WorldWideScience

Sample records for geodetic surveys

  1. Geodetic Control Points - National Geodetic Survey Benchmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This data contains a set of geodetic control stations maintained by the National Geodetic Survey. Each geodetic control station in this dataset has either a precise...

  2. Geodetic Survey Water Level Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Over one million images of National Coast & Geodetic Survey (now NOAA's National Geodetic Survey/NGS) forms captured from microfiche. Tabular forms and charts...

  3. Plane and geodetic surveying

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Aylmer

    2004-01-01

    Plane and Geodetic Surveying blends theory and practice, conventional techniques and GPS, to provide the ideal book for students of surveying.Detailed guidance is given on how and when the principle surveying instruments (theodolites, Total Stations, levels and GPS) should be used. Concepts and formulae needed to convert instrument readings into useful results are explained. Rigorous explanations of the theoretical aspects of surveying are given, while at the same time a wealth of useful advice about conducting a survey in practice is provided. An accompanying least squares adjustment program

  4. National Geodetic Survey's Airport Aerial Photography

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Geodetic Survey (NGS), formerly part of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, has been performing Aeronautical surveys since the 1920's. NGS, in...

  5. Plane and geodetic surveying

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Aylmer

    2014-01-01

    IntroductionAim And ScopeClassification Of SurveysThe Structure Of This BookGeneral Principles Of SurveyingErrorsRedundancyStiffnessAdjustmentPlanning And Record KeepingPrincipal Surveying ActivitiesEstablishing Control NetworksMappingSetting OutResectioningDeformation MonitoringAngle MeasurementThe Surveyor's CompassThe ClinometerThe Total StationMaking ObservationsChecks On Permanent AdjustmentsDistance MeasurementGeneralTape MeasurementsOptical Methods (Tachymetry)Electromagnetic Distance Measurement (EDM)Ultrasonic MethodsGNSSLevellingTheoryThe InstrumentTechniqueBookingPermanent Adjustmen

  6. National Geodetic Survey (NGS) Geodetic Control Stations, (Horizontal and/or Vertical Control), March 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data contains a set of geodetic control stations maintained by the National Geodetic Survey. Each geodetic control station in this dataset has either a precise...

  7. Geodetic surveying of crane trail space relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľudovít Kovanič

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Geodet´s obvious task consists of surveying crane trails of different types. These transport machines must meet precise geometricparameters, considering mainly the safety of their operation. The paper describes several geodetic methods of determining deviationsin direction and height of crane trails. Measurements were realized using special set of appliances composed for this purpose, as well asusing electronic theodolite for measurements from hall floor. Results ofmeasurements were processed using calculation programe Geus, andgraphicproramme Microstation. Used methods were compared in graphic form.

  8. Geodetic surveys in Messina straits area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, P.; Achilli, V.; Mulargia, F.; Broccio, F.

    1983-03-01

    By using the fit of theoretical displacements on a fault according to Mindlin and Cheng (1950) dislocation theory, the vertical deformation field (maximum subsidence of 70 cm) associated to the Dec. 28 1908 Messina M=7.0 earthquake is compared to the results of a spirit levelling survey that we performed in the Messina Straits area in 1981 1982. The differences in level from the last levelling campaign in the area, completed in 1970, show that the coastlines have undergone a moderate differential subsidence of about 1 mm/year in the last decade. This is in agreement with the trend observed around 1908 and with the data of the Messina tide-gauge relative to the period 1897 1908 and 1910 1918. The lack of data in the period 1918 1970 does not allow definite conclusions about the vertical tectonic deformations in the area. Recent data on planimetric deformations have shown a South-North relative motion of Sicily. A comparison with the theoretical displacements indicates that a pure dip-slip of 4 cm on the 1908 fault system does explain the observed vertical deformation, but not the horizontal.

  9. DETECTION OF COASTLINE DEFORMATION USING REMOTE SENSING AND GEODETIC SURVEYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sabuncu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The coastal areas are being destroyed due to the usage that effect the natural balance. Unconsciously sand mining from the sea for nearshore nourishment and construction uses are the main ones. Physical interferences for mining of sand cause an ecologic threat to the coastal environment. However, use of marine sand is inevitable because of economic reasons or unobtainable land-based sand resources. The most convenient solution in such a protection–usage dilemma is to reduce negative impacts of sand production from marine. This depends on the accurate determination of criteriaon production place, style, and amount of sand. With this motivation, nearshore geodedic surveying studies performed on Kilyos Campus of Bogazici University located on the Black Sea coast, north of Istanbul, Turkey between 2001-2002. The study area extends 1 km in the longshore. Geodetic survey was carried out in the summer of 2001 to detect the initial condition for the shoreline. Long-term seasonal changes in shoreline positions were determined biannually. The coast was measured with post-processed kinematic GPS. Besides, shoreline change has studied using Landsat imagery between the years 1986-2015. The data set of Landsat 5 imageries were dated 05.08.1986 and 31.08.2007 and Landsat 7 imageries were dated 21.07.2001 and 28.07.2015. Landcover types in the study area were analyzed on the basis of pixel based classification method. Firstly, unsupervised classification based on ISODATA (Iterative Self Organizing Data Analysis Technique has been applied and spectral clusters have been determined that gives prior knowledge about the study area. In the second step, supervised classification was carried out by using the three different approaches which are minimum-distance, parallelepiped and maximum-likelihood. All pixel based classification processes were performed with ENVI 4.8 image processing software. Results of geodetic studies and classification outputs will be

  10. Detection of Coastline Deformation Using Remote Sensing and Geodetic Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabuncu, A.; Dogru, A.; Ozener, H.; Turgut, B.

    2016-06-01

    The coastal areas are being destroyed due to the usage that effect the natural balance. Unconsciously sand mining from the sea for nearshore nourishment and construction uses are the main ones. Physical interferences for mining of sand cause an ecologic threat to the coastal environment. However, use of marine sand is inevitable because of economic reasons or unobtainable land-based sand resources. The most convenient solution in such a protection-usage dilemma is to reduce negative impacts of sand production from marine. This depends on the accurate determination of criteriaon production place, style, and amount of sand. With this motivation, nearshore geodedic surveying studies performed on Kilyos Campus of Bogazici University located on the Black Sea coast, north of Istanbul, Turkey between 2001-2002. The study area extends 1 km in the longshore. Geodetic survey was carried out in the summer of 2001 to detect the initial condition for the shoreline. Long-term seasonal changes in shoreline positions were determined biannually. The coast was measured with post-processed kinematic GPS. Besides, shoreline change has studied using Landsat imagery between the years 1986-2015. The data set of Landsat 5 imageries were dated 05.08.1986 and 31.08.2007 and Landsat 7 imageries were dated 21.07.2001 and 28.07.2015. Landcover types in the study area were analyzed on the basis of pixel based classification method. Firstly, unsupervised classification based on ISODATA (Iterative Self Organizing Data Analysis Technique) has been applied and spectral clusters have been determined that gives prior knowledge about the study area. In the second step, supervised classification was carried out by using the three different approaches which are minimum-distance, parallelepiped and maximum-likelihood. All pixel based classification processes were performed with ENVI 4.8 image processing software. Results of geodetic studies and classification outputs will be presented in this paper.

  11. Geodetic Control Points, Benchmarks; Vertical elevation bench marks for monumented geodetic survey control points for which mean sea level elevations have been determined., Published in 1995, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — Geodetic Control Points dataset current as of 1995. Benchmarks; Vertical elevation bench marks for monumented geodetic survey control points for which mean sea level...

  12. Global Positioning System (GPS) survey of Augustine Volcano, Alaska, August 3-8, 2000: data processing, geodetic coordinates and comparison with prior geodetic surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauk, Benjamin A.; Power, John A.; Lisowski, Mike; Dzurisin, Daniel; Iwatsubo, Eugene Y.; Melbourne, Tim

    2001-01-01

    Between August 3 and 8,2000,the Alaska Volcano Observatory completed a Global Positioning System (GPS) survey at Augustine Volcano, Alaska. Augustine is a frequently active calcalkaline volcano located in the lower portion of Cook Inlet (fig. 1), with reported eruptions in 1812, 1882, 1909?, 1935, 1964, 1976, and 1986 (Miller et al., 1998). Geodetic measurements using electronic and optical surveying techniques (EDM and theodolite) were begun at Augustine Volcano in 1986. In 1988 and 1989, an island-wide trilateration network comprising 19 benchmarks was completed and measured in its entirety (Power and Iwatsubo, 1998). Partial GPS surveys of the Augustine Island geodetic network were completed in 1992 and 1995; however, neither of these surveys included all marks on the island.Additional GPS measurements of benchmarks A5 and A15 (fig. 2) were made during the summers of 1992, 1993, 1994, and 1996. The goals of the 2000 GPS survey were to:1) re-measure all existing benchmarks on Augustine Island using a homogeneous set of GPS equipment operated in a consistent manner, 2) add measurements at benchmarks on the western shore of Cook Inlet at distances of 15 to 25 km, 3) add measurements at an existing benchmark (BURR) on Augustine Island that was not previously surveyed, and 4) add additional marks in areas of the island thought to be actively deforming. The entire survey resulted in collection of GPS data at a total of 24 sites (fig. 1 and 2). In this report we describe the methods of GPS data collection and processing used at Augustine during the 2000 survey. We use this data to calculate coordinates and elevations for all 24 sites surveyed. Data from the 2000 survey is then compared toelectronic and optical measurements made in 1988 and 1989. This report also contains a general description of all marks surveyed in 2000 and photographs of all new marks established during the 2000 survey (Appendix A).

  13. Geodetic surveying as part of archaeological research in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Pacina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Surveying is an important part of any archaeological research. In this paper we focus on the archaeological research in north Sudan (6th Nile cataract and the surveying methods applicable under the local conditions. Surveying in the Third World countries is affected by the political situation (limited import of surveying tools, local conditions (lack of fixed points, GNSS correction signal, inaccessible basemaps and fixed point network. This article describes the methods and results obtained during the three archaeological seasons (2011-2014. The classical surveying methods were combined with KAP (Kite Aerial Photography to obtain the desired results in form of archaeological maps, detailed orthophoto images and other analyses results.

  14. 2013 NOAA National Geodetic Survey (NGS) LIDAR of New Jersey: Barnegat Light Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping Product

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data were collected by the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration National Geodetic Survey Remote Sensing Division using a Riegl VQ820G system. The data...

  15. Geodetic Control Points, GPS survey sectional control, Published in 2001, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Coconino County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2001. It is described...

  16. 2005珠峰测高GPS测量及其数据处理%Geodetic Height Determination in 2005 Qomolangma Survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    党亚民; 程传录; 陈俊勇; 张鹏

    2007-01-01

    Determining the geodetic height of Mount Qomolangma was one of the very important missions in the 2005 Qomolangma height survey. There were three GPS networks in the survey: regional GPS crustal deformation network, geodetic GPS control network, and GPS measurement on the mountain summit. Data collection and processing were introduced. The final data processing strategy and reasonable geodetic height were fairly determined based on careful data analysis.

  17. Experience with the ULISS-30 inertial survey system for local geodetic and cadastral network control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Rene

    1991-09-01

    The capability of the recently developed SAGEM ULISS-30 inertial survey system for performing local surveys at high accuracies have been tested in a field campaign carried out November 1989 on the island of Fyn, Denmark, in cooperation with the Swedish National Land Survey. In the test a number of lines between existing national geodetic control points were surveyed, along with points in the less reliably determined cadastral network, forming an irregular network pattern of 10 15 km extent. The survey involved frequent offset measurements (up to 50 100 m) with an ISS-integrated total station. The profile geometries were not particularly suited for inertial surveys, with narrow and rather winding roads, necessitating frequent vehicle turns. In addition to the pure inertial surveys a kinematic GPS/inertial test was also carried out, using a pair of Ashtech L-XII receivers. The inertial survey results, analyzed with a smoothing algoritm utilizing common points on forward/backward runs, indicate that 5-cm accuracies are possible on reasonably straight profiles of 5 km length, corresponding to a 10 ppm “best-case” accuracy for double-run traverses. On longer, more winding traverses error levels of 10 20 cm are typical. To handle the inertial data optimally, proper network adjustments are required. A discussion of suitable adjustment models of both conventional and collocation type is included in the paper.

  18. National Geodetic Control Stations, Geographic NAD83, NGS (2004) [geodetic_ctrl_point_la_NGS_2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data contains a set of geodetic control stations maintained by the National Geodetic Survey. Each geodetic control station in this dataset has either a precise...

  19. Reanalysis of CORS and Global GPS Data at the National Geodetic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, J.; Rohde, J. R.; Ray, J.; Cline, M.; Dillinger, W. H.; Dulaney, R. L.; Hilla, S.; Kass, W. G.

    2008-12-01

    We present current results and preliminary interpretations from an ongoing project at the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) to reanalyze Global Positioning System (GPS) data collected since 1994 at stations of the International GNSS Service (IGS) global tracking network and at stations of the U.S. Continuously Operating Reference Stations (CORS) network. Reanalysis of the global data is expected to be complete by January 2009, while the reanalysis of the CORS data will take much longer, perhaps until late 2011. The reanalysis is accomplished in two stages. The first stage is designed to obtain a consistent set of GPS satellite orbits, Earth Rotation Parameters (ERPs) and a time series of global station coordinates expressed in the current IGS Terrestrial Reference Frame, i.e., IGS05. The second stage is designed to obtain a time- series of station coordinates for the much denser CORS network. An important aspect to this two-stage approach is that a relatively uniform global network is used to determine the satellite orbits, ERPs and terrestrial frame, which are then fixed and used to position the CORS network accurately and consistently within the same framework. Both stages of the analysis use a) the PAGES software from NGS to preprocess and reduce the RINEX observations, and b) the CATREF software from Institut Géographique National to obtain regularized station coordinates and secular velocities. The CATREF software provides the added benefit of allowing weekly Helmert frame alignments to the long-term frame and detection of station discontinuities and other frame distortions in both the global and CORS solutions.

  20. Geodetic Control Information on Passive Marks: Horizontal and Vertical Geodetic Control Data for the United States - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA) Geodetic Control Information on Passive Marks

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data contains a set of geodetic control stations maintained by the National Geodetic Survey. Each geodetic control station in this dataset has either a precise...

  1. Horizontal and Vertical Geodetic Control Data for the United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data contains a set of geodetic control stations maintained by the National Geodetic Survey. Each geodetic control station in this dataset has either a precise...

  2. Basic research and data analysis for the National Geodetic Satellite program and for the Earth Surveys program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    Current research is reported on precise and accurate descriptions of the earth's surface and gravitational field and on time variations of geophysical parameters. A new computer program was written in connection with the adjustment of the BC-4 worldwide geometric satellite triangulation net. The possibility that an increment to accuracy could be transferred from a super-control net to the basic geodetic (first-order triangulation) was investigated. Coordinates of the NA9 solution were computed and were transformed to the NAD datum, based on GEOS 1 observations. Normal equations from observational data of several different systems and constraint equations were added and a single solution was obtained for the combined systems. Transformation parameters with constraints were determined, and the impact of computers on surveying and mapping is discussed.

  3. Geodetic Networks, geodetic control points within the National Spatial Reference System, Published in unknown, NGS.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Networks dataset, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of unknown. It is described as 'geodetic control points within the...

  4. Geodetic deformations in the Central-Southern Apennines (Italy) from repeated GPS surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serpelloni, E.; Baldi, P. [Bologna Univ., Bologna (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Pesci, A.; Riguzzi, F.; Anzidei, M.; Casula, G.; Galvani, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Rome (Italy)

    2001-06-01

    It was computed the horizontal strain rate field for a sector of the Central-Southern Apennines (Italy) from GPS data collected during yearly repeated campaigns performed from 1994 to 2000 on the GeoModAp (Geodynamic Modeling of the Appennines) geodetic network. Site velocities were obtained starting from the daily coordinates and covariance solutions, using a Kalman filter approach. The residual velocity field with respect to a Eurasian fixed reference frame shows two different prevalent motion trends, NE-ward for the the eastern sector of the network and NW-ward for the western one. The mean strain rate tensor, obtained from a least square inversion method, shows a significant extensional deformation (1.2 x 10{sup -}8 strain/yr) normal to the Apennine chain, in agreement with seismological and neotectonic data. On the basis of the network dimension, of about 250 km, this value gives a well constrained estimate of about 3.0 plus or minus 0.2 mm/yr of the extensional velocity oriented N55E, normal to the chain axis. The results show a transition of the strain rate field from about N-S compression in the Tyrrhenian side to about NE-SW extension toward the Adriatic, which depicts a more complex deformation pattern.

  5. Geodetic Control Points, Approx 3 mile survey grade GPS grid incorporating NGS and Davenport & Bettendorf existing control (re-occupied), Published in 2005, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Scott County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2005. It is described...

  6. Geodetic Control Points, Survey Monuments (Contact Clint Cosner 410-222-7040 or pwcosn22@aacounty.org), Published in 2003, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Anne Arundel County, OIT GIS.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2003. It is described...

  7. Geodetic Control Points, Geodetic Survey Points; s44bgc95; This dataset displays the location of bench marks fixed landmarks and monumented survey points located by geodetic survey methods for precise location or elevation determination., Published in 1995, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 1995. It is...

  8. GeodeticBenchmark_GEOMON

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The GeodeticBenchmark_GEOMON data layer consists of geodetic control monuments (points) that have a known position or spatial reference. The locations of these...

  9. The evolution of OPUS: A set of web-based GPS processing tools offered by the National Geodetic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Dr.; Mader, Dr.; Schenewerk, Dr.

    2012-04-01

    The Online Positioning User Service (OPUS) is a suite of web-based GPS processing tools that were initially developed by the National Geodetic Survey approximately eleven years ago. The first version, known as OPUS static (OPUS-S), processes L1 and L2 carrier-phase data in native receiver and RINEX formats. Datasets submitted to OPUS-S must be between two and 48 hours in duration and pass several quality control steps before being passed onto the positioning algorithm. OPUS-S was designed to select five nearby CORS to form baselines that are processed independently. The best three solutions are averaged to produce a final set of coordinates. The current version of OPUS-S has been optimized to accept and process GPS data from any location in the continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii and the Caribbean. OPUS Networks (OPUS-Net), one of the most recently developed versions and currently in beta testing, has many of the same processing characteristics and dataset requirements as OPUS-S but with one significant difference. OPUS-Net selects up to 10 IGS reference sites and three regional CORS to perform a simultaneous least squares adjustment with the user-submitted data. The CORS stations are primarily used to better estimate the troposphere while the position of the unknown station and the three CORS reference stations are determined from the more precisely known and monitored IGS reference stations. Additional enhancements to OPUS-Net are the implementation of absolute antenna patterns and ocean tides (FES2004), using reference station coordinates in IGS08 reference frame, as well as using improved phase ambiguity integer fixing and troposphere modeling (GPT and GMF a priori models). OPUS Projects, the final version of OPUS to be reviewed in this paper, is a complete web-based, GPS data processing and analysis environment. The main idea behind OPUS Projects is that one or more managers can define numerous, independent GPS projects. Each newly defined project is

  10. The Fourth Geodetic Surveying Campaign on Mt. Everest and its Adjacent Area%珠峰及邻近区域第四次大地测量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张全德; 陈俊勇; 庞尚益; 张骥; 王泽民

    2001-01-01

    The fourth geodetic surveying campaign on Mt. Everest and itsadjacent area was successfully conducted by Chinese surveyors in 1998. Its fieldwork introductions, data acquisitions, data processing methods and the final results achieved were described in this paper. A thoroughly scientific Analyse based on comparing the 4-session geodetic surveying observations which were conducted in 1998, 1992,1975 and 1966-1968 respectively shows that Qinghai-Tibet Block is still moving on its way of northeast horizontally under the motivation caused by Indian Block movement, while relative vertical movement has waving fluctuation during the entire rising process.%叙述了我国大地测量工作者于1998年对珠穆朗玛峰及邻近区域进行的第四次大规模的大地测量外业概况和取得的成果,以及数据处理方法和最终结果。经过对1998、1966-1968、1975、1992年珠峰及邻近区域四次大地测量数据综合分析,从地学方面进行研究,得出青藏块体在印度板块的推动下,仍向北东东方向运动;珠峰地区相对垂直运动在整体抬升的过程中伴有波浪式的起伏等结论。

  11. Historical Map & Chart Collection of NOAA's Nautical Charts, Hydrographic Surveys, Topographic Surveys, Geodetic Surveys, City Plans, and Civil War Battle Maps Starting from the mid 1700's

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Historical Map and Chart Collection of the Office of Coast Survey contains over 20000 historical maps and charts from the mid 1700s through the late 1900s. These...

  12. Geodetic Control Points, GPS survey was completed to create a GPS network containing 50 azimuth stations throughout the county intended to meet WisDOT First Order geometric accuracy standard (10ppm)., Published in 1996, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Wood County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Geodetic Control Points dataset current as of 1996. GPS survey was completed to create a GPS network containing 50 azimuth stations throughout the county intended to...

  13. Geodetic Control Points, Published in 2004, Jones County GIS.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2004. Data by this publisher are often provided in State...

  14. Calibration of Geodetic Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Bajtala

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of metrology and security systems of unification, correctness and standard reproducibilities belong to the preferred requirements of theory and technical practice in geodesy. Requirements on the control and verification of measured instruments and equipments increase and the importance and up-to-date of calibration get into the foreground. Calibration possibilities of length-scales (of electronic rangefinders and angle-scales (of horizontal circles of geodetic instruments. Calibration of electronic rangefinders on the linear comparative baseline in terrain. Primary standard of planar angle – optical traverse and its exploitation for calibration of the horizontal circles of theodolites. The calibration equipment of the Institute of Slovak Metrology in Bratislava. The Calibration process and results from the calibration of horizontal circles of selected geodetic instruments.

  15. 3D geodetic monitoring slope deformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiss Gabriel

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available For plenty of slope failures that can be found in Slovakia is necessary and very important their geodetic monitoring (because of their activity, reactivisations, checks. The paper gives new methodologies for these works, using 3D terrestrial survey technologies for measurements in convenient deformation networks. The design of an optimal type of deformation model for various kinds of landslides and their exact processing with an efficient testing procedure to determine the kinematics of the slope deformations are presented too.

  16. Geodesy introduction to geodetic datum and geodetic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Zhiping; Qiao, Shubo

    2014-01-01

    A full introduction to geodetic data and systems written by well-known experts in their respective fields, this book is an ideal text for courses in geodesy and geomatics covering everything from coordinate and gravimetry data to geodetic systems of all types.

  17. Chinese geodetic coordinate system 2000

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG YuanXi

    2009-01-01

    The basic strategies In establishing the Chinese geodetic coordinate system 2000 have been summarized,including the definition of the coordinate system,the structure of the terrestrial reference frame,the functional and stochastic models involved in the realization of the reference frame as well as the Improvements of the adjustment procedures.First,the fundamental frame of the coordinate system is composed of the permanent GPS tracking network in China which is integrated into the international GPS service stations by combined adjustment,in order to guarantee the consistence between the international terrestrial reference system and the Chinese geodetic coordinate system.Second,the extended frame of the coordinate system is composed of the unified 2000' national GPS network which is Integrated by 6 nationwide GPS networks with more than 2500 stations under the controlling of the fundamental frame.Third,the densified frame is composed of national astronomical geodetic network with nearly 50 thousand stations which was updated by the combined adjustment with the 2000' national GPS network,thus the datum of the national astronomical geodetic network has been unified and the precision greatly improved.By the optimal data fusion method the influences of the datum errors,systematic errors and the outliers in the separated geodetic networks are weakened in the unified Chinese geodetic coordinate frame.The significance in application of the new geodetic coordinate system and the existing problems In the reference frame are described and analyzed.

  18. Geodetic Networks, Geodetic Network (subset of State Geodetic Network, Contact Clint Cosner 410-222-7040 or pwcosn22@aacounty.org), Published in 2003, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Anne Arundel County, OIT GIS.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Networks dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2003. It is described as...

  19. The current state of the creation and modernization of national geodetic and cartographic resources in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doskocz Adam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available All official data are currently integrated and harmonized in a spatial reference system. This paper outlines a national geodetic and cartographic resources in Poland. The national geodetic and cartographic resources are an important part of the spatial information infrastructure in the European Community. They also provide reference data for other resources of Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI, including: main and detailed geodetic control networks, base maps, land and buildings registries, geodetic registries of utilities and topographic maps. This paper presents methods of producing digital map data and technical standards for field surveys, and in addition paper also presents some aspects of building Global and Regional SDI.

  20. Geodetic Control Points, Geodetic control points constructed and occupied per NGS GPS standards, Published in 2001, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Cochise County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2001. It is described...

  1. Geodetic Control Points, Published in 2008, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Sauk County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2008. Data by this...

  2. Geodetic Control Points, Wisconsin HARN, Published in 1993, Not Applicable scale, Dunn County, WI.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, published at Not Applicable scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 1993. It is described as...

  3. Geodetic Control Points, Published in 2003, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Greenwood County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2003. Data by this...

  4. Geodetic Control Points, Published in 2006, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2006. Data by this...

  5. Geodetic Control Points, ctl2005, Published in 2005, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Jasper County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2005. It is described...

  6. Geodetic Control Points, Hutchinson, KS Benchmarks created by city surveyor at that time, Published in 1980, City of Hutchinson.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 1980. It is described as 'Hutchinson, KS Benchmarks created...

  7. Geodetic Control Points, Published in 2008, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Bartow County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2008. Data by this...

  8. Geodetic Control Points, Published in 2008, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Brown County, WI.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2008. Data by this...

  9. Crowdsourced Contributions to the Nation's Geodetic Elevation Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS), a United States Department of Commerce agency, is engaged in providing the nation's fundamental positioning infrastructure - the National Spatial Reference System (NSRS) - which includes the framework for latitude, longitude, and elevation determination as well as various geodetic models, tools, and data. Capitalizing on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) technology for improved access to the nation's precise geodetic elevation infrastructure requires use of a geoid model, which relates GNSS-derived heights (ellipsoid heights) with traditional elevations (orthometric heights). NGS is facilitating the use of crowdsourced GNSS observations collected at published elevation control stations by the professional surveying, geospatial, and scientific communities to help improve NGS' geoid modeling capability. This collocation of published elevation data and newly collected GNSS data integrates together the two height systems. This effort in turn supports enhanced access to accurate elevation information across the nation, thereby benefiting all users of geospatial data. By partnering with the public in this collaborative effort, NGS is not only helping facilitate improvements to the elevation infrastructure for all users but also empowering users of NSRS with the capability to do their own high-accuracy positioning. The educational outreach facet of this effort helps inform the public, including the scientific community, about the utility of various NGS tools, including the widely used Online Positioning User Service (OPUS). OPUS plays a key role in providing user-friendly and high accuracy access to NSRS, with optional sharing of results with NGS and the public. All who are interested in helping evolve and improve the nationwide elevation determination capability are invited to participate in this nationwide partnership and to learn more about the geodetic infrastructure which is a vital component of viable spatial data for

  10. Legacy and future of Kilauea's geodetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery-Brown, E. D.; Miklius, A.

    2011-12-01

    Because of its extensive and detailed history of geodetic measurements, Kilauea is one of the best-studied if not also best-understood volcanic systems in the world. Hawaiian volcanoes have a long history of deformation observations. These observations range from native legends of Pele's underground travels, through initial measurements made by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, and finally to current ground-based and satellite observations. Many questions still remain, relating to Kilauea's dynamics, where geodetic measurements could offer fundamental insights. For example, new geodetic experiments could lead to a better understanding of the degree of magmatic and tectonic interaction, the geometries of faults at depth, the extent of offshore deformation, and the magmatic plumbing system. While it is possible to design many experiments to address these issues, we focus on three deformation targets where geodetic improvements, including finer sampling in space and time, could yield significant advancements toward understanding Kilauea's dynamics. First, by scrutinizing spatially-dense space-borne geodetic data for signs of upper east rift zone deformation and incorporating gravity and seismic data in a high resolution tomographic model, the hydraulic connection between Kilauea's summit and the rift zone could be imaged, which would provide insight into the pathways that transport magma out to the rift zones. Second, a combination of geodetic and seismic data could be used to determine the nature of possible relationships and interactions between the Hilina fault system and Kilauea's basal decollement. Such a study would have important implications for assessments of future earthquake and sector collapse hazards. Lastly, by adding seafloor geodetic measurements and seismic data to the current geodetic network on Kilauea, we could delimit the offshore extent of transient and episodic decollement deformation. In addition to multidisciplinary approaches, future geodetic

  11. Geodetic Volcano Monitoring Research in Canary Islands: Recent Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, J.; Gonzalez, P. J.; Arjona, A.; Camacho, A. G.; Prieto, J. F.; Seco, A.; Tizzani, P.; Manzo, M. R.; Lanari, R.; Blanco, P.; Mallorqui, J. J.

    2009-05-01

    The Canarian Archipelago is an oceanic island volcanic chain with a long-standing history of volcanic activity (> 40 Ma). It is located off the NW coast of the African continent, lying over a transitional crust of the Atlantic African passive margin. At least 12 eruptions have been occurred on the islands of Lanzarote, Tenerife and La Palma in the last 500 years. Volcanism manifest predominantly as basaltic strombolian monogenetic activity (whole archipelago) and central felsic volcanism (active only in Tenerife Island). We concentrate our studies in the two most active islands, Tenerife and La Palma. In these islands, we tested different methodologies of geodetic monitoring systems. We use a combination of ground- and space-based techniques. At Tenerife Island, a differential interferometric study was performed to detect areas of deformation. DInSAR detected two clear areas of deformation, using this results a survey-based GPS network was designed and optimized to control those deformations and the rest of the island. Finally, using SBAS DInSAR results weak spatial long- wavelength subsidence signals has been detected. At La Palma, the first DInSAR analysis have not shown any clear deformation, so a first time series analysis was performed detecting a clear subsidence signal at Teneguia volcano, as for Tenerife a GPS network was designed and optimized taking into account stable and deforming areas. After several years of activities, geodetic results served to study ground deformations caused by a wide variety of sources, such as changes in groundwater levels, volcanic activity, volcano-tectonics, gravitational loading, etc. These results proof that a combination of ground-based and space-based techniques is suitable tool for geodetic volcano monitoring in Canary Islands. Finally, we would like to strength that those results could have serious implications on the continuous geodetic monitoring system design and implementation for the Canary Islands which is under

  12. The geodetic numbers of graphs and digraphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-hong LU

    2007-01-01

    For every two vertices u and v in a graph G, a u-v geodesic is a shortest path between u and v. Let I(u, v) denote the set of all vertices lying on a u-v geodesic. For a vertex subset S, let I(S)denote the union of all I(u, v) for u, v ∈ S. The geodetic number g(G) of a graph G is the minimum cardinality of a set S with I(S) = V(G). For a digraph D, there is analogous terminology for the geodetic number g(D). The geodetic spectrum of a graph G, denoted by S(G), is the set of geodetic numbers of all orientations of graph G. The lower geodetic number is g-(G) = minS(G) and the upper geodetic number is g+ (G) = maxS(G). The main purpose of this paper is to study the relations among g(G), g-(G) and g+ (G) for connected graphs G. In addition, a sufficient and necessary condition for the equality of g(G) and g(G × K2) is presented, which improves a result of Chartrand, Harary and Zhang.

  13. The geodetic numbers of graphs and digraphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    For every two vertices u and v in a graph G,a u-v geodesic is a shortest path between u and v.Let I(u,v)denote the set of all vertices lying on a u-v geodesic.For a vertex subset S,let I(S) denote the union of all I(u,v)for u,v∈S.The geodetic number g(G)of a graph G is the minimum cardinality of a set S with I(S)=V(G).For a digraph D,there is analogous terminology for the geodetic number g(D).The geodetic spectrum of a graph G,denoted by S(G),is the set of geodetic numbers of all orientations of graph G.The lower geodetic number is g-(G)=minS(G)and the upper geodetic number is g+(G)=maxS(G).The main purpose of this paper is to study the relations among g(G),g-(G)and g+(G)for connected graphs G.In addition,a sufficient and necessary condition for the equality of g(G)and g(G×K2)is presented,which improves a result of Chartrand,Harary and Zhang.

  14. NOS/NGS activities to support development of radio interferometric surveying techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, W. E.; Dracup, J. F.; Hothem, L. D.; Robertson, D. S.; Strange, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    National Geodetic Survey activities towards the development of operational geodetic survey systems based on radio interferometry are reviewed. Information about the field procedures, data reduction and analysis, and the results obtained to date is presented.

  15. NGS Survey Control Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NGS Survey Control Map provides a map of the US which allows you to find and display geodetic survey control points stored in the database of the National...

  16. 1998 Harrisburg Airport Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set includes data collected in 1998 to evaluate the ability of lidar to survey airport obstructions in collaboration with NOAA National Geodetic Survey....

  17. 76 FR 77208 - Affirmation of Vertical Datum for Surveying and Mapping Activities for the Islands of St. Croix...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ...: National Geodetic Survey (NGS), National Ocean Service (NOS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric... (NOS), National Geodetic Survey (NGS), has completed the definition and implementation of VIVD09... monuments is available in digital form, from the NGS Web site:...

  18. Geodetic and seismological investigation in the Ionian area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Riguzzi

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Geodetic and seismic evidence of crustal deformations in the Ionian area are shown in this paper. The Ionian GPS network, composed of nine sites crossing the Ionian Sea from Calabria, Southern Italy, to Northwestern Greece, was established and surveyed in 1991, 1994, 1995 within the framework of the TYRGEONET project (Anzidei et al., 1996. In 1996 a return campaign was carried out after the occurrence of seismic activity in 1995. The displacement pattern obtained for the Greek side of the network agrees well with those previously displayed, both in magnitude and direction, confirming a mean displacement rate of about 1-2 cm1/yr. The same agreement is not found for the Italian side of the network, where no significant deformations were detected between 1994 and 1996. Seismic deformation was also studied for the same area, starting from the moment tensors of events which occurred in the last 20 years with magnitude greater than 5.0; evident similarity with the displacement field exhibited by the Greek side of the Ionian Sea by geodetic surveys was inferred. On the contrary, the motion detected for the Italian area cannot be simply related to seismic activity.

  19. Glaciological and geodetic mass balance of ten long-term glaciers in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Andreassen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The glaciological and geodetic methods provide independent observations of glacier mass balance. The glaciological method measures the surface mass balance, on a seasonal or annual basis, whereas the geodetic method measures surface, internal and basal mass balances, over a period of years or decades. In this paper, we reanalyse the 10 glaciers with long-term mass balance series in Norway. The reanalysis includes (i homogenisation of both glaciological and geodetic observation series, (ii uncertainty assessment, (iii estimates of generic differences including estimates of internal and basal melt, (iv validation, and (v partly calibration of mass balance series. This study comprises an extensive set of data (454 mass balance years, 34 geodetic surveys and large volumes of supporting data, such as metadata and field notes. In total, 21 periods of data were compared and the results show discrepancies between the glaciological and geodetic methods for some glaciers, which in part are attributed to internal and basal ablation and in part to inhomogeneity in the data processing. Deviations were smaller than 0.2 m w.e. a−1 for 12 out of 21 periods. Calibration was applied to seven out of 21 periods, as the deviations were larger than the uncertainty. The reanalysed glaciological series shows a more consistent signal of glacier change over the period of observations than previously reported: six glaciers had a significant mass loss (14–22 m w.e. and four glaciers were nearly in balance. All glaciers have lost mass after year 2000. More research is needed on the sources of uncertainty, to reduce uncertainties and adjust the observation programmes accordingly. The study confirms the value of carrying out independent high-quality geodetic surveys to check and correct field observations.

  20. Geodetic Networks, Lafayette County High Accuracy Resolution Network, Published in 2005, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Lafayette County Land Records.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Networks dataset, published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2005. It is described as...

  1. DGP cosmology from rigid geodetic brane gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Cordero, Rubén; Molgado, Alberto; Rojas, Efrain

    2011-01-01

    We explore the cosmological implications provided by an effective geometrical action describing a codimension-one rigid brane embedded in a 5D fixed Minkowski spacetime, i.e., allowing for a term added to the geodetic brane action which depends on the extrinsic curvature of the worldvolume. In the geodetic brane gravity action we accommodate the rigidity of the brane through a linear term in the extrinsic curvature swept out by the brane. We study the resulting geodetic type equation of motion. Within a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker framework, we obtain a generalized Friedmann equation describing the associated cosmological evolution which in turn allowed us to illustrate explicitly the linkage between the geodetic brane theory and the rigidity content of this sort of branelike universes. We observe that, when the radiation-like energy contribution from the extra dimension is vanishing, this effective model leads to a self-(non-self)-accelerated expansion of the universe in dependence on the nature of the rigidi...

  2. An Autonomous, Low Cost Platform for Seafloor Geodetic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericksen, T.; Foster, J. H.; Bingham, B. S.

    2013-12-01

    The high cost of acquiring geodetic data from the sea floor has limited the observations available to help us understand and model the behavior of seafloor geodetic processes. To address this problem, the Pacific GPS Facility at the University of Hawaii is developing a cost effective approach for accurately measuring short-term vertical motions of the seafloor and maintaining a continuous long-term record of seafloor pressure without the requirement for costly ship time. There is a recognized need to vastly increase our underwater geodetic observing capacity. Most of the largest recorded earthquakes and most devastating tsunamis are generated at subduction zones underwater. Similarly, many volcanoes are partly (e.g. Santorini) or completely (e.g. Loihi) submerged, and are not well observed and understood. Furthermore, landslide features ring many ocean basins, and huge debris deposits surround many volcanic oceanic islands. Our approach will lower the cost of collecting sea-floor geodetic data, reducing the barriers preventing us from acquiring the information we need to observe and understand these types of structures and provide a direct societal benefit in improving hazard assessment. The capability is being developed by equipping one of the University of Hawaii Wave Gliders with an integrated acoustic telemetry package, a dual frequency geodetic-grade Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, processing unit, and cellular communications. The Wave Glider will interrogate high accuracy pressure sensors on the sea floor to maintain a near-continuous stream of pressure and temperature data, but seafloor pressure data includes contribution from a variety of sources and on its own may not provide the accuracy required for geodetic investigations. Independent measurements of sea surface pressure and sea surface height can be used to remove these contributions from the observed sea floor pressure timeseries. We will integrate our seafloor pressure measurements with air

  3. Considerations for improved Integration of Geodetic Techiques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, K. U.

    2012-04-01

    The most demanding goal for the GGOS initiative is the definition of station positions to an accuracy of 1 mm and the corresponding velocities to 0.1 mm/year. Fundamental stations are corner stones for the geodetic reference frames because they are collocating and combining the relevant measurement techniques. However, this requires unprecedented control over local ties, intra- and inter- technique biases. The unperturbed distribution of frequency is an important requirement for all the space geodetic techniques. The distribution of time without jitter has importance for laser time transfer applications such as T2L2 and in the future ELT with ACES on the ISS. The timing system of the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell is based on a radio frequency (5 MHz) distribution scheme and a grid of coaxial cables. Uncontrolable fluctuations in the electrical ground potential and variations in the dielectric properties of these transmission lines give rise to jitter and most likely even small systematic measurement errors. Modern frequency transfer concepts differ from these earlier methods by employing active delay compensation by utilizing control loops in tight (high bandwidth) feedback systems. Furthermore they work on much higher frequencies from hundreds of megahertz up to the optical regime. The definition of a new timing system for Wettzell based on compensated signal transmission lines and the evaluation of the end to end properties of such concepts is work in progress for the coming years with the aim to create a truly common clock for all space geodetic techniques on the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell. This talk will introduce the important aspects and the potential of this next generation of timing systems.

  4. Historical Review of Astro-Geodetic Observations in Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrizovic, V.; Delcev, S.; Vasilic, V.; Gucevic, J.

    2008-10-01

    Astro-geodetic determinations of vertical deflections in Serbia began during the first years of 20th century. The first field works were led by S. Bo\\vsković. After the 2nd World War, Military Geographic Institute, Department of Geodesy from the Faculty of Civil Engineering, and Federal Geodetic Directorate continued the determinations, needed for reductions of terrestrial geodetic measurements and the astro-geodetic geoid determination. Last years improvements of the astro-geodetic methods are carried out in the area of implementing modern measurement equipment and technologies.

  5. 75 FR 57263 - New Policy Announcing That Traditional Horizontal Survey Projects Performed With Terrestrial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    ... Into NGS Databases AGENCY: National Geodetic Survey (NGS), National Ocean Service (NOS), National..., 2011 the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) will cease accepting data, all orders and classes, from... September 1984 ``Standards and Specifications for Geodetic Control Networks'' for inclusion into the...

  6. The AuScope Geodetic VLBI Array

    CERN Document Server

    Lovell, J E J; Reid, P B; McCulloch, P M; Baynes, B E; Dickey, J M; Shabala, S S; Watson, C S; Titov, O; Ruddick, R; Twilley, R; Reynolds, C; Tingay, S J; Shield, P; Adada, R; Ellingsen, S P; Morgan, J S; Bignall, H E; 10.1007/s00190-013-0626-3

    2013-01-01

    The AuScope geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry array consists of three new 12 m radio telescopes and a correlation facility in Australia. The telescopes at Hobart (Tasmania), Katherine (Northern Territory) and Yarragadee (Western Australia) are co-located with other space geodetic techniques including Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and gravity infrastructure, and in the case of Yarragadee, Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) facilities. The correlation facility is based in Perth (Western Australia). This new facility will make significant contributions to improving the densification of the International Celestial Reference Frame in the Southern Hemisphere, and subsequently enhance the International Terrestrial Reference Frame through the ability to detect and mitigate systematic error. This, combined with the simultaneous densification of the GNSS network across Australia will enable the improved measurement of intrapl...

  7. Analysis of variance of an underdetermined geodetic displacement problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darby, D.

    1982-06-01

    It has been suggested recently that point displacements in a free geodetic network traversing a strike-slip fault may be estimated from repeated surveys by minimizing only those displacement components normal to the strike. It is desirable to justify this procedure. We construct, from estimable quantities, a deformation parameter which is an F-statistic of the type occurring in the analysis of variance of linear models not of full rank. A test of its significance provides the criterion to justify the displacement solution. It is also interesting to study its behaviour as one varies the supposed strike of the fault. Justification of a displacement solution using data from a strike-slip fault is found, but not for data from a rift valley. The technique can be generalized to more complex patterns of deformation such as those expected near the end-zone of a fault in a dislocation model.

  8. Determination of Displacement Geodetic Network Points, Fredericton Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Vrečko, Anja

    2010-01-01

    This graduate thesis deals with the Fredericton approach for determining displacements in geodetic networks. In the introduction strain analysis is presented from a geodetic point of view. Special emphasis is placed on the problem of geodetic datum. It is followed by a theoretical explanation of the method in five steps: adjustment of observation for each epoch, preliminary identification of deformation models, estimation of deformation parameters, checking the deformation models and selectin...

  9. Complex Geodetic Research in Ukrainian Antarctic Station "Academician Vernadsky" (Years 2002 - 2005, 2013-2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyak, Kornyliy; Hlotov, Volodymyr; Holubinka, Yuriy; Marusazh, Khrystyna

    2016-06-01

    In this paper is given an information about complex geodetic research in Ukrainian Antarctic station "Academician Vernadsky". Research were carried by Lviv polytechnic scientists, during Antarctic expeditions in years 2002 - 2005, 2013, 2014. Main objectives of the studies were: (a) study of the islands glaciers surface volumes changes in Antarctic archipelago and Antarctic Peninsula using terestrial laser scaning and digital terrestrial stereophotogrammetry survey; (b) investigation of Penola strain tectonic fault, using the results of precise GNSS observations.

  10. Geodetic works on the construction of cooling tower of TEŠ 6

    OpenAIRE

    Kolarič, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    The thesis discusses with geodetic works on the construction of cooling tower of sixth block in Šoštanj thermal power plant. It presents briefly the thermal power plant and describes the process of construction of the cooling tower. The establishment of basic surveying network stakeout is explained. It is also contains a full description of the stakeout procedures. Paper states the requirements and accuracy of stakeout and describes practical examples. It shows the concrete implementation ...

  11. Geodetic leveling data used to define historical height changes between Tonopah Junction and Las Vegas, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, T.D.

    1992-12-31

    This report documents geodetic leveling data for a survey route following US Highway 95 from Tonopah Junction, approximately 50 km west of Tonopah, Nevada, to Las Vegas, Nevada. The survey route passes immediately south of the potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada. Comparisons among the results of the several repeated levelings along this survey route provide a partial basis for evaluating contemporary crustal deformation patterns in the vicinity of the Yucca Mountain site and the relation between any such deformation and geologic structures known or suspected to have been active during Quaternary time.

  12. Geodetic and Geodynamic Studies at Department of Geodesy and Geodetic Astronomy Wut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brzeziński Aleksander

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents current issues and research work conducted in the Department of Geodesy and Geodetic Astronomy at the Faculty of Geodesy and Cartography at Warsaw University of Technology. It contains the most important directions of research in the fields of physical geodesy, satellite measurement techniques, GNSS meteorology, geodynamic studies, electronic measurement techniques and terrain information systems.

  13. Geodetic sensor systems and sensor networks: positioning and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, S.; Grejner-Brzezinska, D.; Retscher, G.; Santos, M.; Ding, X.; Gao, Y.; Jin, S.

    2009-01-01

    This contribution focuses on geodetic sensor systems and sensor networks for positioning and applications. The key problems in this area will be addressed together with an overview of applications. Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and other geodetic techniques play a central role in many a

  14. Geodetic sensor systems and sensor networks: positioning and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, S.; Grejner-Brzezinska, D.; Retscher, G.; Santos, M.; Ding, X.; Gao, Y.; Jin, S.

    2009-01-01

    This contribution focuses on geodetic sensor systems and sensor networks for positioning and applications. The key problems in this area will be addressed together with an overview of applications. Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and other geodetic techniques play a central role in many

  15. GINFEST: Geodetic Intercomparison Network for Evaluating Space Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, Vidal

    Details are given of a geodetic network connecting the major radio telescopes and SLR facilities in Western and Central Europe, which is to be used in a co-location exercise involving VLBI, CERI, SLR and GPS observations, with the aim of evaluating the relative accuracies and system biases of these geodetic space observation techniques.

  16. Using geodetic VLBI to test Standard-Model Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hees, Aurélien; Lambert, Sébastien; Le Poncin-Lafitte, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    The modeling of the relativistic delay in geodetic techniques is primordial to get accurate geodetic products. And geodetic techniques can also be used to measure the relativistic delay and get constraints on parameters describing the relativity theory. The effective field theory framework called the Standard-Model Extension (SME) has been developed in order to systematically parametrize hypothetical violations of Lorentz symmetry (in the Standard Model and in the gravitational sector). In terms of light deflexion by a massive body like the Sun, one can expect a dependence in the elongation angle different from GR. In this communication, we use geodetic VLBI observations of quasars made in the frame of the permanent geodetic VLBI monitoring program to constrain the first SME coefficient. Our results do not show any deviation from GR and they improve current constraints on both GR and SME parameters.

  17. Geodetic Control Points, Third order class 1 GPS for section corners about 100 resurveyed per year, Published in 2013, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Portage County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2013. It is described...

  18. Radio source stability and geodetic VLBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattano, César; Lambert, Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    The observation of the Earth's rotation by VLBI is conditioned by the celestial reference frame that should be as stable as possible. The selection of the most stable sources therefore constitutes a major step in the construction of a celestial reference frame since their stability prevents time deformation of the axes with time. The assessment of astrometric stability, i.e., the time stability the radiocenter location as detected by the VLBI, is one of the methods that were used in previous ICRF realizations (works of M. Feissel-Vernier and ICRF2). We think the same method should be addressed for the construction of the ICRF3. We analyzed the radio source time series obtained from the analysis of the data from the permanent geodetic VLBI monitoring program of the IVS. We used several utils based on basic statistics and more advanced methods (Allan variance) in order to provide a preliminary classification of sources.

  19. Height bias and scale effect induced by antenna gravitational deformations in geodetic VLBI data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarti, Pierguido; Abbondanza, Claudio; Petrov, Leonid; Negusini, Monia

    2011-01-01

    The impact of signal path variations (SPVs) caused by antenna gravitational deformations on geodetic very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) results is evaluated for the first time. Elevation-dependent models of SPV for Medicina and Noto (Italy) telescopes were derived from a combination of terrestrial surveying methods to account for gravitational deformations. After applying these models in geodetic VLBI data analysis, estimates of the antenna reference point positions are shifted upward by 8.9 and 6.7 mm, respectively. The impact on other parameters is negligible. To simulate the impact of antenna gravitational deformations on the entire VLBI network, lacking measurements for other telescopes, we rescaled the SPV models of Medicina and Noto for other antennas according to their size. The effects of the simulations are changes in VLBI heights in the range [-3, 73] mm and a net scale increase of 0.3-0.8 ppb. The height bias is larger than random errors of VLBI position estimates, implying the possibility of significant scale distortions related to antenna gravitational deformations. This demonstrates the need to precisely measure gravitational deformations of other VLBI telescopes, to derive their precise SPV models and to apply them in routine geodetic data analysis.

  20. Density assumptions for converting geodetic glacier volume change to mass change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huss

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The geodetic method is widely used for assessing changes in the mass balance of mountain glaciers. However, comparison of repeated digital elevation models only provides a glacier volume change that must be converted to a change in mass using a density assumption or model. This study investigates the use of a constant factor for the volume-to-mass conversion based on a firn compaction model applied to simplified glacier geometries with idealized climate forcing, and two glaciers with long-term mass balance series. It is shown that the "density" of geodetic volume change is not a constant factor and is systematically smaller than ice density in most cases. This is explained by the accretion/removal of low-density firn layers, and changes in the firn density profile with positive/negative mass balance. Assuming a value of 850 ± 60 kg m−3 to convert volume change to mass change is appropriate for a wide range of conditions. For short time intervals (≤3 yr, periods with limited volume change, and/or changing mass balance gradients, the conversion factor can however vary from 0–2000 kg m−3 and beyond, which requires caution when interpreting glacier mass changes based on geodetic surveys.

  1. Density assumptions for converting geodetic glacier volume change to mass change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huss

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The geodetic method is widely used for assessing changes in the mass balance of mountain glaciers. However, comparison of repeated digital elevation models only provides a glacier volume change that must be converted to a change in mass using a density assumption. This study investigates this conversion factor based on a firn compaction model applied to simplified glacier geometries with idealized climate forcing, and two glaciers with long-term mass balance series. It is shown that the "density" of geodetic volume change is not a constant factor and is systematically smaller than ice density in most cases. This is explained by the accretion/removal of low-density firn layers, and changes in the firn density profile with positive/negative mass balance. Assuming a value of 850 ± 60 kg m−3 to convert volume change to mass change is appropriate for a wide range of conditions. For short time intervals (≤3 yr, periods with limited volume change, and/or changing mass balance gradients, the conversion factor can however vary from 0–2000 kg m−3 and beyond which requires caution when interpreting glacier mass changes based on geodetic surveys.

  2. Geodetic Control Points - Multi-State Control Point Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — The Multi-State Control Point Database (MCPD) is a database of geodetic and mapping control covering Idaho and Montana. The control were submitted by registered land...

  3. Geodetic Control Points - Multi-State Control Point Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — The Multi-State Control Point Database (MCPD) is a database of geodetic and mapping control covering Idaho and Montana. The control were submitted by registered land...

  4. Geodetic Control Points - BENCHMARKS_GPS_NOAA_IN: Geodetic Control Points with GPS Locations in Indiana (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — The following is excerpted from the metadata named "Horizontal and Vertical Geodetic Control Data" provided by NOAA: "This data contains a set of geodetic control...

  5. Datum maintenance of the main Egyptian geodetic control networks by utilizing Precise Point Positioning "PPP" technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabah, Mostafa; Elmewafey, Mahmoud; Farahan, Magda H.

    2016-06-01

    A geodetic control network is the wire-frame or the skeleton on which continuous and consistent mapping, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and surveys are based. Traditionally, geodetic control points are established as permanent physical monuments placed in the ground and precisely marked, located, and documented. With the development of satellite surveying methods and their availability and high degree of accuracy, a geodetic control network could be established by using GNSS and referred to an international terrestrial reference frame used as a three-dimensional geocentric reference system for a country. Based on this concept, in 1992, the Egypt Survey Authority (ESA) established two networks, namely High Accuracy Reference Network (HARN) and the National Agricultural Cadastral Network (NACN). To transfer the International Terrestrial Reference Frame to the HARN, the HARN was connected with four IGS stations. The processing results were 1:10,000,000 (Order A) for HARN and 1:1,000,000 (Order B) for NACN relative network accuracy standard between stations defined in ITRF1994 Epoch1996. Since 1996, ESA did not perform any updating or maintaining works for these networks. To see how non-performing maintenance degrading the values of the HARN and NACN, the available HARN and NACN stations in the Nile Delta were observed. The Processing of the tested part was done by CSRS-PPP Service based on utilizing Precise Point Positioning "PPP" and Trimble Business Center "TBC". The study shows the feasibility of Precise Point Positioning in updating the absolute positioning of the HARN network and its role in updating the reference frame (ITRF). The study also confirmed the necessity of the absent role of datum maintenance of Egypt networks.

  6. Complex Geodetic Research in Ukrainian Antarctic Station “Academician Vernadsky” (Years 2002 - 2005, 2013-2014)

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In this paper is given an information about complex geodetic research in Ukrainian Antarctic station “Academician Vernadsky”. Research were carried by Lviv polytechnic scientists, during Antarctic expeditions in years 2002 - 2005, 2013, 2014. Main objectives of the studies were: (a) study of the islands glaciers surface volumes changes in Antarctic archipelago and Antarctic Peninsula using terestrial laser scaning and digital terrestrial stereophotogrammetry survey; (b) investigation of Penol...

  7. Complex Geodetic Research in Ukrainian Antarctic Station “Academician Vernadsky” (Years 2002 - 2005, 2013-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tretyak Kornyliy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is given an information about complex geodetic research in Ukrainian Antarctic station “Academician Vernadsky”. Research were carried by Lviv polytechnic scientists, during Antarctic expeditions in years 2002 - 2005, 2013, 2014. Main objectives of the studies were: (a study of the islands glaciers surface volumes changes in Antarctic archipelago and Antarctic Peninsula using terestrial laser scaning and digital terrestrial stereophotogrammetry survey; (b investigation of Penola strain tectonic fault, using the results of precise GNSS observations.

  8. The SCEC geodetic transient detection validation exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Rowena B.; Murray, Jessica R.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade the number and size of continuously operating Global Positioning System (GPS) networks has grown substantially worldwide. A steadily increasing volume of freely available GPS measurements, combined with the application of new approaches for mining these data for signals of interest, has led to the identification of a large and diverse collection of time‐varying Earth processes. One phenomenon that has been observed is transient fault slip (also termed slow slip events or silent earthquakes) occurring over time spans of days to years (e.g., Linde et al., 1996; Hirose et al., 1999; Dragert et al., 2001; Miller et al., 2002; Kostoglodov et al., 2003; Douglas et al., 2005; Shelly et al., 2006; Ide et al., 2007; Lohman and McGuire, 2007; Schwartz and Rokosky, 2007; Szeliga et al., 2008). Such events have been widely observed in subduction zones but are also found in other tectonic settings (Linde et al., 1996; Cervelli et al., 2002; Murray and Segall, 2005; Lohman and McGuire, 2007; Montgomery‐Brown et al., 2009; Shelly, 2010; and references therein). Although retrospective study of slow‐slip events using geodetic observations is driving the formulation of new models for fault‐zone behavior and constitutive laws (e.g., Lapusta et al., 2000; Liu and Rice, 2007; Lapusta and Liu, 2009; Segall and Bradley, 2012a), much of the research on near‐real‐time detection and characterization of anomalous behaviors along fault zones has focused solely on the use of seismic tremor (e.g., Rogers and Dragert, 2003; Shelly et al., 2006; Ito et al., 2007).

  9. A Geodetic View on Isostatic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göttl, Franziska; Rummel, Reiner

    2009-09-01

    Before the background of more accurate and denser gravity data it is worthwhile to reassess geodetic isostasy. Currently, in geodesy isostatic models are primarily applied to gravity reduction as needed by geoid and gravity modeling. The selection of the isostatic model is based on four criteria: Isostatically reduced gravity anomalies should be (1) geophysically meaningful, (2) easy to compute, (3) small, smooth and therefore easy to interpolate and (4) the indirect effect, i.e. the change of potential and gravity due to isostatic mass replacement, should be small. In this study we analyze free air anomalies as well as isostatic anomalies based on the Airy-Heiskanen model and on the Pratt-Hayford model in regard to these criteria. Several facts suggest that free air anomalies are the most realistic type of isostatic anomalies. They reflect the actual isostatic compensation, are easy to compute and their indirect effect is negligibly small. However, they are not smooth due to the fact that local topographic loads are only partially compensated. Smoothness can be achieved by introducing either a mathematical low-pass filter or a hydrostatic isostatic model, such as the Airy-Heiskanen or the Pratt-Hayford model. In both cases the resulting isostatically reduced gravity anomalies fulfill all requirements. In order to improve the numerical efficiency, a new mathematical description of the Pratt-Hayford model is formulated. The level of smoothing with respect to free air anomalies is analyzed in global and regional contexts. It turns out that the mechanism of mass compensation in regions of large topographic loads is better described by the Airy-Heiskanen model, whereas the Pratt-Hayford model is more suitable for regions of deep ocean trenches.

  10. The Australian Geodetic Observing Program. Current Status and Future Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, G.; Dawson, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decade, the Australian government has through programs like AuScope, the Asia Pacific Reference Frame (APREF), and the Pacific Sea Level Monitoring (PSLM) Project made a significant contribution to the Global Geodetic Observing Program. In addition to supporting the national research priorities, this contribution is justified by Australia's growing economic dependence on precise positioning to underpin efficient transportation, geospatial data management, and industrial automation (e.g., robotic mining and precision agriculture) and the consequent need for the government to guarantee provision of precise positioning products to the Australian community. It is also well recognised within Australia that there is an opportunity to exploit our near unique position as being one of the few regions in the world to see all new and emerging satellite navigation systems including Galileo (Europe), GPS III (USA), GLONASS (Russia), Beidou (China), QZSS (Japan) and IRNSS (India). It is in this context that the Australian geodetic program will build on earlier efforts and further develop its key geodetic capabilities. This will include the creation of an independent GNSS analysis capability that will enable Australia to contribute to the International GNSS Service (IGS) and an upgrade of key geodetic infrastructure including the national VLBI and GNSS arrays. This presentation will overview the significant geodetic activities undertaken by the Australian government and highlight its future plans.

  11. Experiences in set-up and usage of a geodetic real-time differential correction network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sven; Jahn, Cord-Hinrich

    2000-10-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are commonly used for geodetic and land surveying applications. The stand alone accuracy provided by these GNSS are insufficient for the majority of these operations (GPS, 1995), therefore some form of differential correction method is required. Accordingly, the state survey offices of Germany have installed a differential correction service for geodetic applications. Code- and phase-corrections are broadcast in the VHF-band using the RTCM V2.1 format (RTCM, 1994). One major problem is that the accuracy depends on the distance to a reference station (length of baseline) because of residual orbit and atmospheric biases. To achieve a more precise solution, a number of reference stations are connected together to form a network. Within this network these influences are computed and a set of "area correction parameters" are also transmitted in RTCM message Type 59. Field trials and measurements have confirmed the high accuracy of this service. This paper describes the system itself, investigations of communication methods as well as site planning. In addition measurements from field trials will be presented to demonstrate the high accuracy in a real-time environment.

  12. Using the Nordic Geodetic Observing System for land uplift studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordman, M.; Poutanen, M.; Kairus, A.; Virtanen, J.

    2014-07-01

    Geodetic observing systems have been planned and developed during the last decade. An ideal observing system consists of a network of geodetic observing stations with several techniques at the same site, publicly accessible databases, and as a product delivers data time series, combination of techniques or some other results obtained from the data sets. Globally, there is the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS), and there are ongoing attempts to create also regional observing systems. In this paper we introduce one regional system, the Nordic Geodetic Observing System (NGOS) hosted by the Nordic Geodetic Commission (NKG). Data availability and accessibility are one of the major issues today. We discuss in general data-related topics, and introduce a pilot database project of NGOS. As a demonstration of the use of such a database, we apply it for postglacial rebound studies in the Fennoscandian area. We compare land uplift values from three techniques, GNSS, tide gauges and absolute gravity, with the Nordic Geodetic Commission NKG2005LU land uplift model for Fennoscandia. The purpose is to evaluate the data obtained from different techniques and different sources and get the most reliable values for the uplift using publicly available data. The primary aim of observing systems will be to produce data and other products needed by multidisciplinary projects, such as Upper Mantle Dynamics and Quaternary Climate in Cratonic Areas (DynaQlim) or the European Plate Observing System (EPOS), but their needs may currently exceed the scope of an existing observing system. We discuss what requirements the projects pose to observing systems and their development. To make comparisons between different studies possible and reliable, the researcher should document what they have in detail, either in appendixes, supplementary material or some other available format.

  13. The University, the Market, and the Geodetic Engineer or

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubkjær, Erik

    2002-01-01

    of universities have changed profoundly, largely due to an increased emphasis on market norms. The changes within university teaching of geodetic engineers may be seen from the above perspective. Several fora for deliberations on the education exist, including the Commission 2 of the International Federation...... project, which concerned the education of geodetic engineers in Slovenia. The body of the paper presents a selection of ideas that shaped the university through the centuries, with a view to balance the present interest in advancing market-directed behaviour....

  14. Geodetic Leveling for Back Bay NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the project is to identify existing or establish new (as needed) survey elevation benchmarks for the purpose of providing accurate orthometric heights...

  15. Geodetic Leveling for Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the project is to identify existing or establish new (as needed) survey elevation benchmarks for the purpose of providing accurate orthometric heights...

  16. An algorithm for determination of geodetic path for application in long-range acoustic propagation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, T.V.R.; Sivakholundu, K.M.; Navelkar, G.S.; Somayajulu, Y.K.; Murty, C.S.

    A computer program has been developed for the construction of geodetic path between two points on the spheroidal surface for application in long range acoustic propagation in the ocean. Geodetic equations have integrated numerically upto...

  17. International Collaborations Fostering Data Discovery and Access of Geodetic Data for the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meertens, C. M.; Boler, F. M.; Miller, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    UNAVCO community investigators are actively engaged in using space and terrestrial geodetic techniques to study earthquake processes, mantle properties, active magmatic systems, plate tectonics, plate boundary zone deformation, intraplate deformation, glacial isostatic adjustment, and hydrologic and atmospheric processes. Since the first GPS field projects were conducted over thirty years ago, these science investigations and the UNAVCO constituency as a whole have been international and collaborative in scope and participation. Collaborations were driven by the nature of the scientific problems being addressed, the capability of the technology to make precise measurements over global scales, and inherent technical necessity for sharing of GPS tracking data across national boundaries. The International GNSS Service (IGS) was formed twenty years ago as a voluntary federation to share GPS data from now hundreds of locations around the globe to facilitate realization of global reference frames, ties to regional surveys, precise orbits, and to establish and improve best practices in analysis and infrastructure. Recently, however, numbers of regional stations have grown to the tens of thousands, typically with data that are difficult to access. UNAVCO has been working to help remove technical barriers by providing open source tools such as the Geodetic Seamless Archive Centers software to facilitate data sharing and discovery and by developing DataWorks software to manage network data. Data web services also provide the framework for UNAVCO contributions to multi-technique, inter-disciplinary, and integrative activities such as CooPEUS, GEO Supersites, EarthScope, and EarthCube. We will discuss some of UNAVCO's experiences with building and maintaining international collaborations, processes for defining and evolving best practices, technological approaches for sharing and attribution of geodetic data, and challenges to open data access.

  18. New Developments in Geodetic Data Management Systems for Fostering International Collaborations in the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meertens, Charles; Boler, Fran; Miller, M. Meghan

    2015-04-01

    UNAVCO community investigators are actively engaged in using space and terrestrial geodetic techniques to study earthquake processes, mantle properties, active magmatic systems, plate tectonics, plate boundary zone deformation, intraplate deformation, glacial isostatic adjustment, and hydrologic and atmospheric processes. The first GPS field projects were conducted over thirty years ago, and from the beginning these science investigations and the UNAVCO constituency as a whole have been international and collaborative in scope and participation. Collaborations were driven by the nature of the scientific problems being addressed, the capability of the technology to make precise measurements over global scales, and inherent technical necessity for sharing of GPS tracking data across national boundaries. The International GNSS Service (IGS) was formed twenty years ago as a voluntary federation to share GPS data from now hundreds of locations around the globe to facilitate realization of global reference frames, ties to regional surveys, precise orbits, and to establish and improve best practices in analysis and infrastructure. Recently, however, numbers of regional stations have grown to the tens of thousands, often with data that are difficult to access. UNAVCO has been working to help remove technical barriers by providing open source tools such as the Geodetic Seamless Archive Centers software to facilitate cross-project data sharing and discovery and by developing Dataworks software to manage network data. Data web services also provide the framework for UNAVCO contributions to multi-technique, inter-disciplinary, and integrative activities such as CoopEUS, GEO Supersites, EarthScope, and EarthCube. Within the geodetic community, metadata standards and data exchange formats have been developed and evolved collaboratively through the efforts of global organizations such as the IGS. A new generation of metadata and data exchange formats, as well as the software

  19. Dynamics of the Greenland Ice Sheet and Icelandic Glaciers in the 20th Century Using Geodetic Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Niels Jákup

    The main focus of this thesis is on geodetic methods of estimating mass change of the GrIS, mainly through photogrammetric processing of historical aerial photographs, which are used to produce a Greenland-wide digital elevation model for the years 1978-1987. Photogrammetric stereo-models are also...... by bedrock geometry. It is revealed that dynamic ice loss recently seen in the southeast and northwest GrIS also occurred in the northwest between 1985 and 1993, highlighting the difficulty of capturing these events in mass balance models. Extending the record back to the LIA, the results show...... and after its 1963/1964 surge. Combined with field-surveyed geodetic control and a digital map of landforms, DEMs of Difference are produced and analysed on a landform and landsystems level. Large volumes of sediment was mobilized during the surge, of which the subglacial environment accounts for two...

  20. Geodetic measurement of tectonic deformation in the southern Alps and Provence, France, 1947-1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferhat, Gilbert; Feigl, Kurt L.; Ritz, Jean-François; Souriau, Annie

    1998-06-01

    Active deformation at the boundary between the Eurasia and Africa plates varies in style. The belt between the Alpine mountain range and the Mediterranean Sea, for example, differs markedly in its western and eastern parts. In the western part, around southeast France, the mountains are higher, but the seismicity lower, than in the eastern part, around northern Italy and Greece. Yet the inter-plate convergence rate of 6 mm/yr varies by less than 15% between these two areas. To better understand the behaviour of this complex plate boundary, we use geodesy to map the spatial distribution of the deformation. In this paper, we focus on southeast France, a tectonic crossroads between three different domains (Alps, Ligurian Sea, and Massif Central) which exhibits a moderate level of seismicity. Here, the geodetic measurements imply low rates of horizontal deformation. By combining historical triangulation measurements mostly from 1947 to 1983 with Global Positioning System (GPS) surveys in 1993 and 1994, we estimate the rate of angular shear in triangular subnetworks covering the study area. The estimated strain rates in thirteen of nineteen triangles are smaller than their (1 standard deviation) uncertainties of about 0.1 microradian/yr. This value bounds the rate of deformation for a 100-km wide zone in Provence, between Marseilles to the south and the Ventoux massif to the north. The geodetic estimates place an upper bound of 1 to 2 mm/yr on the slip rates of two seismically active structures, the Durance fault and the Nı̂mes fault, assuming a fault zone ˜20 km wide in each case. We also find strain rates as high as 0.20±0.07 microradian/yr in three subnetworks near the epicentre of the magnitude 5.3 Haute-Ubaye earthquake in 1959, in a region which includes the higher summits. This may be interpreted either as pure shear with compression oriented NE-SW across this region or right-lateral simple shear along NNW-SSE-trending faults. Given that this earthquake is

  1. The Contribution of the Geodetic Community (WG4) to EPOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, R. M. S.; Bastos, L. C.; Bruyninx, C.; D'Agostino, N.; Dousa, J.; Ganas, A.; Lidberg, M.; Nocquet, J.-M.

    2012-04-01

    WG4 - "EPOS Geodetic Data and Infrastructure" is the Working Group of the EPOS project responsible to define and prepare the integration of the existing Pan-European Geodetic Infrastructures into a unique future consistent infrastructure that supports the European Geosciences, which is the ultimate goal of the EPOS project. The WG4 is formed by representatives of the participating EPOS countries and from EUREF (European Reference Frame), which also ensures the inclusion and the contact with countries that formally are not part of the current phase of EPOS. In reality, the fact that Europe is formed by many countries (having different laws and policies) lacking an infrastructure similar to UNAVCO (which concentrates the effort of the local geo-science community) raises the difficulties to create a common geodetic infrastructure serving not only the entire geo-science community, but also many other areas of great social-economic impact. The benefits of the creation of such infrastructure (shared and easily accessed by all) are evident in order to optimize the existing and future geodetic resources. This presentation intends to detail the work being produced within the working group WG4 related with the definition of strategies towards the implementation of the best solutions that will permit to the end-users, and in particular geo-scientists, to access the geodetic data, derived solutions, and associated metadata using transparent and uniform processes. Discussed issues include the access to high-rate data in near real-time, storage and backup of historical and future data, the sustainability of the networks in order to achieve long-term stability in the observation infrastructure, seamless access to the data, open data policies, and processing tools.

  2. Initial Results Obtained with the First TWIN VLBI Radio Telescope at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüler, Torben; Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Plötz, Christian; Neidhardt, Alexander; Bertarini, Alessandra; Bernhart, Simone; la Porta, Laura; Halsig, Sebastian; Nothnagel, Axel

    2015-07-30

    Geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) uses radio telescopes as sensor networks to determine Earth orientation parameters and baseline vectors between the telescopes. The TWIN Telescope Wettzell 1 (TTW1), the first of the new 13.2 m diameter telescope pair at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell, Germany, is currently in its commissioning phase. The technology behind this radio telescope including the receiving system and the tri-band feed horn is depicted. Since VLBI telescopes must operate at least in pairs, the existing 20 m diameter Radio Telescope Wettzell (RTW) is used together with TTW1 for practical tests. In addition, selected long baseline setups are investigated. Correlation results portraying the data quality achieved during first initial experiments are discussed. Finally, the local 123 m baseline between the old RTW telescope and the new TTW1 is analyzed and compared with an existing high-precision local survey. Our initial results are very satisfactory for X-band group delays featuring a 3D distance agreement between VLBI data analysis and local ties of 1 to 2 mm in the majority of the experiments. However, S-band data, which suffer much from local radio interference due to WiFi and mobile communications, are about 10 times less precise than X-band data and require further analysis, but evidence is provided that S-band data are well-usable over long baselines where local radio interference patterns decorrelate.

  3. Initial Results Obtained with the First TWIN VLBI Radio Telescope at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torben Schüler

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI uses radio telescopes as sensor networks to determine Earth orientation parameters and baseline vectors between the telescopes. The TWIN Telescope Wettzell 1 (TTW1, the first of the new 13.2 m diameter telescope pair at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell, Germany, is currently in its commissioning phase. The technology behind this radio telescope including the receiving system and the tri-band feed horn is depicted. Since VLBI telescopes must operate at least in pairs, the existing 20 m diameter Radio Telescope Wettzell (RTW is used together with TTW1 for practical tests. In addition, selected long baseline setups are investigated. Correlation results portraying the data quality achieved during first initial experiments are discussed. Finally, the local 123 m baseline between the old RTW telescope and the new TTW1 is analyzed and compared with an existing high-precision local survey. Our initial results are very satisfactory for X-band group delays featuring a 3D distance agreement between VLBI data analysis and local ties of 1 to 2 mm in the majority of the experiments. However, S-band data, which suffer much from local radio interference due to WiFi and mobile communications, are about 10 times less precise than X-band data and require further analysis, but evidence is provided that S-band data are well-usable over long baselines where local radio interference patterns decorrelate.

  4. An Autonomous, Low Cost Platform for Seafloor Geodetic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericksen, T.; Foster, J. H.; Bingham, B. S.; Oshiro, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Pacific GPS Facility and the Field Robotics Laboratory at the University of Hawaii have developed an approach to significantly reduce the costs of accurately measuring short-term vertical motions of the seafloor and maintaining a continuous long-term record of seafloor pressure. Traditional ship-based methods of acquiring these measurements are often prohibitively expensive. Our goal has been to reduce the primary barrier preventing us from acquiring the observations we need to understand geodetic processes, and the hazards they present, at subduction zones, submarine volcanoes, and subsea landslides. To this end, we have designed a payload package for the University of Hawaii Wave Glider which incorporates an acoustic telemetry package, a dual frequency geodetic-grade Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, meteorological sensors, processing computer, and cellular communications. The Wave Glider is able to interrogate high accuracy pressure sensors on the seafloor to maintain a near-continuous stream of ocean bottom pressure and temperature data. The Wave Glider also functions as an integral part of the seafloor geodetic observing system, recording accurate sea surface elevations and barometric pressure; direct measurements of two of the primary sources of seafloor pressure change. The seafloor geodetic monument seats a sensor capable of recording pressure, temperature, and sound velocity for a deployment duration of over 5 years with an acoustic modem for communications, and an integral acoustic release for recovery and replacement of batteries. The design of the geodetic monument allows for precise repositioning of the sensor to extend the pressure record beyond a single 5+ year deployment, and includes the capability to install a mobile pressure recorder for calibration of the linear drift of the continuous pressure sensor. We will present the results of our field tests and an assessment of our ability to determine cm-scale vertical seafloor motions by

  5. Renewed Geodetic Unrest at Santorini Caldera, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, A. V.; Stiros, S. C.; Moschas, F.; Saltogianni, V.; Feng, L.; Farmer, G. T.; Psimoulis, P.; Jiang, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Santorini Caldera, in the southern Aegean, is part of a well-developed, and very active volcanic system fueled by subduction along the Hellenic arc that is responsible for the largest volcanic eruption in human history (~1650 B.C.). After approximately 50 years of relative seismic quiescence within the caldera and an episode of minor inflation, the volcano has recently reawakened with an exponentially increasing inflation signal, beginning in January 2011. The GPS network, including 3 continuous stations and biennial surveys of 19 campaign stations, showed essentially no deformation between 2006 and 2010. Following a cluster of microseismicity within the caldera two surveys in June and August 2011 were made, while two additional permanent GPS stations were installed. From this data, we found uplift and nearly-radial expansion up to 1 cm/month. This deformation is well-explained by a Mogi-source at the northern part of the caldera, with an approximately 6-10 million m3 volumetric growth at approximately 4 km depth, and tendency for development of a new dome offshore. It is likely that stresses from this magma source are responsible for a cluster of microseismity that began in January 2011 along a radial lineament of young volcanics, called the 'Kameni Line'.

  6. Recent geodetic unrest at Santorini Caldera, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Andrew V.; Stiros, Stathis; Feng, Lujia; Psimoulis, Panos; Moschas, Fanis; Saltogianni, Vasso; Jiang, Yan; Papazachos, Costas; Panagiotopoulos, Dimitris; Karagianni, Eleni; Vamvakaris, Domenikos

    2012-03-01

    After approximately 60 years of seismic quiescence within Santorini caldera, in January 2011 the volcano reawakened with a significant seismic swarm and rapidly expanding radial deformation. The deformation is imaged by a dense network of 19 survey and 5 continuous GPS stations, showing that as of 21 January 2012, the volcano has extended laterally from a point inside the northern segment of the caldera by about 140 mm and is expanding at 180 mm/yr. A series of spherical source models show the source is not migrating significantly, but remains about 4 km depth and has expanded by 14 million m3 since inflation began. A distributed sill model is also tested, which shows a possible N-S elongation of the volumetric source. While observations of the current deformation sequence are unprecedented at Santorini, it is not certain that an eruption is imminent as other similar calderas have experienced comparable activity without eruption.

  7. Linking Oceanic Tsunamis and Geodetic Gravity Changes of Large Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuning; Song, Y. Tony; Gross, Richard S.

    2017-08-01

    Large earthquakes at subduction zones usually generate tsunamis and coseismic gravity changes. These two independent oceanic and geodetic signatures of earthquakes can be observed individually by modern geophysical observational networks. The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment twin satellites can detect gravity changes induced by large earthquakes, while altimetry satellites and Deep-Ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis buoys can observe resultant tsunamis. In this study, we introduce a method to connect the oceanic tsunami measurements with the geodetic gravity observations, and apply it to the 2004 Sumatra Mw 9.2 earthquake, the 2010 Maule Mw 8.8 earthquake and the 2011 Tohoku Mw 9.0 earthquake. Our results indicate consistent agreement between these two independent measurements. Since seafloor displacement is still the largest puzzle in assessing tsunami hazards and its formation mechanism, our study demonstrates a new approach to utilizing these two kinds of measurements for better understanding of large earthquakes and tsunamis.

  8. Application of Geodetic Receivers to Timing and Time Transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIE Guigen; LIU Jingnan

    2005-01-01

    Two methods for smoothing pseudorange observable by Carrier and Doppler are discussed. Then the procedure based on the RINEX observation files is tested using the Ashtech Z-XII3T geodetic receivers driven by a stable external frequency at UNSO. This paper proposes to adapt this procedure for the links between geodetic receivers, in order to take advantage of the P codes available on L1 and L2. This new procedure uses the 30-second RINEX observations files, the standard of the International GPS Service (IGS), and processes the ionosphere-free combination of the codes P1 and P2; the satellite positions are deduced from the IGS rapid orbits, available after two days.

  9. Cartografical And Geodetical Aspects Of The Krakus Mound In Cracow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banasik, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    In this work the fate of the Krakus Mound, the oldest of all existing Krakow's mounds, has been presented. The work was carried out based on selected iconographic, cartographic and geodetic documents. Using as an example old views, panoramas of the city and maps, various functions that the Krakus Mound was fulfilling over its long history were shown. An attempt was made to document the military significance of this mound and the surrounding hills. The particular astro-geodetic importance of the Krakus Mound on the scale of the city and southern Poland region was widely discussed. The Krakus Mound also inscribed itself in the history of the use of GPS technology as well as research on the local determination of the geoid in the area of Krakow.

  10. The University, the Market, and the Geodetic Engineer or

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubkjær, Erik

    2002-01-01

    In Europe, universities have existed for more than 800 years. The university is the place in society for higher learning and related research. Through the ages, the universities have enjoyed a remarkably freedom relative to religious and secular powers. In recent years, the objectives and practises...... of universities have changed profoundly, largely due to an increased emphasis on market norms. The changes within university teaching of geodetic engineers may be seen from the above perspective. Several fora for deliberations on the education exist, including the Commission 2 of the International Federation...... project, which concerned the education of geodetic engineers in Slovenia. The body of the paper presents a selection of ideas that shaped the university through the centuries, with a view to balance the present interest in advancing market-directed behaviour....

  11. Geodetic constraints on the Bhuj 2001 earthquake and surface deformation in the Kachchh Rift Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, K.; Bilham, R.; Blume, F.; Gaur, V. K.; Gahalaut, V.

    2006-05-01

    GPS measurement of historic survey points in the region of the Mw 7.6 Bhuj earthquake of 26 January 2001 reveal a rupture area 25 km × 15 km, with the top of the rupture located at least 9 km beneath the surface. The geodetic data also reveal north-south convergence of ~18 mm/yr across the Rann of Kachchh since 1856. Convergence and the occurrence of south-dipping reverse earthquakes on the northern edge of the Kachchh mainland suggest that the region is one of incipient or ongoing tectonic uplift. The small rupture of the Bhuj earthquake indicates that other earthquakes are likely to occur in the region, although few clues exist to indicate the progression of future ruptures.

  12. A comparative study for the estimation of geodetic point velocity by artificial neural networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Yilmaz; M Gullu

    2014-06-01

    Space geodesy era provides velocity information which results in the positioning of geodetic points by considering the time evolution. The geodetic point positions on the Earth’s surface change over time due to plate tectonics, and these changes have to be accounted for geodetic purposes. The velocity field of geodetic network is determined from GPS sessions. Velocities of the new structured geodetic points within the geodetic network are estimated from this velocity field by the interpolation methods. In this study, the utility of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) widely applied in diverse fields of science is investigated in order to estimate the geodetic point velocities. Back Propagation Artificial Neural Network (BPANN) and Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN) are used to estimate the geodetic point velocities. In order to evaluate the performance of ANNs, the velocities are also interpolated by Kriging (KRIG) method. The results are compared in terms of the root mean square error (RMSE) over five different geodetic networks. It was concluded that the estimation of geodetic point velocity by BPANN is more effective and accurate than by KRIG when the points to be estimated are more than the points known.

  13. An Overview of Geodetic Volcano Research in the Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, José; González, Pablo J.; Camacho, Antonio G.; Prieto, Juan F.; Brú, Guadalupe

    2015-11-01

    The Canary Islands are mostly characterized by diffuse and scattered volcanism affecting a large area, with only one active stratovolcano, the Teide-Pico Viejo complex (Tenerife). More than 2 million people live and work in the 7,447 km2 of the archipelago, resulting in an average population density three times greater than the rest of Spain. This fact, together with the growth of exposure during the past 40 years, increases volcanic risk with respect previous eruptions, as witnessed during the recent 2011-2012 El Hierro submarine eruption. Therefore, in addition to purely scientific reasons there are economic and population-security reasons for developing and maintaining an efficient volcano monitoring system. In this scenario geodetic monitoring represents an important part of the monitoring system. We describe volcano geodetic monitoring research carried out in the Canary Islands and the results obtained. We consider for each epoch the two main existing constraints: the level of volcanic activity in the archipelago, and the limitations of the techniques available at the time. Theoretical and observational aspects are considered, as well as the implications for operational volcano surveillance. Current challenges of and future perspectives in geodetic volcano monitoring in the Canaries are also presented.

  14. Contribution to defining a geodetic reference frame for Africa (AFREF): Geodynamics implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saria, Elifuraha E.

    African Reference Frame (AFREF) is the proposed regional three-dimensional standard frame, which will be used to reference positions and velocities for geodetic sites in Africa and surrounding. This frame will play a crucial role in scientific application for example plate motion and crustal deformation studies, and also in mapping when it involves for example national boundary surveying, remote sensing, GIS, engineering projects and other development programs in Africa. To contribute to the definition of geodetic reference frame for Africa and provide the first continent-wide position/velocity solution for Africa, we processed and analyzed 16 years of GPS and 17 years of DORIS data at 133 GPS sites and 9 DORIS sites continuously operating geodetic sites in Africa and surroundings to describe the present-day kinematics of the Nubian and Somalian plates and constrain relative motions across the East African Rift. We use the resulting horizontal velocities to determine the level of rigidity of Nubia and updated a plate motion model for the East African Rift and revise the counter clockwise rotation of the Victoria plate and clockwise rotation of the Rovuma plate with respect to Nubia. The vertical velocity ranges from -2 to +2 mm/yr, close to their uncertainties with no clear geographical pattern. This study provides the first continent-wide position/velocity solution for Africa, expressed in International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF2008), a contribution to the upcoming African Reference Frame (AFREF). In the next step we used the substantial increase in the geologic, geophysical and geodetic data in Africa to improve our understanding of the rift geometry and the block kinematics of the EAR. We determined the best-fit fault structure of the rift in terms of the locking depth and dip angle and use a block modeling approach where observed velocities are described as the contribution of rigid block rotation and strain accumulation on locked faults. Our results

  15. THE ROLE OF ASTRO-GEODETIC IN PRECISE GUIDANCE OF LONG TUNNELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mirghasempour

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of prime aspects of surveying projects is guidance of paths of a long tunnel from different directions and finally ending all paths in a specific place. This kind of underground surveying, because of particular condition, has some different points in relation to the ground surveying, including Improper geometry in underground transverse, low precise measurement in direction and length due to condition such as refraction, distinct gravity between underground point and corresponding point on the ground (both value and direction of gravity and etc. To solve this problems, astro-geodetic that is part of geodesy science, can help surveying engineers. In this article, the role of astronomy is defined in two subjects: 1- Azimuth determination of directions from entrance and exit nets of tunnel and also calibration of gyro-theodolite to use them in Underground transvers: By astronomical methods, azimuth of directions can be determine with an accuracy of 0.5 arcsecond, whereas, nowadays, no gyroscope can measure the azimuth in this accuracy; For instance, accuracy of the most precise gyroscope (Gyromat 5000 is 1.2 cm over a distance of one kilometre (2.4 arcsecond. Furthermore, the calibration methods that will be mention in this article, have significance effects on underground transverse. 2- Height relation between entrance point and exit point is problematic and time consuming; For example, in a 3 km long tunnel ( in Arak- Khoram Abad freeway, to relate entrance point to exit point, it is necessary to perform levelling about 90 km. Other example of this boring and time consuming levelling is in Kerman tunnel. This tunnel is 36 km length, but to transfer the entrance point height to exit point, 150 km levelling is needed. According to this paper, The solution for this difficulty is application of astro-geodetic and determination of vertical deflection by digital zenith camera system TZK2-D. These two elements make possible to define geoid profile

  16. Geodetic antenna calibration test in the Antarctic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grejner-Brzezinska, A.; Vazquez, E.; Hothem, L.

    2006-01-01

    TransAntarctic Mountain DEFormation (TAMDEF) Monitoring Network is the NSF-sponsored OSU and USGS project, aimed at measuring crustal motion in the Transantarctic Mountains of Victoria Land using GPS carrier phase measurements. Station monumentation, antenna mounts, antenna types, and data processing strategies were optimized to achieve mm-level estimates for the rates of motion. These data contributes also to regional Antarctic frame definition. Significant amount of data collected over several years allow the investigation of unique aspects of GPS geodesy in Antarctica, to determine how the error spectrum compares to the mid-latitude regions, and to identify the optimum measurement and data processing schemes for Antarctic conditions, in order to test the predicted rates of motion (mm-level w.r.t. time). The data collection for the TAMDEF project was initiated in 1996. The primary antenna used has been the Ashtech L1/L2 Dorne Margolin (D/M) choke ring. A few occupations involved the use of a Trimble D/M choke ring. The data were processed using the antenna calibration data available from the National Geodetic Survey (NGS). The recent developments in new antenna designs that are lighter in weight and lower in cost are being considered as a possible alternative to the bulkier and more expensive D/M choke ring design. In November 2003, in situ testing of three alternative models of L1/L2 antennas was conducted at a site located in the vicinity of McMurdo Station, Antarctica (S77.87, E166.56). The antenna models used in this test were: Ashtech D/M choke ring, Trimble D/M choke ring, Trimble Zephyr, and the NovAtel GPS-702. Two stations, spaced within 30 meters, were used in the test. Both had the characteristics similar to the stations of the TAMDEF network, i.e., the UNAVCO fixed-height, force-centered level mounts with a constant antenna offset were used, ensuring extreme stability of the antenna/ mount/pin set up. During each of the four 3-day test data collection

  17. Crustal deformation in the Kumano Basin along the Nankai Trough inferred from repeated seafloor geodetic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, T.; Tadokoro, K.; Sugimoto, S.; Okuda, T.; Muto, D.; Kimoto, A.; Miyata, K.; Kuno, M.

    2008-12-01

    At the Nankai Trough (NT), the Philippine Sea plate (PH) subducts beneath the southwest Japan at a rate of about 4-6 cm/yr, where great interplate earthquakes have repeatedly occurred every 100-200 years. A number of researchers have investigated crustal deformation caused by subduction of the PH based on geodetic measurements as represented by GPS observation. However it is difficult to infer the plate coupling strength in offshore areas, due to the poverty of offshore geodetic data. From a viewpoint of disaster mitigation, it is important to know the updip and downdip limit of the plate locking depth. For this issue, we have conducted observations of the seafloor crustal deformations around the NT using a GPS/Acoustic technique since 2004. In this system, we estimate the position of a surveying vessel by Kinematic GPS analysis and measure the distance between the vessel and the benchmark on the sea floor by Acoustic measurements. Next we determine the location of the benchmark. For the repeatability of observation, the location of benchmark is determined within a precision of 2-3 cm at horizontal components (Tadokoro et al., 2006). In the Kumano Basin, we have two seafloor benchmarks, which are located about 60 and 80 km away from the deformation front of the NT. The observations from 2005 to 2008 have illustrated that these benchmarks are moving at rates of about 5-6 cm/yr with velocity uncertainties of 1-3 cm/yr relative to the Amurian plate. In this study, in order to estimate interplate coupling at the NT, we calculated surface deformations accompanied with plate subduction in an elastic half-space and compared them with on- and offshore GPS velocities. Then, we investigated the effect of observation for the seafloor crustal deformations on slip resolution on the plate interface. We conclude that offshore crustal deformation data provide good constraints for the estimation of fault slips at the shallower part of the plate interface, especially at the depths

  18. Geodetic and seismological investigation of crustal deformation near Izmir (Western Anatolia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogru, Asli; Gorgun, Ethem; Ozener, Haluk; Aktug, Bahadir

    2014-03-01

    The Aegean region including western Turkey, mainland Greece, and the Hellenic Arc is the most seismological and geodynamical active domain in the Alpine Himalayan Belt. In this study, we processed 3 years of survey-mode GPS data and present the analysis of a combination of geodetic and seismological data around Izmir, which is the third most populated city in Turkey. The velocities obtained from 15 sites vary between 25 mm/yr and 28 mm/yr relative to the Eurasian plate. The power law exponent of earthquake size distribution (b-value) ranges from 0.8 to 2.8 in the Izmir region between 26.2°E and 27.2°E. The lowest b-value zones are found along Karaburun Fault (b = 0.8) and, between Seferihisar and Tuzla Faults (b = 0.8). A localized stress concentration is expected from numerical models of seismicity along geometrical locked fault patches. Therefore, areas with lowest b-values are considered to be the most likely location for a strong earthquake, a prediction that is confirmed by the 2005 Mw = 5.9 Seferihisar earthquake sequences, with epicentres located to the south of the Karaburun Fault. The north-south extension of the Izmir area is corroborated by extension rates up to 140 nanostrain/yr as obtained from our GPS data. We combined the 3-year GPS velocity field with the published velocity field to determine the strain rate pattern in the area. The spatial distribution of b-value reflects the normal background due to the tectonic framework and is corroborated by the geodetic data. b-Values correlate with strain pattern. This relationship suggests that decrease of b-values signifies accumulating strain.

  19. Geodetic reference systems for long period studies in earth physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    A simple system of reference axes is defined for possible use in high precision geodetic studies over long periods of time for programs in earth physics. The proposed system is based on the gravitational and dynamic characteristics of the axis of rotation and the earth's center of mass as defined instantaneously at a given epoch. Techniques are outlined for its continuous representation over time intervals of significance for studies in earth physics. The relationship between the proposed system and the representation of extra-terrestrial objects using the celestial sphere concept is also discussed.

  20. Geodetic Space Weather Monitoring by means of Ionosphere Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The term space weather indicates physical processes and phenomena in space caused by radiation of energy mainly from the Sun. Manifestations of space weather are (1) variations of the Earth's magnetic field, (2) the polar lights in the northern and southern hemisphere, (3) variations within the ionosphere as part of the upper atmosphere characterized by the existence of free electrons and ions, (4) the solar wind, i.e. the permanent emission of electrons and photons, (5) the interplanetary magnetic field, and (6) electric currents, e.g. the van Allen radiation belt. It can be stated that ionosphere disturbances are often caused by so-called solar storms. A solar storm comprises solar events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) which have different effects on the Earth. Solar flares may cause disturbances in positioning, navigation and communication. CMEs can effect severe disturbances and in extreme cases damages or even destructions of modern infrastructure. Examples are interruptions to satellite services including the global navigation satellite systems (GNSS), communication systems, Earth observation and imaging systems or a potential failure of power networks. Currently the measurements of solar satellite missions such as STEREO and SOHO are used to forecast solar events. Besides these measurements the Earth's ionosphere plays another key role in monitoring the space weather, because it responses to solar storms with an increase of the electron density. Space-geodetic observation techniques, such as terrestrial GNSS, satellite altimetry, space-borne GPS (radio occultation), DORIS and VLBI provide valuable global information about the state of the ionosphere. Additionally geodesy has a long history and large experience in developing and using sophisticated analysis and combination techniques as well as empirical and physical modelling approaches. Consequently, geodesy is predestinated for strongly supporting space weather monitoring via

  1. Current status of the EPOS WG4 - GNSS and Other Geodetic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Rui; Bastos, Luisa; Bruyninx, Carine; D'Agostino, Nicola; Dousa, Jan; Ganas, Athanassios; Lidberg, Martin; Nocquet, Jean-Mathieu

    2014-05-01

    WG4 - "EPOS Geodetic Data and Other Geodetic Data" is the Working Group of the EPOS project in charge of defining and preparing the integration of the existing Pan-European Geodetic Infrastructures that will support European Geosciences, which is the ultimate goal of the EPOS project. The WG4 is formed by representatives of the participating EPOS countries (23) but it is also open to the entire geodetic community. In fact, WG4 also already includes members from countries that formally are not integrating EPOS in this first step. The geodetic component of EPOS (WG4) is dealing essentially with Research Infrastructures focused on continuous operating GNSS (cGNSS) in the current phase. The option of concentrating the efforts on the presently most generalized geodetic tool supporting research on Solid Earth was decided in order to optimize the existing resources. Nevertheless, WG4 will continue to pursue the development of tools and methodologies that permit the access of the EPOS community to other geodetic information (e.g., gravimetry). Furthermore, although the focus is on Solid Earth applications, other research and technical applications (e.g., reference frames, meteorology, space weather) can also benefit from the efforts of WG4 EPOS towards the optimization of the geodetic resources in Europe. We will present and discuss the plans for the implementation of the thematic and core services (TCS) for geodetic data within EPOS and the related business plan. We will focus on strategies towards the implementation of the best solutions that will permit to the end-users, and in particular geo-scientists, to access the geodetic data, derived solutions, and associated metadata using transparent and uniform processes. Five pillars have been defined proposed for the TCS: Dissemination, Preservation, Monitoring, and Analysis of geodetic data plus the Support and Governance Infrastructure. Current proposals and remaining open questions will be discussed.

  2. SURVEY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SURVEY er en udbredt metode og benyttes inden for bl.a. samfundsvidenskab, humaniora, psykologi og sundhedsforskning. Også uden for forskningsverdenen er der mange organisationer som f.eks. konsulentfirmaer og offentlige institutioner samt marketingsafdelinger i private virksomheder, der arbejder...... med surveys. Denne bog gennemgår alle surveyarbejdets faser og giver en praktisk indføring i: • design af undersøgelsen og udvælgelse af stikprøver, • formulering af spørgeskemaer samt indsamling og kodning af data, • metoder til at analysere resultaterne...

  3. Geodetic studies in Baja California, Mexico, and the evaluation of short-range data from 1974 to 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, Desmond; Gonzalez, J. Javier; Lesage, Philippe

    1984-04-01

    The short-range geodetic data from northern Baja California, Mexico, for the period 1974-1982 are carefully analyzed. These data contribute to an understanding of the complex pattern of faulting associated with the Pacific-North American plate boundary in this region. Survey precisions are evaluated and significant systematic errors are found to exist. A technique of studying a scale-free displacement solution is developed as an aid to interpreting the data. We conclude that (1) the motion on the San Miguel-Vallecitos fault system is presently in a right-lateral sense and at a level that warrants trilateration surveys at least annually, (2) present geodetic data permit no statement about movement on the Agua Bianca fault, and (3) the mesa, whose flank delineates the Cerro Prieto fault in the Valle de Mexicali, lies in a zone which has undergone significant horizontal areal compression, at a rate of 14±5 ppm/yr, in addition to a right-lateral tensor shear at a rate of 4±1 ppm/yr, oriented N(;33°±9°)W, between 1980 and 1982.

  4. Geodetic Control Points, NC State and National Geodetic Control Points for Iredell County, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iredell County GIS.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2009. It...

  5. Geodetic Mobil Solar Spectrometer for JASON Altimeter Satellite Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somieski, A.; Buerki, B.; Geiger, A.; Kahle, H.-G.; Becker-Ross, H.; Florek, S.; Okruss, M.

    Atmospheric water vapor is a crucial factor in achieving highest accuracies for space geodetic measurements. Water vapor causes a delay of the propagation time of the altimeter satellite signal, which propagates into errors for the determination of surface heights. Knowledge of the precipitable water vapor (PW) enables a tropospheric correction of the satellite signal. Therefore, different remote sensing techniques have been pursued to measure the PW continuously. The prototype Geodetic Mobil Solar Spectrometer (GEMOSS) was developed at the Geodesy and Geodynamics Laboratory (GGL, ETH Zurich) in cooperation with the Institute of Spectrochemistry and Applied Spectroscopy (ISAS) (Berlin, Germany). A new optical approach allows the simultaneous measurement of numerous single absorption lines of water vapor in the wide range between 728 nm and 915 nm. The large number of available absorption lines increases the accuracy of the absolute PW retrievals considerably. GEMOSS has been deployed during two campaigns in Greece in the framework of the EU-project GAVDOS, which deals with the calibration of the altimeter satellite JASON. During the overfly of JASON, the ground-based determination of PW enables the correction of the satellite measurements due to tropospheric water vapor. Comparisons with radiometer and radiosondes data allow to assess the accuracy and reliability of GEMOSS. The instrumental advancement of GEMOSS is presented together with the results of the campaigns carried out.

  6. Geodetic refraction effects of electromagnetic wave propagation through the atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    1984-01-01

    With very few exceptions, geodetic measurements use electro­ magnetic radiation in order to measure directions, distances, time delays, and Doppler frequency shifts, to name the main ter­ restrial and space observables. Depending on the wavelength of the radiation and the purpose of the measurements, the follow­ ing parameters of the electromagnetic wave are measured: ampli­ tude, phase, angle-of-arrival, polarisation and frequency. Ac­ curate corrections have to be applied to the measurements in order to take into account the effects of the intervening medium between transmitter and receiver. The known solutions use at­ mospheric models, special observation programs, remote sensing techniques and instrumental methods. It has been shown that the effects of the earth's atmospheric envelope present a fundamental limitation to the accuracy and precision of geodetic measurements. This applies equally to ter­ restrial and space applications. Instrumental accuracies are al­ ready below the atmospherically i...

  7. Adjustment of positional geodetic networks by unconventional estimations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Gašincová

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The content of this paper is the adjustment of positional geodetic networks by robust estimations. The techniques (basedon the unconventional estimations of repeated least-square method which have turned out to be suitable and applicable in the practisehave been demonstrated on the example of the local geodetic network, which was founded to compose this thesis. In the thesisthe following techniques have been chosen to compare the Method of least-squares with those many published in foreign literature:M-estimation of Biweight,M-estimation of Welsch and Danish method. All presented methods are based on the repeated least-squaremethod principle with gradual changing of weight of individual measurements. In the first stage a standard least-square method wascarried out in the following steps – iterations we gradually change individual weights according to the relevant instructions/ regulation(so-called weight function. Iteration process will be stopped when no deviated measurements are found in the file of measured data.MatLab programme version 5.2 T was used to implement mathematical adjustment.

  8. Geodetic Imaging: Expanding the Boundaries of Geodesy in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez Diaz, J. C.; Carter, W. E.; Shrestha, R. L.; Glennie, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    coastal waters) is just beginning to attract the attention of researchers studying such plant life as marsh vegetation and sea grasses, and the habitats of animals as diverse as fish, migratory birds, and lions (Vierling et al., 2008). From thousands and thousands of survey markers covering large regions of the earth common to geodesy a half century ago, the focus of some geodesist has changed to billions and billions of points covering landscapes, which are enabling them to redefine and extend the limits of geodesy in the 21st century. References: Carter, W. E. et al., (2012), 'Geodetic Imaging: A New Tool for Mesoamerican Archaeology,' Eos, Trans. American Geophysical Union, Vol. 93, No. 42, pages 413-415. Chase, A. F. et al., (2010) 'Airborne LiDAR, archaeology, and the ancient Maya landscape at Caracol, Belize,' Journal Of Archaeological Science, vol. 38, no. 2, p. 387-398. Evans, D. H. et al., (2013), 'Uncovering archaeological landscapes at Angkor using lidar.' PNAS. Oskin, M. E. et al., (2012), 'Near-Field Deformation from the El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake Revealed by Differential LIDAR,' Science. Vol. 335 no.6069, pp. 702-705. Perron, J. Taylor, et al (2009), 'Formation of evenly spaced ridges and valleys,' Nature, Vol. 460/23. Vierling, K. T. et al., (2008),'Lidar: shedding new light on habitat characterization and modeling,' Front Ecol Environ 2008, 6(2): 90-98.

  9. The impact of using jason-1 and cryosat-2 geodetic mission altimetry for gravity field modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Jain, Maulik; Knudsen, Per

    2016-01-01

    operating in a geodetic mission as part its end of life mission. In this presentation, we perform an investigation of the impact of the Cryosat-2 and Jason-1 geodetic missions on high resolution marine gravity field mapping through comparison with recent high quality marine gravity measured by the United...

  10. Transforming geocentric cartesian coordinates to geodetic coordinates by using differential search algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civicioglu, Pinar

    2012-09-01

    In order to solve numerous practical navigational, geodetic and astro-geodetic problems, it is necessary to transform geocentric cartesian coordinates into geodetic coordinates or vice versa. It is very easy to solve the problem of transforming geodetic coordinates into geocentric cartesian coordinates. On the other hand, it is rather difficult to solve the problem of transforming geocentric cartesian coordinates into geodetic coordinates as it is very hard to define a mathematical relationship between the geodetic latitude (φ) and the geocentric cartesian coordinates (X, Y, Z). In this paper, a new algorithm, the Differential Search Algorithm (DS), is presented to solve the problem of transforming the geocentric cartesian coordinates into geodetic coordinates and its performance is compared with the performances of the classical methods (i.e., Borkowski, 1989; Bowring, 1976; Fukushima, 2006; Heikkinen, 1982; Jones, 2002; Zhang, 2005; Borkowski, 1987; Shu, 2010 and Lin, 1995) and Computational-Intelligence algorithms (i.e., ABC, JDE, JADE, SADE, EPSDE, GSA, PSO2011, and CMA-ES). The statistical tests realized for the comparison of performances indicate that the problem-solving success of DS algorithm in transforming the geocentric cartesian coordinates into geodetic coordinates is higher than those of all classical methods and Computational-Intelligence algorithms used in this paper.

  11. c5++ - Multi-Technique Analysis Software for Next Generation Geodetic Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobiger, Thomas; Gotoh, Tadahiro; Otsubo, toshimichi; Kubooka, Toshihiro; Sekido, Mamoru; Takiguchi, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Processing of space geodetic techniques should be carried out with consistent and utmost up-todate physical models. Therefore, c5++ is being developed, which will act as a framework under which dedicated space geodetic applications can be created. Due to its nature, combination of different techniques as well as automated processing of VLBI experiments will become possible with c5++.

  12. New form of geodetic coordinate system taking two length quantity as coordinate parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yimin SHI; Ziyang ZHU; Yeming FAN

    2009-01-01

    A new form of geodetic coordinate system based on geodesic coordinates instead of geodetic long-itude and latitude was proposed. The vertical and horizontal geodesic coordinates measured with length were defined as coordinate parameters, but the two families of coordinate curves were still meridians and parallel circles. The first fundamental form on the ellipsoidal surface and its three coefficients were deduced by the geodesic coordinate. The formula for the latitudinal scale factor of length for geodetic parallel lines was derived, by which the obtained result conformed to that standard value calculated from geodetic latitude, and it is applicable in the range of 400 km from north to south. Therefore, it lays the foundation for establishing the differential equation and differential relationship based on this type of coordinate parameters; and consequently, it is convenient and accurate enough to operate on the ellipsoidal surface in this new form of geodetic coordinate system.

  13. The Importance of Local Surveys for Tying Techniques Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, James L.; Bosworth, John M.

    2000-01-01

    The synergistic benefits of combining observations from multiple space geodesy techniques located at a site are a main reason behind the proposal for the establishment of the International Space Geodetic and Gravimetric Network (ISGN). However, the full benefits of inter-comparison are only realized when the spatial relationships between the different space geodetic systems are accurately determined. These spatial relationships are best determined and documented by developing a local reference network of stable ground monuments and conducting periodic surveys to tie together the reference points (for example: the intersection of rotation axes of a VLBI antenna) of the space geodetic systems and the ground monument network. The data obtained from local surveys is vital to helping understand any systematic errors within an individual technique and to helping identify any local movement or deformation of the space geodetic systems over time.

  14. GPS satellite surveying

    CERN Document Server

    Leick, Alfred; Tatarnikov, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE, UP-TO-DATE GUIDE ON GPS TECHNOLOGY FOR SURVEYING Three previous editions have established GPS Satellite Surveying as the definitive industry reference. Now fully updated and expanded to reflect the newest developments in the field, this Fourth Edition features cutting-edge information on GNSS antennas, precise point positioning, real-time relative positioning, lattice reduction, and much more. Expert authors examine additional tools and applications, offering complete coverage of geodetic surveying using satellite technologies. The past decade has seen a major evolut

  15. Error Propagation in Geodetic Networks Studied by FEMLAB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borre, Kai

    2009-01-01

    thousand points. This leads to so large matrix problems that one starts thinking of using continous network models. They result in one or more differential equations with corresponding boundary conditions. The Green’s function works like the covariance matrix in the discrete case. If we can find the Green......’s function we also can study error propagation through large networks. Exactly this idea is exploited for error propagation studies in large geodetic networks. To solve the boundary value problems we have used the FEMLAB software. It is a powerful tool for this type of problems. The M-file was created...... and estimate the solution by using the principle of least squares. Contemporary networks often contain several thousand points. This leads to so large matrix problems that one starts thinking of using continous network models. They result in one or more differential equations with corresponding boundary...

  16. Australian geodetic VLBI network (AuScope): present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, Oleg

    2015-04-01

    The Australian geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) array (AuScope) consisting of three new 12-meter radio telescopes in Australia (Hobart, Katherine and Yarragadee), and a correlation facility in Perth that started operations in 2011. The daily positions of the AuScope array are estimated with a precision of a few mm, whereas their daily estimates vary within a range of 20-30 mm on the annual scale. This VLBI network also provides a substantial contribution to the improvement of the Celestial Reference Frame in the southern hemisphere. The plans for extension of the network in collaboration with the New Zealand and South Africa VLBI stations during 2015-2020 are discussed in this presentation.

  17. Results obtained by geodetic instruments of SELENE (KAGUYA)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KAWANO; Nobuyuki; VRAD/RSAT; Team; LALT; Team

    2010-01-01

    Japanese lunar explorer SELENE (KAGUYA) was equipped with 14 instruments for various measurements of the Moon. Three of these instruments took geodetic measurements of the Moon. These were two sub-satellites and a laser altimeter. The main results obtained by the instruments are: (1) precise orbit determination with an accuracy of ten meters by Doppler and same-beam VLBI; (2) the first precise gravity fields on the lunar far side by 4-way Doppler measurements; (3) the first topography in latitudes higher than 86 degrees; (4) a global map of the gravity anomaly by using the global topography and the global gravity fields; (5) a global map of the lunar crustal thickness and (6) an illumination rate map in the north and south polar regions.

  18. Geometry and distribution of seismic and geodetic strain in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pondrelli, S.; Serpelloni, E.; Morelli, A.

    2003-04-01

    We determine geometry and distribution of seismic strain in Italy, and surrounding regions, by means of seismological information, and compare results with geodetic data. We use data from the Harvard CMT Catalog, mostly supplemented by the INGV-Harvard European-Mediterranean Regional Centroid Moment Tensor (RCMT) Catalog (http://www.ingv.it/seismolgo/RCMT), including solutions for moderate-magnitude earthquakes (4.5encloses about 400 focal solutions for events occurred between 1997 and 2002, besides other significant events (e.g. the Friuli, Northern Italy, 1976 seismic sequence). We believe this to be the most complete dataset, based on instrumental data, for the last 25 years of seismic activity of the study region. Only crustal events are considered. The method used is the Kostrov summation, applied on a regular grid. We thus obtain the cumulative moment tensor, representative of the geometry of deformation. Its distribution shows NE-SW extension along the Apennines, and the compression field (rotating from NE-SW to NNE-SSW) that affects the mountain chains along the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea and the Eastern Alps. The geometry of deformation also exhibits other intriguing trends, such as compression along the Southern Tyrrhenian, changing to strike-slip eastward, and turning to extension passing trough the Aeolian Islands and the Messina Strait. We also note the transition from compression in the outer Northern Apennines to transcurrent style in the outer Southern Apennines. Being this region a low strain rate area, a correct evaluation of strain amount requires to merge the instrumental dataset with the historical seismic moment released, as obtained from catalogs. The hypocentral distribution is taken into account to evaluate the depth of the brittle layer. Our results are compared with geodetic data recently obtained analysing more than 10 years of GPS observations collected by more than 130 stations. Significant similarity is found, especially as

  19. Transient shortening strain across an active extensional fault, Basin and Range Province, north-central Nevada, USA, based on geodetic and paleoseismologic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, A.; Wernicke, B.; Lee, J.; Sieh, K.

    2003-04-01

    The northern Basin and Range province is one of the largest continental extensional regions on earth. At 40 degrees N latitude, the province is 800 km wide and consists of 15 and 20 N-S striking normal faults. These faults accommodated mainly east-west directed extension of tens of kilometers since Mid-Miocene time and recent geodetic surveys show that extension is still active today at a rate of ~1.5 cm/yr across the province (e.g., Bennett et al. 2000; Thatcher et al. 1999). The distribution of this geodetically measurable strain accumulation within the province, however, contradicts geologic observations across some of the active normal faults. For example, coordinated geologic and geodetic measurements across the Crescent Valley fault (CVF), north-central Nevada, reveal a profound mismatch in deformation rates. Since 1996, the two ranges on either side of the CVF have been moving toward each other at ca. 2 mm/yr, indicating shortening. In contrast, new reconnaissance mapping and paleoseismological analyses along the CVF also indicate that this fault is one of the more active normal faults of the Basin and Range province. The 50 km long Cortez Mountains range front is characterized by relief of up to 1.3 km, steep (up to 36 degrees) triangular facets, and young (late Pleistocene to late Holocene) alluvial fans cut by normal fault scarps. Vertical displacement across the CVF is ca. 3 km; since 15 Ma the average long-term vertical displacement rate is ca. 0.2 mm/yr. Topographic profiling shows that fault scarps, 2-7 m high, are the result of a single rupture event and cut late Holocene alluvial fans. A trench across a faulted alluvial fan at Fourmile Canyon reveals a vertical displacement of 4.5 m distributed across two normal faults. 14C analyses on charcoal from a buried offset surface in the hanging wall of the trench and from the base of the overlying colluvial wedge tightly bracket the age of the most recent earthquake to between 2.8 +- 0.1 and 2.7 +- 0.1 ka

  20. Space geodetic monitoring of engineered structures: The ongoing destabilization of the Mosul dam, Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milillo, Pietro; Bürgmann, Roland; Lundgren, Paul; Salzer, Jacqueline; Perissin, Daniele; Fielding, Eric; Biondi, Filippo; Milillo, Giovanni

    2016-12-06

    We present a detailed survey of the ongoing destabilization process of the Mosul dam. The dam is located on the Tigris river and is the biggest hydraulic structure in Iraq. From a geological point of view the dam foundation is poor due to a site geology formed by alternating strata of highly soluble materials including gypsum, anhydrite, marl and limestone. Here we present the first multi-sensor cumulative deformation map for the dam generated from space-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar measurements from the Italian constellation COSMO-SkyMed and the European sensor Sentinel-1a over the period 2014-2016 that we compare to an older dataset spanning 2004-2010 acquired with the European Envisat satellite. We found that deformation was rapid during 2004-2010, slowed in 2012-2014 and increased since August 2014 when grouting operations stopped due to the temporary capture of the dam by the self proclaimed Islamic State. We model the inferred deformation using a Markov chain Monte Carlo approach to solve for change in volume for simple tensile dislocations. Results from recent and historical geodetic datasets suggests that the volume dissolution rate remains constant when the equivalent volume of total concrete injected during re-grouting operations is included in the calculations.

  1. Development of AN Open-Source Automatic Deformation Monitoring System for Geodetical and Geotechnical Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, P.; Schweimler, B.

    2016-04-01

    The deformation monitoring of structures and buildings is an important task field of modern engineering surveying, ensuring the standing and reliability of supervised objects over a long period. Several commercial hardware and software solutions for the realization of such monitoring measurements are available on the market. In addition to them, a research team at the Neubrandenburg University of Applied Sciences (NUAS) is actively developing a software package for monitoring purposes in geodesy and geotechnics, which is distributed under an open source licence and free of charge. The task of managing an open source project is well-known in computer science, but it is fairly new in a geodetic context. This paper contributes to that issue by detailing applications, frameworks, and interfaces for the design and implementation of open hardware and software solutions for sensor control, sensor networks, and data management in automatic deformation monitoring. It will be discussed how the development effort of networked applications can be reduced by using free programming tools, cloud computing technologies, and rapid prototyping methods.

  2. Space geodetic monitoring of engineered structures: The ongoing destabilization of the Mosul dam, Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milillo, Pietro; Bürgmann, Roland; Lundgren, Paul; Salzer, Jacqueline; Perissin, Daniele; Fielding, Eric; Biondi, Filippo; Milillo, Giovanni

    2016-12-01

    We present a detailed survey of the ongoing destabilization process of the Mosul dam. The dam is located on the Tigris river and is the biggest hydraulic structure in Iraq. From a geological point of view the dam foundation is poor due to a site geology formed by alternating strata of highly soluble materials including gypsum, anhydrite, marl and limestone. Here we present the first multi-sensor cumulative deformation map for the dam generated from space-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar measurements from the Italian constellation COSMO-SkyMed and the European sensor Sentinel-1a over the period 2014-2016 that we compare to an older dataset spanning 2004-2010 acquired with the European Envisat satellite. We found that deformation was rapid during 2004-2010, slowed in 2012-2014 and increased since August 2014 when grouting operations stopped due to the temporary capture of the dam by the self proclaimed Islamic State. We model the inferred deformation using a Markov chain Monte Carlo approach to solve for change in volume for simple tensile dislocations. Results from recent and historical geodetic datasets suggests that the volume dissolution rate remains constant when the equivalent volume of total concrete injected during re-grouting operations is included in the calculations.

  3. Feasibility of Construction of the Continuously Operating Geodetic GPS Network of Sinaloa, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, G. E.; Jacobo, C.

    2011-12-01

    This research is based on the study and analysis of feasibility for the construction of the geodetic network for GPS continuous operation for Sinaloa, hereafter called (RGOCSIN). A GPS network of continuous operation is defined as that materialized structure physically through permanent monuments where measurements to the systems of Global Positioning (GPS) is performed continuously throughout a region. The GPS measurements in this network are measurements of accuracy according to international standards to define its coordinates, thus constituting the basic structure of geodetic referencing for a country. In this context is that in the near future the RGOCSIN constitutes a system state only accurate and reliable georeferencing in real-time (continuous and permanent operation) and will be used for different purposes; i.e., in addition to being fundamental basis for any lifting topographic or geodetic survey, and other areas such as: (1) Different construction processes (control and monitoring of engineering works); (2) Studies of deformation of the Earth's crust (before and after a seismic event); (3) GPS meteorology (weather forecasting); (4) Demarcation projects (natural and political); (5) Establishment of bases to generate mapping (necessary for the economic and social development of the state); (6) Precision agriculture (optimization of economic resources to the various crops); (7) Geographic information systems (Organization and planning activities associated with the design and construction of public services); (8) Urban growth (possible settlements in the appropriate form and taking care of the environmental aspect), among others. However there are criteria and regulations according to the INEGI (Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía, http://www.inegi.org.mx/) that must be met; even for this stage of feasibility of construction that sees this project as a first phase. The fundamental criterion to be taken into account according to INEGI is a

  4. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for May, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002365)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  5. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for December, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002541)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of December 01, 1985 to December 31, 1985....

  6. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for March 1986 (NODC Accession 0002544)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of March 01, 1986 to March 31, 1986....

  7. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for November, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002540)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of November 01, 1985 to November 30, 1985....

  8. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for May, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002546)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of May 01, 1986 to May 31, 1986....

  9. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for June, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002359)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of June 01, 1985 to June 30, 1985....

  10. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for June, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002551)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  11. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for April, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002350)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of April 01, 1985 to April 30, 1985....

  12. Geodetic Markers at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (pisp_geomrkrs)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 7 points representing known coordinates on the earth's surface at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. One geodetic...

  13. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for April, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002561)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  14. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for July, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002548)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of July 01, 1986 to July 31, 1986....

  15. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for September, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002550)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of September 01, 1986 to Setpember 30,...

  16. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for August, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002549)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of August 01, 1986 to August 31, 1986....

  17. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for September, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002538)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of September 01, 1985 to September 30,...

  18. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for August, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002565)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  19. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for January, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002558)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  20. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for May, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002351)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of May 01, 1985 to May 31, 1985. Parameters...

  1. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for October, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002555)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  2. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for September, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002554)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  3. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for November, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002556)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  4. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for August, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002553)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — his accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  5. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for July, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002552)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  6. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for April, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002364)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  7. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for February, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002559)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  8. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for October, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002539)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of October 01, 1985 to October 31, 1985....

  9. Geodetic and geophysical observations in Antarctica an overview in the IPY perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Capra, Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    This book is a collection of papers on various aspects of the geodetic and geophysical investigation and observation techniques. It includes material from the Arctic and Antarctica, as well as covering work from both temporary and permanent observatories.

  10. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for July, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002536)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of July 01, 1985 to July 31, 1985....

  11. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for July, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002564)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  12. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for August, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002537)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of August 01, 1985 to August 31, 1985....

  13. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for March, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002363)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  14. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for January, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002542)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of January 01, 1986 to January 31, 1986....

  15. Trials for better precision of seafloor geodetic observation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, M.; Sato, M.; Fujita, M.; Yoshida, Z.; Yabuki, T.; Asada, A.

    2002-12-01

    Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, and Hydrographic Department, Japan, have been developing seafloor geodetic observation system and conducting observations using the system. Precise acoustic ranging and kinematic GPS positioning techniques are combined into the system. Seafloor reference station which consists of four mirror type transponders is deployed on the seafloor and measures its position in reference to GPS stations on land and ship. Fourteen seafloor geodetic reference stations have been distributed on the forearc areas of Japan island arc. Subsea crustal deformation due to subducting two oceanic plates of the Pacific and the Philippine sea can be monitored by using the seafloor reference stations. Although we obtained satisfactory results with the already existing system, we come up with possible improvements of the system as we accumulate the experience of the observations using the system. Trials to improve the system are always done. In this poster, we will present two of such trials. 1. To improve the stability of the rigid pole connecting the GPS antenna and the ship-board transducer. The bending of the GPS pole was found by examining the offsets in the acoustic ranging residuals. Acoustic ranging is made with condition that the ship drifts over sea surface. Drag force generated between surface current and the pole makes the pole itself bend. The pole was replaced by new, more rigid pole to overcome the problem. Also, we monitor amount of bending of the pole, that is, the offset between the GPS antenna and the transducer, using tiltmeter through the observation. 2. To reduce the acoustic ranging error due to shape of the transducer. Coded sinusoidal acoustic wave with 15cm wave length is used as the ranging signal. This wave length is comparable to the dimension of the cylindrical transducers employed both on the ship-board system and on the seafloor transponder. Transducer can not be regarded as a point considering the wave

  16. Geodetic Imaging of Glacio-Seismotectonic Processes in Southern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauber, J.; Bruhn, R.; Forster, R.; Hofton, M.

    2008-12-01

    Across southern Alaska the northwest directed motion of the Pacific plate is accompanied by migration and collision of the Yakutat terrane. The Yakutat terrane is a fragment of the North American plate margin that is partly subducted beneath and partly accreted to the continental margin. Over the last couple of decades the rate of ongoing deformation associated with subduction and a locked main thrust zone has been estimated by geodetic measurements. In the last five years more extensive geodetic measurements, structural and tectonic field studies, thermochronolgy, and high-resolution lidar have been acquired and analyzed as part of the STEEP project [Pavlis et al., 2006]. The nature and magnitude of accretion and translation on upper crustal faults and folds remains uncertain, however, due to complex variations in the style of tectonic deformation, pervasive and changing glaciation, and the logistical challenges of conducting field studies in formidable topography. In this study, we analyze new high-resolution lidar data to extract locations, geometry, and heights of seismogenic faults and zones of active folding across the Malaspina-Seward-Bagley region of the southern Alaska plate boundary that is hypothesized to accommodate upper crustal shortening and right-lateral slip. Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) lidar swath data acquired by Krabill et al. in the summer of 2005 and ICESat data (1993-present) cross a number of proposed faults and folds partially masked by glaciation, including the Malaspina thrust, Esker Creek, Chugach-St.Elias thrust, and Contact. Focal mechanisms from this region indicate mostly shallow (0-30 km) thrust and oblique strike-slip faulting. Similarly, rupture in the 1979 St. Elias earthquake (M=7.4) started as a shallow, north-dipping thrust that later changed to more steeply NE dipping with a large right-lateral strike-slip component. Additionally, we are using the morphology and dynamics of glaciers derived from L-Band SAR ice

  17. Geodetic Monitoring System Operating On Neapolitan Volcanic Area (southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingue, F.; Ov-Geodesy Team

    volcanic high risk, is monitored also by dense geodetic networks using different methods: levelling, GPS, tiltmeter, tide-gauge, gravimetry, INSAR. Each of the collected data contributes to volcanic sources modelling, thus to the eruptive scenarios definition and the risk mitigation. Here the geodetic surveillance system in the Neapolitan area is described in detail and the main results obtained in the last years are shown and discussed.

  18. Analysis and interpretation of geodetic landslide monitoring data based on fuzzy systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Haberler-Weber

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available To place high precision geotechnical sensors exactly at the boundaries between blocks with different directions and rates of movement in a sliding area, it is important to detect these boundaries in a preceding step. An automated algorithm for the block detection based on fuzzy systems is presented. Combining objective geodetic indicators with fuzzy systems gives a powerful tool for the assessment of geodetic landslide monitoring data. The example of a landsliding area shows the applicability of the algorithm.  

  19. The ambiguity of the results of the strict adjustment of horizontal geodetic networks

    OpenAIRE

    Preweda, Edward; Jasi?ska, El?bieta; Butryn, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    The algorithm of the strict adjustment of horizontal geodetic networks using least square adjustment method is well known and widely described in the literature. Referring to the Regulation of the minister of administration and digitization of 14 February 2012 on geodetic, gravimetric and magnetic control networks, which is in force in Poland, the authors draw attention to the important provision contained in this Ordinance: Observa-tions should be adjusted using a rigorous adjustment, based ...

  20. The future of Russian section of the Global Geodetic Observing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipatov, Alexander; Ivanov, Dmitry; Gayazov, Iskandar; Bondarenko, Yuri

    2015-04-01

    The creation of Geodetic Data-processing Center for collection and transmission geodetic data from all stations of Russian geodetic network is considered. New data-processing center will be created on the technical basis of the Institute of Applied Astronomy of Russian Academy of Sciences. In future each interaction with the international services and stations of the Global Geodetic Observing System network is planned to carry out through this data-processing center. The radio interferometer of new generation, created in the Institute of Applied Astronomy at the stations of "Quasar" VLBI network will be the basis of the Russian section of the Global Geodetic Observing System. Currently this new radio interferometer consists of two antennas with a mirror diameters of 13.2 m installed at the "Badary" and "Zelenchukskaya" collocation sites. All installation works of the antenna systems as well as observations of calibration radio sources were carried out at the end of 2014. Processing and analysis of newly obtained data showed that the radio interferometer of new generation allows to operate as a part of the Global Geodetic Observing System network and having an accuracy of 3 mm for pole coordinates, 100 microsecond of arc for the nutation and precession angles and no more than 10 μs for the Universal Time determination, that meets all requirements of the VGOS program.

  1. Data-adaptive detection of transient deformation in geodetic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walwer, Damian; Calais, Eric; Ghil, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The recent development of dense and continuously operating Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) networks worldwide has led to a significant increase in geodetic data sets that sometimes capture transient-deformation signals. It is challenging, however, to extract such transients of geophysical origin from the background noise inherent to GNSS time series and, even more so, to separate them from other signals, such as seasonal redistributions of geophysical fluid mass loads. In addition, because of the very large number of continuously recording GNSS stations now available, it has become impossible to systematically inspect each time series and visually compare them at all neighboring sites. Here we show that Multichannel Singular Spectrum Analysis (M-SSA), a method derived from the analysis of dynamical systems, can be used to extract transient deformations, seasonal oscillations, and background noise present in GNSS time series. M-SSA is a multivariate, nonparametric, statistical method that simultaneously exploits the spatial and temporal correlations of geophysical fields. The method allows for the extraction of common modes of variability, such as trends with nonconstant slopes and oscillations shared across time series, without a priori hypotheses about their spatiotemporal structure or their noise characteristics. We illustrate this method using synthetic examples and show applications to actual GPS data from Alaska to detect seasonal signals and microdeformation at the Akutan active volcano. The geophysically coherent spatiotemporal patterns of uplift and subsidence thus detected are compared to the results of an idealized model of such processes in the presence of a magma chamber source.

  2. Geodetic Observations of Ongoing Unrest at Santorini Caldera, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, A. V.; Stiros, S. C.; Moschas, F.; Saltogianni, V.; Feng, L.; Psimoulis, P.; Jiang, Y.; Karakas, O.; Polster, S.

    2012-12-01

    After approximately 60 years of seismic quiescence within Santorini caldera, in January 2011 the volcano reawakened with a significant seismic swarm and rapidly expanding near-radial deformation. Using a combination of 10 continuous and 22 campaign GPS stations with observations beginning in 2006, we've captured the onset, and 3D shape of surface deformation. Deformation primarily radiates from inside the northern half of the caldera, with episodic growth periods lasting several months at a time. As of this writing, the caldera has expanded laterally about 185 mm, and uplifted at least 80 mm (with the maximum uplift likely occurring under the submerged caldera floor—unobservable by GPS). We will discuss the current geodetic evolution including continuous and 4 GPS campaigns during the period of unrest, exploring new numerical models to address the accompanying stress evolution of the system. We recognize that only anelastic inflation models including volumetric addition and viscoelastic relaxation or discrete dislocation will allow such growth to occur without a long-term stress increase. While observations of the current deformation sequence are unprecedented at Santorini, it is not certain that they mark the early stages of a process leading to an eruption given that other similar calderas have experienced comparable activity without eruption.

  3. Dynamic testing of railway metal culvert using geodetic methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beben Damian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to compare and assess suitability of two methods of geodetic measurements (tachymetry i interferometry used to determine changes of the geometric condition of building and engineering structures. The paper presents the selected results of experimental tests under dynamic loads that were conducted on a railway metal culvert. The dynamic loads were caused by the passages of various trains. The measurements were made for all trains which had been running over the culvert during a 24 hour period. Advantages and disadvantages of both applied methods were characterized. The disadvantage of the tachymetry method is the discreteness of measurements and the lack of the possibility of verifying the results after finishing the field works. The tachymetry measurements were conducted using precise tachymetry manufactured by Leica TC2002. The IBIS microwave coherent radar was used in the interferometry method. Moreover, a special microwave horns IBIS-H23 type with a maximum gain of 23 dBi were used as the interferometer antennas (transmitting and receiving. Conclusions drawn from the tests can be helpful in the measurements of such culverts.

  4. Archive of information about geosamples curated by NMNH collected during NOAA/NOS and USCGS hydrographic surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Prior to August 2001, physical sediment samples collected by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USCGS) and NOAA National Ocean Service (NOS) personnel during...

  5. 77 FR 43063 - Affirmation of Vertical Datum for Surveying and Mapping Activities for the Territory of Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... Activities for the Territory of Puerto Rico AGENCY: National Geodetic Survey (NGS), National Ocean Service... vertical datum for the Territory of Puerto Rico, which includes the islands of Puerto Rico,...

  6. Strain and stress fields in the Southern Apennines (Italy) constrained by geodetic, seismological and borehole data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palano, M.; Cannavò, F.; Ferranti, L.; Mattia, M.; Mazzella, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    We present an improved evaluation of the current strain and stress fields in the Southern Apennines (Italy) obtained through a careful analysis of geodetic, seismological and borehole data. In particular, our analysis provides an updated comparison between the accrued strain recorded by geodetic data, and the strain released by seismic activity in a region hit by destructive historical earthquakes. To this end, we have used nine years of GPS observations (2001-2010) from a dense network of permanent stations, a data set of 73 well-constrained stress indicators (borehole breakouts and focal mechanisms of moderate-to-large earthquakes) and published estimations of the geological strain accommodated by active faults in the region. Although geodetic data are generally consistent with seismic and geological information, previously unknown features of the current deformation in southern Italy emerge from this analysis. The newly obtained GPS velocity field supports the well-established notion of a dominant NE-SW-oriented extension concentrated in a ˜50-km-wide belt along the topographic relief of the Apennines, as outlined by the distribution of seismogenic normal faults. Geodetic deformation is, however, non-uniform along the belt, with two patches of higher strain-rate and shear-stress accumulation in the north (Matese Mountains) and in the south (Irpinia area). Low geodetic strain-rates are found in the Bradano basin and Apulia plateau to the east. Along the Ionian Sea margin of southern Italy, in southern Apulia and eastern Basilicata and Calabria, geodetic velocities indicate NW-SE extension that is consistent with active shallow-crustal gravitational motion documented by geological studies. In the west, along the Tyrrhenian margin of the Campania region, the tectonic geodetic field is disturbed by volcanic processes. Comparison between the magnitude of the geodetic and the seismic strain rates (computed using a long historical seismicity catalogue) allow detecting

  7. Current status of the EPOS WG4 - GNSS and Other Geodetic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Rui; Bastos, Luísa; Bruyninx, Carine; D'Agostino, Nicola; Dousa, Jan; Ganas, Athanassios; Lidberg, Martin; Nocquet, Jean-Mathieu

    2013-04-01

    WG4 - "EPOS Geodetic Data and Other Geodetic Data" is the Working Group of the EPOS project in charge of defining and preparing the integration of the existing Pan-European Geodetic Infrastructures that will support the European Geosciences, which is the ultimate goal of the EPOS project. The WG4 is formed by representatives of the participating EPOS countries (23) but it is also open to the entire geodetic community. In fact, WG4 also includes members from countries that formally are not part of the current phase of EPOS. In an ongoing effort, the majority of existing GNSS Research Infrastructures in Europe were identified. The current database, available at http://epos-couch.cloudant.com/epos-couch/_design/epos-couch/, lists a total of 50 Research Infrastructures managing a total of 1534 GNSS CORS sites. This presentation intends to detail the work being produced within the working group WG4 related with the definition of strategies towards the implementation of the best solutions that will permit to the end-users, and in particular geo-scientists, to access the geodetic data, derived solutions, and associated metadata using transparent and uniform processes. The first step toward the design of an implementation and business plan is the definition of the core services for geodetic data within EPOS. In this talk, we will present the current status of the discussion about the content of core services. Three levels of core services could be distinguished, for which their content need to be defined. The 3 levels are: (1) the core services associated to data (diffusion, archive, long-term preservation, quality check, rapid analysis) (2) core services associated to geodetic products (analysis, products definition like position time series, velocity field and Zenithal Total Delay) (3) User oriented services (reference frames, real-time solutions for early warning systems, strain rate maps, meteorology, space weather, …). Current propositions and remaining open

  8. GeoSEA: Geodetic Earthquake Observatory on the Seafloor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Heidrun; Lange, Dietrich; Flueh, Ernst R.; Petersen, Florian; Behrmann, Jan-Hinrich; Devey, Colin

    2014-05-01

    Space geodetic observations of crustal deformation have contributed greatly to our understanding of plate tectonic processes in general, and plate subduction in particular. Measurements of interseismic strain have documented the active accumulation of strain, and subsequent strain release during earthquakes. However, techniques such as GPS cannot be applied below the water surface because the electromagnetic energy is strongly attenuated in the water column. Evidence suggests that much of the elastic strain build up and release (and particularly that responsible for both tsunami generation and giant earthquakes) occurs offshore. To quantify strain accumulation and assess the resultant hazard potential we urgently need systems to resolve seafloor crustal deformation. Here we report on first results of sea trials of a newly implemented seafloor geodesy array. The GeoSEA (Geodetic Earthquake Observatory on the Seafloor) array consists of a seafloor transponder network comprising 35 units and a wave glider acting as a surface unit (GeoSURF) to ensure satellite correspondence, data transfer and monitor system health. Seafloor displacement occurs in the horizontal (x,y) and vertical direction (z). The vertical displacement is measured by monitoring pressure variations at the seafloor. Horizontal seafloor displacement can be measured either using an acoustic/GPS combination to provide absolute positioning (requiring a suitably equipped vessel to perform repeated cruises to provide the GPS fixes) or by long-term acoustic telemetry between different beacons fixed on the seafloor to determine relative distances by using the travel time observations to each other, which is the technique tested during our short sea trials. For horizontal direct path measurements, the system utilizes acoustic ranging techniques with a ranging precision better than 15 mm and long term stability over 2 km distances. Vertical motion is obtained from pressure gauges. Integrated inclinometers

  9. A Strategic Independent Geodetic VLBI Network for Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Denise; Combrinck, Ludwig; de Witt, Alet

    2014-12-01

    Irregularities of the rotation of the Earth in space are described by the Earth Orientation Parameters (EOPs). An independent EOP network, applying the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) technique and using the Vienna VLBI Software (VieVS), are strategically essential for Europe to minimize its reliance on foreign global support in terms of required infrastructure for the realization of such a network. The generation of independent EOPs is already achievable by countries such as the USA, the People's Republic of China, and the Russian Federation due to their large extent of land mass that allows for long baselines in both the North-South and East-West directions and thus allows for accurate determination of all EOPs. These three countries need not rely on foreign partnerships to generate EOPs, as they all have independent geodetic VLBI networks capable of determining EOPs for precise positioning, navigation, and satellite launch/orbital purposes. They also have or are developing independent Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) constellations; so does the European Union (EU). Accurate EOPs are essential for long-term orbital maintenance of GNSS constellations, leaving the EU GALILEO GNSS vulnerable and reliant on the three superpowers. Generation of accurate EOPs by Europe is not possible due to its much smaller land mass and thus smaller achievable baselines. Even though there are many radio telescopes spread across Europe, these are separated by relatively short distances. The proposed stations that will be used to investigate this independent EOP network for Europe are the WETTZELL radio telescope in Germany, two German owned radio telescopes, TIGOCONC in Concepción, Chile, and OHIGGINS in Antarctica, as well as the HartRAO radio telescope in South Africa.

  10. Finite element method for solving geodetic boundary value problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fašková, Zuzana; Čunderlík, Róbert; Mikula, Karol

    2010-02-01

    The goal of this paper is to present the finite element scheme for solving the Earth potential problems in 3D domains above the Earth surface. To that goal we formulate the boundary-value problem (BVP) consisting of the Laplace equation outside the Earth accompanied by the Neumann as well as the Dirichlet boundary conditions (BC). The 3D computational domain consists of the bottom boundary in the form of a spherical approximation or real triangulation of the Earth’s surface on which surface gravity disturbances are given. We introduce additional upper (spherical) and side (planar and conical) boundaries where the Dirichlet BC is given. Solution of such elliptic BVP is understood in a weak sense, it always exists and is unique and can be efficiently found by the finite element method (FEM). We briefly present derivation of FEM for such type of problems including main discretization ideas. This method leads to a solution of the sparse symmetric linear systems which give the Earth’s potential solution in every discrete node of the 3D computational domain. In this point our method differs from other numerical approaches, e.g. boundary element method (BEM) where the potential is sought on a hypersurface only. We apply and test FEM in various situations. First, we compare the FEM solution with the known exact solution in case of homogeneous sphere. Then, we solve the geodetic BVP in continental scale using the DNSC08 data. We compare the results with the EGM2008 geopotential model. Finally, we study the precision of our solution by the GPS/levelling test in Slovakia where we use terrestrial gravimetric measurements as input data. All tests show qualitative and quantitative agreement with the given solutions.

  11. a Matlab Geodetic Software for Processing Airborne LIDAR Bathymetry Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, M.; Prezioso, G.

    2015-04-01

    The ability to build three-dimensional models through technologies based on satellite navigation systems GNSS and the continuous development of new sensors, as Airborne Laser Scanning Hydrography (ALH), data acquisition methods and 3D multi-resolution representations, have contributed significantly to the digital 3D documentation, mapping, preservation and representation of landscapes and heritage as well as to the growth of research in this fields. However, GNSS systems led to the use of the ellipsoidal height; to transform this height in orthometric is necessary to know a geoid undulation model. The latest and most accurate global geoid undulation model, available worldwide, is EGM2008 which has been publicly released by the U.S. National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) EGM Development Team. Therefore, given the availability and accuracy of this geoid model, we can use it in geomatics applications that require the conversion of heights. Using this model, to correct the elevation of a point does not coincide with any node must interpolate elevation information of adjacent nodes. The purpose of this paper is produce a Matlab® geodetic software for processing airborne LIDAR bathymetry data. In particular we want to focus on the point clouds in ASPRS LAS format and convert the ellipsoidal height in orthometric. The algorithm, valid on the whole globe and operative for all UTM zones, allows the conversion of ellipsoidal heights using the EGM2008 model. Of this model we analyse the slopes which occur, in some critical areas, between the nodes of the undulations grid; we will focus our attention on the marine areas verifying the impact that the slopes have in the calculation of the orthometric height and, consequently, in the accuracy of the in the 3-D point clouds. This experiment will be carried out by analysing a LAS APRS file containing topographic and bathymetric data collected with LIDAR systems along the coasts of Oregon and Washington (USA).

  12. A MATLAB GEODETIC SOFTWARE FOR PROCESSING AIRBORNE LIDAR BATHYMETRY DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pepe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability to build three-dimensional models through technologies based on satellite navigation systems GNSS and the continuous development of new sensors, as Airborne Laser Scanning Hydrography (ALH, data acquisition methods and 3D multi-resolution representations, have contributed significantly to the digital 3D documentation, mapping, preservation and representation of landscapes and heritage as well as to the growth of research in this fields. However, GNSS systems led to the use of the ellipsoidal height; to transform this height in orthometric is necessary to know a geoid undulation model. The latest and most accurate global geoid undulation model, available worldwide, is EGM2008 which has been publicly released by the U.S. National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA EGM Development Team. Therefore, given the availability and accuracy of this geoid model, we can use it in geomatics applications that require the conversion of heights. Using this model, to correct the elevation of a point does not coincide with any node must interpolate elevation information of adjacent nodes. The purpose of this paper is produce a Matlab® geodetic software for processing airborne LIDAR bathymetry data. In particular we want to focus on the point clouds in ASPRS LAS format and convert the ellipsoidal height in orthometric. The algorithm, valid on the whole globe and operative for all UTM zones, allows the conversion of ellipsoidal heights using the EGM2008 model. Of this model we analyse the slopes which occur, in some critical areas, between the nodes of the undulations grid; we will focus our attention on the marine areas verifying the impact that the slopes have in the calculation of the orthometric height and, consequently, in the accuracy of the in the 3-D point clouds. This experiment will be carried out by analysing a LAS APRS file containing topographic and bathymetric data collected with LIDAR systems along the coasts of Oregon and Washington

  13. Geodetic Characterization of Santorini Caldera From Continuous GPS Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, G. T.; Newman, A. V.; Psimoulis, P.; Stiros, S.

    2007-12-01

    Santorini Caldera, in the southern Aegean, is part of a well developed, and very active volcanic system fueled by subduction along the Hellenic arc. The caldera is partially submerged, with only pieces of caldera wall, flanks, and central post-caldera lavas exposed above the sea level comprising a grouping of five small islands. The system had its most recent caldera-forming event around 1650 B.C. in a massive series of Plinean eruptions that expelled some 60 km3 of volcanic material, burying the previous island surface. The system remains active with ongoing smaller pyroclastic and phreatic eruptions, forming the central islets atop of the submerged caldera floor. In late-spring 2006, with UNAVCO field support and support form the Santorini Volcano Observatory, a network of two continuous GPS monuments spanning the caldera was established, and completion of a third monument is planned for this coming year. Additionally, 18 existing and new geodetic markers were first established with GPS across the 5-island group in 2006. These locations cover the caldera rim and flanks, and the central volcanic flows. Preliminary data from the two continuous GPS sites suggest that deformation across the caldera is currently minimal, and below the detection threshold for the 1.5 year continuous network. Through continuing analysis of the continuous network, along with additional campaign measurements, we hope to establish the temporal character and spatial extent of potential deformation in the volcanic complex, and determine if there exists any significant transient deformation associated with ongoing magma movement or edifice cooling. Monitoring such a rate over time may be useful for early hazard awareness and mitigation during regional volcanic crises.

  14. Geodetic Study of Ground Instability at Active Geothermal Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, M. H.; Bawner, E.; Nanis, H.; Alotaibi, M.; Suwihli, S.

    2016-12-01

    Active geothermal systems may cause substantial crustal deformation that can damage the precious infrastructure and increase the frequency and magnitude of earthquakes in the surrounding region. Geothermal production practices commonly contribute to surface motions triggered by natural tectonic and volcanic forces at active geothermal fields and may intensify their significance over years. Hence, routine monitoring of active geothermal sites is required to evaluate the impact of production activities and assess associated ground instabilities. Knowledge of the reservoir geometry, compaction, and response to production behaviors will aid in identifying ideal locations for new production and recharge wells to advance the performance of such a reservoir. This study investigates active geothermal processes and recent seismic events and their impacts on crustal deformation at the Raft River Geothermal Power Plant (RGP) in southeastern Idaho and at the Coso Geothermal (CG) field in eastern California. Contemporary geodetic observations from Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) and Global Positioning System (GPS) imply a rapid rate of ground subsidence ( 7 cm/yr) across the Raft River Valley with a local anomaly of ample uplift (3 cm/yr) near RGP. The measured rate of deflation at CG is 3.1 cm/yr throughout a large area ( 55 sq km) that is directly correlating with the extent of active geothermal production. These rapid rates of ground deformation indicate considerable depressurization of the two reservoirs. Volumetric analysis and modeling are currently underway to characterize the two reservoirs and to infer their deformation source parameters. Understanding the hydrothermal-geomechanical response of the reservoirs to fluid production and injection is crucial for their management and development.

  15. Determination Of Horizontal Geodetic Control Networks For Engineering Objects Using Optoelectronic Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćmielewski Kazimierz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The correctness of the geodetic service of an engineering object not seldom requires designing, alignment or renewing of geodetic situational control points. Building robots often cause that fixed situational control points are partly or completely inaccessible. For setting the position of these control points, there is worked out the methodology using the optoelectronic method. The prepared set of tools realizes the method’s assumptions and enables to determine the sides and control points based on the set of laser planes. In this article there is presented the innovative set of geodetic equipment for fixing horizontal control points. The presented set has been experimentally tested under laboratory conditions taking its functionality, operation range and applied accuracy into account. The measurement accuracy of the set of tools, resulting from identification of the energetic centres of laser planes’ edges, visualizing the sides of geodetic control networks, is within the range of ±0.02mm - ±0.05mm. There were also discussed exemplary versions of shapes and structures of horizontal geodetic control networks (regular and irregular, which are possible to be fixed with the use of the constructed set of tools.

  16. Choosing Geodetic Monuments Based on Noise in New Zealand GPS Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavan, J.

    2004-12-01

    Geodetic signals of tectonic or volcanological interest recorded by geodetic instrumentation may be degraded or obscured by the presence of noise in the geodetic data. Limiting the noise is therefore important for the detection and interpretation of such signals. One source of noise is random motion occurring within the connection of the geodetic instrument to the ground. In the case of surface instruments such as GPS, the connection to the ground is through a geodetic monument. The motion of this monument, with respect to a representative volume of the Earth's near surface in its vicinity, is termed monument noise. Monument noise results from processes such as soil swelling in response to rainfall, and general rock and soil weathering effects. In this paper we investigate the noise levels within time series of continuous GPS (CGPS) positions collected on concrete pillar monuments in New Zealand. We compare these noise levels with those from drilled, braced monuments in several U.S. CGPS networks. We investigate under what conditions monument noise is the limiting noise source in the CGPS data, and attempt to provide a basis for decisions on what type of monument to deploy under certain scenarios.

  17. Geodetic deformation Across the Central Apennines from GPS Data in the time span 1999-2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Loddo

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the time span 1999-2003 was set up and repeatedly surveyed a not permanent GPS network located across one of the highest seismic areas of the central Apennines (Italy. The Central Apennine Geodetic Network (CA-GeoNet, extends across Umbria, Abruzzo, Marche and Lazio regions, in an area of ?180x130 km, from Tyrrhenian to the Adriatic sea. It consists in 125 GPS stations distributed at 3-5 km average grid and includes 7 permanent GPS stations operated by the Italian Space Agency (ASI and the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica and Vulcanologia (INGV. With the aim to estimate the active strain rate across this part of the chain, the GPS sites have been located on the main geological units of the area and across the typical basin and range structures, related with the main seismogenic faults. In this paper we show the network and the first results obtained for a subset of 23 stations that have been occupied at least during three repeated campaigns, in the time span 1999-2003. Data analysis, performed by Bernese 4.2 software, shows an extensional rate normal to the chain, in agreement with geological and seismic data. The strain rates in the inner chain are ranging from 12x10-9±11yr-1 to 16x10-9±11yr-1 and from -14x10-9±11yr-1 to -3x10-9±11yr-1. This result provides an improved estimation of the ongoing deformation of this area with respect to previous studies and is in agreement with the style of deformation inferred from seismicity and with the features of the main seismogenic sources from recent geological and seismological investigations.

  18. Geodetic infrastructure at the Barcelona harbour for sea level monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Benjamin, Juan Jose; Gili, Josep; Lopez, Rogelio; Tapia, Ana; Pros, Francesc; Palau, Vicenc; Perez, Begona

    2015-04-01

    The presentation is directed to the description of the actual geodetic infrastructure of Barcelona harbour with three tide gauges of different technologies for sea level determination and contribution to regional sea level rise and understanding past and present sea level rise in the Barcelona harbour. It is intended that the overall system will constitute a CGPS Station of the ESEAS (European Sea Level) and TIGA (GPS Tide Gauge Benchmark Monitoring) networks. At Barcelona harbour there is a MIROS radar tide gauge belonging to Puertos del Estado (Spanish Harbours).The radar sensor is over the water surface, on a L-shaped structure which elevates it a few meters above the quay shelf. 1-min data are transmitted to the ENAGAS Control Center by cable and then sent each 1 min to Puertos del Estado by e-mail. The information includes wave forescast (mean period, significant wave height, sea level, etc.This sensor also measures agitation and sends wave parameters each 20 min. There is a GPS station Leica Geosystems GRX1200 GG Pro and antenna AX 1202 GG. The Control Tower of the Port of Barcelona is situated in the North dike of the so-called Energy Pier in the Barcelona harbor (Spain). This tower has different kind of antennas for navigation monitoring and a GNSS permanent station. As the tower is founded in reclaimed land, and because its metallic structure, the 50 m building is subjected to diverse movements, including periodic fluctuations due to temperature changes. In this contribution the 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014 the necessary monitoring campaigns are described. In the framework of a Spanish Space Project, the instrumentation of sea level measurements has been improved by providing the Barcelona site with a radar tide gauge Datamar 2000C from Geonica S.L. in June 2014 near an acoustic tide gauge from the Barcelona Harbour installed in 2013. Precision levelling has been made several times in the last two years because the tower is founded in reclaimed land and

  19. A Comparison of Geodetic Strain Rates With Earthquake Moment Tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; Holt, W. E.

    2004-12-01

    In this paper we compare the global model from interpolation of GPS data with the global model inferred from earthquake moment tensors. We use the Harvard CMT catalog to calculate moment rates based on 3 assumptions: a. we assume earthquakes are self-similar; b. we assume a uniform Beta value of the Gutenberg-Richter distribution; c. we assume that all of the long-term strain is accommodated seismically. If these assumptions are correct then the seismicity rate is proportional to the tectonic moment rate. We then inferred a long-term moment rate tensor field estimate for all plate boundary zones from which we inferred a long-term seismic strain rate estimate. Using this estimate we solved for a self-consistent kinematic global solution (motions of rigid spherical caps and motions within plate boundary zones) using bi-cubic spline interpolation of the inferred strain rates. We tested the above assumptions by comparing the global kinematic model obtained from earthquake data with a global model inferred from interpolation of space geodetic data [Kreemer et al., 2003]. A comparison between the two models shows good agreement for motion directions of the North American, and Eurasian plates and for the plate boundary zones within these regions (e.g., Tibet). Problems arise, and our assumptions break down, for plates adjacent to fast spreading ridges where divergence of plates appears to be accommodated aseismically. We next investigated the correlation of strain rate tensor inferred from the interpolation of GPS observations within deforming Asia with the earthquake moment tensors, using both elastic and viscous rheologies. Our solutions satisfy the force balance equations for a given rheology. Our goal for this exercise is to investigate whether the interseismic signal, inferred from GPS, correlates better with moment tensor style for an elastic rheology as opposed to a viscous rheology. Results to date suggest that the viscous models only provide a better agreement

  20. Geodetic constraints on continental rifting along the Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilinger, R.; McClusky, S.; Arrajehi, A.; Mahmoud, S.; Rayan, A.; Ghebreab, W.; Ogubazghi, G.; Al-Aydrus, A.

    2006-12-01

    We are using the Global Positioning System (GPS) to monitor and quantify patterns and rates of tectonic and magmatic deformation associated with active rifting of the continental lithosphere and the transition to sea floor spreading in the Red Sea. Broad-scale motions of the Nubian and Arabian plates indicate coherent plate motion with internal deformation below the current resolution of our measurements (~ 1-2 mm/yr). The GPS-determined Euler vector for Arabia-Nubia is indistinguishable from the geologic Euler vector determined from marine magnetic anomalies, and Arabia-Eurasia relative motion from GPS is equal within uncertainties to relative motion determined from plate reconstructions, suggesting that Arabia plate motion has remained constant (±10%) during at least the past ~10 Ma. The approximate agreement between broad-scale GPS rates of extension (i.e., determined from relative plate motions) and those determined from magnetic anomalies along the Red Sea rift implies that spreading in the central Red Sea is primarily confined to the central rift (±10-20%). Extension appears to be more broadly distributed in the N Red Sea and Gulf of Suez where comparisons with geologic data also indicate a relatively recent (between 500 and 125 kyr BP) change in the motion of the Sinai block that is distinct from both Nubia and Arabia. In the southern Red Sea, GPS results are beginning to define the motion of the "Danakil micro-plate". We investigate and report on a model involving CCW rotation of the Danakil micro-plate relative to Nubia and magmatic inflation below the Afar Triple Junction that is consistent with available geodetic constraints. Running the model back in time suggests that the Danakil micro-plate has been an integral part of rifting/triple junction processes throughout the history of separation of the Arabian and Nubian plates. On the scale of Nubia-Arabia-Eurasia plate interactions, we show that new area formed at spreading centers roughly equals that

  1. Kinematics of the Southwestern Caribbean from New Geodetic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, G.; La Femina, P. C.; Tapia, A.; Camacho, E.; Chichaco, E.; Mora-Paez, H.; Geirsson, H.

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of the Caribbean, Cocos, Nazca, and South American plates has resulted in a complex plate boundary zone and the formation of second order tectonic blocks (e.g., the North Andean, Choco and Central America Fore Arc blocks). The Panama Region [PR], which is bounded by these plates and blocks, has been interpreted and modeled as a single tectonic block or deformed plate boundary. Previous research has defined the main boundaries: 1) The Caribbean plate subducts beneath the isthmus along the North Panama Deformed Belt, 2) The Nazca plate converges at very high obliquity with the PR and motion is assumed along a left lateral transform fault and the South Panama Deformed Belt, 3) The collision of PR with NW South America (i.e., the N. Andean and Choco blocks) has resulted in the Eastern Panama Deformed Belt, and 4) collision of the Cocos Ridge in the west is accommodated by crustal shortening, Central American Fore Arc translation and deformation across the Central Costa Rican Deformed Belt. In addition, there are several models that suggest internal deformation of this region by cross-isthmus strike-slip faults. Recent GPS observations for the PR indicates movement to the northeast relative to a stable Caribbean plate at rates of 6.9±4.0 - 7.8±4.8 mm a-1 from southern Costa Rica to eastern Panama, respectively (Kobayashi et al., 2014 and references therein). However, the GPS network did not have enough spatial density to estimate elastic strain accumulation across these faults. Recent installation and expansion of geodetic networks in southwestern Caribbean (i.e., Costa Rica, Panama, and Colombia) combined with geological and geophysical observations provide a new input to investigate crustal deformation processes in this complex tectonic setting, specifically related to the PR. We use new and existing GPS data to calculate a new velocity field for the region and to investigate the kinematics of the PR, including elastic strain accumulation on the

  2. Geodetic data support trapping of ethane in Titan's polar crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotin, Christophe; Rambaux, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Titan's surface is characterized by polar depressions that strongly influence interpretations of the gravity data. This study investigates several geodynamical models that can explain these depressions. For each model, the values of the three moments of inertia are computed numerically by discretizing the interior in spherical coordinates. The study shows that a Pratt model where the polar subsurface is made of ethane clathrates can explain the polar depression, the abrupt jump in altitude at about 60 degrees latitude, and the values of the degree 2 gravity coefficients. This model, proposed by Choukroun and Sotin [1], is based on the stability of ethane clathrate hydrates relative to methane clathrate hydrates. In addition to fitting the geodetic data, it explains the absence of ethane in Titan's atmosphere although ethane is the main product of the photolysis of methane. Other geophysical models based on latitudinal variations in the tidal heating production or in the heat flux at the base of the icy crust do not provide such a good match to the gravity and topographic observations. The ethane-clathrate model predicts that all the ethane produced by photolysis of methane at the present rate during the last billion years could be stored in the polar subsurface. It is consistent with the age of Titan's surface and that of Titan's atmospheric methane inferred from geological and geochemical observations by the Cassini/Huygens mission. The present study also emphasizes the role of mass anomalies on the interpretation of the degree 2 gravity coefficients. It shows that for Titan, a slow rotator, the values of the two equatorial moments of inertia (MoI) are largely affected by the polar depressions whereas the value of polar MoI is not. Therefore, as pointed out by previous calculations [2], calculating the moment of inertia (MoI) factor from the value of J2 could lead to major errors. This is not the case for our preferred Titan's model for which the negative polar

  3. Photogrammetry status in the act geodetic and cartographic law and connected regulations. (Polish Title: Status fotogrametrii w ustawie prawo geodezyjne i kartograficzne i przepisach powiazanych)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyka, K.; Myszka, P.

    2015-12-01

    The topic of the article is the analysis of regulations referring to photogrammetry, which have been in effect since the latest amendments in the Act Geodetic and Cartographic Law were introduced. Among many new rules, the four most important for regulations for photogrammetry were selected for the analysis. The largest part of analyses deals with so-called technical standards. This regulation introduces the term: geodetic photogrammetric measurement and places identical accuracy requirements as for field measurement. However, photogrammetric measurement, in this law is treated less thoroughly than other techniques. Often in this interpretation of the regulations there are different opinions between the ones who order the measurements and those who carry them out. The article shows which regulations are not satisfactorily clear and can be interpreted in different ways. Moreover, the article refers to unsatisfactory consistency between the analysed enactments. Finally, it was stated that the regulations, despite the indicated drawbacks, allow the application of photogrammetry in surveying and there is a prospect of granting photogrammetry the rank of the operation method, especially in large projects, e.g. the update of cadastral maps and land survey maps.

  4. Subsidence Detection Using InSAR and Geodetic Measurements in the North-West of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, Morteza

    2010-05-01

    The subsidence of the Earth surface is a phenomenon that occurs in some places in the world which overuse underground sources of water. As Iran has semi-arid and arid climate and the rate of rainfall is lower than the mean rate in the world then nowadays we are encountered by over-exploitation of groundwater in agricultural areas and also for extending the cities and industrial areas. Geodetic measurements i.e., repeated leveling measurements of first order leveling network of Iran and continuous GPS measurements of Iranian Permanent GPS Network of Iran (IPGN), showed that there are subsidence areas in the north-west of Iran. In this paper we try to find the area and rate of subsidence in the north-west of Iran using InSAR and geodetic techniques. The result of InSAR technique shows a better understanding on this phenomenon in these areas and has a good consistency with accurate geodetic measurements.

  5. Geodetic Leveling for Rhode Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the project is to identify existing or establish new (as needed) survey elevation benchmarks for the purpose of providing accurate orthometric heights...

  6. Geodetic Leveling for Petit Manan National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the project is to identify existing or establish new (as needed) survey elevation benchmarks for the purpose of providing accurate orthometric heights...

  7. Geodetic Control Points - MO 2014 Springfield Benchmarks (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Points that show set benchmark or survey control locations in the City of Springfield. Many of these points are PLS section corners and quarter corners. These points...

  8. Geodetic Leveling for Eastern Shore of Virginia National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the project is to identify existing or establish new (as needed) survey elevation benchmarks for the purpose of providing accurate orthometric heights...

  9. Geodetic Control Points - MO 2014 Springfield Benchmarks (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — Points that show set benchmark or survey control locations in the City of Springfield. Many of these points are PLS section corners and quarter corners. These points...

  10. Geodetic observations of fault creep in the Imperial Valley: hidden faults, earthquake hazard and implications for frictional properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, E. O.; Fialko, Y. A.

    2014-12-01

    We present new observations of the pattern of fault creep and interseismic deformation in the Imperial Valley, California using a combination of multiple InSAR viewing geometries and survey-mode GPS. We combine more than 100 survey-mode GPS velocities (Crowell et al., 2013) with Envisat InSAR observations from descending tracks 84 and 356 and ascending tracks 77 and 306 (149 total acquisitions), processed using the Stanford Method for Persistent Scatterers (StaMPS) package (Hooper et al., 2007). The result is a dense map of surface velocities across the Imperial fault and surrounding areas. The data suggest that a previously little-known extension of the Superstition Hills fault through the town of El Centro may accommodate a significant portion of the slip previously attributed to the Imperial Fault. We investigate a suite of possible models for the transfer of this slip to the Imperial and Cerro Prieto faults to the south, yielding a range of plausible hazard scenarios. Finally, we compare the geodetic data to models of earthquake cycles with rate- and state-dependent friction to assess the implications for creep depth, moment accumulation rate, and recurrence interval of large events on these faults.

  11. Monitoring of Sea Floor Dynamics by the Application of Geodetic Deformation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorst, L.

    2003-04-01

    is the application of geodetic deformation analysis [Caspary, 1987] to several gridded soundings of the same area. Various hypotheses can be set up for temporal analyses of the area, both per grid point and of the whole area at once. The hypotheses for the area analysis suppose a static behaviour, or an outlying sounding, or a trend, or general instability. They analyse for depth, slope, or sand wave amplitude changes. The hypothesis that fits the best to the data - given the risks of choosing a wrong hypothesis - is accepted as the most probable, i.e. it has the highest test statistic with respect to a critical value. The risk of selecting the wrong alternative hypothesis can be chosen differently for every hypothesis: an undetected continuous growth in sand wave amplitude has for instance worse hydrographic consequences than a single undetected outlying survey. Therefore, the critical value for a hypothesis depends on the accepted chance of falsely choosing a hypothesis. The HS can use this analysis as a tool for the determination of an appropriate survey frequency for the area under consideration, and marine geomorphological research projects can apply it to data sets for e.g. validation of sand wave models. For the point analysis, the minimal detectable deviations of the static hypothesis are several decimetres instead of several centimetres, due to less redundancy of measurements. This method can however detect internal dynamics within an area. Moreover, a prediction of the future situation in an area can be made by extrapolation of the observed dynamics. Obviously, this leads to a worse precision for a more future prediction. If the precisions of a prediction are compared to standards, like the guidelines of the IHO on bathymetry [International Hydrographic Organization, 1998], an alternative tool becomes available for the survey planning: when too many points in an area have a too large predicted standard deviation, a new survey is required there. The

  12. Tectonic dynamics of the Lipari-Vulcano islands revealed by geodetic and seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambino, S.; Alparone, S.; Bonforte, A.; Gresta, S.; Guglielmino, F.; Obrizzo, F.; Puglisi, G.

    2009-12-01

    Ground deformations measured during the last two GPS surveys carried out in March 2006 and September 2007 on the Lipari-Vulcano network are analyzed. Through this period, the monitoring seismic network measured an increase of seismic strain release around the Lipari-Vulcano complex with respect to the previous years. GPS surveys measured a significant N-ward motion of Vulcano island with respect to the ITRF05. This motion abruptly decreases in the N part of Vulcano, suggesting a decoupling of the main Vulcano island from the rest of the volcanic complex. By assuming a local reference frame, we observed that the Lipari island and the northernmost part of the Vulcano island are moving SSE-ward with respect to the central and southernmost part of the Vulcano island. GPS data also highlighted a local uplift of the “La Fossa” cone superimposed on the general subsidence of the island, increasing towards N. The vertical movements measured by GPS are compared with the results of the leveling surveys carried out on the network installed and managed by the INGV - Osservatorio Vesuviano for monitoring vertical ground movements on Volcano island. Height variations are computed with respect to a reference benchmark located on the southern part of the island, which is a relatively stable area compared to the northern part. The comparison between the two most recent surveys (October 2003 and October 2008) indicates a significant subsidence of the centre-northern area of the island (bottom Fossa Crater and Vulcanello). We also analyzed the long-term tilt observations through the same period. The tilt network at Vulcano Island currently has five borehole stations, four of which are installed at depth of 8-10 m, allowing recording stable and highly accurate signals with low noise. Tilt vectors concur well with leveling and GPS data, highlighting a deflection towards the central-northern part of the island. Geodetic strain tensor analysis derived by GPS data was performed over

  13. Geodetic and geophysical results from a Taiwan airborne gravity survey: Data reduction and accuracy assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, C.W.; Hsiao, Y.S.; Shih, H.C.

    2007-01-01

    tracking stations. Long-wavelength errors in position are reduced when doing numerical differentiations for velocity and acceleration. A procedure for computing resolvable wavelength of error-free airborne gravimetry is derived. The accuracy requirements of position, velocity, and accelerations for a 1...

  14. Optimization of geodetic and hydrographic survey to determine the silting of reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Ломпас, Олександр Васильович

    2012-01-01

    У дисертаційній роботі встановлено залежності точності визначення площі поперечного перерізу профілю та об’єму водосховища в залежності від кількості промірних точок, кількості знімальних профілів, точності виміру глибин знімальним пристроєм та кривини підводного рельєфу. Для опису кривини рельєфу запропоновано коефіцієнт кривини поверхні дна водосховища, який обчислюється як сума других похідних функції глибини на профілі. На основі встановлених залежностей запропоновано методику оцінки точн...

  15. TESTING THE ACCURACY OF MEASURED VALUES IN CONTINUOUS LONG-TERM GEODETIC MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Vaněček

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available widespread used method. In this paper, an analysis of the accuracy and its changes over time of the measured values in continuous geodetic monitoring is presented. For the analysis, a set of data measured in the period of time between January 2006 to July 2010 was used. The main method of the analysis is a linear-harmonic function approximation.

  16. Geodetic networks of processing by singular decomposition of the configuration matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiss Gabriel

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper present a solution of the Gauss-Markov Model for processing geodetic networks with constraints using singular decomposition of the network’s design matrix A. The homogenisation and dehomogenisation of the model needed for this purpose is introduced too. Outputs of the solution are presented by the necessary matrices and upon advantages of this way are discoursed.

  17. Geodetic, teleseismic, and strong motion constraints on slip from recent southern Peru subduction zone earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Norabuena, E. O.; Ji, C.; Boroschek, R.; Comte, D.; Simons, M.; Dixon, T. H.; Rosen, P. A.

    2007-03-01

    We use seismic and geodetic data both jointly and separately to constrain coseismic slip from the 12 November 1996 Mw 7.7 and 23 June 2001 Mw 8.5 southern Peru subduction zone earthquakes, as well as two large aftershocks following the 2001 earthquake on 26 June and 7 July 2001. We use all available data in our inversions: GPS, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) from the ERS-1, ERS-2, JERS, and RADARSAT-1 satellites, and seismic data from teleseismic and strong motion stations. Our two-dimensional slip models derived from only teleseismic body waves from South American subduction zone earthquakes with Mw > 7.5 do not reliably predict available geodetic data. In particular, we find significant differences in the distribution of slip for the 2001 earthquake from models that use only seismic (teleseismic and two strong motion stations) or geodetic (InSAR and GPS) data. The differences might be related to postseismic deformation or, more likely, the different sensitivities of the teleseismic and geodetic data to coseismic rupture properties. The earthquakes studied here follow the pattern of earthquake directivity along the coast of western South America, north of 5°S, earthquakes rupture to the north; south of about 12°S, directivity is southerly; and in between, earthquakes are bilateral. The predicted deformation at the Arequipa GPS station from the seismic-only slip model for the 7 July 2001 aftershock is not consistent with significant preseismic motion.

  18. Geodezija od Mesopotamije do Globalnog geodetskog opažačkog sistema : Geodesy from Mesopotamie to Global Geodetic Observing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medžida Mulić

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tokom šest milenijuma postojanja civilizacije na Zemlji, geodetske tehnike su doživjele teško sagledive promjene. Definicija i uloga geodezije su se mijenjale u skladu s tim promijenila. Geodezija (viša je evoluirala od svoje originalne klasične definicije da „proučava kretanja nebeskih tijela, oblik i dimenzije Zemlje“ u „znanost koja osim naprijed rečenog, proučava njene promjene i kompleksne dinamičke procese, koji djeluju unutar Zemlje, na njenoj površini i iznad njene površine, kao i u svemiru koji je okružuje. Rad predstavlja detaljan pregled geodetskih tehnika, instrumenata, katastra i kartografije kod starih civilizacija: Mesopotamije, starog Egipta, antičke Grčke, starog Rima, pa sve do Evropljana, između 17. stoljeća do modernog doba. Posebno su opisani geodetski radovi u Bosni i Hercegovini, od doba osmanlija, austro-ugarskog premjera, do savremenih dostignuća u polju premjera i primjene satelitskih modernih tehnika. Globalni geodetski opažački sistem-GGOS, glavna komponenta Internacionalne asocijacije za geodeziju, kao projekat za buduće generacije geodeta, opisan je na kraju. : During the six millennia of the existence of the civilization on the Earth, surveying techniques have been experienced difficult foreseeable changes. The definition and role of geodesy have been changing accordingly. Geodesy has evolved from its original classic definition that "studying the movements of celestial bodies, the shape and dimensions of the Earth" in the "science which, beside it noted above, studies its changes and complex dynamic processes that ongoing inside the Earth, on the surface, above its surfaces, and evironment. The paper is overview of the geodetic techniques and the surveying instruments, cadastre and cartography in the ancien civilizations: Mesopotamia, ancient Egypt, antic Greece, ancient Rome, to the Europeans, from the 17th century to modern times. A detailed description devoted to surveying and geodetic

  19. Geodetic Imaging of Marsh Surface Elevation with Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, C. T.; Starek, M. J.; Gibeaut, J. C.; Lord, A.

    2015-12-01

    The resilience of marshes to a rising sea is dependent on their elevation response. Given the level of precision required to measure minute changes in marsh elevation over time, survey methods have to be adapted to minimize impacts to the sediment surface. Current approaches include Surface Elevation Tables (SETs), which are used to monitor wetland surface change with respect to an in situ vertical benchmark. Although SETs have been proven as an effective technique to track subtle sedimentation rates (productive estuarine ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico. The study region is covered by dense and tall saw-grass that makes it a challenging environment for bare-earth mapping. For this survey, a Riegl VZ-400 TLS (1550 nm wavelength) was utilized. The system is capable of recording multiple returns per a transmitted pulse (up to 15) and provides full-waveform output for signal post-processing to extract returns. The objectives of the study are twofold: 1) examine impacts of TLS survey design, scan angle and scan density on marsh elevation mapping; 2) assess the capabilities of multiple-echo and full-waveform TLS data to extract the bare-earth surface below the dense vegetation. This presentation will present results of the study including the developed TLS survey protocol and data processing workflow, details on waveform and multi-echo approaches for ground point detection, and a discussion on error analysis and challenges for measuring marsh surface elevation with TLS.

  20. Misbheaving Faults: The Expanding Role of Geodetic Imaging in Unraveling Unexpected Fault Slip Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, W. D.; Briggs, R.

    2015-12-01

    Geodetic imaging techniques enable researchers to "see" details of fault rupture that cannot be captured by complementary tools such as seismology and field studies, thus providing increasingly detailed information about surface strain, slip kinematics, and how an earthquake may be transcribed into the geological record. For example, the recent Haiti, Sierra El Mayor, and Nepal earthquakes illustrate the fundamental role of geodetic observations in recording blind ruptures where purely geological and seismological studies provided incomplete views of rupture kinematics. Traditional earthquake hazard analyses typically rely on sparse paleoseismic observations and incomplete mapping, simple assumptions of slip kinematics from Andersonian faulting, and earthquake analogs to characterize the probabilities of forthcoming ruptures and the severity of ground accelerations. Spatially dense geodetic observations in turn help to identify where these prevailing assumptions regarding fault behavior break down and highlight new and unexpected kinematic slip behavior. Here, we focus on three key contributions of space geodetic observations to the analysis of co-seismic deformation: identifying near-surface co-seismic slip where no easily recognized fault rupture exists; discerning non-Andersonian faulting styles; and quantifying distributed, off-fault deformation. The 2013 Balochistan strike slip earthquake in Pakistan illuminates how space geodesy precisely images non-Andersonian behavior and off-fault deformation. Through analysis of high-resolution optical imagery and DEMs, evidence emerges that a single fault map slip as both a strike slip and dip slip fault across multiple seismic cycles. These observations likewise enable us to quantify on-fault deformation, which account for ~72% of the displacements in this earthquake. Nonetheless, the spatial distribution of on- and off-fault deformation in this event is highly spatially variable- a complicating factor for comparisons

  1. Establishment of 2000 National Geodetic Control Network of China and It’s Technological Progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Junyong

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: 2000’ National Geodetic Control Network of China is an important fundamental scientific engineering project in China. It consists of three parts which are establishment of 2000 National GPS Geodetic Network, its combination adjustment with national astro-geodetic network and 2000 National Gravity Fundamental network. It provides the high precise coordinate reference and gravity reference for three dimensional geo-center national coordinates system and gravity system, respectively. Additionally, it provides precise unified geometric and physical geodesy information for the economic construction, the national defense and the scientific research. Methods: 1. The larger number of data are processed in triple networks adjustment of 2000 National GPS Geodetic Network, which are chosen from the GPS monitoring stations, such as grade A, B of national GPS network , grade 1st and 2nd of national GPS network, crustal movement observation network of China, and others crustal deformation monitoring stations. Finally, the data of 2666 GPS stations are used in the data processing of 2000 National GPS Geodetic Network, including 124 external stations and 2542 internal stations. In order to the results of triple networks adjustment are corresponding to that of three dimensional geo-center coordinates system, ITRF 97 and epoch 2000.0 are chosen as the coordinate reference frame and epoch reference, respectively. The methods of “strong reference” and “weak reference” are combined used in the control data selection of triple networks adjustment. The scale and rotation scales are adopted for each sub network. The least square adjustment is firstly adopted in each sub network adjustment. The data of obvious abnormal baselines are found and rejected firstly. And the method of double factor robust estimation is adopted in the data processing. 2. The combined adjustment of 2000 National GPS Geodetic Network and national astro-geodetic network is

  2. Geodetic networks in Al-Hoceima, Fez-Meknes and Ouarzazate regions (Morocco) to monitor local deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, A. J.; Ruiz, A. M.; Lacy, M. C.; Galindo-Zaldívar, J.; Anahnah, F.; Ruano, P.; Álvarez-Lobato, P. Ayarza, F.; Arboleya, A. Teixel, M. L.; Azzouz, O.; Ahmamou, A. Chalouan, M.; Kchikach, A.

    2009-04-01

    In the framework of some interdisciplinary research projects, several geodetic studies have been initiated aiming to quantify ground deformation in some areas of Morocco: the Al-Hoceima region (Rif cordillera), the Fez-Meknes region and the Ouarzazate region (Atlas Mountains). The Al-Hoceima region, located in the central part of the Rif Cordilleras, has undergone an intense seismic activity, in which the most significant events occurred in 1994 and 2004 (M= 6.3). Although seismicity data support the presence of transcurrent faults, and available radar interferometry researches evidence surface deformations, geological data suggest that main seismogentic fault zone has not a surface expression. Anyway, a set of N-S oriented normal faults (Rouadi, Al-Hoceima, Trougout) determines the present-day geomorphology and seems to continue to be active in surface. In this area, a new non-permanent GPS network consisting of 6 sites has been installed and surveyed in June 2007 and September 2008. The repeated measurements of this network may allow to exactly determine the surface expression of deep tectonic deformations in this region, and to quantify the creep and the coseismic motions in the area, that will contribute to better understand the seismic hazard. The Prerif Ridges located in the Fez-Meknes region, constitute the active mountain front of the Rif cordillera that accommodates most of the recent convergence between Eurasia and African plates. South of the ridges, the Saïss foreland basin overlies the foreland rocks corresponding to the Middle Atlas. There are evidences of Quaternary uplift of the Prerif Ridges and deformation of recent sediments as consequence of the southwards propagation of reverse faults along the mountain front. In addition, the foreland basin undergoes a roughly N-S extensional regime. The region undergoes a moderate seismic activity, with catastrophic events like that occurred in 1755 which damaged Fez and Meknes. On September 2007, a non

  3. Sensor Data Records (SDR) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission for 1985-03-31 (NODC Accession 0002349)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of March 31, 1985. Parameters include:...

  4. Geodetic Control Points, PLSS Corners, Published in 2000, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Walworth County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale as of 2000. It is described as 'PLSS Corners'. Data by this publisher are often provided...

  5. Geodetic Networks, PLSS Sections, Published in 2000, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Walworth County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Networks dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale as of 2000. It is described as 'PLSS Sections'. Data by this publisher are often provided in...

  6. Geodetic Control Points, SR Points, Published in 2008, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Box Elder County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2008. It is described as 'SR...

  7. Geodetic Control Points, UTM 83 tics, Published in 2008, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Box Elder County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2008. It is described as 'UTM...

  8. Geodetic Control Points, control, Published in 2008, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Box Elder County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2008. It is described as...

  9. Ice cap melting and low‐viscosity crustal root explain the narrow geodetic uplift of the Western Alps

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chéry, J; Genti, M; Vernant, P

    2016-01-01

    ...) the isostatic response to denudation responsible for only a fraction of the observed uplift and (2) the rebound induced by the Wurmian ice cap melting which predicts a broader uplifting region than the one evidenced by geodetic observations...

  10. Geodetic Networks, Brian Head Grid, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Networks dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is described as 'Brian...

  11. Geodetic Control Points, master control points, Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2007. It is described as...

  12. NODC Standard Product: US Navy Geosat wind/wave data (WWDR) from the Geodetic Mission (NODC Accession 0054150)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains a complete copy of the previous NODC CD-ROM for the Wind/Wave Data from the Geodetic Mission (revised) between March 31, 1985 and September...

  13. Global geodetic observing system meeting the requirements of a global society on a changing planet in 2020

    CERN Document Server

    Plag, Hans-Peter

    2009-01-01

    Geodesy plays a key role in geodynamics, geohazards, the global water cycle, global change, atmosphere and ocean dynamics. This book covers geodesy's contribution to science and society and identifies user needs regarding geodetic observations and products.

  14. Geodetic Control Points, Brian Head Landmarks, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is described as...

  15. The deflection of light induced by the Sun's gravitational field and measured with geodetic VLBI

    CERN Document Server

    Titov, O

    2015-01-01

    The Sun's gravitational field deflects the apparent positions of close objects in accordance with the formulae of general relativity. Optical astrometry is used to test the prediction, but only with the stars close to the Sun and only during total Solar eclipses. Geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is capable of measuring the deflection of the light from distant radio sources anytime and across the whole sky. We show that the effect of light deflection is equivalent to the gravitational delay calculated during the reduction of VLBI data. All reference radio sources display an annual circular motion with the magnitude proportional to their ecliptic latitude. In particular, radio sources near the ecliptic pole draw an annual circle with magnitude of 4 mas. This effect could be easily measured with the current precision of the geodetic VLBI data.

  16. Applying the theory of general relativity to reducing geodetic VLBI data

    CERN Document Server

    Titov, O

    2015-01-01

    We present an alternate formula for calculating gravitational time delay. We use this formula to reduce geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) data, taking into account gravitational effects within the solar system, and to test general relativity. The alternate formula was obtained by expanding the conventional formula in a Taylor series. We show that the gravitational delay can be split into several terms including a term due to the coordinate transformation and terms that are explicitly linked to the light deflection angle. Our formula is compared numerically with the conventional formula, and difference in arrival times within 1 ps are found at 1$^\\circ$ from the Sun for a full range of baseline lengths. We conclude that the standard reduction of geodetic VLBI data for the effects of general relativity is equivalent to displacing the reference radio sources from their original catalogue positions in accordance with the classical light deflection formula across the whole sky.

  17. Cartographic and geodetic methods to characterize the potential landing sites for the future Russian missions Luna-Glob and Luna-Resurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachevtseva, I. P.; Kokhanov, A. A.; Konopikhin, A. A.; Nadezhdina, I. E.; Zubarev, A. E.; Patratiy, V. D.; Kozlova, N. A.; Uchaev, D. V.; Uchaev, Dm. V.; Malinnikov, V. A.; Oberst, J.

    2015-04-01

    Characterization of the potential landing sites for the planned Luna-Glob and Luna-Resurs Russian missions requires cartographic and geodetic support prepared with special methods and techniques that are briefly overviewed here. The data used in the analysis, including the digital terrain models (DTMs) and the orthoimages acquired in the survey carried out from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and Kaguya spacecraft, are described and evaluated. By way of illustration, different regions of the lunar surface, including the subpolar regions of the Moon, are characterized with the suggested methods and the GIS-technologies. The development of the information support for the future lunar missions started in 2011, and it is now carried on in MIIGAiK Extraterrestrial Laboratory (MExLab), which is a department of the Moscow State University of Geodesy and Cartography (MIIGAiK).

  18. Meteor detections at the Metsähovi Fundamental Geodetic Research Station (Finland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja-Halli, A.; Gritsevich, M.; Näränen, J.; Moreno-Ibáñez, M.; Lyytinen, E.; Virtanen, J.; Zubko, N.; Peltoniemi, J.; Poutanen, M.

    2016-01-01

    We provide an overview and present some spectacular examples of the recent meteor observations at the Metsähovi Geodetic Research Station. In conjunction with the Finnish Fireball Network the all-sky images are used to reconstruct atmospheric trajectories and to calculate the pre-impact meteor orbits in the Solar System. In addition, intensive collaborative work is pursued with the meteor research groups worldwide. We foresee great potential of this activity also for educational and outreach purposes.

  19. Least squares adjustment of large-scale geodetic networks by orthogonal decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, J.A.; Golub, G.H.; Heath, M.T.; Plemmons, R.J.

    1981-11-01

    This article reviews some recent developments in the solution of large sparse least squares problems typical of those arising in geodetic adjustment problems. The new methods are distinguished by their use of orthogonal transformations which tend to improve numerical accuracy over the conventional approach based on the use of the normal equations. The adaptation of these new schemes to allow for the use of auxiliary storage and their extension to rank deficient problems are also described.

  20. The Machian contribution of the Universe to geodetic precession, frame dragging and gravitational clock effect

    CERN Document Server

    Christillin, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Gravitomagnetism resulting from SR has been applied to geodetic precession and frame dragging. The substantial contribution of the "fictitious" Coriolis force, due to the relative rotation of the rest of the Universe in the non inertial frame of the free falling but rotating satellite, has to be taken into account, giving another quantitative confirmation of Mach's arguments and of the black hole nature of our Universe. Also the gravitational clock effect has an elementary prediction in the present post Newtonian formulation.

  1. Geodetic Slip Solution for the Mw=7.4 Champerico (Guatemala) Earthquake of 07 November 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, A. P.; DeMets, C.; Briole, P.; Molina, E.; Flores, O.; Rivera, J.; Lasserre, C.; Lyon-Caen, H.; Lord, N. E.

    2014-12-01

    As the first large subduction thrust earthquake off the coast of western Guatemala in the past several decades, the 07 November 2012 Mw=7.4 earthquake offers the first opportunity for a geodetic study of coseismic and postseismic behavior for a segment of the Middle America trench where frictional coupling makes a transition from weak coupling off the coast of El Salvador to strong coupling in southern Mexico. We use measurements at 19 continuous GPS sites in Guatemala, El Salvador, and Mexico to estimate the coseismic slip and post-seismic deformation of the November 2012 Champerico (Guatemala) earthquake. Coseismic offsets range from ~47 mm near the epicenter to inversion of the geodetic data indicate that that up to ~2 m of coseismic slip occurred on a ~30 km by 30 km rupture area between ~10 and 30 km depth, encouragingly close to the global CMT epicenter. The geodetic moment of 13 x 1019 N·m and corresponding magnitude of 7.4 both agree well with independent seismological estimates. An inversion for the postseismic fault afterslip shows that the transient postseismic motions recorded at 11 GPS sites are well fit with a logarithmically decaying function. More than 70 per cent of the postseismic slip occurred at the same depth or directly downdip from the main shock epicenter. At the upper limit, afterslip that occurred within 6 months of the earthquake released energy equivalent to only ~20 per cent of the coseismic moment. The seismologically derived slip solution from Ye et al. (2012), which features more highly concentrated slip than our own, fits our GPS offsets reasonably well provided that we translate their slip centroid ~51 km to the west to a position close to our own slip centroid. The geodetic and seismologic slip solutions thus suggest bounds of 2-5 m for the peak slip along a region of the interface no larger than 30 x 30 km and possibly much smaller.

  2. The Impact of Sea Level Rise on Geodetic Vertical Datum of Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, A. H. M.; Abazu, I. C.; Pa'suya, M. F.; Omar, K. M.; Hamid, A. I. A.

    2016-09-01

    Sea level rise is rapidly turning into major issues among our community and all levels of the government are working to develop responses to ensure these matters are given the uttermost attention in all facets of planning. It is more interesting to understand and investigate the present day sea level variation due its potential impact, particularly on our national geodetic vertical datum. To determine present day sea level variation, it is vital to consider both in-situ tide gauge and remote sensing measurements. This study presents an effort to quantify the sea level rise rate and magnitude over Peninsular Malaysia using tide gauge and multi-mission satellite altimeter. The time periods taken for both techniques are 32 years (from 1984 to 2015) for tidal data and 23 years (from 1993 to 2015) for altimetry data. Subsequently, the impact of sea level rise on Peninsular Malaysia Geodetic Vertical Datum (PMGVD) is evaluated in this study. the difference between MSL computed from 10 years (1984 - 1993) and 32 years (1984 - 2015) tidal data at Port Kelang showed that the increment of sea level is about 27mm. The computed magnitude showed an estimate of the long-term effect a change in MSL has on the geodetic vertical datum of Port Kelang tide gauge station. This will help give a new insight on the establishment of national geodetic vertical datum based on mean sea level data. Besides, this information can be used for a wide variety of climatic applications to study environmental issues related to flood and global warming in Malaysia.

  3. Aftershock distribution as a constraint on the geodetic model of coseismic slip for the 2004 Parkfield earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennington, Ninfa; Thurber, Clifford; Feigl, Kurt; ,

    2011-01-01

    Several studies of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake have linked the spatial distribution of the event’s aftershocks to the mainshock slip distribution on the fault. Using geodetic data, we find a model of coseismic slip for the 2004 Parkfield earthquake with the constraint that the edges of coseismic slip patches align with aftershocks. The constraint is applied by encouraging the curvature of coseismic slip in each model cell to be equal to the negative of the curvature of seismicity density. The large patch of peak slip about 15 km northwest of the 2004 hypocenter found in the curvature-constrained model is in good agreement in location and amplitude with previous geodetic studies and the majority of strong motion studies. The curvature-constrained solution shows slip primarily between aftershock “streaks” with the continuation of moderate levels of slip to the southeast. These observations are in good agreement with strong motion studies, but inconsistent with the majority of published geodetic slip models. Southeast of the 2004 hypocenter, a patch of peak slip observed in strong motion studies is absent from our curvature-constrained model, but the available GPS data do not resolve slip in this region. We conclude that the geodetic slip model constrained by the aftershock distribution fits the geodetic data quite well and that inconsistencies between models derived from seismic and geodetic data can be attributed largely to resolution issues.

  4. A high-precision, distributed geodetic strainmeter based on dual coaxial cable Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, J.; Wei, T.; Wei, M.; Shen, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Observations of surface deformation are essential for understanding a wide range of geophysical problems, including earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, and glaciers. Current geodetic technologies, such as GPS, InSAR, borehole and laser strainmeters, are costly and limited in their temporal or spatial resolution. Here we present a new type of strainmeter based on coaxial cable Bragg grating (CCBG) sensing technology that provides high-precision, distributed strain measurements at a moderate cost. The coaxial-cable-based strainmeter is designed to cover a long distance (~ km) under harsh environmental conditions such as extreme temperatures. To minimize the environmental noises, two CCBGs are introduced into the geodetic strainmeter: one is used to measure the strain applied on it, and the other acts as a reference only to detect the environmental noises. The environmental noises are removed using the inputs from the strained CCBG and the reference CCBG in a frequency mixer. The test results show that the geodetic strainmeter with dual CCBGs has micron-strain accuracy in the lab.

  5. Crustal motion results derived from observations in the European geodetic VLBI network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Rüdiger; Gueguen, Erwan; Scherneck, Hans-Georg; Nothnagel, Axel; Campbell, James

    2000-10-01

    Geodetic VLBI observations have been performed with the European geodetic VLBI network since early 1990 on a regular basis. The purpose of these observations is to determine crustal motion in Europe and to establish a stable reference frame for other space geodetic techniques. Over the years the size of the network and the number of participating stations has steadily increased. Today, the network extends from the island of Sicily in the south to the island of Spitsbergen/Svalbard in the north and from the Iberian peninsula in the west to the Crimean peninsula in the east. The area covered by the network is affected by two main geodynamic processes which are post-glacial rebound effects in the northern part, and the evolution of the Alps-Apennines orogenic systems in the southern part. With nearly 10 years of VLBI observations the determination of crustal motion in Europe is carried out with high accuracy. Baseline measurements are achieved with an accuracy of a few parts per billion. We compare the evolution of baseline lengths and topocentric station displacements with geophysical models. Strain rates in Europe on a large scale are determined from the results of the VLBI analysis.

  6. Variational solution about over-determined geodetic boundary value problem and its related theories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new solving method for Laplace equation with over-determined geodetic boundary conditions is pro- posed in the paper, with the help of minimizing some kinds of quadratic functional in calculus of variation. At first, the so-called variational solution for over-determined geodetic boundary value problem is defined in terms of principles in calculus of variation. Then theoretical properties related with the solution are derived, especially for its existence, uniqueness and optimal approximation. And then the computational method of the solution is discussed, and its expression is exhibited under the case that all boundaries are spheres. Finally an arithmetic example about EGM96 gravity field model is given, and the computational results show that the proposed method can efficiently raise accuracy to deal with gravity data. In all, the variational solution of over-determined geodetic boundary value problem can not only fit to deal with many kinds of gravity data in a united form, but also has strict mathematical basements.

  7. Geologic context of geodetic data across a Basin and Range normal fault, Crescent Valley, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, A. M.; Lee, J.; Wernicke, B. P.; Sieh, K.

    2004-04-01

    Geodetic strain and late Quaternary faulting in the Basin and Range province is distributed over a region much wider than historic seismicity, which is localized near the margins of the province. In the relatively aseismic interior, both the magnitude and direction of geodetic strain may be inconsistent with the Holocene faulting record. We document the best example of such a disagreement across the NE striking, ˜55° NW dipping Crescent normal fault, where a NW oriented, 70 km geodetic baseline records contemporary shortening of ˜2 mm/yr orthogonal to the fault trace. In contrast, our geomorphic, paleoseismic, and geochronologic analyses of the Crescent fault suggest that a large extensional rupture occurred during the late Holocene epoch. An excavation across the fault at Fourmile Canyon reveals that the most recent event occurred at 2.8 ± 0.1 ka, with net vertical tectonic displacement of 4.6 ± 0.4 m at this location, corresponding to the release of ˜3 m of accumulated NW-SE extension. Measured alluvial scarp profiles suggest a minimum rupture length of 30 km along the range front for the event, implying a moment magnitude Mw of at least 6.6. No prior event occurred between ˜2.8 ka and ˜6.4 ± 0.1 ka, the 14C calender age of strata near the base of the exposed section. Assuming typical slip rates for Basin and Range faults (˜0.3 mm/yr), these results imply that up to one third, or ˜1 m, of the extensional strain released in the previous earthquake could have reaccumulated across the fault since ˜2.8 ka. However, the contemporary shortening implies that the fault is unloading due to a transient process, whose duration is limited to between 6 years (geodetic recording time) and 2.8 ka (the age of the most recent event). These results emphasize the importance of providing accurate geologic data on the timescale of the earthquake cycle in order to evaluate geodetic measurements.

  8. Synchronization of Geodetic Observatories thanks to Time Transfer by Laser Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Alexandre; Exertier, Pierre; Samain, Etienne; Vernotte, François

    2015-08-01

    Since 2008, the Time Transfer by Laser Link experiment (T2L2) onboard Jason-2 at 1336 km allows the clock synchronization by an optical link between ground clocks (generally H-maser) and the space instrument. The space segment includes roughly a detector, a timer, a frequency reference (Ultra Stable Oscillator, USO, provided by the DORIS system) and a Laser Reflector Array. Taking into account the current precision and accuracy of the laser ranging technology and the specifications of the space instrument, the stability of the ground to space time transfer is established at a few picoseconds (ps) over 100 seconds. The combination of any two ground stations (from the International Laser Ranging network) referred to their H-maser clock provides, in common view, a very stable ground to ground time transfer of 10 ps over the common pass (around 10 minutes). The accuracy, of around 100 ps between two time calibrated observatories, is demonstrated thanks to several experiments and a rigourous error budget. However, several geodetic observatories reveal to have a time shift of hundreds of nanoseconds, between their local time reference system and UTC. In order to provide geodetic observatories with a unique time reference frame we used the T2L2 instrument to transfer time in the non-common view mode, all around the international laser network.We show that T2L2 is able to provide accurate frequencies, which are deduced from the ground to space time transfers over each laser station at a few 10-13. Thanks to this monitoring of the frequency variations of the onboard oscillator, we established a physical model to be integrated over 10,000 seconds (around one orbital revolution). This model is built by considering all observatories, weighted by the accuracy of their ground clock. The Grasse geodetic observatory is used to calibrate the model because it is bring back to UTC thanks to a permanent GPS link calibrated tothe Paris Observatory (UTC(OP)). By applying this model, we

  9. Next-Generation Real-Time Geodetic Station Sensor Web for Natural Hazards Research and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Y.; Clayton, R. W.; Fang, P.; Geng, J.; Gutman, S. I.; Kedar, S.; Laber, J. L.; Moore, A. W.; Owen, S. E.; Small, I.; Squibb, M. B.; Webb, F.; Yu, E.

    2012-12-01

    We report on a NASA AIST project focused on better forecasting, assessing, and mitigating natural hazards, including earthquakes, tsunamis, and extreme storms and flooding through development and implementation of a modular technology for the next-generation in-situ geodetic station, and a Geodetic Sensor Web to support the flow of information from multiple stations to scientists, mission planners, decision makers, and first responders. Meaningful warnings save lives when issued within 1-2 minutes for destructive earthquakes, several tens of minutes for tsunamis, and up to several hours for extreme storms and flooding, and can be provided by on-site fusion of multiple data types and generation of higher-order data products: GPS and accelerometer measurements to estimate point displacements, and GPS and meteorological measurements to estimate moisture variability in the free atmosphere. By operating semi-autonomously, each station can provide low-latency, high-fidelity and compact data products within the constraints of narrow communications bandwidth that often accompanies natural disasters. The project encompasses the following tasks, including hardware and software components: (1) Development of a power-efficient, low-cost, plug-in Geodetic Module for fusion of data from in situ sensors including GPS, a MEMS accelerometer package, and a MEMS meteorological sensor package, for deployment at 26 existing continuous GPS stations in southern California. The low-cost modular design is scalable to the many existing continuous GPS stations worldwide. (2) Estimation of new on-the-fly data products with 1 mm precision and accuracy, including three-dimensional broadband displacements and precipitable water, by new software embedded in the Geodetic Module's processor, rather than at a central processing facility. (3) Development of a Geodetic Sensor Web to allow the semi-autonomous sensors to transmit and receive information in real time by means of redundant sensor proxy

  10. Geodetic and Non-Geodetic Methods for Deformation Monitoring of Rock-Fill Dams, a Case Study at Ataturk DAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Y.; Bilgi, S.

    2012-12-01

    Necessity to water is increasing day by day with respect to the World population, rising of living standards and destruction of nature. Water resources have to be controlled and supplied for agricultural uses, drinking and industrial purposes by the countries having limited water resources. This situation is also considerable for Turkey which has a location in the middle zone of World and having limited water sources. Dams are among the most important engineering structures which are used for these purposes. However, the functioning life of dams is as important as the investment and construction. Nevertheless, in order to provide safety of human life living around, well planned monitoring is essential for dams. Deformation measurements have an important status among various engineering surveying. Considering the time and labor consumed by long-term measurements, processing and analysis of measured data, importance of the horizontal and vertical small structural motions at regular intervals could be comprehended. Ataturk Dam in Turkey is the 6th largest dam of world considering the filling volume of embankment. Deformation of Ataturk Dam is being monitoring yearly since 2006 by Istanbul Technical University Department of Geomatics Engineering. We apply both GPS and conventional techniques. In this study, we present the result of radial deformations on Ataturk Dam between 2006 and 2010. The results show significant horizontal movements among the 72% of object points. Maximum movement is found as 14.12 cm (with a radial component of 14.08 cm) in 4.5 years.

  11. Analysis of geodetic and legal documentation in the process of expropriation for roads. Krakow case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trembecka, Anna

    2013-06-01

    Amendment to the Act on special rules of preparation and implementation of investment in public roads resulted in an accelerated mode of acquisition of land for the development of roads. The decision to authorize the execution of road investment issued on its basis has several effects, i.e. determines the location of a road, approves surveying division, approves construction design and also results in acquisition of a real property by virtue of law by the State Treasury or local government unit, among others. The conducted study revealed that over 3 years, in this mode, the city of Krakow has acquired 31 hectares of land intended for the implementation of road investments. Compensation is determined in separate proceedings based on an appraisal study estimating property value, often at a distant time after the loss of land by the owner. One reason for the lengthy compensation proceedings is challenging the proposed amount of compensation, unregulated legal status of the property as well as imprecise legislation. It is important to properly develop geodetic and legal documentation which accompanies the application for issuance of the decision and is also used in compensation proceedings. Zmiana ustawy o szczególnych zasadach przygotowywania i realizacji inwestycji w zakresie dróg publicznych spowodowała przyspieszony tryb pozyskiwania gruntów przeznaczonych pod budowę dróg. Wydawana na jej podstawie decyzja o zezwoleniu na realizację inwestycji drogowej wywołuje szereg skutków, tj. m.in. ustala lokalizację drogi, zatwierdza podziały geodezyjne, zatwierdza projekt budowlany a także powoduje nabycie nieruchomości z mocy prawa, przez Skarb Państwa lub jednostki samorządu terytorialnego. Przeprowadzone badania wykazały iż w powyższym trybie miasto Kraków nabyło w okresie 3 lat ponad 31 ha gruntów przeznaczonych na realizację inwestycji drogowych. Odszkodowanie ustalane jest w drodze odrębnego postępowania w oparciu o operat szacunkowy okre

  12. Slip Distribution and Seismic Moment of the 2010 and 1960 Chilean Earthquakes Inferred from Tsunami Waveforms and Coastal Geodetic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yushiro; Satake, Kenji

    2013-09-01

    The slip distribution and seismic moment of the 2010 and 1960 Chilean earthquakes were estimated from tsunami and coastal geodetic data. These two earthquakes generated transoceanic tsunamis, and the waveforms were recorded around the Pacific Ocean. In addition, coseismic coastal uplift and subsidence were measured around the source areas. For the 27 February 2010 Maule earthquake, inversion of the tsunami waveforms recorded at nearby coastal tide gauge and Deep Ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART) stations combined with coastal geodetic data suggest two asperities: a northern one beneath the coast of Constitucion and a southern one around the Arauco Peninsula. The total fault length is approximately 400 km with seismic moment of 1.7 × 1022 Nm (Mw 8.8). The offshore DART tsunami waveforms require fault slips beneath the coasts, but the exact locations are better estimated by coastal geodetic data. The 22 May 1960 earthquake produced very large, ~30 m, slip off Valdivia. Joint inversion of tsunami waveforms, at tide gauge stations in South America, with coastal geodetic and leveling data shows total fault length of ~800 km and seismic moment of 7.2 × 1022 Nm (Mw 9.2). The seismic moment estimated from tsunami or joint inversion is similar to previous estimates from geodetic data, but much smaller than the results from seismic data analysis.

  13. An application of numerical simulation techniques to improve the resolution of offshore fault kinematics using seafloor geodetic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Sou; Ando, Masataka; Tadokoro, Keiichi

    2005-08-01

    Geodetic measurements reveal a number of tectonic phenomena, such as coseismic and postseismic displacements of earthquakes and interplate coupling on plate interfaces. However, since geodetic measurements are limited to land, slip distribution is poorly resolved offshore, though well constrained in the landward areas. Due to the poverty of offshore data, tectonic motion near trench axes has not been measured. Seafloor geodetic observations provide important information on offshore tectonics. Improved offshore resolution would allow determination of strain accumulation and release processes near trench axes. In this study, using numerical simulation, we discuss the potential for improvement of slip resolution in an offshore area using seafloor geodetic measurements. The plate interface along the Nankai trough is modeled by 36 planar fault segments, whose length and width, respectively, are set to 60 km and 50 km. Three hundred and seventy-five GPS observation sites on land and 10 seafloor sites aligned 60 km off the coast are used for the simulation. We carry out a checkerboard test and compare the estimated slip pattern with the given checkerboard pattern. Models that do not include seafloor sites generate large discrepancies in offshore deformation between the initial and estimated slip patterns, although there are similarities in coastal regions. This indicates poor resolution in offshore areas. When we apply our model to include seafloor sites, the difference between the initial and estimated slip patterns decreases for most of the modeled fault segments. Comparison between these two cases suggests the potential for use of seafloor geodetic techniques to improve offshore resolution.

  14. A Bayesian Perspective on the Complementarity of Tsunami and Geodetic Observations in Models of Megathrust Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladen, A.; Jiang, J.; Minson, S. E.; Lin, Y. N.; Ortega Culaciati, F. H.; Simons, M.

    2011-12-01

    Both geodetic and tsunami observations are commonly used to study the distribution of fault slip in large megathrust earthquakes - although frequently these data sets are not considered simultaneously and are prone to producing significantly different source models. Here, we attempt to quantify the contribution from these different data sets in such inversions. In particular, we are most concerned with the resolution to up-dip and down-dip fault slip provided by each dataset. Such analysis is vital to understanding many key parameters for a given earthquake. Using the CATMIP algorithm, we use a Bayesian approach to explore the estimates of coseismic slip for the 2007 Mw 8.0 Pisco, Peru and 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, Chile earthquakes. Both of these events have on-shore geodetic observations (InSAR and GPS) and open ocean tsunami observations (DART stations). Traditional inverse methods produce a single model subject to some form of regularization. In contrast, in our Bayesian approach, we sample an ensemble of possible models according to how well they fit the data subject to our prior information, resulting in the posterior distributions of possible model parameters. We use the Kullback-Liebler information divergence (KLID) as a metric of the information gain - essentially comparing the posterior PDF to the prior PDF. The KLID serves a role that is similar to model resolution in the classic linearized optimization approach to the inverse problem. Tests of synthetic data and observed data for the two earthquakes demonstrate the expected result that geodetic data has better resolution for slip on portions of the fault closest to land, while tsunami data only provides some constraint on portions of the fault near the trench. These data sets are thus complimentary and should be used simultaneously to extract the most details possible. We discuss implications of these analyses for both the 2007 and 2010 events.

  15. Geodetic Network Design and Optimization on the Active Tuzla Fault (Izmir, Turkey) for Disaster Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halicioglu, Kerem; Ozener, Haluk

    2008-01-01

    Both seismological and geodynamic research emphasize that the Aegean Region, which comprises the Hellenic Arc, the Greek mainland and Western Turkey is the most seismically active region in Western Eurasia. The convergence of the Eurasian and African lithospheric plates forces a westward motion on the Anatolian plate relative to the Eurasian one. Western Anatolia is a valuable laboratory for Earth Science research because of its complex geological structure. Izmir is a large city in Turkey with a population of about 2.5 million that is at great risk from big earthquakes. Unfortunately, previous geodynamics studies performed in this region are insufficient or cover large areas instead of specific faults. The Tuzla Fault, which is aligned trending NE–SW between the town of Menderes and Cape Doganbey, is an important fault in terms of seismic activity and its proximity to the city of Izmir. This study aims to perform a large scale investigation focusing on the Tuzla Fault and its vicinity for better understanding of the region's tectonics. In order to investigate the crustal deformation along the Tuzla Fault and Izmir Bay, a geodetic network has been designed and optimizations were performed. This paper suggests a schedule for a crustal deformation monitoring study which includes research on the tectonics of the region, network design and optimization strategies, theory and practice of processing. The study is also open for extension in terms of monitoring different types of fault characteristics. A one-dimensional fault model with two parameters – standard strike-slip model of dislocation theory in an elastic half-space – is formulated in order to determine which sites are suitable for the campaign based geodetic GPS measurements. Geodetic results can be used as a background data for disaster management systems. PMID:27873783

  16. Seafloor geodetic constraints on interplate coupling of the Nankai Trough megathrust zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Yusuke; Ishikawa, Tadashi; Watanabe, Shun-Ichi; Tashiro, Toshiharu; Asada, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Interplate megathrust earthquakes have inflicted catastrophic damage on human society. Such an earthquake is predicted to occur in the near future along the Nankai Trough off southwestern Japan—an economically active and densely populated area in which megathrust earthquakes have already occurred. Megathrust earthquakes are the result of a plate-subduction mechanism and occur at slip-deficit regions (also known as ‘coupling’ regions), where friction prevents plates from slipping against each other and the accumulated energy is eventually released forcefully. Many studies have attempted to capture distributions of slip-deficit rates (SDRs) in order to predict earthquakes. However, these studies could not obtain a complete view of the earthquake source region, because they had no seafloor geodetic data. The Hydrographic and Oceanographic Department of the Japan Coast Guard (JHOD) has been developing a precise and sustainable seafloor geodetic observation network in this subduction zone to obtain information related to offshore SDRs. Here, we present seafloor geodetic observation data and an offshore interplate SDR-distribution model. Our data suggest that most offshore regions in this subduction zone have positive SDRs. Specifically, our observations indicate previously unknown regions of high SDR that will be important for tsunami disaster mitigation, and regions of low SDR that are consistent with distributions of shallow slow earthquakes and subducting seamounts. This is the first direct evidence that coupling conditions might be related to these seismological and geological phenomena. Our findings provide information for inferring megathrust earthquake scenarios and interpreting research on the Nankai Trough subduction zone.

  17. Heterogeneous interplate coupling along the Nankai Trough, Japan, detected by GPS-acoustic seafloor geodetic observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Yusuke; Ishikawa, Tadashi; Sato, Mariko; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Saito, Hiroaki; Ujihara, Naoto; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Toyama, Shin-ichi; Fujita, Masayuki; Yabuki, Tetsuichiro; Mochizuki, Masashi; Asada, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The recurring devastating earthquake that occurs in the Nankai Trough subduction zone between the Philippine Sea plate and the Eurasian plate has the potential to cause an extremely dangerous natural disaster in the foreseeable future. Many previous studies have assumed interplate-coupling ratios for this region along the trench axis using onshore geodetic data in order to understand this recursive event. However, the offshore region that has the potential to drive a devastating tsunami cannot be resolved sufficiently because the observation network is biased to the land area. Therefore, the Hydrographic and Oceanographic Department of Japan constructed a geodetic observation network on the seafloor along the Nankai Trough using a GPS-acoustic combination technique and has used it to observe seafloor crustal movements directly above the Nankai Trough subduction zone. We have set six seafloor sites and cumulated enough data to determine the displacement rate from 2006 to January 2011. Our seafloor geodetic observations at these sites revealed a heterogeneous interplate coupling that has three particular features. The fast displacement rates observed in the easternmost area indicate strong interplate coupling (>75%) around not only the future Tokai earthquake source region but also the Paleo-Zenisu ridge. The slow displacement rates near the trench axis in the Kumano-nada Sea, a shallow part of the 1944 Tonankai earthquake source region, show a lower coupling ratio (50% to 75%). The slow displacement rate observed in the area shallower than the 1946 Nankaido earthquake source region off Cape Muroto-zaki reflects weakening interplate coupling (about 50%) probably due to a subducting seamount. Our observations above the subducting ridge and seamount indicate that the effect of a subducting seamount on an interplate-coupling region depends on various conditions such as the geometry of the seamount and the friction parameters on the plate boundary.

  18. Geodetic Network Design and Optimization on the Active Tuzla Fault (Izmir, Turkey for Disaster Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haluk Ozener

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Both seismological and geodynamic research emphasize that the Aegean Region, which comprises the Hellenic Arc, the Greek mainland and Western Turkey is the most seismically active region in Western Eurasia. The convergence of the Eurasian and African lithospheric plates forces a westward motion on the Anatolian plate relative to the Eurasian one. Western Anatolia is a valuable laboratory for Earth Science research because of its complex geological structure. Izmir is a large city in Turkey with a population of about 2.5 million that is at great risk from big earthquakes. Unfortunately, previous geodynamics studies performed in this region are insufficient or cover large areas instead of specific faults. The Tuzla Fault, which is aligned trending NE–SW between the town of Menderes and Cape Doganbey, is an important fault in terms of seismic activity and its proximity to the city of Izmir. This study aims to perform a large scale investigation focusing on the Tuzla Fault and its vicinity for better understanding of the region's tectonics. In order to investigate the crustal deformation along the Tuzla Fault and Izmir Bay, a geodetic network has been designed and optimizations were performed. This paper suggests a schedule for a crustal deformation monitoring study which includes research on the tectonics of the region, network design and optimization strategies, theory and practice of processing. The study is also open for extension in terms of monitoring different types of fault characteristics. A one-dimensional fault model with two parameters – standard strike-slip model of dislocation theory in an elastic half-space – is formulated in order to determine which sites are suitable for the campaign based geodetic GPS measurements. Geodetic results can be used as a background data for disaster management systems.

  19. Geodetic Network Design and Optimization on the Active Tuzla Fault (Izmir, Turkey) for Disaster Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halicioglu, Kerem; Ozener, Haluk

    2008-08-19

    Both seismological and geodynamic research emphasize that the Aegean Region, which comprises the Hellenic Arc, the Greek mainland and Western Turkey is the most seismically active region in Western Eurasia. The convergence of the Eurasian and African lithospheric plates forces a westward motion on the Anatolian plate relative to the Eurasian one. Western Anatolia is a valuable laboratory for Earth Science research because of its complex geological structure. Izmir is a large city in Turkey with a population of about 2.5 million that is at great risk from big earthquakes. Unfortunately, previous geodynamics studies performed in this region are insufficient or cover large areas instead of specific faults. The Tuzla Fault, which is aligned trending NE-SW between the town of Menderes and Cape Doganbey, is an important fault in terms of seismic activity and its proximity to the city of Izmir. This study aims to perform a large scale investigation focusing on the Tuzla Fault and its vicinity for better understanding of the region's tectonics. In order to investigate the crustal deformation along the Tuzla Fault and Izmir Bay, a geodetic network has been designed and optimizations were performed. This paper suggests a schedule for a crustal deformation monitoring study which includes research on the tectonics of the region, network design and optimization strategies, theory and practice of processing. The study is also open for extension in terms of monitoring different types of fault characteristics. A one-dimensional fault model with two parameters - standard strike-slip model of dislocation theory in an elastic half-space - is formulated in order to determine which sites are suitable for the campaign based geodetic GPS measurements. Geodetic results can be used as a background data for disaster management systems.

  20. The expanding Earth at present: evidence from temporal gravity field and space-geodetic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiancheng Han

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available

    The Earth expansion problem has attracted great interest, and the present study demonstrates that the Earth has been expanding, at least over the recent several decades. Space-geodetic data recorded at stations distributed globally were used (including global positioning system data, very-long-baseline interferometry, satellite laser ranging stations, and stations for Doppler orbitography and radiopositioning integrated by satellite, which covered a period of more than 10 years in the International Terrestrial Reference Frame 2008. A triangular network covering the surface of the Earth was thus constructed based on the spherical Delaunay approach, and average-weighted vertical variations in the Earth surface were estimated. Calculations show that the Earth is expanding at present at a rate of 0.24 ± 0.04 mm/yr. Furthermore, based on the Earth Gravitational Model 2008 and the secular variation rates of the second-degree coefficients estimated by satellite laser ranging and Earth mean-pole data, the principal inertia moments of the Earth (A, B, C and in particular their temporal variations, were determined: the simple mean value of the three principal inertia moments (i.e., [A+B+C]/3 is gradually increasing. This clearly demonstrates that the Earth has been expanding, at least over the recent decades, and the data show that the Earth is expanding at a rate ranging from 0.17 ± 0.02 mm/yr to 0.21 ± 0.02 mm/yr, which coincides with the space geodetic evidence. Hence, based on both space geodetic observations and gravimetric data, we conclude that the Earth has been expanding at a rate of about 0.2 mm/yr over recent decades.

  1. Geodetic and tectonic analyses along an active plate boundary: The central Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortlieb, L.; Ruegg, J. C.; Angelier, J.; Colletta, B.; Kasser, M.; Lesage, P.

    1989-06-01

    The Gulf of California is traversed by the shear plate boundary between Pacific and North American plates and, because of several islands in its central part, offers the possibility of direct geodetic measurements of plate motion. A geodetic network of 150 km aperture, and comprising 11 stations, was measured in 1982 and 1986 by laser trilateration methods. The deformations deduced from the comparison of the two epochs indicate right-lateral shear strain covering the entire gulf rather than localized movements. In the eastern part of the network, between the axial islands and the Sonoran coast, significant right-lateral shear deformation occurs with a relative displacement of about 23 ± 12 cm over 4 years. In the northwestern region (Canal de Ballenas) a right-lateral displacement of about 17 ± 4 cm is observed, whereas in the southwestern part of the network (Canal Sal-si-Puedes), the deformation remains very weak. This suggests that south of the Canal de Ballenas the plate boundary is locked. A tectonic analysis of Neogene and Quaternary faults in Baja California, Sonora, and the central islands of the gulf, permitted the reconstruction of the stress pattern evolution of this area. These data also indicate the predominance of right-lateral motion on a NW-SE trending zone within a regional framework characterized by an approximately N-S compression and an E-W extension. The geodetic results are discussed in comparison with the neotectonic analysis and the seismic data available in the area. The data suggest a broad strain accumulation zone covering the totality of the central Gulf of California. A NW-SE relative velocity of about 8 ± 3 cm/yr is found between the two sides of the gulf during the 1982-1986 interval.

  2. The Fresnel-Fizeau effect and the atmospheric time delay in geodetic VLBI

    CERN Document Server

    M., Kopeikin S

    2015-01-01

    The Fresnel-Fizeau effect is a special relativistic effect that makes the speed of light dependent on the velocity of a transparent, moving medium. We present a theoretical formalism for discussing propagation of electromagnetic signals through the moving Earth atmosphere with taking into account the Fresnel-Fizeau effect. It provides the rigorous relativistic derivation of the atmospheric time delay equation in the consensus model of geodetic VLBI observations which was never published before. The paper confirms the atmospheric time delay of the consensus VLBI model used in IERS Standards, and provides a firm theoretical basis for calculation of even more subtle relativistic corrections.

  3. Space geodetic observations of nazca-south america convergence across the central andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norabuena; Leffler-Griffin; Mao; Dixon; Stein; Sacks; Ocola; Ellis

    1998-01-16

    Space geodetic data recorded rates and directions of motion across the convergent boundary zone between the oceanic Nazca and continental South American plates in Peru and Bolivia. Roughly half of the overall convergence, about 30 to 40 millimeters per year, accumulated on the locked plate interface and can be released in future earthquakes. About 10 to 15 millimeters per year of crustal shortening occurred inland at the sub-Andean foreland fold and thrust belt, indicating that the Andes are continuing to build. Little (5 to 10 millimeters per year) along-trench motion of coastal forearc slivers was observed, despite the oblique convergence.

  4. ESPACE - a geodetic Master's program for the education of Satellite Application Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, K.; Kirschner, S.; Seitz, F.

    2012-04-01

    In the last decades there has been a rapid development of new geodetic and other Earth observation satellites. Applications of these satellites such as car navigation systems, weather predictions, and, digital maps (such as Google Earth or Google Maps) play a more and more important role in our daily life. For geosciences, satellite applications such as remote sensing and precise positioning/navigation have turned out to be extremely useful and are meanwhile indispensable. Today, researchers within geodesy, climatology, oceanography, meteorology as well as within Earth system science are all dependent on up-to-date satellite data. Design, development and handling of these missions require experts with knowledge not only in space engineering, but also in the specific applications. That gives rise to a new kind of engineers - satellite application engineers. The study program for these engineers combines parts of different classical disciplines such as geodesy, aerospace engineering or electronic engineering. The satellite application engineering program Earth Oriented Space Science and Technology (ESPACE) was founded in 2005 at the Technische Universität München, mainly from institutions involved in geodesy and aerospace engineering. It is an international, interdisciplinary Master's program, and is open to students with a BSc in both Science (e.g. Geodesy, Mathematics, Informatics, Geophysics) and Engineering (e.g. Aerospace, Electronical and Mechanical Engineering). The program is completely conducted in English. ESPACE benefits from and utilizes its location in Munich with its unique concentration of expertise related to space science and technology. Teaching staff from 3 universities (Technische Universität München, Ludwig-Maximilian University, University of the Federal Armed Forces), research institutions (such as the German Aerospace Center, DLR and the German Geodetic Research Institute, DGFI) and space industry (such as EADS or Kayser-Threde) are

  5. Data Democracy in Simultaneous Monte Carlo Optimizations of Geodetic and Seismological Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhaus, H.; Heimann, S.

    2012-04-01

    Estimating the geometry of an earthquake source from seismological and/or geodetic data is a non-linear problem. Often, Monte Carlo optimizations methods are used to find the optimum earthquake model through a clever sampling of the misfit function in the multidimensional model space. The topology of the misfit function, however, very much depends on the data weights we assign. Consequently, also the best fitting model is influenced by the choice of data weights. Data weighting in general is commonly applied these days. Still, there is a large variation between simple arbitrary data weight assignments and weights calculated from estimated data error estimations or trial modeling results. In geodetic source modeling, an accepted and regularly applied procedure is to weight the data, e. g. GPS and InSAR data, according to their quality by using the data error variance-covariance matrix. In this way, we consider correlations of densely spaced data and the data weight factors are independent of the model parametrization. In seismological source studies, the data weighting often appears to be done in a more simple manner. Qualitatively, the azimuthal coverage is taken care of and only sometimes relative weights for different stations are assigned, e. g. based on apparent noise. In a combination of geodetic and seismological data a common rationale for finding the weights would be desirable and moreover we need to find meaningful weighting between the data of different nature, like seismological and GPS data. We present such data weighting in a case study on the 2010 Haiti earthquake to test whether this improves a combined optimization of seismological and geodetic data. For the fault that ruptured during the 2010 Haiti earthquake there are so far at least four different published fault slip models. And, as is often the case, these four are not easily comparable because (1) each model differs from the other to some extent with respect to the model parametrization and

  6. On the interpretation of least squares collocation. [for geodetic data reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapley, B. D.

    1976-01-01

    A demonstration is given of the strict mathematical equivalence between the least squares collocation and the classical minimum variance estimates. It is shown that the least squares collocation algorithms are a special case of the modified minimum variance estimates. The computational efficiency of several forms of the general minimum variance estimation algorithm is discussed. It is pointed out that for certain geodetic applications the least square collocation algorithm may provide a more efficient formulation of the results from the point of view of the computations required.

  7. Geodetic, teleseismic, and strong motion constraints on slip from recent southern Peru subduction zone earthquakes

    OpenAIRE

    Pritchard, M. E.; Norabuena, E. O.; Jillings, C.; Boroschek, R.; Comte, D.; Simons, M.; T. H. Dixon; Rosen, P. A.

    2007-01-01

    We use seismic and geodetic data both jointly and separately to constrain coseismic slip from the 12 November 1996 M_w 7.7 and 23 June 2001 M_w 8.5 southern Peru subduction zone earthquakes, as well as two large aftershocks following the 2001 earthquake on 26 June and 7 July 2001. We use all available data in our inversions: GPS, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) from the ERS-1, ERS-2, JERS, and RADARSAT-1 satellites, and seismic data from teleseismic and strong motion stations...

  8. Correlated errors in geodetic time series: Implications for time-dependent deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, J.; Johnson, H.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of frequent trilateration observations from the two-color electronic distance measuring networks in California demonstrate that the noise power spectra are dominated by white noise at higher frequencies and power law behavior at lower frequencies. In contrast, Earth scientists typically have assumed that only white noise is present in a geodetic time series, since a combination of infrequent measurements and low precision usually preclude identifying the time-correlated signature in such data. After removing a linear trend from the two-color data, it becomes evident that there are primarily two recognizable types of time-correlated noise present in the residuals. The first type is a seasonal variation in displacement which is probably a result of measuring to shallow surface monuments installed in clayey soil which responds to seasonally occurring rainfall; this noise is significant only for a small fraction of the sites analyzed. The second type of correlated noise becomes evident only after spectral analysis of line length changes and shows a functional relation at long periods between power and frequency of and where f is frequency and ?? ??? 2. With ?? = 2, this type of correlated noise is termed random-walk noise, and its source is mainly thought to be small random motions of geodetic monuments with respect to the Earth's crust, though other sources are possible. Because the line length changes in the two-color networks are measured at irregular intervals, power spectral techniques cannot reliably estimate the level of I//" noise. Rather, we also use here a maximum likelihood estimation technique which assumes that there are only two sources of noise in the residual time series (white noise and randomwalk noise) and estimates the amount of each. From this analysis we find that the random-walk noise level averages about 1.3 mm/Vyr and that our estimates of the white noise component confirm theoretical limitations of the measurement technique. In

  9. New High-Precision Values of the Geodetic Rotation of the Major Planets, Pluto, the Moon and the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashkevich, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    This investigation is continuation of our studies of the geodetic (relativistic) rotation of the Solar system bodies (Eroshkin and Pashkevich, 2007) and (Eroshkin and Pashkevich, 2009). For each body (the Moon, the Sun, the major planets and Pluto) the files of the values of the components of the angular velocity of the geodetic rotation are constructed over the time span from AD1000 to AD3000 with one day spacing, by using DE422/LE422 ephemeris (Folkner, 2011), with respect to the proper coordinate systems of the bodies (Seidelmann et al., 2005). For the first time in the perturbing terms of the physical librations for the Moon and in Euler angles for other bodies of the Solar system the most essential terms of the geodetic rotation are found by means of the least squares method and spectral analysis methods.

  10. Ice cap melting and low-viscosity crustal root explain the narrow geodetic uplift of the Western Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chéry, J.; Genti, M.; Vernant, P.

    2016-04-01

    More than 10 years of geodetic measurements demonstrate an uplift rate of 1-3 mm/yr of the high topography region of the Western Alps. By contrast, no significant horizontal motion has been detected. Two uplift mechanisms have been proposed: (1) the isostatic response to denudation responsible for only a fraction of the observed uplift and (2) the rebound induced by the Wurmian ice cap melting which predicts a broader uplifting region than the one evidenced by geodetic observations. Using a numerical model to fit the geodetic data, we show that a crustal viscosity contrast between the foreland and the central part of the Alps, the latter being weaker with a viscosity of 1021 Pa s, is needed. The vertical rates are enhanced if the strong uppermost mantle beneath the Moho is interrupted across the Alps, therefore allowing a weak vertical rheological anomaly over the entire lithosphere.

  11. Academician and geodetic general Stevan P. Bošković, the head of Military Geographic Institute in Belgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevan RADOJČIĆ

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Stevan P. Bošković (1868-1957 was a Serbian geodesist, geographer and cartographer. As a head of Military Geographic Institute, he was the organizer of the first modern geodetic works in Serbia and Yugoslavia. He was the first our geodetic general and the first academician in Serbia and Yugoslavia in the area of geodesy. He innovated and improved geodetic instruments, equipment and methods. He gave a remarkable contribution to activities of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics. Stevan P. Bošković is one of the most educated oficers of Serbian and Yugoslav Armed Forces, and our scientists of that time in general. This paper gives the basic fact about the work of Stevan P. Bošković work and life and his importance in history of geodesy in Serbia and Europe.

  12. Making geodetic glacier mass balances available to the community - Progress and challenges in modifying the WGMS database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machguth, Horst; Landmann, Johannes; Zemp, Michael; Paul, Frank

    2017-04-01

    The recent years have seen a sharp increase in the publication of geodetically derived glacier mass balances. Internationally coordinated glacier monitoring, however, has so far focused mainly on direct glaciological mass balance measurements. There is thus a need to collect geodetic glacier mass balance data in a standardized format and make the data available to the scientific community. This would allow easy access and data use for, e.g., assessment of regional to global scale glacier changes, re-analysis of glaciological mass balance series, evaluation of and comparison to, other data or model results. It appears logical to build such a data archive where glaciological data are already routinely collected. In the framework of the ESA project Glaciers_cci, the World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS) has started an initiative to establish the expertise, the strategy and the infrastructure to make the increasing amount of geodetic glacier mass balance available to the scientific community. The focus is (i) on geodetic (glacier wide) changes as obtained from differencing digital elevation models from two epochs, and (ii) on point elevation change from altimetry. Here we outline the chosen strategy to include gridded data of surface elevation change into the WGMS database. We describe the basic strategy using the netCDF4 data format, summarize the data handling as well as the standardization and discuss major challenges in efficient inclusion of geodetic glacier changes into the WGMS database. Finally, we discuss the potential use of the data and thereby highlight how the added geodetic data influence the calculation of regional to global averages of glacier mass balance.

  13. Technique Errors and Limiting Factors in Laser Ranging to Geodetic Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, G. M.; Luceri, V.; Mueller, H.; Noll, C. E.; Otsubo, T.; Wilkinson, M.

    2012-12-01

    The tracking stations of the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) global network provide to the Data Centres a steady stream of very precise laser range normal points to the primary geodetic spherical satellites LAGEOS (-1 and -2) and Etalon (-1 and -2). Analysis of these observations to determine instantaneous site coordinates and Earth orientation parameters provides a major contribution to ongoing international efforts to define a precise terrestrial reference frame, which itself supports research into geophysical processes at the few mm level of precision. For example, the latest realization of the reference frame, ITRF2008, used weekly laser range solutions from 1983 to 2009, the origin of the Frame being determined solely by the SLR technique. However, in the ITRF2008 publication, Altamimi et al (2011, Journal of Geodesy) point out that further improvement in the ITRF is partly dependent upon improving an understanding of sources of technique error. In this study we look at SLR station hardware configuration that has been subject to major improvements over the last four decades, at models that strive to provide accurate translations of the laser range observations to the centres of mass of the small geodetic satellites and at the considerable body of work that has been carried out via orbital analyses to determine range corrections for some of the tracking stations. Through this study, with specific examples, we start to put together an inventory of system-dependent technique errors that will be important information for SLR re-analysis towards the next realization of the ITRF.

  14. GGOS-D: A German project on the integration of space geodetic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothnagel, A.; Rothacher, M.; Angermann, D.; Artz, T.; Bökmann, S.; et al.

    2008-04-01

    Since September 2005 the German Ministry for Research and Education has been funding a group of scientists at GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ Potsdam), Deutsches Geod¨tisches Forschungsinstitut (DGFI a Munich), Bundesamt f¨ r Kartographie und Geod¨sie (BKG Frankfurt am Main) and Institut f¨ r Geod¨sie u a u a und Geoinformation der Universit¨t Bonn (IGGB Bonn) in a project related to the integration of space a geodetic techniques. These groups comprise experience in GPS, SLR, and VLBI observing techniques as well as in satellite altimetry, global gravity field investigations and large scale combinations. They cooperate with the aim to investigate the production of reference frames and related time series which are consistent across techniques by adapting software packages to common standards and by refining combination procedures. Since the aims of the project closely resemble the general ideas of the GGOS initiative (Global Geodetic Observing System) by the International Association of Geodesy (IAG), the group has gathered under the acronym GGOS-D.

  15. Geodetic Mobile Solar Spectrometry: Description of the New Spectrometer GEMOSS and First Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somieski, A.; Buerki, B.; Kahle, H.-G.; Becker-Ross, H.; Florek, S.; Okruss, M.

    2003-04-01

    In former scientific research projects of the Geodesy and Geodynamic Laboratory (GGL) the method of solar spectrometry has demonstrated its performance as a remote sensing technique for determination of integrated precipitable water vapor (IPWV). A first prototype, named Solar Atmospheric MOnitoring Spectrometer (SAMOS), was developed at GGL in cooperation with the Institute of Spectrochemistry and Applied Spectroscopy (ISAS) in Berlin. A new type of solar spectrometer for geodetic applications is currently under development. In this project the construction of the first prototype GEMOSS I (Geodetic MObile Solar Spectrometer) has been completed. It provides simultaneous measurements of water vapor absorption lines in the range from 730 nm to 910 nm with a spectral resolution of 10-15 pm. This technique allows a compact design, low weight as well as high time resolution and accuracy of IPWV at a relatively low level of costs. First measurements were carried out to verify the system stability under field conditions and the data quality. The presentation will highlight the technical innovations of GEMOSS I and will show results of first measurements.

  16. First geodetic VLBI sessions with the Chinese Deep Space Stations Jiamusi and Kashi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dezhen; Dong, Guangliang; Wang, Guangli; Li, Haitao; Jiang, Wu

    2016-11-01

    The first three 24-h S/X dual-band geodetic VLBI sessions using two new Chinese Deep Space Stations (CDSSs), Jiamusi and Kashi, and four Chinese VLBI Stations (CVSs), Beijing, Kunming, Seshan, and Urumqi were conducted with the goal of improving the two CDSSs' positions, which were previously known to a few decimeters. Due to the limited frequency ranges of Jiamusi and Kashi, different but compatible frequencies for bandwidth synthesis were set at the CDSS and CVS stations. This paper presents the scheduling, correlation and fringe fit, and geodetic analysis of the observations. Final estimates of the station positions are obtained from the global solution using 5365 international VLBI sessions from August 3, 1979 through September 29, 2015. Position estimates for Jiamusi are accurate to 23, 35, and 41 mm in the X, Y, and Z directions, respectively, and for Kashi are accurate to 10, 20, and 16 mm. Precisions of the two CDSSs' positions are improved by a factor of 5-10 over previous values, which fully satisfies the requirements of the experiments and makes the first step towards the foundation and maintenance of the time-space reference frame based on the Chinese Deep Space Network (CDSN).

  17. Extraction of the deterministic ingredient of a dynamic geodetic control network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahar, L.; Even-Tzur, G.

    2012-01-01

    A minimum constraints solution, which resolves the datum defect of a control network, is an arbitrary solution that may result in a systematic error in the estimation of the deformation parameters. This error is not derived from measurements and is usually inconsistent with the geophysical reality. A free network is affected only by errors of measurement and, therefore, a free network is an accepted way of coping with this problem. Study of deformations, which is based on the use of geodetic measurements, is usually performed today by defining a kinematic model. Such a model, when used to describe a complex geophysical environment, can lead to the partial estimation of the deterministic dynamics, which characterize the entire network. These dynamics are themselves expressed in measurements, as the adjustment systems' residuals. The current paper presents an extension of the definition of the parameters that are revalued. This extension enables the cleaning of measurements by means of the extraction of datum elements that have been defined by geodetic measurement. This cleaning minimizes the effects of these elements on the revaluated deformation. The proposed algorithm may be applied to achieve the simultaneous estimation of the physical parameters that define the geophysical activity in the network.

  18. Introduction to the GNSS Geodetic Infrastructure in Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L.; Wang, G.; Huerfano Moreno, V. A.; von Hillebrandt-Andrade, C.; Martínez-Cruzado, J. A.; Liu, H.

    2016-12-01

    The Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands (PRVI) are located within the complex plate boundary zone between the North American and Caribbean plates. The region faces multiple natural hazards, such as earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, hurricanes, and flooding. A natural hazards monitoring network that integrates seismic, tide gauge and high-rate GPS has been established in the region by a joint effort of academic, government and private sectors. This study summarized the current GPS geodetic infrastructure in the PRVI region, which includes three components: a dense CORS network, a stable local reference frame and sophisticated software packages for GPS data processing. This study focused on establishing a local reference frame, the stable Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands reference frame of 2014 (PRVI14), which is essential for precisely delineating local ground deformation over space and time. Applications of the geodetic infrastructure for precise faulting, landslide, and sea-level monitoring were illustrated in this study. According to this study, the St. Croix Island is moving away from the Puerto Rico and Northern Virgin Islands toward southeast with a steady velocity of 1.7 mm/year; the Lajas Valley in southwestern of Puerto Rico may be experiencing a north-south direction extension (1.5 mm/year) and a minor right-lateral strike slip (0.4 mm/year) with respect to the PRVI14 reference frame; the current absolute sea-level rise rate in the PRVI coastal region is about 1.6 to 2.0 mm/year.

  19. Uncertainty assessment in geodetic network adjustment by combining GUM and Monte-Carlo-simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeier, Wolfgang; Tengen, Dieter

    2017-06-01

    In this article first ideas are presented to extend the classical concept of geodetic network adjustment by introducing a new method for uncertainty assessment as two-step analysis. In the first step the raw data and possible influencing factors are analyzed using uncertainty modeling according to GUM (Guidelines to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurements). This approach is well established in metrology, but rarely adapted within Geodesy. The second step consists of Monte-Carlo-Simulations (MC-simulations) for the complete processing chain from raw input data and pre-processing to adjustment computations and quality assessment. To perform these simulations, possible realizations of raw data and the influencing factors are generated, using probability distributions for all variables and the established concept of pseudo-random number generators. Final result is a point cloud which represents the uncertainty of the estimated coordinates; a confidence region can be assigned to these point clouds, as well. This concept may replace the common concept of variance propagation and the quality assessment of adjustment parameters by using their covariance matrix. It allows a new way for uncertainty assessment in accordance with the GUM concept for uncertainty modelling and propagation. As practical example the local tie network in "Metsähovi Fundamental Station", Finland is used, where classical geodetic observations are combined with GNSS data.

  20. Application of Geodetic VLBI Data to Obtaining Long-Term Light Curves for Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijima, Masachika

    2010-01-01

    The long-term light curve is important to research on binary black holes and disk instability in AGNs. The light curves have been drawn mainly using single dish data provided by the University of Michigan Radio Observatory and the Metsahovi Radio Observatory. Hence, thus far, we have to research on limited sources. I attempt to draw light curves using VLBI data for those sources that have not been monitored by any observatories with single dish. I developed software, analyzed all geodetic VLBI data available at the IVS Data Centers, and drew the light curves at 8 GHz. In this report, I show the tentative results for two AGNs. I compared two light curves of 4C39.25, which were drawn based on single dish data and on VLBI data. I confirmed that the two light curves were consistent. Furthermore, I succeeded in drawing the light curve of 0454-234 with VLBI data, which has not been monitored by any observatory with single dish. In this report, I suggest that the geodetic VLBI archive data is useful to obtain the long-term light curves at radio bands for astrophysics.

  1. GPS geodetic measurements of subsidence from groundwater drawdown in central Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansma, P.; Mattioli, G.; Marshall, A.; Czarnecki, J.

    2005-05-01

    The state of Arkansas ranks fifth in the nation in ground water consumption, largely fueled by its robust rice and manufacturing industries. The region centered on Lonoke, Arkansas, Jefferson and Monroe counties in the center of the state has seen dramatic drawdown of its ground-water resources and development of significant cones of depression. Subsidence of 1.5 meters over a few decades was postulated for portions of Arkansas county on the basis of elevation changes of benchmarks. These results were preliminary and measurements were not made with geodetic grade equipment. Validation of these results is the primary goal of our on-going work. We are developing an extensive network of suitable benchmarks throughout central and eastern Arkansas, whose vertical position can be monitored using high-precision Global Positioning System geodesy. Campaign GPS measurements were first obtained in summer 2003. Second epoch observations were acquired throughout 2004. Although errors are high due to the limited temporal dataset, preliminary GPS geodetic results are consistent with subsidence of the ground surface above the cones of depression on the order of tens of millimeters per year.

  2. NEAR REAL-TIME DETERMINATION OF EARTHQUAKE SOURCE PARAMETERS FOR TSUNAMI EARLY WARNING FROM GEODETIC OBSERVATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Manneela

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Exemplifying the tsunami source immediately after an earthquake is the most critical component of tsunami early warning, as not every earthquake generates a tsunami. After a major under sea earthquake, it is very important to determine whether or not it has actually triggered the deadly wave. The near real-time observations from near field networks such as strong motion and Global Positioning System (GPS allows rapid determination of fault geometry. Here we present a complete processing chain of Indian Tsunami Early Warning System (ITEWS, starting from acquisition of geodetic raw data, processing, inversion and simulating the situation as it would be at warning center during any major earthquake. We determine the earthquake moment magnitude and generate the centroid moment tensor solution using a novel approach which are the key elements for tsunami early warning. Though the well established seismic monitoring network, numerical modeling and dissemination system are currently capable to provide tsunami warnings to most of the countries in and around the Indian Ocean, the study highlights the critical role of geodetic observations in determination of tsunami source for high-quality forecasting.

  3. Near Real-Time Determination of Earthquake Source Parameters for Tsunami Early Warning from Geodetic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manneela, Sunanda; Srinivasa Kumar, T.; Nayak, Shailesh R.

    2016-06-01

    Exemplifying the tsunami source immediately after an earthquake is the most critical component of tsunami early warning, as not every earthquake generates a tsunami. After a major under sea earthquake, it is very important to determine whether or not it has actually triggered the deadly wave. The near real-time observations from near field networks such as strong motion and Global Positioning System (GPS) allows rapid determination of fault geometry. Here we present a complete processing chain of Indian Tsunami Early Warning System (ITEWS), starting from acquisition of geodetic raw data, processing, inversion and simulating the situation as it would be at warning center during any major earthquake. We determine the earthquake moment magnitude and generate the centroid moment tensor solution using a novel approach which are the key elements for tsunami early warning. Though the well established seismic monitoring network, numerical modeling and dissemination system are currently capable to provide tsunami warnings to most of the countries in and around the Indian Ocean, the study highlights the critical role of geodetic observations in determination of tsunami source for high-quality forecasting.

  4. Indicating Vertical Deviation of Historical Buildings Using Geodetic Methods - Case Study of Brick and Wood Tower in Nowe Miasteczko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrówczyńska, Maria; Gibowski, Sławomir

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the possibilities of applying geodetic methods to determine the vertical deviation of historical buildings. In particular, the results of measurements obtained for a brick and wood Town Hall Tower located in the town of Nowe Miasteczko have been presented. Geodetic measurements of vertical deviation taken before and after carrying out repairs which were aimed at stopping or eliminating the destructive processes of degradation taking place, especially in the wooden part of the tower. During the renovation works, attention was also given to improving the technical condition of the building, which was reflected by the results of the measurements and calculations.

  5. Improving deformation models by discounting transient signals in geodetic data: 2. Geodetic data, stress directions, and long-term strain rates in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carafa, Michele M. C.; Bird, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The lithosphere of Italy is exposed to a number of different short-term strain transients, including but not limited to landslides, postseismic relaxation, and volcanic inflation/deflation. These transients affect GPS velocities and complicate the assessment of the long-term tectonic component of the surface deformation. In a companion paper we present a method for anticipating the principal patterns of nontectonic, short-term strains and building this information into the covariance matrix of the geodetic velocities. In this work we apply this method to Italian GPS velocities to build an augmented covariance matrix that characterizes all expected discrepancies between short- and long-term velocities. We find that formal uncertainties usually reported for GPS measurements are smaller than the variability of the same benchmarks across a geologic time span. Furthermore, we include in our modeling the azimuths of most compressive horizontal principal stresses (SHmax) because GPS data cannot resolve the active kinematics of coastal and offshore areas. We find that the final tectonic model can be made relatively insensitive to short-term interfering processes if the augmented covariance matrix and SHmax data records are used in the objective function. This results in a preferred neotectonic model that is also in closer agreement with independent geologic and seismological constraints and has the advantage of reducing short-term biases in forecasts of long-term seismicity.

  6. Rapid Assessment of Earthquakes with Radar and Optical Geodetic Imaging and Finite Fault Models (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, E. J.; Sladen, A.; Simons, M.; Rosen, P. A.; Yun, S.; Li, Z.; Avouac, J.; Leprince, S.

    2010-12-01

    Earthquake responders need to know where the earthquake has caused damage and what is the likely intensity of damage. The earliest information comes from global and regional seismic networks, which provide the magnitude and locations of the main earthquake hypocenter and moment tensor centroid and also the locations of aftershocks. Location accuracy depends on the availability of seismic data close to the earthquake source. Finite fault models of the earthquake slip can be derived from analysis of seismic waveforms alone, but the results can have large errors in the location of the fault ruptures and spatial distribution of slip, which are critical for estimating the distribution of shaking and damage. Geodetic measurements of ground displacements with GPS, LiDAR, or radar and optical imagery provide key spatial constraints on the location of the fault ruptures and distribution of slip. Here we describe the analysis of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) and sub-pixel correlation (or pixel offset tracking) of radar and optical imagery to measure ground coseismic displacements for recent large earthquakes, and lessons learned for rapid assessment of future events. These geodetic imaging techniques have been applied to the 2010 Leogane, Haiti; 2010 Maule, Chile; 2010 Baja California, Mexico; 2008 Wenchuan, China; 2007 Tocopilla, Chile; 2007 Pisco, Peru; 2005 Kashmir; and 2003 Bam, Iran earthquakes, using data from ESA Envisat ASAR, JAXA ALOS PALSAR, NASA Terra ASTER and CNES SPOT5 satellite instruments and the NASA/JPL UAVSAR airborne system. For these events, the geodetic data provided unique information on the location of the fault or faults that ruptured and the distribution of slip that was not available from the seismic data and allowed the creation of accurate finite fault source models. In many of these cases, the fault ruptures were on previously unknown faults or faults not believed to be at high risk of earthquakes, so the area and degree of

  7. On the potential of lunar observations in regular geodetic VLBI sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopotek, Grzegorz; Hobiger, Thomas; Haas, Rüdiger

    2017-04-01

    Artificial radio sources on the surface of the Moon enable us to observe lunar based transmitters with geodetic VLBI. Although during the last years a few dedicated VLBI experiments have already been carried out, the question still remains how and to what extend new information can be derived from observing such targets. Therefore, we perform Monte Carlo simulations using the c5++ software in order to evaluate how the inclusion of lunar observations into regular VLBI schedules would impact classical Earth-related target parameters of geodetic VLBI such as station coordinates and Earth Orientation Parameters, as well as how it would extend the possibilities to determine selenoidic parameters. Our study is based on modified IVS-R1 observing schedules, originally created by the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS) to determine Earth Orientation Parameters, thus representing state-of-the-art VLBI observing programs. Based on our simulations, we demonstrate that an artificial radio source on the surface of the Moon can be located with both, accuracy and precision of better than 50 cm when observed along with quasars in the regular IVS-R1 session schedules. Moreover, we show that geodetic VLBI has the potential to improve our knowledge of lunar physical models and/or help to verify or update lunar ephemerides. We will discuss how the quality and quantity of lunar observations affect the uncertainty of the position of a non-moving artificial radio source located on the surface of the Moon and we highlight the factors limiting the determination of its position. Furthermore, we will reveal the impact of Moon VLBI observations on the determination of the Earth Orientation Parameters and VLBI station positions. We will also test the concept of VLBI lunar observations with simulations that reflect VGOS performance in terms of observation precision, number of scans and future network configurations. Thus, our simulations will provide valuable insights

  8. A future geodetic monitoring system for vertical land motion in the Perth basin, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filmer, Mick; Featherstone, Will; Morgan, Linda; Schenk, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Vertical land movement (VLM) affects many regions around the world and can have various causes, such as tectonics, glacial isostatic adjustment and resource extraction. Geodetic monitoring systems are employed in different configurations to identify VLM to provide knowledge for hazard mapping, risk assessment and land planning. We describe results from historical geodetic observations, and efforts to establish a monitoring system in the Western Australian city of Perth, which is subject to VLM, most probably caused by groundwater extraction over the past ~100 years. The most direct evidence of VLM in Perth is provided by two continuously operating GNSS (CGNSS) stations HIL1 (from 1997) and PERT (from 1992). However, these stations provide estimates only at discrete locations. In addition, the data from HIL1 is subject to frequent equipment changes and PERT ceased operation in early 2012. The CGNSS VLM rates reach ~-6 mm/yr, but are not linear over time and appear to be highly correlated with the rates of groundwater extraction. Limited sequences of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) images are available over short periods between 1992-2009, and although these suggest spatially variable VLM rates reaching -5 mm/yr at some locations, the uncertainty from the small number of images suggest that these results should be treated cautiously. If it remains necessary to extract groundwater for Perth (possibly at increased rates), an ongoing monitoring programme is needed. This should be based on combined GNSS, InSAR and levelling observation programmes. Historical levelling data from the early 1970s is currently being extracted from hardcopy archives into digital file format for analysis and adjustment. These data will be used to establish an original reference network for later geodetic observations comprising repeat levelling campaigns connected to periodic GNSS campaigns and CGNSS stations, but most importantly, a regular and structured acquisition of In

  9. The Geodetic Matched Filter: Searching for Low Amplitude Slow Slip Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousset, B.; Campillo, M.; Lasserre, C.; Frank, W.; Socquet, A.; Cotte, N.; Walpersdorf, A.; Kostoglodov, V.

    2016-12-01

    Since the discovery of Slow Slip Events (SSEs), many methods have successfully been applied to model obvious transient events in geodetic time series, such as the widely used network strain filter. Independent seismological observations of tremors or low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) are evidences of low amplitude slow deformation but do not always coincide with clear occurrences of transient signals in geodetic time series. One way to discriminate if the slow deformation information is present or not in geodetic data is to use the seismological catalog as a tracker. For example, Frank et. al 2015 used the LFEs bursts timings on the Mexican subduction zone to stack potential slow events included in GPS time series in order to increase the signal to noise ratio. It successfully produced a slow slip like signal corresponding to the average surface motion of all the stacked events. The aim of the present study is to find a way to extract the signal corresponding to slow slips, hidden in the noise of GPS time series, without using information from independent datasets. We take advantage of the Mexican continuous GPS network (40 stations) within Guerrero and Oaxaca regions. We first build templates of transient events by assembling a source function with green functions that link slip on the subduction interface to surface displacement. We then correlate the templates built on the whole interface with the GPS time-series cleaned of co-seismic, post-seismic signals and large SSEs. We apply a weighted stacking, that takes into account the location of GPS stations compared to the sliding patch, on all correlation functions across the GPS network. We perform an analysis on synthetic time series, where we add transients signals to noise enable to set a detection treshold. Applied on the same period of time as the one analyzed by Frank et al. 2015, this technique enables us to (i) detect in time the events corresponding to bursts of LFEs and (ii) locate and characterize the

  10. Geodetic Data Via Web Services: Standardizing Access, Expanding Accessibility, and Promoting Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietlow, D. W.; Molnar, C.; Meertens, C. M.; Phillips, D. A.; Bartel, B. A.; Ertz, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    UNAVCO, a university-governed consortium that enables geodetic research and education, is developing and implementing new web services to standardize and enhance access to geodetic data for an ever-growing community of users. This simple and easy to use tool gives both experienced and novice users access to all data and products archived at UNAVCO through a uniform interface regardless of data type and structure. UNAVCO data product types include GPS station position time series, velocity estimates and metadata, as well as meteorological time series, and borehole geophysical data and metadata including strain, seismic, and tilt time series. Users access data through a request URL or through the Swagger user interface (UI). The Swagger UI allows users to easily learn about the web services and provides users the ability to test the web services in their web browser. Swagger UI also provides documentation of the web services' URLs and query parameters. With this documentation users can see the valid query parameters for each web service to assist in documentation for both the developers and the users.Output from the web services is currently in a standard comma-separated (CSV) format that can then be used in other processing and/or visualization programs. The web services are being standardized so that all CSV formats will follow the GeoCSV specification. Other formats will be available such as GeoJSON and time series xml since not all data are well represented by the CSV format. The UNAVCO web services are written using Python along with the Flask microframework. This allows quick development and the ability to easily implement new services. Future services are being planned to allow users to access metadata from any station with data available directly or indirectly from the UNAVCO website. In collaboration with the UNAVCO Student Internship Program (USIP), we developed a short video demonstrating how to use the web services tool to assist new users and the broader

  11. Geodetic insights on the post-seismic transients from the Andaman Nicobar region: 2005-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnest, A.; Vijayan, M.; Jade, S.; Krishnan, R.; Sringeri, S. T.

    2013-12-01

    The 2004 Mw 9.2 Sumatra-Andaman mega-thrust rupture broke the whole 1300 km long fore-arc sliver boundary of the Indo- Burmese collision. Earlier events of 1679 (M~7.5), 1941 (M 7.7), 1881 (M~7.9) and 2002 (Mw 7.3) generated spatially restricted ruptures along this margin. GPS based geodetic measurements of post-seismic deformation following the 2004 M9.2 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake gives insights on the spatio-temporal evolution of transient tectonic deformation happening at the Suda-Andaman margin. This work encompasses the near-field geodetic data collected from the Andaman-Nicobar Islands and far-field CGPS site data available from SUGAR, UNAVCO and IGS from 2005-2013. Precise geodetic data analysis shows that the GPS benchmarks in the Andaman-Nicobar region moved immediately after 2004 event towards the sea-ward trench in the SW direction, following very much the co-seismic offset directions. This can be possibly because of the continued predominant after-slip occurrence around the 2004 rupture zone due to the velocity-strengthening behavior at the downdip segments of the rupture zone. Lately a progressive reversal of motion direction away from the oceanic trench (and the co-seismic offset direction) of the coastal and inland GPS sites of Andaman-Nicobar Islands are observed. The site displacement transients shows a rotation of the displacement vector moving from south-west to north. Spatio-temporal analysis of the earthquakes show dense shallow seismicity in the back-arc region, normal and thrust faulting activity towards the trench. The hypo-central distribution highlights the shallow subduction at the northern segment, which becomes steeper and deeper to the south. The stress distribution, inferred from the P and T-axes of earthquake faulting mechanisms, represents the compressional fore-arc and extensional back-arc stress regimes. Our analysis results will be discussed in detail by integrating the kinematics and seismo-tectonic evolution of this subducting

  12. Demonstration of the Cascadia G‐FAST geodetic earthquake early warning system for the Nisqually, Washington, earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Brendan; Schmidt, David; Bodin, Paul; Vidale, John; Gomberg, Joan S.; Hartog, Renate; Kress, Victor; Melbourne, Tim; Santillian, Marcelo; Minson, Sarah E.; Jamison, Dylan

    2016-01-01

    A prototype earthquake early warning (EEW) system is currently in development in the Pacific Northwest. We have taken a two‐stage approach to EEW: (1) detection and initial characterization using strong‐motion data with the Earthquake Alarm Systems (ElarmS) seismic early warning package and (2) the triggering of geodetic modeling modules using Global Navigation Satellite Systems data that help provide robust estimates of large‐magnitude earthquakes. In this article we demonstrate the performance of the latter, the Geodetic First Approximation of Size and Time (G‐FAST) geodetic early warning system, using simulated displacements for the 2001Mw 6.8 Nisqually earthquake. We test the timing and performance of the two G‐FAST source characterization modules, peak ground displacement scaling, and Centroid Moment Tensor‐driven finite‐fault‐slip modeling under ideal, latent, noisy, and incomplete data conditions. We show good agreement between source parameters computed by G‐FAST with previously published and postprocessed seismic and geodetic results for all test cases and modeling modules, and we discuss the challenges with integration into the U.S. Geological Survey’s ShakeAlert EEW system.

  13. Evolution of pulsar high-energy pulse profiles due to geodetic precession in the striped wind model

    CERN Document Server

    Petri, J

    2014-01-01

    Geodetic precession has been observed directly in the double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039. Its rate has even been measured and is in agreement with predictions of general relativity. Very recently, the double pulsar has been detected in X-rays and gamma-rays. This opens up the hope to observe geodetic precession in the high-energy pulse profile of this system. Unfortunately the geometric configuration of the binary renders unlikely any detection of such an effect. Nevertheless, this precession should be present in other relativistic binaries or double neutron star systems containing at least one X-ray or gamma-ray pulsar.}{In this paper we compute the variation of the high-energy pulse profile expected from this geodetic motion according to the striped wind model. We compare our results with two-pole caustic and outer gap emission patterns.}{We show that for a sufficient misalignment between the orbital angular momentum and the spin angular momentum, significant change in the pulse profile due to geodetic pre...

  14. Geodetic constraint on the motion of a slab window: Implication for the Mendocino Crustal Conveyor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Y.; Dong, D.; Yan, J.; Chen, W.

    2017-07-01

    The migration of the slab window in the Northern California Coast Ranges provides a unique setting to study the viscous coupling between crust and asthenosphere flow. The mechanisms of these dynamic processes are explained by the Mendocino Crustal Conveyor model, which predicts a 2-D "double-humped" surface uplift rate pattern on a 400 km long profile. To evaluate the Mendocino Crustal Conveyor (MCC) model using accurate geodetic measurements, we derive the vertical velocity field from 43 continuous GPS (CGPS) stations in the Coast Ranges region and project it onto the profile along three possible orientations of the slab window. The CGPS measured uplift rates are in good agreement with the MCC prediction, when the slab window orientation is parallel to the symmetry axis of the region of thickened crust. Thus, the CGPS solutions not only provide a complementary means to diagnose the MCC model but also provide an effective way to constrain the orientation of the slab window.

  15. Optimization of observation plan based on the stochastic characteristics of the geodetic network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pachelski Wojciech

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Optimal design of geodetic network is a basic subject of many engineering projects. An observation plan is a concluding part of the process. Any particular observation within the network has through adjustment a different contribution and impact on values and accuracy characteristics of unknowns. The problem of optimal design can be solved by means of computer simulation. This paper presents a new method of simulation based on sequential estimation of individual observations in a step-by-step manner, by means of the so-called filtering equations. The algorithm aims at satisfying different criteria of accuracy according to various interpretations of the covariance matrix. Apart of them, the optimization criterion is also amount of effort, defined as the minimum number of observations required.

  16. Geodetically resolved slip distribution of the 27 August 2012 Mw=7.3 El Salvador earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geirsson, H.; La Femina, P. C.; DeMets, C.; Hernandez, D. A.; Mattioli, G. S.; Rogers, R.; Rodriguez, M.

    2013-12-01

    On 27 August 2012 a Mw=7.3 earthquake occurred offshore of Central America causing a small tsunami in El Salvador and Nicaragua but little damage otherwise. This is the largest magnitude earthquake in this area since 2001. We use co-seismic displacements estimated from episodic and continuous GPS station time series to model the magnitude and spatial variability of slip for this event. The estimated surface displacements are small (El Salvador. Additionally, we observe a deeper region of slip to the east, that reaches towards the Gulf of Fonseca between El Salvador and Nicaragua. The observed tsunami additionally indicates near-trench rupture off the coast of El Salvador. The duration of the rupturing is estimated from seismic data to be 70 s, which indicates a slow rupture process. Since the geodetic moment we obtain agrees with the seismic moment, this indicates that the earthquake was not associated with aseismic slip.

  17. Processing of a geodetic network determined in ETRS-89 with application of different cofactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavomír Labant

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available At present, manufacturers characterize the accuracy of vectors measured by the static method of GNSS technology usingrelationship 5 mm + 1⋅ D ppm . The advantage of the GNSS system over other terrestrial technologies is that it is not affectedby uncertainties in the ground layers of the atmosphere. The paper presents experimental measurement of the 3D geodetic network usingthe technology of global navigation satellite systems, processing and analysis of measurements taken at the Čierny Váh pumping hydropowerstation. Observations were carried out in July 2008. The aim of the paper is to assess parameters used in the model to estimateparameters of the first and second order of the network structures.

  18. Geodetic constraints on volcanic plume height at Grímsvötn volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Roberts, Matthew; Björnsson, Halldór; Grapenthin, Ronni; Arason, Pórdur; Árnadóttir, Thóra; Hólmjárn, Jósef; Geirsson, Halldór; Bennett, Richard; Gudmundsson, Magnús; Oddsson, Björn; Ófeigsson, Benedikt; Villemin, Thierry; Jónsson, Torsteinn; Sturkell, Erik; Höskuldsson, Ármann; Larsen, Gudrún; Thordarson, Thor; Óladóttir, Bergrún

    2014-05-01

    In 2011 a VEI 4 explosive eruption took place at Grímsvötn volcano, Iceland. Grímsvötn is a subglacial basaltic volcano beneath the Vatnajökull ice cap. It is Iceland's most frequently erupting volcano, with recent eruptions in 1983, 1998, 2004, and 2011. The volcano has a low seismic velocity anomaly down to about 3 km depth, interpreted as a magma chamber. A continuous GPS station and a tiltmeter are located on a nunatak, Mount Grímsfjall, which protrudes from the ice at the southern rim of the caldera. The 21-28 May 2011 eruption was Grímsvötn's largest since 1873, resulting in airspace closure in northern Europe and the cancellation of about 900 passenger flights. The eruption was preceded by gradual inflation following the 2004 eruption and progressive increase in seismicity. Kinematic 1 Hz solutions were derived for the position of the GPS station in the hours immediately before and during the 2011 eruption. The onset of deformation preceded the eruption by one hour and reached maximum of 0.57 m within 48 hours. Throughout the eruption the GPS station moved consistently in direction N38.4+/-0.5W, opposite to the direction of movements during the 2004-2011 inter eruptive phase. The deformation characteristics suggest that the signal was mostly due to pressure change in a source at 1.7 +/- 0.2 km depth. We use the geodetic measurements to infer co-eruptive pressure change in the magma chamber using the Mogi model. The rate of pressure drop is then used to estimate the magma flow rate from the chamber. Numerous studies have shown that plume height in explosive eruptions can be related to magma discharge. Using an empirical relationship between the volcanic plume height and magma flow rate (Mastin et al., 2009) we estimate the evolution of the plume height from the geodetic data. Two weather radars monitored the height of the volcanic plume during the eruption. A strong initial plume with peaks at 20-25 km was followed by a declining, pulsating activity

  19. Horizontal strain rate estimation using discrete geodetic data and its application to Southern California (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Z.; Zeng, Y.

    2010-12-01

    We present an algorithm to calculate horizontal strain rates through interpolation of a geodetically derived velocity field. To derive a smoothly distributed strain rate field using discrete geodetic observations is an under-determined inverse problem. Therefore a priori information, in the form of weighted smoothing, is required to facilitate the solution. Our method is revised from the previous approaches of Shen et al. (1996, 2007). At a given location, the velocity field in its vicinity is approximated by a linear function of positions and can be represented by two velocity components, three strain rate components, and a rotation rate at that point. The velocity data in the neighborhood, after re-weighting, are used to estimate the field parameters through a least-squares procedure. Data weighting is done with following considerations: (a) Data are weighted according to either the Voronoi cell area of each neighboring site, or the station azimuthal span of two azimuthally adjacent neighboring sites. (b) A distance weighting factor is assigned according to site-to-station distances, in the form of either a Gaussian or quadratic decay function. (c) The distance decay coefficient is determined from setting a minimum total weighting threshold which is defined as the sum of the weighting coefficients for all the data input. We also developed an algorithm to exclude contributions of the non-elastic strain associated with fault creep such as creeping along the Central California Creeping segment of the San Andres fault system. We apply this method to derive the strain rate field for southern California using the SCEC CMM4 velocity field.

  20. Incorporating GPS geodetic data into the undergraduate classroom to improve data and information literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansma, P. E.; Mattioli, G. S.

    2002-12-01

    As part of an NSF-funded project, we are incorporating Global Positioning System (GPS) geodesy into the classroom to improve data and information literacy among undergraduate students. Our objectives are: to introduce statistical concepts essential for the interpretation of large datasets; to promote communication skills; to enhance critical thinking; and to build teamwork. GPS geodesy is ideal for illustrating data literacy concepts. Data precision and accuracy depend upon several factors, including type of equipment, environmental conditions, length of occupations, monument design, site location, configuration of the geodetic network, and processing strategies. All of these can be varied, allowing the students to learn the trade-offs among cost, time, and quality and to determine the most efficient methodology for specific problems. In addition, precision, accuracy, and errors govern the interpretations that can be made and the potential to distinguish among competing models. Our focus is a semester-long course that uses GPS geodesy in real-world applications and also requires integration of GPS data into oral presentations and written reports. Students work in teams on "cases" that pose hypotheses for testing. The cases are derived from our on-going research projects and take advantage of on-line continuous GPS (CGPS) data as well as our archived campaign data. The case studies are: 1) Microplate tectonics in the northeastern Caribbean; 2) Inflation/deflation cycles of the Soufriere Hills volcano, Montserrat; and 3) Contribution of monument instability to the overall error in geodetic data from the New Madrid Seismic Zone. All course materials will be on-line and available for the community.

  1. Reconciling geodetic and geologic estimates of recent plate motion across the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMets, C.; Calais, E.; Merkouriev, S.

    2016-10-01

    We use recently published, high-resolution reconstructions of the Southwest Indian Ridge to test whether a previously described systematic difference between Global Positioning System (GPS) and 3.16-Myr-average estimates of seafloor spreading rates between Antarctica and Africa is evidence for a recent slowdown in Southwest Indian Ridge seafloor spreading rates. Along the Nubia-Antarctic segment of the ridge, seafloor opening rates that are estimated with the new, high-resolution reconstructions and corrected for outward displacement agree well with geodetic rate estimates and reduce previously reported, highly significant non-closure of the Nubia-Antarctic-Sur plate circuit. The observations are inconsistent with a slowdown in spreading rates and instead indicate that Nubia-Antarctic plate motion has been steady since at least 5.2 Ma. Lwandle-Antarctic seafloor spreading rates that are estimated from the new high-resolution reconstructions differ insignificantly from a GPS estimate, thereby implying steady Lwandle-Antarctic plate motion since 5.2 Ma. Between the Somalia and Antarctic plates, the new Southwest Indian Ridge reconstructions eliminate roughly half of the systematic difference between the GPS and MORVEL spreading rate estimates. We interpret the available observations as evidence that Somalia-Antarctic spreading rates have been steady since at least 5.2 Ma and postulate that the remaining difference is attributable to random and/or systematic errors in the plate kinematic estimates and the combined effects of insufficient geodetic sampling of undeforming areas of the Somalia plate, glacial isostatic adjustment in Antarctica, and transient deformation triggered by the 1998 Mw=8.2 Antarctic earthquake, the 2004 Mw=9.3 Sumatra earthquake, or possibly other large historic earthquakes.

  2. Garonne River monitoring from Signal-to-Noise Ratio data collected by a single geodetic receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, Nicolas; Frappart, Frédéric; Darrozes, José; Ramillien, Guillaume; Bonneton, Philippe; Bonneton, Natalie; Detandt, Guillaume; Roques, Manon; Orseau, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) altimetry has demonstrated a strong potential for water level monitoring through the last decades. Interference Pattern Technique (IPT) based on the analysis of the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) estimated by a GNSS receiver, presents the main advantage of being applicable everywhere by using a single geodetic antenna and a classical GNSS receiver. Such a technique has already been tested in various configurations of acquisition of surface-reflected GNSS signals with an accuracy of a few centimeters. Nevertheless, classical SNR analysis method used to estimate the variations of the reflecting surface height h(t) has a limited domain of validity due to its variation rate dh/dt(t) assumed to be negligible. In [1], authors solve this problem with a "dynamic SNR method" taking the dynamic of the surface into account to conjointly estimate h(t) and dh/dt(t) over areas characterized by high amplitudes of tides. If the performance of this dynamic SNR method is already well-established for ocean monitoring [1], it was not validated in continental areas (i.e., river monitoring). We carried out a field study during 3 days in August and September, 2015, using a GNSS antenna to measure the water level variations in the Garonne River (France) in Podensac located 140 km downstream of the estuary mouth. In this site, the semi-diurnal tide amplitude reaches ~5 m. The antenna was located ~10 m above the water surface, and reflections of the GNSS electromagnetic waves on the Garonne River occur until 140 m from the antenna. Both classical SNR method and dynamic SNR method are tested and results are compared. [1] N. Roussel, G. Ramillien, F. Frappart, J. Darrozes, A. Gay, R. Biancale, N. Striebig, V. Hanquiez, X. Bertin, D. Allain : "Sea level monitoring and sea state estimate using a single geodetic receiver", Remote Sensing of Environment 171 (2015) 261-277.

  3. Geodetic and Structural Research in La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain: 1992-2007 Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, J. F.; González, P. J.; Seco, A.; Rodríguez-Velasco, G.; Tunini, L.; Perlock, P. A.; Arjona, A.; Aparicio, A.; Camacho, A. G.; Rundle, J. B.; Tiampo, K. F.; Pallero, J. L. G.; Pospiech, S.; Fernández, J.

    2009-09-01

    We review the results of the geodetic and structural studies carried out on La Palma Island using geodetic and geophysical data during the period 1992-2007. InSAR and GPS observation techniques were applied to study the existence of deformation on the island and gravity observations were carried out for structural studies. Gravity data were inverted using a nonlinear three-dimensional gravity inversion approach to obtain the geometry of the anomalous bodies constructed in a random growth process with respect to an exponentially stratified background. The main structural feature is a large central body (under the Caldera de Taburiente) with high density, which was interpreted as the Pliocene-age uplifted seamount and a relatively dense intrusive plutonic complex/magma body. The Cumbre Vieja series is characterized by elongated minima distributed according to the rift structure. InSAR results show a clear subsidence located on the Teneguía volcano, where the last eruption took place in 1971. A thermal source is the most probable origin for this deformation. A GPS network composed of 26 stations covering the total island surface was set up. Vertical displacements determined comparing the GPS coordinates obtained in 2007 with coordinates determined in 1994 are consistent with the InSAR results obtained in the southern part of the island. This is not the case for the northern part. From the comparison of 2006 and 2007 coordinates it is clear that more time is needed to obtain significant displacements, but observed trends are also consistent with InSAR results. All the observed significant displacements are in stations located outside of the large high-density central body.

  4. Real-time GPS positioning of the Pacific Northwest Geodetic Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabak, I.; Santillan, V. M.; Scrivner, C. W.; Melbourne, T. I.

    2009-12-01

    The Pacific Northwest Geodetic Array (PANGA) is now comprised of nearly 130 continuously operating GPS receivers located throughout the Cascadia subduction zone. The stations straddle active crustal faults, volcanoes and landslides, they span the megathrust forearc and tsunamigenic regions along the Pacific coast, and they monitor ageing man-made structures such as dams, levees and elevated freeways. All data are streamed in real-time into CWU where they are processed in real-time into station position and tropospheric water content within a reference frame defined in central Washington. To disseminate these streams, we currently provide 16 station position streams via an interface to Google Maps to present geographically the three component real-time plots in 5 min, 1 hour, and 24 hour time periods. The user's web browser makes repeated requests at a refresh rate of 5 seconds and after the initial request it only requests new data points from the web server. The 5 min real-time plot is updated every second. The web server provides the data streams in a compact JSON (JavaScript Object Notation) form and data plotting is handled by the user's web browser. The data streams are parsed into JavaScript arrays and plotted using the new HTML5 "canvas" element. This approach produces faster response times for the data streams, and by reducing the load on the web server, allows distribution to large numbers of users. Data are also available via a dedicated Ntrip/TCP-IP socket interface. These real-time data are now being used to monitor geodetic displacements caused by earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and landslides; current efforts to develop real-time finite fault inversions and automated alarm systems will be discussed.

  5. Investigating the long-term geodetic response to magmatic intrusions at volcanoes in northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, A. L.; Biggs, J.; Annen, C.; Houseman, G. A.; Yamasaki, T.; Wright, T. J.; Walters, R. J.; Lu, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Ratios of intrusive to extrusive activity at volcanic arcs are thought to be high, with estimates ranging between 5:1 and 30:1. Understanding the geodetic response to magmatic intrusion is therefore fundamental to large-scale studies of volcano deformation, providing insight into the dynamics of the inter-eruptive period of the volcano cycle and the building of continental crust. In northern California, we identify two volcanoes - Medicine Lake Volcano (MLV) and Lassen Volcanic Center (LaVC) - that exhibit long-term (multi-decadal) subsidence. We test the hypothesis that deformation at these volcanoes results from processes associated with magmatic intrusions. We first constrain the spatial and temporal characteristics of the deformation fields, establishing the first time-series of deformation at LaVC using InSAR data, multi-temporal analysis techniques and global weather models. Although the rates of deformation at the two volcanoes are similar (~1 cm/yr), our results show that the ratio of vertical to horizontal displacements is significantly different, suggesting contrasting source geometries. To test the origin of deformation, we develop modeling strategies to investigate thermal and viscoelastic processes associated with magmatic intrusions. The first model we develop couples analytical geodetic models to a numerical model of volume loss due to cooling and crystallization based upon temperature-melt fraction relationships from petrological experiments. This model provides evidence that magmatic intrusion at MLV has occurred more recently than the last eruption ~1 ka. The second model we test uses a finite element approach to simulate the time-dependent viscoelastic response of the crust to magmatic intrusion. We assess the magnitude and timescales of ground deformation that may result from these processes, exploring the model parameter space before applying the models to our InSAR observations of subsidence in northern California.

  6. Geodetic results in Afar: The rifting episode of November 1978 in the Asal-Ghoubbet rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasser, M.; Lepine, J. C.; Ruegg, J. C.; Tarantula, A.

    1981-01-01

    A seismo-tectonic and volcanic crisis occurred in November 1978 in the Asal-Ghoubbet rift, first subaerial section of the accreting plate boundary between the African and Arabian plates (Allard et al., 1979; Abdallah et al., 1979; Le Dain et al., 1980). The activity was located in the center of a geodetic network set up in the winter 1972-1973 by the Institut Géographique National in collaboration with the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris. Simultaneously, a precise levelling line of about 100 km was established across the area (I.G.N., 1973). The resurveying of both the geodetic network and the levelling line was carried out after the crisis, between November 1978 and March 1979. Extensions up to 2.4 m and vertical displacements up to 0.7 m were measured. Operating techniques and results of the resurveying are described in Kasser et al. (1979) and Ruegg et al. (1979). Figure 1 shows the horizontal displacements (relating to point B and to the direction BT) and figure 2 shows the vertical displacements relating to the two external points. Tarantola et al. (1979, 1980) have shown that these results can be geodynamically interpreted by a mechanism of sudden breaking and elastic rebound after an elastic stretching of the crust due to the relative drift of the plates. The breaking is triggered by magmatic fracturing of the crust, with dykes injection from a magmatic chamber which has fed the basaltic fissurai eruption. The horizontal and vertical displacements outside the broken zone of the Inner Floor are predicted by a numerical model based on this interpretation which fit very well the experimental data.

  7. Airborne Geodetic Imaging Using the L-band UAVSAR Instrument (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, S.; Zebker, H. A.; Jones, C. E.; Michel, T.; Chapman, B. D.; Muellerschoen, R.; Fore, A.; Simard, M.

    2009-12-01

    Radar interferometry using both airborne and spaceborne platforms has become an integral tool in geodetics sciences over the past 3 decades for both fine resolution topographic mapping and for measuring surface deformation from a variety of both natural and anthropogenic sources. The UAVSAR instrument, employing an L-band actively electronically scanned antenna, had its genesis in the ESTO Instrument Incubator Program and after 3 years of development has begun the regular collection of science data in support of various geodetic applications. System design was motivated by solid Earth applications where repeat pass radar interferometry can be used to measure subtle deformation of the surface, however flexibility and extensibility to support other applications were also major design drivers. Initial testing and deployments are being carried out with the NASA Gulfstream III aircraft, which has been modified to accommodate the radar pod and has been equipped with precision autopilot capability developed by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. With this the aircraft can fly within a 10 m diameter tube on any specified trajectory necessary for repeat-pass radar interferometric applications. To maintain the required pointing for repeat-pass interferometric applications we have employed an actively scanned antenna steered using INU measurement data. This talk will present some early deformation results made by the UAVSAR instrument over volcanoes (Mt St Helens), landslides near Parkfield CA, ice sheet motion in Greenland and Iceland, anthropogenic induced surface deformation from oil pumping near Lost Hills, CA and changes in agricultural surfaces in California’s San Joaquin Valley. This research was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  8. Geodetic imaging of thermal deformation in geothermal reservoirs - production, depletion and fault reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Kyungjae; Elsworth, Derek; Guglielmi, Yves; Mattioli, Glen S.

    2017-05-01

    We investigate thermally induced surface deformation in geothermal systems. To define source mechanisms at depth, we assess the mechanical process of subsurface deformation by assuming a spherically cooled fractured reservoir in an infinite medium and derive relations that define magnitudes of thermal contraction, stress change and permeability evolution. The magnitude of thermal deformation in typical geothermal system is larger than anticipated and suggests two different modalities of surface subsidence - thermal contraction and fault reactivation. Here, surface deformation (vertical displacement, surface tilt and horizontal strain) induced by the two different modalities are assessed with Mogi (contraction) and Okada (slip) models and compared with instrumental sensitivity of high precision surface geodetic tools. We show that 1 year of geothermal operation at 10 MW with a power plant conversion efficiency of 12% can yield 3.0 × 104 m3 of subsurface volume change. For a reservoir at 2000 m depth, this induces 1.7 mm of vertical surface displacement, 800 nano-radians of surface tilt and 900 nano-strains of surface strain. This result implies that typically observed magnitudes of surface subsidence (order of cm/year) are naturally expected in massive (100 MW scale) geothermal operations and observed surface subsidence may largely be the result of thermal contraction. Conversely, thermal unloading can trigger fault reactivation. Analysis with an Okada slip model shows these shear offsets on pre-existing faults can also result in surface deformations of considerable magnitude. Our analysis of field operational data from various geothermal projects suggests that both thermal contraction and slow fault reactivation may contribute to the observed large surface deformation. Comparison of predicted deformation with instrumental sensitivity of high precision surface tools confirms that geodetic signals, especially tilt and strain, are indeed sufficiently large to

  9. Space geodetic observation of the deformation cycle across the Ballenas Transform, Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, Christina; Malservisi, Rocco; Amelung, Falk; Dixon, Timothy H.; Hackl, Matthias; Verdecchia, Alessandro; Lonsdale, Peter; Suarez-Vidal, Francisco; Gonzalez-Garcia, Javier

    2015-08-01

    The Gulf of California, Mexico, accommodates ~90% of North America-Pacific plate relative motion. While most of this motion occurs on marine transform faults and spreading centers, several fault segments in the central Gulf come close to peninsular Baja California. Here we present Global Positioning System and interferometric synthetic aperture radar data near the Ballenas transform fault, separating the peninsula from Angel de la Guarda Island. We observe interseismic motion between June 2004 and May 2009 and displacements associated with the 3 August 2009 Mw 6.9 earthquake. From the interseismic data we estimate a locking depth of 9-12.5 km and a slip rate of 44.9-48.1 mm/yr, indicating that faults east of Angel de la Guarda deform at negligible rates and that the Ballenas Transform accommodates virtually all of the relative motion between the North American plate and the Baja California microplate. Our preferred model for coseismic slip on a finite rectangular fault plane suggests 1.3 m of strike-slip displacement along a vertical rupture plane that is 60 km long and extends from the surface to a depth of 13 km in the eastern Ballenas Channel, striking parallel to Baja California-North America relative plate motion. These estimates agree with the seismic moment tensor and the location of the major foreshock and aftershocks and are compatible with the fault location identified from high-resolution bathymetric mapping. The geodetic moment is 33% higher than the seismic moment in part because some afterslip and viscous flow in the first month after the earthquake are included in the geodetic estimate. Coulomb stress changes for adjacent faults in the Gulf are consistent with the location of smaller aftershocks following the 2009 main shock and suggest potential triggering of the 12 April 2012 Mw 6.9 Guaymas earthquake.

  10. Ice cap melting and low viscosity crustal root explain narrow geodetic uplift of the Western Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chery, Jean; Genti, Manon; Vernant, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    More than 10 years of geodetic measurements demonstrate an uplift rate of 1-3 mm/yr of the high topography region of the Western Alps. By contrast, no significant horizontal motion has been detected. Three uplift mechanisms have been proposed so far: (1) the isostatic response to denudation. However this process is responsible for only a fraction of the observed uplift and (2) the rebound induced by the Wurmian ice cap melting. This process leads to a broader uplifting region than the one evidenced by geodetic observations. (3) a deep source motion associated with slab motion or some deep isostatic unbalance. Using a numerical model accounting for crustal and mantle rheology of the Alps and its foreland, we model the response to Wurmian ice cap melting. We show that a crustal viscosity contrast between the foreland and the central part of the Alps, the later being weaker with a viscosity of 1021 Pa.s, is needed to produce a narrow uplift. The vertical rates are enhanced if the strong uppermost mantle beneath the Moho is interrupted across the Alps, therefore allowing a weak vertical rheological anomaly thanks to the continuity between the low viscosity parts of the crust and mantle. References: Champagnac, J.-D., F. Schlunegger, K. Norton, F. von Blanckenburg, L. M. Abbühl, and M. Schwab (2009), Erosion-driven uplift of the modern Central Alps, Tectonophysics, 474(1-2), 236-249. Vernant, P., F. Hivert, J. Chéry, P. Steer, R. Cattin, and A. Rigo (2013), Erosion-induced isostatic rebound triggers extension in low convergent mountain ranges, geology, 41(4), 467-470.

  11. Twenty-five years of geodetic measurements along the Tadjoura-Asal rift system, Djibouti, East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigny, Christophe; de Chabalier, Jean-Bernard; Ruegg, Jean-Claude; Huchon, Philippe; Feigl, Kurt L.; Cattin, Rodolphe; Asfaw, Laike; Kanbari, Khaled

    2007-06-01

    Since most of Tadjoura-Asal rift system sits on dry land in the Afar depression near the triple junction between the Arabia, Somalia, and Nubia plates, it is an ideal natural laboratory for studying rifting processes. We analyze these processes in light of a time series of geodetic measurements from 1978 through 2003. The surveys used triangulation (1973), trilateration (1973, 1979, and 1981-1986), leveling (1973, 1979, 1984-1985, and 2000), and the Global Positioning System (GPS, in 1991, 1993, 1995, 1997, 1999, 2001, and 2003). A network of about 30 GPS sites covers the Republic of Djibouti. Additional points were also measured in Yemen and Ethiopia. Stations lying in the Danakil block have almost the same velocity as Arabian plate, indicating that opening near the southern tip of the Red Sea is almost totally accommodated in the Afar depression. Inside Djibouti, the Asal-Ghoubbet rift system accommodates 16 ± 1 mm/yr of opening perpendicular to the rift axis and exhibits a pronounced asymmetry with essentially null deformation on its southwestern side and significant deformation on its northeastern side. This rate, slightly higher than the large-scale Arabia-Somalia motion (13 ± 1 mm/yr), suggests transient variations associated with relaxation processes following the Asal-Ghoubbet seismovolcanic sequence of 1978. Inside the rift, the deformation pattern exhibits a clear two-dimensional pattern. Along the rift axis, the rate decreases to the northwest, suggesting propagation in the same direction. Perpendicular to the rift axis, the focus of the opening is clearly shifted to the northeast, relative to the topographic rift axis, in the "Petit Rift," a rift-in-rift structure, containing most of the active faults and the seismicity. Vertical motions, measured by differential leveling, show the same asymmetric pattern with a bulge of the northeastern shoulder. Although the inner floor of the rift is subsiding with respect to the shoulders, all sites within the

  12. Geodetic model of the 2016 Central Italy earthquake sequence inferred from InSAR and GPS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheloni, Daniele

    2017-04-01

    On 24th August 2016, a Mw 6.0 earthquake struck a sector of the Apennines in Central Italy, causing extensive damage to the town of Amatrice and several surroundings villages, and killing about 300 inhabitants. The seismic sequence which followed was characterized by numerous aftershocks southeast and northwest of the main event, which decreased in frequency and magnitude until the end of October, when an event of magnitude Mw 5.9 occurred on 26th October about 25 km to the NW of the 24th August event, close to Visso village. In addition, few days later, on 30th October a third great shock of magnitude Mw 6.5, nucleated below the town of Norcia, hit an area encompassing the two previous main events. In order to infer the ground displacement field and to determine the source parameters of the causative faults associated with the three main events of the seismic sequence we exploit the InSAR and GPS coseismic measurements. In particular, we use SAR data acquired by the ALOS-2 (Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency), Sentinel-1 (European Space Agency) and COSMO-SkyMed (Italian Space Agency) satellites, from both ascending and descending orbits, and data from continuous and survey-mode GPS stations operating during the earthquake sequence. We show that our preferred model is consistent with the activation of at least four main coseismic asperities during the entire sequence, belonging to a SW-dipping normal fault system, the surface expression of which could be associated with the Mt. Gorzano-Mt. Vettore-Mt. Bove alignment. To better simulate the complex deformation pattern associated with the greatest event of the sequence (the 30th October Mw 6.5 Norcia earthquake), additional slip is required by secondary anti- and synthetic faults in the hanging-wall of the main fault, and by a further SW-dipping low-angle fault plane. Finally, we compare the latter retrieved geodetic source with the known geological structures of the Central Apennines; this result may suggest a

  13. Proposals for Changes in Surveying-Legal Procedures for the Needs of Cadastre in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Monika

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the need for changes of geodetic-legal procedures for the cadastre and real estate management. This problem was analyzed both in theoretical and practical terms. In order to better present the analyzed technical and legal procedures, a study of several cases of surveying documentation was made. On their example the problems associated with the surveying services were shows and the formal and legal procedures, on the basis of which described surveying works were done were verified. The problem presented is current and valid not only for the comfort of the surveyor's work, but also from the point of view of the structure and modernization of the real estate cadastre, constituting the backbone of the real estate management. The article emphasized the need to unify the databases of state registers and the digitization of the National Geodetic and Cartographic Resources (PZDGiK). Research has shown that despite the continuous changes of legislation, there are still many shortcomings and gaps, which often complicate the surveying works. The surveyor must analyze and verify all materials he uses, including those obtained from the Centre of Geodetic and Cartographic Documentation (ODGiK). The quality of the geodetic and cartographic elaboration depends largely on the work of the Centre of Geodetic and Cartographic Documentation. The need of modernization of the Land and Buildings Registry, which acts as a cadastre in Poland, has been demonstrated. Furthermore, the unification of data used as reference systems both for plane coordinates and elevation has been proposed.

  14. The potential role of real-time geodetic observations in tsunami early warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinti, Stefano; Armigliato, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    experimental or testing stage and haven't been implemented yet in any standard TWS operations. Nonetheless, this is seen to be the future and the natural TWS evolving enhancement. In this context, improvement of the real-time estimates of tsunamigenic earthquake focal mechanism is of fundamental importance to trigger the appropriate computational chain. Quick discrimination between strike-slip and thrust-fault earthquakes, and equally relevant, quick assessment of co-seismic on-fault slip distribution, are exemplary cases to which a real-time geodetic monitoring system can contribute significantly. Robust inversion of geodetic data can help to reconstruct the sea floor deformation pattern especially if two conditions are met: the source is not too far from network stations and is well covered azimuthally. These two conditions are sometimes hard to satisfy fully, but in certain regions, like the Mediterranean and the Caribbean sea, this is quite possible due to the limited size of the ocean basins. Close cooperation between the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) community, seismologists, tsunami scientists and TWS operators is highly recommended to obtain significant progresses in the quick determination of the earthquake source, which can trigger a timely estimation of the ensuing tsunami and a more reliable and detailed assessment of the tsunami size at the coast.

  15. MOONLIGHT: A NEW LUNAR LASER RANGING RETROREFLECTOR AND THE LUNAR GEODETIC PRECESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Martini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1970s Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR to the Apollo Cube Corner Retroreflector (CCR arrays (developed by the University of Maryland, UMD supplied almost all significant tests of General Relativity (Alley et al., 1970; Chang et al., 1971; Bender et al.,1973: possible changes in the gravitational constant, gravitational self-energy, weak equivalence principle, geodetic precession, inverse-square force-law. The LNF group, in fact, has just completed a new measurement of the lunar geodetic precession with Apollo array, with accuracy of 9 × 10−3, comparable to the best measurement to date. LLR has also provided significant information on the composition and origin of the moon. This is the only Apollo experiment still in operation. In the 1970s Apollo LLR arrays contributed a negligible fraction of the ranging error budget. Since the ranging capabilities of ground stations improved by more than two orders of magnitude, now, because of the lunar librations, Apollo CCR arrays dominate the error budget. With the project MoonLIGHT (Moon Laser Instrumentation for General relativity High-accuracy Tests, in 2006 INFN-LNF joined UMD in the development and test of a new-generation LLR payload made by a single, large CCR (100mm diameter unaffected by the effect of librations. With MoonLIGHT CCRs the accuracy of the measurement of the lunar geodetic precession can be improved up to a factor 100 compared to Apollo arrays. From a technological point of view, INFN-LNF built and is operating a new experimental apparatus (Satellite/lunar laser ranging Characterization Facility, SCF and created a new industry-standard test procedure (SCF-Test to characterize and model the detailed thermal behavior and the optical performance of CCRs in accurately laboratory-simulated space conditions, for industrial and scientific applications. Our key experimental innovation is the concurrent measurement and modeling of the optical Far Field Diffraction Pattern (FFDP and the

  16. Geodetic measurement of deformation east of the San Andreas fault in central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauber, Jeanne; Lisowski, Michael; Solomon, Sean C.

    Triangulation and trilateration data from two geodetic networks located between the San Andreas fault and the Great Valley have been used to calculate shear strain rates in the Diablo Range and to estimate the slip rate along the Calaveras and Paicines faults in central California. The shear strain rates, γ1 and γ2, were estimated independently from angle changes using Prescott's method and from the simultaneous reduction for station position and strain parameters using the DYNAP method with corrections to reduce the triangulation and trilateration data to a common reference surface. On the basis of Prescott's method, the average shear strain rate across the Diablo Range for the time period between 1962 and 1982 is 0.15±0.08 μrad/yr, with the orientation of the most compressive strain (β) at N16°E±14°. Utilizing corrections for the deflection of the vertical and the geoid reference ellipsoid separation computed on the basis of local gravity observations, γ = 0.19±0.09 μrad/yr and β = N16°E±13°. Although γ is not significantly greater than zero, at the 95% confidence level the orientation of β is similar to the direction of maximum compressive strain indicated by the orientation of major fold structures in the region (N25°E). We infer that the measured strain is due to compression across the folds of this area; the average shear straining corresponds to a relative shortening rate of 5.7±2.7 mm/yr. In contrast to the situation throughout most of the Coast Ranges where fold axes have orientations approximately parallel to the San Andreas fault, within the Diablo Range between Hollister and Coalinga the trends of the fold axes are different and are thought to be controlled by reactivation of older structures. From trilateration measurements made between 1972 and 1987 on lines that are within 10 km of the San Andreas fault, a slip rate of 10-12 mm/yr was calculated for the Calaveras-Paicines fault south of Hollister. The slip rate on the Paicines

  17. Geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) from 12 July 1988 to 15 August 1988 (NODC Accession 8800257)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of July 12, 1988 to August 15, 1988....

  18. Geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) from 27 April 1987 to 30 May 1987 (NODC Accession 8700243)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of April 27, 1987 to May 30, 1987....

  19. NODC Standard Product: US Navy Geosat Enhanced JGM-3 Geophysical Data Records (GDR) from the Geodetic and Exact Repeat Missions (NODC Accession 0053056)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains a copy of the NODC CD_ROM product titled 'Enhanced JGM-3 Geophysical Data Records (GDRs) from the Geodetic and Exact Repeat Missions' that...

  20. Geodetic Control Points, GPS monuments for Fulton County, Published in 2000, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Fulton County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2000. It is...

  1. Geodetic Control Points, GPS monuments, corner certificates, Published in 2009, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Ia Department of Human Services.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2009. It is described as...

  2. Geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) from 02 November 1986 to 12 December 1986 (NODC Accession 8700069)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of November 02, 1986 to December 12,...

  3. Geodetic Control Points, lat/long tics, Published in 2008, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Box Elder County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2008. It is described as...

  4. Crossover difference data records (XDR) from GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) data from 01 April 1985 to 07 November 1987 (NCEI Accession 9100053)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Crossover difference data records (XDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period April 1, 1985 to November 7, 1987....

  5. Geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) from 18 September 1988 to 21 October 1988 (NODC Accession 8800328)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of September 18, 1988 to October 21,...

  6. Geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) from 24 January 1988 to 26 February 1988 (NODC Accession 8800083)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of January 24, 1988 to February 26,...

  7. Geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) from 12 December 1986 to 15 January 1987 (NODC Accession 8700123)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of December 12, 1986 to January 15,...

  8. Crossover difference data records (XDR) from GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) data from 01 January 1985 to 31 December 1989 (NODC Accession 9000068)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Crossover difference data records (XDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of January 01, 1985 to December 31,...

  9. Geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) from 08 November 1986 to 30 December 1989 (NODC Accession 9100103)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of November 08, 1986 to December 30,...

  10. Geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) from 24 March 1987 to 26 April 1987 (NODC Accession 8700209)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of March 24, 1987 to April 26, 1987....

  11. Geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) from 08 June 1988 to 11 July 1988 (NODC Accession 8800235)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of June 08, 1988 to July 11, 1988....

  12. Geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) from 15 August 1988 to 17 September 1988 (NODC Accession 8800297)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of August 15, 1988 to September 17,...

  13. Geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) from 24 August 1989 to 27 September 1989 (NODC Accession 8900276)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of August 24, 1989 to September 27,...

  14. Geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) from 01 April 1988 to 04 May 1988 (NODC Accession 8800157)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of April 01, 1988 to May 04, 1988....

  15. Geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) from 07 March 1989 to 09 April 1989 (NODC Accession 8900145)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of March 07, 1989 to April 09, 1989....

  16. Geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) from 07 August 1987 to 09 September 1987 (NODC Accession 8700339)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of August 07, 1987 to September 09,...

  17. Geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) from 17 June 1989 to 20 July 1989 (NODC Accession 8900229)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of June 17, 1989 to July 20, 1989....

  18. Geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) from 29 December 1988 to 31 January 1989 (NODC Accession 8900058)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of December 29, 1988 to January 31,...

  19. Tropospheric Parameters and Subdaily EOP From Combinations of Independent Space Geodetic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaller, D.; Krügel, M.; Rothacher, M.; Angermann, D.; Schmid, R.; Tesmer, V.

    2004-12-01

    The space geodetic techniques GPS, VLBI, SLR and DORIS contribute to the determination of several geodetic parameters (e.g. site positions, Earth orientation parameters (EOP), tropospheric parameters) providing valuable information to study various geophysical processes. Due to the different strengths of the techniques it can be expected that the parameters benefit from a combination. The VLBI campaign CONT02, initiated by the IVS, provides 15~days of continuous VLBI measurements. Therefore, this data set is well-suited for the combination with other techniques. Especially the combination with other microwave techniques like GPS provides the opportunity to estimate common tropospheric parameters in addition to station coordinates and EOP. For the studies presented here, free daily normal equations were generated for GPS and VLBI using identical models and the same parameterization to avoid any inconsistencies. Additionally, the normal equation of a 14-day SLR solution is included to investigate primarily reference frame related aspects. The work focusses on the combination of tropospheric parameters and EOP with a high resolution in time: solutions with one and two hour resolution of the parameters were compared to decide whether a higher time resolution is more appropriate to describe the time-dependent behavior of these parameters. For the validation of the tropospheric parameters independent data sets of water vapor radiometers are used, and the EOP are compared with a subdaily model derived from altimetry. Special attention has to be addressed to the tropospheric parameters from GPS, because they are sensitive to the physical characteristics of the antenna and the antenna environment. The comparison with VLBI-derived tropospheric parameters shows that absolute antenna phase center corrections should be used instead of relative models. Similarly, if a radome is installed at the antenna, the tropospheric zenith delay estimates change significantly. As no phase

  20. Geodetic measurements for monitoring rapid crustal uplift in southeastern Alaska caused by the recent deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, S.; Sun, W.; Sugano, T.; Kaufman, A.; Sato, T.; Fujimoto, H.; Ohta, Y.; Larsen, C.; Freymueller, J.

    2008-12-01

    Glaciers at high latitudes are considered to be extremely sensitive to climate change and thus monitoring of glaciers is a clue to evaluate the future effect of global warming and the related phenomena. Ice mass changes also produce a time-variable surface load and give us useful data to investigate subsurface structure of the earth, especially to constrain the flow characteristics of the mantle. Larsen et al. [EPSL05] have extensively studied on vertical crustal movement in SE Alaska to reveal the world's fastest glacial isostatic uplifting, which can be attributed to the response associated with deglaciation. Displacement data, however, can only be used to constrain the sum of the elastic response to present-day ice melting (PDIM) and the viscoelastic one to past changes in ice. A Japan-US joint research project, ISEA (International geodetic research project in SouthEast Alaska), was initiated in 2005 to add new geodetic data and to refine the viscoelastic model derived by the previous studies. Absolute gravity data have been acquired at the five sites in the stdudy area using a Micro-g LaCoste absolute gravimeter, FG5#111. At each site data were collected over a 48~62 hour period. The long-term variation in absolute gravity at 2 stations, HNSG and BRM, where the measurements were performed in 1987 by Sasagawa et al. [JGR89] demonstrates rapid gravity decrease with rates of -4.4 micro-gal/yr, and -3.0 micro-gal/yr, respectively, and can be attributed to uplifting and mass-redstribution. ISEA supplements pre-existing continuous GPS (CGPS) stations operated by the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and the UNAVCO (Plate Boundary Observatory, PBO) and improves the spatial coverage in and around Glacier Bay. The time series of the site coordinates obtained for Queen Inlet (QUIC), which locates close to a zone of maximum uplift, shows obvious uplifting, even though there are long- term gaps because of an antenna cable trouble in 2006 and power outage in 2008 causing rather

  1. Geodetic observations in Iceland: divergent plate boundary influenced by a hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofeigsson, Benedikt Gunnar; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrun; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Arnadottir, Thora; Vogfjord, Kristin; Geirsson, Halldor; Einarsson, Pall; Jonsson, Sigurjon; Villemin, Thierry; Fjalar Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Roberts, Matthew; Sturkell, Erik; Lafemina, Peter C.; Bennett, Richard; Voelksen, Christof; Valsson, Gudmundur; Sigurdsson, Thorarinn

    2013-04-01

    The mid Atlantic ridge, separating the Eurasian and North American tectonic plates, is mostly buried below the Atlantic. There are, however, a few places where subaerial exposure of the mid-oceanic rift system allows geodetic observations of the deformation associated with the plate boundary. Iceland is the largest portion of the system emerged above sea level, a consequence of excessive volcanism caused by the interaction of a mantle plume with the mid-oceanic ridge. Iceland is therefore a unique site to study processes associated with divergent plate boundaries, and the effects of the plume-ridge interaction. A network of continuous GPS stations have been operating in Iceland since 1995 when the first station was installed in Reykjavik. Since then, stations have been added to the network at different points in time, with over 70 stations presently in operation. The network has been used e.g. for studies of deformation associated with the divergent plate boundary, micro-plate formation due to rift jumps, the plate-spreading deformation cycle associated with rifting episodes, strain rates and stress accumulation on transform zones connecting the ridge segments and deformation due to magmatic processes. In addition the GPS network is used in studies of the deformation associated with mass variations of Iceland's glaciers. The continuous GPS network serves as monitoring tool in Iceland, both for volcanic and seismic hazards but also as a research tool. In the recent Futurvolc project, which partly builds on EPOS, the data from the continuous GPS network along with data from the seismic network and InSAR observations, will serve as the main input in joint analyses of long and short term magma movements in volcanic regions. The establishment of the continuous GPS network in Iceland has provided an ideal tool to further increase our understanding of the geodynamic processes associated with divergent plate boundaries and plume-ridge interaction as well as establishing a

  2. From quiescence to unrest: 20 years of satellite geodetic measurements at Santorini volcano, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Michelle M.; Moore, James D. P.; Papanikolaou, Xanthos; Biggs, Juliet; Mather, Tamsin A.; Pyle, David M.; Raptakis, Costas; Paradissis, Demitris; Hooper, Andrew; Parsons, Barry; Nomikou, Paraskevi

    2015-02-01

    Periods of unrest at caldera-forming volcanic systems characterized by increased rates of seismicity and deformation are well documented. Some can be linked to eventual eruptive activity, while others are followed by a return to quiescence. Here we use a 20 year record of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) and GPS measurements from Santorini volcano to further our understanding of geodetic signals at a caldera-forming volcano during the periods of both quiescence and unrest, with measurements spanning a phase of quiescence and slow subsidence (1993-2010), followed by a phase of unrest (January 2011 to April 2012) with caldera-wide inflation and seismicity. Mean InSAR velocity maps from 1993-2010 indicate an average subsidence rate of 6 mm/yr over the southern half of the intracaldera island Nea Kameni. This subsidence can be accounted for by a combination of thermal contraction of the 1866-1870 lava flows and load-induced relaxation of the substrate. For the period of unrest, we use a joint inversion technique to convert InSAR measurements from three separate satellite tracks and GPS observations from 10 continuous sites into a time series of subsurface volume change. The optimal location of the inflating source is consistent with previous studies, situated north of Nea Kameni at a depth of 4 km. However, the time series reveals two distinct pressure pulses. The first pulse corresponds to a volume change (ΔV) within the shallow magma chamber of (11.56 ± 0.14) × 106 m3, and the second pulse has a ΔV of (9.73 ± 0.10) × 106 m3. The relationship between the timing of these pulses and microseismicity observations suggests that these pulses may be driven by two separate batches of magma supplied to a shallow reservoir. We find no evidence suggesting a change in source location between the two pulses. The decline in the rates of volume change at the end of both pulses and the observed lag of the deformation signal behind cumulative seismicity, suggest

  3. Robust adjustment of a geodetic network measured by satellite technology in the Dargovských Hrdinov suburb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavomír Labant

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the adjustment of a 3D geodetic network in the Dargovských Hrdinov suburbs using Global Navigation SatelliteSystems (GNSS for the purposes of deformation analysis. The advantage of using the GNSS compared to other terrestrial technology is thatit is not influenced by unpredictability in the ground level atmosphere and individual visibilities between points in the observed network arenot necessary. This article also includes the planning of GNSS observations using Planning Open Source software from Trimble as well assubsequent observations at individual network points. The geodetic network is processing on the basis of the Gauss-Markov model usingthe least square method and robust adjustment. From robust methods, Huber’s Robust M-estimation and Hampel’s Robust M-estimationwere used. Individual adjustments were tested and subsequently the results of analysis were graphically visualised using absolute confidenceellipsoids.

  4. The combined geodetic network adjusted on the reference ellipsoid – a comparison of three functional models for GNSS observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadaj Roman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The adjustment problem of the so-called combined (hybrid, integrated network created with GNSS vectors and terrestrial observations has been the subject of many theoretical and applied works. The network adjustment in various mathematical spaces was considered: in the Cartesian geocentric system on a reference ellipsoid and on a mapping plane. For practical reasons, it often takes a geodetic coordinate system associated with the reference ellipsoid. In this case, the Cartesian GNSS vectors are converted, for example, into geodesic parameters (azimuth and length on the ellipsoid, but the simple form of converted pseudo-observations are the direct differences of the geodetic coordinates. Unfortunately, such an approach may be essentially distorted by a systematic error resulting from the position error of the GNSS vector, before its projection on the ellipsoid surface. In this paper, an analysis of the impact of this error on the determined measures of geometric ellipsoid elements, including the differences of geodetic coordinates or geodesic parameters is presented. Assuming that the adjustment of a combined network on the ellipsoid shows that the optimal functional approach in relation to the satellite observation, is to create the observational equations directly for the original GNSS Cartesian vector components, writing them directly as a function of the geodetic coordinates (in numerical applications, we use the linearized forms of observational equations with explicitly specified coefficients. While retaining the original character of the Cartesian vector, one avoids any systematic errors that may occur in the conversion of the original GNSS vectors to ellipsoid elements, for example the vector of the geodesic parameters. The problem is theoretically developed and numerically tested. An example of the adjustment of a subnet loaded from the database of reference stations of the ASG-EUPOS system was considered for the preferred functional

  5. The combined geodetic network adjusted on the reference ellipsoid - a comparison of three functional models for GNSS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadaj, Roman

    2016-12-01

    The adjustment problem of the so-called combined (hybrid, integrated) network created with GNSS vectors and terrestrial observations has been the subject of many theoretical and applied works. The network adjustment in various mathematical spaces was considered: in the Cartesian geocentric system on a reference ellipsoid and on a mapping plane. For practical reasons, it often takes a geodetic coordinate system associated with the reference ellipsoid. In this case, the Cartesian GNSS vectors are converted, for example, into geodesic parameters (azimuth and length) on the ellipsoid, but the simple form of converted pseudo-observations are the direct differences of the geodetic coordinates. Unfortunately, such an approach may be essentially distorted by a systematic error resulting from the position error of the GNSS vector, before its projection on the ellipsoid surface. In this paper, an analysis of the impact of this error on the determined measures of geometric ellipsoid elements, including the differences of geodetic coordinates or geodesic parameters is presented. Assuming that the adjustment of a combined network on the ellipsoid shows that the optimal functional approach in relation to the satellite observation, is to create the observational equations directly for the original GNSS Cartesian vector components, writing them directly as a function of the geodetic coordinates (in numerical applications, we use the linearized forms of observational equations with explicitly specified coefficients). While retaining the original character of the Cartesian vector, one avoids any systematic errors that may occur in the conversion of the original GNSS vectors to ellipsoid elements, for example the vector of the geodesic parameters. The problem is theoretically developed and numerically tested. An example of the adjustment of a subnet loaded from the database of reference stations of the ASG-EUPOS system was considered for the preferred functional model of the GNSS

  6. A Comparative Study of the Applied Methods for Estimating Deflection of the Vertical in Terrestrial Geodetic Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Vittuari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares three different methods capable of estimating the deflection of the vertical (DoV: one is based on the joint use of high precision spirit leveling and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS, a second uses astro-geodetic measurements and the third gravimetric geoid models. The working data sets refer to the geodetic International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF co-location sites of Medicina (Northern, Italy and Noto (Sicily, these latter being excellent test beds for our investigations. The measurements were planned and realized to estimate the DoV with a level of precision comparable to the angular accuracy achievable in high precision network measured by modern high-end total stations. The three methods are in excellent agreement, with an operational supremacy of the astro-geodetic method, being faster and more precise than the others. The method that combines leveling and GNSS has slightly larger standard deviations; although well within the 1 arcsec level, which was assumed as threshold. Finally, the geoid model based method, whose 2.5 arcsec standard deviations exceed this threshold, is also statistically consistent with the others and should be used to determine the DoV components where local ad hoc measurements are lacking.

  7. ALGORITHMS VARIANTS OF ELABORATION OF THE PRECISE GNSS NETWORK ESTABLISHED FOR GEODETIC SERVICE OF BUILDING OF THE MINING FACILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard MIELIMĄKA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the problem of the usage of post‐processing services of the ASG‐EUPOS system on the example of GNSS network established for geodetic service of building of the inclined drift, to make coal deposit accessible, and also building associated objects. For the purpose of geodetic service of construction realization network was established outside the planned objects. The network consists of six new ground points and four control points belonging to ASG‐EUPOS network. Simultaneous, static measurements of the network were performed in three‐hour observation session, using multi‐frequency and multi‐system satellite receivers – Trimble R8. The paper presents three variants of post‐processing of the observation results. Calculations were performed using POZGEO‐D service and geodetic software package GEONET. The results of the calculation process revealed, that homogeneous vector networks should be adjusted on the ellipsoid or in the geocentric system. Model of adjustment of the vector network on the plane adopted in the GEONET software package should not be applied for elaboration of this type of network (long reference vectors more than 50km.

  8. The influence of cooling, crystallisation and re-melting on the interpretation of geodetic signals in volcanic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricchi, Luca; Biggs, Juliet; Annen, Catherine; Ebmeier, Susanna

    2014-02-01

    Deformation of volcanic edifices is typically attributed to the movement of magma within the volcanic plumbing system, but a wide range of magmatic processes are capable of producing significant volume variations and may also produce deformation. In order to understand the evolution of magmatic systems prior to eruption and correctly interpret monitoring signals, it is necessary to quantify the patterns and timescales of surface deformation that processes such as crystallisation, degassing and expansion of the hydrothermal system can produce. We show how the combination of petrology and thermal modelling can be applied to geodetic observations to identify the processes occurring in a magmatic reservoir during volcanic unrest. Thermal modelling and petrology were used to determine the timescales and volumetric variations associated with cooling, crystallisation and gas exsolution. These calculations can be performed rapidly and highlight the most likely processes responsible for the variation of a set of monitoring parameters. We then consider the magnitude and timescales of deformation produced by other processes occurring within the vicinity of an active magma system. We apply these models to a time series of geodetic data spanning the period between the 1997 and 2008 eruptions of Okmok volcano, Aleutians, examining scenarios involving crystallisation, degassing and remelting of the crystallising shallow magmatic body and including a viscoelastic shell or hydrothermal system. The geodetic observations are consistent with the injection of a water-saturated basalt, followed by minor crystallisation and degassing. Other scenarios are not compatible either with the magnitude or rate of the deformation signals.

  9. The integration of astro-geodetic data observed with ACSYS to the local geoid models Istanbul-Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halicioglu, Kerem; Ozludemir, M. Tevfik; Deniz, Rasim; Ozener, Haluk; Albayrak, Muge; Ulug, Rasit; Basoglu, Burak

    2017-04-01

    Astro-geodetic deflections of the vertical components provide accurate and valuable information of Earth's gravity filed. Conventional methods require considerable effort and time whereas new methods, namely digital zenith camera systems (DZCS), have been designed to eliminate drawbacks of the conventional methods, such as observer dependent errors, long observation times, and to improve the observation accuracy. The observation principle is based on capturing star images near zenithal direction to determine astronomical coordinates of the station point with the integration of CCD, telescope, tiltmeters, and GNSS devices. In Turkey a new DZCS have been designed and tested on control network located in Istanbul, of which the geoid height differences were known with the accuracy of ±3.5 cm. Astro-geodetic Camera System (ACSYS) was used to determine the deflections of the vertical components with an accuracy of ±0.1 - 0.3 arc seconds, and results were compared with geoid height differences using astronomical levelling procedure. The results have also been compared with the ones calculated from global geopotential models. In this study the recent results of the first digital zenith camera system of Turkey are presented and the future studies are introduced such as the current developments of the system including hardware and software upgrades as well as the new observation strategy of the ACSYS. We also discuss the contribution and integration of the astro-geodetic deflections of the vertical components to the geoid determination studies in the light of information of current ongoing projects being operated in Turkey.

  10. Seismological and Geodetic Observations of the 15th August 2007 Pisco, Peru Earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, J.; Psencik, K.; Norabuena, E.; Robinson, D.; Dixon, T.

    2007-12-01

    On 15th August 2007, a M8.0 earthquake occurred on the interface between the Nazca and South American Plates causing widespread damage in the towns of Chincha Alta, Ica and Pisco, with 514 casualties and 35,500 buildings reported destroyed. The 2007 Pisco earthquake occurred in a region between two large recent earthquakes: the 1996 M7.7 Nazca earthquake to the south and, in 1974, a M8.1 earthquake to the north. The existing local GPS network was resurveyed within 2 weeks of the earthquake and significant displacements measured at 8-10 sites. Co-seismic and postseismic InSAR data has been collected from several satellites, including Envisat, ERS-2, Radarsat and ALOS. In the two weeks following the mainshock, 42 aftershocks were recorded teleseismicly with magnitudes in the range 4-6.3. We will present results from the analysis of this geodetic data along with seismological analysis of teleseismic recordings of the mainshock and aftershocks.

  11. Geodetic Constraints on Mantle Q at Periods from a Fortnight to 18.6 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, D.; Wahr, J.; Desai, S.

    2002-12-01

    Seismic observations have provided numerous constraints on the earth's spherically-averaged mantle anelasticity at periods of tens of minutes and shorter. Meanwhile, post-glacial rebound and other geodynamic studies provide information at periods of a few thousand years and longer. However, constraints at intermediate periods are scarce. Such constraints could be useful in trying to connect the seismic anelastic models with the longer-period visco-elastic behavior. Here we will describe constraints on anelasticity in this intermediate range of periods as obtained from earth tide and earth rotation observations. We discuss results from: (1) VLBI observations of the monthly and fortnightly tidal variations in rotation rate; (2) satellite laser ranging observations of the 18.6-year tidal variations in the earth's gravitational field; and (3) astrometric and geodetic observations of the 14-month Chandler Wobble period and damping. We find that these observations are consistent with a nearly frequency-independent mantle Q stretching from seismic periods all the way out to the 14-month Chandler Wobble period; but that Q appears to decrease significantly between 14-months and 18.6-years.

  12. GEODETIC OBSERVATION AND INTERPRETATION OF ICE FLOW VELOCITIES IN THE SOUTHERN PART OF SUBGLACIAL LAKE VOSTOK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Richter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of geodetic in-situ observations of ice-flow velocities in the southern part of subglacialLakeVostokare combined with data sets of the ice surface topography, ice thickness, surface accumulation, basal accretion and firn/ice density for interpretations regarding the glaciological setting of theLakeVostoksystem. Based on the ice-flow velocities and the ice thickness, mean surface accumulation rates are derived applying the flux gate method. These are representative for surface segments extending from the southern part ofLakeVostokto the Ridge B ice divide. They are consistent with the present-day accumulation rate at Vostok station and its variation upstream and thus suggest that the area has been close to steady state. In addition, ice-flow dynamics are investigated along a flow line segment extending from26 kmupstream to12 kmdownstream from Vostok station. The analysis suggests deficiencies in current modelling approaches within the transition zone from floating to grounded ice.

  13. Optimization of observation plan based on the stochastic characteristics of the geodetic network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachelski, Wojciech; Postek, Paweł

    2016-06-01

    Optimal design of geodetic network is a basic subject of many engineering projects. An observation plan is a concluding part of the process. Any particular observation within the network has through adjustment a different contribution and impact on values and accuracy characteristics of unknowns. The problem of optimal design can be solved by means of computer simulation. This paper presents a new method of simulation based on sequential estimation of individual observations in a step-by-step manner, by means of the so-called filtering equations. The algorithm aims at satisfying different criteria of accuracy according to various interpretations of the covariance matrix. Apart of them, the optimization criterion is also amount of effort, defined as the minimum number of observations required. A numerical example of a 2-D network is illustrated to view the effectiveness of presented method. The results show decrease of the number of observations by 66% with respect to the not optimized observation plan, which still satisfy the assumed accuracy.

  14. Investigating relativity using lunar laser ranging - Geodetic precession and the Nordtvedt effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, J. O.; Newhall, X. X.; Williams, J. G.

    1989-01-01

    The emplacement of retroreflectors on the moon by Apollo astronauts and the Russian Lunakhod spacecraft marked the inception of lunar laser ranging (LLR) and provided a natural laboratory for the study of general relativity. Continuing acquisition of increasingly accurate LLR data has provided enhanced sensitivity to general relativity parameters. Two relativistic effects are investigated in this paper: (1) the Nordtvedt effect, yielding a test of the strong equivalence principle, would appear as a distortion of the geocentric lunar orbit in the direction of the sun. The inclusion of recent LLR data limits the size of any such effect to 3 + or - 4 cm. The sensitivities to the various PPN quantities are also highlighted. (2) the geodetic precession of the lunar perigee is predicted by general relativity as a consequence of the motion of the earth-moon system about the sun; its theoretical magnitude is 19.2 mas/yr. Analysis presented here confirms this value and determines this quality to a 2 percent level.

  15. Satellite geodetic monitoring of the Vladikavkaz active fault zone: First results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milyukov, V. K.; Mironov, A. P.; Steblov, G. M.; Ovsyuchenko, A. N.; Rogozhin, E. A.; Drobyshev, V. N.; Kusraev, A. G.; Khubaev, Kh. M.; Torchinov, Kh.-M. Z.

    2017-07-01

    A geodetic network of Global Satellite Navigation System (GNSS) observation sites was organized in 2014-2015 for studying the contemporary crustal motions in the zone of the Vladikavkaz deep fault (Milyukov et al., 2014; 2015). The measurements were conducted and the first velocity estimates obtained testifying to the consistency of crustal motions in the Vladikavkaz fault zone and the Ossetian region overall in the ITRG2008 system. The first results show that the velocities and directions of horizontal motions do not change upon the transition of the fault zone. In correspondence with the northeastern orientation of the site displacement vectors and sublatitudinal trend of the disjunctive zone, the presence of left-lateral strike-slip displacements along the branches of an active fault should be expected. However, the signs pointing to the activation of motion in the fault zone are absent. Besides, even the manifestation of weak seismicity has not been observed within the high-magnitude seismogenic Vladikavkaz zone associated with this fault for more than 25 years. This suggests the passive present state of this structure, one of the largest disjunctive structures of the Northern Caucasus. In order to verify this conclusion and revealing the kinematic pattern of the displacements associated with the fault structure it is reasonable to continue the measurements.

  16. Rank defect analysis and the realization of proper singularity in normal equations of geodetic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsakis, C.; Chatzinikos, M.

    2017-06-01

    The singularity of input normal equations (NEQ) is a crucial element for their optimal handling in the context of terrestrial reference frame (TRF) estimation under the minimal-constraint framework. However, this element is often missing in the recovered NEQ from SINEX files after the usual deconstraining based on the stated information for the stored solutions. The same setback also occurs with the original NEQ that are formed by the least-squares processing of space geodetic data due to the datum information which is carried by various modeling choices and/or software-dependent procedures. In the absence of this datum-related singularity, it is not possible to obtain genuine minimally constrained solutions because of the interference between the input NEQ's content and the external datum conditions, a fact that may alter the geometrical information of the original measurements and can cause unwanted distortions in the estimated solution. The main goal of this paper is the formulation of a filtering scheme to enforce the proper (or desired) singularity in the input NEQ with regard to datum parameters that will be handled by the minimal-constraint setting in TRF estimation problems. The importance of this task is extensively discussed and justified with the help of several numerical examples in different GNSS networks.

  17. Deciphering oblique shortening of central Alborz in Iran using geodetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernant, Ph.; Nilforoushan, F.; Chéry, J.; Bayer, R.; Djamour, Y.; Masson, F.; Nankali, H.; Ritz, J.-F.; Sedighi, M.; Tavakoli, F.

    2004-06-01

    The Alborz is a narrow (100 km) and elevated (3000 m) mountain belt which accommodates the differential motion between the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone in central Iran and the South Caspian basin. GPS measurements of 12 geodetic sites in Central Alborz between 2000 and 2002 allow to constrain the motion of the belt with respect to western Eurasia. One site velocity on the Caspian shoreline suggests that the South Caspian basin moves northwest at a rate of 6±2 mm/year with respect to western Eurasia. North-South shortening across the Alborz occurs at 5±2 mm/year. To the South, deformation seems to extend beyond the piedmont area, probably due to active thrusting on the Pishva fault. We also observe a left-lateral shear of the overall belt at a rate of 4±2 mm/year, consistent with the geological motion observed along E-W active strike-slip faults inside the belt (e.g., the Mosha fault).

  18. West-Coast Wide Expansion and Testing of the Geodetic Alarm System (G-larmS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhl, C. J.; Grapenthin, R.; Melgar, D.; Aranha, M. A.; Allen, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Geodetic Alarm System (G-larmS) was developed in collaboration between the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory (BSL) and New Mexico Tech for real-time Earthquake Early Warning (EEW). G-larmS has been in continuous operation at the BSL since 2014 using event triggers from the ShakeAlert EEW system and real-time position time series from a fully triangulated network consisting of BARD, PBO and USGS stations across northern California (CA). G-larmS has been extended to include southern CA and Cascadia, providing continuous west-coast wide coverage. G-larmS currently uses high rate (1 Hz), low latency (6.5) in CA and Cascadia built from realistic 3D geometries. Synthetic long-period 1Hz displacement waveforms were obtained from a new stochastic kinematic slip distribution generation method. Waveforms are validated by direct comparison to peak P-wave displacement scaling laws and to PGD GMPEs obtained from high-rate GPS observations of large events worldwide. We run the scenarios on real-time streams to systematically test the recovery of slip and magnitude by G-larmS. In addition to presenting these results, we will discuss new capabilities, such as implementing 2D geometry and the applicability of these results to GPS enhanced tsunami warning systems.

  19. Determination of the Deformation along the Tuzla Fault, Izmir, Turkey by Geodetic Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabuncu, A.; Ozener, H.

    2010-12-01

    The Aegean region is the most seismically active domain in Western Anatolia which comprises Greece, the Hellenic Arc, and Western Turkey. The Aegean region is mainly under pure shear stress from an internally deforming counter-clockwise direction of the Anatolian Plate relative to the Eurasia Plate. Izmir is the third largest city in Turkey with 2.7 million population. The Tuzla Fault is lying between the town of Menderes and Cape Doganbey which has NE-SW lineament trending. It is 42 km long through the land with 3 right lateral strike slip segments. This fault has a great importance as its proximity to the city of Izmir. The study aims to perform a large scale investigation, focusing on the Tuzla Fault and its vicinity for better understanding of the region’s tectonics. A micro-geodetic network with 15 points has been established in the study area. In order to investigate the crustal deformation and relative displacements along the Tuzla Fault GPS and Precise leveling techniques were used. Observations of two GPS campaigns and two precise leveling measurements were performed in 2009 and 2010. In order to process collected data by GPS campaigns, GAMIT/GLOBK software was used. As a result of two GPS campaigns, the velocity vectors of points are rated between 21mm/yr to 25mm/yr. In addition, 6.6 mm vertical displacement was observed between two leveling benchmarks which seems critical and needs further investigation.

  20. Geodetic implications on block formation and geodynamic domains in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrocoso, M.; Fernández-Ros, A.; Prates, G.; García, A.; Kraus, S.

    2016-01-01

    The South Shetland Islands archipelago is dynamically complex due to its tectonic surroundings. Most islands are part of a formerly active volcanic arc, although Deception, Penguin and Bridgeman Islands, as well as several submarine volcanoes, are characterized by active back-arc volcanism. Geodetic benchmarks were deployed and the movement of the lithosphere to which they were fixed measured to provide geodynamic insight for the South Shetland Islands, Bransfield Basin and Antarctic Peninsula area based on surface deformation. These benchmarks' data add spatial and temporal coverage to previous results. The results reveal two different geodynamic patterns, each confined to a distinct part of the South Shetland Islands archipelago. The inferred absolute horizontal velocity vectors for the benchmarks in the northeastern part of the archipelago are consistent with the opening of the Bransfield Basin, while benchmark vectors in the southwestern part of the archipelago are similar to those of the benchmarks on the Antarctic Peninsula. In between, Snow, Deception and Livingston Islands represent a transition zone. In this area, the horizontal velocity vectors relative to the Antarctic plate shift northeastwards from N to NW. Furthermore, the South Shetland Islands benchmarks, except for that at Gibbs (Elephant) Islands, indicate subsidence, which might be a consequence of the slab roll-back at the South Shetland Trench. In contrast, the uplift revealed by the Antarctic Peninsula benchmarks suggests glacial isostatic adjustment after the Larson B ice-shelf breakup.

  1. Geodetic Constraints on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau Present-Day Geophysical Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Erkan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau is the largest and the highest area in the world with distinct and competing surface and subsurface processes. The entire Plateau has been undergoing crustal deformation and accompanying isostatic uplift as a result of the Cenozoic collision of the Indian and Eurasian continents. Regional secular surface mass changes include the melting of mountain glaciers and ice caps, and permafrost layer degradation due to global warming. There is also a plausible effect of glacial isostatic adjustment due to the removal of a possible Pleistocene ice-sheet. In this article, we present an assessment of the sizes and extents of these competing interior and exterior dynamical processes, and their possible detections using contemporary space geodetic techniques. These techniques include, in addition to GPS, satellite radar altimetry over land, and temporal gravity field measurements from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE satellite mission. These techniques are complementary: land satellite altimetry, similar to GPS, is sensitive only to surface uplift, whereas GRACE is sensitive to both surface uplift and mass changes inside the Earth. Each process may dominate the others in a particular region. Our analysis shows that GRACE data are more sensitive (than GPS or land altimetry to hydrologic and meteorology signals, some of which are larger than the combined effect of geodynamic processes and permafrost degradation.

  2. Space-geodetic estimation of the nazca-south america euler vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angermann, D.; Klotz, J.; Reigber, C.

    1999-09-01

    GPS data from four sites in the Nazca Plate (Easter Island, Galapagos, Robinson Crusoe and San Felix Islands) and from five sites in the stable core of the South American Plate enabled us to estimate the Euler vector of the Nazca Plate with respect to South America. The observed velocities of Easter Island (6.6 cm/yr at 102.3°), Galapagos (5.1 cm/yr at 90.0°), Robinson Crusoe (6.6 cm/yr at 80.1°) and San Felix (6.0 cm/yr at 82.1°) are significantly slower than the global plate model NUVEL-1A velocites for those four sites. Our estimated Euler pole is located at 48.8°N, 91.7°W with a rate of 0.59°/m.y. The NUVEL-1A and earlier space-geodetic studies give rotation rates that are 20% faster.

  3. Rank defect analysis and the realization of proper singularity in normal equations of geodetic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsakis, C.; Chatzinikos, M.

    2017-01-01

    The singularity of input normal equations (NEQ) is a crucial element for their optimal handling in the context of terrestrial reference frame (TRF) estimation under the minimal-constraint framework. However, this element is often missing in the recovered NEQ from SINEX files after the usual deconstraining based on the stated information for the stored solutions. The same setback also occurs with the original NEQ that are formed by the least-squares processing of space geodetic data due to the datum information which is carried by various modeling choices and/or software-dependent procedures. In the absence of this datum-related singularity, it is not possible to obtain genuine minimally constrained solutions because of the interference between the input NEQ's content and the external datum conditions, a fact that may alter the geometrical information of the original measurements and can cause unwanted distortions in the estimated solution. The main goal of this paper is the formulation of a filtering scheme to enforce the proper (or desired) singularity in the input NEQ with regard to datum parameters that will be handled by the minimal-constraint setting in TRF estimation problems. The importance of this task is extensively discussed and justified with the help of several numerical examples in different GNSS networks.

  4. Modeling sea level changes and geodetic variations by glacial isostasy: the improved SELEN code

    CERN Document Server

    Spada, Giorgio; Galassi, Gaia; Colleoni, Florence

    2012-01-01

    We describe the basic features of SELEN, an open source Fortran 90 program for the numerical solution of the so-called "Sea Level Equation" for a spherical, layered, non-rotating Earth with Maxwell viscoelastic rheology. The Sea Level Equation was introduced in the 70s to model the sea level variations in response to the melting of late-Pleistocene ice-sheets, but it can be also employed for predictions of geodetic quantities such as vertical and horizontal surface displacements and gravity variations on a global and a regional scale. SELEN (acronym of SEa Level EquatioN solver) is particularly oriented to scientists at their first approach to the glacial isostatic adjustment problem and, according to our experience, it can be successfully used in teaching. The current release (2.9) considerably improves the previous versions of the code in terms of computational efficiency, portability and versatility. In this paper we describe the essentials of the theory behind the Sea Level Equation, the purposes of SELEN...

  5. Space Geodetic Imaging of Earthquake Potential in the San Francisco Bay Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürgmann, R.; Funning, G. J.; Ferretti, A.; Novali, F.

    2008-12-01

    Active crustal deformation in the San Francisco Bay Area includes contributions from elastic strain buildup across major faults and aseismic fault creep relieving a small portion of the plate tectonic fault slip budget. Increasingly precise and dense measurements of surface motions using GPS and InSAR satellite data provide valuable information on the distribution and rates of surface deformation. In the Eastern Bay Area, the Hayward, Calaveras and Concord faults are known to be source areas of moderate to large earthquakes, but also exhibit significant aseismic fault creep. Modeling of space geodetic data collected along the Hayward fault over > 10-year period allows for the determination of the distribution of currently locked asperities and creeping portions of the fault zone. Inversions of these data reveal a locked zone at depth which has built up a slip deficit since the 1868 Hayward fault rupture that is large enough to produce a M > 6.7 earthquake. The inferred slip rates along the creeping portions of the Hayward fault are significantly less than the long-term slip rate, and thus a substantial slip deficit is accumulating there as well. However, it is possible that the creeping portions of the East Bay faults will catch up most of their slip deficit by accelerated postseismic creep following large ruptures of the currently locked asperities. The kinematic locking models help inform dynamic rupture scenarios and ground motion simulations of major earthquakes along the Hayward fault (Aagaard et al., 2008 Fall AGU).

  6. Deformation in the Central Gulf of California from Geodetic data (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, C.; Malservisi, R.; Amelung, F.

    2009-12-01

    The spatial and temporal variation of lithospheric strain provides important information for understanding the rifting process at continental margins. However, in the Gulf of California rift system even the modern strain distribution is poorly known. Our geodetic study aims on filling this gap of knowledge by quantifying the plate boundary deformation in the Gulf of California considering different timescales. In the past, Plattner et al. (2007) determined the Baja California - North America rigid plate relative motion, which is comparable with 3Myr-average seafloor spreading rates in the Gulf of California. Here, we study interseismic deformation in the central Gulf of California and coseismic strain release during the August 2009 earthquakes. Our analysis is based on InSAR data acquired by Envisat over a broad area across Baja California, islands in the central Gulf of California, and Sonora. Data from 1993 to May 2009 are used for studying interseismic strain accumulation, considering both, a time-independent model, and a time-dependent model. InSAR data from 2009 only is used in modeling the coseismic displacement during the August 3rd 2009 M 6.9 earthquake. Our modeling results provide information on the modern strain accumulation pattern and fault slip in the Gulf of California. Furthermore, we characterize the parameters of strain accumulation, in particular the Ballenas transform fault.

  7. Preliminary results of the Geoid Slope Validation Survey 2014 in Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. M.; Becker, C.; Breidenbach, S.; Geoghegan, C.; Martin, D.; Winester, D.; Hanson, T.; Mader, G. L.; Eckl, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The National Geodetic Survey conducted a second Geoid Slope Validation Survey in the summer of 2014 (GSVS14). The survey took place in Iowa along U.S Route 30. The survey line is approximately 200 miles long (325 km), extending from Denison, IA to Cedar Rapids, IA. There are over 200 official survey bench marks. A leveling survey was performed, conforming to 1st order, class II specifications. A GPS survey was performed using 24 to 48 hour occupations. Absolute gravity, relative gravity, and gravity gradient measurements were also collected during the survey. In addition, deflections of the vertical were acquired at 200 eccentric survey benchmarks using the Compact Digital Astrometric Camera (CODIAC) camera. This paper presents the preliminary results of the survey, including the accuracy analysis of the leveling data, GPS ellipsoidal heights, and the deflections of the vertical which serves as an independent data set in addition to the GPS/leveling implied geoid heights.

  8. Geodetic Constraints From The Volcanic Arc Of The Andaman - Nicobar Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnest, A.; Krishnan, R.; Mayandi, S.; Sringeri, S. T.; Jade, S.

    2012-12-01

    We report first ever GPS derived surface deformation rates in the Barren and Narcondum volcanic islands east of Andaman-Nicobar archipelago which lies in the Bay of Bengal, a zone that generates frequent earthquakes, and coincides with the eastern plate boundary of India. The tectonics of this region is predominantly driven by the subduction of the Indian plate under the Burma plate. Andaman sea region hosts few volcanoes which lies on the inner arc extending between Sumatra and Myanmar with the sub-aerial expressions at Barren and Narcondum Islands. Barren Island, about 135 km ENE of Port Blair, is presently active with frequent eruptive histories whereas Narcondum is believed to be dormant. We initiated precise geodetic campaign mode measurements at Barren Island between 2007 to 2012 and one year (2011-2012) continuous measurements at Narcondum island. Preliminary results from this study forms a unique data set, being the first geodetic estimate from the volcanic arc of this subducting margin. Our analysis indicates horizontal convergence of the Barren benchmark to south-westward (SW) direction towards the Andaman accretionary fore-arc wedge where as the Narcondum benchmark recorded northeast (NE) motion. West of the Andaman fore-arc there is NE oriented subduction of the Indian plate which is moving at the rate of ~5 cm/yr. Convergence rates for the Indian plate from the Nuvel 1A model also show oblique convergence towards N23°E at 5.4 cm/yr. GPS derived inter seismic motion of Andaman islands prior to 2004 Sumatra earthquake is ~4.5 cm/yr NE. The marginal sea basin east of Barren Island at the Andaman spreading ridge has a NNW orienting opening of the sea-floor at 3.6 cm/yr. However the recent post seismic measurements of Andaman islands indicate rotation of displacement vectors from SW to NNE during 2005 to 2012. In this tectonic backdrop, the estimated rate of displacement of the volcanic islands probably represents a composite signal of tectonic as well as

  9. The 2015, Mw 6.5, Leucas (Ionian Sea, Greece) earthquake: Seismological and Geodetic Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltogianni, Vasso; Taymaz, Tuncay; Yolsal-Çevikbilen, Seda; Eken, Tuna; Moschas, Fanis; Stiros, Stathis

    2016-04-01

    A cluster of earthquakes (6Greece, in the last 30 years. The most recent earthquake was the 2015 (Mw 6.5) Leucas (Lefkada) earthquake. The modelling of these earthquakes, some of which are double events (2003 Leucas; 2014 Cephalonia) is a challenge for two main reasons. First, the geography of the area limits the distribution of the available seismological and GNSS stations and the correlations of INSAR data. Second, the structural pattern of the area indicates distributed thrusting but recent earthquakes are confined to the west margin of the Aegean Arc, usually assigned to the Cephalonia Transform Fault (CTF), and are dominated by strike slip faulting. In order to contribute to the understanding active tectonics along this critical region, our study was based on the independent analysis of the seismological and geodetic signature of the 2015 earthquake and the on the joint evaluation of the inferred models on the basis of the fault pattern of the area and of previous earthquakes. First, based on teleseismic long-period P- and SH- and broad-band P-waveforms a point-source solution at the SW part of Leucas yielded dominantly right-lateral strike-slip faulting mechanisms (strike: 23o, dip: 68o, rake: -170o) with a shallow focal depth (h: 9 km) and with seismic moment of Mo: 10.4x1018 Nm. Furthermore, the rupture history of the earthquake was obtained by applying a new back-projection method that uses teleseismic P-waveforms to integrate the direct P-phase with reflected phases from structural discontinuities near the source. In the slip inversion the faulting occurs on a single fault plane (strike and dip are obtained from the best fitting point-source solution) and slip (rake) angle varied during the whole rupture process. Second, co-seismic displacements were derived from eight permanent and one campaign GPS stations spread in the near and far field of the meizoseismal area. Significant horizontal slip was recognized, with a maximum dislocation of 36 cm in the SW

  10. Seismic potential of the active faults in Italy: new estimation from geodetic and geophysical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrolembo, B.; Caporali, A.; Montone, P.; Valensise, G.

    2016-12-01

    Earthquakes take place along faults that rupture under stress and release elastic energy accumulated over the interseismic period. Tectonic stress results into strain across the active faults, therefore regions with higher strain concentration are often the locations of seismogenic faults and more prone to be the source of future earthquakes. Based on the relative orientation of regional stress and faults planes and slip, the Coulomb Failure Function (CFF) indicates the rate at which every active structure is loading or unloading elastic energy showing which faults are optimally oriented for failure. In this work we use GPS velocities from nearly 500 stations distributed all along the Italian peninsula together with stress data from the new Stress Map released by Montone et al, 2016 (i.e. boreholes breakout, focal mechanisms), seismicity data and faults data from the Database of Individual Seismogenic Sources (DISS) of INGV. We estimate the surface geodetic strain-rate, then we convert it into stress rate to compute the rate of CFF on the known faults plane included into the DISS database. Comparing these results with the recorded historical earthquakes enable us to separate regions where the current strain well explains the seismicity from areas where stress is consistently building up but are historically quiescent. In such areas the lack of seismicity may result from a limited earthquake coupling - i.e. aseismic creeping - or from the incompleteness of the earthquake record. Our results may ultimately contribute to the assessment of the time-dependent seismic hazard in Italy, thus complementing the time-independent approach used for conventional seismic hazard maps.

  11. The IONORING Project: Exploiting The Italian Geodetic GPS Network For Ionospheric Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spogli, L.; Cesaroni, C.; Pezzopane, M.; Alfonsi, L.; Romano, V.; Avallone, A.; Settimi, A.

    2015-12-01

    The increasing use of GNSS for navigation and precise positioning leads to the need of more and more accurate knowledge of the morphology and dynamics of the ionosphere. In fact, it is well known that the ionospheric induced delay is the main error on the GNSS precise positioning applications. On the other hand, GNSS signals propagating through the ionosphere are useful to probe the ionization of the upper atmosphere. RING (Rete Integrata GPS Nazionale) is a dense geodetic network of GPS stations managed by INGV (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia) including about 180 receivers deployed on the whole Italian peninsula. Data acquired by the receivers were initially collected and stored to perform mainly studies focused on crustal deformations, caused both by plates movement and by earthquakes effects. The main goal of the IONORING (IONOspheric RING) project is to exploit data from the RING network to obtain ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) maps with very fine spatial resolution (0.1°x0.1°, lat x long) in near real-time. Ad hoc calibration and interpolation algorithms are applied to RINEX data to produce rapid and final products. The former are generated with a time lag of about 1 hour, the latter, characterized by a higher accuracy, are produced with a time lag of maximum 48 hours. These maps will be useful to support ionospheric error mitigation in precise positioning (rapid product) and to study the ionosphere morphology and dynamics during strong solar and geomagnetic storms affecting the mid-latitude ionosphere (final product). Maps and data resulting from the data-processing will be available on a dedicated web page through the electronic Space Weather upper atmosphere portal managed by INGV (www.eswua.it). In this paper, some preliminary results of the IONORING project are presented as well as the ICT interface of the project.

  12. Mechanical constraints on inversion of co-seismic geodetic data for fault slip and geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, F.; Sun, J.; Johnson, K. M.; Shen, Z.; Burgmann, R.

    2010-12-01

    Modern geodetic techniques, such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), provide high-precision deformation measurements of earthquakes. Through elastic models and mathematical optimization methods, the observations can be related to a slip-distribution model. The classic linear, kinematic, and static slip inversion problem requires specification of a smoothing norm of slip parameters and a residual norm of the data, and a choice about the relative weight between the two norms. Inversions for unknown fault geometry are nonlinear and therefore the fault geometry is often assumed to be known for the slip inversion problem. We present a new method to invert simultaneously for fault slip and fault geometry assuming a uniform stress drop over the slipping area of the fault. The method uses a Full Bayesian Inference method as an engine to estimate the posterior probability distribution of stress drop, fault geometry parameters, and fault slip. We validate the method with a synthetic data set and apply the method to InSAR observations of a moderate-sized normal faulting event, the October 6, 2008 Mw 6.3 Dangxiong-Yangyi (Tibet) earthquake. The results show a 45.0±0.2° west dipping fault with a maximum net slip of ~1.13 m, and the static stress drop and rake angle are estimated as ~5.43 MPa and ~92.5° respectively. The stress drop estimate falls within the typical range of earthquake stress drops known from previous studies.

  13. Spatio-temporal mapping of plate boundary faults in California using geodetic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnellan, Andrea; Arrowsmith, Ramon; DeLong, Stephen B.

    2017-01-01

    The Pacific–North American plate boundary in California is composed of a 400-km-wide network of faults and zones of distributed deformation. Earthquakes, even large ones, can occur along individual or combinations of faults within the larger plate boundary system. While research often focuses on the primary and secondary faults, holistic study of the plate boundary is required to answer several fundamental questions. How do plate boundary motions partition across California faults? How do faults within the plate boundary interact during earthquakes? What fraction of strain accumulation is relieved aseismically and does this provide limits on fault rupture propagation? Geodetic imaging, broadly defined as measurement of crustal deformation and topography of the Earth’s surface, enables assessment of topographic characteristics and the spatio-temporal behavior of the Earth’s crust. We focus here on crustal deformation observed with continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) data and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) from NASA’s airborne UAVSAR platform, and on high-resolution topography acquired from lidar and Structure from Motion (SfM) methods. Combined, these measurements are used to identify active structures, past ruptures, transient motions, and distribution of deformation. The observations inform estimates of the mechanical and geometric properties of faults. We discuss five areas in California as examples of different fault behavior, fault maturity and times within the earthquake cycle: the M6.0 2014 South Napa earthquake rupture, the San Jacinto fault, the creeping and locked Carrizo sections of the San Andreas fault, the Landers rupture in the Eastern California Shear Zone, and the convergence of the Eastern California Shear Zone and San Andreas fault in southern California. These examples indicate that distribution of crustal deformation can be measured using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), Global Navigation

  14. Total variation regularization of geodetically and geologically constrained block models for the Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Eileen L.; Loveless, John P.; Meade, Brendan J.

    2015-08-01

    Geodetic observations of interseismic deformation in the Western United States provide constraints on microplate rotations, earthquake cycle processes, and slip partitioning across the Pacific-North America Plate boundary. These measurements may be interpreted using block models, in which the upper crust is divided into microplates bounded by faults that accumulate strain in a first-order approximation of earthquake cycle processes. The number and geometry of microplates are typically defined with boundaries representing a limited subset of the large number of potentially seismogenic faults. An alternative approach is to include a large number of potentially active faults bounding a dense array of microplates, and then algorithmically estimate the boundaries at which strain is localized. This approach is possible through the application of a total variation regularization (TVR) optimization algorithm, which simultaneously minimizes the L2 norm of data residuals and the L1 norm of the variation in the differential block motions. Applied to 3-D spherical block models, the TVR algorithm can be used to reduce the total variation between estimated rotation vectors, effectively grouping microplates that rotate together as larger blocks, and localizing fault slip on the boundaries of these larger block clusters. Here we develop a block model comprised of 137 microplates derived from published fault maps, and apply the TVR algorithm to identify the kinematically most important faults in the western United States. This approach reveals that of the 137 microplates considered, only 30 unique blocks are required to approximate deformation in the western United States at a residual level of <2 mm yr-1.

  15. An approach for estimating time-variable rates from geodetic time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didova, Olga; Gunter, Brian; Riva, Riccardo; Klees, Roland; Roese-Koerner, Lutz

    2016-11-01

    There has been considerable research in the literature focused on computing and forecasting sea-level changes in terms of constant trends or rates. The Antarctic ice sheet is one of the main contributors to sea-level change with highly uncertain rates of glacial thinning and accumulation. Geodetic observing systems such as the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and the Global Positioning System (GPS) are routinely used to estimate these trends. In an effort to improve the accuracy and reliability of these trends, this study investigates a technique that allows the estimated rates, along with co-estimated seasonal components, to vary in time. For this, state space models are defined and then solved by a Kalman filter (KF). The reliable estimation of noise parameters is one of the main problems encountered when using a KF approach, which is solved by numerically optimizing likelihood. Since the optimization problem is non-convex, it is challenging to find an optimal solution. To address this issue, we limited the parameter search space using classical least-squares adjustment (LSA). In this context, we also tested the usage of inequality constraints by directly verifying whether they are supported by the data. The suggested technique for time-series analysis is expanded to classify and handle time-correlated observational noise within the state space framework. The performance of the method is demonstrated using GRACE and GPS data at the CAS1 station located in East Antarctica and compared to commonly used LSA. The results suggest that the outlined technique allows for more reliable trend estimates, as well as for more physically valuable interpretations, while validating independent observing systems.

  16. Engaging the Geodetic and Geoscience Communities in EarthScope Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlevoix, D. J.; Berg, M.; Morris, A. R.; Olds, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    UNAVCO is NSF's geodetic facility and operates as a university-governed consortium dedicated to facilitating geoscience research and education, including the support of EarthScope. The Education and Community Engagement program at UNAVCO provides support for broader impacts both externally to the broader University and EarthScope community as well as internally to the UNAVCO. During the first 10 years of EarthScope UNAVCO has engaged in outreach and education activities across the EarthScope footprint ranging from outreach to formal and informal educators and interpreters, to technical training for university faculty and researchers. UNAVCO works jointly with the EarthScope National Office and IRIS while simultaneously maintaining and developing an independent engagement and education program. UNAVCO provides training in the form of technical short courses to researchers including graduate students and early-career professionals, and conducts educational workshops for K-12 educators. A suite of educational materials focused on the integration of EarthScope data into curriculum materials is available from UNAVCO and will soon expand the undergraduate offerings to include a broader suite of geodesy applications activities for undergraduate students. UNAVCO provides outreach materials and in support of EarthScope including summaries of research project and campaign highlights, science snapshots featuring summaries of scientific advancements made possible by UNAVCO services and non-technical communications via social media. UNAVCO also provides undergraduate students exposure to EarthScope science research participation in a year-long research internship managed by UNAVCO (Research Experiences in Solid Earth Science for Students - RESESS).

  17. Space Geodetic Constraints on the Structure and Properties of Compliant Damage Zones Around Major Crustal Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialko, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Geologic and seismologic studies of large crustal faults indicate that the fault interface that accommodates most of seismic slip is often surrounded by heavily damaged material characterized by high crack density and reduced seismic velocities. Recently such damage zones were imaged by space geodetic observations. I present results of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) observations of deformation across kilometer-wide compliant fault zones in response to nearby earthquakes. In particular, a number of faults in the Eastern California Shear Zone, including the Calico, Rodman, Pinto Mountain, and Lenwood faults, were strained by both the 1992 Landers and the 1999 Hector Mine earthquakes. Analysis of deformation on these faults indicates that the fault zone displacements depend on the magnitude, but are independent of the sign of the co-seismic stress changes, implying a linearly elastic deformation. Other examples include faults adjacent to the North Anatolian fault (Turkey) that were strained by the 1999 Izmit earthquake. Analytic and numerical (finite element) modeling of the observed deformation suggests that the compliant fault zones have width of 1-2 km, depth extent of several km (or greater), and reductions in the effective shear modulus of about a factor of two. Stacked interferometric data from the Eastern California Shear Zone spannig a time period of more than 10 years reveal time-dependent (post- or inter-seismic) deformation on some of the inferred compliant fault zones. In particular, the fault zone associated with the Pinto Mountain fault was subsiding over several years following the Landers eartquake, with the total amplitude of subsidence comparable to the amplitude of the co-seismically-induced uplift. This behavior may be indicative of the poro-elastic deformation of the fluid-saturated fault zone.

  18. Chinese Digital Zenith Telescope (DZT) used for Astro-geodetic Deflection of the Vertical Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, L.; Wang, B.; Wang, Z.; Yin, Z.; Hu, H.; Wang, H.; Han, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Classical optical astrometry can be used to measure and study variations of plumb line. For the earth gravity filed related researches, it is irreplaceable by technologies like GNSS、VLBI、SLR, etc. However, classical astrometric instruments have some major drawback, such as low efficiency, low automation, more operating observers, and individual error in some visual instruments. In 2011, The National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) successfully developed the new digital zenith telescope prototype (DZT-1), which has the ability of highly automatic observation and data processing, even allowing unattended observation by remote control. By utilizing CCD camera as imaging terminal and high-accuracy tiltmeter to replace mercurial plate, observation efficiency of DZT is improved greatly. According to the results of data obtained from test observations, single-observation accuracy of DZT-1 is 0.15-0.3″ and one night observation accuracy up to 0.07-0.08″, which is better than the observation accuracy of classical astrometric instruments. The observations of DZT can be used to obtain the plumb line variations and the vertical deflections, which can be used for carrying out seismic, geodetic and other related geo-scientific researches. Especially the collocated observations with gravimeters and the conjoint analysis of the observation data will be helpful to recognize the anomalous motion and variation of underground mass over time, and maybe provide significant information for estimating the scale of underground anomalous mass. The information is valuable for determining the three key factors of earthquake possibly. Moreover, the project team is carrying out the development of new DZT with better performance and studying the key techniques for new instrument to make DZT play a more significant role in the astronomy and geoscience fields.

  19. Recent geodetic mass balance of Monte Tronador glaciers, northern Patagonian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Lucas; Berthier, Etienne; Viale, Maximiliano; Pitte, Pierre; Masiokas, Mariano H.

    2017-02-01

    Glaciers in the northern Patagonian Andes (35-46° S) have shown a dramatic decline in area in the last decades. However, little is known about glacier mass balance changes in this region. This study presents a geodetic mass balance estimate of Monte Tronador (41.15° S; 71.88° W) glaciers by comparing a Pléiades digital elevation model (DEM) acquired in 2012 with the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) X-band DEM acquired in 2000. We find a slightly negative Monte-Tronador-wide mass budget of -0.17 m w.e. a-1 (ranging from -0.54 to 0.14 m w.e. a-1 for individual glaciers) and a slightly negative trend in glacier extent (-0.16 % a-1) over the 2000-2012 period. With a few exceptions, debris-covered valley glaciers that descend below a bedrock cliff are losing mass at higher rates, while mountain glaciers with termini located above this cliff are closer to mass equilibrium. Climate variations over the last decades show a notable increase in warm season temperatures in the late 1970s but limited warming afterwards. These warmer conditions combined with an overall drying trend may explain the moderate ice mass loss observed at Monte Tronador. The almost balanced mass budget of mountain glaciers suggests that they are probably approaching a dynamic equilibrium with current (post-1977) climate, whereas the valley glaciers tongues will continue to retreat. The slightly negative overall mass budget of Monte Tronador glaciers contrasts with the highly negative mass balance estimates observed in the Patagonian ice fields further south.

  20. Seafloor Geodetic Monitoring of the Central Andean Subduction Zone: The Geosea Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, H.; Lange, D.; Contreras Reyes, E.; Behrmann, J. H.; McGuire, J. J.; Flueh, E. R.

    2014-12-01

    Seafloor geodesy has been identified as one of the central tools in marine geosciences to monitor seafloor deformation at high resolution. To quantify strain accumulation and assess the resultant hazard potential we urgently need systems to resolve seafloor crustal deformation. The GeoSEA (Geodetic Earthquake Observatory on the Seafloor) array consists of a seafloor transponder network comprising a total of 35 units and a wave glider acting as a surface unit (GeoSURF) to ensure satellite correspondence, data transfer and monitor system health. For horizontal direct path measurements, the system utilizes acoustic ranging techniques with a ranging precision better than 15 mm and long term stability over 2 km distance. Vertical motion is obtained from pressure gauges. Integrated inclinometers monitor station settlement in two horizontal directions. Travel time between instruments and the local water sound velocity will be recorded autonomously subsea without system or human intervention for up to 3.5 years. Data from the autonomous network on the seafloor can be retrieved via the integrated high-speed acoustic telemetry link without recovering the seafloor units. In late 2015 GeoSEA will be installed on the Iquique segment of the South America - Nazca convergent plate boundary to monitor crustal deformation. The Iquique seismic gap experienced the 2014 Mw 8.1 Pisagua earthquake, which apparently occurred within a local locking minimum. It is thus crucial to better resolve resolve strain in the forearc between the mainland and the trench in order to improve our understanding of forearc deformation required for hazard assessment. Mobile autonomous seafloor arrays for continuous measurement of active seafloor deformation in hazard zones have the potential to lead to transformative discoveries of plate boundary/fault zone tectonic processes and address a novel element of marine geophysical research.

  1. Long-term crustal deformation monitored by gravity and space geodetic techniques at Medicina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, B.; Zerbini, S.; Lago, L.; Romagnoli, C.; Simon, D.

    2003-04-01

    In the framework of an international collaboration, during 1996, at Medicina, Italy, a continuous GPS (CGPS) and a superconducting gravimeter (SG) were installed by the University of Bologna and the Bundesamt fuer Kartographie und Geodaesie, Frankfurt, respectively. The main purpose of the research was the establishment and the demonstration of an observational procedure leading to a reliable estimate of height variations and to interpret gravity variations/changes in conjunction with mass variations/changes within and above the Earth's crust. To fulfill the stated objectives, additional information is needed. In particular, continuous registrations of meteoclimatic parameters such as sacrificial water table level, electrical conductivity and temperature, deep well levels, rainfall, air pressure and temperature and balloon radio sonde data. A comparison, performed over a period of more than six years of data, between the CGPS and SG series has shed light on the existence of relevant seasonal fluctuations in both data sets, quite similar in amplitude and phase. They were interpreted and modeled as the sum of various environmental loadings for the height and gravity series and the Newtonian attraction components for gravity alone. The removal of the observed oscillations is most important in order to estimate properly the long-term trends, which characterize the CGPS and SG series. Moreover, the combination of SG and repeated absolute gravity measurements shows the capability of both techniques to determine the long-term trend in gravity. Just the combined view allows a significant trend analysis. In addition, the CGPS measurements are compared with other geodetic space techniques available at the Medicina station. In total, a strategy has been developed demonstrating how the present day available techniques should be combined to monitor crustal deformations and achieve relevant information for possible causes.

  2. GPS code phase variations (CPV) for GNSS receiver antennas and their effect on geodetic parameters and ambiguity resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Tobias; Schön, Steffen

    2016-12-01

    Precise navigation and geodetic coordinate determination rely on accurate GNSS signal reception. Thus, the receiver antenna properties play a crucial role in the GNSS error budget. For carrier phase observations, a spherical radiation pattern represents an ideal receiver antenna behaviour. Deviations are known as phase centre corrections. Due to synergy of carrier and code phase, similar effects on the code exist named code phase variations (CPV). They are mainly attributed to electromagnetic interactions of several active and passive elements of the receiver antenna. Consequently, a calibration and estimation strategy is necessary to determine the shape and magnitudes of the CPV. Such a concept was proposed, implemented and tested at the Institut für Erdmessung. The applied methodology and the obtained results are reported and discussed in this paper. We show that the azimuthal and elevation-dependent CPV can reach maximum magnitudes of 0.2-0.3 m for geodetic antennas and up to maximum values of 1.8 m for small navigation antennas. The obtained values are validated by dedicated tests in the observation and coordinate domain. As a result, CPV are identified to be antenna- related properties that are independent from location and time of calibration. Even for geodetic antennas when forming linear combinations the CPV effect can be amplified to values of 0.4-0.6 m. Thus, a significant fractional of the Melbourne-Wübbena linear combination. A case study highlights that incorrect ambiguity resolution can occur due to neglecting CPV corrections. The impact on the coordinates which may reach up to the dm level is illustrated.

  3. GPS code phase variations (CPV) for GNSS receiver antennas and their effect on geodetic parameters and ambiguity resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Tobias; Schön, Steffen

    2017-06-01

    Precise navigation and geodetic coordinate determination rely on accurate GNSS signal reception. Thus, the receiver antenna properties play a crucial role in the GNSS error budget. For carrier phase observations, a spherical radiation pattern represents an ideal receiver antenna behaviour. Deviations are known as phase centre corrections. Due to synergy of carrier and code phase, similar effects on the code exist named code phase variations (CPV). They are mainly attributed to electromagnetic interactions of several active and passive elements of the receiver antenna. Consequently, a calibration and estimation strategy is necessary to determine the shape and magnitudes of the CPV. Such a concept was proposed, implemented and tested at the Institut für Erdmessung. The applied methodology and the obtained results are reported and discussed in this paper. We show that the azimuthal and elevation-dependent CPV can reach maximum magnitudes of 0.2-0.3 m for geodetic antennas and up to maximum values of 1.8 m for small navigation antennas. The obtained values are validated by dedicated tests in the observation and coordinate domain. As a result, CPV are identified to be antenna- related properties that are independent from location and time of calibration. Even for geodetic antennas when forming linear combinations the CPV effect can be amplified to values of 0.4-0.6 m. Thus, a significant fractional of the Melbourne-Wübbena linear combination. A case study highlights that incorrect ambiguity resolution can occur due to neglecting CPV corrections. The impact on the coordinates which may reach up to the dm level is illustrated.

  4. On the Accuracy of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment Models for Geodetic Observations to Estimate Arctic Ocean Sea-Level Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenwei Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Arctic Ocean sea-level change is an important indicator of climate change. Contemporary geodetic observations, including data from tide gages, satellite altimetry and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE, are sensitive to the effect of the ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA process. To fully exploit these geodetic observations to study climate related sea-level change, this GIA effect has to be removed. However, significant uncertainty exists with regard to the GIA model, and using different GIA models could lead to different results. In this study we use an ensemble of 14 contemporary GIA models to investigate their differences when they are applied to the above-mentioned geodetic observations to estimate sea-level change in the Arctic Ocean. We find that over the Arctic Ocean a large range of differences exists in GIA models when they are used to remove GIA effect from tide gage and GRACE observations, but with a relatively smaller range for satellite altimetry observations. In addition, we compare the derived sea-level trend from observations after applying different GIA models in the study regions, sea-level trend estimated from long-term tide gage data shows good agreement with altimetry result over the same data span. However the mass component of sea-level change obtained from GRACE data does not agree well with the result derived from steric-corrected altimeter observation due primarily to the large uncertainty of GIA models, errors in the Arctic Ocean altimetry or steric measurements, inadequate data span, or all of the above. We conclude that GIA correction is critical for studying sea-level change over the Arctic Ocean and further improvement in GIA modelling is needed to reduce the current discrepancies among models.

  5. Geodetic Infrastructure in the Ibiza and Barcelona Harbours for Sea Level Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Benjamin, J. J.; Gili, J.; Lopez, R.; Tapia, A.; Perez, B.; Pros, F.

    2013-12-01

    The presentation is directed to the description of the actual situation and relevant information of the geodetic infrastructure of Ibiza and Barcelona sites for sea level determination and contribution to regional sea level rise. Time series are being analysed for mean sea level variations www.puertos.es. .In the framework of a Spanish Space Project, the instrumentation of sea level measurements has been improved by providing the Barcelona site with a radar tide gauge Datamar 2000C from Geonica s.l. near an acoustic tide gauge. Puertos del Estado installed in 2007 a MIROS radar tide gauge and the Barcelona Harbour Authority a GPS referente station in the roof of the new Control Tower situated in the Energy Pier. The radar sensor is over the water surface, on a L-shaped structure which elevates it a few meters above the quay shelf. 1-min data are transmitted to the ENAGAS Control Center by cable and then sent each 1 min to Puertos del Estado by e-mail. There is a GPS station Leica Geosystems GRX1200 GG Pro and antenna 1202. Precision levelling has been made several times in the last two years because the tower is founded in reclaimed land. The measured settlement rate is about 1cm/year that may be could mask the values registered by the tide gauge. A description of the actual infrastructure at Ibiza harbour at Marina de Botafoch, is presented and its applications to sea level monitoring and altimeter calibration in support of the main CGPS at Ibiza harbour. It is described the geometrical precision levelling made in June 2013 between the radar tide gauge and the GPS station. In particular, the CGPS located at Ibiza harbour is essential for its application to the marine campaign Baleares 2013, near Ibiza island. The main objective is to determine the altimeter bias for Jason-2, about 9:09 UTC September 15, 2013, and Saral/AltiKa, about 05:30 UTC September 16, UTC. These activities has been received funding of the Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion under Spanish

  6. Space-geodetic Constraints on GIA Models with 3D Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Wal, W.; Xu, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Models for Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) are an important correction to observations of mass change in the polar regions. Inputs for GIA models include past ice thickness and deformation parameters of the Earth's mantle, both of which are imperfectly known. Here we focus on the latter by investigating GIA models with 3D viscosity and composite (linear and non-linear) flow laws. It was found recently that GIA models with a composite flow law result in a better fit to historic sea level data, but they predict too low present-day uplift rates and gravity rates. Here GIA models are fit to space-geodetic constraints in Fennoscandia and North America. The preferred models are used to calculate the magnitude of the GIA correction on mass change estimates in Greenland and Antarctica. The observations used are GRACE Release 4 solutions from CSR and GFZ and published GPS solutions for North America and Fennoscandia, as well as historic sea level data. The GIA simulations are performed with a finite element model of a spherical, self-gravitating, incompressible Earth with 2x2 degree elements. Parameters in the flow laws are taken from seismology, heatflow measurements and experimental constraints and the ice loading history is prescribed by ICE-5G. It was found that GRACE and GPS derived uplift rates agree at the level of 1 mm/year in North America and at a level of 0.5 mm/year in Fennoscandia, the difference between the two regions being due to larger GPS errors and under sampling in North America. It can be concluded that both GPS and GRACE see the same process and the effects of filtering, noise and non-GIA processes such as land hydrology are likely to be small. Two GIA models are found that bring present-day uplift rate close to observed values in North America and Fennoscandia. These models result in a GIA correction of -17 Gt/year and -26 Gt/year on Greenland mass balance estimates from GRACE.

  7. The 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake imaged from inversion of geodetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnadottir, Thora; Segall, Paul

    1994-11-01

    We invert geodetic measurements of coseismic deformation from the 1989 M(sub S)7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake to determine the geometry of the fault and the distribution of slip on the fault plane. The data include electronic distance measurements, Global Positioning System and very long baseline interferometry vectors, and elevation changes derived from spirit leveling. The fault is modeled as a rectangular dislocation surface in a homogeneous, elastic half-space. First, we assume that the slip on the fault is uniform and estimate the position, orientation, and size of the fault plane using a nonlinear, quasi-Newton algorithm. The best fitting dislocation strikes N48 deg +/- 4 deg W and dips 76 deg +/- 9 deg SW, consistent with the trend of the aftershock zone and moment tensor solutions. Bootstrap resampling of the data is used to graphically illustrate the uncertainty in the location of the rupture plane. Second, we estimate the slip distribution using the best fitting uniform slip fault orientation but increase the fault length to 40 km and the downdip width to 18 km. The fault is divided into 162 subfaults, 18 along strike and 9 along dip. Each subfault is allowed to have constant right-lateral and reverse components of slip. We then solve for the slip on each subfault that minimizes a linear combination of the norm of the weighted data residual and the roughness of the slip distribution. The smoothing parameter, which determines the relative weight put on fitting the data versus smoothing the slip distribution, is chosen by cross validation. The preferred slip distribution is very heterogeneous, with maximum strike slip and dip slip of about 5 and 8 m, respectively, located roughly 10 km north of the hypocenter. There is insignificant dip slip in the southeastern most part of the fault, causing the rake to vary from nearly pure right-lateral in the southeast to oblique right-reverse in the northwest. The change in rake is consistent with a uniform stress field if

  8. Kinematic Analysis of Subsurface Structures of the Northern Longitudinal Valley From Geodetic and Seismic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T. Y.; Chang, W. L.; Chang, C. P.; Kuochen, H.

    2014-12-01

    Longitudinal Valley (LV), extended form Hualien to Taitung between the Central Range (CR) and the Coastal Range in the eastern Taiwan, is considered as a plate boundary formed by the convergence between the Eurasian and Philippine Sea plates. Previous studies reveal ~30 mm/yr shortening in the southern part of the LV; however, many interesting tectonic and geologic features in the northern LV are worth to discuss. Our relocation of M>2.0 background seismicity in the northern LV using HypoDD revealed an east dipping LV fault and a west-dipping lineament beneath the middle Central Range, while the lineament gradually becomes horizontal as extended to the east (Fig. 1). In Oct. 31, 2013, a NNE-strike earthquake of Mw=6.4 occurred near the town of Ruisui (Fig. 1), which is the largest event of the northern LV area since the 1972 M=7.2 earthquake. . The focal mechanism indicates that the earthquake is a high angle thrusting fault dipping to west, consistent with the aforementioned west-dipping seismic lineament beneath CR. In this study, we analyzed GPS data from 38 continuous stations together with ERS and Envisat images processed by PSInSAR (Persistent Scatterers InSAR) technique to study the interseismic and the post-Ruisui ground deformation of the northern LV area (Fig. 2). Our geodetic analysis reveal that the GPS horizontal velocity field decreases toward the north from ~25 mm/yr to <10 mm/yr across the latitude of ~23.5°, with a clockwise rotation of velocity directions from northwest to north and further to east in the Hualien area. In addition, the vertical velocities show subsidence in the most of the area with rates up to 10 mm/yr. Moreover, the mean Line of Sight (LOS) velocity of ERS from 1993-2001 reveals subsidence rates of up to 8 mm/yr in the Longitudinal Valley and an uplift up to 5 mm/yr at the west of the Milun fault (Fig. 2). Besides, the 2004-2008 Envisat data show an uplift of ~3 mm/yr in most of the Milun fault area. A couple of two

  9. Inverting for Shear Stress Rate on the Northern Cascadia Megathrust Using Geodetic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhat, L.; Segall, P.; Bradley, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Past physics-based models of slow slip events (SSE) have shown that, when averaged over many SSE cycles, the shear stress within the SSE zone remains roughly constant. Stress accumulates between SSE, and then is released during slow slip events. However, the predicted long-term deformation rates from such models, assuming the plate boundary is locked to the top of the ETS zone, do not fit well GPS velocities and uplift rates determined from leveling and tide-gauge data. These physics-based models particularly misfit the vertical rates. At the same time, previous kinematic inversions display a gap between the down-dip limit of the locked region and the top of the ETS zone. Our inversions of geodetic data for fault slip rates exhibit a steeper slip-rate profile at the top of the ETS zone, relative to the constant shear stress model, as well as creep up dip of the ETS zone. We explore physics-based models with velocity-strengthening regions of different length up dip the ETS zone, i.e. within the "gap" identified in kinematic inversions. However, this still does not match the observations well. We therefore try a new approach: we invert for shear stress rates on the megathrust that best fit the data. We show that a small decrease in shear stress within the top of the ETS zone, reaching 5 kPa/year at a depth of ~ 30 km, is required to fit the data. Possible explanations for this include a slow decrease in normal stress with time, possibly due to an increase in pore pressure, or a reduction in fault friction. We explore these hypotheses, using 2D quasi-dynamic simulations with rate-and-state friction and isothermal v-cutoff models for generating slow slip events. The potential for creep above the top of the ETS zone has important implications for the mechanical relationship between deep slow slip and dynamic events in the locked region.

  10. Combination of terrestrial reference frames based on space geodetic techniques in SHAO: methodology and main issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bing; Wang, Xiao-Ya; Hu, Xiao-Gong; Zhao, Qun-He

    2017-09-01

    Based on years of input from the four geodetic techniques (SLR, GPS, VLBI and DORIS), the strategies of the combination were studied in SHAO to generate a new global terrestrial reference frame as the material realization of the ITRS defined in IERS Conventions. The main input includes the time series of weekly solutions (or fortnightly for SLR 1983–1993) of observational data for satellite techniques and session-wise normal equations for VLBI. The set of estimated unknowns includes 3-dimensional Cartesian coordinates at the reference epoch 2005.0 of the stations distributed globally and their rates as well as the time series of consistent Earth Orientation Parameters (EOPs) at the same epochs as the input. Besides the final solution, namely SOL-2, generated by using all the inputs before 2015.0 obtained from short-term observation processing, another reference solution, namely SOL-1, was also computed by using the input before 2009.0 based on the same combination of procedures for the purpose of comparison with ITRF2008 and DTRF2008 and for evaluating the effect of the latest six more years of data on the combined results. The estimated accuracy of the x-component and y-component of the SOL-1 TRF-origin was better than 0.1 mm at epoch 2005.0 and better than 0.3 mm yr‑1 in time evolution, either compared with ITRF2008 or DTRF2008. However, the z-component of the translation parameters from SOL-1 to ITRF2008 and DTRF2008 were 3.4 mm and ‑1.0 mm, respectively. It seems that the z-component of the SOL-1 TRF-origin was much closer to the one in DTRF2008 than the one in ITRF2008. The translation parameters from SOL-2 to ITRF2014 were 2.2, ‑1.8 and 0.9 mm in the x-, y- and z-components respectively with rates smaller than 0.4 mm yr‑1. Similarly, the scale factor transformed from SOL-1 to DTRF2008 was much smaller than that to ITRF2008. The scale parameter from SOL-2 to ITRF2014 was ‑0.31 ppb with a rate lower than 0.01 ppb yr‑1. The external precision (WRMS

  11. Analysis of the displacement of geodetic stations during the Emilia seismic sequence of May 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Caporali

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The two events of Mw 6.11 and 5.96 [EMERGEO Working Group 2012, this volume] that took place on May 20 and 29, 2012, respectively, in the Po Plain, and the associated seismic sequence, represent the response of the brittle upper crust (hypocentral depth ca. 10 km to the compressive stress in the outer Apennine Arc. Kinematically, the motion of the Apennines that has led to a compressional regime in the Po Plain can be represented as a counterclockwise rotation, as demonstrated by the shortening of the transalpine baselines, with a rate that decreases going west [Caporali and Martin 2000]. The compressive stress field is known from borehole breakout data [Pierdominici and Heidbach 2012] and it agrees with the principal directions of the strain rate derived from global positioning system (GPS data. The geodetic strain rate for seismic zone 912 (Dorsale Ferrarese, according to Meletti et al. [2008] is 92.86 ±0.04 nstrain/yr, which is a relatively high value [Caporali et al. 2011]. On a more local scale, the Mirandola fault is described in the Database of Individual Seismic Sources (DISS; http://diss.rm.ingv.it/ under the ID ITIS107 as a possible individual source, and it has a position, strike, dip, size and expected maximum magnitude [Burrato et al. 2003, Carminati et al. 2010, Scrocca et al. 2007] that are very close to the main events of the 2012 sequence. Several permanent GPS stations were in activity in the area. Using ultrarapid international Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS Service (IGS orbits and the Bernese BSW 5.0 software [Dach et al. 2007] at our computing facility, a fast solution for the coseismic displacement was published on the May 21, 2012, and on the May 30, 2012, for the events of May 20 and 29, 2012, respectively. The largest signal was about 2 cm in the North direction at the station SGIP (San Giovanni in Persiceto, which was relatively consistent with the fault-plane solution [Devoti 2012, this volume]. In this

  12. Application of ray-traced tropospheric slant delays to geodetic VLBI analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, Armin; Böhm, Johannes

    2017-02-01

    The correction of tropospheric influences via so-called path delays is critical for the analysis of observations from space geodetic techniques like the very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). In standard VLBI analysis, the a priori slant path delays are determined using the concept of zenith delays, mapping functions and gradients. The a priori use of ray-traced delays, i.e., tropospheric slant path delays determined with the technique of ray-tracing through the meteorological data of numerical weather models (NWM), serves as an alternative way of correcting the influences of the troposphere on the VLBI observations within the analysis. In the presented research, the application of ray-traced delays to the VLBI analysis of sessions in a time span of 16.5 years is investigated. Ray-traced delays have been determined with program RADIATE (see Hofmeister in Ph.D. thesis, Department of Geodesy and Geophysics, Faculty of Mathematics and Geoinformation, Technische Universität Wien. http://resolver.obvsg.at/urn:nbn:at:at-ubtuw:1-3444, 2016) utilizing meteorological data provided by NWM of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). In comparison with a standard VLBI analysis, which includes the tropospheric gradient estimation, the application of the ray-traced delays to an analysis, which uses the same parameterization except for the a priori slant path delay handling and the used wet mapping factors for the zenith wet delay (ZWD) estimation, improves the baseline length repeatability (BLR) at 55.9% of the baselines at sub-mm level. If no tropospheric gradients are estimated within the compared analyses, 90.6% of all baselines benefit from the application of the ray-traced delays, which leads to an average improvement of the BLR of 1 mm. The effects of the ray-traced delays on the terrestrial reference frame are also investigated. A separate assessment of the RADIATE ray-traced delays is carried out by comparison to the ray-traced delays from the

  13. Seismic hazard assessment of Sub-Saharan Africa using geodetic strain rate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggi, Valerio; Pagani, Marco; Weatherill, Graeme; Garcia, Julio; Durrheim, Raymond J.; Mavonga Tuluka, Georges

    2016-04-01

    The East African Rift System (EARS) is the major active tectonic feature of the Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) region. Although the seismicity level of such a divergent plate boundary can be described as moderate, several earthquakes have been reported in historical times causing a non-negligible level of damage, albeit mostly due to the high vulnerability of the local buildings and structures. Formulation and enforcement of national seismic codes is therefore an essential future risk mitigation strategy. Nonetheless, a reliable risk assessment cannot be done without the calibration of an updated seismic hazard model for the region. Unfortunately, the major issue in assessing seismic hazard in Sub-Saharan Africa is the lack of basic information needed to construct source and ground motion models. The historical earthquake record is largely incomplete, while instrumental catalogue is complete down to sufficient magnitude only for a relatively short time span. In addition, mapping of seimogenically active faults is still an on-going program. Recent studies have identified major seismogenic lineaments, but there is substantial lack of kinematic information for intermediate-to-small scale tectonic features, information that is essential for the proper calibration of earthquake recurrence models. To compensate this lack of information, we experiment the use of a strain rate model recently developed by Stamps et al. (2015) in the framework of a earthquake hazard and risk project along the EARS supported by USAID and jointly carried out by GEM and AfricaArray. We use the inferred geodetic strain rates to derive estimates of total scalar moment release, subsequently used to constrain earthquake recurrence relationships for both area (as distributed seismicity) and fault source models. The rates obtained indirectly from strain rates and more classically derived from the available seismic catalogues are then compared and combined into a unique mixed earthquake recurrence model

  14. Upgrading the seismic and geodetic network of the Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calò, Marco; Iglesias Mendoza, Arturo; Legrand, Denis; Valdés González, Carlos Miguel; Perez Campos, Xyoli

    2017-04-01

    The Popocatépetl is one of the most active volcanoes in Mexico and is located only 70 km from Mexico City, populated by more than 20 millions of people, and only 35 km from the Puebla municipality with almost 1.5 millions of people living. The recent activity of the volcano is generally marked by explosions emitting ash plumes often reaching the densely populated regions. In the framework of the Mexican Fund for Prevention of Natural Disasters (FOPREDEN) we are renovating and upgrading the existing geodetic and seismic networks monitoring the volcano. In this project we are installing 10 broadband seismic stations (120s-050Hz) in shallow boreholes (3-5m depth) and 4 GPS with real time sampling rate of 1 Hz. All instruments are equipped with continuous recording systems for real time monitoring purposes and research. The Popocatépetl exceeds 5400m, and the altitude of the stations ranges from 2200 m to 4300 m making it difficult their installation and maintenance. Because of ash emissions and the hard working condition, the real-time transmission is split into two systems in order to ensure the monitoring of the volcano also during the highest expected activity. Therefore we set up a network of "first order", consisting of four stations located about 20 km from the crater and equipped with satellite transmission. These stations, being far enough from the crater, ensure the real time monitoring of the major events also during intense periods of activity of the volcano. The remaining six stations are installed near to the crater (less than 10 km) and take part of the "second order" network equipped with a telemetered radio system transmitting the data either directly to the National Center of Disaster Prevention (CENAPRED) and National Seismological Service (SSN) or to the first order stations (for the sites that have not direct visible line with the monitoring centers). The four GPS sensors are all installed in the second order sites in order to monitor the largest

  15. The kinematics of faults in the San Francisco Bay area inferred from geodetic and seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, David Andrew

    2002-01-01

    The work presented in this dissertation focuses on the kinematics and mechanics of the Hayward fault, the Loma Prieta earthquake rupture, and the Silver Creek fault. To better understand their behavior and geometry, geodetic and seismic data are used in conjunction with elastic models of the crust. Along the northern and central segments of the Hayward fault, a steady interseismic deformation rate is observed. Variations in this rate along strike suggest a variable slip-rate distribution at depth indicative of locked and creeping patches. A locked patch that correlates with the presumed source region of the 1868 earthquake on the Hayward fault implies that elastic strain is accumulating at this location. The southern Hayward fault exhibits complex time-dependent slip. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is employed to visualize the crustal deformation signal by utilizing over 100 interferograms. Results suggest that the observed surface deformation is best explained by a combination of transient fault slip and land subsidence. This is in contrast to the Silver Creek fault in the Santa Clara Valley where all of the deformation is attributed to differential aquifer compaction and expansion across the fault. Regional faults interact through the redistribution of stress in the crust and upper mantle. The effect of this change in stress on the creeping portion of the Hayward fault following the 1906 San Francisco earthquake is explored using a rate-and-state friction model. The predicted surface creep response, driven by the postseismic relaxation of the mantle following the 1906 event, is used to constrain the rheology of the lower crust. Rheologies that include a horizontal shear zone underpredict the surface creep response observed from offset cultural features. Inversions for the coseismic slip distribution of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake are performed to evaluate the sensitivity of the inversion to the prescribed fault geometry. Models the

  16. Application of ray-traced tropospheric slant delays to geodetic VLBI analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, Armin; Böhm, Johannes

    2017-08-01

    The correction of tropospheric influences via so-called path delays is critical for the analysis of observations from space geodetic techniques like the very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). In standard VLBI analysis, the a priori slant path delays are determined using the concept of zenith delays, mapping functions and gradients. The a priori use of ray-traced delays, i.e., tropospheric slant path delays determined with the technique of ray-tracing through the meteorological data of numerical weather models (NWM), serves as an alternative way of correcting the influences of the troposphere on the VLBI observations within the analysis. In the presented research, the application of ray-traced delays to the VLBI analysis of sessions in a time span of 16.5 years is investigated. Ray-traced delays have been determined with program RADIATE (see Hofmeister in Ph.D. thesis, Department of Geodesy and Geophysics, Faculty of Mathematics and Geoinformation, Technische Universität Wien. http://resolver.obvsg.at/urn:nbn:at:at-ubtuw:1-3444, 2016) utilizing meteorological data provided by NWM of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). In comparison with a standard VLBI analysis, which includes the tropospheric gradient estimation, the application of the ray-traced delays to an analysis, which uses the same parameterization except for the a priori slant path delay handling and the used wet mapping factors for the zenith wet delay (ZWD) estimation, improves the baseline length repeatability (BLR) at 55.9% of the baselines at sub-mm level. If no tropospheric gradients are estimated within the compared analyses, 90.6% of all baselines benefit from the application of the ray-traced delays, which leads to an average improvement of the BLR of 1 mm. The effects of the ray-traced delays on the terrestrial reference frame are also investigated. A separate assessment of the RADIATE ray-traced delays is carried out by comparison to the ray-traced delays from the

  17. Maintenance of the Geodetic Reference Frame in the Global Positioning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oria, A.; Brodsky, B. L.; Labrecque, J.; Miller, J. J.; Moreau, M.; Pearlman, M.; Nelson, R.

    2007-12-01

    In the Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of the satellite coordinates and the underlying World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 84) reference frame are derived from observables such as pseudorandom noise (PRN) signals, and carrier phase, which are referenced to on-board atomic clocks. Systematic errors exist in both the estimated satellite coordinates and the reference frame. The reference frame utilizes external inputs in the form of International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) coordinates and constrains the results to be compatible with the ITRF coordinates for a set of global reference stations. The ITRF is, in turn, obtained from the combined analysis of GPS, Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR), Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), and Doppler Orbitography and Radio-positioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) data. The current realization of the reference frame could be described as circular in that an independent method of external verification is currently not available. To ensure the continued successful operation of the GPS it is necessary to have the capability of analyzing systematic errors by an independent means from current radiometric observables and data from foreign sources. In practice, accuracy of the standards used for measurement should be better than the expected, required operational measurement accuracy by a factor of ten to ensure that the desired requirement is met. Currently, the accuracy of both the ITRF and the WGS 84 is estimated to be on the order of 1 to 2 parts per billion, leading to expected drifts of 0.6 to 1.2 cm per year. The experience of the last three decades has indicated an approximate improvement by a factor of ten per decade. Therefore, while current accuracy of the ITRF and WGS 84 reference frames marginally meets civilian and military requirements, it is very likely that, within the lifetime of GPS III, the accuracy of the reference frames will be unable to meet the anticipated requirements. This report examines

  18. Quantizing the Complexity of the Western United States Fault System with Geodetically and Geologically Constrained Block Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, E. L.; Meade, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Geodetic observations of interseismic deformation provide constraints on miroplate rotations, earthquake cycle processes, slip partitioning, and the geometric complexity of the Pacific-North America plate boundary. Paleoseismological observations in the western United States provide a complimentary dataset of Quaternary fault slip rate estimates. These measurements may be integrated and interpreted using block models, in which the upper crust is divided into microplates bounded by mapped faults, with slip rates defined by the differential relative motions of adjacent microplates. The number and geometry of microplates are typically defined with boundaries representing a limited sub-set of the large number of potentially seismogenic faults. An alternative approach is to include large number of potentially active faults in a dense array of microplates, and then deterministically estimate the boundaries at which strain is localized, while simultaneously satisfying interseismic geodetic and geologic observations. This approach is possible through the application of total variation regularization (TVR) which simultaneously minimizes the L2 norm of data residuals and the L1 norm of the variation in the estimated state vector. Applied to three-dimensional spherical block models, TVR reduces the total variation between estimated rotation vectors, creating groups of microplates that rotate together as larger blocks, and localizing fault slip on the boundaries of these larger blocks. Here we consider a suite of block models containing 3-137 microplates, where active block boundaries have been determined by TVR optimization constrained by both interseismic GPS velocities and geologic slip rate estimates.

  19. Rapid, reliable geodetic data analysis for hazard response: Results from the Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, S. E.; Simons, M.; Hua, H.; Yun, S.; Cruz, J.; Webb, F.; Rosen, P. A.; Fielding, E. J.; Moore, A. W.; Polet, J.; Liu, Z.; Agram, P. S.; Lundgren, P.

    2013-12-01

    ARIA is a joint JPL/Caltech coordinated project to automate InSAR and GPS imaging capabilities for scientific understanding, hazard response, and societal benefit. Geodetic imaging's unique ability to capture surface deformation in high spatial and temporal resolution allows us to resolve the fault geometry and distribution of slip associated with earthquakes in high spatial & temporal detail. In certain cases, it can be complementary to seismic data, providing constraints on location, geometry, or magnitude that is difficult to determine with seismic data alone. In addition, remote sensing with SAR provides change detection and damage assessment capabilities for earthquakes, floods and other disasters that can image even at night or through clouds. We have built an end-to-end prototype geodetic imaging data system that forms the foundation for a hazard response and science analysis capability that integrates InSAR, high-rate GPS, seismology, and modeling to deliver monitoring, science, and situational awareness products. This prototype incorporates state-of-the-art InSAR and GPS analysis algorithms from technologists and scientists. The products have been designed and a feasibility study conducted in collaboration with USGS scientists in the earthquake and volcano science programs. We will present results that show the capabilities of this data system in terms of latency, data processing capacity, quality of automated products, and feasibility of use for analysis of large SAR and GPS data sets and for earthquake response activities.

  20. Incorporating Geodetic Data in Introductory Geoscience Classrooms through UNAVCO's GETSI "Ice Mass and Sea Level Changes" Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, L. A.; Walker, B.; Pratt-Sitaula, B.

    2015-12-01

    GETSI (Geodesy Tools for Societal Issues) is an NSF-funded partnership program between UNAVCO, Indiana University, Mt. San Antonio College, and the Science Education Resource Center (SERC). We present results from classroom testing and assessment of the GETSI Ice Mass and Sea Level Changes module that utilizes geodetic data to teach about ice sheet mass loss in introductory undergraduate courses. The module explores the interactions between global sea level rise, Greenland ice mass loss, and the response of the solid Earth. It brings together topics typically addressed in introductory Earth science courses (isostatic rebound, geologic measurements, and climate change) in a way that highlights the interconnectivity of the Earth system and the interpretation of geodetic data. The module was tested 3 times at 3 different institution types (R1 institution, comprehensive university, and community college), and formative and summative assessment data were obtained. We will provide an overview of the instructional materials, describe our teaching methods, and discuss how formative and summative assessment data assisted in revisions of the teaching materials and changes in our pedagogy during subsequent implementation of the module. We will also provide strategies for faculty who wish to incorporate the module into their curricula. Instructional materials, faculty and student resources, and implementation tips are freely available on the GETSI website.

  1. An Investigation on the Use of Different Centroiding Algorithms and Star Catalogs in Astro-Geodetic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basoglu, Burak; Halicioglu, Kerem; Albayrak, Muge; Ulug, Rasit; Tevfik Ozludemir, M.; Deniz, Rasim

    2017-04-01

    In the last decade, the importance of high-precise geoid determination at local or national level has been pointed out by Turkish National Geodesy Commission. The Commission has also put objective of modernization of national height system of Turkey to the agenda. Meanwhile several projects have been realized in recent years. In Istanbul city, a GNSS/Levelling geoid was defined in 2005 for the metropolitan area of the city with an accuracy of ±3.5cm. In order to achieve a better accuracy in this area, "Local Geoid Determination with Integration of GNSS/Levelling and Astro-Geodetic Data" project has been conducted in Istanbul Technical University and Bogazici University KOERI since January 2016. The project is funded by The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey. With the scope of the project, modernization studies of Digital Zenith Camera System are being carried on in terms of hardware components and software development. Accentuated subjects are the star catalogues, and centroiding algorithm used to identify the stars on the zenithal star field. During the test observations of Digital Zenith Camera System performed between 2013-2016, final results were calculated using the PSF method for star centroiding, and the second USNO CCD Astrograph Catalogue (UCAC2) for the reference star positions. This study aims to investigate the position accuracy of the star images by comparing different centroiding algorithms and available star catalogs used in astro-geodetic observations conducted with the digital zenith camera system.

  2. Geodetic observations of ice flow velocities over the southern part of subglacial Lake Vostok, Antarctica, and their glaciological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Jens; Dietrich, Reinhard; Fritsche, Mathias; Wendt, Anja; Yuskevich, Alexander; Kokhanov, Andrey; Senatorov, Anton; Lukin, Valery; Shibuya, Kazuo; Doi, Koichiro

    2006-09-01

    In the austral summer seasons 2001/02 and 2002/03, Global Positioning System (GPS) data were collected in the vicinity of Vostok Station to determine ice flow velocities over Lake Vostok. Ten GPS sites are located within a radius of 30km around Vostok Station on floating ice as well as on grounded ice to the east and to the west of the lake. Additionally, a local deformation network around the ice core drilling site 5G-1 was installed. The derived ice flow velocity for Vostok Station is 2.00ma-1 +/- 0.01ma-1. Along the flowline of Vostok Station an extension rate of about 10-5a-1 (equivalent to 1cm km-1 a-1) was determined. This significant velocity gradient results in a new estimate of 28700 years for the transit time of an ice particle along the Vostok flowline from the bedrock ridge in the southwest of the lake to the eastern shoreline. With these lower velocities compared to earlier studies and, hence, larger transit times the basal accretion rate is estimated to be 4mma-1 along a portion of the Vostok flowline. An assessment of the local accretion rate at Vostok Station using the observed geodetic quantities yields an accretion rate in the same order of magnitude. Furthermore, the comparison of our geodetic observations with results inferred from ice-penetrating radar data indicates that the ice flow may not have changed significantly for several thousand years.

  3. Geodetic Leveling for Cape May and Supawna Meadows National Wildlife Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the project is to identify existing or establish new (as needed) survey elevation benchmarks for the purpose of providing accurate orthometric heights...

  4. Geodetic Leveling for Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the project is to identify existing or establish new (as needed) survey elevation benchmarks for the purpose of providing accurate orthometric heights...

  5. High Resolution Airborne InSAR DEM of Bagley Ice Valley, South-central Alaska: Geodetic Validation with Airborne Laser Altimeter Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muskett, R. R.; Lingle, C. S.; Echelmeyer, K. A.; Valentine, V. B.; Elsberg, D.

    2001-12-01

    Bagley Ice Valley, in the St. Elias and Chugach Mountains of south-central Alaska, is an integral part of the largest connected glacierized terrain on the North American continent. From the flow divide between Mt. Logan and Mt. St. Elias, Bagley Ice Valley flows west-northwest for some 90 km down a slope of less than 1o, at widths up to 15 km, to a saddle-gap where it turns south-west to become Bering Glacier. During 4-13 September 2000, an airborne survey of Bagley Ice Valley was performed by Intermap Technologies, Inc., using their Star-3i X-band SAR interferometer. The resulting digital elevation model (DEM) covers an area of 3243 km2. The DEM elevations are orthometric heights, in meters above the EGM96 geoid. The horizontal locations of the 10-m postings are with respect to the WGS84 ellipsoid. On 26 August 2000, 9 to 18 days prior to the Intermap Star-3i survey, a small-aircraft laser altimeter profile was acquired along the central flow line for validation. The laser altimeter data consists of elevations above the WGS84 ellipsoid and orthometric heights above GEOID99-Alaska. Assessment of the accuracy of the Intermap Star-3i DEM was made by comparison of both the DEM orthometric heights and elevations above the WGS84 ellipsoid with the laser altimeter data. Comparison of the orthometric heights showed an average difference of 5.4 +/- 1.0 m (DEM surface higher). Comparison of elevations above the WGS84 ellipsoid showed an average difference of -0.77 +/- 0.93 m (DEM surface lower). This indicates that the X-band Star-3i interferometer was penetrating the glacier surface by an expected small amount. The WGS84 comparison is well within the 3 m RMS accuracy quoted for GT-3 DEM products. Snow accumulation may have occurred, however, on Bagley Ice Valley between 26 August and 4-13 September 2000. This will be estimated using a mass balance model and used to correct the altimeter-derived surface heights. The new DEM of Bagley Ice Valley will provide a reference

  6. Characterization of Ground Displacement Sources from Variational Bayesian Independent Component Analysis of Space Geodetic Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualandi, Adriano; Serpelloni, Enrico; Elina Belardinelli, Maria; Bonafede, Maurizio; Pezzo, Giuseppe; Tolomei, Cristiano

    2015-04-01

    A critical point in the analysis of ground displacement time series, as those measured by modern space geodetic techniques (primarly continuous GPS/GNSS and InSAR) is the development of data driven methods that allow to discern and characterize the different sources that generate the observed displacements. A widely used multivariate statistical technique is the Principal Component Analysis (PCA), which allows to reduce the dimensionality of the data space maintaining most of the variance of the dataset explained. It reproduces the original data using a limited number of Principal Components, but it also shows some deficiencies, since PCA does not perform well in finding the solution to the so-called Blind Source Separation (BSS) problem. The recovering and separation of the different sources that generate the observed ground deformation is a fundamental task in order to provide a physical meaning to the possible different sources. PCA fails in the BSS problem since it looks for a new Euclidean space where the projected data are uncorrelated. Usually, the uncorrelation condition is not strong enough and it has been proven that the BSS problem can be tackled imposing on the components to be independent. The Independent Component Analysis (ICA) is, in fact, another popular technique adopted to approach this problem, and it can be used in all those fields where PCA is also applied. An ICA approach enables us to explain the displacement time series imposing a fewer number of constraints on the model, and to reveal anomalies in the data such as transient deformation signals. However, the independence condition is not easy to impose, and it is often necessary to introduce some approximations. To work around this problem, we use a variational bayesian ICA (vbICA) method, which models the probability density function (pdf) of each source signal using a mix of Gaussian distributions. This technique allows for more flexibility in the description of the pdf of the sources

  7. Control Surveys for Underground Construction of the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greening, W.J.Trevor; Robinson, Gregory L.; /Measurment Science Inc.; Robbins, Jeffrey S.; Ruland, Robert E.; /SLAC

    2005-08-16

    Particular care had to be taken in the design and implementation of the geodetic control systems for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) due to stringent accuracy requirements, the demanding tunneling schedule, long duration and large size of the construction effort of the project. The surveying requirements and the design and implementation of the surface and underground control scheme for the precise location of facilities which include approximately 120 km of bored tunnel are discussed. The methodology used for the densification of the surface control networks, the technique used for the transfer of horizontal and vertical control into the underground facilities, and the control traverse scheme employed in the tunnels is described.

  8. Control Surveys for Underground Construction of the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greening, W.J.Trevor; Robinson, Gregory L.; /Measurment Science Inc.; Robbins, Jeffrey S.; Ruland, Robert E.; /SLAC

    2005-08-16

    Particular care had to be taken in the design and implementation of the geodetic control systems for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) due to stringent accuracy requirements, the demanding tunneling schedule, long duration and large size of the construction effort of the project. The surveying requirements and the design and implementation of the surface and underground control scheme for the precise location of facilities which include approximately 120 km of bored tunnel are discussed. The methodology used for the densification of the surface control networks, the technique used for the transfer of horizontal and vertical control into the underground facilities, and the control traverse scheme employed in the tunnels is described.

  9. Precision Analysis of Trimble Rtx Surveying Technology with Xfill Function in the Context of Obtained Conversion Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzyżek Robert

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available As a result of traditional geodetic surveying we usually achieve observations which are then used for calculating rectangular coordinates onto a plane along with precision evaluation. In this article the surveying methods are presented in which the situation is different. Test measurements were carried out, consisting in the measurement of a fragment of detailed control network in RTK (Real Time Kinematic and RTX (Real Time Extended mode with xFill function. First, the rectangular coordinates onto a plane (through the transformation of data ellipsoidal were obtained, on the basis of which the conversion observations were determined and they were compared with each other, as well as with reference parameters - conversion observations out of detailed control network adjustment with use of the method of least squares. The results of the study allow to verify the precision and application possibilities of conversion observations obtained thanks to Trimble RTX technology with xFill function. Application of this surveying method in typical geodetic tasks is fully justifiable. Nevertheless, it is recommendable to be aware of the correlations of absolute or relative values obtained in RTX procedure to reference parameters, which in turn will enable conclusive verification of the possibilities of Trimble RTX technology application in certain geodetic surveys.

  10. Undergraduate teaching modules featuring geodesy data applied to critical social topics (GETSI: GEodetic Tools for Societal Issues)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt-Sitaula, B. A.; Walker, B.; Douglas, B. J.; Charlevoix, D. J.; Miller, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    The GETSI project, funded by NSF TUES, is developing and disseminating teaching and learning materials that feature geodesy data applied to critical societal issues such as climate change, water resource management, and natural hazards (serc.carleton.edu/getsi). It is collaborative between UNAVCO (NSF's geodetic facility), Mt San Antonio College, and Indiana University. GETSI was initiated after requests by geoscience faculty for geodetic teaching resources for introductory and majors-level students. Full modules take two weeks but module subsets can also be used. Modules are developed and tested by two co-authors and also tested in a third classroom. GETSI is working in partnership with the Science Education Resource Center's (SERC) InTeGrate project on the development, assessment, and dissemination to ensure compatibility with the growing number of resources for geoscience education. Two GETSI modules are being published in October 2015. "Ice mass and sea level changes" includes geodetic data from GRACE, satellite altimetry, and GPS time series. "Imaging Active Tectonics" has students analyzing InSAR and LiDAR data to assess infrastructure earthquake vulnerability. Another three modules are in testing during fall 2015 and will be published in 2016. "Surface process hazards" investigates mass wasting hazard and risk using LiDAR data. "Water resources and geodesy" uses GRACE, vertical GPS, and reflection GPS data to have students investigating droughts in California and the High Great Plains. "GPS, strain, and earthquakes" helps students learn about infinitesimal and coseismic strain through analysis of horizontal GPS data and includes an extension module on the Napa 2014 earthquake. In addition to teaching resources, the GETSI project is compiling recommendations on successful development of geodesy curricula. The chief recommendations so far are the critical importance of including scientific experts in the authorship team and investing significant resources in

  11. Fault geometry inversion and slip distribution of the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake from geodetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mong-Han; Fielding, Eric J.; Dickinson, Haylee; Sun, Jianbao; Gonzalez-Ortega, J. Alejandro; Freed, Andrew M.; Bürgmann, Roland

    2017-01-01

    The 4 April 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah (EMC) earthquake in Baja, California, and Sonora, Mexico, had primarily right-lateral strike-slip motion and a minor normal-slip component. The surface rupture extended about 120 km in a NW-SE direction, west of the Cerro Prieto fault. Here we use geodetic measurements including near- to far-field GPS, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), and subpixel offset measurements of radar and optical images to characterize the fault slip during the EMC event. We use dislocation inversion methods and determine an optimal nine-segment fault geometry, as well as a subfault slip distribution from the geodetic measurements. With systematic perturbation of the fault dip angles, randomly removing one geodetic data constraint, or different data combinations, we are able to explore the robustness of the inferred slip distribution along fault strike and depth. The model fitting residuals imply contributions of early postseismic deformation to the InSAR measurements as well as lateral heterogeneity in the crustal elastic structure between the Peninsular Ranges and the Salton Trough. We also find that with incorporation of near-field geodetic data and finer fault patch size, the shallow slip deficit is reduced in the EMC event by reductions in the level of smoothing. These results show that the outcomes of coseismic inversions can vary greatly depending on model parameterization and methodology.

  12. Interseismic and coseismic surface deformation deduced from space geodetic observations : with inferences on seismic hazard, tectonic processes, earthquake complexity, and slip distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, A.G. (Annemarie Gerredina)

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis I am concerned with modeling the kinematics of surface deformation using space geodetic observations in order to advance insight in both interseismic and coseismic surface response. To model the surface deformation field I adopt the method of Spakman and Nyst (2002) which resolves the

  13. An objective mechanical modelling approach for estimating the distribution of fault creep and locking from geodetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funning, Gareth; Burgmann, Roland

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of the extents of locked areas on faults is a critical input to seismic hazard assessments, defining possible asperities for future earthquakes. On partially creeping faults, such as those found in California, Turkey and in several major subduction zones, these locked zones can be identified by studying the distribution and extent of creep on those faults. Such creep produces surface deformation that can be measured geodetically (e.g. by InSAR and GPS), and used as a constraint on geophysical models. We present a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, based on mechanical boundary element modelling of geodetic data, for finding the extents of creeping fault areas. In our scheme, the surface of a partially-creeping fault is represented as a mesh of triangular elements, each of which is modelled as either locked or creeping (freely-slipping) using the boundary element code poly3d. Slip on the creeping elements of our fault mesh, and therefore elastic deformation of the surface, is driven by stresses imparted by semi-infinite faults beneath the base of the mesh (and any other faults in the region of interest) that slip at their geodetic interseismic slip rates. Starting from a random distribution of locked and unlocked patches, a modified Metropolis algorithm is used to propose changes to the locking state (i.e., from locked to creeping, or vice-versa) of randomly selected elements, retaining or discarding these based on a geodetic data misfit criterion; the succession of accepted models forms a Markov chain of model states. After a 'burn-in' period of a few hundred samples, these Markov chains sample a region of parameter space close to the minimum misfit configuration. By computing Markov chains of a million samples, we can realise multiple such well-fitting models, and look for robustly resolved features (i.e., features common to a majority of the models, and/or present in the mean of those models). We apply this method to a combination of persistent scatterer

  14. Geodetic evidence for passive control of a major Miocene tectonic boundary on the contemporary deformation field of Athens (Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Foumelis

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A GPS-derived velocity field is presented from a dense geodetic network (~5km distance between stations established in the broader area of Athens. It shows significant local variations of strain rates across a major inactive tectonic boundary separating metamorphic and non-metamorphic geotectonic units. The southeastern part of Athens plain displays negligible deformation rates, whereas towards the northwestern part higher strain rates are observed, indicating the control of the inactive tectonic boundary on the contemporary deformation field of the region. These findings are in agreement with previous geological observations, however, due to the dense local GPS network it was fatherly possible to localize and quantify the effect of such a major inherited tectonic feature on the deformation pattern of the area.

  15. The common geodetic coordinate system and its transformation%常用大地坐标系统及其转换

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林辉; 傅民生; 黄望华

    2013-01-01

      从应用角度阐述大地坐标系的构成,对椭球体、投影及其与大地坐标系之间关系进行了剖析。我国常用的高斯克吕格投影及三度带、六度带方面的知识作了介绍,对大地坐标的影响,特别是关键因子的影响进行了分析。结合实际应用中遇到的坐标问题进行了解释,使抽象难懂的投影简单化,易于理解。在大地坐标知识基础上介绍了坐标转换的方法,并总结了一些实际应用中遇到的大地坐标转换问题及解决方法。%In this paper, composition of the geodetic coordinate system is explained; ellipsoid, projection and relations between the geodetic coordinate system and them are analyzed, from the point of application. The common Gauss-Kruger projection used in practice and knowledge of 3 and 6 degree bands are introduced. The influence of the geodetic coordinate, esp. the influence of the key factors is analyzed. The questions concerning the coordinate appeared in practical application are interpreted so that the abstract and difficult projection theory be simplified and under comprehension. On basis of the geodetic coordinate knowledge, the author then introduces the methods of coordinate transformation and finally makes a summary of the problems of geodetic coordinate transformation appeared possibly in practice and the methods of solution of them.

  16. GEodesy Tools for Societal Issues (GETSI): Undergraduate curricular modules that feature geodetic data applied to critical social topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, B. J.; Pratt-Sitaula, B.; Walker, B.; Miller, M. S.; Charlevoix, D.

    2014-12-01

    The GETSI project is a three-year NSF funded project to develop and disseminate teaching and learning materials that feature geodesy data applied to critical societal issues such as climate change, water resource management, and natural hazards (http://serc.carleton.edu/getsi). GETSI was born out of requests from geoscience faculty for more resources with which to educate future citizens and future geoscience professionals on the power and breadth of geodetic methods to address societally relevant topics. Development of the first two modules started at a February 2014 workshop and initial classroom testing begins in fall 2014. The Year 1 introductory module "Changing Ice and Sea Level" includes geodetic data such as gravity, satellite altimetry, and GPS time series. The majors-level Year 1 module is "Imaging Active Tectonics" and it has students analyzing InSAR and LiDAR data to assess infrastructure vulnerability to demonstratively active faults. Additional resources such as animations and interactive data tools are also being developed. The full modules will take about two weeks of class time; module design will permit portions of the material to be used as individual projects or assignments of shorter duration. Ultimately a total of four modules will be created and disseminated, two each at the introductory and majors-levels. GETSI is working in tight partnership with the Science Education Resource Center's (SERC) InTeGrate project on the module development, assessment, and dissemination to ensure compatibility with the growing number of resources for geoscience education. This will allow for an optimized module development process based on successful practices defined by these earlier efforts.

  17. Retrieving the Stress Field Within the Campi Flegrei Caldera (Southern Italy) Through an Integrated Geodetical and Seismological Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Auria, Luca; Massa, Bruno; Cristiano, Elena; Del Gaudio, Carlo; Giudicepietro, Flora; Ricciardi, Giovanni; Ricco, Ciro

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the Campi Flegrei caldera using a quantitative approach to retrieve the spatial and temporal variations of the stress field. For this aim we applied a joint inversion of geodetic and seismological data to a dataset of 1,100 optical levelling measurements and 222 focal mechanisms, recorded during the bradyseismic crisis of 1982-1984. The inversion of the geodetic dataset alone, shows that the observed ground deformation is compatible with a source consisting of a planar crack, located at the centre of the caldera at a depth of about 2.56 km and a size of about 4 × 4 km. Inversion of focal mechanisms using both analytical and graphical approaches, has shown that the key features of the stress field in the area are: a nearly subvertical σ 1 and a sub-horizontal, roughly NNE-SSW trending σ 3. Unfortunately, the modelling of the stress fields based only upon the retrieved ground deformation source is not able to fully account for the stress pattern delineated by focal mechanism inversion. The introduction of an additional regional background field has been necessary. This field has been determined by minimizing the difference between observed slip vectors for each focal mechanism and the theoretical maximum shear stress deriving from both the volcanic (time-varying) and the regional (constant) field. The latter is responsible for a weak NNE-SSW extension, which is consistent with the field determined for the nearby Mt. Vesuvius volcano. The proposed approach accurately models observations and provides interesting hints to better understand the dynamics of the volcanic unrest and seismogenic processes at Campi Flegrei caldera. This procedure could be applied to other volcanoes experiencing active ground deformation and seismicity.

  18. Recurrent landsliding of a high bank at Dunaszekcső, Hungary: Geodetic deformation monitoring and finite element modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bányai, László; Mentes, Gyula; Újvári, Gábor; Kovács, Miklós; Czap, Zoltán; Gribovszki, Katalin; Papp, Gábor

    2014-04-01

    Five years of geodetic monitoring data at Dunaszekcső, Hungary, are processed to evaluate recurrent landsliding, which is a characteristic geomorphological process affecting the high banks of the Middle Danube valley in Hungary. The integrated geodetic observations provide accurate three dimensional coordinate time series, and these data are used to calculate the kinematic features of point movements and the rigid body behavior of point blocks. Additional datasets include borehole tiltmeter data and hydrological recordings of the Danube and soil water wells. These data, together with two dimensional final element analyses, are utilized to gain a better understanding of the physical, soil mechanical background and stability features of the high bank. Here we indicate that the main trigger of movements is changing groundwater levels, whose effect is an order of magnitude higher than that of river water level changes. Varying displacement rates of the sliding blocks are interpreted as having been caused by basal pore water pressure changes originating from shear zone volume changes, floods of the River Danube through later seepage and rain infiltration. Both data and modeling point to the complex nature of bank sliding at Dunaszekcső. Some features imply that the movements are rotational, some reveal slumping. By contrast, all available observational and modeling data point to the retrogressive development of the high bank at Dunaszekcső. Regarding mitigation, the detailed analysis of three basic parameters (the direction of displacement vectors, tilting, and the acceleration component of the kinematic function) is suggested because these parameters indicate the zone where the largest lateral displacements can be expected and point to the advent of the rapid landsliding phase that affects high banks along the River Danube.

  19. Investigations with the Sentinel-1 Interferometric Wide Swath mode: first results and comparison with in-situ geodetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgstrom, Sven; Del Gaudio, Carlo; De Martino, Prospero; Ricciardi, Giovanni P.; Ricco, Ciro; Siniscalchi, Valeria; Prats-Iraola, Pau; Nannini, Matteo; Costantini, Mario; Minati, Federico; Walter, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The contribution focuses on the current status of the ESA study entitled "INSARAP: Sentinel-1 InSAR Performance study with TOPS Data". The study investigates the performance of the interferometric wide swath (IW) mode of Sentinel-1, which is implemented using the terrain observation by progressive scans (TOPS) mode. In this regard, first analyses with Sentinel-1 time series will be shown, with a comparison with in-situ geodetic measurements on different test sites identified in the framework of the study, namely, Campi Flegrei/Vesuvius area in Italy, Istanbul city in Turkey, and Mexico City. The evaluation of the results will be performed by exploiting mainly continuous GPS stations located on the different sites, besides leveling measurements when also available. Also in a recent past, the comparison between InSAR and continuous GPS data, the latter projected into the radar LOS, has proven to be very effective for a cross comparison, besides InSAR Cal/Val activities, as it was for instance in the case of the recent inflation events occurred in Campi Flegrei area, marked by the well know bradyseismic phenomenon. Although continuous GPS networks are characterized by a poor space coverage in comparison with InSAR results, continuous GPS data recording allows to complement the geodetic information from InSAR sensors, limited by their revisiting time. The issue to be faced in this study is the possibility to deal with very low deformation rates in comparison with the Sentinel-1 C-band data, although the Sentinel-1 time series we expect to get from October 2014 to date should allow the identification of ground deformation in the areas of interest.

  20. Differential geodetic stereo SAR with TerraSAR-X by exploiting small multi-directional radar reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisinger, Christoph; Willberg, Martin; Balss, Ulrich; Klügel, Thomas; Mähler, Swetlana; Pail, Roland; Eineder, Michael

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the direct positioning of small multi-directional radar reflectors, so-called octahedrons, with the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite TerraSAR-X. Its highest resolution imaging mode termed staring spotlight enables the use of such octahedron reflectors with a dimension of only half a meter, but still providing backscatter equivalent to 1-2 cm observation error. Four octahedrons were deployed at Wettzell geodetic observatory, and observed by TerraSAR-X with 12 acquisitions in three different geometries. By applying our least squares stereo SAR algorithm already tested with common trihedral corner reflectors (CRs), and introducing a novel differential extension using one octahedron as reference point, the coordinates of the remaining octahedrons were directly retrieved in the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). Contrary to our standard processing, the differential approach does not require external corrections for the atmospheric path delays and the geodynamic displacements, rendering it particularly useful for joint geodetic networks employing SAR and GNSS. In this paper, we present and discuss both methods based on results when applying them to the aforementioned Wettzell data set of the octahedrons. The comparison with the independently determined reference coordinates confirms the positioning accuracy with 2-5 cm for the standard approach, and 2-3 cm for the differential processing. Moreover, we present statistical uncertainty estimates of the observations and the positioning solutions, which are additionally provided by our parameter estimation algorithms. The results also include our 1.5 m CR available at Wettzell, and the outcomes clearly demonstrate the advantage of the multi-directional octahedrons over conventional CRs for global positioning applications with SAR.

  1. Photogrammetric survey of dinosaur skeletons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wiedemann

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available To derive physiological data of dinosaurs, it is necessary to determine the volume and the surface area of this animals. For this purpose, a detailed survey of reconstructed skeletons is required. The skeletons of three dinosaurs in the Museum für Naturkunde in Berlin and two skeletons in the Museum d'Histoire Naturelle in Paris have been surveyed using stereo photogrammetry. Two of the Berlin skeletons were also surveyed with the close range laser scanners of the Institut für Navigation of the Universität Stuttgart. Both data acquisition techniques require a geodetic control network as a geometric reference system. The surveying methods used, together with results of mathematical approaches for the determination of the volume and surface of the animals are presented in this paper. Zur Herleitung physiologischer Daten der Dinosaurier ist es erforderlich, zunächst Volumen und Oberfläche ihres Körpers zu bestimmen. Dazu wurde eine detaillierte Vermessung rekonstruierter Skelette durchgeführt. Die Skelette dreier Saurier im Museum für Naturkunde in Berlin und zweier im Museum d'Histoire Naturelle in Paris wurden stereophotogrammetrisch vermessen. Bei zwei der Berliner Skelette wurden zusätzlich die Laserscanner des Instituts für Navigation der Universität Stuttgart eingesetzt. Beide Datenerfassungstechniken benötigen ein Paßpunktfeld als geometrisches Referenzsystem. Die verwendeten Vermessungsmethoden, die mathematischen Ansätze für die Berechnung von Volumina und Oberflächen und die Ergebnisse werden in diesem Aufsatz vorgestellt. doi:10.1002/mmng.1999.4860020108

  2. The Advantage of the Second Military Survey in Fluvial Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, G.

    2009-04-01

    The Second Military Survey of the Habsburg Empire, completed in the 19th century, can be very useful in different scientific investigations owing to its accuracy and data content. The fact, that the mapmakers used geodetic projection, and the high accuracy of the survey guarantee that scientists can use these maps and the represented objects can be evaluated in retrospective studies. Among others, the hydrological information of the map sheets is valuable. The streams were drawn with very thin lines that also ascertain the high accuracy of their location, provided that the geodetic position of the sheet can be constructed with high accuracy. After geocoding these maps we faced the high accuracy of line elements. Not only the location of these lines but the form of the creeks are usually almost the same as recent shape. The goal of our study was the neotectonic evaluation of the western part of the Pannonian Basin, bordered by Pinka, Rába and Répce Rivers. The watercourses, especially alluvial ones, react very sensitively to tectonic forcing. However, the present-day course of the creeks and rivers are mostly regulated, therefore they are unsuitable for such studies. Consequently, the watercourses should be reconstructed from maps surveyed prior to the main water control measures. The Second Military Survey is a perfect source for such studies because it is the first survey has drawn in geodetic projection but the creeks haven't been regulated yet. The maps show intensive agricultural cultivation and silviculture in the study area. Especially grazing cultivation precincts of the streams is important for us. That phenomenon and data from other sources prove that the streams haven't been regulated in that time. The streams were able to meander, and flood its banks, and only natural levees are present. The general morphology south from the Kőszegi Mountains shows typical SSE slopes with low relief cut off by 30-60 meter high scarps followed by streams. That

  3. Validation of tectonic models for an intraplate seismic zone, Charleston, South Carolina, with GPS geodetic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talwani, P.; Kellogg, J.N.; Trenkamp, R. [South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    1997-02-01

    Although the average strain rate in intraplate settings is 2--3 orders of magnitude lower than at plate boundaries, there are pockets of high strain rates within intraplate regions. The results of a Global Positioning System survey near the location of current seismicity (and the inferred location of the destructive 1886 Charleston, South Carolina earthquake) suggest that there is anomalous strain build-up occurring there. By reoccupying 1930 triangulation and 1980 GPS sites with six Trimble SST dual frequency receivers, a strain rate of 0.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} yr{sup {minus}1} was observed. At the 95% confidence level, this value is not significant; however, at a lower level of confidence ({approximately} 85%) it is about two orders of magnitude greater than the background of 10{sup {minus}9} to 10{sup {minus}10} yr{sup {minus}1}. The direction of contraction inferred from the GPS survey 66{degree} {+-} 11{degree} is in excellent agreement with the direction of the maximum horizontal stress (N 60{degree} E) in the area, suggesting that the observed strain rate is also real. 66 refs.

  4. Geodetic Control Points, Prince George's County does not have this dataset available, Published in 2015, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Prince George's County Office of Information Technology and Communications.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Control Points dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2015. It is described as...

  5. Geodetic Control Points, Chippewa County has been working on tightening up their control network over the years. The first network was constructed in 1993, with densification done from 2008-2011., Published in 2011, Not Applicable scale, Chippewa County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Geodetic Control Points dataset current as of 2011. Chippewa County has been working on tightening up their control network over the years. The first network was...

  6. Sea level estimate from multi-frequency signal-to-noise ratio data collected by a single geodetic receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, Nicolas; Frappart, Frédéric; Ramillien, Guillaume; Darrozes, José; Cornu, Gwendolyne; Koummarasy, Khanithalath

    2016-04-01

    GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) altimetry has demonstrated a strong potential for sea level monitoring. Interference Pattern Technique (IPT) based on the analysis of the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) estimated by a GNSS receiver, presents the main advantage of being applicable everywhere by using a single geodetic antenna and receiver, transforming them to real tide gauges. Such a technique has already been tested in various configurations of acquisition of surface-reflected GNSS signals with an accuracy of a few centimeters. Nevertheless, the classical SNR analysis method for estimating the reflecting surface-antenna height is limited by an approximation: the vertical velocity of the reflecting surface must be negligible. Authors present a significant improvement of the SNR technique to solve this problem and broaden the scope of SNR-based tide monitoring. The performances achieved on the different GNSS frequency band (L1, L2 and L5) are analyzed. The method is based on a Least-Mean Square Resolution Method (LSM), combining simultaneous measurements from different GNSS constellations (GPS, GLONASS), which permits to take the dynamic of the surface into account. It was validated in situ [1], with an antenna placed at 60 meters above the Atlantic Ocean surface with variations reaching ±3 meters, and amplitude rate of the semi-diurnal tide up to 0.5 mm/s. Over the three months of SNR records on L1 frequency band for sea level determination, we found linear correlations of 0.94 by comparing with a classical tide gauge record. Our SNR-based time series was also compared to a tide theoretical model and amplitudes and phases of the main astronomical periods (6-, 12- and 24-h) were perfectly well detected. Waves and swell are also likely to be detected. If the validity of our method is already well-established with L1 band [1], the aim of our current study is to analyze the results obtained with the other GNSS frequency band: L2 and L5. L1 band seems to provide the best sea

  7. Dome/Conduit inflation-deflation at Volcan de Fuego, Colima: evidence from seismic and geodetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Castaneda, E.; Salazar-Tlaczani, L.; DeMets, C.; Marquez-Azua, B.

    2013-12-01

    Volcan de Fuego is a strato-volcano (3860 m high) in Colima Mexico, which has been presenting high explosive activity from small to large explosive events, occasionally accompanied by pyroclastic flows, periodic dome growth and destructive phases, intense fumarole activity and degassing, during the last decade. Since June 2011 a broadband seismic and geodetic network has been operating at radial distances ranging between 1.5 and 4 km from the crater. Five stations are equipped with a Nanometrics 120 s Trillium seismometer and Trimble NetR9 GPS receiver, from which three of them include a MiniDOAS gas detection system. During the period of study eruptive activity of Volcan de Fuego has been dominated by dome growth, degassing and occasional large explosions. These events are associated with the partial dome destruction and frequent ash emissions. Preliminary analyses of two-year continuous records of broadband seismic and geodesy data have revealed dome/conduit inflation-deflation phases related to conspicuous VLP tremor in the 1-20 s period band. VLP tremor has been detected in several periods since 2011 in all stations of the network. VLP tremor may be spasmodic or a persistent signal that fluctuates both in amplitude and time. Since in volcanic areas microseismicity may cover a period range of 5 to 20 s, we analyze and characterize the noise levels considering the relative amplitude with respect to the average amplitude of microseismic noise at each station. We evaluate temporal and frequency variations of volcanic activity with respect the microseismic levels. Our results indicate that the energy of the wave field in the 1-20 s period band is dominated by volcanic activity, especially in cases associated with large eruptive events. The presence of VLP tremor correlates well with inflation-deflation phases observed in the GPS time series, with total vertical displacements of 20-40 mm. This behavior is most evident in the COPN, COPE and COLW stations, which are

  8. Geodetic slip solutions for the Mw = 7.4 Champerico (Guatemala) earthquake of 2012 November 7 and its postseismic deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Andria P.; DeMets, Charles; Briole, Pierre; Molina, Enrique; Flores, Omar; Rivera, Jeffrey; Lasserre, Cécile; Lyon-Caen, Hélène; Lord, Neal

    2015-05-01

    As the first large subduction thrust earthquake off the coast of western Guatemala in the past several decades, the 2012 November 7 Mw = 7.4 earthquake offers the first opportunity to study coseismic and postseismic behaviour along a segment of the Middle America trench where frictional coupling makes a transition from weak coupling off the coast of El Salvador to strong coupling in southern Mexico. We use measurements at 19 continuous GPS sites in Guatemala, El Salvador and Mexico to estimate the coseismic slip and postseismic deformation of the November 2012 Champerico (Guatemala) earthquake. An inversion of the coseismic offsets, which range up to ˜47 mm at the surface near the epicentre, indicates that up to ˜2 m of coseismic slip occurred on a ˜30 × 30 km rupture area between ˜10 and 30 km depth, which is near the global CMT centroid. The geodetic moment of 13 × 1019 N m and corresponding magnitude of 7.4 both agree well with independent seismological estimates. Transient postseismic deformation that was recorded at 11 GPS sites is attributable to a combination of fault afterslip and viscoelastic flow in the lower crust and/or mantle. Modelling of the viscoelastic deformation suggests that it constituted no more than ˜30 per cent of the short-term postseismic deformation. GPS observations that extend six months after the earthquake are well fit by a model in which most afterslip occurred at the same depth or directly downdip from the rupture zone and released energy equivalent to no more than ˜20 per cent of the coseismic moment. An independent seismological slip solution that features more highly concentrated coseismic slip than our own fits the GPS offsets well if its slip centroid is translated ˜50 km to the west to a position close to our slip centroid. The geodetic and seismologic slip solutions thus suggest bounds of 2-7 m for the peak slip along a region of the interface no larger than 30 × 30 km.

  9. Workshop targets development of geodetic transient detection methods: 2009 SCEC Annual Meeting: Workshop on transient anomalous strain detection; Palm Springs, California, 12-13 September 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray-Moraleda, Jessica R.; Lohman, Rowena

    2010-01-01

    The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) is a community of researchers at institutions worldwide working to improve understanding of earthquakes and mitigate earthquake risk. One of SCEC's priority objectives is to “develop a geodetic network processing system that will detect anomalous strain transients.” Given the growing number of continuously recording geodetic networks consisting of hundreds of stations, an automated means for systematically searching data for transient signals, especially in near real time, is critical for network operations, hazard monitoring, and event response. The SCEC Transient Detection Test Exercise began in 2008 to foster an active community of researchers working on this problem, explore promising methods, and combine effective approaches in novel ways. A workshop was held in California to assess what has been learned thus far and discuss areas of focus as the project moves forward.

  10. A new gravimetric reference station in South America: The installation of the Superconducting Gravimeters SG038 at the Argentinian-German Geodetic Observatory AGGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wziontek, Hartmut; Nowak, Ilona; Hase, Hayo; Häfner, Michael; Güntner, Andreas; Reich, Marvin; Brunini, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    In April 2015, the Transportable Integrated Geodetic Observatory (TIGO) of BKG was moved from Concepcion / Chile to La Plata / Argentina and was inaugurated in July 2015 as the Argentinian-German Geodetic Observatory (AGGO). In December 2015 the superconducting gravimeter SG038 was set up. The new station is equipped with four stable pillars to serve as a reference station and comparison site for absolute gravimeters in the future. We report about the overland transportation of the SG with the sphere floating, its installation at the new site and the hydrological instrumentation to observe local water storage changes to model near field gravimetric effects. We give an outlook about the first months of gravity time series and assess the drift behaviour after transport.

  11. Comparison of baseline results for the TI-4100 and Trimble 4000SDT geodetic GPS receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freymueller, Jeffrey T.

    1992-10-01

    Many GPS networks which were initially surveyed with Texas Instruments TI-4100 receivers have now been resurveyed with mixtures of TI-4100 and Trimble 4000 receivers or exclusively with Trimble receivers. In order to make confident tectonic interpretation of displacements observed between such surveys, it is necessary to understand any biases which may be introduced by using different receiver types or by mixing receivers within a network. Therefore, one of the primary objectives of the Ecuador 1990 GPS campaign (February 1990) was to provide a direct long baseline comparison between the TI-4100 and Trimble 4000SDT GPS receivers. p ]During this campaign, TI and Trimble receivers were co-located at each end of a 1323 kilometer baseline (Jerusalen to Baltra). Solutions for this baseline show no variation with receiver type. Zero-length baseline solutions showed no evidence for any intrinsic bias caused by mixing the two receiver types. Short baseline solutions indicate a bias of -34±10 mm in the baseline vertical component; the sign of the bias indicates that either the assumed phase center location for the TI is too low or the assumed location for the Trimble is too high. The bias is explainable if the phase centers of the Trimble SDT and SST antennas are similarly located. p ]Solutions for baselines measured with codeless receivers (such as the Trimble) should be as precise as those for baselines measured with P-code receivers (such as the TI) as long as it is possible to resolve ambiguities. Resolution of the widelane ambiguity is the limiting factor in ambiguity resolution with any codeless receiver, and in the February 1990 campaigns it was not successful fore baselines longer than 100 km. Without explicit modeling of the ionospheric effect on the widelane, ambiguity resolution with codeless receivers will not be successful for baselines longer than about 100 km, depending on the local ionospheric conditions.

  12. Regional glacial-isostatic adjustment in Antarctica inferred from combining spaceborne geodetic observations (ESA-STSE CryoSat+ Project REGINA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasgen, Ingo; Martin, Alba; Horvath, Alexander; Klemann, Volker; Petrie, Elizabeth; Wouters, Bert; Horwath, Martin; Pail, Roland; Bamber, Jonathan; Clarke, Peter J.; Konrad, Hannes; Drinwater, Mark

    2016-04-01

    A major uncertainty in determining the mass balance of the Antarctic ice sheet from satellite gravimetry, and to a lesser extent altimetry, measurements is the poorly known correction for the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) of the solid Earth. Although much progress has been made in consistently modelling ice-sheet evolution and related bedrock deformation, predictions of GIA remain ambiguous due to the sparsity of geodetic and geological constraints. Here, we present an improved geodetic GIA estimate based on GRACE, Envisat/ICESat/CryoSat-2 and GPS measurements. Using viscoelastic response functions of the radial displacement and gravity field change to a disc load forcing, we estimate GIA based on multiple space-geodetic observations, making use of their different sensitivities to surface and solid Earth processes. The approach allows us to consider a laterally varying lithosphere thickness and mantle viscosity in Antarctica, and particularly investigate the effect of a low-viscosity asthenosphere and a ductile layer in the elastic lithosphere in West Antarctica. We compare our GIA estimate with published estimates and results from numerical modelling, and evaluate its impact on the determination of ice-mass balance in Antarctica from GRACE and CryoSat-2. The results presented are the final results of the Support To Science Element Project REGINA and its Supplementary Study of the European Space Agency, www.regina-science.eu.

  13. Geodetic Monitoring of The Strain Evolution Field During The July - August 2001 Mt. Etna Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, G.; Etna01-Geo Team

    Since the beginning of the 2001 Etna eruption, EDM and GPS measurements have been carried out to monitor the evolution of the ground deformation pattern of the volcano during the particular period of activity. The ground deformation pattern pre- ceding the eruption was known thanks to previous EDM and GPS surveys carried out and completed just few days before the onset of the eruption. During the period of activity, EDM measurements have been carried out daily on the uppermost part of the southern and northeastern trilateration networks in order to monitor the strain of the areas surrounding the eruptive fractures. These surveys allowed following the evolu- tion of the strain field since the beginning of the seismic swarm preceding the opening of the eruptive fracture system. Most of the ground deformation has been observed during the very first days of the eruption. Starting from the last days of the activity, the three EDM networks located on the NE, SW and S flanks of the volcano have been completely measured to fix the ground deformation pattern caused by the eruption. During the opening of the fracture system, the N-S GPS profile (17 stations), starting from the NE Rift to the Rifugio Sapienza area, has been measured together with a few GPS stations on the upper part of the volcano. The comparison of these measurements with the previous ones carried out the day before the seismic swarm, depicts a strong ground deformation pattern in good agreement with the dynamics of the intrusion. Later, several measurements have been carried out also during the eruption, on part of the N-S profile (12 stations), from the NE rift to the Piano del Lago area, very near the upper part of the eruptive fracture, because some of the southernmost stations were covered by the lava flows during the first days of the eruption. GPS sessions have been also carried out almost daily on an E-W profile, consisting of 16 stations and cross- ing the Rifugio Sapienza and the 1989 fracture

  14. The First Geodetic VLBI Field Test of LIFT: A 550-km-long Optical Fiber Link for Remote Antenna Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perini, Federico; Bortolotti, Claudio; Roma, Mauro; Ambrosini, Roberto; Negusini, Monia; Maccaferri, Giuseppe; Stagni, Matteo; Nanni, Mauro; Clivati, Cecilia; Frittelli, Matteo; Mura, Alberto; Levi, Filippo; Zucco, Massimo; Calonico, Davide; Bertarini, Alessandra; Artz, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    We present the first field test of the implementation of a coherent optical fiber link for remote antenna synchronization realized in Italy between the Italian Metrological Institute (INRIM) and the Medicina radio observatory of the National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF). The Medicina VLBI antenna participated in the EUR137 experiment carried out in September 2015 using, as reference systems, both the local H-maser and a remote H-maser hosted at the INRIM labs in Turin, separated by about 550 km. In order to assess the quality of the remote clock, the observed radio sources were split into two sets, using either the local or the remote H-maser. A system to switch automatically between the two references was integrated into the antenna field system. The observations were correlated in Bonn and preliminary results are encouraging since fringes were detected with both time references along the full 24 hours of the session. The experimental set-up, the results, and the perspectives for future radio astronomical and geodetic experiments are presented.

  15. Comparison of VTEC from ground-based space geodetic techniques based on ray-traced mapping factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinkelmann, Robert; Alizadeh, M. Mahdi; Schuh, Harald; Deng, Zhiguo; Zus, Florian; Etemadfard, M. Hossein

    2016-07-01

    For the derivation of vertical total electron content (VTEC) from slant total electron content (STEC), usually a standard approach is used based on mapping functions that assume a single-layer model of the ionosphere (e.g. IERS Conventions 2010). In our study we test the standard approach against a recently developed alternative which is based on station specific ray-traced mapping factors. For the evaluation of this new mapping concept, we compute VTEC at selected Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) stations using the dispersive delays and the corresponding formal errors obtained by observing extra-galactic radio sources at two radio frequencies in S- and X-bands by the permanent geodetic/astrometric program organized by the IVS (International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry). Additionally, by applying synchronous sampling and a consistent analysis configuration, we determine VTEC at Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) antennas using GPS (Global Positioning System) and/or GLONASS (Globalnaja nawigazionnaja sputnikowaja Sistema) observations provided by the IGS (International GNSS Service) that are operated in the vicinity of the VLBI antennas. We compare the VTEC time series obtained by the individual techniques over a period of about twenty years and describe their characteristics qualitatively and statistically. The length of the time series allows us to assess the long-term climatology of ionospheric VTEC during the last twenty years.

  16. Analyses of the global geopotential models and different sources of gravity field elements used to reductions of geodetic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszak, Tomasz; Jackiewicz, Małgorzata; Margański, Stanisław

    2013-04-01

    For reductions of geodetic observations onto geoid and ellipsoid (eg. astronomical coordinates, deflections of the vertical, astronomical azimuth and linear measurements) it is necessary a knowledge of the gravity field parameters. Also, in the leveling network it is necessary to collect such information to calculate the normal (or orthometric) correction. The poster provides an assessment of the available gravity data sources for use in the reduction of mentioned observations. As a such source it is understood of direct measurements, the interpolated anomalies of the existing gravity data sets and a calculateion them based on geopotential models. The study included field data, data from the Polish National Geological Institute including anomalies used for interpolation, and data from the model Earth Gravitational Model 2008 (EGM2008) in full form and truncated to 360 degree and order. In the case of the normal corrections mentioned sources also are analyzed in comparison with the values measured Faye's anomalies on selected benchmarks of leveling lines in various Polish regions. The paper shows the requirements of precision to be met by gravimetric data to provide by the required technical instructions. It was found that for 90% of the Polish it is possible to dispense with the measured data to the data generated from the geopotential model while maintaining the sufficient accuracy. For mountain areas, however, it is necessary to use the natural elements of the gravity field determined only by direct measurements.

  17. Geodetic evidence and modeling of a slow, small-scale inflation episode in the Thera (Santorini) volcano caldera, Aegean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiros, Stathis C.; Psimoulis, Panos; Vougioukalakis, George; Fyticas, Michalis

    2010-11-01

    Analysis of a radial geodetic monitoring record indicated small-scale inflation of the NW part of the Thera (Santorini) caldera (up to 10 cm baseline length increase) between 1994 and 2000, corresponding to up to 2 * 10 -5 strain, and subsequent stabilization especially after 2006, as GPS data indicate. The southern part of the caldera on the contrary remained practically stable. This partial caldera inflation was assigned to slow magma intrusion which was not associated with changes in the seismicity. Using a stochastic approach based on numerical analysis and the theory of graphs and sets, the Mogi source of this magmatic activity was identified between the Nea Kammeni and the Therasia islets, along a major tectonovolcanic lineament, at a depth of around 1 km, or possibly 5.5 km, it remained stable during the whole small-scale inflation period and was associated with small-scale pressure changes. Slow-deformation events have been observed in other volcanoes as well, but they were associated with abrupt seismicity changes.

  18. A 10-Year Comparison of Water Levels Measured with a Geodetic GPS Receiver Versus a Conventional Tide Gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Kristine M.; Ray, Richard D.; Williams, Simon D. P.

    2017-01-01

    A standard geodetic GPS receiver and a conventional Aquatrak tide gauge, collocated at Friday Harbor, Washington, are used to assess the quality of 10 years of water levels estimated from GPS sea surface reflections.The GPS results are improved by accounting for (tidal) motion of the reflecting sea surface and for signal propagation delay by the troposphere. The RMS error of individual GPS water level estimates is about 12 cm. Lower water levels are measured slightly more accurately than higher water levels. Forming daily mean sea levels reduces the RMS difference with the tide gauge data to approximately 2 cm. For monthly means, the RMS difference is 1.3 cm. The GPS elevations, of course, can be automatically placed into a well-defined terrestrial reference frame. Ocean tide coefficients, determined from both the GPS and tide gauge data, are in good agreement, with absolute differences below 1 cm for all constituents save K1 and S1. The latter constituent is especially anomalous, probably owing to daily temperature-induced errors in the Aquatrak tide gauge

  19. The first geodetic investigation at the summit of Dome A, Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Shengkai; E Dongchen; Li Yuansheng; Wang Zemin; Zhou Chunxia; SHEN Qiang

    2008-01-01

    Dome A is the highest ice feature in the Antarctica,up to now,little is known about surface topography at Dome A.The first Chinese ITASE expedition was carried out from Zhongshan station to Dome A during the 1996/1997 austral summer.During the 2004/2005 austral summer,the traverse was extended to the summit of Dome A which is 1228 km from Zhongshan Station by 21st Chinese National Antarctic Research Expedition (CHINARE).The real time kinematic (RTK) GPS surveywas carried out in the summit of Dome A during 2004/05 austral summer.The surface topography of Dome A was drawn up using the kinematic double frequency GPS data covering an area of about 70 km2.The accuracy of the kinematic survey is in the range of 0.20 m.Precise surface topography,bedrock morphology and internallayering geometry are important for the future selection of the best site for deep drilling at Dome A.

  20. "Suntelligence" Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the American Academy of Dermatology's "Suntelligence" sun-smart survey. Please answer the following questions to measure ... be able to view a ranking of major cities suntelligence based on residents' responses to this survey. ...

  1. 全球大地测量基准动态修正与服务%Dynamic Correction and Services of Global Geodetic Datum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成英燕; 曾安敏; 张鹏; 吕志平; 魏娜

    2016-01-01

    目标是建立高精度的全球动态地心坐标参考框架,形成我国独立自主的全球大地测量基准动态修正与服务体系,以满足国家经济建设、国防建设、科学研究以及测绘行业现代化对高精度动态基准日益增长的迫切需求。该年度首先从理论上对全球动态地心参考框架维持中观测数据的误差特性进行了分析,对不同观测数据融合时融合方法、函数模型、随机模型构建进行研究,对全球框架观测台站动态特性及稳定性进行分析,并基于多项原则对全球框架核心站点或控制站点进行优化选取,同时考虑到全球及我国框架的高精度维护,课题本年度还开展了基于多种大地测量技术手段确定地球质心的方法的研究,用全球分布GNSS观测台站10年观测数据,采用不同的技术和方法初步获得的地球质心的运动变化信息。在大网平差算法研究及软件实现上,研究了全球动态地心参考框架数据处理分布式计算技术,完成法方程层面及观测方程层面的参考框架数据处理分布式计算算法研究;完成多模卫星定位数据集成处理原型软件的模块设计和代码编写及大规模网数据组合和平差处理原型软件的模块设计和代码编写;研究基于国内大规模的GNSS区域网的地心坐标参考框架维持方法;为建立高精度全球动态地心坐标参考框架与维持奠定基础。%The project studys high-precision dynamic global geocentric reference frame for establishing an independent dynamic correction and service system of global geodetic datum to meet growing urgent needs of precision dynamic geocentric datum for economic construction, national defense, scientific research and modern surveying and mapping industry. In the first year, observation data error characteristics in maintainance of the global dynamic geocentric reference frame were analyzed; and data fusion method

  2. Survey Says

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Susan K.

    2005-01-01

    Survey Says is a lesson plan designed to teach college students how to access Internet resources for valid data related to the sexual health of young people. Discussion questions based on the most recent available data from two national surveys, the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance-United States, 2003 (CDC, 2004) and the National Survey of…

  3. Geodetic monitoring (TLS of a steel transport trestle bridge located in an active mining exploitation site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skoczylas Arkadiusz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Underground mining exploitation causes, in general, irregular vertical and horizontal shifts in the superficial layer of the rock mass. In the case of construction objects seated on this layer, a deformation of the object’s foundation can be observed. This leads to additional loads and deformations. Identification of surface geometry changes in construction objects located within the premises of underground mining exploitation areas is an important task as far as safety of mining sites is concerned. Surveys targeting shifts and deformations in engineering objects preformed with the use of classic methods are of a selective nature and do not provide the full image of the phenomenon being the subject of the observation. This paper presents possibilities of terrestrial laser scanning technology application in the monitoring of engineering objects that allows for a complete spatial documentation of an object subjected to the influence of an active mining exploitation. This paper describes an observation of a 100 m section of a steel transport trestle bridge located on the premises of hard coal mine Lubelski Węgiel “Bogdanka” S.A. carried out in 2015. Measurements were carried out using a Z+F Imager 5010C scanner at an interval of 3.5 months. Changes in the structure’s geometry were determined by comparing the point clouds recorded during the two measurement periods. The results of the analyses showed shifts in the trestle bridge towards the exploited coal wall accompanied by object deformation. The obtained results indicate the possibility of of terrestrial laser scanning application in studying the aftereffects of underground mining exploitation on surface engineering objects.

  4. Monitoring ground subsidence due to underground mining using integrated space geodetic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linlin Ge; Michael Hsing-Chung Chang; Chris Rizos [University of NSW, NSW (Australia)

    2004-04-01

    Differential radar interferometry (DInSAR) can deliver {approximately} 1cm height change resolution. The combination of regular radar beam scanning and movement of the satellites carrying the radar sensor enables imaging of the mining region in seconds, from which subtle ground movements can be detected. Quantitative validation comparing the DInSAR-derived subsidence profile against ground truth shows a best RMS error of 1.4cm. A methodology has been developed to use GPS (the Global Positioning System) observations to measure atmospheric disturbances so that the DInSAR results can be corrected. A Geographic Information System (GIS) has been used to post-process InSAR results throughout this project. GIS can be used to present the final results in various formats, for example, profiles for validating with ground truth, subsidence contour maps, and three-dimensional views. Professional looking thematic maps can be generated based on these analyses, lining up with the practice within the mining industry to deliver drawings/maps in a GIS format. Multi-temporal DInSAR results can be analysed using GIS, and the final results compiled into an animation, showing the subsidence region moving as time passes. A virtual reality image has been generated in the GIS, combining DEM, aerial photography, and DInSAR subsidence results. The UNSW InSAR-GPS-GIS Integration Software has been developed to support the seamless flow of data among the three technologies, DInSAR, GPS, and GIS. Several radar satellite missions, some especially designed for InSAR, are scheduled for launch in the near future. Therefore radar data of global coverage with weekly or even daily revisit will be made available at multiple radar bands. With atmospheric disturbances properly accounted for, DInSAR will be a cost-effective, reliable, and operational tool that complements traditional ground survey methods.

  5. Post-rifting relaxation processes in the Afar region (Ethiopia) from geodetic measurements and numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennati, L.; Calais, E.; Freed, A. M.; Hamling, I. J.; Wright, T. J.; Lewi, E.; Nooner, S. L.; Buck, W. R.

    2009-12-01

    In September 2005, a 60km-long dike intrusion took place at the Dabbahu rift, Afar, Ethiopia, at the boundary between the Nubian and Danakil plates. Since this major event, 12 new intrusions have affected the central and southern parts of the 2005 dike. Time series from continuous GPS stations outside of volcanoes show a combination of discrete diking events and quasi constant velocity displacement at rates up to 10 times faster than the secular divergence rate between Nubia and Arabia. Survey GPS sites in the far-field show rates twice as fast as the secular Nubia/Arabia divergence. Similar observations after the 1975-1985 Krafla events in Iceland and the 1978 Asal-Ghoubbet events in Afar have been interpreted as the result of stress relaxation in a viscoelastic lithospheric mantle and/or continued magma injection. Nooner et al. (submitted) showed that horizontal GPS displacements are well explained by the relaxation, in a viscoelastic upper mantle, of the stresses imparted by the dike intrusions. The best fit is obtained for a 13.2km-thick crust overlying a mantle with a viscosity of 5.2x10^18Pa.s. We improve upon this approach with a model accounting for dike intrusions, viscoelastic stress relaxation in a power-law rheology upper mantle, laterally varying crustal thicknesses, and pressure changes in magma reservoirs. Preliminary results indicate that 3-dimensional velocity field from GPS and InSAR requires a combination of viscoelastic relaxation and magma transport at depth.

  6. Global Positioning System surveys of storm-surge sensors deployed during Hurricane Ike, Seadrift, Texas, to Lake Charles, Louisiana, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Jason; Woodward, Brenda K.; Storm, John B.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey installed a network of pressure sensors at 65 sites along the Gulf Coast from Seadrift, Texas, northeast to Lake Charles, Louisiana, to record the timing, areal extent, and magnitude of inland storm surge and coastal flooding caused by Hurricane Ike in September 2008. A Global Positioning System was used to obtain elevations of reference marks near each sensor. A combination of real-time kinematic (RTK) and static Global Positioning System surveys were done to obtain elevations of reference marks. Leveling relative to reference marks was done to obtain elevations of sensor orifices above the reference marks. This report summarizes the Global Positioning System data collected and processed to obtain reference mark and storm-sensor-orifice elevations for 59 storm-surge sensors recovered from the original 65 installed as a necessary prelude to computation of storm-surge elevations. National Geodetic Survey benchmarks were used for RTK surveying. Where National Geodetic Survey benchmarks were not within 12 kilometers of a sensor site, static surveying was done. Additional control points for static surveying were in the form of newly established benchmarks or reestablished existing benchmarks. RTK surveying was used to obtain positions and elevations of reference marks for 29 sensor sites. Static surveying was used to obtain positions and elevations of reference marks for 34 sensor sites; four sites were surveyed using both methods. Multiple quality checks on the RTK-survey and static-survey data were applied. The results of all quality checks indicate that the desired elevation accuracy for the surveys of this report, less than 0.1-meter error, was achieved.

  7. Rapid Mapping Method Based on Free Blocks of Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xianwen; Wang, Huiqing; Wang, Jinling

    2016-06-01

    While producing large-scale larger than 1:2000 maps in cities or towns, the obstruction from buildings leads to difficult and heavy tasks of measuring mapping control points. In order to avoid measuring the mapping control points and shorten the time of fieldwork, in this paper, a quick mapping method is proposed. This method adjusts many free blocks of surveys together, and transforms the points from all free blocks of surveys into the same coordinate system. The entire surveying area is divided into many free blocks, and connection points are set on the boundaries between free blocks. An independent coordinate system of every free block is established via completely free station technology, and the coordinates of the connection points, detail points and control points in every free block in the corresponding independent coordinate systems are obtained based on poly-directional open traverses. Error equations are established based on connection points, which are determined together to obtain the transformation parameters. All points are transformed from the independent coordinate systems to a transitional coordinate system via the transformation parameters. Several control points are then measured by GPS in a geodetic coordinate system. All the points can then be transformed from the transitional coordinate system to the geodetic coordinate system. In this paper, the implementation process and mathematical formulas of the new method are presented in detail, and the formula to estimate the precision of surveys is given. An example has demonstrated that the precision of using the new method could meet large-scale mapping needs.

  8. Gnss Geodetic Monitoring as Support of Geodynamics Research in Colombia, South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Paez, H.; Acero-Patino, N.; Rodriguez-Zuluaga, J. S.; Diederix, H.; Bohorquez-Orozco, O. P.; Martinez-Diaz, G. P.; Diaz-Mila, F.; Giraldo-Londono, L. S.; Cardozo-Giraldo, S.; Vasquez-Ospina, A. F.; Lizarazo, S. C.

    2013-05-01

    To support the geodynamics research at the northwestern corner of South America, GEORED, the acronym for "Geodesia: Red de Estudios de Deformación" has been adopted for the Project "Implementation of the National GNSS Network for Geodynamics" carried out by the Colombian Geological Survey, (SGC), formerly INGEOMINAS. Beginning in 2007, discussions within the GEORED group led to a master plan for the distribution of the base permanent GPS/GNSS station array and specific areas of interest for campaign site construction. The use of previously identified active faults as preferred structures along which stresses are transferred through the deformational area led to the idea of segmentation of the North Andes within Colombia into 20 tectonic sub-blocks. Each of the 20 sub-blocks is expected to have, at least, three-four permanent GPS/GNSS stations within the block along with construction of campaign sites along the boundaries. Currently, the GEORED Network is managing 46 continuously including: 40 GEORED GPS/GNSS continuously operating stations; 4 GNSS continuously operating stations provided by the COCONet (Continuously Operating Caribbean GPS Observational Network) Project; the Bogotá IGS GPS station (BOGT), installed in 1994 under the agreement between JPL-NASA and the SGC; and the San Andres Island station, installed in 2007 under the MOU between UCAR and the SGC. In addition to the permanent installations, more than 230 GPS campaign sites have been constructed and are being occupied one time per year. The Authority of the Panama Canal and the Escuela Politecnica de Quito have also provided data of 4 and 5 GPS/GNSS stations respectively. The GPS data are processed using the GIPSY-OASIS II software, and the GPS time series of daily station positions give fundamental information for both regional and local geodynamics studies. Until now, we have obtained 100 quality vector velocities for Colombia, 23 of them as part of the permanent network. The GPS/GNSS stations

  9. Shallow Faulting in Morelia, Mexico, Based on Seismic Tomography and Geodetically Detected Land Subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral-Cano, E.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Vergara-Huerta, F.; Chaussard, E.; Wdowinski, S.; DeMets, C.; Salazar-Tlaczani, L.

    2013-12-01

    Subsidence has been a common occurrence in several cities in central Mexico for the past three decades. This process causes substantial damage to the urban infrastructure and housing in several cities and it is a major factor to be considered when planning urban development, land-use zoning and hazard mitigation strategies. Since the early 1980's the city of Morelia in Central Mexico has experienced subsidence associated with groundwater extraction in excess of natural recharge from rainfall. Previous works have focused on the detection and temporal evolution of the subsidence spatial distribution. The most recent InSAR analysis confirms the permanence of previously detected rapidly subsiding areas such as the Rio Grande Meander area and also defines 2 subsidence patches previously undetected in the newly developed suburban sectors west of Morelia at the Fraccionamiento Del Bosque along, south of Hwy. 15 and another patch located north of Morelia along Gabino Castañeda del Rio Ave. Because subsidence-induced, shallow faulting develops at high horizontal strain localization, newly developed a subsidence areas are particularly prone to faulting and fissuring. Shallow faulting increases groundwater vulnerability because it disrupts discharge hydraulic infrastructure and creates a direct path for transport of surface pollutants into the underlying aquifer. Other sectors in Morelia that have been experiencing subsidence for longer time have already developed well defined faults such as La Colina, Central Camionera, Torremolinos and La Paloma faults. Local construction codes in the vicinity of these faults define a very narrow swath along which housing construction is not allowed. In order to better characterize these fault systems and provide better criteria for future municipal construction codes we have surveyed the La Colina and Torremolinos fault systems in the western sector of Morelia using seismic tomographic techniques. Our results indicate that La Colina Fault

  10. Discovering plate boundaries: Laboratory and classroom exercises using geodetic data to develop students' understanding of plate motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, S. E.

    2010-12-01

    To introduce the concept of plate boundaries, typical introductory geology exercises include students observing and plotting the location of earthquakes and volcanoes on a map to visually demarcate plate boundaries. Accompanying these exercises, students are often exposed to animations depicting the movement of Earth’s tectonic plates over time. Both of these teaching techniques are very useful for describing where the tectonics plates have been in the past, their shapes, and where the plates are now. With the integration of data from current geodetic techniques such as GPS, InSAR, LiDAR, students can learn that not only have the tectonic plates moved in the past, but they are moving, deforming, and changing shape right now. Additionally, GPS data can be visualized using time scales of days to weeks and on the scale of millimeters to centimeters per year. The familiar temporal and spatial scales of GPS data also help students understand that plate tectonics is a process that is happening in the present and can ease the transition to thinking about processes that are typically described using deep time, a very difficult concept for students to grasp. To provide a more robust learning environment, UNAVCO has been incorporating high-precision GPS data into free, place-based, data-rich learning modules for educators and students in introductory Earth science courses at secondary and undergraduate levels. These modules integrate new scientific discoveries related to crustal deformation and explore applications of GPS, LiDAR, and InSAR techniques to research. They also provide students with case studies highlighting the process of scientific discovery, providing context and meaning. Concurrent to these efforts, tools to visualize the inter-relationships of geophysical and geologic processes, structures, and measurements including high-precision GPS velocity data are an essential part of the learning materials. Among the suite of visualization tools that UNAVCO has made

  11. Integration of the Plate Boundary Observatory and Existing GPS Networks in Southern California: A Multi Use Geodetic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, C.; Blume, F.; Meertens, C.; Arnitz, E.; Lawrence, S.; Miller, S.; Bradley, W.; Jackson, M.; Feaux, K.

    2007-12-01

    The ultra-stable GPS monument design developed by Southern California Geodetic Network (SCIGN) in the late 1990s demonstrates sub-millimeter errors on long time series where there are a high percentage of observations and low multipath. Following SCIGN, other networks such as PANGA and BARGEN have adopted the monument design for both deep drilled braced monuments (DDBM = 5 legs grouted 10.7 meters into bedrock/stratigraphy) and short drilled braced monuments (SDBM = 4 legs epoxied 2 meters into bedrock). A Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) GPS station consists of a "SCIGN" style monument and state of the art NetRS receiver and IP based communications. Between the years 2003-2008 875 permanent PBO GPS stations are being built throughout the United States. Concomitant with construction of the PBO the majority of pre-existing GPS stations that meet stability specifications are being upgraded with Trimble NetRS and IP based communications to PBO standards under the EarthScope PBO Nucleus project. In 2008, with completed construction of the Plate Boundary Observatory, more than 1100 GPS stations will share common design specifications and have identical receivers with common communications making it the most homogenous geodetic network in the World. Of the 875 total Plate Boundary Observatory GPS stations, 211 proposed sites are distributed throughout the Southern California region. As of August 2007 the production status is: 174 stations built (81 short braced monuments, 93 deep drilled braced monuments), 181 permits signed, 211 permits submitted and 211 station reconnaissance reports. The balance of 37 stations (19 SDBM and 18 DDBM) will be built over the next year from Long Valley to the Mexico border in order of priority as recommended by the PBO Transform, Extension and Magmatic working groups. Fifteen second data is archived for each station and 1 Hz as well as 5 Hz data is buffered to be triggered for download in the event of an earthquake. Communications

  12. State and evolution of the Bérard rock glacier (Southern French Alps) after its collapse in 2006: insights from geophysical, geodetic and thermal datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiecki, Jean-Michel; Le Roux, Olivier; Bodin, Xavier; Schoeneich, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    In the French Alps, the summer 2006 has been marked by the sudden collapse of the Bérard rockglacier, a rare event, exceptional by the quasi complete destabilization of the landform. This case raises questions on the evolution of mountain permafrost under warming conditions, especially those ice-rich debris accumulations located close to the altitudinal and/or latitudinal limits of permafrost and that may be experiencing morphogenetic crisis. The Bérard site (2500-2900 m asl; 44°26' N. - 6°40' E.) is located in the Parpaillon range, near the Southern limits of the Alpine permafrost and under Mediterranean climatic conditions. The objectives of our study are to analyse the present state of the Bérard rock glacier (collapsed and non-collapsed mass) and its evolution after the major movements of summer 2006 that mobilized 1.5 millions m3 of material. In this purpose, electrical resistivity and seismic refraction tomographies were repeated along two profiles in summers 2007 and 2009, GPS survey of 40 points was initiated in summer 2007 and a thermal monitoring, composed of 6 miniature temperature dataloggers and an automatic weather station was installed on the site on summer 2007. First, the combination of the thermal and geodetic data allows us to distinguish three areas: 1) the unstable but non-collapsed upper part of the rock glacier, characterized by creeping signs and which displays surface velocity between 0.1 and 0.6 m/yr and WEqT (Winter Equilibrium Temperature) values > - 2°C in 2008 and 2009; 2) the highly unstable but non-collapsed median part, characterized by destabilization signs like wide fractures and which displays surface velocity up to 8 m/yr (no ground temperature available); 3) the collapsed mass, characterized by strong morphological changes (rapid downwasting of ice/debris packets) just after the deposition but no visible signs of evolution since 2007 and which displays surface velocity below 0.1 m/yr and WEqT around 0°C. The electrical

  13. Mechanical and Geodetic Constraints on the Gap between the Locked Zone and the ETS Region in Northern Cascadia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhat, L.; Segall, P.

    2015-12-01

    Kinematic inversions of GPS and tide gauge/leveling data display an unresolved gap between the down-dip limit of the locked region and the top of the ETS zone in northern Cascadia. Moreover, physics-based models of slow slip events (SSE) result in nearly constant shear stress when averaged over the SSE cycle, implying additional slip-deficit within the ETS zone. Assuming the fault is locked to the top of the ETS zone, the predicted deformation-rates from such models do not adequately fit long-term GPS velocities, and especially the uplift rates. We analyze long-term deformation rates to determine how much interseismic slip deficit accumulates on the megathrust. We first show that the use of heterogeneous Green's functions, which include a stiff oceanic mantle, compared to homogeneous, does not sufficiently bias the predicted slip rates to explain the gap identified in kinematic inversions. We then explore physics-based models with velocity-strengthening regions up-dip of the ETS zone, to account for steady creep within the gap. This yields ~1cm/year of creep within the gap, improving the fit to the geodetic data, however these models still misfit the uplift rates. As an intermediate step between kinematic and fully physics-based inversion, we invert for the distribution of shear stress rate on the megathrust that best fits the data. We find that a small decrease in shear stress within the ETS zone, reaching 5 kPa/year at a depth of ~30 km, is required to fit the data. Possible explanations for this include a slow decrease in normal stress with time, possibly due to an increase in pore pressure, or a reduction in fault friction. We explore these hypotheses, and study their impact on both the SSE characteristics and on the seismic cycle, using 2D quasi-dynamic simulations with rate-and-state friction and isothermal v-cutoff models for generating slow slip events.

  14. First results of geodetic deformation monitoring after commencement of CO2 injection at the Aquistore underground CO2 storage site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craymer, M.; White, D.; Piraszewski, M.; Zhao, Y.; Henton, J.; Silliker, J.; Samsonov, S.

    2015-12-01

    Aquistore is a demonstration project for the underground storage of CO2 at a depth of ~3350 m near Estevan, Saskatchewan, Canada. An objective of the project is to design, adapt, and test non-seismic monitoring methods that have not been systematically utilized to date for monitoring CO2 storage projects, and to integrate the data from these various monitoring tools to obtain quantitative estimates of the change in subsurface fluid distributions, pressure changes and associated surface deformation. Monitoring methods being applied include satellite-, surface- and wellbore-based monitoring systems and comprise natural- and controlled-source electromagnetic methods, gravity monitoring, continuous GPS, synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR), tiltmeter array analysis, and chemical tracer studies. Here we focus on the GPS, InSAR and gravity monitoring. Five monitoring sites were installed in 2012 and another six in 2013, each including GPS and InSAR corner reflector monuments (some collocated on the same monument). The continuous GPS data from these stations have been processed on a daily basis in both baseline processing mode using the Bernese GPS Software and precise point positioning mode using CSRS-PPP. Gravity measurements at each site have also been performed in fall 2013, spring 2014 and fall 2015, and at two sites in fall 2014. InSAR measurements of deformation have been obtained for a 5 m footprint at each site as well as at the corner reflector point sources. Here we present the first results of this geodetic deformation monitoring after commencement of CO2 injection on April 14, 2015. The time series of these sites are examined, compared and analyzed with respect to monument stability, seasonal signals, longer term trends, and any changes in motion and mass since CO2 injection.

  15. The UNAVCO role in planning, building, and maintaining geodetic infrastructure across the Americas: update on PBO, COCONet, and TLALOCNet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, G. S.; Braun, J. J.; Cabral, E.; Calais, E.; DeMets, C.; Feaux, K.; Mencin, D.; Miller, M. M.; Normandeau, J.; Serra, Y.; Wang, G.

    2013-05-01

    UNAVCO maintains the NSF-funded Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), which is the geodetic facility of EarthScope. PBO is largest continuous GPS and borehole geophysical network in the Americas, with ~1130 cGPS sites, including several with multiple monuments, ~80 boreholes, with 75 tensor strainmeters, 79 short-period, 3-component seismometers, and pore pressure sensors at 23 sites. PBO also includes 26 tiltmeters deployed at several volcanoes. Surface meteorological sensors are collocated at 134 GPS sites. UNAVCO provides high-rate (1 Hz), low-latency (centers. Three workshops have helped to foster a COCONet science community and provide important guidance to UNAVCO to assure success of this complex multi-national project. A new joint UNAVCO-Mexican multi-hazard GPS-Met observatory, called TLALOCNet, has been proposed based on the outcomes of a NSF-funded workshop held in Puerto Vallarta in 2010. The TLALOCNet plan calls for UNAVCO to install 9 new PBO-quality GPS-Met sites in Mexico and adjacent islands, upgrade 29 sites previously installed with NSF funding along the western subduction boundary, and coordinate with the Mexican National Meteorological Service to federate data from at least another 80 GPS-Met sites distributed across Mexico. All GPS-Met data from TLALOCNet will be freely available at the UNAVCO archive and Mexican mirror sites. The ultimate goal for these networks is to provide free, high-quality, low-latency data and data products for researchers, educators, students, and the private sector. Data from COCONet and TLALOCNet will be used by US and international scientists to study solid earth processes, for example plate kinematics and dynamic as well as plate boundary interactions and deformation, with an emphasis on the earthquake cycle. The networks also serve atmospheric science objectives by providing more precise estimates of tropospheric water vapor thus enabling better forecast of the dynamics of airborne moisture associated with the yearly

  16. Crustal Stress and Strain Distribution in Sicily (Southern Italy) from Joint Analysis of Seismicity and Geodetic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presti, D.; Neri, G.; Aloisi, M.; Cannavo, F.; Orecchio, B.; Palano, M.; Siligato, G.; Totaro, C.

    2014-12-01

    An updated database of earthquake focal mechanisms is compiled for the Sicilian region (southern Italy) and surrounding off-shore areas where the Nubia-Eurasia convergence coexists with the very-slow residual rollback of the Ionian subducting slab. High-quality solutions selected from literature and catalogs have been integrated with new solutions estimated in the present work using the Cut And Paste (CAP) waveform inversion method. In the CAP algorithm (Zhao and Helmberger, 1994; Zhu and Helmberger, 1996), each waveform is broken up into Pnl and surface wave segments, which are weighted differently during the inversion procedure. Integration of the new solutions with the ones selected from literature and official catalogs led us to collect a database consisting exclusively of waveform inversion data relative to earthquakes with minimum magnitude 2.6. The seismicity and focal mechanism distributions have been compared with crustal motion and strain data coming from GNSS analyses. For this purpose GNSS-based observations collected over the investigated area by episodic measurements (1994-2013) as well as continuous monitoring (since 2006) were processed by the GAMIT/GLOBK software packages (Herring et al., 2010) following the approach described in Palano et al. (2011). To adequately investigate the crustal deformation pattern, the estimated GNSS velocities were aligned to a fixed Eurasian reference frame. The good agreement found between seismic and geodetic information contributes to better define seismotectonic domains characterized by different kinematics. Moving from the available geophysical information and from an early application of FEM algorithms, we have also started to investigate stress/strain fields in the crust of the study area including depth dependence and relationships with rupture of the main seismogenic structures.

  17. High-precision gravimetric survey in support of lunar laser ranging at Haleakala, Maui, 1976 - 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, B. E.; Laurila, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    The planning, observations and adjustment of high-precision gravity survey networks established on the islands of Maui and Oahu as part of the geodetic-geophysical program in support of lunar laser ranging at Haleakala, Maui, Hawaii are described. The gravity survey networks include 43 independently measured gravity differences along the gravity calibration line from Kahului Airport to the summit of Mt. Haleakala, together with some key points close to tidal gauges on Maui, and 40 gravity differences within metropolitan Honolulu. The results of the 1976-1978 survey are compared with surveys made in 1961 and in 1964-1965. All final gravity values are given in the system of the international gravity standardization net 1971 (IGSN 71); values are obtained by subtracting 14.57 mgal from the Potsdam value at the gravity base station at the Hickam Air Force Base, Honolulu.

  18. A geodetic coseismic fault-slip model for the May, 11{sup t}h 2011 Lorca earthquake using radar interferometry and GPS; Determinacion geodesica del deslizamiento de falla para el terremoto de Lorca del 11 de Mayo de 2011 usando interferometria radar y GPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, P. J.; Tiampo, K. F.; Palano, M.; Cannovo, F.; Fernandez, J.

    2012-07-01

    The Alhama de Murcia Fault (AMF) is a compound multi-segmented oblique left-lateral fault system. The AMF is one the longest faults in the Eastern Betics Shear zone (Southeastern Spain). In the last decades its seismogenic potential has been carefully evaluated based on paleoseismological data. On May 11{sup t}h, 2011 a moderate (Mw 5.1) earthquake shook the region, causing nine casualties and severe damage in Lorca city (Murcia region). The early reported location of the aftershock sequence did not draw any particular trend; furthermore in-situ geology surveys did not identify any surface coseismic slip-related ground deformation. In order to provide better seismic hazard assessments, we need to locate and, if possible, characterize the fault-slip distribution that generated this earthquake. In this work, we detected small but significant ground deformation close to the epicentral area of the Lorca earthquake by using geodetic (satellite radar interferometry and GPS) data. Geodetic data was processed by using a stack of differential radar interferograms (corrected for a known long-term subsidence contribution), daily GPS estimated coordinates and high-rate 1-Hz GPS data. We jointly inverted the detected static coseismic displacements for the fault plane geometry parameters by using a rectangular dislocation model embedded in a homogeneous elastic half-space. The best-fitting fault plane closely follows the geologically derived AMF geometry (NE-SW strike trend and dipping {approx}70 degree centigrade to NW). Later, the obtained model geometry was extended and divided into patches to allow for a detailed analysis of the fault slip distribution pattern. Slip distribution indicates that slip occurred in a main patch 4-5 km long with reverse and left lateral motion (with peak fault slip magnitude of {approx}20 cm). However, the modelling results also indicate that fault slip occurred close to the surface along the centre and southwest of the city of Lorca. The

  19. Rupture history of the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan, China, earthquake: Evaluation of separate and joint inversions of geodetic, teleseismic, and strong-motion data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, Stephen; Mendoza, Carlos; Ramírez-Guzmán, Leonardo; Zeng, Yuesha; Mooney, Walter

    2013-01-01

    An extensive data set of teleseismic and strong-motion waveforms and geodetic offsets is used to study the rupture history of the 2008 Wenchuan, China, earthquake. A linear multiple-time-window approach is used to parameterize the rupture. Because of the complexity of the Wenchuan faulting, three separate planes are used to represent the rupturing surfaces. This earthquake clearly demonstrates the strengths and limitations of geodetic, teleseismic, and strong-motion data sets. Geodetic data (static offsets) are valuable for determining the distribution of shallower slip but are insensitive to deeper faulting and reveal nothing about the timing of slip. Teleseismic data in the distance range 30°–90° generally involve no modeling difficulties because of simple ray paths and can distinguish shallow from deep slip. Teleseismic data, however, cannot distinguish between different slip scenarios when multiple fault planes are involved because steep takeoff angles lead to ambiguity in timing. Local strong-motion data, on the other hand, are ideal for determining the direction of rupture from directivity but can easily be over modeled with inaccurate Green’s functions, leading to misinterpretation of the slip distribution. We show that all three data sets are required to give an accurate description of the Wenchuan rupture. The moment is estimated to be approximately 1.0 × 1021 N · m with the slip characterized by multiple large patches with slips up to 10 m. Rupture initiates on the southern end of the Pengguan fault and proceeds unilaterally to the northeast. Upon reaching the cross-cutting Xiaoyudong fault, rupture of the adjacent Beichuan fault starts at this juncture and proceeds bilaterally to the northeast and southwest.

  20. Implementing a C++ Version of the Joint Seismic-Geodetic Algorithm for Finite-Fault Detection and Slip Inversion for Earthquake Early Warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. E.; Felizardo, C.; Minson, S. E.; Boese, M.; Langbein, J. O.; Guillemot, C.; Murray, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The earthquake early warning (EEW) systems in California and elsewhere can greatly benefit from algorithms that generate estimates of finite-fault parameters. These estimates could significantly improve real-time shaking calculations and yield important information for immediate disaster response. Minson et al. (2015) determined that combining FinDer's seismic-based algorithm (Böse et al., 2012) with BEFORES' geodetic-based algorithm (Minson et al., 2014) yields a more robust and informative joint solution than using either algorithm alone. FinDer examines the distribution of peak ground accelerations from seismic stations and determines the best finite-fault extent and strike from template matching. BEFORES employs a Bayesian framework to search for the best slip inversion over all possible fault geometries in terms of strike and dip. Using FinDer and BEFORES together generates estimates of finite-fault extent, strike, dip, preferred slip, and magnitude. To yield the quickest, most flexible, and open-source version of the joint algorithm, we translated BEFORES and FinDer from Matlab into C++. We are now developing a C++ Application Protocol Interface for these two algorithms to be connected to the seismic and geodetic data flowing from the EEW system. The interface that is being developed will also enable communication between the two algorithms to generate the joint solution of finite-fault parameters. Once this interface is developed and implemented, the next step will be to run test seismic and geodetic data through the system via the Earthworm module, Tank Player. This will allow us to examine algorithm performance on simulated data and past real events.

  1. Development of a System to Generate Near Real Time Tropospheric Delay and Precipitable Water Vapor in situ at Geodetic GPS Stations, to Improve Forecasting of Severe Weather Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, A. W.; Bock, Y.; Geng, J.; Gutman, S. I.; Laber, J. L.; Morris, T.; Offield, D. G.; Small, I.; Squibb, M. B.

    2012-12-01

    We describe a system under development for generating ultra-low latency tropospheric delay and precipitable water vapor (PWV) estimates in situ at a prototype network of geodetic GPS sites in southern California, and demonstrating their utility in forecasting severe storms commonly associated with flooding and debris flow events along the west coast of North America through infusion of this meteorological data at NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Forecast Offices and the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL). The first continuous geodetic GPS network was established in southern California in the early 1990s and much of it was converted to real-time (latency tropospheric zenith delays, which can be converted into mm-accuracy PWV using collocated pressure and temperature measurements, the basis for GPS meteorology (Bevis et al. 1992, 1994; Duan et al. 1996) as implemented by NOAA with a nationwide distribution of about 300 GPS-Met stations providing PW estimates at subhourly resolution currently used in operational weather forecasting in the U.S. We improve upon the current paradigm of transmitting large quantities of raw data back to a central facility for processing into higher-order products. By operating semi-autonomously, each station will provide low-latency, high-fidelity and compact data products within the constraints of the narrow communications bandwidth that often occurs in the aftermath of natural disasters. The onsite ambiguity-resolved precise point positioning solutions are enabled by a power-efficient, low-cost, plug-in Geodetic Module for fusion of data from in situ sensors including GPS and a low-cost MEMS meteorological sensor package. The decreased latency (~5 minutes) PW estimates will provide the detailed knowledge of the distribution and magnitude of PW that NWS forecasters require to monitor and predict severe winter storms, landfalling atmospheric rivers, and summer thunderstorms associated with the North American monsoon. On the

  2. Engineering surveying

    CERN Document Server

    Schofield, W

    2001-01-01

    The aim of Engineering Surveying has always been to impart and develop a clear understanding of the basic topics of the subject. The author has fully revised the book to make it the most up-to-date and relevant textbook available on the subject.The book also contains the latest information on trigonometric levelling, total stations and one-person measuring systems. A new chapter on satellites ensures a firm grasp of this vitally important topic.The text covers engineering surveying modules for civil engineering students on degree courses and forms a reference for the engineering surveying module in land surveying courses. It will also prove to be a valuable reference for practitioners.* Simple clear introduction to surveying for engineers* Explains key techniques and methods* Details reading systems and satellite position fixing

  3. Geodetic constraints to the source mechanism of the 2011-2013 unrest at Campi Flegrei (Italy) caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trasatti, Elisa; Polcari, Marco; Bonafede, Maurizio; Stramondo, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    Campi Flegrei (Italy) is a nested caldera and together with Vesuvius is one of the Italian GEO Geohazard Supersites (GSNL). The area is characterized by one of the highest volcanic hazard of the world, due to the very high density of inhabitants (1800/km²), the persistent activity of the system and the explosive character of volcanism. A major unrest episode took place in 1982-84, when the town of Pozzuoli, located at the caldera center, was uplifted by 1.80 m. Minor uplifts of few centimeters, seismic swarms and degassing episodes took place in 1989, 2000 and 2004-06. Since 2005 Campi Flegrei is uplifting, reaching a ground velocity of 9 cm/yr in 2012, showing that the caldera is in a critical state on the verge of instability. In this work, we present results from SAR Interferometry and geodetic data modelling at Campi Flegrei in the framework of the EU's FP7 MED-SUV Project. We exploit two COSMO-SkyMed data sets to map the deformation field during 2011-2013. The spatial distributions of the cumulative displacement from COSMO-SkyMed ascending/descending orbits show similar behaviors, confirming the bell-shaped pattern of the deformation at least within the inner rim of the caldera. The resulting data, together with GPS data from the Neapolitan Volcanoes Continuous GPS network (NeVoCGPS) is fitted through a geophysical inversion process using finite element forward models to account for the 3D heterogeneous medium. The best fit model is a north dipping mixed-mode dislocation source lying at ~5 km depth. The driving mechanism is ascribable to magma input into the source of the large 1982-1984 unrest (since similar source characteristics were inferred) that generates initial inflation followed by additional shear slip accompanying the extension of crack tips. The history and the current state of the system indicate that Campi Flegrei is able to erupt again. Constraining the defomation source may have important implications in terms of civil protection and the

  4. Groundwater and Land Subsidence Monitoring in 3 Mega-Cities, Indonesia, by Means of Integrated Geodetic Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Y.; Higashi, T.; Miyazaki, S.; Hasegawa, T.; Yoshii, S.; Fukushima, Y.; Nishijima, J.; Tanigushi, M.; Abidin, H. Z.; Delinom, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    In urbanized cities, one of the urgent problems is the monitoring groundwater variations especially connected with the land subsidence. In Jakarta, Indonesia, there are more than several tens of observation wells and the monitoring of the groundwater levels have been conducted so far. However for monitoring the variations of groundwater storages, we need additional information about groundwater mass variations as well as land movements which can be obtained by modern geodetic techniques. Therefore we intend to employ a new technique of precise gravity measurements combined with GPS, and InSAR techniques. The gravity changes due to groundwater mass movements are measured as gravity changes by means of precise gravimeters. An infinite water table of one meter thickness causes about a 40-micro gal gravity change. Thus, an accuracy of 10 micro gals or better is required for the hydrologic problems. It is not easy to achieve an accuracy of 10 micro gals by means of a spring-type relative gravimeter, for instance Schintrex gravimeter. We therefore propose a new method to combine absolute gravity measurements and relative gravity measurements. For this purpose, we employ a portable absolute gravimeter A-10, for the measurements at some control points, and employ relative gravimeters of superior portability for the measurements at most points around the control points. Because groundwater variations cause vertical land movements in many cases, it is also important to monitor the height changes at the gravity points. Moreover the rate of gravity changes versus height changes depends on the density of the material which causes the gravity changes, thus it gives important information about the mechanism of the deformation. Therefore we employ GPS measurements for monitoring height changes. We also employ In-SAR images to identify the areas of the subsidence occurs. The first experimental measurements in Jakarta have been conducted in August 2008. The same measurements have

  5. Deformation Sources in Kīlauea's Southwest Rift Zone Inferred from the Modeling of Geodetic and Seismic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauthier, C.; Roman, D. C.; Poland, M. P.; Miklius, A.; Fukushima, Y.; Hooper, A. J.; Cayol, V.

    2014-12-01

    For much of the first 20 years of Kīlauea's 1983-present ERZ (East Rift Zone) eruption, deformation was characterized by subsidence at the summit and along both rift zones. We speculate that subsidence of the rift zones was caused by deep rift opening and basal fault slip. A 3D Mixed-Boundary Element model including deep rift-zone opening (running from ~3 to 9 km depth beneath Kīlauea's East and Southwest Rift Zones) as well as slip on the décollement fault that underlies the volcano's south flank (at ~9 km depth) can indeed explain most of the deformation imaged by InSAR data from RADARSAT-1 and JERS-1 spanning two distinct background periods: 1993-1997 and 2000-2003, respectively. At the end of 2003, however, Kīlauea's summit began a 4-year-long period of inflation that culminated in an ERZ dike intrusion and small eruption during 17-19 June 2007—the "Father's Day" (FD) event. On the basis of deformation, seismicity, effusion rate, and lava chemistry and temperature, the FD event was interpreted as the result of forcible intrusion of magma driven by high pressure within the summit magma storage area, as opposed to a passive response to deep rift zone opening. This period of summit inflation is particularly interesting in 2006. According to daily GPS data, two distinct periods can be defined, spanning January to March 2006 and March to end of 2006. A major seismic swarm occurred during the first period while the south caldera area was inflating. The beginning of the second period corresponds to a switch from subsidence to inflation of the SWRZ (Southwest Rift Zone). The SWRZ had been subsiding since the last eruptive episode there in 1974, with the exception of a few dike injections in 1981-82. To investigate the magmatic processes which occurred during 2006 and their implications in terms of the magma plumbing system and local stress field, we integrate contemporary geodetic data from InSAR and GPS with seismic and geologic observations of the SWRZ.

  6. Crustal motion studies in the southwest Pacific: Geodetic measurements of plate convergence in Tonga, Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, David A.

    The southwest Pacific is one of the most tectonically dynamic regions on Earth. This research focused on crustal motion studies in three regions of active Pacific-Australia plate convergence in the southwest Pacific: Tonga, the New Hebrides (Vanuatu) and the Solomons Islands. In Tonga, new and refined velocity estimates based on more than a decade of Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements and advanced analysis techniques are much more accurate than previously reported values. Convergence rates of 80 to 165 mm/yr at the Tonga trench represent the fastest plate motions observed on Earth. For the first time, rotation of the Fiji platform relative to the Australian plate is observed, and anomalous deformation of the Tonga ridge was also detected. In the New Hebrides, a combined GPS dataset with a total time series of more than ten years led to new and refined velocity estimates throughout the island arc. Impingement of large bathymetric features has led to arc fragmentation, and four distinct tectonic segments are identified. The central New Hebrides arc segment is being shoved eastward relative to the rest of the arc as convergence is partitioned between the forearc (Australian plate) and the backarc (North Fiji Basin) boundaries due to impingement of the d'Entrecasteaux Ridge and associated Bougainville seamount. The southern New Hebrides arc converges with the Australian plate more rapidly than predicted due to backarc extension. The first measurements of convergence in the northern and southernmost arc segments were also made. In the Solomon Islands, a four-year GPS time series was used to generate the first geodetic estimates of crustal velocity in the New Georgia Group, with 57--84 mm/yr of Australia-Solomon motion and 19--39 mm/yr of Pacific-Solomon motion being observed. These velocities are 20--40% lower than predicted Australia-Pacific velocities. Two-dimensional dislocation models suggest that most of this discrepancy can be attributed to locking of

  7. Geodetic Secor Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-06-01

    simple, and had low-power lem. 17 14. Satellite Orientation . The satellite was designed to maintain a constant relationship between the antenna...the same satellite orientation . Further considerations were Th oscillations, however, when higher orbital ranges (500-2500 nautical miles) -, 3 a

  8. Volcano-tectonic deformation in the Kivu Region, Central Africa: Results from six years of continuous GNSS observations of the Kivu Geodetic Network (KivuGNet)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geirsson, Halldor; d'Oreye, Nicolas; Mashagiro, Niche; Syauswa, Muhindo; Celli, Gilles; Kadufu, Benjamin; Smets, Benoît; Kervyn, François

    2017-10-01

    We present an overview of the installation, operation, and initial results of the 15-station KivuGNet (Kivu Geodetic Network) in the Kivu Region, Central Africa. The network serves primarily as a research and monitoring tool for active volcanic, earthquake, and plate boundary processes in the region. Continuous operation of in-situ measurement networks in naturally and politically harsh environments is challenging, but has proven fruitful in this case. During the operation of the network since 2009, KivuGNet has captured: co-eruptive deformation from two eruptions of Nyamulagira (in 2010 and 2011-2012); inter-eruptive deformation, which we interpret as a combination of plate motion across the Western - East Africa Rift, and decreasing deep-seated magma accumulation under the Nyiragongo-Nyamulagira region; co-seismic deformation from the Mw5.8 August 7, 2015 Lwiro earthquake at the western border of Lake Kivu. We hope that this study will serve as a motivation for further implementation of in-situ geodetic networks in under-monitored and under-studied sections of the East African Rift.

  9. Surveying Humaness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Randi; Gad, Christopher

    Christopher Gad. Ph.d. Dept. of Information and Media Studies Randi Markussen. Associate Professor, Dept. of Information and Media Studies. rmark@imv.au.dk   Abstract:   Surveying humanness -politics of care improvement   For various reasons we both were subjected to a specific survey procedure...... and development of a large collection of biological and psychological symptoms and psycho-social problems. However, the surveys say nothing about how the information will be of use to the people who answer the procedure or how this scientific intervention will be put to use more specifically within the public...... carried out in a Danish county in order to improve treatment of people who have suffered from long-term illnesses. The surveys concern not only feed back on how people experience their present and past interaction with the social services and health care system; they also ask people to indicate the state...

  10. Surveying Humaness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Randi; Gad, Christopher

    Christopher Gad. Ph.d. Dept. of Information and Media Studies Randi Markussen. Associate Professor, Dept. of Information and Media Studies. rmark@imv.au.dk   Abstract:   Surveying humanness -politics of care improvement   For various reasons we both were subjected to a specific survey procedure...... and development of a large collection of biological and psychological symptoms and psycho-social problems. However, the surveys say nothing about how the information will be of use to the people who answer the procedure or how this scientific intervention will be put to use more specifically within the public...... be imagined as a positive end, as ‘making explicit’ (in a popular psychological perspective) is considered to be therapeutic and good in itself? We will discuss those questions from a Foucaultian and ANT perspective, where one does not accept that pre-existing subjects are exposed to survey procedures...

  11. Survey Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Cleaned and QCd data for the Fishing Effort Survey. Questions on fishing and other out are asked on weather and outdoor activity, including fishing trips. Used for...

  12. Engineering surveying

    CERN Document Server

    Schofield, W

    2007-01-01

    Engineering surveying involves determining the position of natural and man-made features on or beneath the Earth's surface and utilizing these features in the planning, design and construction of works. It is a critical part of any engineering project. Without an accurate understanding of the size, shape and nature of the site the project risks expensive and time-consuming errors or even catastrophic failure.Engineering Surveying 6th edition covers all the basic principles and practice of this complex subject and the authors bring expertise and clarity. Previous editions of this classic text have given readers a clear understanding of fundamentals such as vertical control, distance, angles and position right through to the most modern technologies, and this fully updated edition continues that tradition.This sixth edition includes:* An introduction to geodesy to facilitate greater understanding of satellite systems* A fully updated chapter on GPS, GLONASS and GALILEO for satellite positioning in surveying* Al...

  13. Microvega (micro Vessel for Geodetics Application): a Marine Drone for the Acquisition of Bathymetric Data for GIS Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, F.; Mattei, G.; Parente, C.; Peluso, F.; Santamaria, R.

    2015-04-01

    Bathymetric data are fundamental to produce navigational chart and sea-floor 3D models. They can be collected using different techniques and sensors on board of a variety of platforms, such as satellite, aircraft, ship and drone. The MicroVEGA drone is an Open Prototype of Autonomous Unmanned Surface Vessel (AUSV) conceived, designed and built to operate in the coastal areas (0-20 meters of depth), where a traditional boat is poorly manoeuvrable. It is equipped with a series of sensors to acquire the morpho-bathymetric high precision data. In this paper we presents the result of the first case study, a bathymetric survey carried out at Sorrento Marina Grande. This survey is a typical application case of this technology; the Open Prototype MicroVega has an interdisciplinary breath and it is going to be applied to various research fields. In future, it will expect to do new knowledge, new survey strategies and an industrial prototype in fiberglass.

  14. Revisiting the Interplate Coupling Beneath Northeast Japan Before the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake (M9.0) Based on Terrestrial and Seafloor Geodetic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iinuma, T.; Hino, R.; Kido, M.; Ohta, Y.; Miura, S.

    2014-12-01

    Large coseismic slip along the Japan Trench during the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake (M9.0) highlighted the necessity of the re-examination of the interplate coupling on the boundary between the subducting Pacific and overriding continental plates beneath the northeastern Japanese Islands. Interplate coupling along the shallowest portion of the megathrust before the Tohoku Earthquake must have been persistent, but spatial resolution of the inversion analysis based only on terrestrial geodetic data is generally not high enough to constrain the coupling state in the far offshore area.Meanwhile, seafloor geodetic observation has been developed and applied off the Pacific coast of Tohoku district in this decade, and the secular displacement rates before the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake are reported by Japan Coast Guard and Tohoku University. These seafloor geodetic observation data are invaluable to estimate the interplate coupling beneath the northeastern Japan, but have been difficult to be included in the inversion analyses, because the measurements contain large uncertainties and are more sparsely sampled both in temporal and spatial domains than the terrestrial observations. To overcome this difficulty, we have taken into account the correlations between the observed displacement rates at terrestrial GPS stations in the inversion analyisis. We assumed that the covariance between the displacement rates at two different GPS sites depends on the distance, and configured the covariance between the different components, such as EW, NS and UD, by applying the result of raw GPS data processing.We performed numerical test to examine the advantage of involving the covariance matrix, and concluded that the covariance between the observations should be taken into account in the inversion analysis. We appied the inversion to the actual displacement field data obtained before the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake. The results show that evident temporal change of the slip deficit had occurred after an

  15. Corrigendum to "The 3-D strain patterns in Turkey using geodetic velocity fields from the RTK-CORS (TR) network" [J. African Earth Sci. 115 (2016) 246-270

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutoglu, Hakan Senol; Toker, Mustafa; Mekik, Cetin

    2016-12-01

    In the article titled "The 3-D Strain patterns in Turkey using Geodetic velocity fields from the RTK-CORS (TR) Network" published in Journal of African Earth Sciences Vol. 11, pp.246-270, the black arrows on the Figs. 10 and 12 are shifted due to printing error to undesired places. The correct form of Figs. 10 and 12 are given below:

  16. Happiness Survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Are Chinese people happy in today’s fast-paced, modern society? What are the sources of their happiness? In today’s rapidly developing economy, is happiness closely related to wealth or not? A recent happiness survey conducted in China gives some answers.

  17. Intensive sound speed monitoring in ocean and its impact on the GPS/acoustic seafloor geodetic measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Motoyuki

    2016-04-01

    GPS/acoustic (GPS/A) technique, based on GPS positioning and acoustic ranging, is now getting a popular tool to measure seafloor crustal movement. Several groups in the world have been intensively conducted campaign surveys in the region of scientifically interest. As the technology of measurement has been matured and plenty of data are accumulated, researchers are now aware of the limit of its precision mainly due to unexpected undulation of sound speed in ocean, which significantly degrades acoustic ranging. If sound speed structure keeps its figure during survey period, e.g., more than a couple of hours, it can be estimated by a moving survey to get sufficient paths from various directions to illustrate the structure. However the sound speed structure often varies quickly with in a hour due to internal gravitational wave excited by interaction of tidal current and seafloor topography. In this case one cannot separate temporal and spatial variations. We revisited our numerous sound speed profile data derived from numbers of XBT measurements, which were concurrently carried out with GPS/A survey along the Nankai Trough and Japan Trench. Among the measurements, we found notably short-period variation in sound speed profile through intensive XBT survey repeatedly cast every 6 minutes for one hour, which also appeared in residuals in traveltime of acoustic ranging. The same feature is also found in more moderate rate for semidiurnal undulation, in which vertical oscillation of the middle of the profile can be clearly seen rather than variation of absolute sound speed. This also reflects traveltime residuals in the GPS/A measurement. These typical frequencies represent dominant wavelengths of spatial sound speed variation. In the latter, local horizontal variation can be negligible in the vicinity of a point survey area and the traditional analysis can be applicable that assumes time-varying stratified sound speed structure. In the former case, on the contrary, local

  18. What Are Probability Surveys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Aquatic Resource Surveys (NARS) use probability-survey designs to assess the condition of the nation’s waters. In probability surveys (also known as sample-surveys or statistical surveys), sampling sites are selected randomly.

  19. Verification of the Polish Geodetic Reference Frame by Means of a New Solution Based on Permanent GNSS Data from the Years 2011-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwosz T.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The new solution for the Polish geodetic primary GNSS network was created to verify the currently used reference frame (PL-ETRF2000. The new solution is based on more GNSS data (more daily observation sessions included, a longer data timespan, GLONASS observations added which were processed in a newer reference frame (IGb08 according to up-to-date methodology and using the latest version of Bernese GNSS Software. The new long-term solution (spanning 3.7 years was aligned to the IGb08 reference frame using a minimum constraints approach. We categorized Polish reference stations into two categories according to their data length. We obtained good agreement of the new solution with the PL-ETRF2000: for most stations position differences did not exceed 5 mm in horizontal, and 10 mm in vertical components. However, for 30 stations we observed discontinuities in position time series, mostly due to GNSS equipment changes, which occured after the introduction of PL-ETRF2000. Position changes due to the discontinuities reached 9.1 mm in horizontal components, and 26.9 mm in vertical components. The new solution takes into account position discontinuities, and in addition also includes six new stations which were installed after the introduction of the PL-ETRF2000. Therefore, we propose to update the currently-used reference frame for the Polish geodetic primary network (PL-ETRF2000 with the new solution. The new solution was also accepted by the EUREF Technical Working Group as a class A solution (highest accuracy according to EUREF standards.

  20. Heterogeneous Earth Structure, Deformation, and Slip During the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake from Geodetic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, M. H.; Dickinson, H.; Fielding, E. J.; Sun, J.; Freed, A. M.; Burgmann, R.

    2015-12-01

    The 4th of April 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah (EMC) earthquake in Baja California and Sonora, Mexico has primarily right-lateral strike-slip motion and a minor normal slip component. The surface rupture extends about 120 km west of the boundary between the Pacific and the North American plates. The EMC event initiated near the center and ruptured bilaterally into an east-dipping strike-slip fault zone to the north and a west-dipping strike-slip zone to the south. Here we use geodetic measurements including GPS, InSAR (SAR interferometry), and sub-pixel offset measurements to characterize the fault slip during the EMC event. We use dislocation inversion methods to determine fault geometry as well as sub-fault slip distribution based on geodetic measurements. We find that assuming layered earth elastic structure increased the inferred deep slip (10-15 km depth) by up to 1.6 m (60%) compared to assuming a homogeneous elastic structure. Inferred slip was also strongly (up to 2 m) influenced by the choice of observational constraints used in the inversion. The choice of constraints also influenced the inverted seismic moment from Mw 7.20 to 7.26, and the difference is equivalent to a Mw 6.5 event. Our results show that the outcomes of coseismic inversions can vary greatly depending on the methodology, something that needs to be considered both for characterizing an earthquake and when using such results in subsequent studies of postseismic deformation.

  1. ISSM-SESAW v1.0: mesh-based computation of gravitationally consistent sea-level and geodetic signatures caused by cryosphere and climate driven mass change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Surendra; Ivins, Erik R.; Larour, Eric

    2016-03-01

    A classical Green's function approach for computing gravitationally consistent sea-level variations associated with mass redistribution on the earth's surface employed in contemporary sea-level models naturally suits the spectral methods for numerical evaluation. The capability of these methods to resolve high wave number features such as small glaciers is limited by the need for large numbers of pixels and high-degree (associated Legendre) series truncation. Incorporating a spectral model into (components of) earth system models that generally operate on a mesh system also requires repetitive forward and inverse transforms. In order to overcome these limitations, we present a method that functions efficiently on an unstructured mesh, thus capturing the physics operating at kilometer scale yet capable of simulating geophysical observables that are inherently of global scale with minimal computational cost. The goal of the current version of this model is to provide high-resolution solid-earth, gravitational, sea-level and rotational responses for earth system models operating in the domain of the earth's outer fluid envelope on timescales less than about 1 century when viscous effects can largely be ignored over most of the globe. The model has numerous important geophysical applications. For example, we compute time-varying computations of global geodetic and sea-level signatures associated with recent ice-sheet changes that are derived from space gravimetry observations. We also demonstrate the capability of our model to simultaneously resolve kilometer-scale sources of the earth's time-varying surface mass transport, derived from high-resolution modeling of polar ice sheets, and predict the corresponding local and global geodetic signatures.

  2. Decadal-Scale Decoupling of the Japan Trench Prior to the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake from Geodetic and Repeating-Earthquake Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, R.; King, R. W.; Lancaster, M.; Miller, M. M.; Wells, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    Geodetic, geologic and paleomagnetic data reveal that Oregon and parts of California, Nevada and Idaho rotate clockwise at 0.3 to 1.0 deg/Ma (relative to North America) about an axis near the Idaho-Oregon-Washington border, while northeast Washington is relatively fixed to North America. This rotation has been going on for at least 15 Ma. The spatial termination of the rotation requires shortening between Oregon and Washington. The Yakima fold and thrust belt (YFTB) lies along the boundary between northern Oregon and central Washington where convergence of the clockwise-rotating Oregon block is apparently accommodated. Shortening across the YFTB is thought to occur in a fan-like manner, increasing to the west. We obtained high-accuracy, high-density geodetic GPS measurements in 2012 and 2013 that are used with earlier measurements to characterize YFTB kinematics. Deformation associated with the YFTB starts in the south at the Blue Mountains Anticline in northern Oregon and extends northward to Frenchman Hills in Washington. To the east, the faulting and earthquake activity of the YFTB are truncated by a NNW-trending, narrow zone of deformation that runs along the Pasco Basin and Moses Lake region. It accommodates about 0.5 to 1.0 mm/yr of east to northeast shortening along the eastern boundary of the Department of Energy Hanford Site. The deforming zone aligns with recent seismicity in the Ice Harbor dike swarm, a relatively young ~ 8.5 Ma vent complex. West of the Cascade arc, shortening is accommodated by a series of east-trending faults, starting at the Doty fault in central coastal Washington and extending through Seattle up to the Canadian border. South of the Doty fault, other faults may take up some motion but may be too slow to resolve with GPS.

  3. Effects of the Earth Albedo and Thermic Emissivity on Geodetic Satellite Trajectories: a Mean Model from 2000-2016 data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleflie, Florent; Sammuneh, Muhammad Ali; Coulot, David; Pollet, Arnaud; Biancale, Richard; Capderou, Michel

    2017-04-01

    Part of the energy received on the Earth from the Sun is split into two components, a short wave component which corresponds to the visible emissivity of the Earth's surface (albedo), and the long wave part corresponding to the thermic emissivity (infrared wavelengths). These two components induce small non gravitational forces on the orbits of artificial satellites, towards the radial direction (mainly), that we are evaluating to derive a mean model. The first step to evaluate the mean amplitudes and periods of the generaetd perturbations consists in comparing post-fit adjustment of geodetic satellites to SLR data, in two dynamical models accounting or not accounting for empirical forces standing for such effects: the orbits of the geodetic satellite STARLETTE, Stella, Ajisai, Lageos 1 and Lageos 2 are carried out in such a way over the period 2000-2016, with the GINS GRGS orbit computation s/w. We then use three kinds of data sets to investigate the mean amplitudes of the perturbations, and to investigate features on regional spatial scales: (i) Stephens tables, (Stephens, 1980), ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts ) data sets (that are available at GRGS, Groupe de Recherche de Géodésie Spatiale, France), and CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) data sets (publickly available).We analyze what is the data set leading to the lowest residual level. Then, following an approach close to the one developed by Stephens, we propose a set of monthly grids that are averaged over the period 2000-2016, and that is evaluated through the orbit computation of the above-mentioned satellites.

  4. Verification of the Polish Geodetic Reference Frame by Means of a New Solution Based on Permanent GNSS Data from the Years 2011-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liwosz, T.; Ryczywolski, M.

    2016-12-01

    The new solution for the Polish geodetic primary GNSS network was created to verify the currently used reference frame (PL-ETRF2000). The new solution is based on more GNSS data (more daily observation sessions included, a longer data timespan, GLONASS observations added) which were processed in a newer reference frame (IGb08) according to up-to-date methodology and using the latest version of Bernese GNSS Software. The new long-term solution (spanning 3.7 years) was aligned to the IGb08 reference frame using a minimum constraints approach. We categorized Polish reference stations into two categories according to their data length. We obtained good agreement of the new solution with the PL-ETRF2000: for most stations position differences did not exceed 5 mm in horizontal, and 10 mm in vertical components. However, for 30 stations we observed discontinuities in position time series, mostly due to GNSS equipment changes, which occured after the introduction of PL-ETRF2000. Position changes due to the discontinuities reached 9.1 mm in horizontal components, and 26.9 mm in vertical components. The new solution takes into account position discontinuities, and in addition also includes six new stations which were installed after the introduction of the PL-ETRF2000. Therefore, we propose to update the currently-used reference frame for the Polish geodetic primary network (PL-ETRF2000) with the new solution. The new solution was also accepted by the EUREF Technical Working Group as a class A solution (highest accuracy) according to EUREF standards.

  5. Joint analysis of geodetic and earthquake fault-plane solution data to constrain magmatic sources: A case study from Kīlauea Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauthier, Christelle; Roman, Diana C.; Poland, Michael P.

    2016-12-01

    A joint analysis of geodetic and seismic datasets from Kīlauea Volcano during a period of magmatic unrest in 2006 demonstrates the effectiveness of this combination for testing and constraining models of magma dynamics for a complex, multi-source system. At the end of 2003, Kīlauea's summit began a four-year-long period of inflation due to a surge in magma supply to the volcano. In 2006, for the first time since 1982, Kīlauea's Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ) also experienced inflation. To investigate the characteristics of active magma sources and the nature of their interactions with faults in the SWRZ during 2006, we integrate, through Coulomb stress modeling, contemporary geodetic data from InSAR and GPS with a new catalogue of double-couple fault-plane solutions for volcano-tectonic earthquakes. We define two periods of inflation during 2006 based on the rate of deformation measured in daily GPS data, spanning February to 15 March 2006 (Period 1) and 16 March to 30 September 2006 (Period 2). InSAR data for these two periods are inverted to determine the position, change in size, and shape of inflation sources in each period. Our new models are consistent with microseismic activity from each period. They suggest that, during Period 1, deformation in the SWRZ can be explained by pressurization of magma in a spherical reservoir beneath the south caldera, and that, during Period 2, magma was also aseismically intruded farther to the southwest into the SWRZ along a sub-horizontal plane. Our Coulomb stress analysis shows that the microseismicity recorded in the SWRZ is induced by overpressurization of the south caldera reservoir, and not by magma intrusion into the SWRZ. This study highlights the importance of a joint analysis of independent geophysical datasets to fully constrain the nature of magma accumulation.

  6. Joint analysis of geodetic and earthquake fault-plane solution data to constrain magmatic sources: A case study from Kīlauea Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauthier, Christelle; Roman, Diana C.; Poland, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A joint analysis of geodetic and seismic datasets from Kīlauea Volcano during a period of magmatic unrest in 2006 demonstrates the effectiveness of this combination for testing and constraining models of magma dynamics for a complex, multi-source system. At the end of 2003, Kīlauea's summit began a four-year-long period of inflation due to a surge in magma supply to the volcano. In 2006, for the first time since 1982, Kīlauea's Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ) also experienced inflation. To investigate the characteristics of active magma sources and the nature of their interactions with faults in the SWRZ during 2006, we integrate, through Coulomb stress modeling, contemporary geodetic data from InSAR and GPS with a new catalogue of double-couple fault-plane solutions for volcano-tectonic earthquakes. We define two periods of inflation during 2006 based on the rate of deformation measured in daily GPS data, spanning February to 15 March 2006 (Period 1) and 16 March to 30 September 2006 (Period 2). InSAR data for these two periods are inverted to determine the position, change in size, and shape of inflation sources in each period. Our new models are consistent with microseismic activity from each period. They suggest that, during Period 1, deformation in the SWRZ can be explained by pressurization of magma in a spherical reservoir beneath the south caldera, and that, during Period 2, magma was also aseismically intruded farther to the southwest into the SWRZ along a sub-horizontal plane. Our Coulomb stress analysis shows that the microseismicity recorded in the SWRZ is induced by overpressurization of the south caldera reservoir, and not by magma intrusion into the SWRZ. This study highlights the importance of a joint analysis of independent geophysical datasets to fully constrain the nature of magma accumulation.

  7. Geodetic mass balance of surge-type Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska, 1980-2001-2010, including role of rockslide deposition and earthquake displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienholz, C.; Hock, R.; Truffer, M.; Arendt, A. A.; Arko, S.

    2016-12-01

    We determine the geodetic mass balance of surge-type Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska, for the time periods 1980-2001 and 2001-2010 by combining modern interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR)-derived digital elevation models (DEMs), DEMs derived from archival aerial imagery, laser altimetry data, and in situ surface elevation measurements. Our analysis accounts for both the large rockslides and terrain displacements caused by the 2002 M7.9 earthquake on the Denali fault, which runs through Black Rapids Glacier. To estimate uncertainties, we apply Monte Carlo simulations. For the earthquake-triggered rockslides we find a volume of 56.62 ± 2.86 × 106 m3, equivalent to an average debris thickness of 4.44 ± 0.24 m across the 11.7 km2 deposit area on the glacier. Terrain displacement due to the earthquake corresponds to an apparent glacier volume change of -53.1 × 106 m3, which would cause an apparent specific mass balance of -0.19 meter water equivalent (mwe) if not taken into account. The geodetic mass balance of Black Rapids Glacier is -0.48 ± 0.07 mwe a-1 for the entire 30 year period, but more negative for the period 2001-2010 (-0.64 ± 0.11 mwe a-1) than the period 1980-2001 (-0.42 ± 0.11 mwe a-1), in agreement with trends indicated by in situ mass balance measurements. Elevation data indicate no net thickening of the surge reservoir between 1980 and 2010, in contrast to what is expected during the quiescent phase. A surge of Black Rapids Glacier in the near future is thus considered unlikely.

  8. Survey Expectations

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Weale

    2005-01-01

    This paper focusses on survey expectations and discusses their uses for testing and modeling of expectations. Alternative models of expectations formation are reviewed and the importance of allowing for heterogeneity of expectations is emphasized. A weak form of the rational expectations hypothesis which focusses on average expectations rather than individual expectations is advanced. Other models of expectations formation, such as the adaptive expectations hypothesis, are briefly discussed. ...

  9. Survey Expectations

    OpenAIRE

    Pesaran, M.H.; Weale, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on survey expectations and discusses their uses for testing and modeling of expectations. Alternative models of expectations formation are reviewed and the importance of allowing for heterogeneity of expectations is emphasized. A weak form of the rational expectations hypothesis which focuses on average expectations rather than individual expectations is advanced. Other models of expectations formation, such as the adaptive expectations hypothesis, are briefly discussed. Te...

  10. Survey expectations

    OpenAIRE

    Pesaran, Mohammad Hashem; Weale, Martin R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on survey expectations and discusses their uses for testing and modeling of expectations. Alternative models of expectations formation are reviewed and the importance of allowing for heterogeneity of expectations is emphasized. A weak form of the rational expectations hypothesis which focuses on average expectations rather than individual expectations is advanced. Other models of expectations formation, such as the adaptive expectations hypothesis, are briefly discussed. Te...

  11. Surveying Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    2009-01-01

    In relation to surveying education there is one big question to be asked: Is the role of the surveyors changing? In a global perspective the answer will be "Yes". There is a big swing that could be entitled "From Measurement to Management". This does not imply that measurement is no longer a rele...... on an efficient interaction between education, research, and professional practice.......In relation to surveying education there is one big question to be asked: Is the role of the surveyors changing? In a global perspective the answer will be "Yes". There is a big swing that could be entitled "From Measurement to Management". This does not imply that measurement is no longer....... In surveying education there are a range of other challenges to be faced. These relate to the focus on learning to learn; the need for flexible curriculum to deal with constant change; the move towards introducing virtual academy; the demand for creating a quality culture; and the perspective of lifelong...

  12. MICROVEGA (MICRO VESSEL FOR GEODETICS APPLICATION: A MARINE DRONE FOR THE ACQUISITION OF BATHYMETRIC DATA FOR GIS APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Giordano

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Bathymetric data are fundamental to produce navigational chart and sea-floor 3D models. They can be collected using different techniques and sensors on board of a variety of platforms, such as satellite, aircraft, ship and drone. The MicroVEGA drone is an Open Prototype of Autonomous Unmanned Surface Vessel (AUSV conceived, designed and built to operate in the coastal areas (0-20 meters of depth, where a traditional boat is poorly manoeuvrable. It is equipped with a series of sensors to acquire the morpho-bathymetric high precision data. In this paper we presents the result of the first case study, a bathymetric survey carried out at Sorrento Marina Grande. This survey is a typical application case of this technology; the Open Prototype MicroVega has an interdisciplinary breath and it is going to be applied to various research fields. In future, it will expect to do new knowledge, new survey strategies and an industrial prototype in fiberglass.

  13. Multiple Surveys of Students and Survey Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, Michael E.; Weitzer, William H.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter reviews the literature on survey fatigue and summarizes a research project that indicates that administering multiple surveys in one academic year can significantly suppress response rates in later surveys. (Contains 4 tables.)

  14. Detailed Analysis of the Illapel Mw 8.3 Earthquake Source and Nucleation from Geodetic and Seismological Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigny, C.; Ruiz, S.; Klein, E.; Del-Campo, F., Sr.; Rivera, E.; Poli, P.; Métois, M.; Baez, J. C.; Vargas Easton, G.; Leyton, F.; Madariaga, R. I.; Fleitout, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Illapel Mw 8.3 earthquake of 16 September 2015 broke a large area of a very well surveyed region in North-central Chile, where more than 15 high rate GPS instruments and ~50 survey benchmarks were installed starting from 2004. Previous studies had shown that the Coquimbo region near Illapel was 60% coupled on average and was part of the so-called "metropolitan segment" delimited by two low coupling zones (LCZ) : the two bays of La Serena, near 30°S in the north and San Antonio, near 34°S in the South. To understand the seismic rupture, we studied the coseismic displacement, the rupture propagation, the location and mechanisms of the aftershocks and computed GPS time series. We observed that after the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule mega earthquake, the upper plate deformation decreased in the 2010 rupture area but increased by about 15% north of it, in the Illapel region. We attribute this decrease/increase to viscous strain relaxation occurred in the asthenosphere after Maule 2010 (and still going on). The area where deformation increased, within the metropolitan segment, agrees well with the slip distribution we determined from the inversion of GPS data : from 32°S to 30.5°S. Therefore we postulate that the deep transient slow slip triggered the Illapel earthquake, which explains why it occurred now but ruptured only half of the metropolitan segment.

  15. Surface deformation associated with the 2015 Mw 8.3 Illapel earthquake revealed by satellite-based geodetic observations and its implications for the seismic cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wanpeng; Samsonov, Sergey; Tian, Yunfeng; Qiu, Qiang; Li, Peng; Zhang, Yong; Deng, Zhiguo; Omari, Khalid

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we present inter-, co- and post-seismic displacements observed in the 2015 Illapel earthquake area by Global Positioning System (GPS) and Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR). RADARSAT-2, ALOS-2 and Sentinel-1A interferograms capture the co- and post-seismic displacements due to the Illapel earthquake. Based on a layered Earth structure, we modeled both co- and post-seismic faulting behaviors on the subduction interface of central Chile. The best-fit model shows that the coseismic rupture broke a 200 km × 200 km area with a maximum slip of 10 m at a depth of 20 km. Two distinct slip centers, likely controlled by local ramp-flat structure, are revealed. The total coseismic geodetic moment is 2.76 ×1021 N m, equivalent to a moment magnitude 8.3. The accumulated afterslip in the first two months after the mainshock is observed on both sides of the coseismic rupture zone with both ascending and descending Sentinel-1A interferograms. A limited overlap zone between co- and post-seismic slip models can be observed, suggesting partitioning of the frictional properties within the Illapel earthquake rupture zone. The total afterslip releases ∼ 5.0 ×1020 N m geodetic moment, which is equivalent to an earthquake of Mw 7.7. The 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake that occurred ∼400 km away from the Illapel earthquake epicenter could have exerted certain effects on the seismic cycle of the Illapel earthquake area. The seismic records from 2000 to 2015 imply that the rate of annual seismic moment release in the Illapel earthquake area dropped from 0.4 to 0.2 ×1019 N m /yr after the Maule earthquake. Based on the forward modeling with the best-fit slip models determined in this study, we reproduce the local surface displacements before, during and after the Illapel earthquake. A rough deformation cycle, 105 ± 29 yr, calculated by using the coseismic displacements and interseismic rate is basically identical with the revisit interval of M8 events in the

  16. A method for the joint inversion of geodetic and seismic waveform data using ABIC: application to the 1997 Manyi, Tibet, earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funning, Gareth J.; Fukahata, Yukitoshi; Yagi, Yuji; Parsons, Barry

    2014-03-01

    Geodetic imaging data and seismic waveform data have complementary strengths when considering the modelling of earthquakes. The former, particularly modern space geodetic techniques such as Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), permit high spatial density of observation and thus fine resolution of the spatial pattern of fault slip; the latter provide precise and accurate timing information, and thus the ability to resolve how that fault slip varies over time. In order to harness these complementary strengths, we propose a method through which the two data types can be combined in a joint inverse model for the evolution of slip on a specified fault geometry. We present here a derivation of Akaike's Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC) for the joint inversion of multiple data sets that explicitly deals with the problem of objectively estimating the relative weighting between data sets, as well as the optimal influence of model smoothness constraints in space and time. We demonstrate our ABIC inversion scheme by inverting InSAR displacements and teleseismic waveform data for the 1997 Manyi, Tibet, earthquake. We test, using a simplified fault geometry, three cases-InSAR data inverted alone, vertical component teleseismic broad-band waveform data inverted alone and a joint inversion of both data sets. The InSAR-only model and seismic-only model differ significantly in the distribution of slip on the fault plane that they predict. The joint-inversion model, however, has not only a similar distribution of slip and fit to the InSAR data in the InSAR-only model, suggesting that those data provide the stronger control on the pattern of slip, but is also able to fit the seismic data at a minimal degradation of fit when compared with the seismic-only model. The rupture history of the preferred, joint-inversion model, indicates bilateral rupture for the first 20 s of the earthquake, followed by a further 25 s of westward unilateral rupture afterwards, with slip

  17. Infrastructure Survey 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the Group of Eight (Go8) conducted a survey on the state of its buildings and infrastructure. The survey is the third Go8 Infrastructure survey, with previous surveys being conducted in 2007 and 2009. The current survey updated some of the information collected in the previous surveys. It also collated data related to aspects of the…

  18. Options for developing modernized geodetic datum for Nepal following the April 25, 2015 Mw7.8 Gorkha earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Chris; Manandhar, Niraj; Denys, Paul

    2017-09-01

    Along with the damage to buildings and infrastructure, the April 25, 2015 Mw7.8 Gorkha earthquake caused significant deformation over a large area of eastern Nepal with displacements of over 2 m recorded in the vicinity of Kathmandu. Nepal currently uses a classical datum developed in 1984 by the Royal (UK) Engineers in collaboration with the Nepal Survey Department. It has served Nepal well; however, the recent earthquakes have provided an impetus for developing a semi-dynamic datum that will be based on ITRF2014 and have the capacity to correct for tectonic deformation. In the scenario we present here, the datum would be based on ITRF2014 with a reference epoch set some time after the end of the current sequence of earthquakes. The deformation model contains a grid of the secular velocity field combined with models of the Gorkha Earthquake and the May 12 Mw7.3 aftershock. We have developed a preliminary velocity field by collating GPS derived crustal velocities from four previous studies for Nepal and adjacent parts of China and India and aligning them to the ITRF. Patches for the co-seismic part of the deformation for the Gorkha earthquake and the May 12, 2015 Mw 7.2 aftershock are based on published dislocation models. High order control would be a CORS network based around the existing Nepal GPS Array. Coordinates for existing lower order control would be determined by readjusting existing survey measurements and these would be combined with a series of new control stations spread throughout Nepal.

  19. Is the Okavango Delta the terminus of the East African Rift System? Towards a new geodynamic model: Geodetic study and geophysical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastier, Anne-Morwenn; Dauteuil, Olivier; Murray-Hudson, Michael; Moreau, Frédérique; Walpersdorf, Andrea; Makati, Kaelo

    2017-08-01

    The Okavango Graben (OG) has been considered as the terminus of the southwestern branch of the East African Rift System (EARS) since the 1970s based on fault morphology and early seismic and geophysical data. Thus it has been assumed to be an incipient rifting zone, analogous to the early stage of mature rifts in the EARS. Recent geodetic data and geophysical studies in the area bring new insights into the local crust and lithosphere, mantle activity and fault activity. In this study, we computed the velocities for three permanent GPS stations surrounding the graben and undertook a review of the new geophysical data available for the area. The northern and southern blocks of the graben show an exclusively low strike-slip displacement rate of about 1mm/year, revealing the transtensional nature of this basin. The seismic record of central and southern Africa was found to be instrumentally biased for the events recorded before 2004 and the OG may not represent the most seismically active area in Botswana anymore. Moreover, no significant lithosphere and crustal thinning is found in the tectonic structure nor any strong negative Bouguer anomaly and surface heat flux. Thus the OG does not match the classical model for a rifting zone. We propose a new geodynamic model for the deformation observed west of the EARS based on accommodation of far-field deformation due to the differential extension rates of the EARS and the displacement of the Kalahari craton relative to the Nubian plate.

  20. Observations of vertical tidal motions of a floating iceberg in front of Shirase Glacier, East Antarctica, using a geodetic-mode GPS buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Yuichi; Kim, Tae-Hee; Doi, Koichiro; Hayakawa, Hideaki; Higashi, Toshihiro; Ohsono, Shingo; Shibuya, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    A dual-frequency GPS receiver was deployed on a floating iceberg downstream of the calving front of Shirase Glacier, East Antarctica, on 28 December 2011 for utilizing as floating buoy. The three-dimensional position of the buoy was obtained by GPS every 30 s with a 4-5-cm precision for ca. 25 days. The height uncertainty of the 1-h averaged vertical position was ∼0.5 cm, even considering the uncertainties of un-modeled ocean loading effects. The daily evolution of north-south (NS), east-west (EW), and up-down (UD) motions shows periodic UD variations sometimes attaining an amplitude of 1 m. Observed amplitudes of tidal harmonics of major constituents were 88%-93% (O1) and 85%-88% (M2) of values observed in the global ocean tide models FES2004 and TPXO-8 Atlas. The basal melting rate of the iceberg is estimated to be ∼0.6 m/day, based on a firn densification model and using a quasi-linear sinking rate of the iceberg surface. The 30-s sampling frequency geodetic-mode GPS buoy helps to reveal ice-ocean dynamics around the calving front of Antarctic glaciers.