CRF08_BC (6.2%)、B'型(4.2%)和B型(2.1%),CRF01_AE亚型为经性途径感染的单纯HIV感染患者的主要HIV-1基因亚型,约占78.4%.结论 广东省HIV/HCV共感染患者和单纯HIV感染患者中流行的HIV-1病毒基因亚型呈现多样性,尽管HIV/HCV共感染患者的主要感染途径与单纯HIV感染患者的不同,但HIV-1病毒主要基因亚型相同.%Objective To investigate the transmission routes and subtypes distribution of HIV in HIV/HCV co-infected and HIV mono-infected individuals in Guangdong Province.Methods Reverse transcription nested (RT-PCR) was performed to amplify the HIV-1 ENV c2v3 and GAG p17 gene regions from 51 HIV/HCV co-infected and 48HIV mono-infected individuals in Guangdong province.The PCR products were sequenced for HIV subtyping.Genetic analysis was done by MEGA4 software.Results Injection drug use (IDU,82%) was the main route of the transmission of HIV/HCV co-infection.The HIV subtype CRF01_AE (54.9%),CRF07_BC (33.3%),CRF08_BC (4%) and B'(7.8%) were identified; among which CRFO1 AE (54.7%) was proved the predominant one in HIV

  10. Geographic Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukinbeal, Chris

    2014-01-01

    While the use of media permeates geographic research and pedagogic practice, the underlying literacies that link geography and media remain uncharted. This article argues that geographic media literacy incorporates visual literacy, information technology literacy, information literacy, and media literacy. Geographic media literacy is the ability…

  11. The predominance of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 circulating recombinant form 02 (CRF02_AG in West Central Africa may be related to its replicative fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butel Christelle

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CRF02_AG is the predominant HIV strain circulating in West and West Central Africa. The aim of this study was to test whether this predominance is associated with a higher in vitro replicative fitness relative to parental subtype A and G viruses. Primary HIV-1 isolates (10 CRF02_AG, 5 subtype A and 5 subtype G were obtained from a well-described Cameroonian cohort. Growth competition experiments were carried out at equal multiplicity of infection in activated T cells and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MO-DC in parallel. Results Dual infection/competition experiments in activated T cells clearly indicated that CRF02_AG isolates had a significant replication advantage over the subtype A and subtype G viruses. The higher fitness of CRF02_AG was evident for isolates from patients with CD4+ T cell counts >200 cells/μL (non-AIDS or CD4+ T cell counts Conclusion We observed a higher ex vivo replicative fitness of CRF02_AG isolates compared to subtype A and G viruses from the same geographic region and showed that this was independent of the co-receptor tropism and irrespective of high or low CD4+ T cell count. This advantage in replicative fitness may contribute to the dominant spread of CRF02_AG over A and G subtypes in West and West Central Africa.

  12. Analysis of HIV type 1 BF recombinant sequences from South America dates the origin of CRF12_BF to a recombination event in the 1970s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilernia, Dario A; Jones, Leandro R; Pando, Maria A; Rabinovich, Roberto D; Damilano, Gabriel D; Turk, Gabriela; Rubio, Andrea E; Pampuro, Sandra; Gomez-Carrillo, Manuel; Salomón, Horacio

    2011-05-01

    HIV-1 epidemics in South America are believed to have originated in part from the subtype B epidemic initiated in the Caribbean/North America region. However, circulation of BF recombinants in similar proportions was extensively reported. Information currently shows that many BF recombinants share a recombination structure similar to that found in the CRF12_BF. In the present study, analyzing a set of 405 HIV sequences, we identified the most likely origin of the BF epidemic in an early event of recombination. We found that the subtype B epidemics in South America analyzed in the present study were initiated by a founder event that occurred in the early 1970s, a few years after the introduction of these strains in the Americas. Regarding the F/BF recombinant epidemics, by analyzing a subtype F genomic segment within the viral gene gag present in the majority of the BF recombinants, we found evidence of a geographic divergence very soon after the introduction of subtype F strains in South America. Moreover, through analysis of a subtype B segment present in all the CRF12_BF-like recombination structure, we estimated the circulation of the subtype B strain that gave rise to that recombinant structure around the same time period estimated for the introduction of subtype F strains. The HIV epidemics in South America were initiated in part through a founder event driven by subtype B strains coming from the previously established epidemic in the north of the continent. A second introduction driven by subtype F strains is likely to have encountered the incipient subtype B epidemic that soon after their arrival recombined with them, originating the BF epidemic in the region. These results may explain why in South America the majority of F sequences are found as BF recombinants.

  13. Prevalence, incidence and determinants of herpes simplex virus type 2 infection among HIV-seronegative women at high-risk of HIV infection: a prospective study in Beira, Mozambique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivete Meque

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To estimate the prevalence, incidence and determinants of herpes simplex type 2 (HSV-2 infection, and associations between HSV-2 and incident HIV infection, among women at higher risk for HIV infection in Beira, Mozambique. METHODS: Between 2009 and 2012, 411 women aged 18-35 years at higher risk of HIV acquisition (defined as having had two or more sexual partners in the month prior to study enrollment were enrolled and followed monthly for one year. At each study visit, they were counseled, interviewed, and tested for HSV-2 and HIV antibodies. RESULTS: The HSV-2 prevalence at baseline was 60.6% (95% CI: 55.7% -65.4%. Increasing age (aOR = 2.94, 95% CI: 1.74-4.97, P<0.001 and aOR = 3.39, 95% CI: 1.58-7.29, P = 0.002 for age groups of 21-24 and 25-35 years old respectively, lower educational level (aOR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.09-3.02, P = 0.022, working full time (aOR = 8.56, 95% CI: 1.01-72.53, P = 0.049 and having practiced oral sex (aOR = 3.02, 95% CI: 1.16-7.89, P = 0.024 were strongly associated with prevalent HSV-2 infection. Thirty one participants seroconverted for HSV-2 (20.5%; 95% CI: 14.4% -27.9% and 22 for HIV during the study period. The frequency of vaginal sex with a casual partner using a condom in the last 7 days was independently associated with incident HSV-2 infection (aOR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.05-3.47, P = 0.034. Positive HSV-2 serology at baseline was not significantly associated with risk of subsequent HIV seroconversion. CONCLUSIONS: Young women engaging in risky sexual behaviors in Beira had high prevalence and incidence of HSV-2 infection. Improved primary HSV-2 control strategies are urgently needed in Beira.

  14. Core Binding Factor β Protects HIV, Type 1 Accessory Protein Viral Infectivity Factor from MDM2-mediated Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Yusuke; Shindo, Keisuke; Nagata, Kayoko; Yoshinaga, Noriyoshi; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2016-11-25

    HIV, type 1 overcomes host restriction factor apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3) proteins by organizing an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex together with viral infectivity factor (Vif) and a host transcription cofactor core binding factor β (CBFβ). CBFβ is essential for Vif to counteract APOBEC3 by enabling the recruitment of cullin 5 to the complex and increasing the steady-state level of Vif protein; however, the mechanisms by which CBFβ up-regulates Vif protein remains unclear. Because we have reported previously that mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2) is an E3 ligase for Vif, we hypothesized that CBFβ might protect Vif from MDM2-mediated degradation. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses showed that Vif mutants that do not bind to CBFβ preferentially interact with MDM2 and that overexpression of CBFβ disrupts the interaction between MDM2 and Vif. Knockdown of CBFβ reduced the steady-state level of Vif in MDM2-proficient cells but not in MDM2-null cells. Cycloheximide chase analyses revealed that Vif E88A/W89A, which does not interact with CBFβ, degraded faster than wild-type Vif in MDM2-proficient cells but not in MDM2-null cells, suggesting that Vif stabilization by CBFβ is mainly caused by impairing MDM2-mediated degradation. We identified Vif R93E as a Vif variant that does not bind to MDM2, and the virus with this substitution mutation was more resistant to APOBEC3G than the parental virus. Combinatory substitution of Vif residues required for CBFβ binding and MDM2 binding showed full recovery of Vif steady-state levels, supporting our hypothesis. Our data provide new insights into the mechanism of Vif augmentation by CBFβ.

  15. Induction of antibodies against epitopes inaccessible on the HIV type 1 envelope oligomer by immunization with recombinant monomeric glycoprotein 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Bolmstedt, A; Novotny, J;

    1998-01-01

    An N-glycan (N306) at the base of the V3 loop of HIV-BRU gp120 is shielding a linear neutralization epitope at the tip of the V3 loop on oligomeric Env. In contrast, this epitope is readily antigenic on monomeric gp120. Immunization with recombinant monomeric HIV-BRU gp120 may thus be expected to...... immunogenic structures inaccessible on the envelope oligomer. The limited ability of recombinant gp120 vaccines to induce neutralizing antibodies against primary isolates may thus not exclusively reflect genetic variation.......An N-glycan (N306) at the base of the V3 loop of HIV-BRU gp120 is shielding a linear neutralization epitope at the tip of the V3 loop on oligomeric Env. In contrast, this epitope is readily antigenic on monomeric gp120. Immunization with recombinant monomeric HIV-BRU gp120 may thus be expected...

  16. Therapeutic Vaccination Using Cationic Liposome-Adjuvanted HIV Type 1 Peptides Representing HLA-Supertype-Restricted Subdominant T Cell Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Román, Victor Raúl Gómez; Jensen, Kristoffer Jarlov; Jensen, Sanne Skov

    2013-01-01

    , and HIV-1 viral loads. T cell immunogenicity was monitored longitudinally by interferon (IFN)-γ ELISpot. New vaccine-specific T cell responses were induced in 6/14 vaccinees for whom ELISpot data were valid. CD4 T cell counts and viral loads were stable. The study shows that therapeutic immunization......We have designed a therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine concept based on peptides together with the adjuvant CAF01. Peptides represented 15 HLA-supertype-restricted subdominant and conserved CD8 T cell epitopes and three CD4 T-helper cell epitopes. In this phase I clinical trial, safety and immunogenicity...... were assessed in untreated HIV-1-infected individuals in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa. Twenty-three HIV-1-infected individuals were randomized to receive placebo (n=5) or vaccine (n=18). Safety was appraised by clinical follow-up combined with monitoring of biochemistry, hematology, CD4 T cell counts...

  17. Vegetation Changes in the Permafrost Regions of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau from 1982-2012: Different Responses Related to Geographical Locations and Vegetation Types in High-Altitude Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiwei; Wang, Qian; Wu, Xiaodong; Zhao, Lin; Yue, Guangyang; Nan, Zhuotong; Wang, Puchang; Yi, Shuhua; Zou, Defu; Qin, Yu; Wu, Tonghua; Shi, Jianzong

    2017-01-01

    The Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) contains the largest permafrost area in a high-altitude region in the world, and the unique hydrothermal environments of the active layers in this region have an important impact on vegetation growth. Geographical locations present different climatic conditions, and in combination with the permafrost environments, these conditions comprehensively affect the local vegetation activity. Therefore, the responses of vegetation to climate change in the permafrost region of the QTP may be varied differently by geographical location and vegetation condition. In this study, using the latest Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) product based on turning points (TPs), which were calculated using a piecewise linear model, 9 areas within the permafrost region of the QTP were selected to investigate the effect of geographical location and vegetation type on vegetation growth from 1982 to 2012. The following 4 vegetation types were observed in the 9 selected study areas: alpine swamp meadow, alpine meadow, alpine steppe and alpine desert. The research results show that, in these study areas, TPs mainly appeared in 2000 and 2001, and almost 55.1% and 35.0% of the TPs were located in 2000 and 2001. The global standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI) and 7 meteorological variables were selected to analyze their correlations with NDVI. We found that the main correlative variables to vegetation productivity in study areas from 1982 to 2012 were precipitation, surface downward long-wave radiation and temperature. Furthermore, NDVI changes exhibited by different vegetation types within the same study area followed similar trends. The results show that regional effects rather than vegetation type had a larger impact on changes in vegetation growth in the permafrost regions of the QTP, indicating that climatic factors had a larger impact in the permafrost regions than the

  18. Immunogenicity of three Haemophilus influenzae type b protein conjugate vaccines in HIV seropositive adults and analysis of predictors of vaccine response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockrell, D H; Poland, G A; Steckelberg, J M; Wollan, P C; Strickland, S R; Pomeroy, C

    1999-07-16

    HIV-seropositive adults may be at increased risk of infection due to Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) as compared with HIV-seronegative adults. Protein conjugate vaccines have been demonstrated to induce protective levels of antibodies against Hib in immunocompetent infants and also in HIV-seropositive infants. In this study we determined the immunogenicity of three protein conjugate Hib vaccines (PRP-D, HbOC, HbNOMP) in 135 HIV-seropositive adults who received one dose of Hib vaccine. Anti-polyribosylribitol phosphate (PRP) antibodies were measured at 0, 1, 3 and 12 months postimmunization by the Farr method. We demonstrate that all three vaccines are highly immunogenic and result in protective (> 1.0 microg/ml) levels of antibody. Overall the anti-PRP antibody level was > 1.0 microg/ml in 26% of patients preimmunization, 91% at both 1 and 3 months, and 79% at 12 months postvaccination. Comparison of responses to the three vaccines over time demonstrated differences in the mean geometric anti-PRP antibody level at 1 month (p=0.03) and the 12 month time points (p=0.03) with lower geometric mean levels in the HbNOMP group, though baseline differences in groups limit the interpretation of these findings. In a univariate analysis of baseline characteristics which predicted poor vaccine response, low total IgG2 levels preimmunization predicted a poor antibody response at 1 month (p < 0.01) and at 12 months (p=0.05), while low CD4 T-cell count predicted poor response at 12 months (p < 0.01). We conclude that all three US licensed protein conjugate Hib vaccines are immunogenic in HIV-seropositive adults, and that baseline CD4 T-cell count and IgG2 levels predict the likelihood of antibody response to vaccine.

  19. The relationship between community structural characteristics, the context of crack use, and HIV risk behaviors in San Salvador, El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson-Gomez, Julia; McAuliffe, Timothy; Rivas de Mendoza, Lorena; Glasman, Laura; Gaborit, Mauricio

    2012-02-01

    This paper explores community structural factors in different low-income communities in the San Salvador, El Salvador, that account for differences in the social context in which crack is used and HIV risk behaviors among crack users. Results suggest that both more distal (type of low-income community, level of violent crime, and poverty) and proximate structural factors (type of site where drugs are used, and whether drugs are used within or outside of community of residence) influence HIV risk behaviors among drug users. Additionally, our results suggest that community structural factors influence the historical and geographic variation in drug use sites.

  20. Human papilloma virus types in the oral and cervical mucosa of HIV-positive South African women prior to antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Karin L; van Rensburg, Estrelita Janse; van Heerden, Willie F P; Boy, Sonja C

    2008-10-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and types in the oral and cervix mucosa of treatment-naïve HIV-1-positive women with CD4 counts less than 300 cells per ml with no HPV-associated oral lesions. Oral epithelium was harvested from the buccal mucosa and lateral borders of the tongue and cervical samples were collected from the endocervical area of 30 women, 22-64 years old. Cytobrush Plus cell collectors were used for sampling both anatomical areas. Genital pathology, obstetric and gynaecological history, co-morbid disease, hormone therapy, sexual behavior and smoking history were assessed via physical examination and clinical interviews. Special investigations included cervical Papanicolau smears, CD4 counts and HIV-1 viral loads. The linear array HPV test was used to determine HPV genotypes present in the specimens. Oral HPV were identified in 20% (n = 6) of the patients, of which two had infection with two HPV types. Genital HPV was found in 96.7% (n = 29) of the women, of which only 14 had cytological abnormalities on Papanicolau smear. Infection with multiple HPV types were present in 93.1% (n = 27) of the patients, with an average of four HPV types per individual. South African HIV-positive women with CD4 counts less than 300 cells per ml have a significant risk of cervical HPV strains and multiple strain infection of the cervix. The prevalence of HPV in normal oral mucosa was low but high-risk types were present. Limited correlation between oral HPV types and those identified in the cervical mucosa was found.

  1. Seamless modification of wild-type induced pluripotent stem cells to the natural CCR5Δ32 mutation confers resistance to HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lin; Wang, Jiaming; Beyer, Ashley I; Teque, Fernando; Cradick, Thomas J; Qi, Zhongxia; Chang, Judy C; Bao, Gang; Muench, Marcus O; Yu, Jingwei; Levy, Jay A; Kan, Yuet Wai

    2014-07-01

    Individuals homozygous for the C-C chemokine receptor type 5 gene with 32-bp deletions (CCR5Δ32) are resistant to HIV-1 infection. In this study, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) homozygous for the naturally occurring CCR5Δ32 mutation through genome editing of wild-type iPSCs using a combination of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) or RNA-guided clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 together with the piggyBac technology. Remarkably, TALENs or CRISPR-Cas9-mediated double-strand DNA breaks resulted in up to 100% targeting of the colonies on one allele of which biallelic targeting occurred at an average of 14% with TALENs and 33% with CRISPR. Excision of the piggyBac using transposase seamlessly reproduced exactly the naturally occurring CCR5Δ32 mutation without detectable exogenous sequences. We differentiated these modified iPSCs into monocytes/macrophages and demonstrated their resistance to HIV-1 challenge. We propose that this strategy may provide an approach toward a functional cure of HIV-1 infection.

  2. The EVVA Cohort Study: Anal and Cervical Type-Specific Human Papillomavirus Prevalence, Persistence, and Cytologic Findings in Women Living With HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pokomandy, Alexandra; Kaufman, Elaina; de Castro, Christina; Mayrand, Marie-Hélène; Burchell, Ann N; Klein, Marina; Charest, Louise; Auger, Manon; Rodrigues-Coutlée, Sophie; Coutlée, François

    2017-08-15

    The risk of anal cancer due to high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) is higher in women living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) than in the general population. We present findings of cervical and anal HPV and cytologic tests at baseline in the EVVA cohort study and HPV persistence data 6 months after baseline. Semiannual visits included questionnaires, chart reviews, cervical/anal cytologic and cervical/anal HPV testing for 2 years. Genotyping for 36 HPV genotypes was performed using the Roche Linear Array HPV genotyping test. A total of 151 women living with HIV were recruited. At baseline, 75% had anal HPV, 51% had anal HR-HPV, 50% had cervical HPV, and 29% had cervical HR-HPV. Anal HPV-16 and HPV-51 were more frequent in women born in Canada (31% and 29%, respectively, compared with ≤16% for other women). Most anal HR-HPV types detected at 6 months (57%-93%) were persistent from baseline. Findings of anal cytologic tests were abnormal for 37% of women. Anal HPV is highly prevalent in women living with HIV, and type distribution varies by place of birth. High-resolution anoscopy was indicated in more than one third of results. As anal cancer is potentially preventable, these important findings need to be considered when selecting the best approach for anal cancer screening programs.

  3. Estimation of the Binding Free Energy of AC1NX476 to HIV-1 Protease Wild Type and Mutations Using Free Energy Perturbation Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Son Tung; Mai, Binh Khanh; Hiep, Dinh Minh; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-10-01

    The binding mechanism of AC1NX476 to HIV-1 protease wild type and mutations was studied by the docking and molecular dynamics simulations. The binding free energy was calculated using the double-annihilation binding free energy method. It is shown that the binding affinity of AC1NX476 to wild type is higher than not only ritonavir but also darunavir, making AC1NX476 become attractive candidate for HIV treatment. Our theoretical results are in excellent agreement with the experimental data as the correlation coefficient between calculated and experimentally measured binding free energies R = 0.993. Residues Asp25-A, Asp29-A, Asp30-A, Ile47-A, Gly48-A, and Val50-A from chain A, and Asp25-B from chain B play a crucial role in the ligand binding. The mutations were found to reduce the receptor-ligand interaction by widening the binding cavity, and the binding propensity is mainly driven by the van der Waals interaction. Our finding may be useful for designing potential drugs to combat with HIV.

  4. Drug Abuse, HIV, and HCV in Asian Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Liang, Di; Lan, Yu-Ching; Vicknasingam, Balasingam Kasinather; Chakrabarti, Amit

    2016-09-01

    Drug abuse and co-occurring infections are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Asian countries are particularly vulnerable to the deleterious consequences of these risks/problems, as they have some of the highest rates of these diseases. This review describes drug abuse, HIV, and hepatitis C (HCV) in Asian countries. The most commonly used illicit drugs include opioids, amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS), cannabis, and ketamine. Among people who inject drugs, HIV rates range from 6.3 % in China to 19 % in Malaysia, and HCV ranges from 41 % in India and Taiwan to 74 % in Vietnam. In the face of the HIV epidemics, drug policies in these countries are slowly changing from the traditional punitive approach (e.g., incarcerating drug users or requiring registration as a drug user) to embrace public health approaches, including, for example, community-based treatment options as well as harm reduction approaches to reduce needle sharing and thus HIV transmission. HIV and HCV molecular epidemiology indicates limited geographic diffusion. While the HIV prevalence is declining in all five countries, use of new drugs (e.g., ATS, ketamine) continues to increase, as well as high-risk sexual behaviors associated with drug use-increasing the risk of sexual transmission of HIV, particularly among men who have sex with men. Screening, early intervention, and continued scaling up of therapeutic options (drug treatment and recovery support, ART, long-term HIV and HCV care for drug users) are critical for effective control or continued reduction of drug abuse and co-infections.

  5. Suppression of CCR5-tropic HIV type 1 infection by OX40 stimulation via enhanced production of β-chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Reiko; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Kodama, Akira; Saito, Mineki; Ansari, Aftab A; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2010-10-01

    To elucidate the immunological role for the costimulatory molecule OX40 against the early stage of HIV-1 infection, fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from normal donors were stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) together with soluble anti-CD28 mAb for 24 h, infected with CCR5-tropic (R5) HIV-1, and then cocultured in the presence or absence of OX40 ligand (OX40L). Results of these studied showed that OX40 stimulation led to a marked reduction in levels of p24, the frequency of intracellular p24(+) cells, as well as HIV-1-mediated syncytium formation. The suppression was reversed by anti-OX40L mAb. The mechanism underlying the R5 HIV-1 suppression was shown to be mediated in part by the CCR5-binding β-chemokines RANTES, MIP-1α, and MIP-1β, since the effect of the OX40 stimulation was reversed by a neutralizing antibody mixture against these three β-chemokines. Thus, OX40 stimulation enhanced the production of these CCR5-binding β-chemokines by the activated PBMCs and subsequently down-modulated CCR5 expression on the activated CD4(+) T cells. Taken together, the present data revealed a new role for OX40 in HIV-1 infection and documents the fact that OX40 stimulation suppresses the infection of primary activated PBMCs with R5 HIV-1 via enhanced production of R5 HIV-1 suppressing β-chemokines.

  6. Quantitative analysis of differentially expressed saliva proteins in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infected individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Nawei; Zhang, Zhenyu [Beijing Chaoyang Hospital Affiliated Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Feng, Shan [MOE Key Laboratory of Bioinformatics, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Wang, Qingtao [Beijing Chaoyang Hospital Affiliated Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Malamud, Daniel [NYU College of Dentistry, 345 East 24th Street, New York, NY 10010 (United States); Deng, Haiteng, E-mail: dht@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Bioinformatics, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2013-04-24

    Highlights: ► A high-throughput method for profiling and quantification of the differentially expressed proteins in saliva samples was developed. ► Identified that DMBT1, S100A7, S100A8, S100A9 and alpha defensin were up-regulated in saliva from HIV-1 seropositive patients. ► Established analytical strategies are translatable to the clinical setting. -- Abstract: In the present study, we have established a new methodology to analyze saliva proteins from HIV-1-seropositive patients before highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and seronegative controls. A total of 593 and 601 proteins were identified in the pooled saliva samples from 5 HIV-1 subjects and 5 controls, respectively. Forty-one proteins were found to be differentially expressed. Bioinformatic analysis of differentially expressed salivary proteins showed an increase of antimicrobial proteins and decrease of protease inhibitors upon HIV-1 infection. To validate some of these differentially expressed proteins, a high-throughput quantitation method was established to determine concentrations of 10 salivary proteins in 40 individual saliva samples from 20 seropositive patients before HAART and 20 seronegative subjects. This method was based on limited protein separation within the zone of the stacking gel of the 1D SDS PAGE and using isotope-coded synthetic peptides as internal standards. The results demonstrated that a combination of protein profiling and targeted quantitation is an efficient method to identify and validate differentially expressed salivary proteins. Expression levels of members of the calcium-binding S100 protein family and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 protein (DMBT1) were up-regulated while that of Mucin 5B was down-regulated in HIV-1 seropositive saliva samples, which may provide new perspectives for monitoring HIV-infection and understanding the mechanism of HIV-1 infectivity.

  7. Use of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) human hyperimmune immunoglobulin in HIV type 1-infected children (Pediatric AIDS clinical trials group protocol 273).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiehm, E R; Fletcher, C V; Mofenson, L M; Palumbo, P E; Kang, M; Fenton, T; Sapan, C V; Meyer, W A; Shearer, W T; Hawkins, E; Fowler, M G; Bouquin, P; Purdue, L; Sloand, E M; Nemo, G J; Wara, D; Bryson, Y J; Starr, S E; Petru, A; Burchett, S

    2000-02-01

    The clinical, immunologic, and virologic effects and the pharmacokinetics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) human hyperimmune immunoglobulin (HIVIG) were assessed in 30 HIV-infected children aged 2-11 years. All had moderately advanced disease with an immune complex-dissociated (ICD) p24 antigen >70 pg/mL and were on stable antiviral therapy. Three groups of 10 children received 6 monthly infusions of 200, 400, or 800 mg/kg of HIVIG, and serial immunologic and virologic assays were performed. HIVIG doses as high as 800 mg/kg were safe and well tolerated. The half-life of HIVIG, determined by serial p24 antibody titers, was 13-16 days, the volume of distribution was 102-113 mL/kg, and clearance was 5.6-6.0 mL/kg/day. Plasma ICD p24 decreased during the infusions, but CD4 cell levels, plasma RNA copy number, cellular virus, immunoglobulin levels, and neutralizing antibody titers were minimally affected by the infusions. Clinical status did not change during the 6-month infusion and 3-month follow-up periods.

  8. The Utility of a Syndemic Framework in Understanding Chronic Disease Management Among HIV-Infected and Type 2 Diabetic Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byg, Blaire; Bazzi, Angela Robertson; Funk, Danielle; James, Bonface; Potter, Jennifer

    2016-12-01

    Syndemic theory posits that epidemics of multiple physical and psychosocial problems co-occur among disadvantaged groups due to adverse social conditions. Although sexual minority populations are often stigmatized and vulnerable to multiple health problems, the syndemic perspective has been underutilized in understanding chronic disease. To assess the potential utility of this perspective in understanding the management of co-occurring HIV and Type 2 diabetes, we used linear regression to examine glycemic control (A1c) among men who have sex with men (MSM) with both HIV and Type 2 diabetes (n = 88). Bivariable linear regression explored potential syndemic correlates of inadequate glycemic control. Compared to those with adequate glycemic control (A1c ≤ 7.5 %), more men with inadequate glycemic control (A1c > 7.5 %) had hypertension (70 vs. 46 %, p = 0.034), high triglycerides (93 vs. 61 %, p = 0.002), depression (67 vs. 39 %, p = 0.018), current substance abuse (15 vs. 2 %, p = 0.014), and detectable levels of HIV (i.e., viral load ≥75 copies per ml blood; 30 vs. 10 %, p = 0.019). In multivariable regression controlling for age, the factors that were independently associated with higher A1c were high triglycerides, substance use, and detectable HIV viral load, suggesting that chronic disease management among MSM is complex and challenging for patients and providers. Findings also suggest that syndemic theory can be a clarifying lens for understanding chronic disease management among sexual minority stigmatized populations. Interventions targeting single conditions may be inadequate when multiple conditions co-occur; thus, research using a syndemic framework may be helpful in identifying intervention strategies that target multiple co-occurring conditions.

  9. Synthesis, 2D-NMR and molecular modelling studies of pentacycloundecane lactam-peptides and peptoids as potential HIV-1 wild type C-SA protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makatini, Maya M; Petzold, Katja; Alves, Cláudio Nahum; Arvidsson, Per I; Honarparvar, Bahareh; Govender, Patrick; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G; Sayed, Yasien; JerônimoLameira; Maguire, Glenn E M; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2013-02-01

    In this study, eight non-natural peptides and peptoids incorporating the pentacycloundecane (PCU) lactam were designed and synthesized as potential inhibitors of the wild type C-SA HIV-protease. Five of these inhibitors gave IC(50) values ranging from 0.5 up to 0.75 µM against the resistance-prone wild type C-South African HIV-protease. NMR EASY-ROESY studies enabled us to describe the secondary structure of three of these compounds in solution. The 3D structures of the selected cage peptides were also modelled in solution using QM/MM/MD simulations. Satisfactory agreement between the NMR observations and the low energy calculated structures exists. Only one of these inhibitors (11 peptoid), which showed the best IC(50)(0.5 µM), exhibited a definable 3-D structure in solution. Autodock4 and AutodockVina were used to model the potential interaction between these inhibitors and the HIV-PR. It appears that the docking results are too crude to be correlated with the relative narrow range of experimental IC(50) values (0.5-10 µM). The PCU-peptides and peptoides were several orders less toxic (145 μM for 11 and 102 μM for 11 peptoid) to human MT-4 cells than lopinavir (0.025 μM). This is the first example of a polycyclic cage framework to be employed as an HIV-PR transition state analogue inhibitor and can potentially be utilized for other diseases related proteases. [Figure: see text].

  10. Microarray study reveals that HIV-1 induces rapid type-I interferon-dependent p53 mRNA up-regulation in human primary CD4+ T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tremblay Michel J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with HIV-1 has been shown to alter expression of a large array of host cell genes. However, previous studies aimed at investigating the putative HIV-1-induced modulation of host gene expression have been mostly performed in established human cell lines. To better approximate natural conditions, we monitored gene expression changes in a cell population highly enriched in human primary CD4+ T lymphocytes exposed to HIV-1 using commercial oligonucleotide microarrays from Affymetrix. Results We report here that HIV-1 influences expression of genes related to many important biological processes such as DNA repair, cellular cycle, RNA metabolism and apoptosis. Notably, expression of the p53 tumor suppressor and genes involved in p53 homeostasis such as GADD34 were up-regulated by HIV-1 at the mRNA level. This observation is distinct from the previously reported p53 phosphorylation and stabilization at the protein level, which precedes HIV-1-induced apoptosis. We present evidence that the HIV-1-mediated increase in p53 gene expression is associated with virus-mediated induction of type-I interferon (i.e. IFN-α and IFN-β. Conclusion These observations have important implications for our understanding of HIV-1 pathogenesis, particularly in respect to the virus-induced depletion of CD4+ T cells.

  11. Differentially co-expressed interacting protein pairs discriminate samples under distinct stages of HIV type 1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Dukyong; Kim, Hyosil; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung; Park, Rae Woong; Lee, KiYoung

    2011-01-01

    Microarray analyses based on differentially expressed genes (DEGs) have been widely used to distinguish samples across different cellular conditions. However, studies based on DEGs have not been able to clearly determine significant differences between samples of pathophysiologically similar HIV-1 stages, e.g., between acute and chronic progressive (or AIDS) or between uninfected and clinically latent stages. We here suggest a novel approach to allow such discrimination based on stage-specific genetic features of HIV-1 infection. Our approach is based on co-expression changes of genes known to interact. The method can identify a genetic signature for a single sample as contrasted with existing protein-protein-based analyses with correlational designs. Our approach distinguishes each sample using differentially co-expressed interacting protein pairs (DEPs) based on co-expression scores of individual interacting pairs within a sample. The co-expression score has positive value if two genes in a sample are simultaneously up-regulated or down-regulated. And the score has higher absolute value if expression-changing ratios are similar between the two genes. We compared characteristics of DEPs with that of DEGs by evaluating their usefulness in separation of HIV-1 stage. And we identified DEP-based network-modules and their gene-ontology enrichment to find out the HIV-1 stage-specific gene signature. Based on the DEP approach, we observed clear separation among samples from distinct HIV-1 stages using clustering and principal component analyses. Moreover, the discrimination power of DEPs on the samples (70-100% accuracy) was much higher than that of DEGs (35-45%) using several well-known classifiers. DEP-based network analysis also revealed the HIV-1 stage-specific network modules; the main biological processes were related to "translation," "RNA splicing," "mRNA, RNA, and nucleic acid transport," and "DNA metabolism." Through the HIV-1 stage-related modules, changing

  12. HIV Associated Lupus Like Nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-seropositive patients are at a high risk for the development of a variety of acute and chronic renal diseases. Most patients with HIVAN are of African descent, presenting late in the course of their HIV-1 infection. The only reliable test to establish or rule out the presence of HIVAN (HIV associated nephropathy) is renal biopsy. The most common lesion associated with HIV is a focal segmental glomeruloscelerosis, but several times, other ...

  13. Analysis of Sequence Based Classifier Prediction for HIV Subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Santhosh Kumar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is a lent virus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. The main drawback in HIV treatment process is its sub type prediction. The sub type and group classification of HIV is based on its genetic variability and location. HIV can be divided into two major types, HIV type 1 (HIV-1 and HIV type 2 (HIV-2. Many classifier approaches have been used to classify HIV subtypes based on their group, but some of cases are having two groups in one; in such cases the classification becomes more complex. The methodology used is this paper based on the HIV sequences. For this work several classifier approaches are used to classify the HIV1 and HIV2. For implementation of the work a real time patient database is taken and the patient records are experimented and the final best classifier is identified with quick response time and least error rate.

  14. Psychoneuroimmunology and HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Michael H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents evidence describing benefits of behavioral interventions such as aerobic exercise training on both psychological and immunological functioning among high risk human immunodeficiency virus-Type 1 (HIV-1) seronegative and very early stage seropositive homosexual men. HIV-1 infection is cast as chronic disease for which early…

  15. Airports Geographic Information System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Airports Geographic Information System maintains the airport and aeronautical data required to meet the demands of the Next Generation National Airspace System....

  16. Evidence that levels of the dimeric cellular transcription factor CP2 play little role in the activation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat in vivo or following superinfection with herpes simplex virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, F; Swendeman, S L; Popik, W; Pitha, P M; Sheffery, M

    1994-08-19

    The dimeric transcription factor CP2 binds a sequence element found near the transcription start site of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) long terminal repeat. Several groups have suggested that cellular factors binding this element might play a role in modulating HIV-1 promoter activity in vivo. For example, induction of latent HIV-1 gene expression in response to superinfection by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) or cytomegalovirus is thought to be mediated, in part, by factors binding the CP2 site. In this report we began to examine directly the relationship between CP2 and expression of the HIV-1 promoter. First, we tested what effect HSV-1 infection of T cells had on the cellular levels of CP2. The results showed that HSV-1 infection led to a significant reduction in the level of CP2 DNA binding activity and protein within 20 h. Next, we tested the effect of overexpressing either the wild-type factor or a dominant negative variant of CP2 on HIV-1 promoter activity in vivo. The results showed that CP2 had little effect or slightly repressed HIV-1 promoter activity in vivo. In addition, these expression constructs had little effect on the induction of HIV-1 promoter activity elicited by HSV-1 infection.

  17. Comparative performances of serologic and molecular assays for detecting human T lymphotropic virus type 1 and type 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoline Rodrigues Campos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present study evaluated several techniques currently available (commercial kits and in-house assays for diagnosing human T lymphotropic viruses types 1 and 2 in two groups of patients enrolled at HIV/AIDS specialized care services in São Paulo: Group 1 (G1, n = 1608, 1237 male/371 female, median age 44.3 years old, majority using highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART; G2, n = 1383, 930 male/453 female, median age of 35.6 years old, majority HAART naïve. Enzyme immunoassays [(EIA Murex and Gold ELISA] were employed for human T lymphotropic viruses types 1 and 2 screening; Western blotting (WB, INNO-LIA (LIA, real-time PCR pol (qPCR, and nested-PCR-RFLP (tax were used to confirm infection. Samples were considered human T lymphotropic viruses types 1 and 2 positive when there was reactivity using at least one of the four confirmatory assays. By serological screening, 127/2991 samples were positive or borderline, and human T lymphotropic virus infection was confirmed in 108 samples (three EIA-borderline: 56 human T lymphotropic virus type 1 [G1 (27 + G2 (29]; 45 human T lymphotropic virus type 2 [G1 (21 + G2 (24]; one human T lymphotropic virus type 1 + human T lymphotropic virus type 2 (G2; six human T lymphotropic virus [G1 (2 + G2 (4]. Although there were differences in group characteristics, human T lymphotropic viruses types 1 and 2 prevalence was similar [3.1% (G1 and 4.2% (G2, p = 0.113]. The overall sensitivities of LIA, WB, qPCR, and PCR-RFLP were 97.2%, 82.4%, 68.9%, and 68.4%, respectively, with some differences among groups, likely due to the stage of human T lymphotropic virus infection and/or HAART duration. Indeterminate immunoblotting results were detected in G2, possibly due to the seroconversion period. Negative results in molecular assays could be explained by the use of HAART, the occurrence of defective provirus and/or the low circulating proviral load. In conclusion, when determining the human T

  18. Female sex workers who use amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) in three cities of Vietnam: use and sexual risks related to HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hien Thi; Le, Giang Minh; Dinh, Thuy Thanh

    2013-01-01

    Early evidence shows that amphetamine-type stimulant (ATS) use has been rapidly increasing in Vietnam. Female sex workers (FSWs) who use ATSs have increased sexual risks for HIV infection. This paper presents qualitative data from a mixed-method study conducted from 2010 to 2011 that aimed to explore the use of ATS among FSWs in three major cities and to identify HIV-related sexual risks among this group. A total of 37 in-depth interviews were conducted, and thematic analysis was performed using NVIVO 8.0 software. Study participants reported that they perceive ATS to be more 'stylish', 'higher class' and much less 'addictive' than heroin. The study highlights multiple sexual risks among this group, including having prolonged sex; sex with multiple simultaneous partners or clients; lack of negotiation for safe sex; increased likelihood of group sex in the context of drug pooling and extended drug and sexual network; as well as unprotected sex. There is an urgent need to promote contextually appropriate interventions to reduce the HIV-related sexual risks among this group.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of the wild type and E92Q/N155H mutant of Elvitegravir-resistance HIV-1 integrase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qi [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., Shanghai (China). State Key Lab. of Microbial Metabolism and College of Life Science and Biotechnology; Cheng, Xiaolin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Molecular Biophysics; Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology; Wei, Dongqing [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., Shanghai (China). State Key Lab. of Microbial Metabolism and College of Life Science and Biotechnology; Xu, Qin [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., Shanghai (China). State Key Lab. of Microbial Metabolism and College of Life Science and Biotechnology

    2014-11-06

    Although Elvitegravir (EVG) is a newly developed antiretrovirals drug to treat the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), drug resistance has already been found in clinic, such as E92Q/N155H and Q148H/G140S. Several structural investigations have already been reported to reveal the molecular mechanism of the drug resistance. As full length crystal structure for HIV-1 integrase is still unsolved, we use in this paper the crystal structure of the full length prototype foamy virus (PFV) in complex with virus DNA and inhibitor Elvitegravir as a template to construct the wild type and E92Q/N155H mutant system of HIV-1 integrase. Molecular dynamic simulations was used to revel the binding mode and the drug resistance of the EVG ligand in E92Q/N155H. Several important interactions were discovered between the mutated residues and the residues in the active site of the E92Q/N155H double mutant pattern, and cross correlation and clustering methods were used for detailed analysis. The results from the MD simulation studies will be used to guide the experimental efforts of developing novel inhibitors against drug-resistant HIV integrase mutants.

  20. Short Communication: Current Prevalence and Risk Factors Associated with Human T Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 and Human T Lymphotropic Virus Type 2 Infections Among HIV/AIDS Patients in São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caterino-de-Araujo, Adele; Sacchi, Cláudio Tavares; Gonçalves, Maria Gisele; Campos, Karoline Rodrigues; Magri, Mariana Cavalheiro; Alencar, Wong Kuen

    2015-05-01

    During the 1990s, high prevalences of HIV/human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and HIV/human T lymphotropic virus type 2 (HTLV-2) coinfections were detected in São Paulo, Brazil in association with intravenous drug use (IDU). The current prevalences and risk factors for HIV/HTLV-1/-2 were evaluated in 1,608 patients attending the AIDS/STD Reference and Training Center in São Paulo. Blood samples were analyzed for HTLV-1/2-specific antibodies using enzyme immunoassays (EIA Murex HTLV-I+II, Diasorin, and Gold ELISA HTLV-I+II, REM) and immunoblotting (HTLV Blot 2.4, MP Biomedicals and INNO-LIA HTLV-I/II, Innogenetics) and for the pol proviral DNA segments of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 by "in-house" real-time PCR. These analyses revealed that 50 (3.11%) of the samples were HTLV positive, including 25 (1.55%) that were HTLV-1 positive, 21 (1.31%) that were HTLV-2 positive, and 4 (0.25%) that were HTLV positive (untypeable). The median age of the HIV/HTLV-coinfected individuals was 50 years versus 44 years in the overall population (p=0.000). The risk factors associated with HIV/HTLV-1/-2 coinfections were female gender (OR 3.26, 1.78-5.95), black/pardo color (OR 2.21, 1.21-4.03), infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) (OR 4.27, 2.32-7.87) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) (OR 24.40, 12.51-48.11), and intravenous drug use (IDU) (OR 30.01, 15.21-59.29). The current low prevalence of HTLV-1/2 in HIV-infected patients in São Paulo could be explained in part by programs providing IDUs with sterile needles and syringes and changes in the drug usage patterns of individuals from injecting cocaine to smoking crack cocaine.

  1. HIV Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... All Collapse All Should I get tested for HIV? CDC recommends that everyone between the ages of ...

  2. Analysis of workability of rocks and type of prequarternary bedrock in the selected part of the Ostrava conurbation by means of geographic information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Marschalko

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available An up-to-date topic with which engineering geology can contribute to the requirements of practice and research, in particularthe needs of land use planning, state administration, building offices, developers, etc. is an analysis of new possibilities of providingreference information on the engineering-geological conditions by means of geographic information systems. The study in the presentedpaper deals with an evaluation of two geofactors. They are the character of rocks workability and Pre-quaternary bedrock. Workabilityis a significant limiting factor, which affects the used technology and financial demands of earth work. Especially in case of demandingconstructions, the Pre-quaternary bedrock is a geological environment which will have to be interacted with and must be taken intoaccount during selecting engineering foundation. The overall project was divided into five model areas (1-5, while this paper evaluatesa partial model area of no.1, which is defined by topographical map in drawing scale 1:10 1000 (topographic sheet No. 15-43-10.Namely they are Slezské, Moravské Ostravy, Vítkovic a Radvanice. The mentioned methodology was applied in the interest area forthe first time.

  3. Conceptual Model of Dynamic Geographic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Rosales Miguel Alejandro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In geographic environments, there are many and different types of geographic entities such as automobiles, trees, persons, buildings, storms, hurricanes, etc. These entities can be classified into two groups: geographic objects and geographic phenomena. By its nature, a geographic environment is dynamic, thus, it’s static modeling is not sufficient. Considering the dynamics of geographic environment, a new type of geographic entity called event is introduced. The primary target is a modeling of geographic environment as an event sequence, because in this case the semantic relations are much richer than in the case of static modeling. In this work, the conceptualization of this model is proposed. It is based on the idea to process each entity apart instead of processing the environment as a whole. After that, the so called history of each entity and its spatial relations to other entities are defined to describe the whole environment. The main goal is to model systems at a conceptual level that make use of spatial and temporal information, so that later it can serve as the semantic engine for such systems.

  4. Assessing Geographic Information Enhancement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Loenen, B.; Zevenbergen, J.

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of geographic information infrastructures (or spatial data infrastructures) is increasingly attracting the attention of researchers in the Geographic information (GI) domain. Especially the assessment of value added GI appears to be complex. By applying the concept of value chain analysis

  5. Environmental geographic information system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peek, Dennis W; Helfrich, Donald Alan; Gorman, Susan

    2010-08-01

    This document describes how the Environmental Geographic Information System (EGIS) was used, along with externally received data, to create maps for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (SWEIS) Source Document project. Data quality among the various classes of geographic information system (GIS) data is addressed. A complete listing of map layers used is provided.

  6. Characterization of a novel type of HIV-1 particle assembly inhibitor using a quantitative luciferase-Vpr packaging-based assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Gonzalez

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 auxiliary protein Vpr and Vpr-fusion proteins can be copackaged with Gag precursor (Pr55Gag into virions or membrane-enveloped virus-like particles (VLP. Taking advantage of this property, we developed a simple and sensitive method to evaluate potential inhibitors of HIV-1 assembly in a living cell system. Two proteins were coexpressed in recombinant baculovirus-infected Sf9 cells, Pr55Gag, which formed the VLP backbone, and luciferase fused to the N-terminus of Vpr (LucVpr. VLP-encapsidated LucVpr retained the enzymatic activity of free luciferase. The levels of luciferase activity present in the pelletable fraction recovered from the culture medium correlated with the amounts of extracellular VLP released by Sf9 cells assayed by conventional immunological methods. Our luciferase-based assay was then applied to the characterization of betulinic acid (BA derivatives that differed from the leader compound PA-457 (or DSB by their substituant on carbon-28. The beta-alanine-conjugated and lysine-conjugated DSB could not be evaluated for their antiviral potentials due to their high cytotoxicity, whereas two other compounds with a lesser cytotoxicity, glycine-conjugated and ε-NH-Boc-lysine-conjugated DSB, exerted a dose-dependent negative effect on VLP assembly and budding. A fifth compound with a low cytotoxicity, EP-39 (ethylene diamine-conjugated DSB, showed a novel type of antiviral effect. EP-39 provoked an aberrant assembly of VLP, resulting in nonenveloped, morula-like particles of 100-nm in diameter. Each morula was composed of nanoparticle subunits of 20-nm in diameter, which possibly mimicked transient intermediates of the HIV-1 Gag assembly process. Chemical cross-linking in situ suggested that EP-39 favored the formation or/and persistence of Pr55Gag trimers over other oligomeric species. EP-39 showed a novel type of negative effect on HIV-1 assembly, targeting the Pr55Gag oligomerisation. The biological effect of EP-39

  7. Differences in HIV type 1 RNA plasma load profile of closely related cocirculating Ethiopian subtype C strains: C and C'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayele, Workenesh; Mekonnen, Yared; Messele, Tsehaynesh; Mengistu, Yohannes; Tsegaye, Aster; Bakker, Margreet; Berkhout, Ben; Dorigo-Zetsma, Wendelien; Wolday, Dawit; Goudsmit, Jaap; Coutinho, Roel; de Baar, Michel; Paxton, William A; Pollakis, Georgios

    2010-07-01

    Two HIV-1 subtype C subclusters have been identified in Ethiopia (C and C') with little knowledge regarding their biological or clinical differences. We longitudinally monitored HIV-1 viral loads and CD4(+) T cell counts for 130 subtype C-infected individuals from Ethiopia over 5 years. The genetic subclusters C and C' were determined and comparisons were made between the groups. None of the study individuals received antiretroviral therapy. Subcluster C' was found to be the more prevalent (72.3%) genotype circulating. Individuals infected with subcluster C' harbored higher viral loads in comparison to subcluster C-infected individuals when the CD4(+) T cell counts were high (500-900 cells/mm(3)), whereas at low CD4(+) T cell counts (0-150 cells/mm(3)) individuals infected with subcluster C viruses showed higher viral loads. We identified a greater number of deaths among individuals infected with subcluster C viruses in comparison to C'. Our results indicate that infection with subcluster C viruses leads to a more rapid onset of disease, despite the initial lower HIV-1 RNA plasma loads. Additionally, the higher viral loads seen for HIV-1 subcluster C' infections at higher CD4(+) T cell counts can help explain the higher prevalence of this subtype in Ethiopia.

  8. Virologic and immunologic outcomes after 24 weeks in HIV type 1-infected adolescents receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flynn, PM; Rudy, BJ; Douglas, SD; Lathey, J; Spector, SA; Martinez, J; Silio, M; Belzer, M; Friedman, L; D'Angelo, L; McNamara, J; Hodge, J; Hughes, MD; Lindsey, JC

    2004-01-01

    Background. Adolescents represent the fastest growing demographic group of new human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections in the United States. At present, there is little information available about their response to therapy. Methods. We studied 120 adolescents infected via high-risk behaviors w

  9. [Parameters of the CD4-Cell count and viral load in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infected patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selimova, L M; Serebrovskaya, L V; Ivanova, L A; Kravchenko, A V; Buravtsova, E V

    2015-01-01

    In this work the specific features of parameters of plasma CD4 T-lymphocytes count and level virus RNA in the HIV-infected patients were studied. 22% correlation between reduction of CD4 cell count and an increase in virus RNA level was observed in persons that did not receive antiretroviral treatment during the third HIV-infection phase. During this phase of infection patients exhibited a growth of the median value of virus load in cases of both rise as decline in CD4 cell count during long observation period. In addition, towards the end of the observation period, the percentage of patients with virus load > 3.3 Ig copies/ml considerably expanded. 43% correlation between CD4 cell count and duration of the HIV-infection was detected during the fourth infection phase in persons that did not receive antiretroviral treatment. Most of the patients in the third and the fourth infection phases had essential CD4 cell count growth during antiretroviral treatment. Best values were observed in patients with the initial value of CD4 > 400 cells/μl belonging to the third HIV-infection phase.

  10. Prevalence, types, and geographical distribution of Listeria monocytogenes from a survey of retail Queso Fresco and associated cheese processing plants and dairy farms in Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Enriquez, R I; Garcia-Galaz, A; Acedo-Felix, E; Gonzalez-Rios, I H; Call, J E; Luchansky, J B; Diaz-Cinco, M E

    2007-11-01

    In the first part of this study, samples were collected from farms, cheese processing plants (CPPs), and retail markets located in various geographical areas of Sonora, Mexico, over a 12-month period during the summer of 2004 and winter of 2005. Four (all Queso Fresco [QF] from retail markets) of 349 total samples tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes (Lm). Of these four positive samples, three were collected in the northern region and one in the southern region of Sonora. Additionally, two were collected during the winter months, and two were collected during the summer months. For the second part of the study, a total of 39 samples from a farm, a CPP, and retail markets were collected and processed according to a combination of the Norma Oficial Mexicana NOM-143-SSA1-1995.10 method (NOM) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Bacteriological Analytical Manual method, and 27 samples from these same locations were collected and processed according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service method (USDA-FSIS). The NOM-FDA method recovered the pathogen from 6 (15%) of 39 samples (one cheese and five product contact surfaces), while the USDA-FSIS method recovered the pathogen from 5 (18.5%) of 27 samples (all product contact surfaces). In addition, the 40 isolates recovered from the 15 total samples that tested positive for Lm grouped into five distinct pulsotypes that were ca. 60% related, as determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis. The results of this study confirmed a 3.4% prevalence of Lm in QF collected from retail markets located in Sonora and no appreciable difference in the effectiveness of either the NOM-FDA or USDA-FSIS method to recover the pathogen from cheese or environmental samples.

  11. Functional stability of unliganded envelope glycoprotein spikes among isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitish Agrawal

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env spike is challenging to study at the molecular level, due in part to its genetic variability, structural heterogeneity and lability. However, the extent of lability in Env function, particularly for primary isolates across clades, has not been explored. Here, we probe stability of function for variant Envs of a range of isolates from chronic and acute infection, and from clades A, B and C, all on a constant virus backbone. Stability is elucidated in terms of the sensitivity of isolate infectivity to destabilizing conditions. A heat-gradient assay was used to determine T(90 values, the temperature at which HIV-1 infectivity is decreased by 90% in 1 h, which ranged between ∼40 to 49°C (n = 34. For select Envs (n = 10, the half-lives of infectivity decay at 37°C were also determined and these correlated significantly with the T(90 (p = 0.029, though two 'outliers' were identified. Specificity in functional Env stability was also evident. For example, Env variant HIV-1(ADA was found to be labile to heat, 37°C decay, and guanidinium hydrochloride but not to urea or extremes of pH, when compared to its thermostable counterpart, HIV-1(JR-CSF. Blue native PAGE analyses revealed that Env-dependent viral inactivation preceded complete dissociation of Env trimers. The viral membrane and membrane-proximal external region (MPER of gp41 were also shown to be important for maintaining trimer stability at physiological temperature. Overall, our results indicate that primary HIV-1 Envs can have diverse sensitivities to functional inactivation in vitro, including at physiological temperature, and suggest that parameters of functional Env stability may be helpful in the study and optimization of native Env mimetics and vaccines.

  12. HIV Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS Prevention Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... All Is abstinence the only 100% effective HIV prevention option? Yes. Abstinence means not having oral, vaginal, ...

  13. Use of Geographical Information System (GIS) and remote sensing in development of urban forest types and shapes in Tangerang Selatan City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Gumilar; Hermawan, Rachmad; Budi Prasetyo, Lilik

    2017-01-01

    The development of a city could create adverse effects, such as increase in air pollutant, and decrease in amenity. One of the ways to overcome these adverse effects is developing urban forest. For maximizing the function of urban forest, the appropriate types of urban forest to be developed, should be determined first. The aims of this study were to determine the appropriate types of urban forest and to identify the shape of urban forest in Tangerang Selatan City by using GIS and remote sensing. Urban forest shape was identified on the basis of shape and distribution of land unit. The steps of the study comprised data collection, map preparation and data analysis. Landsat 8 satellite imagery was interpreted for land use/cover classification. Scoring based on air temperature, land slope, and soil types was used to determine priority of the urban forest locations. Besides that, land use planning was considered to determine the appropriate urban forest type. The results of the study show that the appropriate urban forest types are residential area urban forest, industry urban forest, and recreation urban forest. On the other hand, the appropriate urban forest shapes are strip, scattered, and clustered pattern.

  14. Science challenging HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, R R; Lakshi, V

    1993-04-01

    The first accepted report of a novel human, slow virus disease belonging to "lentivirus" known as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome can be traced to reports of June 1981. HIV-1 and HIV-2 were later found over the period 1984-86 to be unequivocally associated with AIDS. They are two serologically distinct viruses belonging to the same family with the unique properties of integration and latency in the host cell genome and the presence of reverse transcriptase. Typical of all retroviruses, the HIV genome comprises three genes governing the synthesis of all core proteins, replication protein encoding, and envelope proteins. HIV uses the CD4 antigen on T-helper cells, and about 40% of blood monocytes and tissue macrophages as a cell surface receptor. HIV may, however, also infect cells which contain no CD4. Macrophages serve as the main reservoir of HIV and may carry the virus to different organs. Very recently a rare type of white blood cell called the dendritic cell has been found to allow for direct infection by HIV during sexual intercourse. These cells are prominently present in the anal and vaginal mucosa. The authors discuss facts and figures on the HIV epidemic, the Indian scenario, classification of the clinical spectrum, the enzyme immunoassay HIV testing format, Western blot, immunofluorescence antibody, HIV culture, flow cytometry, radio immuno precipitation assay, and the detection of HIV DNA. Significant advances have been made over the last ten years in understanding the pathogenesis of HIV infection and accurately diagnosing infected individuals, with recombinant technology, polymerase chain reaction, and the construction of synthetic hybrid virus rapidly becoming part of routine diagnostics. More sensitive, specific, and rapid techniques are, however, needed for the early diagnosis and management of AIDS cases. The need for more ideal antibody incorporating both regulatory and structural proteins of the virion, preferably manufactured using

  15. Broadly neutralizing antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and rational design of HIV-1 vaccines%抗人类免疫缺陷病毒广谱中和抗体与疫苗设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王若珂; 郭建影; 张林琦

    2013-01-01

    自发现人类免疫缺陷病毒1型(HIV-1)30年来,科学家们不断探索有效的 HIV-1疫苗,但至今效果不理想。由于“精英患者”的广谱中和血清能起到有效的抗病毒作用,研究人员希望通过对体液保护免疫机制的研究,推动疫苗的设计和优化,为尽早研发成功 HIV疫苗提供关键理论和技术支撑。近几年来,由于技术的突破和改进,从HIV感染者中分离获得广谱中和抗体的概率和数量大大提高。本文针对近几年来分离的有代表性的广谱中和抗体,根据其不同的识别位点分为四大类进行详细介绍,并总结了从研究广谱中和抗体中所获得的疫苗设计创新思路与启示。%Antibody response is a crucial host defense against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection .In recent years , tremendous progress has been made in isolating and characterizing of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bnmAbs ) from “elite neutralizers” who remain healthy despite of prolonged infection . These bnmAbs were found to target four major vulnerable sites on the envelope glycoprotein .Structural and functional characterization of these bnmAbs has provided critical foundation for our better understanding of protective antibody response in vivo .In the current review ,we summarize the characteristics of these bnmAbs and discuss on their implications for rational design of novel HIV-1 vaccines capable of inducing antibodies similar to those bnmAbs .

  16. MULTIMEDIA ON GEOGRAPHIC NETWORK

    OpenAIRE

    Merlanti, Danilo

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate the topic of the multimedia contents distribution on a geo- graphic network which is a rarefied and huge field. First of all we have to classify the main parts necessary in the multimedia distribution on a geographic network. The main aspects of a geographic network that will be highlighted in this thesis are: the mechanism used to retrieve the sources of the multimedia content; in the case of the peer-to-peer network on geographic network one of t...

  17. Drug susceptibility to etravirine and darunavir among Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-derived pseudoviruses in treatment-experienced patients with HIV/AIDS in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Oh-Kyung; Kim, Sung Soon; Rhee, Jee Eun; Kee, Mee-Kyung; Park, Mina; Oh, Hye-Ri; Choi, Ju-Yeon

    2015-04-09

    In South Korea, about 20 types of antiretroviral drugs are used in the treatment of patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Since 2010, raltegravir, etravirine, and darunavir have been spotlighted as new drugs for highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-experienced adults with resistant HIV-1 in South Korea. In this study, we investigated potential susceptibility of pseudoviruses derived from treatment-experienced Korean patients to etravirine vs efavirenz and to darunavir vs amprenavir and indinavir using a modified single-round assay. Pseudoviruses derived from nine treatment-experienced patients infected with HIV-1 were investigated by comparison with the wild-type strain pNL4-3. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values were calculated and drug susceptibility was compared. The intensity of genotypic drug resistance was classified based on the 'SIR' interpretation of the Stanford data base. Drug susceptibility was generally higher for etravirine and darunavir compared with efavirenz, amprenavir, and indinavir in pseudoviruses derived from treatment-experienced patients. Pseudoviruses derived from patients KRB4025 and KRB8014, who exhibited long-term use of protease inhibitors, showed an outside of tested drug concentration, especially for amprenavir and indinavir. However, they exhibited a lower fold-change in resistance to darunavir. Etravirine and darunavir have been used in HAART since 2010 in South Korea. Therefore, these antiretroviral drugs together with other newly introduced antiretroviral drugs are interesting for the optimal treatment of patients with treatment failure. This study may help to find a more effective HAART in the case of HIV-1 infected patients that have difficulty being treated.

  18. Evaluation on uncertainty of detection results of HIV-1/HIV-2 type of antybody in hu-man serum by using ELISA method%酶标法检测人体血清中HIV-1/HIV-2型抗体结果不确定度评定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭莉莉

    2009-01-01

    目的:对用酶标法测定人体血清中HIV-1/HIV-2型抗体结果的不确定度进行评定,确保检测结果的准确可靠.方法:使用珠海丽珠试剂有限公司提供的HIV-1/HIV-2型抗体检测诊断试剂盒,采用酶标法,对未知标本进行10次重复测试,获得未知样本OD值,建立数学模型,分析酶标法测定HIV-1/HIV-2型抗体的不确定度来源,对分量不确定度进行评估来评定酶标法测定HIV-1/HIV-2型抗体的不确定度.结果:样品中HIV-1/HIV-2型抗体的扩展不确定度U=0.022,K=2.结论:在检测结果中带入测量不确定度结果,可以降低初筛试验的假阴性结果,使检测结果表达更完整.

  19. Characterization of HIV type 1 envelope sequence among viral isolates circulating in the northern region of Colombia, South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, José-Luis; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Palacio, Lucy; Peñuela, Martha; Hernández, Robin; Lemay, Guy; Cervantes-Acosta, Guillermo

    2012-12-01

    To characterize human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) strains circulating in the Northern region of Colombia in South America, sequences of the viral envelope C2V3C3 region were obtained from patients with different high-risk practices. Close to 60% of the sequences were predicted to belong to macrophage-tropic viruses, according to the positions of acidic amino acids and putative N-linked glycosylation sites. This is in agreement with the fact that most of the patients were recently diagnosed individuals. Phylogenic analysis then allowed assignment of all 35 samples to subtype B viruses. This same subtype was found in previous studies carried out in other Colombian regions. This study thus expands previous analyses with previously missing data from the Northern region of the country. The number and the length of the sequences examined also help to provide a clearer picture of the prevailing situation of the present HIV epidemics in this country.

  20. Snapshot of HIV pathogenesis in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nitin; K; SAKSENA; Bin; WANG; Megan; STEAIN; Rong; Ge; YANG; Lin; Qi; ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    Several reviews have focused on the nature of HIV infection and its spread in various geographical regions of China.In contrast, this review provides a comprehensive update on the prevalence of multiple HIV-1 subtypes, consequent emergence of recombinant and novel forms of HIV-1 in China, and the implications this may have on HIV diversity and the development of effective vaccines. In addition it also examines the dissemination of primary drug resistance in therapy na(i)ve patients, as well as co-infections with two other important viruses-hepatitis B and C. The main purpose of this review is to provide a current snapshot of HIV-1 pathogenesis in China and possibly shed some light on the future of HIV evolution, and potential challenges for future vaccine and anti-retroviral therapeutics against HIV strains in this area.

  1. Novel codon insert in HIV type 1 clade B reverse transcriptase associated with low-level viremia during antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillon, Antoine; Gianella, Sara; Vazquez, Homero; Ignacio, Caroline; Zweig, Adam C; Richman, Douglas D; Smith, Davey M

    2014-02-01

    We investigated the pol genotype in two phylogenetically and epidemiologically linked partners, who were both experiencing persistent low-level viremia during antiretroviral therapy. In one partner we identified a new residue insertion between codon 248 and 249 of the HIV-1 RNA reverse transcriptase (RT) coding region (HXB2 numbering). We then investigated the potential impact of identified mutations in RT and antiretroviral binding affinity using a novel computational approach.

  2. Identification of new and unusual rev and nef transcripts expressed by an HIV type 1 primary isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Yolanda; Delgado, Elena; Carrera, Cristina; Nebreda, Paloma; Fernández-García, Aurora; Cuevas, María Teresa; Pérez-Álvarez, Lucía; Thomson, Michael M

    2013-07-01

    We analyzed RNA splice site usage in three HIV-1 subtype B primary isolates through reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification of spliced RNAs using a fluorescently labeled primer, with computerized size determination and quantification of PCR products, which were also identified by clone sequencing. In one isolate, P2149-3, unusual and unreported spliced transcripts were detected. This isolate preferentially used for rev RNA generation a 3' splice site (3'ss) located five nucleotides upstream of A4a, previously identified only in a T cell line-adapted virus and in a group O isolate, and designated A4d. P2149-3 also used an unreported 3'ss for rev RNA generation, designated A4h, located 20 nucleotides upstream of 3'ss A4c. Additionally, unusual nef RNAs using 3'ss A5a and A7a and with exon composition 1.3.7 were identified. The identification of several unusual and unreported spliced transcripts in an HIV-1 primary isolate suggests a greater diversity of splice site usage in HIV-1 than previously appreciated.

  3. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and TNF-related molecules in HIV-1+ individuals: relationship with in vitro Thl/Th2-type response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzardi, G P; Marriott, J B; Cookson, S; Lazzarin, A; Dalgleish, A G; Barcellini, W

    1998-01-01

    We examined the secretion and expression by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of TNF-α and TNF-related molecules with regard to Th1/Th2-type cytokine production. In 76 HIV+ patients at different disease stages and in 25 controls we measured cytokine (TNF-α/β, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), IL-2, IL-4, IL-10), and activation marker secretion (sCD4, sCD8, sCD30) in phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated and unstimulated PBMC cultures by ELISA, and membrane-bound TNF-α and CD30 expression by flow cytometry. We found an expansion of the TNF system in HIV+ individuals, that positively correlated with TNF-α, IFN-γ and sCD8, probably representing activation of the cytotoxic compartment. In advanced disease these correlations disappeared, and TNF-α and TNF-related molecules positively correlated with IL-10. Our results are in line with the hypothesis that an expanded TNF system is immunopathological in conjunction with Th2-type immunity in the advanced stage of disease and with the inexorable progression to disease seen when both IL-10 and TNF-α are elevated. PMID:9764604

  4. Thermal stability of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 receptors, CD4 and CXCR4, reconstituted in proteoliposomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail A Zhukovsky

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The entry of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 into host cells involves the interaction of the viral exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120, and receptors on the target cell. The HIV-1 receptors are CD4 and one of two chemokine receptors, CCR5 or CXCR4. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We created proteoliposomes that contain CD4, the primary HIV-1 receptor, and one of the coreceptors, CXCR4. Antibodies against CD4 and CXCR4 specifically bound the proteoliposomes. CXCL12, the natural ligand for CXCR4, and the small-molecule CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100, bound the proteoliposomes with affinities close to those associated with the binding of these molecules to cells expressing CXCR4 and CD4. The HIV-1 gp120 exterior envelope glycoprotein bound tightly to proteoliposomes expressing only CD4 and, in the presence of soluble CD4, bound weakly to proteoliposomes expressing only CXCR4. The thermal stability of CD4 and CXCR4 inserted into liposomes was examined. Thermal denaturation of CXCR4 followed second-order kinetics, with an activation energy (E(a of 269 kJ/mol (64.3 kcal/mol and an inactivation temperature (T(i of 56°C. Thermal inactivation of CD4 exhibited a reaction order of 1.3, an E(a of 278 kJ/mol (66.5 kcal/mol, and a T(i of 52.2°C. The second-order denaturation kinetics of CXCR4 is unusual among G protein-coupled receptors, and may result from dimeric interactions between CXCR4 molecules. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our studies with proteoliposomes containing the native HIV-1 receptors allowed an examination of the binding of biologically important ligands and revealed the higher-order denaturation kinetics of these receptors. CD4/CXCR4-proteoliposomes may be useful for the study of virus-target cell interactions and for the identification of inhibitors.

  5. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of some HIV medicines may increase blood glucose levels and lead to type 2 diabetes. Other risk factors for type 2 diabetes include a family history of diabetes, being overweight, and lack of physical ... blood glucose levels checked before they start taking HIV medicines. People ...

  6. Genetic and phylogenetic evolution of HIV-1 in a low subtype heterogeneity epidemic: the Italian example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tornesello Maria

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 is classified into genetic groups, subtypes and sub-subtypes which show a specific geographic distribution pattern. The HIV-1 epidemic in Italy, as in most of the Western Countries, has traditionally affected the Intra-venous drug user (IDU and Homosexual (Homo risk groups and has been sustained by the genetic B subtype. In the last years, however, the HIV-1 transmission rate among heterosexuals has dramatically increased, becoming the prevalent transmission route. In fact, while the traditional risk groups have high levels of knowledge and avoid high-risk practices, the heterosexuals do not sufficiently perceive the risk of HIV-1 infection. This misperception, linked to the growing number of immigrants from non-Western Countries, where non-B clades and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs are prevalent, is progressively introducing HIV-1 variants of non-B subtype in the Italian epidemic. This is in agreement with reports from other Western European Countries. In this context, the Italian HIV-1 epidemic is still characterized by low subtype heterogeneity and represents a paradigmatic example of the European situation. The continuous molecular evolution of the B subtype HIV-1 isolates, characteristic of a long-lasting epidemic, together with the introduction of new subtypes as well as recombinant forms may have significant implications for diagnostic, treatment, and vaccine development. The study and monitoring of the genetic evolution of the HIV-1 represent, therefore, an essential strategy for controlling the local as well as global HIV-1 epidemic and for developing efficient preventive and therapeutic strategies.

  7. [Genital ulcers caused by sexually transmitted diseases: current therapies, diagnosis and their relevance in HIV pandemy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa, João Borges; Domingues, Dulce; Castro, R; Exposto, Filomena

    2006-01-01

    The sexual transmitted pathogens associated with genital ulcers are Treponema pallidum, Haemophilus ducreyi, Calymmatobacterium granulomatis, Chlamydia trachomatis and Herpes simplex virus type 1 or 2. Although geographic differences still exist, herpetic infections prevalence is growing worldwide as the most frequent ulcerative sexual transmitted disease. The failure of the many different used guidelines in achieving a sustained reduction in the number of new cases, in particular the WHO syndromic management, leads into an over treatment of bacterial agents and missing of viral agents. This situation is also associated with poor efficacy and wasting of economical resources. Ulcerative and non-ulcerative sexual transmitted diseases are important in the world HIV pandemy because they promote HIV transmission and are also associated with the disease evolution. Portugal had until recently the highest incidence of HIV infection in Europe and that points out to importance of treating and control of both ulcerative and non-ulcerative sexual transmitted diseases in order.

  8. Suppression of multiclade R5 and X4 human immunodeficiency virus type-1 infections by a coreceptor-based anti-HIV strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Daisuke; Misumi, Shogo; Mukai, Ryouzaburo; Tachibana, Kuniomi; Umeda, Mamoru; Shibata, Hideaki; Takamune, Nobutoki; Shoji, Shozo

    2005-11-01

    A cyclic chimeric dodecapeptide (cCD) mimicking the conformation-specific domains of CCR5 and CXCR4 was prepared in which Gly-Asp links the amino and carboxyl termini of two combined pentapeptides (S169-G173 of CCR5; E179-R183 of CXCR4) derived from human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) coreceptors. The immunization of Balb/c mice with cCD conjugated with a multiple-antigen peptide (cCD-MAP) induced seven cCD-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, CPMAb-I to -VII) that reacted with native CCR5 and CXCR4. Among the tested mAbs, CPMAb-I and -II potently inhibited the infection of both the R5 and X4 laboratory strains. CPMAb-III and -VI were effective against only R5 laboratory strains, and also against some X4 and R5 primary isolates. CPMAb-IV and -V had potent antiviral activities against the R5 and X4 primary isolates. In particular, CPMAb-VII was protective against not only R5 and X4 laboratory strains, but also most of the R5 and X4 primary isolates. Moreover, cCD-MAP immunization also induced antibodies that were effective against R5 and X4 multiclade HIV-1 isolates in vitro in two of three cynomolgus monkeys. Taken together, the results suggest that cCD-MAP is a candidate multiclade immunogen that can be used to block multiclade R5 and X4 HIV-1 infections.

  9. Introducing Catastrophe-QSAR. Application on Modeling Molecular Mechanisms of Pyridinone Derivative-Type HIV Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Lazea

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The classical method of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR is enriched using non-linear models, as Thom’s polynomials allow either uni- or bi-variate structural parameters. In this context, catastrophe QSAR algorithms are applied to the anti-HIV-1 activity of pyridinone derivatives. This requires calculation of the so-called relative statistical power and of its minimum principle in various QSAR models. A new index, known as a statistical relative power, is constructed as an Euclidian measure for the combined ratio of the Pearson correlation to algebraic correlation, with normalized t-Student and the Fisher tests. First and second order inter-model paths are considered for mono-variate catastrophes, whereas for bi-variate catastrophes the direct minimum path is provided, allowing the QSAR models to be tested for predictive purposes. At this stage, the max-to-min hierarchies of the tested models allow the interaction mechanism to be identified using structural parameter succession and the typical catastrophes involved. Minimized differences between these catastrophe models in the common structurally influential domains that span both the trial and tested compounds identify the “optimal molecular structural domains” and the molecules with the best output with respect to the modeled activity, which in this case is human immunodeficiency virus type 1 HIV-1 inhibition. The best molecules are characterized by hydrophobic interactions with the HIV-1 p66 subunit protein, and they concur with those identified in other 3D-QSAR analyses. Moreover, the importance of aromatic ring stacking interactions for increasing the binding affinity of the inhibitor-reverse transcriptase ligand-substrate complex is highlighted.

  10. Correlates of amphetamine-type stimulants use and associations with HIV-related risks among young women engaged in sex work in Phnom Penh, Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Marie-Claude; Evans, Jennifer L.; Sothy, Neth San; Stein, Ellen S.; Sichan, Keo; Maher, Lisa; Page, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    Background Amphetamine-type stimulant (ATS) use has increased in Cambodia and emerged as a significant problem among female sex workers (FSWs), potentially contributing to increased risk of HIV. We examined the prevalence of ATS use and its effect on sexual risk behaviors, and sexually transmitted infections (STI) among FSWs in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Methods A one-year prospective study among young women engaged in sex work in brothels, entertainment establishments and on a freelance basis. Socio-demographics, sexual risks, and recent ATS use were assessed by self-report. Blood and urine samples were collected to detect HIV, Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC). Bivariate and multivariate longitudinal analyses were conducted to assess the effects of ATS use on number of sex partners, inconsistent condom use with paying partners and incident STI. Results ATS use was higher among women working freelance (35.6%) and in brothels (34.8%) compared to women working in entertainment establishments (17.7%) or in multiple venues (14.8%). ATS users reported more sex partners and days drunk in the previous month. In multivariate longitudinal analysis, ATS use was associated with having a higher number of sex partners (Adjusted Risk Ratio 1.49; 95% CI: 1.00–2.21) and incident STI (Adjusted Odds Ratio 5.41; 95% CI: 1.15–25.48), but not inconsistent condom use with paying partner. Conclusion ATS users had more sex partners, high level of alcohol use, and were at increased risk of STI. Our findings underscore ATS use as an important emerging risk exposure that should be integrated into HIV prevention interventions targeting this population. PMID:21820251

  11. Human immunodeficiency type-1 virus (HIV-1) infection in serodiscordant couples (SDCs) does not have an impact on embryo quality or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Marco Antonio Barreto; Meseguer, Marcos; Bellver, José; Remohí, José; Pellicer, Antonio; Garrido, Nicolás

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the embryo quality in our program for human immunodeficiency type-1 virus (HIV-1) serodiscordant couples (SDCs) with the male infected in comparison with a tubal-factor infertility control group. Retrospective case-control study. Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad, Valencia, Spain. Thirty SDC and 79 control couples without HIV-1 infection attending for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Only first cycles were considered. Controlled ovarian hyperstimulation and ICSI in both groups; sperm wash, nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in semen sample, and capacitation by swim-up after thawing the semen sample in the SDC group; and sperm capacitation by swim-up after thawing the semen sample in the control group. ICSI procedure and embryo characteristics (fertilization, cleavage, embryo morphology, and development) and cycle outcome (ongoing pregnancy and miscarriage rates). Fertilization and cleavage rates were similar between the groups. On days 2 and 3 of embryo development, very similar embryo features were found between the groups. There was no difference in mean number of optimal embryos on day 3. When embryos were cultured up to 5-6 days, a significant increase in embryo blockage was found in the SDC group compared with the control group. The mean number of optimal blastocysts on day 6 was comparable in both groups. No difference was found regarding the number of cryopreserved and transferred embryos or implantation, pregnancy, multiple pregnancy, or miscarriage rates between the groups. HIV-1 infection in SDCs with infected males does not appear to have a significantly negative impact on embryo development or ICSI outcome.

  12. Introducing Catastrophe-QSAR. Application on Modeling Molecular Mechanisms of Pyridinone Derivative-Type HIV Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putz, Mihai V.; Lazea, Marius; Putz, Ana-Maria; Duda-Seiman, Corina

    2011-01-01

    The classical method of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) is enriched using non-linear models, as Thom’s polynomials allow either uni- or bi-variate structural parameters. In this context, catastrophe QSAR algorithms are applied to the anti-HIV-1 activity of pyridinone derivatives. This requires calculation of the so-called relative statistical power and of its minimum principle in various QSAR models. A new index, known as a statistical relative power, is constructed as an Euclidian measure for the combined ratio of the Pearson correlation to algebraic correlation, with normalized t-Student and the Fisher tests. First and second order inter-model paths are considered for mono-variate catastrophes, whereas for bi-variate catastrophes the direct minimum path is provided, allowing the QSAR models to be tested for predictive purposes. At this stage, the max-to-min hierarchies of the tested models allow the interaction mechanism to be identified using structural parameter succession and the typical catastrophes involved. Minimized differences between these catastrophe models in the common structurally influential domains that span both the trial and tested compounds identify the “optimal molecular structural domains” and the molecules with the best output with respect to the modeled activity, which in this case is human immunodeficiency virus type 1 HIV-1 inhibition. The best molecules are characterized by hydrophobic interactions with the HIV-1 p66 subunit protein, and they concur with those identified in other 3D-QSAR analyses. Moreover, the importance of aromatic ring stacking interactions for increasing the binding affinity of the inhibitor-reverse transcriptase ligand-substrate complex is highlighted. PMID:22272148

  13. Sequencing of Gag/Env association with HIV genotyping resolution and HIV-related epidemiologic studies of HIV in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, L; Wang, H W; Xu, Y; Feng, Y; Zhang, H F; Wang, K H

    2016-10-24

    HIV genotyping has led to conflicting results between laboratories. Therefore, identifying the most accurate gene combinations to sequence remains a priority. Datasets of Chinese HIV subtypes based on several markers and deposited in PubMed, Metstr, CNKI, and VIP databases between 2000 and 2015 were studied. In total, 9177 cases of amplification-positive samples from 26 provinces of China were collected and used to classify HIV subtypes based on eight individual genes or a combination thereof. CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC, CRF08_BC and B were the prevalent HIV subtypes in China, accounting for 84.07% of all genotypes. Gag/Env sequencing classified a greater number of HIV subtypes compared to other genes or combination of gene fragments. The geographical distribution of Gag and Gag/Env genotypes was similar to that observed with all genetic markers. Further principal component analysis showed a significantly different geographical distribution pattern of HIV in China for HIV genotypes detected with Gag/Env, which was in line with the distribution of all HIV genotypes in China. Gag/Env sequences had the highest diversity of the eight markers studied, followed by Gag and Gag/Pol/Env; Pol/Env polymorphisms were the least divergent. Gag/Env can serve as a high-resolution marker for HIV genotyping.

  14. Sexual risk behaviors, circumcision status, and preexisting immunity to adenovirus type 5 among men who have sex with men participating in a randomized HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial: step study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblin, Beryl A; Mayer, Kenneth H; Noonan, Elizabeth; Wang, Ching-Yun; Marmor, Michael; Sanchez, Jorge; Brown, Stephen J; Robertson, Michael N; Buchbinder, Susan P

    2012-08-01

    The Step Study found that men who had sex with men (MSM) who received an adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) vector-based vaccine and were uncircumcised or had prior Ad5 immunity, had a higher HIV incidence than MSM who received placebo. We investigated whether differences in HIV exposure, measured by reported sexual risk behaviors, may explain the increased risk. Among 1764 MSM in the trial, 726 were uncircumcised, 994 had prior Ad5 immunity, and 563 were both uncircumcised and had prior Ad5 immunity. Analyses compared sexual risk behaviors and perceived treatment assignment among vaccine and placebo recipients, determined risk factors for HIV acquisition, and examined the role of insertive anal intercourse in HIV risk among uncircumcised men. Few sexual risk behaviors were significantly higher in vaccine versus placebo recipients at baseline or during follow-up. Among uncircumcised men, vaccine recipients at baseline were more likely to report unprotected insertive anal intercourse with HIV-negative partners (24.9% vs. 18.1%; P = 0.03). Among uncircumcised men who had prior Ad5 immunity, vaccine recipients were more likely to report unprotected insertive anal intercourse with partners of unknown HIV status (46.0% vs. 37.8%; P = 0.05). Vaccine recipients remained at higher risk of HIV infection compared with placebo recipients (hazard ratio = 2.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-6.8) controlling for potential confounders. These analyses do not support a behavioral explanation for the increased HIV infection rates observed among uncircumcised men in the Step Study. Identifying biologic mechanisms to explain the increased risk is a priority .

  15. Re-emergence of dengue virus type 3 in Canton, China, 2009-2010, associated with multiple introductions through different geographical routes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiying Liang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endemic dengue virus type 3 (DENV-3 infections have not been reported in Canton, China, since 1980. In March 2009, DENV-3 was isolated for the second time, occurring about 30 years after the previous circulation. In August, 3 other cases emerged. One much larger outbreak occurred again in 2010. To address the origin and particularly to determine whether the outbreaks were caused by the same viral genotype, we investigated the epidemiological and molecular characteristics of the introduction, spread and genetic microevolution of DENV-3 involved. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Three imported cases (index-1,2,3 separately traveled back from Vietnam, India and Tanzania, resulted in 1, 3 and 60 secondary autochthonous cases, respectively. In autochthonous cases, 64.6% positive in IgM anti-DENV and 18.6% in IgG from a total of 48 submitted serum samples, accompanied by 7 DENV-3 isolates. With 99.8%, 99.7%, and 100% envelope gene nucleotidic identity, 09/GZ/1081 from index-1 and endemic strain (09/GZ/1483 belonged to genotype V; 09/GZ/10616 from index-2 and endemic strains (09/GZ/11144 and 09/GZ/11194 belonged to genotype III Clade-A; and 10/GZ/4898 from index-3 and all four 2010 endemic DENV-3 strains belonged to genotype III Clade-B, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Both epidemiological and phylogenetic analyses showed that the 2010 outbreak of dengue was not a reemergence of the 2009 strain. Introductions of different genotypes following more than one route were important contributory factors for the 2009-2010 dengue epidemics/outbreaks in Canton. These findings underscore the importance of early detection and case management of imported case in preventing large-scale dengue epidemics among indigenous peoples of Canton.

  16. Multi-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistant HIV type-1 in a patient from Sierra Leone failing stavudine, lamivudine and nevirapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamers, Raph L; Wensing, Annemarie Mj; Back, Nicole Kt; Arcilla, Maria S; Frissen, Jos Ph

    2011-01-01

    We report a 33-year-old HIV type-1 (HIV-1)-infected male from Sierra Leone who harboured extensive drug resistance mutations to all nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and non-NRTIs, including the multi-NRTI-resistance Q151M complex, K65R, M184I and Y181I, after using standard first-line generic fixed-dose stavudine, lamivudine and nevirapine (Triomune™) for 36 months. In the context of non-B subtypes in resource-limited countries, first-line stavudine-containing regimens have been associated with more extensive and complex mutation patterns, compared with subtype B viruses. Whether the extensive and complex NRTI resistance patterns found among African patients failing first-line antiretroviral therapy is explained by viral genetic diversity or by different patient monitoring strategies remains to be elucidated. Emerging multi-NRTI resistance in sub-Saharan Africa would not only compromise second-line treatment options and the success of antiretroviral rollout, but could also contribute to the spread of drug-resistant variants worldwide.

  17. Comparison of Parasitological, Serological, and Molecular Tests for Visceral Leishmaniasis in HIV-Infected Patients: A Cross-Sectional Delayed-Type Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cota, Gláucia Fernandes; de Sousa, Marcos Roberto; de Freitas Nogueira, Betânia Mara; Gomes, Luciana Inácia; Oliveira, Edward; Assis, Tália Santana Machado; de Mendonça, Andréa Laender Pessoa; Pinto, Bruna Fernandes; Saliba, Juliana Wilke; Rabello, Ana

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of invasive and non-invasive tests for diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in a large series of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. In this delayed-type cross-sectional study, 113 HIV-infected symptomatic patients were evaluated by an adjudication committee after clinical follow-up to establish the presence or absence of VL as the target condition (reference test). The index tests were recombinant K39 antigen-based immunochromatographic test (rK39), indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT), prototype kit of direct agglutination test (DAT-LPC), and real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in peripheral blood. Compared with parasitological test and adjudication committee diagnosis or latent class model analyses, IFAT and rk39 dipstick test presented the lowest sensitivity. DAT-LPC exhibited good overall performance, and there was no statistical difference between DAT-LPC and qPCR diagnosis accuracy. Real-time PCR emerges as a less invasive alternative to parasitological examination for confirmation of cases not identified by DAT. PMID:23836568

  18. MLVA-16 typing of 295 marine mammal Brucella isolates from different animal and geographic origins identifies 7 major groups within Brucella ceti and Brucella pinnipedialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Isabelle

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 1994, Brucella strains have been isolated from a wide range of marine mammals. They are currently recognized as two new Brucella species, B. pinnipedialis for the pinniped isolates and B. ceti for the cetacean isolates in agreement with host preference and specific phenotypic and molecular markers. In order to investigate the genetic relationships within the marine mammal Brucella isolates and with reference to terrestrial mammal Brucella isolates, we applied in this study the Multiple Loci VNTR (Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analysis (MLVA approach. A previously published assay comprising 16 loci (MLVA-16 that has been shown to be highly relevant and efficient for typing and clustering Brucella strains from animal and human origin was used. Results 294 marine mammal Brucella strains collected in European waters from 173 animals and a human isolate from New Zealand presumably from marine origin were investigated by MLVA-16. Marine mammal Brucella isolates were shown to be different from the recognized terrestrial mammal Brucella species and biovars and corresponded to 3 major related groups, one specific of the B. ceti strains, one of the B. pinnipedialis strains and the last composed of the human isolate. In the B. ceti group, 3 subclusters were identified, distinguishing a cluster of dolphin, minke whale and porpoise isolates and two clusters mostly composed of dolphin isolates. These results were in accordance with published analyses using other phenotypic or molecular approaches, or different panels of VNTR loci. The B. pinnipedialis group could be similarly subdivided in 3 subclusters, one composed exclusively of isolates from hooded seals (Cystophora cristata and the two others comprising other seal species isolates. Conclusion The clustering analysis of a large collection of marine mammal Brucella isolates from European waters significantly strengthens the current view of the population structure of these two

  19. HIV type 1 pol gene diversity and antiretroviral drug resistance mutations in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, N; Mulanga, C; Bazepeo, S Edidi; Mwamba, J Kasali; Tshimpaka, J; Kashi, M; Mama, N; Valéa, D; Delaporte, E; Lepira, F; Peeters, M

    2006-02-01

    To study recombination and the natural polymorphism in pol of HIV-1 strains in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) we sequenced the protease and RT genes for 70 HIV-1 strains previously characterized in the env V3-V5 region from a sentinel surveillance study in 2002. For 41 of the 70 (58.6%) strains, the same subtype/ CRF designations were observed in pol and env. Twenty-three (32.9%) of 70 pol sequences were complex recombinants involving two to five subtypes as well as fragments that could not be classified into any of the known subtypes. All subtypes were involved in recombination events. Unclassified (U) and env subtype H strains were very likely to be recombinant strains. Overall, many minor mutations were identified in the protease sequences. Although at the time of our study ARV use was not yet widespread in DRC, three strains were identified with one major mutation associated with drug resistance: L90M and M46L in protease and K103N in RT.

  20. Women and HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Information by Audience For Women Women and HIV Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... HIV? What should pregnant women know about HIV? HIV Quick Facts What is HIV? HIV is the ...

  1. Symposium on Geographic Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felleman, John, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Six papers on geographic information systems cover the future of geographic information systems, land information systems modernization in Wisconsin, the Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (TIGER) System of the U.S. Bureau of the Census, satellite remote sensing, geographic information systems and sustainable development,…

  2. Geographical Income Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azhar, Hussain; Jonassen, Anders Bruun

    In this paper we estimate the degree, composition and development of geographical income polarization based on data at the individual and municipal level in Denmark from 1984 to 2002. Rising income polarization is reconfirmed when applying new polarization measures, the driving force being greater...

  3. Making Geographical Futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, John

    2015-01-01

    Although there are surprisingly few academic books about geography with the term "future" or "futures" in their titles, this paper indicates that for much of the twentieth century geographers contributed to important discussions about the shape of worlds to come. The paper offers a review of these debates within Anglo-American…

  4. Geographic profiling survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emeno, Karla; Bennell, Craig; Snook, Brent; Taylor, Paul Jonathon

    Geographic profiling (GP) is an investigative technique that involves predicting a serial offender?s home location (or some other anchor point) based on where he or she committed a crime. Although the use of GP in police investigations appears to be on the rise, little is known about the procedure

  5. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) genital shedding in HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women receiving effective combination antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péré, Héléne; Rascanu, Aida; LeGoff, Jérome; Matta, Mathieu; Bois, Frédéric; Lortholary, Olivier; Leroy, Valériane; Launay, Odile; Bélec, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of genital shedding of HSV-2 DNA was assessed in HIV-1-infected women taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). HIV-1 RNA, HIV-1 DNA and HSV DNA loads were measured during 12-18 months using frozen plasma, PBMC and cervicovaginal lavage samples from 22 HIV-1-infected women, including 17 women naive for antiretroviral therapy initiating cART and 5 women with virological failure switching to a new regimen. Nineteen (86%) women were HSV-2-seropositive. Among HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women, HIV-1 RNA loads showed a rapid fall from baseline after one month of cART, in parallel in paired plasma and cervicovaginal secretions. In contrast, HIV-1 DNA loads did not show significant variations from baseline up to 18 months of treatment in both systemic and genital compartments. HSV DNA was detected at least once in 12 (63%) of 19 women during follow up: HSV-2 shedding in the genital compartment was observed in 11% of cervicovaginal samples at baseline and in 16% after initiating or switching cART. Cervicovaginal HIV-1 RNA loads were strongly associated with plasma HIV-1 RNA loads over time, but not with cervicovaginal HSV DNA loads. Reactivation of genital HSV-2 replication frequently occurred despite effective cART in HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women. Genital HSV-2 replication under cART does not influence cervicovaginal HIV-1 RNA or DNA shedding.

  6. Differences in the expressed HLA class I alleles effect the differential clustering of HIV type 1-specific T cell responses in infected Chinese and Caucasians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu,XG; Addo,MM; Perkins,BA; Wej,FL; Rathod,A; Geer,SC; Parta,M; Cohen,D; Stone,DR; Russell,CJ; Tanzi,G; Mei,S; Wureel,AG; Frahm,N; Lichterfeld,M; Heath,L; Mullins,JI; Marincola,F; Goulder,PJR; Brander,C; Allen,T; Cao,YZ; Walker,BD; Altfeld,M

    2005-01-01

    China is a region of the world with a rapidly spreading HIV-1 epidemic. Studies providing insights into HIV-1 pathogenesis in infected Chinese are urgently needed to support the design and testing of an effective HIV-1 vaccine for this population. HIV-1-specific T cell responses were characterized in 32 HIV-1-infected individuals of Chinese origin and compared to 34 infected caucasians using 410 overlapping peptides spanning the entire HIV-1 clade B consensus sequence in an IFN-gamma ELISpot assay. All HIV-1 proteins were targeted with similar frequency in both populations and all study subjects recognized at least one overlapping peptide. HIV-1-specific T cell responses clustered in seven different regions of the HIV-1 genome in the Chinese cohort and in nine different regions in the caucasian cohort. The dominant HLA class I alleles expressed in the two populations differed significantly, and differences in epitope clustering pattern were shown to be influenced by differences in class I alleles that restrict immunodominant epitopes. These studies demonstrate that the clustering of HIV-1-specific T cell responses is influenced by the genetic HLA class I background in the study populations. The design and testing of candidate vaccines to fight the rapidly growing HIV-1 epidemic must therefore take the HLA genetics of the population into account as specific regions of the virus can be expected to be differentially targeted in ethnically diverse populations.

  7. Full-length characterization of A1/D intersubtype recombinant genomes from a therapy-induced HIV type 1 controller during acute infection and his noncontrolling partner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders; Vinner, Lasse; Therrien, Dominic;

    2008-01-01

    homology in shared regions. Four of seven crossover points were identical; however, the env gene from UG1 was subtype D, but A1 in DK1. Both viruses encoded proteins of the expected length and replicated equally well in vitro. DK1 and UG1 shared the HLA-A02 tissue type. HLA-A02-restricted CD8(+) T cell IFN...... after 1 year in Uganda. Following transient antiretroviral therapy DK1 maintained undetectable viral load for more than 10 years. His Ugandan wife (UG1) developed high viral load. HIV-1 sequences from both individuals were compared by bootscanning for recombination break points. Diversity plots......-gamma IC-FACS response in DK1 was detected against only one (Pol(476)) of 23 conserved epitopes. Neutralizing antibodies were induced only to the homologous isolate. These results indicate an A1D intersubtype recombination or transmission of a minor variant. Transient early antiretroviral therapy may have...

  8. Nonrandom distribution of cryptic repeating triplets of purines and pyrimidines (RNY)(n) in gp120 of HIV Type1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Crignis, Elisa; Guglietta, Silvia; Foley, Brian T; Negroni, Matteo; Di Narzo, Antonio Fabio; Waelti Da Costa, Vreneli; Cavassini, Matthias; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Graziosi, Cecilia

    2012-05-01

    We have analyzed purine (R) and pyrimidine (Y) codon patterns in variable and constant regions of HIV-1 gp120 in seven patients infected with different HIV-1 subtypes and naive to antiretroviral therapy. We have calculated the relative frequency of each in-frame codon RNY, YNR, RNR, and YNY (N=any nucleotide) in variable and constant regions of gp120, in the sequence within indels and at indels' flanking sites. Our data show that hypervariable regions V1, V2, V4, and V5 are characterized by the presence of long stretches of RNY codons constituting the majority of the sequence portion within insertions/deletions. In full-length gp120 and within inserted/deleted fragments the number of AVT (V=A, C, G) codons did not exceed 50% of the total RNY codons. RNY strings in variable regions spanned up to 21 codons and were always in frame. In contrast, RNY strings in constant regions were mostly out of frame and their length was limited to five codons. The frequency of the codon RNY was found to be significantly higher in variable regions (p<0.0001; t-test), within indels, and at indels' flanking sites (p<0.0001; χ(2) test). Analysis of the distribution of RNY strings equal to or longer than five codons in the full genome of HXB2 also shows that these sequences are mostly out of frame, unless they contain a potential N-glycosylation site or an asparagine. These data suggest that cryptic repeats of RNY may play a role in the genesis of multiple base insertions and deletions in hypervariable regions of gp120.

  9. Optima: A Model for HIV Epidemic Analysis, Program Prioritization, and Resource Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Cliff C; Stuart, Robyn M; Gray, Richard T; Shattock, Andrew J; Fraser-Hurt, Nicole; Benedikt, Clemens; Haacker, Markus; Berdnikov, Maxim; Mahmood, Ahmed Mohamed; Jaber, Seham Abdalla; Gorgens, Marelize; Wilson, David P

    2015-07-01

    Optima is a software package for modeling HIV epidemics and interventions that we developed to address practical policy and program problems encountered by funders, governments, health planners, and program implementers. Optima's key feature is its ability to perform resource optimization to meet strategic HIV objectives, including HIV-related financial commitment projections and health economic assessments. Specifically, Optima allows users to choose a set of objectives (such as minimizing new infections, minimizing HIV-related deaths, and/or minimizing long-term financial commitments) and then determine the optimal resource allocation (and thus program coverage levels) for meeting those objectives. These optimizations are based on the following: calibrations to epidemiological data; assumptions about the costs of program implementation and the corresponding coverage levels; and the effects of these programs on clinical, behavioral, and other epidemiological outcomes. Optima is flexible for which population groups (specified by behavioral, epidemiological, and/or geographical factors) and which HIV programs are modeled, the amount of input data used, and the types of outputs generated. Here, we introduce this model and compare it with existing HIV models that have been used previously to inform decisions about HIV program funding and coverage targets. Optima has already been used in more than 20 countries, and there is increasing demand from stakeholders to have a tool that can perform evidence-based HIV epidemic analyses, revise and prioritize national strategies based on available resources, set program coverage targets, amend subnational program implementation plans, and inform the investment strategies of governments and their funding partners.

  10. HIV-2 infection and chemokine receptors usage - clues to reduced virulence of HIV-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo-Pereira, José Miguel; Santos-Costa, Quirina; Moniz-Pereira, José

    2005-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and type 2 (HIV-2) are the causative agents of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Without therapeutic intervention, HIV-1 or HIV-2 infections in humans are characterized by a gradual and irreversible immunologic failure that ultimately leads to the onset of a severe immunodeficiency that constitutes the hallmark of AIDS. In the last two decades AIDS has evolved into a global epidemic affecting millions of persons worldwide. Although sharing several identical properties, HIV-1 and HIV-2 have shown some important differences in vivo. In fact, a significant amount of epidemiologic, clinical and virologic data suggest that HIV-2 is in general less virulent than HIV-1. This reduced virulence is revealed by the longer asymptomatic period and the smaller transmission rate that characteristically are observed in HIV-2 infection. In this context, studies using HIV-2 as a model of a naturally less pathogenic infection could bring important new insights to HIV pathogenesis opening to new strategies to vaccines or therapeutic design. The reasons underlying the reduced pathogenicity of HIV-2 are still essentially unknown and surely are the outcome of a combination of distinct factors. In this review we will discuss the importance and the possible implications in HIV-2 pathogenesis, particularly during the asymptomatic period, of a less fitted interaction between viral envelope glycoproteins and cellular receptors that have been described in the way HIV-2 and HIV-1 use these receptors.

  11. An important role for type Ⅲ interferon(IFN-lambda) in anti-HIV activity%新型干扰素——IFN-λ抗HIV-1感染

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵颖岚; 孙黎; 王旭; 侯炜; 霍文哲

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine whether IFN-λ has the ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection of blood monocyte-derived macrophages and its mechanism(s). Methods Macrophages were pretreated with IFN-λ/ IFN-λ2 for 24 h before infected by HIV-1 R5 strains (Bal, Jago, and JRFL). And then the culture supernatants were detected HIV-1 reverse transcription (RT) activity and p24 protein expression by HIV-1 BT assay and ELISA. The expressions of IFN-λ receptor, CD4, CCRS, CXCR4 were evaluated by real-time PCR. Results Both IFN-λ1 and IFN-λ2, when added to macrophage cultures, inhibited HIV-1 infection and replication. This IFN-λ-mediated anti-HIV-I activity is broad, as IFN-λ could inhibit infection by both laboratory-adapted and clinical strains of HIV-1. Investigations of mechanism(s) responsible for the IFN-λ action showed that although IFN-λ had little effect on HIV-1 entry receptor CD4 and co-receptor CCR5 and CXCR4 expression, IFN-λ inhibited HIV-I infection of macrophages through connecting with IFN-λ recep-tor. Conclusion IFN-λ could inhibit HIV-I replication in macrophages. These findings indicate that IFN-λ may have a therapeutic value in the treatment of HIV-1 infection.%目的 研究干扰素λ(IFN-λ)是否对HIV-1感染人臣噬细胞有抑制作用,并对可能介导IFN-λ抗HIV-1作用的受体和辅助受体表达水平进行研究,初步探讨其抗HIV-1感染的机制.方法 HIV-1毒株感染人巨噬细胞前用IFN-λ处理细胞24 h,感染后第4天、第8天以及第12天分别检测感染细胞上清中HIV-1逆转录酶(RT)活性和p24蛋白水平,并用实时定量PCR检测细胞上IFN-λ受体、CD4、CCR5、CXCR4的表达.结果 IFN-λ对HIV-1感染人巨噬细胞具有明显抑制作用,且此作用与其剂量及作用时间呈正相关.但IFN-λ对CD4、CCR5、CXCR4的表达影响无统计学意义.结论 IFN-λ能有效抑制HIV-1感染人口噬细胞,并证实这一作用是通过其受体发挥功能的.但IFN-λ介导的抗HIV-1

  12. Redescription and molecular phylogeny of the type species for two main metopid genera, Metopus es (Müller, 1776) Lauterborn, 1916 and Brachonella contorta (Levander, 1894) Jankowski, 1964 (Metopida, Ciliophora), based on broad geographic sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourland, William; Rotterova, Johana; Čepička, Ivan

    2017-06-01

    Metopid ciliates occupy terrestrial, freshwater, and marine habitats worldwide, playing important roles as predominant consumers of bacteria, flagellates, algae, and diatoms in hypoxic environments. Metopus and Brachonella are the most species-rich metopid genera, however most of their species have not been studied by modern methods Here, we report the morphologic, morphometric and molecular characterization, and phylogeny of Metopus es and Brachonella contorta, both types of their respective genera, collected in a broad global sampling effort. Five strains of M. es and three strains of B. contorta were studied in detail, providing the first correlation of morphology, morphometrics, and 18S rRNA gene sequencing for both. We submitted 29 new 18S rRNA gene sequences to GenBank. Phylogenetic analyses yielded trees of similar topology. A strongly supported Metopus es clade is sister to the Brachonella contorta clade. Our analysis shows genus Metopus is not monophyletic. The monophyly of Brachonella cannot yet be determined due to lack of sequences for other species of this genus in molecular databases. Both species appear to have a global distribution. Metopus es was not found in Africa, probably reflecting low sampling effort. Strains of both species showed low 18S rRNA gene sequence divergence despite wide geographic separation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Virology, Immunology, and Clinical Course of HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchan, J. Allen

    1990-01-01

    Presents overview of medical aspects of human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 (HIV-1) disease. Addresses structure and replication of virus, current methods for detecting HIV-1 in infected persons, effects of the virus on immune system, and clinical course of HIV-1 disease. Emphasizes variable causes of progression through HIV-1 infection stages;…

  14. Virology, Immunology, and Clinical Course of HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchan, J. Allen

    1990-01-01

    Presents overview of medical aspects of human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 (HIV-1) disease. Addresses structure and replication of virus, current methods for detecting HIV-1 in infected persons, effects of the virus on immune system, and clinical course of HIV-1 disease. Emphasizes variable causes of progression through HIV-1 infection stages;…

  15. Molecular characterization of the HIV type 1 vpr gene in infected Chinese former blood/plasma donors at different stages of diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chengli; Gupta, Phalguni; Wu, Hao; Chen, Xinyue; Huang, Xiaojie; Zhou, Yusen; Chen, Yue

    2008-04-01

    The HIV-1 vpr regions were PCR amplified and sequenced from eight long-term nonprogressors' (LTNP) and seven AIDS patients' DNA samples of a cohort of HIV-1-infected Chinese plasma/blood donors (PBDs). Sequence analysis revealed that the patients' HIV-1 vpr sequences belong to HIV-1 subtype B and there were no differences in the divergence of vpr sequences between these two groups of patients. Similarly, in the deduced amino acid sequences, no significant differences have been detected in vpr functional domains from patients at different stages of the disease. Moreover, the predicted binding motifs of HLA A2 and A11 were highly conserved among patients' vpr amino acid sequences. These results show that vpr may not play an important role in HIV-1 pathogenesis in different stages of Chinese patients and may have important implications in developing vpr-related treatments suitable for HIV-1-infected PBDs.

  16. CBF tomograms with (/sup 99m/Tc-HM-PAO in patients with dementia (Alzheimer type and HIV) and Parkinson's disease--initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, D.C.; Ell, P.J.; Burns, A.; Philpot, M.; Levy, R.

    1988-12-01

    We present preliminary data on the utility of functional brain imaging with (99mTc)-d,l-HM-PAO and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in the study of patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT), HIV-related dementia syndrome, and the on-off syndrome of Parkinson's disease. In comparison with a group of age-matched controls, the DAT patients revealed distinctive bilateral temporal and posterior parietal deficits, which correlate with detailed psychometric evaluation. Patients with amnesia as the main symptom (group A) showed bilateral mesial temporal lobe perfusion deficits (p less than 0.02). More severely affected patients (group B) with significant apraxia, aphasia, or agnosia exhibited patterns compatible with bilateral reduced perfusion in the posterior parietal cortex, as well as reduced perfusion to both temporal lobes, different from the patients of the control group (p less than 0.05). SPECT studies of HIV patients with no evidence of intracraneal space occupying pathology showed marked perfusion deficits. Patients with Parkinson's disease and the on-off syndrome studied during an on phase (under levodopa therapy) and on another occasion after withdrawal of levodopa (off) demonstrated a significant change in the uptake of (99mTc)-d,l-HM-PAO in the caudate nucleus (lower on off) and thalamus (higher on off). These findings justify the present interest in the functional evaluation of the brain of patients with dementia. (99mTc)-d,l-HM-PAO and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF)/SPECT appear useful and highlight individual disorders of flow in a variety of neuropsychiatric conditions.

  17. Computational Studies of a Mechanism for Binding and Drug Resistance in the Wild Type and Four Mutations of HIV-1 Protease with a GRL-0519 Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Hu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance of mutations in HIV-1 protease (PR is the most severe challenge to the long-term efficacy of HIV-1 PR inhibitor in highly active antiretroviral therapy. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of drug resistance associated with mutations (D30N, I50V, I54M, and V82A and inhibitor (GRL-0519 complexes, we have performed five molecular dynamics (MD simulations and calculated the binding free energies using the molecular mechanics Poisson–Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA method. The ranking of calculated binding free energies is in accordance with the experimental data. The free energy spectra of each residue and inhibitor interaction for all complexes show a similar binding model. Analysis based on the MD trajectories and contribution of each residues show that groups R2 and R3 mainly contribute van der Waals energies, while groups R1 and R4 contribute electrostatic interaction by hydrogen bonds. The drug resistance of D30N can be attributed to the decline in binding affinity of residues 28 and 29. The size of Val50 is smaller than Ile50 causes the residue to move, especially in chain A. The stable hydrophobic core, including the side chain of Ile54 in the wild type (WT complex, became unstable in I54M because the side chain of Met54 is flexible with two alternative conformations. The binding affinity of Ala82 in V82A decreases relative to Val82 in WT. The present study could provide important guidance for the design of a potent new drug resisting the mutation inhibitors.

  18. Prevalence and type of drug–drug interactions involving ART in patients attending a specialist HIV outpatient clinic in Kampala, Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seden, K.; Merry, C.; Hewson, R.; Siccardi, M.; Lamorde, M.; Byakika-Kibwika, P.; Laker, E.; Parkes-Ratanshi, R.; Back, D. J.; Khoo, S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Scale-up of HIV services in sub-Saharan Africa has rapidly increased, necessitating evaluation of medication safety in these settings. Drug–drug interactions (DDIs) involving antiretrovirals (ARVs) in sub-Saharan Africa are poorly characterized. We evaluated the prevalence and type of ARV DDIs in Ugandan outpatients and identified the patients most at risk. Methods A total of 2000 consecutive patients receiving ARVs at the Infectious Diseases Institute, Kampala were studied. The most recent prescription for each patient was screened for clinically significant DDIs using www.hiv-druginteractions.org. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression were used to identify risk factors for DDIs. A screening tool was developed using significant risk factors and tested in a further 500 patients. Results Clinically significant DDIs were observed in 374 (18.7%) patients, with a total of 514 DDIs observed. Only 0.2% of DDIs involved a contraindicated combination. Comedications commonly associated with DDIs were antibiotics (4.8% of 2000 patients), anthelmintics (2.2%) and antifungals (3.5%). Patient age, gender, CD4 count and weight did not affect risk of DDIs. In multivariable analysis, the patient factors that independently increased risk of DDIs were two or more comedications (P < 0.0001), a PI-containing ARV regimen (P < 0.0001), use of an anti-infective (P < 0.0001) and WHO clinical stage 3–4 (P = 0.04). A scoring system based on having at least two of these risk factors identified between 75% and 90% of DDIs in a validation cohort. Conclusions Significant ARV DDIs occur at similar rates in resource-limited settings and developed countries; however, the comedications frequently causing DDIs differ. Development of tools that are relevant to particular settings should be a priority to assist with prevention and management of DDIs. PMID:26286575

  19. GEOGRAPHICAL ANALYSIS OF FOREST FLORA OF THE CENTRAL CISCAUCASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. L. Ivanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Aim. Forest flora of the Central Ciscaucasia in General is a relict, geographically situated in the steppe zone. Composing flora elements have different types of habitats, concentrated in the natural physical-geographical unit where isolated from the main habitats. Comparative analysis of the geographic, ecological and systematic components of forest flora will provide data about the correlation of these parameters identify the leading group. Location. The Central CiscaucasiaMethods. We made the geographical and systematic ranges of forest flora of the Central Ciscaucasia and their comparative analysis is conducted.Results. Geographical analysis of forest flora of the Central Ciscaucasia revealed 16 geographical elements, grouped in 6 categories, among which is the predominant group of boreal geographical elements. It is established that the leading geographical elements are Euro-Caucasian, Caucasian and Sub-Caucasian, numbering 189 species, and are half of the flora. Comparison with ecological spectrum showed that the sequence geographical elements completely different, here leading positions are occupied Northern species as ecologically more conservative, and the Caucasian demonstrate ecological plasticity. In a systematic relation matched warheads geographical and systematic spectra. The scope of the results. The results may be used in comparative Floristics, in its theoretical part in adjusting themodels of the Genesis of the flora.Conclusions. Thus, half of the geographical elements of the forest flora of the Central Ciscaucasia are linked in their distribution of Caucasian floristic province (Euro-Caucasian, Caucasian and Sub-Caucasian. These same geographical elements to predominate in the head part of the spectrum families. Most geographical elements have low ecological plasticity species, their components, do not go beyond the forest plant association, but geographical elements head part of the geographical range

  20. Short Communication Phylogenetic Characterization of HIV Type 1 CRF01_AE V3 Envelope Sequences in Pregnant Women in Northern Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caridha, Rozina; Ha, Tran Thi Thanh; Gaseitsiwe, Simani; Hung, Pham Viet; Anh, Nguyen Mai; Bao, Nguyen Huy; Khang, Dinh Duy; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Cam, Phung Dac; Chiodi, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Characterization of HIV-1 strains is important for surveillance of the HIV-1 epidemic. In Vietnam HIV-1-infected pregnant women often fail to receive the care they are entitled to. Here, we analyzed phylogenetically HIV-1 env sequences from 37 HIV-1-infected pregnant women from Ha Noi (n=22) and Hai Phong (n=15), where they delivered in 2005–2007. All carried CRF01_AE in the gp120 V3 region. In 21 women CRF01_AE was also found in the reverse transcriptase gene. We compared their env gp120 V3 sequences phylogenetically in a maximum likelihood tree to those of 198 other CRF01_AE sequences in Vietnam and 229 from neighboring countries, predominantly Thailand, from the HIV-1 database. Altogether 464 sequences were analyzed. All but one of the maternal sequences colocalized with sequences from northern Vietnam. The maternal sequences had evolved the least when compared to sequences collected in Ha Noi in 2002, as shown by analysis of synonymous and nonsynonymous changes, than to other Vietnamese sequences collected earlier and/or elsewhere. Since the HIV-1 epidemic in women in Vietnam may still be underestimated, characterization of HIV-1 in pregnant women is important to observe how HIV-1 has evolved and follow its molecular epidemiology. PMID:21936713

  1. Short communication: phylogenetic characterization of HIV type 1 CRF01_AE V3 envelope sequences in pregnant women in Northern Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caridha, Rozina; Ha, Tran Thi Thanh; Gaseitsiwe, Simani; Hung, Pham Viet; Anh, Nguyen Mai; Bao, Nguyen Huy; Khang, Dinh Duy; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Cam, Phung Dac; Chiodi, Francesca; Ehrnst, Anneka

    2012-08-01

    Characterization of HIV-1 strains is important for surveillance of the HIV-1 epidemic. In Vietnam HIV-1-infected pregnant women often fail to receive the care they are entitled to. Here, we analyzed phylogenetically HIV-1 env sequences from 37 HIV-1-infected pregnant women from Ha Noi (n=22) and Hai Phong (n=15), where they delivered in 2005-2007. All carried CRF01_AE in the gp120 V3 region. In 21 women CRF01_AE was also found in the reverse transcriptase gene. We compared their env gp120 V3 sequences phylogenetically in a maximum likelihood tree to those of 198 other CRF01_AE sequences in Vietnam and 229 from neighboring countries, predominantly Thailand, from the HIV-1 database. Altogether 464 sequences were analyzed. All but one of the maternal sequences colocalized with sequences from northern Vietnam. The maternal sequences had evolved the least when compared to sequences collected in Ha Noi in 2002, as shown by analysis of synonymous and nonsynonymous changes, than to other Vietnamese sequences collected earlier and/or elsewhere. Since the HIV-1 epidemic in women in Vietnam may still be underestimated, characterization of HIV-1 in pregnant women is important to observe how HIV-1 has evolved and follow its molecular epidemiology.

  2. Resources and obstacles to developing and implementing a structural intervention to prevent HIV in San Salvador, El Salvador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, A. Michelle; Bodnar, Gloria; Rodriguez, Karla; Guevara, Carmen E

    2009-01-01

    HIV prevention researchers have increasingly advocated structural interventions that address factors in the social, political and economic context to reduce disparities of HIV/AIDS among disadvantaged populations. This paper draws on data collected in three different types of low-income communities (n=6) in the San Salvador metropolitan area in El Salvador. Nine focus group discussions were conducted between January 2006 - July 2007, six with community leaders, and three with crack cocaine users, as well as in-depth interviews with 20 crack users and crack dealers. We explore opportunities and barriers to the implementation of a community-level, structural intervention. We first analyze the different forms of leadership, and other community resources including existing HIV prevention activities that could potentially be used to address the related problems of crack use and HIV in the communities, and the structural factors that may act as barriers to capitalizing on communities’ strengths in interventions. Each of the communities studied demonstrated different resources that stem from each community's unique history and geographic location. HIV testing and prevention resources varied widely among the communities, with resources concentrated in one Older Central community despite a strong need in all communities. In many communities, fear of gang violence and non-responsiveness by government agencies to communities’ needs have discouraged community organizing. In the discussion, we offer concrete suggestions for developing and implementing structural interventions to reduce HIV risks that use communities’ different but complementary resources. PMID:19910099

  3. Resources and obstacles to developing and implementing a structural intervention to prevent HIV in San Salvador, El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson-Gomez, Julia; Corbett, A Michelle; Bodnar, Gloria; Rodriguez, Karla; Guevara, Carmen E

    2010-02-01

    HIV prevention researchers have increasingly advocated structural interventions that address factors in the social, political and economic context to reduce disparities of HIV/AIDS among disadvantaged populations. This paper draws on data collected in three different types of low-income communities (n=6) in the San Salvador metropolitan area in El Salvador. Nine focus group discussions were conducted between January 2006 and July 2007, 6 with community leaders, and 3 with crack cocaine users, as well as in-depth interviews with 20 crack users and crack dealers. We explore opportunities and barriers to the implementation of a community-level, structural intervention. We first analyze the different forms of leadership, and other community resources including existing HIV prevention activities that could potentially be used to address the related problems of crack use and HIV in the communities, and the structural factors that may act as barriers to capitalizing on communities' strengths in interventions. Each of the communities studied demonstrated different resources that stem from each community's unique history and geographic location. HIV testing and prevention resources varied widely among the communities, with resources concentrated in one Older Central community despite a strong need in all communities. In many communities, fear of gang violence and non-responsiveness by government agencies to communities' needs have discouraged community organizing. In the discussion, we offer concrete suggestions for developing and implementing structural interventions to reduce HIV risks that use communities' different but complementary resources.

  4. HAART治疗对不同临床类型HIV-1感染者血清IL-18及IL-18BP水平的影响%The effect of HAART on levels of serum IL-18 and IL-18 BP in different clinical types patients with HIV-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张英; 蒋就喜; 李赫伟; 胡婷婷; 徐茹; 沈剑锋; 谢付静

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨高效抗逆转录病毒治疗(HAART)对不同临床类型HIV-l感染者血清白细胞介素-18(Interleukin 18,IL-18)和白细胞介素-18结合蛋白(Interleukin 18 binding protein,IL-18BP)水平的影响.方法:酶联免疫吸附法(ELISA)检测67例经12个月以上HAART治疗有效的HIV-1感染者及18例健康人的血清IL-18和IL-18BP水平.采用流式细胞术测定HIV-1感染者血液中CD4+、CD8+T细胞水平.结果:不同临床类型HIV-1感染者血清IL-18、IL-18BP水平均高于正常对照组(P<0.05);A类HIV-1感染组CD4/CD8比值高于B类、C类HIV-1感染组(P<0.05,P=0.004,0.014).CD4+T细胞<500的两组血清IL-18、IL-18BP水平均高于正常对照组(P<0.05);正常对照组血清IL-18和IL-18BP水平呈正相关(P< 0.01,r=0.705).结论:HAART治疗不能完全逆转HIV-1感染者免疫系统失衡,但艾滋病患者早期治疗可能降低机体免疫系统失衡的程度.%Objective To investigate the impact of HAART on the levels of IL-18 and IL-18BP in serum of different types HIV-1 infected patients. Methods Serum samples obtained from 18 healthy subjects and 67 HIV-1 infected patients who responded well to HAART were analyzed by ELISA to determine their IL-18 and IL-18BP contents. The levels of CD4+ T cell and CD8+ T cell in blood of 67 HIV-1 infected patients were detected by flow cytometry. Results Compared with healthy persons, serum IL-18, IL-18BP increased in the serum of HIV-infected patients (P < 0.05). The ratio of CD8 to CD4 of HIV-1 group A was higher than that of group B and C (P < 0.05 , P = 0.004 ;P = 0.014). Serum IL-18 and IL-18BP of HIV-1 groups which the levels of CD4+ helper T cell was less than 200 were higher than the control group (P < 0.05). A significant positive correlation was found between the levels of IL-18 and IL-18BP in healthy persons (P < 0.01 ,r = 0.705). Conclusions HAART can't completely reverse the imbalance of HIV-1 infected patients' immune system. Early treatment may

  5. Geography and Geographical Information Science: Interdisciplinary Integrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellul, Claire

    2015-01-01

    To understand how Geography and Geographical Information Science (GIS) can contribute to Interdisciplinary Research (IDR), it is relevant to articulate the differences between the different types of such research. "Multidisciplinary" researchers work in a "parallel play" mode, completing work in their disciplinary work streams…

  6. Spatial data structures in geographic information systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterom, P.J.M. van

    1988-01-01

    This document gives an overview of Geographic Infomation Systems (GISs) with respect to the Data Model. We introduce a classification of the types of data that one encounters in GISs. The requirements for the GIS Data Model, that we are developing, are summarized in a short list. The known solutions

  7. Geographical orientation. An integral geoperspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristóbal Cobo Arízaga

    2013-12-01

    This approach seeks to create a new line of discussion, to launch a proposal that is scientifically challenging to the hegemony of geographical thought and that provides new geographical rationality structures.

  8. Prevalence and Type Distribution of Human Papillomavirus Among 1813 Men in Tanzania and the Relationship to HIV Status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Tina Bech; Iftner, Thomas; Mwaiselage, Julius;

    2013-01-01

    Infection with high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with penile cancer in men, cervical cancer in women, and anal cancer and certain types of head and neck cancers in both sexes. Few studies have assessed the prevalence and type distribution of HPV among men in sub-Saharan Africa...

  9. Factors are not the same for risk of stopping exclusive breast-feeding and introducing different types of liquids and solids in HIV-affected communities in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquis, Grace S; Lartey, Anna; Perez-Escamilla, Rafael; Mazur, Robert E; Brakohiapa, Lucy; Birks, Katherine A

    2016-07-01

    Exclusive breast-feeding (EBF) for 6 months supports optimal infant growth, health and development. This paper examined whether maternal HIV status was associated with EBF and other infant feeding practices. Pregnant women were enrolled after HIV counselling, and their babies were followed up for up to 1 year. Data on household socio-economics and demographics, maternal characteristics and infants' daily diet were available for 482 infants and their mothers (150 HIV-positive (HIV-P), 170 HIV-negative (HIV-N) and 162 HIV-unknown (HIV-U)). Survival analyses estimated median EBF duration and time to introduction of liquids and foods; hazards ratios (HR) used data from 1-365 and 1-183 d, adjusting for covariates. Logistic regression estimated the probability of EBF for 6 months. Being HIV-P was associated with a shorter EBF duration (139 d) compared with HIV-N (163 d) and HIV-U (165 d) (P=0·004). Compared with HIV-N, being HIV-P was associated with about a 40 % higher risk of stopping EBF at any time point (HR 1·39; 95 % CI 1·06, 1·84; P=0·018) and less than half as likely to complete 6 months of EBF (adjusted OR 0·42; 95 % CI 0·22, 0·81; P=0·01). Being HIV-P tended to be or was associated with a higher risk of introducing non-milk liquids (HR 1·34; 95 % CI 0·98, 1·83; P=0·068), animal milks (HR 2·37; 95 % CI 1·32, 4·24; P=0·004) and solids (HR 1·56; 95 % CI 1·10, 2·22; P=0·011) during the first 6 months. Weight-for-age Z-score was associated with EBF and introducing formula. Different factors (ethnicity, food insecurity, HIV testing strategy) were associated with the various feeding behaviours, suggesting that diverse interventions are needed to promote optimal infant feeding.

  10. Trivalent adenovirus type 5 HIV recombinant vaccine primes for modest cytotoxic capacity that is greatest in humans with protective HLA class I alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A Migueles

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available If future HIV vaccine design strategies are to succeed, improved understanding of the mechanisms underlying protection from infection or immune control over HIV replication remains essential. Increased cytotoxic capacity of HIV-specific CD8+ T-cells associated with efficient elimination of HIV-infected CD4+ T-cell targets has been shown to distinguish long-term nonprogressors (LTNP, patients with durable control over HIV replication, from those experiencing progressive disease. Here, measurements of granzyme B target cell activity and HIV-1-infected CD4+ T-cell elimination were applied for the first time to identify antiviral activities in recipients of a replication incompetent adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 HIV-1 recombinant vaccine and were compared with HIV-negative individuals and chronically infected patients, including a group of LTNP. We observed readily detectable HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell recall cytotoxic responses in vaccinees at a median of 331 days following the last immunization. The magnitude of these responses was not related to the number of vaccinations, nor did it correlate with the percentages of cytokine-secreting T-cells determined by ICS assays. Although the recall cytotoxic capacity of the CD8+ T-cells of the vaccinee group was significantly less than that of LTNP and overlapped with that of progressors, we observed significantly higher cytotoxic responses in vaccine recipients carrying the HLA class I alleles B*27, B*57 or B*58, which have been associated with immune control over HIV replication in chronic infection. These findings suggest protective HLA class I alleles might lead to better outcomes in both chronic infection and following immunization due to more efficient priming of HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell cytotoxic responses.

  11. The phase 2b HVTN 503/Phambili study test-of-concept HIV vaccine study, investigating a recombinant adenovirus type 5 HIV gag/pol/nef vaccine in South Africa: unblinded, long-term follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Glenda E; Moodie, Zoe; Metch, Barbara; Gilbert, Peter B.; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Churchyard, Gavin; Nchabeleng, Maphoshane; Mlisana, Koleka; Laher, Fatima; Roux, Surita; Mngadi, Kathryn; Innes, Craig; Mathebula, Matsontso; Allen, Mary; McElrath, M Julie; Robertson, Michael; Kublin, James; Corey, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Background The Phambili study, conducted in South Africa amongst a predominantly heterosexual population, evaluated the efficacy of the MRK Ad5 gag/pol/nef subtype B HIV-1 preventive vaccine. Enrollment and vaccinations were stopped, participants unblinded, and follow-up extended when the Step study evaluating the same vaccine in the Americas, Caribbean and Australia was unblinded for non-efficacy with more HIV infections amongst vaccinee than placebo recipients [ZM1]. Extensive analyses over the complete follow-up period, most of which was unblinded, are reported. Methods Phambili participants were HIV-1 uninfected, sexually active men and women aged 18–35 years, followed for 3.5 years. HIV testing and risk reduction counseling occurred at weeks 0, 12, 30 and were switched to a 3 monthly schedule after unblinding. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate HIV-1 infection hazard ratios (HR) comparing vaccine to placebo recipients, overall and within subgroups. Long-term vaccine efficacy was evaluated in participants who were unblinded early in follow-up. Results Of the 801 participants enrolled (400 vaccine, 401 placebo), 112 (28%) received 1 vaccination, 259 (65%) 2 vaccinations and 29(7%) 3 vaccinations. More infections occurred in vaccinees (n=63) as compared to placebo (n=37) (adjusted HR (vaccine:placebo) 1.70, 95% CI 1.13–2.55, p = 0.01). We found no increase in infections with the number of vaccinations received and that the HRs did not differ by gender, circumcision, or Ad5 serostatus. Differences in risk behavior at baseline or during the study, or differential drop-out (p=0.40) are unlikely explanations for the increased rate of HIV-1 infections seen in vaccinees. Conclusion The increased HR of HIV-1 acquisition, irrespective of number of doses received, warrants further investigation to understand the biological mechanism. Further use of the Ad5 vector for HIV vaccines is not warranted PMID:24560541

  12. An attenuated herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1 encoding the HIV-1 Tat protein protects mice from a deadly mucosal HSV1 challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariaconcetta Sicurella

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV1 and HSV2 are common infectious agents in both industrialized and developing countries. They cause recurrent asymptomatic and/or symptomatic infections, and life-threatening diseases and death in newborns and immunocompromised patients. Current treatment for HSV relies on antiviral medications, which can halt the symptomatic diseases but cannot prevent the shedding that occurs in asymptomatic patients or, consequently, the spread of the viruses. Therefore, prevention rather than treatment of HSV infections has long been an area of intense research, but thus far effective anti-HSV vaccines still remain elusive. One of the key hurdles to overcome in anti-HSV vaccine development is the identification and effective use of strategies that promote the emergence of Th1-type immune responses against a wide range of epitopes involved in the control of viral replication. Since the HIV1 Tat protein has several immunomodulatory activities and increases CTL recognition of dominant and subdominant epitopes of heterologous antigens, we generated and assayed a recombinant attenuated replication-competent HSV1 vector containing the tat gene (HSV1-Tat. In this proof-of-concept study we show that immunization with this vector conferred protection in 100% of mice challenged intravaginally with a lethal dose of wild-type HSV1. We demonstrate that the presence of Tat within the recombinant virus increased and broadened Th1-like and CTL responses against HSV-derived T-cell epitopes and elicited in most immunized mice detectable IgG responses. In sharp contrast, a similarly attenuated HSV1 recombinant vector without Tat (HSV1-LacZ, induced low and different T cell responses, no measurable antibody responses and did not protect mice against the wild-type HSV1 challenge. These findings strongly suggest that recombinant HSV1 vectors expressing Tat merit further investigation for their potential to prevent and/or contain HSV1

  13. Geographical Income Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azhar, Hussain; Jonassen, Anders Bruun

    In this paper we estimate the degree, composition and development of geographical income polarization based on data at the individual and municipal level in Denmark from 1984 to 2002. Rising income polarization is reconfirmed when applying new polarization measures, the driving force being greater...... inter municipal income inequality. Counter factual simulations show that rising property prices to a large part explain the rise in polarization. One side-effect of polarization is tendencies towards a parallel polarization of residence location patterns, where low skilled individuals tend to live...

  14. HIV Treatment: The Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV Treatment HIV Treatment: The Basics (Last updated 2/24/2017; last reviewed 2/24/2017) Key Points Antiretroviral therapy (ART) ... reduces the risk of HIV transmission . How do HIV medicines work? HIV attacks and destroys the infection- ...

  15. HIV/AIDS Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin HIV/AIDS Treatment HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS Vaccine Development ... such as hepatitis, malaria, and tuberculosis. Treatment of HIV Infection In the early 1980s when the HIV/ ...

  16. Env-2dCD4 S60C complexes act as super immunogens and elicit potent, broadly neutralizing antibodies against clinically relevant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killick, Mark A; Grant, Michelle L; Cerutti, Nichole M; Capovilla, Alexio; Papathanasopoulos, Maria A

    2015-11-17

    The ability to induce a broadly neutralizing antibody (bNAb) response following vaccination is regarded as a crucial aspect in developing an effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The bNAbs target the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) which is exposed on the virus surface, thereby preventing cell entry. To date, conventional vaccine approaches such as the use of Env-based immunogens have been unsuccessful. We expressed, purified, characterized and evaluated the immunogenicity of several unique HIV-1 subtype C Env immunogens in small animals. Here we report that vaccine immunogens based on Env liganded to a two domain CD4 variant, 2dCD4(S60C) are capable of consistently eliciting potent, broadly neutralizing antibody responses in New Zealand white rabbits against a panel of clinically relevant HIV-1 pseudoviruses. This was irrespective of the Env protein subtype and context. Importantly, depletion of the anti-CD4 antibodies appeared to abrogate the neutralization activity in the rabbit sera. Taken together, this data suggests that the Env-2dCD4(S60C) complexes described here are "super" immunogens, and potentially immunofocus antibody responses to a unique epitope spanning the 2dCD4(60C). Recent data from the two available anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies, Ibalizumab and CD4-Ig (and bispecific variants thereof) have highlighted that the use of these broad and potent entry inhibitors could circumvent the need for a conventional vaccine targeting HIV-1. Overall, the ability of the unique Env-2dCD4(S60C) complexes to elicit potent bNAb responses has not been described previously, reinforcing that further investigation for their utility in preventing and controlling HIV-1/SIV infection is warranted.

  17. Dynamic features of the selective pressure on the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 gp120 CD4-binding site in a group of long term non progressor (LTNP subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazzi Benedetta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The characteristics of intra-host human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 env evolution were evaluated in untreated HIV-1-infected subjects with different patterns of disease progression, including 2 normal progressor [NP], and 5 Long term non-progressor [LTNP] patients. High-resolution phylogenetic analysis of the C2-C5 env gene sequences of the replicating HIV-1 was performed in sequential samples collected over a 3–5 year period; overall, 301 HIV-1 genomic RNA sequences were amplified from plasma samples, cloned, sequenced and analyzed. Firstly, the evolutionary rate was calculated separately in the 3 codon positions. In all LTNPs, the 3rd codon mutation rate was equal or even lower than that observed at the 1st and 2nd positions (p = 0.016, thus suggesting strong ongoing positive selection. A Bayesian approach and a maximum-likelihood (ML method were used to estimate the rate of virus evolution within each subject and to detect positively selected sites respectively. A great number of N-linked glycosylation sites under positive selection were identified in both NP and LTNP subjects. Viral sequences from 4 of the 5 LTNPs showed extensive positive selective pressure on the CD4-binding site (CD4bs. In addition, localized pressure in the area of the IgG-b12 epitope, a broad neutralizing human monoclonal antibody targeting the CD4bs, was documented in one LTNP subject, using a graphic colour grade 3-dimensional visualization. Overall, the data shown here documenting high selective pressure on the HIV-1 CD4bs of a group of LTNP subjects offers important insights for planning novel strategies for the immune control of HIV-1 infection.

  18. Current hemoglobin levels are more predictive of disease progression than hemoglobin measured at baseline in patients receiving antiretroviral treatment for HIV type 1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalska, Justyna D; Mocroft, Amanda; Blaxhult, Anders;

    2007-01-01

    The role of hemoglobin levels as an independent prognostic marker of progression to AIDS and/or death in HIV-infected patients starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) was investigated. A total of 2,579 patients from the EuroSIDA cohort with hemoglobin, CD4 cell count, and HIV RNA viral...

  19. The Geographical Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Schweikart

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The Geographical Information System, normally called GIS, is a tool for representing spatial relationships and real processes with the help of a model. A GIS is a system of hardware, software and staff for collecting, managing, analysing and representing geospatial information. For example, we can study the evolution of an infectious disease in a certain territory, perform market analysis, or locate the best ways to choose a new industrial site. In substance, it is data manipulation software for that allows us to have, both the graphic component, that is a territorial representation of the reality that you want to represent, and the data components in the form of a database or more commonly, calculation sheets. Geographical data are divided in spatial data and attribute data: Spatial data are recorded as points, lines and polygons (vectorial structure. In other words, the survey systems have been projected to acquire information in accordance to elementary cells corresponding to a territorial grid (raster structure. It also includes remote sensing data.

  20. Genetic diversity of different geographic populations and body color types of Sitobion avenae%不同地理种群和红色及绿色麦长管蚜遗传多样性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张烨; 尹姣; 曹雅忠; 李克斌

    2011-01-01

    Variation in body color is a common phenomenon in Sitobion avenae ( Fabricius) and understanding thisvariation has potential application in pest control and monitoring. Cluster analysis and molecular variance analysis of 5. Avenae were carried out using microsatellite markers and the genetic diversity of different geographic populations and color types analyzed from a population genetics perspective. The results show that 5. Avenue's genetic differentiation is mainly due to variation within populations, with variation among populations comprising a relatively small proportion of the total variance. In addition, we found no significant genetic differentiation between different colors morphs and that gene exchange in 5. Avenae is frequent.%麦长管蚜Sitobion avenae(Fabricius)体色变异(红色和绿色)是一种常见的生物学现象,揭示其体色的转换机制对该类害虫的防控和测报具有潜在意义.本文利用微卫星标记技术,对麦长管蚜种群进行聚类分析和分子方差分析,从群体遗传学角度研究了不同地理种群和不同色型之间遗传多样性差异.研究结果表明,麦长管蚜的遗传分化主要以种群内的变异为主,种群间的变异占总变异的比例很小.此外,研究发现,红、绿体色间的遗传分化并不显著,且存在频繁的基因交流.这说明不同区域的不同体色麦长管蚜种群各自之间具有相似的遗传背景.

  1. Analytical Performances of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 RNA-Based Amplix® Real-Time PCR Platform for HIV-1 RNA Quantification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Diamant Mossoro-Kpinde

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We evaluated the performances of Amplix real-time PCR platform developed by Biosynex (Strasbourg, France, combining automated station extraction (Amplix station 16 Dx and real-time PCR (Amplix NG, for quantifying plasma HIV-1 RNA by lyophilized HIV-1 RNA-based Amplix reagents targeting gag and LTR, using samples from HIV-1-infected adults from Central African Republic. Results. Amplix real-time PCR assay showed low limit of detection (28 copies/mL, across wide dynamic range (1.4–10 log copies/mL, 100% sensitivity and 99% specificity, high reproducibility, and accuracy with mean bias < 5%. The assay showed excellent correlations and concordance of 95.3% with the reference HIV-1 RNA load assay (Roche, with mean absolute bias of +0.097 log copies/mL by Bland-Altman analysis. The assay was able to detect and quantify the most prevalent HIV-1 subtype strains and the majority of non-B subtypes, CRFs of HIV-1 group M, and HIV-1 groups N and O circulating in Central Africa. The Amplix assay showed 100% sensitivity and 99.6% specificity to diagnose virological failure in clinical samples from antiretroviral drug-experienced patients. Conclusions. The HIV-1 RNA-based Amplix real-time PCR platform constitutes sensitive and reliable system for clinical monitoring of HIV-1 RNA load in HIV-1-infected children and adults, particularly adapted to intermediate laboratory facilities in sub-Saharan Africa.

  2. HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... percentage is less than 15%. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  3. [Research progress on the risk factors of geographic tongue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huamei, Yang; Yu, Zhou; Xin, Zeng; Ga, Liao; Qianming, Chen

    2015-02-01

    Geographic tongue, also called benign migratory glossitis, is a common and superficial benign inflammatory disorder that affects the tongue epithelium. The majority of geographic tongue lesions typically manifest as irregular central erythematous patches. These lesions, which are caused by the loss of filiform papillae, are defined by an elevated whitish band-like border that can change location, size, and pattern over a period of time. Histological observations of the oral mucosa affected by geographic tongue revealed nonspecific inflammation. Some reports described cases of migratory stomatitis, wherein lesions simultaneously manifested on the extra lingual oral mucosa. This condition is also called ectopic geographic tongue, which is clinically and histologically similar to the type normally confined to the tongue. In most cases, patients are asymptomatic and do not require treatment. The condition may spontaneously exhibit periods of remission and exacerbation with good prognosis. The specific etiology of geographic tongue remains unknown. Geographic tongue is age-related and is prevalent among young individuals. Various etiological factors that have been suggested in literature include immunological factors, genetic factors, atopic or allergic tendency, emotional stress, tobacco consumption, hormonal disturbances, and zinc deficiency. Geographic tongue may coexist with other disorders, such as fissured tongue, psoriasis, diabetes mellitus, gastroin- testinal diseases, burning mouth syndrome, and Down syndrome. Experts currently disagree on whether geographic tongue is an oral manifestation of psoriasis. Moreover, some scholars suggest that geographic tongue is a prestage of fissured tongue. The objective of this review is to summarize current research on risk factors of geographic tongue.

  4. Three types of self-efficacy associated with medication adherence in patients with co-occurring HIV and substance use disorders, but only when mood disorders are present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reif S

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Susan Reif,1 Rae Jean Proeschold-Bell,1,2 Jia Yao,1 Sara LeGrand,1,2 Anna Uehara,2 Edgar Asiimwe,2 Evelyn Byrd Quinlivan31Duke Center for Health Policy and Inequalities Research, 2Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC, 3Center for Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USABackground: Adherence with medication regimens for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is a life-saving behavior for people with HIV infection, yet adherence is challenging for many individuals with co-occurring substance use and/or mood disorders. Medication-taking self-efficacy, which is the confidence that one can take one's medication as prescribed, is associated with better adherence with HIV medication. However, little is known about the influence that other kinds of self-efficacy have on adherence with HIV medication, especially among HIV-infected individuals with co-occurring substance use and/or mood disorders. We sought to examine the relationship between adherence with HIV medication among substance users and three specific kinds of self-efficacy, ie, one's confidence that one can communicate with medical providers, get support, and manage one's mood. We further sought to examine whether symptoms of depression and anxiety moderate these relationships.Methods: Patients were recruited from three HIV clinics in the southeastern United States as part of an integrated study of treatment for HIV and substance use.Results: We interviewed 154 patients with HIV and substance use who reported taking HIV medications. Based on symptoms of depression and anxiety using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety, 63% had probable depression and/or anxiety. Higher levels of self-efficacy in provider communication (β = 3.86, P < 0.01, getting needed support (β = 2.82, P < 0.01, and mood management (β = 2.29, P < 0.05 were related to better self-reported adherence with HIV

  5. Trajectory Networks and Their Topological Changes Induced by Geographical Infiltration

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Luciano da Fontoura

    2008-01-01

    In this article we investigate the topological changes undergone by trajectory networks as a consequence of progressive geographical infiltration. Trajectory networks, a type of knitted network, are obtained by establishing paths between geographically distributed nodes while following an associated vector field. For instance, the nodes could correspond to neurons along the cortical surface and the vector field could correspond to the gradient of neurotrophic factors, or the nodes could represent towns while the vector fields would be given by economical and/or geographical gradients. Therefore trajectory networks are natural models of a large number of geographical structures. The geographical infiltrations correspond to the addition of new local connections between nearby existing nodes. As such, these infiltrations could be related to several real-world processes such as contaminations, diseases, attacks, parasites, etc. The way in which progressive geographical infiltrations affect trajectory networks is ...

  6. Delineation of eco—geographic regional system of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUShaohong; YANGOinye; ZHENGDu

    2003-01-01

    Eco-geographic regionalization has been one of the most important topics in China's regionalization researches since the end of the 20th century. It is a major ecosystem in geographic zonality. A hierarchical system, which is formed by division or combination of natural features based on geographic relativity and comparison of major ecosystem factors (including biological and non-biological) and geographic zonality, is called eco-geographic regional system. This paper introduces process of China's regionalization development. The first level unit, temperature zone, is delineated with main criteria of temperature. The second level unit, humidity region, is based on criteria of water/moisture states. The third level unit, natural region, is divided according to medium geomorphologic units. Vegetation types and soils are applied as supplementary criteria to indicate temperature and water/moisture states. Mapping process from qualitative to quantitative and China's eco-geographic regional system are also explained in this paper.

  7. Socio-demographic and epidemiological characteristics associated with human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1 infection in HIV-1-explosed but uninfected individuals, and in HIV-1-infected patients from a southern brasilian population Características sociodemográficas e epidemiológicas associadas com a infecção pelo vírus da imunodeficiência humana tipo 1 (HIV-1 em indivíduos expostos ao HIV-1 mas não infectados e em pacientes infectados pelo HIV-1, provenientes da população da região Sul do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Maria Vissoci Reiche

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability to control human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection and progression of the disease is regulated by host and viral factors. This cross-sectional study describes the socio-demographic and epidemiological characteristics associated with HIV-1 infection in 1,061 subjects attended in Londrina and region, south of Brazil: 136 healthy individuals (Group 1, 147 HIV-1-exposed but uninfected individuals (Group 2, 161 HIV-1-infected asymptomatic patients (Group 3, and 617 patients with AIDS (Group 4. Data were obtained by a standardized questionnaire and serological tests. The age of the individuals ranged from 15.1 to 79.5 years, 54.0% and 56.1% of the Groups 3 and 4 patients, respectively, were men. The major features of groups 2, 3, and 4 were a predominance of education level up to secondary school (55.8%, 60.2% and 62.4%, respectively, sexual route of exposure (88.4%, 87.0% and 82.0%, respectively, heterosexual behavior (91.8%, 75.2% and 83.7%, respectively, and previous sexually transmitted diseases (20.4%, 32.5%, and 38.1%, respectively. The patients with AIDS showed the highest rates of seropositivity for syphilis (25.6%, of anti-HCV (22.3%, and anti-HTLV I/II obtained by two serological screening tests (6.2% and 6.8%, respectively. The results documenting the predominant characteristics for HIV-1 infection among residents of Londrina and region, could be useful for the improvement of current HIV-1 prevention, monitoring and therapeutic programs targeted at this population.Este estudo transversal descreve as principais características sociodemográficas e epidemiológicas associadas com a infecção pelo HIV-1 em 1.061 indivíduos atendidos em Londrina e região, Sul do Brasil: 136 indivíduos saudáveis (Grupo 1, 147 indivíduos expostos ao HIV-1 mas não infectados (Grupo 2, 161 pacientes infectados pelo HIV-1 assintomáticos (Grupo 3 e 617 pacientes com aids (Grupo 4. Os dados foram obtidos pela aplicação de um

  8. Analyzing geographic clustered response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.; Selvin, S.; Mohr, M.S.

    1991-08-01

    In the study of geographic disease clusters, an alternative to traditional methods based on rates is to analyze case locations on a transformed map in which population density is everywhere equal. Although the analyst's task is thereby simplified, the specification of the density equalizing map projection (DEMP) itself is not simple and continues to be the subject of considerable research. Here a new DEMP algorithm is described, which avoids some of the difficulties of earlier approaches. The new algorithm (a) avoids illegal overlapping of transformed polygons; (b) finds the unique solution that minimizes map distortion; (c) provides constant magnification over each map polygon; (d) defines a continuous transformation over the entire map domain; (e) defines an inverse transformation; (f) can accept optional constraints such as fixed boundaries; and (g) can use commercially supported minimization software. Work is continuing to improve computing efficiency and improve the algorithm. 21 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. HIV Prevention

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-01

    Dr. Kevin Fenton, Director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, talks about steps people can take to protect their health from HIV.  Created: 2/1/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 2/1/2012.

  10. Global Dispersal Pattern of HIV Type 1 Subtype CRF01_AE: A Genetic Trace of Human Mobility Related to Heterosexual Sexual Activities Centralized in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis, Konstantinos; Albert, Jan; Mamais, Ioannis; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Hatzakis, Angelos; Hamouda, Osamah; Struck, Daniel; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Wensing, Annemarie M J; Alexiev, Ivailo; Åsjö, Birgitta; Balotta, Claudia; Camacho, Ricardo J; Coughlan, Suzie; Griskevicius, Algirdas; Grossman, Zehava; Horban, Andrzej; Kostrikis, Leondios G; Lepej, Snjezana; Liitsola, Kirsi; Linka, Marek; Nielsen, Claus; Otelea, Dan; Paredes, Roger; Poljak, Mario; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elisabeth; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Sönnerborg, Anders; Staneková, Danica; Stanojevic, Maja; Boucher, Charles A B; Kaplan, Lauren; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Paraskevis, Dimitrios

    2015-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype CRF01_AE originated in Africa and then passed to Thailand, where it established a major epidemic. Despite the global presence of CRF01_AE, little is known about its subsequent dispersal pattern. We assembled a global data set of 2736 CRF01_AE sequences by pooling sequences from public databases and patient-cohort studies. We estimated viral dispersal patterns, using statistical phylogeographic analysis run over bootstrap trees estimated by the maximum likelihood method. We show that Thailand has been the source of viral dispersal to most areas worldwide, including 17 of 20 sampled countries in Europe. Japan, Singapore, Vietnam, and other Asian countries have played a secondary role in the viral dissemination. In contrast, China and Taiwan have mainly imported strains from neighboring Asian countries, North America, and Africa without any significant viral exportation. The central role of Thailand in the global spread of CRF01_AE can be probably explained by the popularity of Thailand as a vacation destination characterized by sex tourism and by Thai emigration to the Western world. Our study highlights the unique case of CRF01_AE, the only globally distributed non-B clade whose global dispersal did not originate in Africa. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Evidence that Vpu modulates HIV-1 Gag-envelope interaction towards envelope incorporation and infectivity in a cell type dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Gautam

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 Vpu is required for efficient virus particle release from the plasma membrane and intracellular CD4 degradation in infected cells. In the present study, we found that the loss of virus infectivity as a result of envelope (Env incorporation defect caused by a Gag matrix (MA mutation (L30E was significantly alleviated by introducing a start codon mutation in vpu. Inactivation of Vpu partially restored the Env incorporation defect imposed by L30E substitution in MA. This effect was found to be comparable in cell types such as 293T, HeLa, NP2 and GHOST as well as in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM. However, in HeLa cells BST-2 knockdown was found to further alleviate the effect of Vpu inactivation on infectivity of L30E mutant. Our data demonstrated that the impaired infectivity of virus particles due to Env incorporation defect caused by MA mutation was modulated by start codon mutation in Vpu.

  12. Assembling different antennas of the gp120 high mannose-type glycans on gold nanoparticles provides superior binding to the anti-HIV antibody 2G12 than the individual antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodo, Fabrizio; Enríquez-Navas, Pedro M; Angulo, Jesús; Marradi, Marco; Penadés, Soledad

    2015-03-20

    In order to re-build Man9GlcNAc2 clusters of the HIV gp120 glycoprotein, ∼2 nm gold glyconanoparticles (GNPs) were coated with the synthetic partial structures of Man9, the tetramannoside Manα1-2Manα1-2Manα1-3Manα1- and the pentamannoside Manα1-2Manα1-3[Manα1-2Manα1-6]Manα1-. Their interactions with the anti-HIV broadly neutralizing antibody 2G12 were studied by surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensors and saturation transfer difference (STD)-NMR spectroscopy. A synergistic effect of the tetra- and pentamannosides multimerized on a same GNP was observed. The assembly of these antennas of the gp120 high-mannose type glycan on GNPs provided superior binding to the anti-HIV antibody 2G12 with respect to GNPs carrying only the individual oligomannosides. The results presented in this work provide new molecular information on the interactions between clusters of oligomannosides and 2G12 that could help in the design of a carbohydrate-based vaccine against HIV.

  13. Optimized Infectivity of the Cell-Free Single-Cycle Human Immunodeficiency Viruses Type 1 (HIV-1 and Its Restriction by Host Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin H Kim

    Full Text Available The infectivity of retroviruses such as HIV-1 in plasma or cultured media is less than 0.1% in general, the mechanisms of which are not yet fully understood. One possible explanation among others is the potential presence of large numbers of defective virions in a virus pool, which limits the apparent infectivity of HIV virions. To test this hypothesis, we have varied the culture conditions used to generate single-cycle HIV-1 virions. Among these culture variables, virion harvest time, media change after transfection, and envelope plasmid input can all improve HIV-1 infectivity by reducing the number of defective virions. A harvest time of 18-24 hours post transfection as opposed to 48 hours, and a media change six hours post transfection both improve viral infectivity. An optimal quantity of envelope plasmid input during transfection was also found. Collectively, these conditions increased the infectivity of HIV-1 virions by sevenfold compared to normally reported values in TZM-bl indicator cell lines. These conditions also increased the infectivity of HIV-1 in CD4(+ T cells, suggesting that these conditions work by increasing the intrinsic infectivity of a virus pool. Nevertheless, these improvements on virion infectivity were marginal compared to the impact of host cells on HIV infection, which can decrease the apparent infectivity by 19-fold even for the most optimized viruses. These results suggest that the infectivity of HIV-1 virions can be optimized by reducing the number of defective virions; however, viral-cell interactions may pose a major barrier for HIV-1 infectivity.

  14. Antiretroviral effects of deoxyhypusyl hydroxylase inhibitors: a hypusine-dependent host cell mechanism for replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrus, L; Szabo, P; Grady, R W; Hanauske, A R; Huima-Byron, T; Slowinska, B; Zagulska, S; Hanauske-Abel, H M

    1998-06-01

    The HIV-1 protein Rev, critical for translation of incompletely spliced retroviral mRNAs encoding capsid elements, requires a host cell protein termed "eukaryotic initiation factor 5A" (eIF-5A). This is the only protein containing hypusine, a lysine-derived hydroxylated residue that determines its proposed bioactivity, the translation of a subset of cellular mRNAs controlling G1-to-S transit of the cell cycle. We postulated that inhibiting the hypusine-forming deoxyhypusyl hydroxylase (DOHH) should, by depleting eukaryotic initiation factor 5A, compromise Rev function and thus reduce HIV-1 multiplication. We now report that the alpha-hydroxypyridones, specifically mimosine, a natural product, and deferiprone, an experimental drug, inhibited deoxyhypusyl hydroxylase in T-lymphocytic and promonocytic cell lines and, in a concentration-dependent manner, suppressed replication of HIV-1. However, the alpha-hydroxypyridones did not affect the formation of unspliced or multiply spliced HIV-1 transcripts. Rather, these agents caused Rev-dependent incompletely spliced HIV-1 mRNA such as gag, but not cellular "housekeeping" mRNAs, to disappear from polysomes. Consequently, alpha-hydroxypyridone-mediated depletion of eIF-5A decreased biosynthesis of structural HIV-1 protein encoded by gag, measured as p24, whereas the induced formation of cellular protein like tumor necrosis factor alpha remained unaffected. By interfering with the translation of incompletely spliced retroviral mRNAs, these compounds restrict HIV-1 to the early, nongenerative phase of its reproductive cycle. In the inducibly HIV-1 expressing T-cell line ACH-2, the deoxyhypusyl hydroxylase inhibitors triggered extensive apoptosis, particularly of cells that actively produce HIV-1. Selective suppression of retroviral protein biosynthesis and preferential apoptosis of retrovirally infected cells by alpha-hydroxypyridones point to a novel mode of antiretroviral action.

  15. Modification of a loop sequence between α-helices 6 and 7 of virus capsid (CA protein in a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 derivative that has simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac239 vif and CA α-helices 4 and 5 loop improves replication in cynomolgus monkey cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adachi Akio

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 productively infects only humans and chimpanzees but not cynomolgus or rhesus monkeys while simian immunodeficiency virus isolated from macaque (SIVmac readily establishes infection in those monkeys. Several HIV-1 and SIVmac chimeric viruses have been constructed in order to develop an animal model for HIV-1 infection. Construction of an HIV-1 derivative which contains sequences of a SIVmac239 loop between α-helices 4 and 5 (L4/5 of capsid protein (CA and the entire SIVmac239 vif gene was previously reported. Although this chimeric virus could grow in cynomolgus monkey cells, it did so much more slowly than did SIVmac. It was also reported that intrinsic TRIM5α restricts the post-entry step of HIV-1 replication in rhesus and cynomolgus monkey cells, and we previously demonstrated that a single amino acid in a loop between α-helices 6 and 7 (L6/7 of HIV type 2 (HIV-2 CA determines the susceptibility of HIV-2 to cynomolgus monkey TRIM5α. Results In the study presented here, we replaced L6/7 of HIV-1 CA in addition to L4/5 and vif with the corresponding segments of SIVmac. The resultant HIV-1 derivatives showed enhanced replication capability in established T cell lines as well as in CD8+ cell-depleted primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells from cynomolgus monkey. Compared with the wild type HIV-1 particles, the viral particles produced from a chimeric HIV-1 genome with those two SIVmac loops were less able to saturate the intrinsic restriction in rhesus monkey cells. Conclusion We have succeeded in making the replication of simian-tropic HIV-1 in cynomolgus monkey cells more efficient by introducing into HIV-1 the L6/7 CA loop from SIVmac. It would be of interest to determine whether HIV-1 derivatives with SIVmac CA L4/5 and L6/7 can establish infection of cynomolgus monkeys in vivo.

  16. Bioinformatic Prediction Programs Underestimate the Frequency of CXCR4 Usage by R5X4 HIV Type 1 in Brain and Other Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Mefford, Megan E; Gorry, Paul R.; Kunstman, Kevin; Steven M Wolinsky; Gabuzda, Dana

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) variants in brain primarily use CCR5 for entry into macrophages and microglia, but dual-tropic (R5X4) HIV-1 has been detected in brain and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) of some patients with HIV-associated dementia (HAD). Here, we sequenced the gp120 coding region of nine full-length dual-tropic (R5X4) env genes cloned directly from autopsy brain and spleen tissue from an AIDS patient with severe HAD. We then compiled a dataset of 30 unique clade B R5X4 Env ...

  17. Synthesis and anti-HIV evaluation of hybrid-type prodrugs conjugating HIV integrase inhibitors with d4t by self-cleavable spacers containing an amino acid residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossey, Christine; Huynh, Ngoc-Trinh; Vu, Anh-Hoang; Vidu, Anamaria; Zarafu, Irina; Laduree, Daniel; Schmidt, Sylvie; Laumond, Geraldine; Aubertin, Anne-Marie

    2007-10-01

    In an attempt to combine the anti-HIV inhibitory capacity of reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) and integrase (IN) inhibitors (INIs), several heterodimer analogues of the previously reported [d4T]-PABC-[INI] and [d4T]-OABC-[INI] prototypes have been prepared. In these novel series, we wished to extend our results to conjugates which incorporated an enzymatically labile aminoacid unit (L-alanine) connected to d4T through a self-immolative para- or ortho-aminobenzyl carbonate (PABC or OABC) spacer. Among the novel heterodimers, several derivatives show a potent anti-HIV-1 activity, which proved comparable to that of the [L-708,906]-PABC-[d4T] Heterodimer A prototype. However, although the compounds proved inhibitory to HIV-1, they were less potent than the parent compounds from which they were derived.

  18. GEOGRAPHIC NAMES INFORMATION SYSTEM (GNIS) ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS), developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Board on Geographic Names (BGN), contains information about physical and cultural geographic features in the United States and associated areas, both current and historical, but not including roads and highways. The database also contains geographic names in Antarctica. The database holds the Federally recognized name of each feature and defines the location of the feature by state, county, USGS topographic map, and geographic coordinates. Other feature attributes include names or spellings other than the official name, feature designations, feature class, historical and descriptive information, and for some categories of features the geometric boundaries. The database assigns a unique feature identifier, a random number, that is a key for accessing, integrating, or reconciling GNIS data with other data sets. The GNIS is our Nation's official repository of domestic geographic feature names information.

  19. Fidelity of classwide-resistant HIV-2 reverse transcriptase and differential contribution of K65R to the accuracy of HIV-1 and HIV-2 reverse transcriptases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Mar; Sebastián-Martín, Alba; García-Marquina, Guillermo; Menéndez-Arias, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors constitute the backbone of current therapies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and type 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively). However, mutational pathways leading to the development of nucleoside analogue resistance are different in both types of HIV. In HIV-2, resistance to all approved nucleoside analogues is conferred by the combination of RT substitutions K65R, Q151M and M184V. Nucleotide incorporation kinetic analyses of mutant and wild-type (WT) HIV-2 RTs show that the triple-mutant has decreased catalytic efficiency due to the presence of M184V. Although similar effects were previously reported for equivalent mutations in HIV-1 RT, the HIV-2 enzymes were catalytically less efficient. Interestingly, in highly divergent HIV-1 RTs, K65R confers several-fold increased accuracy of DNA synthesis. We have determined the intrinsic fidelity of DNA synthesis of WT HIV-2 RT and mutants K65R and K65R/Q151M/M184V. Our results show that those changes in HIV-2 RT have a relatively small impact on nucleotide selectivity. Furthermore, we found that there were less than two-fold differences in error rates obtained with forward mutation assays using mutant and WT HIV-2 RTs. A different conformation of the β3-β4 hairpin loop in HIV-1 and HIV-2 RTs could probably explain the differential effects of K65R. PMID:28333133

  20. Stigma reduction in adolescents and young adults newly diagnosed with HIV: findings from the Project ACCEPT intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Gary W; Lemos, Diana; Hosek, Sybil G

    2014-10-01

    This article describes the influence of a group-based behavioral intervention for adolescents and young adults newly diagnosed with HIV (Project ACCEPT) on four dimensions of HIV-related stigma-personalized stigma, disclosure concerns, negative self-image, and concern with public attitudes about people with HIV-as measured by the Berger HIV Stigma Scale. Stigma was addressed in a holistic manner during the intervention by providing HIV/AIDS-related information, facilitating the acquisition of coping skills, and providing contact with other youth living with HIV in order to improve social support. Fifty youth (28 male, 22 female; mean age=19.24 years) newly diagnosed with HIV from four geographically diverse clinics participated in a one-group pretest-posttest design study whereby they received the intervention over a 12-week period, and completed assessments at baseline, post-intervention, and 3-month follow-up. Results from the combined sample (males and females) revealed overall reductions in stigma in three dimensions: personalized stigma, disclosure concerns, and negative self-image, although only the combined-sample effects for negative self-image were maintained at 3-month follow-up. Gender-specific analyses revealed that the intervention reduced stigma for males across all four dimensions of stigma, with all effects being maintained to some degree at the 3-month follow-up. Only personalized stigma demonstrated a decrease for females, although this effect was not maintained at the 3-month follow-up; while the other three types of stigma increased at post-intervention and 3-month follow-up. Findings are discussed in terms of gender specific outcomes and the need for a different type of intervention to reduce stigma for young women.

  1. Survey of both hepatitis B virus (HBsAg and hepatitis C virus (HCV-Ab coinfection among HIV positive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pournia Yadollah

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV, HBVand HCV is major public health concerns. Because of shared routes of transmission, HIV-HCV coinfection and HIV-HBV coinfection are common. HIV-positive individuals are at risk of coinfection with HBV and HCV infections. The prevalence rates of coinfection with HBV and HCV in HIV-patients have been variable worldwide depending on the geographic regions, and the type of exposure. Aim This study aimed to examine HBV and HCV coinfection serologically and determine the shared and significant factors in the coinfection of HIV-positive patients. Methods This descriptive, cross-sectional study was carried out on 391 HIV-positive patients including 358 males and 33 females in Lorestan province, west Iran, to survey coinfection with HBsAg and anti-HCV. The retrospective demographic data of the subjects was collected and the patients' serums were analyzed by ELISA kits including HBsAg and anti-HCV. The collected data was analyzed with SPSS software (15 and Chi-square. Fisher's exact test with 5% error intervals was used to measure the correlation of variables and infection rates. Results The results of the study indicated that the prevalence of coinfection in HIV-positive patients with hepatitis viruses was 94.4% (370 in 391, out of whom 57 (14.5% cases were HBsAg positive, 282 (72% cases were anti-HCV positive, and 31 (7.9% cases were both HBsAg and anti-HCV positive. Conclusion There was a significant correlation between coinfection with HCV and HBV and/or both among HIV-positive patients depending on different variables including sex, age, occupation, marital status, exposure to risk factors.(p

  2. High-affinity binding of southern African HIV type 1 subtype C envelope protein, gp120, to the CCR5 coreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, Bernhard J; Coetsee, Marla; Van Der Watt, Pauline; Chan, Mei-Chi; Sperling, Karin M; Katz, Arieh A; Flanagan, Colleen A

    2008-12-01

    HIV-1 subtype C is the fastest spreading subtype worldwide and predominantly uses the CCR5 coreceptor, showing minimal transition to the X4 phenotype. This raises the possibility that envelope proteins of HIV-1 subtype C have structural features that favor interaction with CCR5. Preference for CCR5 could arise from enhanced affinity of HIV-1 subtype C for CCR5. To test this, we have characterized the interaction of gp120 envelope proteins from HIV-1 subtype C clones with CD4 and CCR5. Recombinant gp120 proteins from isolates of HIV-1 subtypes B and C were expressed, purified, and assessed in a CD4 binding assay and a CCR5 chemokine competition binding assay. All gp120 proteins bound to CD4-expressing cells, except one, 97ZA347ts, which had Arg substituted for the Cys239 in the conserved C2 loop. Reconstitution of Cys239, using site-directed mutagenesis, restored CD4 binding, while introducing Arg or Ser into position 239 of the functional Du151 gp120 protein abrogated CD4 binding. This shows that the Cys228-Cys239 disulfide bond of gp120 is required for high-affinity binding to CD4. Recombinant gp120 proteins from two HIV-1 subtype B clones bound CCR5 in the presence of CD4, while gp120 from the X4-tropic, HxB2, clone did not bind CCR5. gp120 from two functional HIV-1 subtype C clones, Du151 and MOLE1, bound CCR5 with high affinity in the presence of CD4 and Du151 showed significant CCR5 binding in the absence of CD4. A gp120 from a nonfunctional subtype C clone had lower affinity for CCR5. These results indicate that HIV-1 subtype C proteins have high affinity for CCR5 with variable dependence on CD4.

  3. Polymorphisms of the SAMHD1 Gene Are Not Associated with the Infection and Natural Control of HIV Type 1 in Europeans and African-Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, Sirena; Wang, Danxin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The HIV-1 restriction factor SAM domain and HD domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1) blocks HIV-1 infection in human myeloid cells. Mutations in the SAMHD1 gene are associated with rare genetic diseases including Aicardi–Goutieres syndrome. However, it is unknown whether polymorphisms of SAMHD1 are associated with infection and natural control of HIV-1 in humans. Our objective was to determine whether the expression of SAMHD1 mRNA is affected by common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in SAMHD1 and whether the SNPs are associated with HIV-1 infection status. Using a tagging SNP approach, we determined the association between eight tagging SNPs in SAMHD1 and the mRNA expression in B-lymphocyte cell lines from 70 healthy white donors. We identified one SNP (rs1291142) that was significantly associated with SAMHD1 mRNA expression, with minor allele carriers having 30% less mRNA levels (p=0.015). However, after analyzing the published genome-wide association study data of 857 HIV-1 controllers and 2088 HIV-1 progressors from the European and African-American cohorts, we did not find a significant association between SNPs in SAMHD1 and HIV-1 infection status, including SNP rs1291142 (p>0.05). We also observed 2- to 6-fold variations of SAMHD1 mRNA levels in primary B-lymphocytes, CD4+ T-lymphocytes, and CD14+ monocytes from five healthy donors. Our results suggest that common regulatory polymorphism(s) exist in the SAMHD1 gene that affects its mRNA expression in B-lymphocyte cell lines from healthy whites. However, polymorphisms of SAMHD1 are unlikely to contribute to the infection and natural control of HIV-1 in European and African-American individuals. PMID:22530776

  4. High frequency of regulatory T cells among HIV type 1-infected men who have sex with men correlates with disease progression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wan-hai; MING Liang; WANG Ying; KAN Quan-cheng; ZHANG Xiao-yan

    2013-01-01

    Background Regulatory T cells (Tregs) may play an important role in immunopathology during HIV-1 infection.Transcription factor forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) orchestrates the development of Tregs and is a useful marker to identify this population.Using a FoxP3 phenotype to define Tregs,we investigated the level and phenotype of peripheral blood natural CD4+Tregs and assessed the relationship between the frequencies and absolute numbers of CD4+Tregs and disease progression among untreated HIV-infected men who have sex with men (HIV+MSM) in China.Methods Fifty-two untreated HIV+MSM with CD4+T-cell counts of ≤350 cells/μl or >350 cells/μl were compared in a cresssectional study.Twelve age-matched HIV-uninfected MSM and nine patients receiving antiratroviral therapy for at least 1 year were also included.Expression of CD25,CD127,CD45RA,CCR7 and CTLA-4 was assessed on CD4+Tregs using polychromatic flow cytometry.Results The percentage of CD4+Tregs was increased significantly,whereas CD4+Tregs expressed less CTLA-4 in HIV+MSM compared with controls.CD4+Tregs displayed predominantly an effector memory phenotype (CD45RA-CCR7-),phenotypically distinct from conventional CD4+T cells.Moreover,the expansive frequencies of CD4+Tregs coincided with lower CD4+T-cell counts and higher viral loads whereas the absolute numbers of CD4+Tregs were associated with higher CD4+T-cell counts and lower viral loads.The expansion of Tregs was also associated with CD8+T-cell activation.Conclusion Increased proportions and decreased numbers of CD4+Tregs are associated with HIV progression,and their functions may impair with the progression of HIV infection.

  5. Prevalence and clinical characteristics of HIV type 1-infected patients receiving dialysis in Spain: results of a Spanish survey in 2006: GESIDA 48/05 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trullàs, J-C; Barril, G; Cofan, F; Moreno, A; Cases, A; Fernandez-Lucas, M; Martinez-Ara, J; Ceballos, M; Garcia-de-Diego, J; Muñiz, M-L; Molina, J; Martínez-Castelao, A; González-Garcia, J; Miró, J-M

    2008-10-01

    End-stage renal diseases (ESRD) are becoming more frequent in HIV-infected patients. In Europe there is little information about HIV-infected patients on dialysis. A cross-sectional multicenter survey in 328 Spanish dialysis units was conducted in 2006. Information from 14,876 patients in dialysis was obtained (81.6% of the Spanish dialysis population). Eighty-one were HIV infected (0.54%; 95% CI, 0.43-0.67), 60 were on hemodialysis, and 21 were on peritoneal dialysis. The mean (range) age was 45 (28-73) years. Seventy-two percent were men and 33% were former drug users. The mean (range) time of HIV infection was 11 (1-27) years and time on dialysis was 4.6 (0.4-25) years. ESRD was due to glomerulonephritis (36%) and diabetes (15%). HIV-associated nephropathy was not reported. Eighty-five percent were on HAART, 76.5% had a CD4 T cell count above 200 cells, and 73% had undetectable viral load. Thirty-nine percent of patients met criteria for inclusion on the renal transplant (RT) waiting list but only 12% were included. Sixty-one percent had HCV coinfection. HCV-coinfected patients had a longer history of HIV, more previous AIDS events, parenteral transmission as the most common risk factor for acquiring HIV infection, and less access to the RT waiting list (p HIV infection in Spanish dialysis units in 2006 was 0.54% HCV coinfection was very frequent (61%) and the percentage of patients included on the Spanish RT waiting list was low (12%).

  6. Do the risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus vary by location? A spatial analysis of health insurance claims in Northeastern Germany using kernel density estimation and geographically weighted regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauhl, Boris; Schweikart, Jürgen; Krafft, Thomas; Keste, Andrea; Moskwyn, Marita

    2016-11-03

    The provision of general practitioners (GPs) in Germany still relies mainly on the ratio of inhabitants to GPs at relatively large scales and barely accounts for an increased prevalence of chronic diseases among the elderly and socially underprivileged populations. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is one of the major cost-intensive diseases with high rates of potentially preventable complications. Provision of healthcare and access to preventive measures is necessary to reduce the burden of T2DM. However, current studies on the spatial variation of T2DM in Germany are mostly based on survey data, which do not only underestimate the true prevalence of T2DM, but are also only available on large spatial scales. The aim of this study is therefore to analyse the spatial distribution of T2DM at fine geographic scales and to assess location-specific risk factors based on data of the AOK health insurance. To display the spatial heterogeneity of T2DM, a bivariate, adaptive kernel density estimation (KDE) was applied. The spatial scan statistic (SaTScan) was used to detect areas of high risk. Global and local spatial regression models were then constructed to analyze socio-demographic risk factors of T2DM. T2DM is especially concentrated in rural areas surrounding Berlin. The risk factors for T2DM consist of proportions of 65-79 year olds, 80 + year olds, unemployment rate among the 55-65 year olds, proportion of employees covered by mandatory social security insurance, mean income tax, and proportion of non-married couples. However, the strength of the association between T2DM and the examined socio-demographic variables displayed strong regional variations. The prevalence of T2DM varies at the very local level. Analyzing point data on T2DM of northeastern Germany's largest health insurance provider thus allows very detailed, location-specific knowledge about increased medical needs. Risk factors associated with T2DM depend largely on the place of residence of the

  7. INCIDENCE OF LYMPHOMAS AND OTHER CANCERS IN HIV-INFECTED AND HIV-UNINFECTED PATIENTS WITH HEMOPHILIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    RABKIN, CS; HILGARTNER, MW; HEDBERG, KW; ALEDORT, LM; HATZAKIS, A; EICHINGER, S; EYSTER, ME; WHITE, GC; KESSLER, CM; LEDERMAN, MM; DEMOERLOOSE, P; BRAY, GL; COHEN, AR; ANDES, WA; MANCOJOHNSON, M; SCHRAMM, W; KRONER, BL; BLATTNER, WA; GOEDERT, JJ

    1992-01-01

    Objective. - To determine the types and rates of cancers occurring in excess in the presence of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Design. - Cohort analytic study of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected subjects followed for up to 12 years. Setting. - Fifteen hemophilia treat

  8. Infant HIV Type 1 gp120 Vaccination Elicits Robust and Durable Anti-V1V2 Immunoglobulin G Responses and Only Rare Envelope-Specific Immunoglobulin A Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouda, Genevieve G.; Cunningham, Coleen K.; McFarland, Elizabeth J.; Borkowsky, William; Muresan, Petronella; Pollara, Justin; Song, Lin Ye; Liebl, Brooke E.; Whitaker, Kaylan; Shen, Xiaoying; Vandergrift, Nathan A.; Overman, R. Glenn; Yates, Nicole L.; Moody, M. Anthony; Fry, Carrie; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Robb, Merlin; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.; Montefiori, David C.; Ferrari, Guido; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Permar, Sallie R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Infant responses to vaccines can be impeded by maternal antibodies and immune system immaturity. It is therefore unclear whether human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccination would elicit similar responses in adults and infants. Method HIV-1 Env–specific antibody responses were evaluated in 2 completed pediatric vaccine trials. In the Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group (PACTG) 230 protocol, infants were vaccinated with 4 doses of Chiron rgp120 with MF59 (n = 48), VaxGen rgp120 with aluminum hydroxide (alum; n = 49), or placebo (n = 19) between 0 and 20 weeks of age. In PACTG 326, infants received 4 doses of ALVAC-HIV-1/AIDSVAX B/B with alum (n = 9) or placebo (n = 13) between 0 and 12 weeks of age. Results By 52 weeks of age, the majority of maternally acquired antibodies had waned and vaccine Env-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses in vaccinees were higher than in placebo recipients. Chiron vaccine recipients had higher and more-durable IgG responses than VaxGen vaccine recipients or ALVAC/AIDSVAX vaccinees, with vaccine-elicited IgG responses still detectable in 56% of recipients at 2 years of age. Remarkably, at peak immunogenicity, the concentration of anti-V1V2 IgG, a response associated with a reduced risk of HIV-1 acquisition in the RV144 adult vaccine trial, was 22-fold higher in Chiron vaccine recipients, compared with RV144 vaccinees. Conclusion As exemplified by the Chiron vaccine regimen, vaccination of infants against HIV-1 can induce robust, durable Env-specific IgG responses, including anti-V1V2 IgG. PMID:25170104

  9. Pyridoxine hydroxamic acids as novel HIV-integrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranix, Brent R; Wu, Jinzi J; Milot, Guy; Beaulieu, Françis; Bouchard, Jean-Emanuel; Gouveia, Kristine; Forte, André; Garde, Seema; Wang, Zhigang; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Delelis, Olivier; Xiao, Yong

    2016-02-15

    A series of pyridoxine hydroxamic acid analog bearing a 5-aryl-spacers were synthesized. Evaluation of these novel HIV integrase complex inhibitors revealed compounds with high potency against wild-type HIV virus.

  10. Sensitivity of HIV type 1 primary isolates to human anti-CD40 antibody-mediated suppression is related to coreceptor use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abayneh, Sisay A; Ellmark, Peter; Karlsson, Ulf; Andersson, Henrik; Borrebaeck, Carl A K; Karlsson, Ingrid; Fenyö, Eva Maria

    2008-03-01

    The effect of CD40 ligation on infection by HIV-1 primary isolates with different R5 phenotypes was evaluated with a novel set of anti-CD40 monoclonal antibodies originating from a human phage display library. Five human monoclonal anti-CD40 antibodies of IgG1 subtype characterized by the ability to activate B cells via CD40 were tested for induction of the CC-chemokines RANTES and MIP-1alpha and inhibition of HIV-1 replication in primary monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). All activating anti-CD40 antibodies were able to induce CC-chemokines in MDM. We chose the most potent antibody, clone B44, for further experiments. This antibody had a suppressive effect on HIV-1 isolates of the R5 phenotype with limited use of CCR5/CXCR4 chimeric receptors. In comparison, HIV-1 isolates with broader use of CCR5/CXCR4 chimeric receptors or with CXCR4 use were less sensitive to anti-CD40-induced suppression. The results indicate that HIV-1 replication is inhibited by human anti-CD40 monoclonal antibodies through the mechanism of CC-chemokine induction. This effect is thus restricted to HIV-1 isolates sensitive to inhibition by CC-chemokines.

  11. Molecular epidemiology of early and acute HIV type 1 infections in the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2005-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heipertz, Richard A; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Kijak, Gustavo; Howell, Shana; Lazzaro, Michelle; Jagodzinski, Linda L; Eggleston, John; Peel, Sheila; Malia, Jennifer; Armstrong, Adam; Michael, Nelson L; Kim, Jerome H; O'Connell, Robert J; Scott, Paul T; Brett-Major, David M; Tovanabutra, Sodsai

    2013-10-01

    The U.S. military represents a unique population within the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) pandemic. The last comprehensive study of HIV-1 in members of the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps (Sea Services) was completed in 2000, before large-scale combat operations were taking place. Here, we present molecular characterization of HIV-1 from 40 Sea Services personnel who were identified during their seroconversion window and initially classified as HIV-1 negative during screening. Protease/reverse transcriptase (pro/rt) and envelope (env) sequences were obtained from each member of the cohort. Phylogenetic analyses were carried out on these regions to determine relatedness within the cohort and calculate the most recent common ancestor for the related sequences. We identified 39 individuals infected with subtype B and one infected with CRF01_AE. Comparison of the pairwise genetic distance of Sea Service sequences and reference sequences in the env and pro/rt regions showed that five samples were part of molecular clusters, a group of two and a group of three, confirmed by single genome amplification. Real-time molecular monitoring of new HIV-1 acquisitions in the Sea Services may have a role in facilitating public health interventions at sites where related HIV-1 infections are identified.

  12. Is an HIV vaccine possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A. Wilson

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The road to the discovery of a vaccine for HIV has been arduous and will continue to be difficult over the ensuing twenty years. Most vaccines are developed by inducing neutralizing antibodies against the target pathogen or by using attenuated strains of the particular pathogen to engender a variety of protective immune responses. Unfortunately, simple methods of generating anti-HIV antibodies have already failed in a phase III clinical trial. While attenuated SIV variants work well against homologous challenges in non-human primates, the potential for reversion to a more pathogenic virus and recombination with challenge viruses will preclude the use of attenuated HIV in the field. It has been exceedingly frustrating to vaccinate for HIV-specific neutralizing antibodies given the enormous diversity of the Envelope (Env glycoprotein and its well-developed glycan shield. However, there are several antibodies that will neutralize many different strains of HIV and inducing these types of antibodies in vaccinees remains the goal of a vigorous effort to develop a vaccine for HIV based on neutralizing antibodies. Given the difficulty in generating broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies, the HIV vaccine field has turned its attention to inducing T cell responses against the virus using a variety of vectors. Unfortunately, the results from Merck's phase IIb STEP trial proved to be disappointing. Vaccinees received Adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 expressing Gag, Pol, and Nef of HIV. This vaccine regimen failed to either prevent infection or reduce the level of HIV replication after challenge. These results mirrored those in non-human primate testing of Ad5 using rigorous SIV challenge models. This review will focus on recent developments in HIV vaccine development. We will deal largely with attempts to develop a T cell-based vaccine using the non-human primate SIV challenge model.

  13. Is an HIV vaccine possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A. Wilson

    Full Text Available The road to the discovery of a vaccine for HIV has been arduous and will continue to be difficult over the ensuing twenty years. Most vaccines are developed by inducing neutralizing antibodies against the target pathogen or by using attenuated strains of the particular pathogen to engender a variety of protective immune responses. Unfortunately, simple methods of generating anti-HIV antibodies have already failed in a phase III clinical trial. While attenuated SIV variants work well against homologous challenges in non-human primates, the potential for reversion to a more pathogenic virus and recombination with challenge viruses will preclude the use of attenuated HIV in the field. It has been exceedingly frustrating to vaccinate for HIV-specific neutralizing antibodies given the enormous diversity of the Envelope (Env glycoprotein and its well-developed glycan shield. However, there are several antibodies that will neutralize many different strains of HIV and inducing these types of antibodies in vaccinees remains the goal of a vigorous effort to develop a vaccine for HIV based on neutralizing antibodies. Given the difficulty in generating broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies, the HIV vaccine field has turned its attention to inducing T cell responses against the virus using a variety of vectors. Unfortunately, the results from Merck's phase IIb STEP trial proved to be disappointing. Vaccinees received Adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 expressing Gag, Pol, and Nef of HIV. This vaccine regimen failed to either prevent infection or reduce the level of HIV replication after challenge. These results mirrored those in non-human primate testing of Ad5 using rigorous SIV challenge models. This review will focus on recent developments in HIV vaccine development. We will deal largely with attempts to develop a T cell-based vaccine using the non-human primate SIV challenge model.

  14. Coloring geographical threshold graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradonjic, Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Percus, Allon [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muller, Tobias [EINDHOVEN UNIV. OF TECH

    2008-01-01

    We propose a coloring algorithm for sparse random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). Here, we analyze the GTG coloring algorithm together with the graph's clique number, showing formally that in spite of the differences in structure between GTG and RGG, the asymptotic behavior of the chromatic number is identical: {chi}1n 1n n / 1n n (1 + {omicron}(1)). Finally, we consider the leading corrections to this expression, again using the coloring algorithm and clique number to provide bounds on the chromatic number. We show that the gap between the lower and upper bound is within C 1n n / (1n 1n n){sup 2}, and specify the constant C.

  15. Intimate partner violence and HIV infection among women: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To assess evidence of an association between intimate partner violence (IPV and HIV infection among women. Methods: Medline/PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, EBSCO, Ovid, Cochrane HIV/AIDS Group's Specialized Register and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched up to 20 May 2013 to identify studies that examined the association between IPV and HIV infection in women. We included studies on women aged ≥15 years, in any form of sexually intimate relationship with a male partner. Results: Twenty-eight studies [(19 cross-sectional, 5 cohorts and 4 case-control studies involving 331,468 individuals in 16 countries – the US (eight studies, South Africa (four studies, East Africa (10 studies, India (three studies, Brazil (one study and multiple low-income countries (two studies] were included. Results were pooled using RevMan 5.0. To moderate effect estimates, we analyzed all data using the random effects model, irrespective of heterogeneity level. Pooled results of cohort studies indicated that physical IPV [pooled RR (95% CI: 1.22 (1.01, 1.46] and any type of IPV [pooled RR (95% CI: 1.28 (1.00, 1.64] were significantly associated with HIV infection among women. Results of cross-sectional studies demonstrated significant associations of physical IPV with HIV infection among women [pooled OR (95% CI: 1.44 (1.10, 1.87]. Similarly, results of cross-sectional studies indicated that combination of physical and sexual IPV [pooled OR (95% CI: 2.00 (1.24, 3.22 and any type of IPV [pooled OR (95% CI: 1.41 (1.16, 1.73] were significantly associated with HIV infection among women. Conclusions: Available evidence suggests a moderate statistically significant association between IPV and HIV infection among women. To further elucidate the strength of the association between IPV and HIV infection among women, there is a need for high-quality follow-up studies conducted in different geographical regions of the world, and among

  16. Co-infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1: does immune activation lead to a faster progression to AIDS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savino Wilson

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent data have shown that HTLV-1 is prevalent among HIV positive patients in Mozambique, although the impact of HTLV-1 infection on HIV disease progression remains controversial. Our aim was to determine the phenotypic profile of T lymphocytes subsets among Mozambican patients co-infected by HIV and HTLV-1. Methods We enrolled 29 patients co-infected by HTLV-1 and HIV (co-infected, 59 patients mono-infected by HIV (HIV and 16 healthy controls (HC, respectively. For phenotypic analysis, cells were stained with the following fluorochrome-labeled anti-human monoclonal antibodies CD4-APC, CD8-PerCP, CD25-PE, CD62L-FITC, CD45RA-FITC. CD45RO-PE, CD38-PE; being analysed by four-colour flow cytometry. Results We initially found that CD4+ T cell counts were significantly higher in co-infected, as compared to HIV groups. Moreover, CD4+ T Lymphocytes from co-infected patients presented significantly higher levels of CD45RO and CD25, but lower levels of CD45RA and CD62L, strongly indicating that CD4+ T cells are more activated under HTLV-1 plus HIV co-infection. Conclusion Our data indicate that HTLV-1/HIV co-infected patients progress with higher CD4+ T cell counts and higher levels of activation markers. In this context, it is conceivable that in co-infected individuals, these higher levels of activation may account for a faster progression to AIDS.

  17. International Refugees: A Geographical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demko, George J.; Wood, William B.

    1987-01-01

    Examines the problem of international refugees from a geographical perspective. Focuses on sub-saharan Africa, Afghanistan, Central America, and southeast Asia. Concludes that geographers can and should use their skills and intellectual tools to address and help resolve this global problem. (JDH)

  18. Adaptive Cartography and Geographical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konecny, Milan; Stanek, Karel

    2010-01-01

    The article focuses on adaptive cartography and its potential for geographical education. After briefly describing the wider context of adaptive cartography, it is suggested that this new cartographic approach establishes new demands and benefits for geographical education, especially in offering the possibility for broader individual…

  19. The epidemiology of HIV infection in Morocco: systematic review and data synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouyoumjian, S P; Mumtaz, G R; Hilmi, N; Zidouh, A; El Rhilani, H; Alami, K; Bennani, A; Gouws, E; Ghys, P D; Abu-Raddad, L J

    2013-01-01

    Summary Morocco has made significant strides in building its HIV research capacity. Based on a wealth of empirical data, the objective of this study was to conduct a comprehensive and systematic literature review and analytical synthesis of HIV epidemiological evidence in this country. Data were retrieved using three major sources of literature and data. HIV transmission dynamics were found to be focused in high-risk populations, with female sex workers (FSWs) and clients contributing the largest share of new HIV infections. There is a pattern of emerging epidemics among some high-risk populations, and some epidemics, particularly among FSWs, appear to be established and stable. The scale of the local HIV epidemics and populations affected show highly heterogeneous geographical distribution. To optimize the national HIV response, surveillance and prevention efforts need to be expanded among high-risk populations and in geographic settings where low intensity and possibly concentrated HIV epidemics are emerging or are already endemic. PMID:23970764

  20. "Resistance" to PSC-RANTES revisited: two mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 HIV-1 SF162 or simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV SF162-p3 do not confer resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedellec, Rebecca; Coetzer, Mia; Lederman, Michael M; Offord, Robin E; Hartley, Oliver; Mosier, Donald E

    2010-06-01

    Resistance of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to small-molecule CCR5 inhibitors is well demonstrated, but resistance to macromolecular CCR5 inhibitors (e.g., PSC-RANTES) that act by both CCR5 internalization and receptor blockade had not been reported until recently (3). The report of a single simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV(SF162-p3) variant with one V3 and one gp41 sequence change in gp160 that conferred both altered replicative fitness and resistance to PSC-RANTES was therefore surprising. We introduced the same two mutations into both the parental HIV-1(SF162) and the macaque-adapted SHIV(SF162-p3) and found minor differences in entry fitness but no changes in sensitivity to inhibition by either PSC-RANTES or the small-molecule allosteric inhibitor TAK-779. We attribute the earlier finding to confounding fitness effects with inhibitor sensitivity.

  1. Long-term survival after infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) among homosexual men in hepatitis B vaccine trial cohorts in Amsterdam, New York City, and San Francisco, 1978-1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblin, B A; van Benthem, B H; Buchbinder, S P; Ren, L; Vittinghoff, E; Stevens, C E; Coutinho, R A; van Griensven, G J

    1999-11-15

    Information on long-term survival after infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is limited. In hepatitis B vaccine trials in Amsterdam, New York City, and San Francisco, 362 gay men were followed up to 18 years (1978-1995). The median survival time from seroconversion was 12.1 years (95% confidence interval: 11.4, 12.9). The annual risk of dying increased at a constant rate until 8 years after seroconversion and then leveled off, suggesting a group that is relatively resistant to progression. These data provide a picture of the natural history of HIV-1 infection, especially in the era prior to widespread use of highly effective treatments.

  2. Dolutegravir (S/GSK1349572) exhibits significantly slower dissociation than raltegravir and elvitegravir from wild-type and integrase inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 integrase-DNA complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightower, Kendra E; Wang, Ruolan; Deanda, Felix; Johns, Brian A; Weaver, Kurt; Shen, Yingnian; Tomberlin, Ginger H; Carter, H Luke; Broderick, Timothy; Sigethy, Scott; Seki, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Masanori; Underwood, Mark R

    2011-10-01

    The integrase inhibitor (INI) dolutegravir (DTG; S/GSK1349572) has significant activity against HIV-1 isolates with raltegravir (RAL)- and elvitegravir (ELV)-associated resistance mutations. As an initial step in characterizing the different resistance profiles of DTG, RAL, and ELV, we determined the dissociation rates of these INIs with integrase (IN)-DNA complexes containing a broad panel of IN proteins, including IN substitutions corresponding to signature RAL and ELV resistance mutations. DTG dissociates slowly from a wild-type IN-DNA complex at 37°C with an off-rate of 2.7 × 10(-6) s(-1) and a dissociative half-life (t(1/2)) of 71 h, significantly longer than the half-lives for RAL (8.8 h) and ELV (2.7 h). Prolonged binding (t(1/2), at least 5 h) was observed for DTG with IN-DNA complexes containing E92, Y143, Q148, and N155 substitutions. The addition of a second substitution to either Q148 or N155 typically resulted in an increase in the off-rate compared to that with the single substitution. For all of the IN substitutions tested, the off-rate of DTG from IN-DNA complexes was significantly slower (from 5 to 40 times slower) than the off-rate of RAL or ELV. These data are consistent with the potential for DTG to have a higher genetic barrier to resistance, provide evidence that the INI off-rate may be an important component of the mechanism of INI resistance, and suggest that the slow dissociation of DTG may contribute to its distinctive resistance profile.

  3. Epidemiology of HIV and AIDS in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, M K; John, T J; Keusch, G T

    1994-01-01

    India is the second most populous country in the world, with more than 880 million people in 1993. With less than 1% of the global land mass, India has more than 16% of the world's population, more than that of South America, Africa, and Australia combined. The population will exceed one billion by 2000, surpassing even China. By then, India will have more new cases of HIV infection per year than any single country, and probably the largest number of HIV-infected people as well. Whatever happens in India will therefore have a major impact upon the global pandemic of HIV and AIDS. The paper considers the history of the HIV epidemic in India, the probable routes of entry of HIV into India, trends in prevalence in population samples, the geographic distribution of HIV in India, AIDS in India, clinical problems in India, projections of HIV/AIDS cases, and how to control HIV/AIDS. The HIV epidemic has grown silently in India over the past decade, with the virus spread mainly through heterosexual intercourse. All known routes of transmission are, however, known in India, and increasing seroprevalence has been noted among prostitutes, STD clinic patients, blood donors, and IV drug users. The population has been largely ignorant of the advance of HIV, with public officials and the media at a loss to adequately inform the public about what is taking place. Greater energy and resources are now being devoted to the problem, but it may be too late to stop a major epidemic. The authors reviewed all available published and unpublished data to present an overview of the epidemiology of HIV and AIDS in India.

  4. HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. It harms your immune system by destroying the white blood cells ... It is the final stage of infection with HIV. Not everyone with HIV develops AIDS. HIV most ...

  5. HIV Medication Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Treatment Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV Medication Adherence Last Reviewed: March 2, 2017 Key ...

  6. HIV and Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 03-13T18:29:11+00:00 PH and HIV Print PH and HIV Brochure (PDF) Order Copies ... to know about pulmonary hypertension in connection with HIV? Although pulmonary hypertension and HIV are two separate ...

  7. HIV and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions HIV & Rheumatic Diseases HIV and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Rheumatic diseases related ... knows he or she has HIV. What are HIV-associated rheumatic diseases? Some diseases of the joints ...

  8. HIV and AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? HIV and AIDS KidsHealth > For Kids > HIV and AIDS ... actually the virus that causes the disease AIDS. HIV Hurts the Immune System People who are HIV ...

  9. HIV and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions HIV & Rheumatic Diseases HIV and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Rheumatic diseases related ... knows he or she has HIV. What are HIV-associated rheumatic diseases? Some diseases of the joints ...

  10. HIV Medication Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking ... exactly as prescribed. Why is adherence to an HIV regimen important? Adherence to an HIV regimen gives ...

  11. HIV and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG HIV and Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs HIV and Pregnancy ... Pregnancy FAQ113, December 2012 PDF Format HIV and Pregnancy Pregnancy What is human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)? How ...

  12. 4. CRIMINALISING HIV TRANSMISSION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    should be adopted to expand targeted efforts in preventing new HIV infections in Zambia. ... result of sexual intercourse between an HIV positive and. HIV negative person and ..... countries have not criminalized HIV infection. To this end, those ...

  13. Spatial Distributions of HIV Infection in an Endemic Area of Western Kenya: Guiding Information for Localized HIV Control and Prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Hoshi

    Full Text Available HIV is still a major health problem in developing countries. Even though high HIV-risk-taking behaviors have been reported in African fishing villages, local distribution patterns of HIV infection in the communities surrounding these villages have not been thoroughly analyzed. The objective of this study was to investigate the geographical distribution patterns of HIV infection in communities surrounding African fishing villages. In 2011, we applied age- and sex-stratified random sampling to collect 1,957 blood samples from 42,617 individuals registered in the Health and Demographic Surveillance System in Mbita, which is located on the shore of Lake Victoria in western Kenya. We used these samples to evaluate existing antibody detection assays for several infectious diseases, including HIV antibody titers. Based on the results of the assays, we evaluated the prevalence of HIV infection according to sex, age, and altitude of participating households. We also used Kulldorff's spatial scan statistic to test for HIV clustering in the study area. The prevalence of HIV at our study site was 25.3%. Compared with the younger age group (15-19 years, adults aged 30-34 years were 6.71 times more likely to be HIV-positive, and the estimated HIV-positive population among women was 1.43 times larger than among men. Kulldorff's spatial scan statistic detected one marginally significant (P = 0.055 HIV-positive and one significant HIV-negative cluster (P = 0.047 in the study area. These results suggest a homogeneous HIV distribution in the communities surrounding fishing villages. In addition to individual behavior, more complex and diverse factors related to the social and cultural environment can contribute to a homogeneous distribution pattern of HIV infection outside of African fishing villages. To reduce rates of transmission in HIV-endemic areas, HIV prevention and control programs optimized for the local environment need to be developed.

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in Chinese infected with HIV-1 B'/C Recombinant (CRF07_BC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xu G

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The characterization of HIV-1-specific T cell responses in people infected with locally circulating HIV-1 strain will facilitate the development of HIV-1 vaccine. Sixty intravenous drug users infected with HIV-1 circulating recombinant form 07_BC (CRF07_BC, which has been spreading rapidly in western China from north to south, were recruited from Xinjiang, China to assess the HIV-1-specific T cell responses at single peptide level with overlapping peptides (OLP covering the whole concensus clades B and C proteome. Results The median of the total magnitude and total number of OLPs recognized by CTL responses were 10925 SFC/million PBMC and 25 OLPs, respectively, when tested by clade C peptides, which was significantly higher than when tested by clade B peptides. The immunodominant regions, which cover 14% (58/413 of the HIV-1 proteome, are widely distributed throughout the HIV-1 proteome except in Tat, Vpu and Pol-PR, with Gag, Pol-RT, Pol-Int and Nef being most frequently targeted. The subdominant epitopes are mostly located in p24, Nef, integrase, Vpr and Vif. Of the responses directed to clade C OLPs, 61.75% (972/1574 can be observed when tested with corresponding clade B OLPs. However, Pol-PR and Vpu tend to be targeted in the clade B sequence rather than the clade C sequence, which is in line with the recombinant pattern of CRF07_BC. Stronger and broader CTL responses in subjects with CD4 cell counts ranging from 200 to 400/mm3 were observed when compared to those with less than 200/mm3 or more than 400/mm3, though there have been no significant correlations identified between the accumulative CTL responses or overall breadth and CD4 cell count or plasma viral load. Conclusion This is the first study conducted to comprehensively address T cell responses in Chinese subjects infected with HIV-1 CRF07_BC in which subtle differences in cross-reactivity were observed, though similar patterns of overall immune responses were

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of env, gag, and tat genes of HIV type 1 detected among the injecting drug users in West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullick, Ranajoy; Sengupta, Satarupa; Sarkar, Kamalesh; Saha, M K; Chakrabarti, Sekhar

    2006-12-01

    A recent occurrence of HIV-1 seropositivity among a group of injecting drug users (IDUs) in Darjeeling, a hilly district in northern West Bengal, revealed overall 11.8% HIV seroprevalence. Our study based on env (C2-V3), gag (p24-p7), and tat (exon-1) genomic regions of HIV-1 detected among this population showed that Darjeeling IDU sequences belonged to subtype C. Interestingly, the IDU sequences from Darjeeling were again found to be closer to the C strains from Manipur, a northeastern state in India, which is linked to the Golden Triangle via the Manipur-Myanmar border, rather than the IDU C sequences from Nepal, a neighboring country of India. The outgroup reference strains from different sites of IDU-driven epidemics in the world like Russia, Vietnam, Thailand, and Spain belonged to the nonsubtype C group and formed separate clusters from the subtype C cluster in our analysis. These results indicate a rapid spread of HIV-1 by possible drug trafficking along international boundaries, which might also help in the invasion of HIV-1 among IDUs of Darjeeling through the Manipur-Myanmar border of India.

  16. Short communication: high prevalence of drug resistance in HIV type 1-infected children born in Honduras and Belize 2001 to 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, Leda; de Rivera, Ivette Lorenzana; Murillo, Wendy; Naver, Lars; Largaespada, Natalia; Albert, Jan; Karlsson, Annika C

    2011-10-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has had a great impact on the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1. However, development of drug resistance, which could be subsequently transmitted to the child, is a major concern. In Honduras and Belize the prevalence of drug resistance among HIV-1-infected children remains unknown. A total of 95 dried blood spot samples was obtained from HIV-1-infected, untreated children in Honduras and Belize born during 2001 to 2004, when preventive antiretroviral therapy was often suboptimal and consisted of monotherapy with nevirapine or zidovudine. Partial HIV-1 pol gene sequences were successfully obtained from 66 children (Honduras n=55; Belize n=11). Mutations associated with drug resistance were detected in 13% of the Honduran and 27% of the Belizean children. Most of the mutations detected in Honduras (43%) and all mutations detected in Belize were associated with resistance to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, which was expected from the wide use of nevirapine to prevent MTCT during the study period. In addition, although several mothers reported that they had not received antiretroviral therapy, mutations associated with resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors were found in Honduras. This suggests prior and unreported use of these drugs, or that these women had been infected with resistant virus. The present study demonstrates, for the first time, the presence of drug resistance-associated mutations in HIV-1-infected Honduran and Belizean children.

  17. Short communication: analysis of the integrase gene from HIV type 1-positive patients living in a rural area of West Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turriziani, Ombretta; Montagna, Claudia; Falasca, Francesca; Bucci, Mauro; Russo, Gianluca; Lichtner, Miriam; Sobze, Martin Sanou; Vullo, Vincenzo; Pistello, Mauro; Antonelli, Guido

    2012-12-01

    Major mutations associated with HIV-I integrase inhibitors (INI) resistance are rare in INI-naive patients. However, polymorphisms at positions that may influence the genetic barrier and/or drive the selection of specific INI resistance pathways are common in HIV non-B subtypes. The aim was to evaluate the presence of natural polymorphisms and/or INI resistance mutations in HIV-1 non-B subtype samples obtained from INI-naive patients living in rural west Cameroon. Thirty-three HIV-1 non-B samples were obtained from INI-naive African women and, as controls, 15 samples of HIV-1 subtype B were obtained from antiretroviral-naive Italian patients. The integrase gene was amplified and sequenced using Trugene Core Reagents. Several amino acid positions in B and non-B subtypes were found to be polymorphic. Interestingly, two patients infected with the CRF02_AG subtype had the resistance mutations N155H and E157Q/E and 12% of African samples had an amino acid substitution at position 143. Silent mutations leading to a higher increment of genetic barriers were detected at 140 and 151 positions in non B-subtypes. Although most polymorphisms may have little effect on INI susceptibility, the IN gene variations found in the present study should be taken into consideration as they may facilitate or delay the emergence of variants fully resistant to INIs.

  18. The incidence rate of HIV type-1 drug resistance in patients on antiretroviral therapy: a nationwide population-based Danish cohort study 1999-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Audelin, A.M.; Lohse, N.; Obel, N.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Newer antiretroviral treatment regimens for HIV carry a lower risk of inducing drug resistance mutations. We estimated changes in incidence rates (IRs) of new mutations in HIV-infected individuals receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). METHODS: Population-based data...... were obtained from the Danish HIV Cohort Study and the Danish HIV Sequence Database. We included treatment-naive patients initiating HAART after December 1997 and computed time to first drug resistance mutation, identified as new mutations detected within 1 year after a 60-day period of treatment.......077). The IR of PI resistance decreased from 7.5 (1.4-21.8) in 1999 to 2.9 (0.7-11.4) in 2002-2003 (P=0.148). The IRs were low for specific resistance mutations, except for M184V (IR 5.6 [4.0-7.9]) and K103N (IR 8.2 [5.6-12.0]). CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of acquired drug resistance has decreased among HIV...

  19. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of HIV in the United States, please visit: https://www.aids.gov/hiv-aids-basics/hiv-aids- ... HIV, STD, and TB Prevention. What Is HIV? ( http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pubs/faq/faq1.htm ). ...

  20. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of HIV in the United States, please visit: https://www.aids.gov/hiv-aids-basics/hiv-aids- ... HIV, STD, and TB Prevention. What Is HIV? ( http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pubs/faq/faq1.htm ). ...

  1. T CD4+ cells count among patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1: high prevalence of tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM Contagens de células T CD4+ na co-infecção HIV-1 e HTLV-1: alta prevalência da paraparesia espástica tropical/mielopatia associada ao HTLV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Casseb

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: HIV positive patients co-infected with HTLV-1 may have an increase in their T CD4+ cell counts, thus rendering this parameter useless as an AIDS-defining event. OBJECTIVE: To study the effects induced by the co-infection of HIV-1 and HTLV-1 upon CD4+ cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Since 1997, our group has been following a cohort of HTLV-1-infected patients, in order to study the interaction of HTLV-1 with HIV and/or with hepatitis C virus (HCV, as well as HTLV-1-only infected asymptomatic carriers and those with tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1 associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM. One hundred and fifty HTLV-1-infected subjects have been referred to our clinic at the Institute of Infectious Diseases "Emílio Ribas", São Paulo. Twenty-seven of them were also infected with HIV-1 and HTLV-1-infection using two ELISAs and confirmed and typed by Western Blot (WB or polymerase chain reaction (PCR. All subjects were evaluated by two neurologists, blinded to the patient's HTLV status, and the TSP/HAM diagnostic was based on the World Health Organization (WHO classification. AIDS-defining events were in accordance with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC classification of 1988. The first T CD4+ cells count available before starting anti-retroviral therapy are shown compared to the HIV-1-infected subjects at the moment of AIDS defining event. RESULTS: A total of 27 HIV-1/HTLV-1 co-infected subjects were identified in this cohort; 15 already had AIDS and 12 remained free of AIDS. The median of T CD4+ cell counts was 189 (98-688 cells/mm³ and 89 (53-196 cells/mm³ for co-infected subjects who had an AIDS-defining event, and HIV-only infected individuals, respectively (p = 0.036. Eight of 27 co-infected subjects (30% were diagnosed as having a TSP/HAM simile diagnosis, and three of them had opportunistic infections but high T CD4+ cell counts at the time of their AIDS- defining event. DISCUSSION: Our results indicate that higher T CD4+ cells

  2. A global approach to HIV-1 vaccine development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Kathryn E; Barouch, Dan H

    2013-01-01

    Summary A global human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) vaccine will have to elicit immune responses capable of providing protection against a tremendous diversity of HIV-1 variants. In this review, we first describe the current state of the HIV-1 vaccine field, outlining the immune responses that are desired in a global HIV-1 vaccine. In particular, we emphasize the likely importance of Env-specific neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies for protection against HIV-1 acquisition and the likely importance of effector Gag-specific T lymphocytes for virologic control. We then highlight four strategies for developing a global HIV-1 vaccine. The first approach is to design specific vaccines for each geographic region that include antigens tailor-made to match local circulating HIV-1 strains. The second approach is to design a vaccine that will elicit Env-specific antibodies capable of broadly neutralizing all HIV-1 subtypes. The third approach is to design a vaccine that will elicit cellular immune responses that are focused on highly conserved HIV-1 sequences. The fourth approach is to design a vaccine to elicit highly diverse HIV-1-specific responses. Finally, we emphasize the importance of conducting clinical efficacy trials as the only way to determine which strategies will provide optimal protection against HIV-1 in humans. PMID:23772627

  3. HIV among Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Among Women Format: Select One File [155K] Recommend ...

  4. HIV among Transgender People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Among Transgender People Format: Select One PDF [227K] ...

  5. Living with HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS Living With HIV Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ...

  6. HIV Among Asians

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Among Asians in the United States Format: Select ...

  7. Building capacity for HIV/AIDS prevention among Asian Pacific Islander organizations: the experience of a culturally appropriate capacity-building program in Southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Lois M; Candelario, Jury; Young, Tim; Mediano, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This article has two goals: (1) to outline a conceptual model for culturally appropriate HIV prevention capacity building; (2) to present the experiences from a 3-year program provided by Asian Pacific AIDS Intervention Team to Asian Pacific Islander (API) organizations in southern California. The participating organizations were of two types: lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) social organizations and social service agencies not targeting LGBTQ. These organizations were selected for participation because of their commitment to HIV/AIDS issues in API communities. An organizational survey and staff observations were used to explore changes in capacity. The organizations were mostly small, targeted diverse populations, served a large geographic area (southern California as a region), and were knowledgeable about HIV. Organizations became more viable (more capacity in human resources, financial, external relations, and strategic management), but also more unstable (large growth in paid staff and board members), and showed more capacity in HIV knowledge environments (especially less stigma and more sensitivity to diverse populations). The results suggest that capacity can expand over a short period of time, but as capacity increases, organizational viability/stability and HIV knowledge environments change, meaning that different types of technical assistance would be needed for sustainability.

  8. Geographical Effects on Complex Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zhong-Cai; YANG Lei; YANG Kong-Qing

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate how the geographical structure of a complex network affects its network topology, synchronization and the average spatial length of edges. The geographical structure means that the connecting probability of two nodes is related to the spatial distance of the two nodes. Our simulation results show that the geographical structure changes the network topology. The synchronization tendency is enhanced and the average spatial length of edges is enlarged when the node can randomly connect to the further one. Analytic results support our understanding of the phenomena.

  9. Undiagnosed HIV among people who inject drugs in Manipur, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Gregory; Medhi, Gajendra K; Mahanta, Jagadish; Paranjape, R S; Kermode, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Manipur is a geographically isolated state of India characterised by a high HIV prevalence among people who inject drugs (PWID). A low-to-moderate lifetime rate of HIV testing has been documented amongst PWID in Manipur. Little is known about the extent of undiagnosed HIV in this setting and whether uptake of HIV testing (and knowledge of a positive diagnosis) leads HIV-positive PWID to change their risk behaviours. The cross-sectional data (n = 821) analysed for this paper were collected in 2009 for the Integrated Behavioural and Biological Assessment (IBBA) using interviewer-administered questionnaires and the collection of de-linked blood and urine samples. Almost one-third (30.7%) of the participants tested HIV positive. The majority knew where to obtain a confidential HIV test (80.7%), however, half of the HIV-positive participants had either never had an HIV test (37.7%), or had undertaken a test without collecting the result (12.7%). Almost one-quarter (23.4%) of the HIV-positive participants and 17.4% of the HIV-negative participants had shared a needle/syringe with at least one other injector during the preceding month. Encouragingly, HIV-positive participants were significantly more likely than HIV-negative participants to use condoms with their regular sexual partners, however, there was still a high proportion of HIV-positive participants who did not use a condom at last sex with their regular (47.2%) or casual (48.0%) partners. Having taken an HIV test and collected the result was associated with a reduction in HIV-risk behaviours among HIV-positive participants, but not among HIV-negative participants. In conclusion, we found that a substantial proportion of the HIV-positive PWID in Manipur were not aware of their positive status, and risky injecting and sexual practices were commonplace. However, HIV-positive PWID appear to reduce their high-risk behaviours when they become aware of their HIV status highlighting the importance of taking HIV testing

  10. Geographically isolated wetlands: Rethinking a misnomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushet, David M.; Calhoun, Aram J. K.; Alexander, Laurie C.; Cohen, Matthew J.; DeKeyser, Edward S.; Fowler, Laurie G.; Lane, Charles R.; Lang, Megan W.; Rains, Mark C.; Walls, Susan

    2015-01-01

    We explore the category “geographically isolated wetlands” (GIWs; i.e., wetlands completely surrounded by uplands at the local scale) as used in the wetland sciences. As currently used, the GIW category (1) hampers scientific efforts by obscuring important hydrological and ecological differences among multiple wetland functional types, (2) aggregates wetlands in a manner not reflective of regulatory and management information needs, (3) implies wetlands so described are in some way “isolated,” an often incorrect implication, (4) is inconsistent with more broadly used and accepted concepts of “geographic isolation,” and (5) has injected unnecessary confusion into scientific investigations and discussions. Instead, we suggest other wetland classification systems offer more informative alternatives. For example, hydrogeomorphic (HGM) classes based on well-established scientific definitions account for wetland functional diversity thereby facilitating explorations into questions of connectivity without an a priori designation of “isolation.” Additionally, an HGM-type approach could be used in combination with terms reflective of current regulatory or policymaking needs. For those rare cases in which the condition of being surrounded by uplands is the relevant distinguishing characteristic, use of terminology that does not unnecessarily imply isolation (e.g., “upland embedded wetlands”) would help alleviate much confusion caused by the “geographically isolated wetlands” misnomer.

  11. A Splenic Marginal Zone-Like Peripheral Blood CD27+B220− B Cell Population Is Preferentially Depleted in HIV Type 1-Infected Individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Morrow, Matthew; Valentin, Antonio; Little, Richard; Yarchoan, Robert; Pavlakis, George N.

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral blood CD27+ B cells are reduced in HIV-1-infected individuals. In healthy individuals, the human peripheral blood CD27+ B cell pool consists of two subsets defined by the expression, or lack thereof, of the CD45 isoform B220. We investigated the presence of circulating B220+ and B220− memory B cells in HIV+ individuals and found that the reduction in CD27+ memory B cells occurs primarily among CD27+B220− B cells. Studies conducted using healthy controls indicate that CD27+B220− B c...

  12. 33 CFR 165.8 - Geographic coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Geographic coordinates. 165.8... Geographic coordinates. Geographic coordinates expressed in terms of latitude or longitude, or both, are not... 1983 (NAD 83), unless such geographic coordinates are expressly labeled NAD 83. Geographic...

  13. Perceived HIV-Associated Stigma among HIV-Seropositive Men: Psychometric Study of HIV Stigma Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Valle, Adrian; Treviño,Ana Cecilia; Zambrano, Farith Francisco; Urriola, Karla Elizabeth; Sánchez, Luis Antonio; Elizondo,Jesus Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the internal consistency and factor structure of the abridged Spanish version of the Berger HIV Stigma Scale (HSS-21), to provide evidence for its convergent and discriminant validity, and to describe perceived stigma in an urban population from northeast Mexico. Methods Seventy-five HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) were recruited. Participants answered the Spanish versions of three Likert-type scales: HSS-21, Robsenberg’s self-esteem scale, and the abbreviate...

  14. Perceived HIV-associated stigma among HIV-seropositive men: psychometric study of HIV stigma scale

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian eValle; Ana Cecilia Treviño; Farith Francisco Zambrano; Karla Elizabeth Urriola; Luis Antonio Sánchez; Jesus Eduardo Elizondo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the internal consistency and factor structure of the abridged Spanish version of the Berger HIV Stigma Scale (HSS-21), provide evidence for its convergent and discriminant validity, and describe perceived stigma in an urban population from northeast Mexico. Methods: Seventy five HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) were recruited. Participants answered the Spanish versions of three Likert-type scales: HSS-21, Robsenberg’s self-esteem scale, and the abbreviated ve...

  15. HLA-associated susceptibility to HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabio, G; Scorza, R; Lazzarin, A; Marchini, M; Zarantonello, M; D'Arminio, A; Marchisio, P; Plebani, A; Luzzati, R; Costigliola, P

    1992-01-01

    We studied HLA antigen distribution of 50 heterosexual partners of HIV+ drug abusers with more than 1 year of sexual exposure to HIV, 36 children born to seropositive mothers and 61 haemophiliac patients exposed to presumably infectious clotting factor concentrates. B52 and B44 antigens were associated with HIV resistance while B51 was associated with HIV susceptibility. Forty-nine HIV+ drug abusers, spouses of heterosexual partners studied and 25 HIV+ mothers of the children were also typed. DR11 phenotype was associated with infectiousness of HIV+ subjects. Our data suggest that the HLA region controls susceptibility to infection with HIV and infectiousness of HIV+ subjects in different risk groups. PMID:1733633

  16. NEPR Geographic Zone Map 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This geographic zone map was created by interpreting satellite and aerial imagery, seafloor topography (bathymetry model), and the new NEPR Benthic Habitat Map...

  17. Ecoscapes: Geographical Patternings of Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimar Ventsel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Book review of the publication Ecoscapes: Geographical Patternings of Relations. Edited by Gary Backhaus and John Murungi. Lanham, Boulder, New York, Toronto, Oxford, Lexington Books, 2006, xxxiii+241 pp.

  18. Geographic Tongue in Monozygotic Twins

    OpenAIRE

    Shekhar M, Guna

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses a case of 5-year-old girl monozygotic twins who were suffering from geographic tongue (GT), a benign inflammatory disorder of the tongue which is characterized by circinate, irregular erythematous lesions on the dorsum and lateral borders of the tongue caused by loss of filiform papillae of the tongue epithelium. Whilst geographic tongue is a common entity, reports on this condition are uncommon in the literature. To best of our knowledge, this is the first report which...

  19. The Influence of Technology on Geographic Cognition and Tourism Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tussyadiah, Iis; Zach, Florian

    2011-01-01

    Tourists today have access to retrieve voluminous geographic information about destinations while travelling as various context-aware geographic technologies have become increasingly ubiquitous. These technologies are suggested to aid tourists in the process of destination consumption to gain...... meaningful tourism experiences. This study found that people using different types of technologies for everyday routine perceive that these technologies help them with spatial inference to acquire geographic information; making sense of direction and orientation, and interacting with and within places......, and social dimensions of tourism experience....

  20. Change of Geographic Information Service Model in Mobile Context

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Fu; DU Qingyun

    2005-01-01

    A research on that how the topic of mobility, which is completely different but tightly relevant to space, provides new approaches and methods so as to promote the further development of geographic information services, will accumulate basic experience for different types of relative information systems in the wide fields of location based services. This paper analyzes the meaning of mobility and the change for geographic information service model, it describes the differences and correlation between M-GIS and traditional GIS. It sets a technical framework of geographic information services according to mobile context and provides a case study.

  1. Ecoregions for Louisiana from EPA source data, Geographic NAD83, LOSCO (2004) [ecoregions_EPA_2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. By recognizing the spatial differences...

  2. Women and HIV in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breskin, Alexander; Adimora, Adaora A.; Westreich, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Background The demographic and geographic characteristics of the HIV epidemic in the US has changed substantially since the disease emerged, with women in the South experiencing a particularly high HIV incidence. In this study, we identified and described counties in the US in which the prevalence of HIV is particularly high in women compared to men. Methods Using data from AIDSVu, a public dataset of HIV cases in the US in 2012, we categorized counties by their decile of the ratio of female to male HIV prevalence. The demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of counties in the highest decile were compared to those of counties in the lower deciles. Results Most of the counties in the highest decile were located in the Deep South. These counties had a lower median income, higher percentage of people in poverty, and lower percentage of people with a high school education. Additionally, people with HIV in these counties were more likely to be non-Hispanic black. Conclusions Counties with the highest ratios of female-to-male HIV prevalence are concentrated in the Southern US, and residents of these counties tend to be of lower socioeconomic status. Identifying and describing these counties is important for developing public health interventions. PMID:28207818

  3. A splenic marginal zone-like peripheral blood CD27+B220- B cell population is preferentially depleted in HIV type 1-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Matthew; Valentin, Antonio; Little, Richard; Yarchoan, Robert; Pavlakis, George N

    2008-04-01

    Peripheral blood CD27(+) B cells are reduced in HIV-1-infected individuals. In healthy individuals, the human peripheral blood CD27(+) B cell pool consists of two subsets defined by the expression, or lack thereof, of the CD45 isoform B220. We investigated the presence of circulating B220(+) and B220(-) memory B cells in HIV(+) individuals and found that the reduction in CD27(+) memory B cells occurs primarily among CD27(+)B220(-) B cells. Studies conducted using healthy controls indicate that CD27(+)B220(-) B cells have a splenic marginal zone like the immunophenotype IgM(hi)IgD(lo)CD21(+)CD23(-), express TLR9, and proliferate and secrete IgG and IgM in response to B cell-specific ODN. CD27(+)B220(+) B cells have the immunophenotype IgM(lo)IgD(hi)CD21(+)CD23(+), express activation-induced cytidine deaminase, and proliferate in response to SAC but do not secrete immunoglobulin. The AICD expression, along with CD86 expression, by CD27(+)B220(+) suggests these cells are of germinal center origin. The preferential depletion of CD27(+)B220(-) B cells mirrors alterations in spleen morphology and resident B cell populations due to HIV infection reported by other investigators and may play an important role in the defective B cell immunity against T-independent pathogens such as pneumococcus observed in HIV-1-infected individuals.

  4. A phase 1 study to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of a recombinant HIV type 1 subtype C adeno-associated virus vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, Sanjay; van Lunzen, Jan; Clumeck, Nathan; Rockstroh, Jurgen; Vets, Eva; Johnson, Philip R.; Anklesaria, Pervin; Barin, Burc; Boaz, Mark; Kochhar, Sonali; Lehrman, Jennifer; Schmidt, Claudia; Peeters, Mathieu; Schwarze-Zander, Carolynne; Kabamba, Kabeya; Glaunsinger, Tobias; Sahay, Seema; Thakar, Madhuri; Paranjape, Ramesh; Gilmour, Jill; Excler, Jean-Louis; Fast, Patricia; Heald, A1lison E.

    2008-01-01

    A novel prophylactic AIDS vaccine candidate, consisting of single-stranded DNA for HIV-1 subtype C gag, protease, and part of reverse transcriptase genes, enclosed within a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype-2 protein capsid (tgAAC09) induced T cell responses and antibodies in nonhuman prim

  5. Destabilization and fusion of zwitterionic large unilamellar lipid vesicles induced by a beta-type structure of the HIV-1 fusion peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieva, JL; Nir, S; Wilschut, J

    1998-01-01

    The peptide HIVarg, corresponding to a sequence of 23 amino acid residues at the N-terminus of HIV-1 gp41, has the capacity to induce fusion of large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) consisting of negatively charged or zwitterionic phospholipids. In the present study, we further characterize this destabil

  6. A phase 1 study to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of a recombinant HIV type 1 subtype C adeno-associated virus vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, Sanjay; van Lunzen, Jan; Clumeck, Nathan; Rockstroh, Jurgen; Vets, Eva; Johnson, Philip R.; Anklesaria, Pervin; Barin, Burc; Boaz, Mark; Kochhar, Sonali; Lehrman, Jennifer; Schmidt, Claudia; Peeters, Mathieu; Schwarze-Zander, Carolynne; Kabamba, Kabeya; Glaunsinger, Tobias; Sahay, Seema; Thakar, Madhuri; Paranjape, Ramesh; Gilmour, Jill; Excler, Jean-Louis; Fast, Patricia; Heald, A1lison E.

    A novel prophylactic AIDS vaccine candidate, consisting of single-stranded DNA for HIV-1 subtype C gag, protease, and part of reverse transcriptase genes, enclosed within a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype-2 protein capsid (tgAAC09) induced T cell responses and antibodies in nonhuman

  7. Factors Associated with Recent HIV Testing among Heterosexuals at High-Risk for HIV Infection in New York City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marya eGwadz

    2016-04-01

    gender-specific facilitators of HIV testing. Findings suggest a number of avenues for increasing HIV testing rates including increasing the number and types of settings offering high-quality HIV testing; promoting STI as well as HIV testing; better integrating STI and HIV testing systems; implementing peer-driven social/behavioral intervention approaches to harness the positive influence of social networks and reduce unfavorable shared peer norms; and specialized approaches for women who use drugs.

  8. HIV-1 Sequence Data Coverage in Central East Africa from 1959 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, Susanna L; Barbier, Andrew E; Ratmann, Oliver; Fraser, Christophe; Rose, Rebecca; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Grabowski, Mary K

    2016-09-01

    Central and Eastern African HIV sequence data have been most critical in understanding the establishment and evolution of the global HIV pandemic. Here we report on the extent of publicly available HIV genetic sequence data in the Los Alamos National Laboratory Sequence Database sampled from 1959 to 2013 from six African countries: Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Rwanda. We have summarized these data, including HIV subtypes, the years sampled, and the genomic regions sequenced. We also provide curated alignments for this important geographic area in five HIV genomic regions with substantial coverage.

  9. Peptides from second extracellular loop of C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) inhibit diverse strains of HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogo-Isonagie, Cajetan; Lam, Son; Gustchina, Elena; Acharya, Priyamvada; Yang, Yongping; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed; Clore, G Marius; Kwong, Peter D; Bewley, Carole A

    2012-04-27

    To initiate HIV entry, the HIV envelope protein gp120 must engage its primary receptor CD4 and a coreceptor CCR5 or CXCR4. In the absence of a high resolution structure of a gp120-coreceptor complex, biochemical studies of CCR5 have revealed the importance of its N terminus and second extracellular loop (ECL2) in binding gp120 and mediating viral entry. Using a panel of synthetic CCR5 ECL2-derived peptides, we show that the C-terminal portion of ECL2 (2C, comprising amino acids Cys-178 to Lys-191) inhibit HIV-1 entry of both CCR5- and CXCR4-using isolates at low micromolar concentrations. In functional viral assays, these peptides inhibited HIV-1 entry in a CD4-independent manner. Neutralization assays designed to measure the effects of CCR5 ECL2 peptides when combined with either with the small molecule CD4 mimetic NBD-556, soluble CD4, or the CCR5 N terminus showed additive inhibition for each, indicating that ECL2 binds gp120 at a site distinct from that of N terminus and acts independently of CD4. Using saturation transfer difference NMR, we determined the region of CCR5 ECL2 used for binding gp120, showed that it can bind to gp120 from both R5 and X4 isolates, and demonstrated that the peptide interacts with a CD4-gp120 complex in a similar manner as to gp120 alone. As the CCR5 N terminus-gp120 interactions are dependent on CD4 activation, our data suggest that gp120 has separate binding sites for the CCR5 N terminus and ECL2, the ECL2 binding site is present prior to CD4 engagement, and it is conserved across CCR5- and CXCR4-using strains. These peptides may serve as a starting point for the design of inhibitors with broad spectrum anti-HIV activity.

  10. New subtypes and genetic recombination in HIV type 1-infecting patients with highly active antiretroviral therapy in Peru (2008-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabar, Carlos Augusto; Acuña, Maribel; Gazzo, Cecilia; Salinas, Gabriela; Cárdenas, Fanny; Valverde, Ada; Romero, Soledad

    2012-12-01

    HIV-1 subtype B is the most frequent strain in Peru. However, there is no available data about the genetic diversity of HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) here. A group of 267 patients in the Peruvian National Treatment Program with virologic failure were tested for genotypic evidence of HIV drug resistance at the Instituto Nacional de Salud (INS) of Peru between March 2008 and December 2010. Viral RNA was extracted from plasma and the segments of the protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) genes were amplified by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), purified, and fully sequenced. Consensus sequences were submitted to the HIVdb Genotypic Resistance Interpretation Algorithm Database from Stanford University, and then aligned using Clustal X v.2.0 to generate a phylogenetic tree using the maximum likelihood method. Intrasubtype and intersubtype recombination analyses were performed using the SCUEAL program (Subtype Classification by Evolutionary ALgo-rithms). A total of 245 samples (91%) were successfully genotyped. The analysis obtained from the HIVdb program showed 81.5% resistance cases (n=198). The phylogenetic analysis revealed that subtype B was predominant in the population (98.8%), except for new cases of A, C, and H subtypes (n=4). Of these cases, only subtype C was imported. Likewise, recombination analysis revealed nine intersubtype and 20 intrasubtype recombinant cases. This is the first report of the presence of HIV-1 subtypes C and H in Peru. The introduction of new subtypes and circulating recombinants forms can make it difficult to distinguish resistance profiles in patients and consequently affect future treatment strategies against HIV in this country.

  11. eHealth interventions for HIV prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noar, Seth M; Willoughby, Jessica Fitts

    2012-01-01

    The rapidly changing media landscape and proliferation of new technologies creates vast new opportunities for HIV prevention. The fast growth of the relatively new eHealth field is a testament to the excitement and promise of these new technologies. eHealth interventions in HIV prevention tested to date include computer- and Internet-based interventions; chat room interventions; text messaging interventions; and social media. The current article provides a brief review of these types of interventions in HIV prevention, including their unique advantages and evidence of efficacy. Implications for future research in the eHealth HIV prevention field are discussed.

  12. The Ability of an Oligomeric Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Envelope Antigen To Elicit Neutralizing Antibodies against Primary HIV-1 Isolates Is Improved following Partial Deletion of the Second Hypervariable Region

    OpenAIRE

    Barnett, S. W.; Lu, S.; Srivastava, I.; Cherpelis, S.; Gettie, A.; Blanchard, J.; Wang, S.; Mboudjeka, I.; Leung, L; Lian, Y.; Fong, A.; Buckner, C.; Ly, A.; Hilt, S.; Ulmer, J.

    2001-01-01

    Partial deletion of the second hypervariable region from the envelope of the primary-like SF162 virus increases the exposure of certain neutralization epitopes and renders the virus, SF162ΔV2, highly susceptible to neutralization by clade B and non-clade B human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive) sera (L. Stamatatos and C. Cheng-Mayer, J. Virol. 78:7840–7845, 1998). This observation led us to propose that the modified, SF162ΔV2-derived envelope may elicit higher titers of cross-reactive ne...

  13. 77 FR 36550 - Office of Clinical and Preventive Services Funding Opportunity: National HIV Program for Enhanced...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ...: National HIV Program for Enhanced HIV/AIDS Screening and Engagement in Care Announcement Type: New. Funding... has the administrative infrastructure to support activities to increase HIV/ AIDS screening and assist.... Describe the objectives of the program and how they will increase HIV screening in...

  14. Stroke in a Patient With HIV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buse Rahime Hasırcı

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Stroke which is a common complication in Human immumodeficiency virus type 1 positive patients is seen between 1% and 5% in clinical series. Vasculopathy and atherogenesis in HIV are the main pathologic mechanisms of stroke. We report a 63 year old man with sudden onset of a right hemiplegia and who was diagnosed as HIV-related stroke.

  15. No. 185-HIV Screening in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan-Lindsay, Lisa; Yudin, Mark H

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this guideline is to provide recommendations to obstetric health care providers and to minimize practice variations for HIV screening, while taking provincial and territorial recommendations into account. The risk of transmission of HIV from mother to fetus is significant if the mother is not treated. The primary outcome of screening for and treating HIV in pregnancy is a marked decrease in the rate of vertical transmission of HIV from mother to fetus. Secondary outcomes include confirmation of HIV infection in the woman, which allows optimization of her health and long-term management. The Cochrane Library and Medline were searched for English-language articles published related to HIV screening and pregnancy. Additional articles were identified through the references of these articles. All study types were reviewed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. GEOGRAPHICAL EDUCATION MEDIATIZATION AND MEDIASECURITY ISSUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Arpentieva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the interaction of legal and moral development of media technologies in the context of geographical education. The article summarizes the experience of the theoretical analysis of mediatization in geographic education, the legal and moral aspects of the disorders and ways of their prevention and correction in the process of educational interaction between teacher and student, between student and teacher, mediated mediatechnologies. It is noted that geographical education in the modern world is education, which is closely associated with the use of media technologies. In other types of education the role of media technologies in improving the quality of education is less obvious, in the field of teaching and learning geography, it speaks very clearly. Therefore, the problems associated with its mediatization, are very important and their solution is particularly compelling. These issues are primarily associated with actively flowing social, economic, political and ideological crisis in many communities and countries of the Earth. Many of them as in the “mirror” are reflected in the sphere of high technologies, including media technologies. The article provides guidance and direction to the correction of violations at the individual and social levels.

  17. Structural factors influencing patterns of drug selling and use and HIV risk in the San Salvador metropolitan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson-Gomez, Julia

    2010-06-01

    This article explores differences in the social context in which crack sales and use and HIV risk take place in seven low-income communities in San Salvador, and structural factors that may influence these differences. The organization of drug selling varied among the communities on a number of dimensions including: whether drug sales were open or closed systems; the type of drug-selling site; and the participation of drug users in drug-distribution roles. Drug-use sites also varied according to whether crack was used in private, semiprivate, or public spaces, and whether individuals used drugs alone or with other drug users. Three patterns of drug use and selling were identified based on the dimensions outlined above. Structural factors that influenced these patterns included the geographic location of the communities, their physical layout, gang involvement in drug sales, and police surveillance. Implications for HIV risk and prevention are explored for each pattern.

  18. HIV-1 drug resistance and resistance testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clutter, Dana S; Jordan, Michael R; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Shafer, Robert W

    2016-12-01

    The global scale-up of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy (ART) has led to dramatic reductions in HIV-1 mortality and incidence. However, HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) poses a potential threat to the long-term success of ART and is emerging as a threat to the elimination of AIDS as a public health problem by 2030. In this review we describe the genetic mechanisms, epidemiology, and management of HIVDR at both individual and population levels across diverse economic and geographic settings. To describe the genetic mechanisms of HIVDR, we review the genetic barriers to resistance for the most commonly used ARVs and describe the extent of cross-resistance between them. To describe the epidemiology of HIVDR, we summarize the prevalence and patterns of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and acquired drug resistance (ADR) in both high-income and low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). We also review to two categories of HIVDR with important public health relevance: (i) pre-treatment drug resistance (PDR), a World Health Organization-recommended HIVDR surveillance metric and (ii) and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)-related drug resistance, a type of ADR that can impact clinical outcomes if present at the time of treatment initiation. To summarize the implications of HIVDR for patient management, we review the role of genotypic resistance testing and treatment practices in both high-income and LMIC settings. In high-income countries where drug resistance testing is part of routine care, such an understanding can help clinicians prevent virological failure and accumulation of further HIVDR on an individual level by selecting the most efficacious regimens for their patients. Although there is reduced access to diagnostic testing and to many ARVs in LMIC, understanding the scientific basis and clinical implications of HIVDR is useful in all regions in order to shape appropriate surveillance, inform treatment algorithms, and manage difficult cases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B

  19. Future Life Goals of HIV-Positive Gay and Bisexual Male Emerging Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Douglas; Harper, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the future life goals reported by a sample of HIV-positive gay/bisexual male emerging adults. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 54 participants ages 17-24 at four geographically and demographically diverse adolescent HIV medicine programs to explore the content of participants' goals, perceived…

  20. Drug resistance mutations for surveillance of transmitted HIV-1 drug-resistance: 2009 update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Bennett (Diane); R.J. Camacho (Ricardo Jorge); D. Otelea (Dan); D.R. Kuritzkes (Daniel); H. Fleury (Hervé); M. Kiuchi (Mark); W. Heneine (Walid); R. Kantor (Rami); M.R. Jordan (Michael); J.M. Schapiro (Jonathan); A.M. Vandamme (Anne Mieke); P. Sandstrom (Paul); C.A. Boucher (Charles); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David); S.Y. Rhee (Soo Yoon); T.F. Liu (Tommy); D. Pillay (Deenan); R.W. Shafer (Robert)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractPrograms that monitor local, national, and regional levels of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance inform treatment guidelines and provide feedback on the success of HIV-1 treatment and prevention programs. To accurately compare transmitted drug resistance rates across geographic regions an

  1. Geographical mobility of manpower in the USSR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossov, V V; Tatevosov, R V

    1984-01-01

    "The Soviet Union is experiencing a substantial reduction in the growth of its working-age population, accompanied by a shift in the distributional pattern of population growth, with the largest increases occurring in regions where geographical mobility is low. After describing the types and scales of manpower migration in the USSR, the [authors discuss] the means used to encourage workers to move to the sparsely populated developing regions and away from large cities. This is achieved primarily through incentives, with wage differentials decreasing in importance compared with incentives bearing on the quality of life; restrictive measures have a purely corrective function."

  2. Acquiring geographical data with web harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dramowicz, K.

    2016-04-01

    Many websites contain very attractive and up to date geographical information. This information can be extracted, stored, analyzed and mapped using web harvesting techniques. Poorly organized data from websites are transformed with web harvesting into a more structured format, which can be stored in a database and analyzed. Almost 25% of web traffic is related to web harvesting, mostly while using search engines. This paper presents how to harvest geographic information from web documents using the free tool called the Beautiful Soup, one of the most commonly used Python libraries for pulling data from HTML and XML files. It is a relatively easy task to process one static HTML table. The more challenging task is to extract and save information from tables located in multiple and poorly organized websites. Legal and ethical aspects of web harvesting are discussed as well. The paper demonstrates two case studies. The first one shows how to extract various types of information about the Good Country Index from the multiple web pages, load it into one attribute table and map the results. The second case study shows how script tools and GIS can be used to extract information from one hundred thirty six websites about Nova Scotia wines. In a little more than three minutes a database containing one hundred and six liquor stores selling these wines is created. Then the availability and spatial distribution of various types of wines (by grape types, by wineries, and by liquor stores) are mapped and analyzed.

  3. Evaluating the impact of the HIV pandemic on measles control and elimination.

    OpenAIRE

    Helfand, RF; Moss, WJ; Harpaz, R; Scott, S; Cutts, F.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the impact of the HIV pandemic on vaccine-acquired population immunity to measles virus because high levels of population immunity are required to eliminate transmission of measles virus in large geographical areas, and HIV infection can reduce the efficacy of measles vaccination. METHODS: A literature review was conducted to estimate key parameters relating to the potential impact of HIV infection on the epidemiology of measles in sub-Saharan Africa; parameters include...

  4. Genetic diversity on the integrase region of the pol gene among HIV type 1-infected patients naive for integrase inhibitors in São Paulo City, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Liã Bárbara; Fonseca, Luiz Augusto M; Duarte, Alberto J S; Casseb, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The presence of mutations associated with integrase inhibitor (INI) resistance among INI-naive patients may play an important clinical role in the use of those drugs Samples from 76 HIV-1-infected subjects naive to INIs were submitted to direct sequencing. No differences were found between naive (25%) subjects and subjects on HAART (75%). No primary mutation associated with raltegravir or elvitegravir resistance was found. However, 78% of sequences showed at least one accessory mutation associated with resistance. The analysis of the 76 IN sequences showed a high polymorphic level on this region among Brazilian HIV-1-infected subjects, including a high prevalence of aa substitutions related to INI resistance. The impact of these findings remains unclear and further studies are necessary to address these questions.

  5. Induction of Multifunctional Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1)-Specific T Cells Capable of Proliferation in Healthy Subjects by Using a Prime-Boost Regimen of DNA- and Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara-Vectored Vaccines Expressing HIV-1 Gag Coupled to CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonetilleke, Nilu; Moore, Stephen; Dally, Len; Winstone, Nicola; Cebere, Inese; Mahmoud, Abdul; Pinheiro, Susana; Gillespie, Geraldine; Brown, Denise; Loach, Vanessa; Roberts, Joanna; Guimaraes-Walker, Ana; Hayes, Peter; Loughran, Kelley; Smith, Carole; De Bont, Jan; Verlinde, Carl; Vooijs, Danii; Schmidt, Claudia; Boaz, Mark; Gilmour, Jill; Fast, Pat; Dorrell, Lucy; Hanke, Tomas; McMichael, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    A double-blind randomized phase I trial was conducted in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-negative subjects receiving vaccines vectored by plasmid DNA and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing HIV-1 p24/p17 gag linked to a string of CD8+ T-cell epitopes. The trial had two groups. One group received either two doses of MVA.HIVA (2× MVA.HIVA) (n = 8) or two doses of placebo (2× placebo) (n = 4). The second group received 2× pTHr.HIVA followed by one dose of MVA.HIVA (n = 8) or 3× placebo (n = 4). In the pTHr.HIVA-MVA.HIVA group, HIV-1-specific T-cell responses peaked 1 week after MVA.HIVA vaccination in both ex vivo gamma interferon (IFN-γ) ELISPOT (group mean, 210 spot-forming cells/106 cells) and proliferation (group mean stimulation index, 37), with assays detecting positive responses in four out of eight and five out of eight subjects, respectively. No HIV-1-specific T-cell responses were detected in either assay in the 2× MVA.HIVA group or subjects receiving placebo. Using a highly sensitive and reproducible cultured IFN-γ ELISPOT assay, positive responses mainly mediated by CD4+ T cells were detected in eight out of eight vaccinees in the pTHr.HIVA-MVA.HIVA group and four out of eight vaccinees in the 2× MVA.HIVA group. Importantly, no false-positive responses were detected in the eight subjects receiving placebo. Of the 12 responders, 11 developed responses to previously identified immunodominant CD4+ T-cell epitopes, with 6 volunteers having responses to more than one epitope. Five out of 12 responders also developed CD8+ T-cell responses to the epitope string. Induced T cells produced a variety of anti-viral cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β. These data demonstrate that prime-boost vaccination with recombinant DNA and MVA vectors can induce multifunctional HIV-1-specific T cells in the majority of vaccinees. PMID:16641265

  6. HIV Life Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV Overview The HIV Life Cycle (Last updated 9/13/2016; last reviewed 9/8/2016) Key Points HIV gradually destroys the immune ... life cycle. What is the connection between the HIV life cycle and HIV medicines? Antiretroviral therapy (ART) ...

  7. Molecular typing of the recently expanding subtype B HIV-1 epidemic in Romania: evidence for local spread among MSMs in Bucharest area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraschiv, Simona; Otelea, Dan; Batan, Ionelia; Baicus, Cristian; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Paraskevis, Dimitrios

    2012-07-01

    HIV-1 subtype B is predominant in Europe except in some countries from Eastern Europe which are characterized by a high prevalence of non-B subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs). Romania is a particular case: the HIV-1 epidemic started with subtype F1 which is still the most prevalent. Previous studies have shown an increasing prevalence of subtype B which is the second most frequent one among the newly diagnosed individuals, followed by subtype C and several CRFs as well as unique recombinant forms (URFs). Our objective was to analyze in detail the characteristics (way of dispersal, association with transmission risk groups) of the subtype B infections in Romania by means of phylogenetic analysis. Among all the individuals sampled during 2003-2010, 71 out of 1127 patients (6.3%) have been identified to be infected with subtype B strains. The most frequent route of infection identified in HIV-1 subtype B patients in Romania was MSM transmission (39.6%), followed by the heterosexual route (35.2%). Many of the patients acquired the infection abroad, mainly in Western European countries. Phylogenetic analysis indicated the existence of a local transmission network (monophyletic clade) including 14 patients, mainly MSM living in the Bucharest area. We estimate the origin of the local transmission network that dates at the beginning of the 90s; the introduction of the F1 and C subtypes occurred earlier. The rest of the sequences were intermixed with reference strains sampled across Europe suggesting that single infection were not followed by subsequent dispersal within the local population. Although HIV-1 subtype B epidemic in Romania is recent, there is evidence for local spread among the MSMs, in addition to multiple introductions.

  8. Molecular typing of the recently expanding subtype B HIV-1 epidemic in Romania: Evidence for local spread among MSMs in Bucharest area☆☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraschiv, Simona; Otelea, Dan; Batan, Ionelia; Baicus, Cristian; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Paraskevis, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 subtype B is predominant in Europe except in some countries from Eastern Europe which are characterized by a high prevalence of non-B subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs). Romania is a particular case: the HIV-1 epidemic started with subtype F1 which is still the most prevalent. Previous studies have shown an increasing prevalence of subtype B which is the second most frequent one among the newly diagnosed individuals, followed by subtype C and several CRFs as well as unique recombinant forms (URFs). Our objective was to analyze in detail the characteristics (way of dispersal, association with transmission risk groups) of the subtype B infections in Romania by means of phylogenetic analysis. Among all the individuals sampled during 2003–2010, 71 out of 1127 patients (6.3%) have been identified to be infected with subtype B strains. The most frequent route of infection identified in HIV-1 subtype B patients in Romania was MSM transmission (39.6%), followed by the heterosexual route (35.2%). Many of the patients acquired the infection abroad, mainly in Western European countries. Phylogenetic analysis indicated the existence of a local transmission network (monophyletic clade) including 14 patients, mainly MSM living in the Bucharest area. We estimate the origin of the local transmission network that dates at the beginning of the 90s; the introduction of the F1 and C subtypes occurred earlier. The rest of the sequences were intermixed with reference strains sampled across Europe suggesting that single infection were not followed by subsequent dispersal within the local population. Although HIV-1 subtype B epidemic in Romania is recent, there is evidence for local spread among the MSMs, in addition to multiple introductions. PMID:22430050

  9. The immunological and virological response in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 infected Indian individuals on haart therapy: A one-year follow up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannangai R

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, antiretroviral therapy has become more affordable even in developing countries and it is being used in India. Fifteen HIV-1 infected individuals, who were on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, were followed up for an average period of one year. The plasma viral load and CD4+ T cell estimation done at mean intervals of 5 months and 11 months after initiation of therapy showed a good response to therapy in 14 (93% individuals.

  10. HIV Latency

    OpenAIRE

    Robert F. Siliciano; Greene, Warner C.

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 can establish a state of latent infection at the level of individual T cells. Latently infected cells are rare in vivo and appear to arise when activated CD4+ T cells, the major targets cells for HIV-1, become infected and survive long enough to revert back to a resting memory state, which is nonpermissive for viral gene expression. Because latent virus resides in memory T cells, it persists indefinitely even in patients on potent antiretroviral therapy. This latent reservoir is recogni...

  11. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA Class I Down-Regulation by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Negative Factor (HIV-1 Nef: What Might We Learn From Natural Sequence Variants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Mwimanzi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 causes a chronic infection in humans that is characterized by high plasma viremia, progressive loss of CD4+ T lymphocytes, and severe immunodeficiency resulting in opportunistic disease and AIDS. Viral persistence is mediated in part by the ability of the Nef protein to down-regulate HLA molecules on the infected cell surface, thereby allowing HIV-1 to evade recognition by antiviral CD8+ T lymphocytes. Extensive research has been conducted on Nef to determine protein domains that are required for its immune evasion activities and to identify critical cellular co-factors, and our mechanistic understanding of this process is becoming more complete. This review highlights our current knowledge of Nef-mediated HLA class I down-regulation and places this work in the context of naturally occurring sequence variation in this protein. We argue that efforts to fully understand the critical role of Nef for HIV-1 pathogenesis will require greater analysis of patient-derived sequences to elucidate subtle differences in immune evasion activity that may alter clinical outcome.

  12. Screening and diagnosis for HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV testing; HIV screening; HIV screening test; HIV confirmatory test ... Task Force. Final Update Summary: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection: Screening. July 2015. www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/UpdateSummaryFinal/ ...

  13. Changes at the National Geographic Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwille, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    For more than 125 years, National Geographic has explored the planet, unlocking its secrets and sharing them with the world. For almost thirty of those years, National Geographic has been committed to K-12 educators and geographic education through its Network of Alliances. As National Geographic begins a new chapter, they remain committed to the…

  14. Changes at the National Geographic Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwille, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    For more than 125 years, National Geographic has explored the planet, unlocking its secrets and sharing them with the world. For almost thirty of those years, National Geographic has been committed to K-12 educators and geographic education through its Network of Alliances. As National Geographic begins a new chapter, they remain committed to the…

  15. QUASI analysis of the HIV-1 envelope sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory HIV sequence database: pattern and distribution of positive selection sites and their frequencies over years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Binhua; Luo, Ma; Ball, T Blake; Plummer, Francis A

    2007-04-01

    The envelope (env) protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) plays a crucial role in virus entry and is a central target for HIV vaccine design. Using the QUASI program, we analyzed the conserved regions of all currently available env sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory HIV Sequence Database and identified positive selection (PS) sites that are likely to be restricted by host immune responses. We found that PS sites are dispersed across conserved regions of env sequence, and that the C3, C4, and C5 regions were the most targeted. Several regions were identified as being PS free and were mainly distributed in the C1 and C2 regions. When comparing individual QUASI PS site frequencies across clades and geographical regions with the overall frequency of the entire env database, the env sequences from North America showed significantly lower PS site frequency, while those from Asia were significantly higher using Student's t test. The QUASI PS site frequency of env proteins from viruses isolated from different years showed that the PS site frequencies of the env population increased over time. Our study provides an overview of PS sites across the conserved regions of HIV-1 env sequences.

  16. Volunteered Geographic Information and Computational Geography: New Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Volunteered geographic information (VGI), one of the most important types of user-generated web content, has been emerging as a new phenomenon. VGI is contributed by numerous volunteers and supported by web 2.0 technologies. This chapter discusses how VGI provides new perspectives for computational geography, a transformed geography based on the use of data-intensive computing and simulations to uncover the underlying mechanisms behind geographic forms and processes. We provide several exemplars of computational geography using OpenStreetMap data and GPS traces to investigate the scaling of geographic space and its implications for human mobility patterns. We illustrate that the field of geography is experiencing a dramatic change and that geoinformatics and computational geography deserve to be clearly distinguished, with the former being a study of engineering and the latter being a science. Keywords geoinformatics, openstreetmap, scaling of geographic space, spatial heterogeneity

  17. Bioinformatic prediction programs underestimate the frequency of CXCR4 usage by R5X4 HIV type 1 in brain and other tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefford, Megan E; Gorry, Paul R; Kunstman, Kevin; Wolinsky, Steven M; Gabuzda, Dana

    2008-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) variants in brain primarily use CCR5 for entry into macrophages and microglia, but dual-tropic (R5X4) HIV-1 has been detected in brain and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) of some patients with HIV-associated dementia (HAD). Here, we sequenced the gp120 coding region of nine full-length dual-tropic (R5X4) env genes cloned directly from autopsy brain and spleen tissue from an AIDS patient with severe HAD. We then compiled a dataset of 30 unique clade B R5X4 Env V3 sequences from this subject and 16 additional patients (n = 4 brain and 26 lymphoid/blood) and used it to compare the ability of six bioinformatic algorithms to correctly predict CXCR4 usage in R5X4 Envs. Only one program (SVM(geno2pheno)) correctly predicted the ability of R5X4 Envs in this dataset to use CXCR4 with 90% accuracy (n = 27/30 predicted to use CXCR4). The PSSM(SINSI), Random Forest, and SVM(genomiac) programs and the commonly used charge rule correctly predicted CXCR4 usage with >50% accuracy (22/30, 16/30, 19/30, and 25/30, respectively), while the PSSM(X4R5) matrix and "11/25" rule correctly predicted CXCR4 usage in <50% of the R5X4 Envs (10/30 and 13/30, respectively). Two positions in the V3 loop (19 and 32) influenced coreceptor usage predictions of nine R5X4 Envs from patient MACS1 and a total of 12 Envs from the dataset (40% of unique V3 sequences). These results demonstrate that most predictive algorithms underestimate the frequency of R5X4 HIV-1 in brain and other tissues. SVM(geno2pheno) is the most accurate predictor of CXCR4 usage by R5X4 HIV-1.

  18. Differentiation and Cure Typing of HIV/AIDS Patient Stomatopathy in Henan%河南地区HIV/AIDS患者常见口腔病变的辨治分型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卫淑华; 姜枫; 张荣欣

    2008-01-01

    HIV/AIDS患者常见的口腔病变是临床较为棘手的病症之一.根据中医辨证论治的原则,将其分为湿热熏蒸证,毒火熏灼证,气阴两虚证,脾肾阳虚证,分别采用甘露消毒丹、导赤散、龙胆泻肝汤、凉膈散、黄连解毒汤、归芍天地煎、养阴清肺汤、六味地黄汤、附子理中汤、桂附地黄汤加减治疗,取得一定的疗效.

  19. Estimated HIV Incidence in California, 2006-2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Scheer

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Accurate estimates of HIV incidence are crucial for prioritizing, targeting, and evaluating HIV prevention efforts. Using the methodology the CDC used to estimate national HIV incidence, we estimated HIV incidence in Los Angeles County (LAC, San Francisco (SF, and California's remaining counties. METHODS: We estimated new HIV infections in 2006-2009 among adults and adolescents in LAC, SF and the remaining California counties using the Serologic Testing Algorithm for Recent Seroconversion (STARHS. STARHS methodology uses the BED HIV-1 capture enzyme immunoassay to determine recent HIV infections by testing remnant serum from persons newly diagnosed with HIV. A population-based incidence estimate is calculated using HIV testing data from newly diagnosed cases and imputing for persons unaware of their HIV infection. RESULTS: For years 2007-2009, respectively, we estimated new infections in LAC to be 2426 (95% CI 1871-2982, 1669 (CI 1309-2029 and 1898 (CI 1452-2344 (p<0.01; in SF for 2006-2009, 492 (CI 327-657, 490 (CI 335-646, 458 (CI 342-574 and 367 (CI 261-473 (p = 0.14; and in the remaining California counties in 2008-2009, 2526 (CI 1688-3364 and 2993 (CI 2141-3846 respectively. HIV infection rates among men who have sex with men (MSM in LAC were 100 times higher than other risk populations; the SF MSM rate was 3 to 18 times higher than other demographic groups. In LAC, incidence rates among African-Americans were twice those of whites and Latinos; persons 40 years or older had lower rates of infection than younger persons. DISCUSSION: We report the first HIV incidence estimates for California, highlighting geographic disparities in HIV incidence and confirming national findings that MSM and African-Americans are disproportionately impacted by HIV. HIV incidence estimates can and should be used to target prevention efforts towards populations at highest risk of acquiring new HIV infections, focusing on geographic, racial and risk

  20. Mapping Polyclonal HIV-1 Antibody Responses via Next-Generation Neutralization Fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Altae-Tran, Han R; Roark, Ryan S; Schmidt, Stephen D; Sutton, Matthew S; Louder, Mark K; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Bailer, Robert T; Cortez, Valerie; Kong, Rui; McKee, Krisha; O'Dell, Sijy; Wang, Felicia; Abdool Karim, Salim S; Binley, James M; Connors, Mark; Haynes, Barton F; Martin, Malcolm A; Montefiori, David C; Morris, Lynn; Overbaugh, Julie; Kwong, Peter D; Mascola, John R; Georgiev, Ivelin S

    2017-01-01

    Computational neutralization fingerprinting, NFP, is an efficient and accurate method for predicting the epitope specificities of polyclonal antibody responses to HIV-1 infection. Here, we present next-generation NFP algorithms that substantially improve prediction accuracy for individual donors and enable serologic analysis for entire cohorts. Specifically, we developed algorithms for: (a) selection of optimized virus neutralization panels for NFP analysis, (b) estimation of NFP prediction confidence for each serum sample, and (c) identification of sera with potentially novel epitope specificities. At the individual donor level, the next-generation NFP algorithms particularly improved the ability to detect multiple epitope specificities in a sample, as confirmed both for computationally simulated polyclonal sera and for samples from HIV-infected donors. Specifically, the next-generation NFP algorithms detected multiple specificities in twice as many samples of simulated sera. Further, unlike the first-generation NFP, the new algorithms were able to detect both of the previously confirmed antibody specificities, VRC01-like and PG9-like, in donor CHAVI 0219. At the cohort level, analysis of ~150 broadly neutralizing HIV-infected donor samples suggested a potential connection between clade of infection and types of elicited epitope specificities. Most notably, while 10E8-like antibodies were observed in infections from different clades, an enrichment of such antibodies was predicted for clade B samples. Ultimately, such large-scale analyses of antibody responses to HIV-1 infection can help guide the design of epitope-specific vaccines that are tailored to take into account the prevalence of infecting clades within a specific geographic region. Overall, the next-generation NFP technology will be an important tool for the analysis of broadly neutralizing polyclonal antibody responses against HIV-1.

  1. Lectins with Anti-HIV Activity: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouafae Akkouh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lectins including flowering plant lectins, algal lectins, cyanobacterial lectins, actinomycete lectin, worm lectins, and the nonpeptidic lectin mimics pradimicins and benanomicins, exhibit anti-HIV activity. The anti-HIV plant lectins include Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin lectin, concanavalin A, Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop agglutinin-related lectins, Musa acuminata (banana lectin, Myrianthus holstii lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin, and Urtica diocia agglutinin. The anti-HIV algal lectins comprise Boodlea coacta lectin, Griffithsin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin. The anti-HIV cyanobacterial lectins are cyanovirin-N, scytovirin, Microcystis viridis lectin, and microvirin. Actinohivin is an anti-HIV actinomycete lectin. The anti-HIV worm lectins include Chaetopterus variopedatus polychaete marine worm lectin, Serpula vermicularis sea worm lectin, and C-type lectin Mermaid from nematode (Laxus oneistus. The anti-HIV nonpeptidic lectin mimics comprise pradimicins and benanomicins. Their anti-HIV mechanisms are discussed.

  2. The Andes: A Geographical Portrait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Bebbington

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Reviewed: The Andes: A Geographical Portrait. By Axel Borsdorf and Christoph Stadel. Translated by Brigitte Scott and Christoph Stadel. Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing, 2015. xiv + 368 pp. US$ 139.00. Also available as an e-book. ISBN 978-3-319-03529-1.

  3. Geographic Projection of Cluster Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nerbonne, J.; Bosveld-de Smet, L.M.; Kleiweg, P.; Blackwell, A.; Marriott, K.; Shimojima, A.

    2004-01-01

    A composite cluster map displays a fuzzy categorisation of geographic areas. It combines information from several sources to provide a visualisation of the significance of cluster borders. The basic technique renders the chance that two neighbouring locations are members of different clusters as the

  4. Geographical Concepts in Turkish Lullabys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çifçi, Taner

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a collection of lullabies which have an important place in Turkish culture and which form an important genre in folk literature are examined to find out distribution and presentation of geographical terms in the lullabies in this collection. In the study, 2480 lullabies in Turkish Lullabies which is one of the leading collections in…

  5. Territorial Decentration and Geographic Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltman, Joseph P.

    Territorial decentration is a question of major significance to geographic educators. This paper reports the findings of a research project designed to determine the territorial decentration of an American sample of children. The primary purpose of the research was to determine if Piaget's territorial decentration stages are appropriate for…

  6. HIV/AIDS Community Health Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Christopher L; Kaukinen, Catherine E

    2003-01-01

    Given changes in the faces of AIDS over the last decade, it is crucial that disparities in health and access to healthcare are addressed. An Internet-based GIS was developed using ESRI's Arc Internet Map Server (Arc IMS) to provide users with a suite of tools to interact with geographic data and conduct spatial analyses related to the characteristics that promote or impede the provision of HIV-related services. Internet Mapping allows those engaged in local decision-making to: (1) geographically visualize information via the Internet; (2) Assess the relationship between the distribution of HIV services and spatially referenced socio-economic data; and (3) generate "what if" scenarios" that may direct the allocation of healthcare resources.

  7. HIV and Immunizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV Treatment HIV and Immunizations (Last updated 2/24/2017; last reviewed 2/24/2017) Key Points Vaccines protect people from ... a disease outbreak. Is there a vaccine against HIV? Testing is underway on experimental vaccines to prevent ...

  8. Children and HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Children Children and HIV Most HIV-positive children under the age of ... Frequently Asked Questions How long do children with HIV typically live? Because effective treatments are relatively new ...

  9. HIV/AIDS Coinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Laotian Mongolian Spanish Turkish Vietnamese Hindi Subscribe HIV/AIDS Coinfection Approximately 10% of the HIV-infected population ... Control and Prevention website to learn about HIV/AIDS and Viral Hepatitis guidelines and resources. Home About ...

  10. HIV and Hepatitis B