WorldWideScience

Sample records for geodesy

  1. Applied geodesy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, S.

    1987-01-01

    This volume is based on the proceedings of the CERN Accelerator School's course on Applied Geodesy for Particle Accelerators held in April 1986. The purpose was to record and disseminate the knowledge gained in recent years on the geodesy of accelerators and other large systems. The latest methods for positioning equipment to sub-millimetric accuracy in deep underground tunnels several tens of kilometers long are described, as well as such sophisticated techniques as the Navstar Global Positioning System and the Terrameter. Automation of better known instruments such as the gyroscope and Distinvar is also treated along with the highly evolved treatment of components in a modern accelerator. Use of the methods described can be of great benefit in many areas of research and industrial geodesy such as surveying, nautical and aeronautical engineering, astronomical radio-interferometry, metrology of large components, deformation studies, etc

  2. Tides and Modern Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Richard D.; Chao, Benjamin F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In modem high-precision geodesy, and especially in modem space geodesy, every measurement that one makes contains tidal signals. Generally these signals are considered noise and must somehow be eliminated. The stringent requirements of the latest space geodetic missions place severe demands on tidal models. On the other hand, these missions provide the strongest data for improving tidal models. In particular, TOPEX/POSEIDON altimetry and LAGEOS laser ranging have improved models to such an extent that new geophysical information about the ocean and the solid Earth are coming to light. Presumably GRACE intersatellite ranging data will also add to this information. This paper discusses several of these new geophysical results, with special emphasis given to the dissipation of tidal energy. Strong constraints have recently been placed on the partitioning of energy dissipation among the ocean, atmosphere, and solid earth and between the deep and shallow ocean. The dissipation in deep water is associated with internal tides and has potentially important implications for understanding the ocean's thermohaline circulation.

  3. Atomic clocks for geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlstäubler, Tanja E.; Grosche, Gesine; Lisdat, Christian; Schmidt, Piet O.; Denker, Heiner

    2018-06-01

    We review experimental progress on optical atomic clocks and frequency transfer, and consider the prospects of using these technologies for geodetic measurements. Today, optical atomic frequency standards have reached relative frequency inaccuracies below 10‑17, opening new fields of fundamental and applied research. The dependence of atomic frequencies on the gravitational potential makes atomic clocks ideal candidates for the search for deviations in the predictions of Einstein’s general relativity, tests of modern unifying theories and the development of new gravity field sensors. In this review, we introduce the concepts of optical atomic clocks and present the status of international clock development and comparison. Besides further improvement in stability and accuracy of today’s best clocks, a large effort is put into increasing the reliability and technological readiness for applications outside of specialized laboratories with compact, portable devices. With relative frequency uncertainties of 10‑18, comparisons of optical frequency standards are foreseen to contribute together with satellite and terrestrial data to the precise determination of fundamental height reference systems in geodesy with a resolution at the cm-level. The long-term stability of atomic standards will deliver excellent long-term height references for geodetic measurements and for the modelling and understanding of our Earth.

  4. Geodesy and Mapping (Selected Articles),

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-16

    August 1979 MICROFICHE NR. C-0/O GEODESY AND MAPPING (SELECTED ARTICLES) English pages: 53 Source: Geodezja i Kartograflia, Vol. 27, Nr. 2, 1978, pp. 83...Hausbrandt S., Wyrdwnanie sieci trygonemetryernych z odrzuceniem zalolenia bezbIfdneil pwo- ktdw dowiqzania, Geodezja i Kartografia. T III, z. 1, 1954. [2

  5. Geodesy and Cartography (Selected Articles),

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-10

    C-OO/b73 GEODESY AND CARTOGRAPHY (SELECTED ARTICLES) English pages: 40 Source: GeodezJa i Kartografia, Vol. 27, Nr. 1, 1978, PP. 3-27 Country of...1976. 14) kledzixski, J., Zibek, Z., Czarnecki, K., Rogowski, J.B., Problems in Using Satellite Surveys in an Astronomical-Geodesic Network, Geodezja i...Based on Observations of Low-Low Satellites Using Collocation Methods, Geodezja i Kartografia, Vol. XXVI, No. 4, 1977. [-7. Krynski, J., Schwarz, K.P

  6. Global tectonics and space geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Richard G.; Stein, Seth

    1992-01-01

    Much of the success of plate tectonics can be attributed to the near rigidity of tectonic plates and the availability of data that describe the rates and directions of motion across narrow plate boundaries of about 1 to 60 kilometers. Nonetheless, many plate boundaries in both continental and oceanic lithosphere are not narrow but are hundreds to thousands of kilometers wide. Wide plate boundary zones cover approximately 15 percent of earth's surface area. Space geodesy, which includes very long baseline radio interferometry, satellite laser ranging, and the global positioning system, provides the accurate long-distance measurements needed to estimate the present motion across and within wide plate boundary zones. Space geodetic data show that plate velocities averaged over years are remarkably similar to velocities avaraged over millions of years.

  7. NASA's Contribution to Global Space Geodesy Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, John M.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Space Geodesy program continues to be a major provider of space geodetic data for the international earth science community. NASA operates high performance Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR), Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) and Global Positioning System (GPS) ground receivers at well over 30 locations around the world and works in close cooperation with space geodetic observatories around the world. NASA has also always been at the forefront in the quest for technical improvement and innovation in the space geodesy technologies to make them even more productive, accurate and economical. This presentation will highlight the current status of NASA's networks; the plans for partnerships with international groups in the southern hemisphere to improve the geographic distribution of space geodesy sites and the status of the technological improvements in SLR and VLBI that will support the new scientific thrusts proposed by interdisciplinary earth scientists. In addition, the expanding role of the NASA Space geodesy data archive, the CDDIS will be described.

  8. Mars geodesy, rotation and gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenblatt, Pascal; Dehant, Veronique

    2010-01-01

    This review provides explanations of how geodesy, rotation and gravity can be addressed using radioscience data of an orbiter around a planet or of the lander on its surface. The planet Mars is the center of the discussion. The information one can get from orbitography and radioscience in general concerns the global static gravitational field, the time variation of the gravitational field induced by mass exchange between the atmosphere and the ice caps, the time variation of the gravitational field induced by the tides, the secular changes in the spacecraft's orbit induced by the little moons of Mars named Phobos and Deimos, the gravity induced by particular targets, the Martian ephemerides, and Mars' rotation and orientation. The paper addresses as well the determination of the geophysical parameters of Mars and, in particular, the state of Mars' core and its size, which is important for understanding the planet's evolution. Indeed, the state and dimension of the core determined from the moment of inertia and nutation depend in turn on the percentage of light elements in the core as well as on the core temperature, which is related to heat transport in the mantle. For example, the radius of the core has implications for possible mantle convection scenarios and, in particular, for the presence of a perovskite phase transition at the bottom of the mantle. This is also important for our understanding of the large volcanic province Tharsis on the surface of Mars. (invited reviews)

  9. Engineering Geodesy - Definition and Core Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Heiner; Schwieger, Volker; Wieser, Andreas; Niemeier, Wolfgang

    2014-11-01

    This article summarises discussions concerning the definition of "engineering geodesy" within the German Geodetic Commission. It is noted that engineering geodesy by means of its tasks, methods and characteristics is an application-oriented science whose research questions often arise from observed phenomena or from unsolved practical problems. In particular it is characterised by the professional handling of geometry-related problems in a cost-effective manner that includes comprehensive quality assessment at all phases of the problem solution - from planning through measurement to data processing and interpretation. The current methodical developments are primarily characterised by the increasing integration of the measurement and analysis into challenging construction, production and monitoring processes as well as by the transition to spatially continuous methods. A modern definition of engineering geodesy is proposed at the end of this article.

  10. Physical applications of GPS geodesy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Yehuda; Melgar, Diego

    2016-10-01

    Geodesy, the oldest science, has become an important discipline in the geosciences, in large part by enhancing Global Positioning System (GPS) capabilities over the last 35 years well beyond the satellite constellation's original design. The ability of GPS geodesy to estimate 3D positions with millimeter-level precision with respect to a global terrestrial reference frame has contributed to significant advances in geophysics, seismology, atmospheric science, hydrology, and natural hazard science. Monitoring the changes in the positions or trajectories of GPS instruments on the Earth's land and water surfaces, in the atmosphere, or in space, is important for both theory and applications, from an improved understanding of tectonic and magmatic processes to developing systems for mitigating the impact of natural hazards on society and the environment. Besides accurate positioning, all disturbances in the propagation of the transmitted GPS radio signals from satellite to receiver are mined for information, from troposphere and ionosphere delays for weather, climate, and natural hazard applications, to disturbances in the signals due to multipath reflections from the solid ground, water, and ice for environmental applications. We review the relevant concepts of geodetic theory, data analysis, and physical modeling for a myriad of processes at multiple spatial and temporal scales, and discuss the extensive global infrastructure that has been built to support GPS geodesy consisting of thousands of continuously operating stations. We also discuss the integration of heterogeneous and complementary data sets from geodesy, seismology, and geology, focusing on crustal deformation applications and early warning systems for natural hazards.

  11. Geodesy problems in nuclear power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eory, K.

    1981-01-01

    The special geodetic problems encountered during the construction of the Paks nuclear power plants are treated. The main building with its hermetically connected components including the reactor, the steam generators, the circulation pumps etc. impose special requirements on the control net of datum points. The geodesy tasks solved during the construction of the main building are presented in details. (R.P.)

  12. Volcano Geodesy: Recent developments and future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Jose F.; Pepe, Antonio; Poland, Michael; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn

    2017-01-01

    Ascent of magma through Earth's crust is normally associated with, among other effects, ground deformation and gravity changes. Geodesy is thus a valuable tool for monitoring and hazards assessment during volcanic unrest, and it provides valuable data for exploring the geometry and volume of magma plumbing systems. Recent decades have seen an explosion in the quality and quantity of volcano geodetic data. New datasets (some made possible by regional and global scientific initiatives), as well as new analysis methods and modeling practices, have resulted in important changes to our understanding of the geodetic characteristics of active volcanism and magmatic processes, from the scale of individual eruptive vents to global compilations of volcano deformation. Here, we describe some of the recent developments in volcano geodesy, both in terms of data and interpretive tools, and discuss the role of international initiatives in meeting future challenges for the field.

  13. Reference Ellipsoid and Geoid in Chronometric Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeikin, Sergei M.

    2016-02-01

    Chronometric geodesy applies general relativity to study the problem of the shape of celestial bodies including the earth, and their gravitational field. The present paper discusses the relativistic problem of construction of a background geometric manifold that is used for describing a reference ellipsoid, geoid, the normal gravity field of the earth and for calculating geoid's undulation (height). We choose the perfect fluid with an ellipsoidal mass distribution uniformly rotating around a fixed axis as a source of matter generating the geometry of the background manifold through the Einstein equations. We formulate the post-Newtonian hydrodynamic equations of the rotating fluid to find out the set of algebraic equations defining the equipotential surface of the gravity field. In order to solve these equations we explicitly perform all integrals characterizing the interior gravitational potentials in terms of elementary functions depending on the parameters defining the shape of the body and the mass distribution. We employ the coordinate freedom of the equations to choose these parameters to make the shape of the rotating fluid configuration to be an ellipsoid of rotation. We derive expressions of the post-Newtonian mass and angular momentum of the rotating fluid as functions of the rotational velocity and the parameters of the ellipsoid including its bare density, eccentricity and semi-major axes. We formulate the post-Newtonian Pizzetti and Clairaut theorems that are used in geodesy to connect the parameters of the reference ellipsoid to the polar and equatorial values of force of gravity. We expand the post-Newtonian geodetic equations characterizing the reference ellipsoid into the Taylor series with respect to the eccentricity of the ellipsoid, and discuss the small-eccentricity approximation. Finally, we introduce the concept of relativistic geoid and its undulation with respect to the reference ellipsoid, and discuss how to calculate it in chronometric

  14. Reference ellipsoid and geoid in chronometric geodesy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei M Kopeikin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronometric geodesy applies general relativity to study the problem of the shape of celestial bodies including the earth, and their gravitational field. The present paper discusses the relativistic problem of construction of a background geometric manifold that is used for describing a reference ellipsoid, geoid, the normal gravity field of the earth and for calculating geoid's undulation (height. We choose the perfect fluid with an ellipsoidal mass distribution uniformly rotating around a fixed axis as a source of matter generating the geometry of the background manifold through the Einstein equations. We formulate the post-Newtonian hydrodynamic equations of the rotating fluid to find out the set of algebraic equations defining the equipotential surface of the gravity field. In order to solve these equations we explicitly perform all integrals characterizing the interior gravitational potentials in terms of elementary functions depending on the parameters defining the shape of the body and the mass distribution. We employ the coordinate freedom of the equations to choose these parameters to make the shape of the rotating fluid configuration to be an ellipsoid of rotation. We derive expressions of the post-Newtonian mass and angular momentum of the rotating fluid as functions of the rotational velocity and the parameters of the ellipsoid including its bare density, eccentricity and semi-major axes. We formulate the post-Newtonian Pizzetti and Clairaut theorems that are used in geodesy to connect the parameters of the reference ellipsoid to the polar and equatorial values of force of gravity. We expand the post-Newtonian geodetic equations characterizing the reference ellipsoid into the Taylor series with respect to the eccentricity of the ellipsoid, and discuss the small-eccentricity approximation. Finally, we introduce the concept of relativistic geoid and its undulation with respect to the reference ellipsoid, and discuss how to calculate it

  15. Reference Ellipsoid and Geoid in Chronometric Geodesy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopeikin, Sergei M., E-mail: kopeikins@missouri.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Department of Physical Geodesy and Remote Sensing, Siberian State University of Geosystems and Technologies, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-25

    Chronometric geodesy applies general relativity to study the problem of the shape of celestial bodies including the earth, and their gravitational field. The present paper discusses the relativistic problem of construction of a background geometric manifold that is used for describing a reference ellipsoid, geoid, the normal gravity field of the earth and for calculating geoid's undulation (height). We choose the perfect fluid with an ellipsoidal mass distribution uniformly rotating around a fixed axis as a source of matter generating the geometry of the background manifold through the Einstein equations. We formulate the post-Newtonian hydrodynamic equations of the rotating fluid to find out the set of algebraic equations defining the equipotential surface of the gravity field. In order to solve these equations we explicitly perform all integrals characterizing the interior gravitational potentials in terms of elementary functions depending on the parameters defining the shape of the body and the mass distribution. We employ the coordinate freedom of the equations to choose these parameters to make the shape of the rotating fluid configuration to be an ellipsoid of rotation. We derive expressions of the post-Newtonian mass and angular momentum of the rotating fluid as functions of the rotational velocity and the parameters of the ellipsoid including its bare density, eccentricity and semi-major axes. We formulate the post-Newtonian Pizzetti and Clairaut theorems that are used in geodesy to connect the parameters of the reference ellipsoid to the polar and equatorial values of force of gravity. We expand the post-Newtonian geodetic equations characterizing the reference ellipsoid into the Taylor series with respect to the eccentricity of the ellipsoid, and discuss the small-eccentricity approximation. Finally, we introduce the concept of relativistic geoid and its undulation with respect to the reference ellipsoid, and discuss how to calculate it in

  16. VLBI2010 in NASA's Space Geodesy Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chopo

    2012-01-01

    In the summer of 20 11 NASA approved the proposal for the Space Geodesy Project (SGP). A major element is developing at the Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory a prototype of the next generation of integrated stations with co-located VLBI, SLR, GNSS and DORIS instruments as well as a system for monitoring the vector ties. VLBI2010 is a key component of the integrated station. The objectives ofSGP, the role of VLBI20 lOin the context of SGP, near term plans and possible future scenarios will be discussed.

  17. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Nancy R. (Editor); Baver, Karen D. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This volume of reports is the 2000 Annual Report of the International Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS). The individual reports were contributed by VLBI groups in the international geodetic and astrometric community who constitute the components of IVS. The 2000 Annual Report documents the work of these IVS components over the period March 1, 1999, through December 31, 2000. The reports document changes, activities, and progress of the IVS. The entire contents of this Annual Report also appear on the IVS web site at http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications/ar2000.

  18. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Nancy R. (Editor); Baver, Karen D. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    This volume of reports is the 2003 Annual Report of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS). The individual reports were contributed by VLBI groups in the international geodetic and astrometric community who constitute the permanent components of IVS. The IVS 2003 Annual Report documents the work of the IVS components for the calendar year 2003, our fifih year of existence. The reports describe changes, activities, and progress of the IVS. Many thanks to all IVS components who contributed to this Annual Report. The entire contents of this Annual Report also appear on the IVS web site at http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications/ar2OO3

  19. Next Generation NASA Initiative for Space Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkowitz, S. M.; Desai, S.; Gross, R. S.; Hilliard, L.; Lemoine, F. G.; Long, J. L.; Ma, C.; McGarry J. F.; Murphy, D.; Noll, C. E.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Space geodesy measurement requirements have become more and more stringent as our understanding of the physical processes and our modeling techniques have improved. In addition, current and future spacecraft will have ever-increasing measurement capability and will lead to increasingly sophisticated models of changes in the Earth system. Ground-based space geodesy networks with enhanced measurement capability will be essential to meeting these oncoming requirements and properly interpreting the sate1!ite data. These networks must be globally distributed and built for longevity, to provide the robust data necessary to generate improved models for proper interpretation ofthe observed geophysical signals. These requirements have been articulated by the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS). The NASA Space Geodesy Project (SGP) is developing a prototype core site as the basis for a next generation Space Geodetic Network (SGN) that would be NASA's contribution to a global network designed to produce the higher quality data required to maintain the Terrestrial Reference Frame and provide information essential for fully realizing the measurement potential of the current and coming generation of Earth Observing spacecraft. Each of the sites in the SGN would include co-located, state of-the-art systems from all four space geodetic observing techniques (GNSS, SLR, VLBI, and DORIS). The prototype core site is being developed at NASA's Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory at Goddard Space Flight Center. The project commenced in 2011 and is scheduled for completion in late 2013. In January 2012, two multiconstellation GNSS receivers, GODS and GODN, were established at the prototype site as part of the local geodetic network. Development and testing are also underway on the next generation SLR and VLBI systems along with a modern DORIS station. An automated survey system is being developed to measure inter-technique vector ties, and network design studies are being

  20. 48 CFR 252.245-7000 - Government-furnished mapping, charting, and geodesy property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... mapping, charting, and geodesy property. 252.245-7000 Section 252.245-7000 Federal Acquisition Regulations..., charting, and geodesy property. As prescribed in 245.107-70, use the following clause: Government-Furnished Mapping, Charting, and Geodesy Property (DEC 1991) (a) Definition—Mapping, charting, and geodesy (MC&G...

  1. Seismology and space-based geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tralli, David M.; Tajima, Fumiko

    1993-01-01

    The potential of space-based geodetic measurement of crustal deformation in the context of seismology is explored. The achievements of seismological source theory and data analyses, mechanical modeling of fault zone behavior, and advances in space-based geodesy are reviewed, with emphasis on realizable contributions of space-based geodetic measurements specifically to seismology. The fundamental relationships between crustal deformation associated with an earthquake and the geodetically observable data are summarized. The response and spatial and temporal resolution of the geodetic data necessary to understand deformation at various phases of the earthquake cycle is stressed. The use of VLBI, SLR, and GPS measurements for studying global geodynamics properties that can be investigated to some extent with seismic data is discussed. The potential contributions of continuously operating strain monitoring networks and globally distributed geodetic observatories to existing worldwide modern digital seismographic networks are evaluated in reference to mutually addressable problems in seismology, geophysics, and tectonics.

  2. 25 Years of Reports on Geodesy and Geoinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siemiątkowska Jadwiga

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an outline of the 25-year history of the journal “Reports on Geodesy and Geoinformatics”. The source of information was mainly the journal issues themselves. Attention was drawn to changes that the journal underwent over a quarter of a century and its relationship with the Institute of Geodesy and Geodetic Astronomy and later the Department of Geodesy and Geodetic Astronomy. Many issues were dedicated to materials from Polish conferences - those organised by the Institute and the international ones attended by the employees of the Institute, which was indicated in the section on the history of the journal.

  3. Integration of space geodesy: a US National Geodetic Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunck, Thomas P.; Neilan, Ruth

    2003-01-01

    In the interest of improving the performance and efficiency of space geodesy a diverse group in the U.S., in collaboration with IGGOS, has begun to establish a unified National Geodetic Observatory (NGO).

  4. Sciences of geodesy I advances and future directions

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Guochang

    2010-01-01

    This series of reference books describes sciences of different elds in and around geodesy with independent chapters. Each chapter covers an individual eld and describes the history, theory, objective, technology, development, highlights of research and applications. In addition, problems as well as future directions are discussed. The subjects of this reference book include Absolute and Relative Gravimetry, Adaptively Robust Kalman Filters with Applications in Navigation, Airborne Gravity Field Determination, Analytic Orbit Theory, Deformation and Tectonics, Earth Rotation, Equivalence of GPS Algorithms and its Inference, Marine Geodesy, Satellite Laser Ranging, Superconducting Gravimetry and Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry. These are individual subjects in and around geodesy and are for the rst time combined in a unique book which may be used for teaching or for learning basic principles of many subjects related to geodesy. The material is suitable to provide a general overview of geodetic sciences f...

  5. Improved DORIS accuracy for precise orbit determination and geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Pascal; Jayles, Christian; Tavernier, Gilles

    2004-01-01

    In 2001 and 2002, 3 more DORIS satellites were launched. Since then, all DORIS results have been significantly improved. For precise orbit determination, 20 cm are now available in real-time with DIODE and 1.5 to 2 cm in post-processing. For geodesy, 1 cm precision can now be achieved regularly every week, making now DORIS an active part of a Global Observing System for Geodesy through the IDS.

  6. Mathematical foundation of geodesy selected papers of Torben Krarup

    CERN Document Server

    Borre, K

    2006-01-01

    This volume contains selected papers by Torben Krarup, one of the most important geodesists of the 20th century. The collection includes the famous booklet "A Contribution to the Mathematical Foundation of Physical Geodesy" from 1969, the unpublished "Molodenskij letters" from 1973, the final version of "Integrated Geodesy" from 1978, "Foundation of a Theory of Elasticity for Geodetic Networks" from 1974, as well as trend-setting papers on the theory of adjustment.

  7. Normal gravity field in relativistic geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeikin, Sergei; Vlasov, Igor; Han, Wen-Biao

    2018-02-01

    Modern geodesy is subject to a dramatic change from the Newtonian paradigm to Einstein's theory of general relativity. This is motivated by the ongoing advance in development of quantum sensors for applications in geodesy including quantum gravimeters and gradientometers, atomic clocks and fiber optics for making ultra-precise measurements of the geoid and multipolar structure of the Earth's gravitational field. At the same time, very long baseline interferometry, satellite laser ranging, and global navigation satellite systems have achieved an unprecedented level of accuracy in measuring 3-d coordinates of the reference points of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame and the world height system. The main geodetic reference standard to which gravimetric measurements of the of Earth's gravitational field are referred is a normal gravity field represented in the Newtonian gravity by the field of a uniformly rotating, homogeneous Maclaurin ellipsoid of which mass and quadrupole momentum are equal to the total mass and (tide-free) quadrupole moment of Earth's gravitational field. The present paper extends the concept of the normal gravity field from the Newtonian theory to the realm of general relativity. We focus our attention on the calculation of the post-Newtonian approximation of the normal field that is sufficient for current and near-future practical applications. We show that in general relativity the level surface of homogeneous and uniformly rotating fluid is no longer described by the Maclaurin ellipsoid in the most general case but represents an axisymmetric spheroid of the fourth order with respect to the geodetic Cartesian coordinates. At the same time, admitting a post-Newtonian inhomogeneity of the mass density in the form of concentric elliptical shells allows one to preserve the level surface of the fluid as an exact ellipsoid of rotation. We parametrize the mass density distribution and the level surface with two parameters which are

  8. NASA's Next Generation Space Geodesy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkowitz, S. M.; Desai, S. D.; Gross, R. S.; Hillard, L. M.; Lemoine, F. G.; Long, J. L.; Ma, C.; McGarry, J. F.; Murphy, D.; Noll, C. E.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Requirements for the ITRF have increased dramatically since the 1980s. The most stringent requirement comes from critical sea level monitoring programs: a global accuracy of 1.0 mm, and 0.1mm/yr stability, a factor of 10 to 20 beyond current capability. Other requirements for the ITRF coming from ice mass change, ground motion, and mass transport studies are similar. Current and future satellite missions will have ever-increasing measurement capability and will lead to increasingly sophisticated models of these and other changes in the Earth system. Ground space geodesy networks with enhanced measurement capability will be essential to meeting the ITRF requirements and properly interpreting the satellite data. These networks must be globally distributed and built for longevity, to provide the robust data necessary to generate improved models for proper interpretation of the observed geophysical signals. NASA has embarked on a Space Geodesy Program with a long-range goal to build, deploy and operate a next generation NASA Space Geodetic Network (SGN). The plan is to build integrated, multi-technique next-generation space geodetic observing systems as the core contribution to a global network designed to produce the higher quality data required to maintain the Terrestrial Reference Frame and provide information essential for fully realizing the measurement potential of the current and coming generation of Earth Observing spacecraft. Phase 1 of this project has been funded to (1) Establish and demonstrate a next-generation prototype integrated Space Geodetic Station at Goddard's Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory (GGAO), including next-generation SLR and VLBI systems along with modern GNSS and DORIS; (2) Complete ongoing Network Design Studies that describe the appropriate number and distribution of next-generation Space Geodetic Stations for an improved global network; (3) Upgrade analysis capability to handle the next-generation data; (4) Implement a modern

  9. NASA's Next Generation Space Geodesy Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, S. D.; Gross, R. S.; Hilliard, L.; Lemoine, F. G.; Long, J. L.; Ma, C.; McGarry, J. F.; Merkowitz, S. M.; Murphy, D.; Noll, C. E.; hide

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Space Geodesy Project (SGP) is developing a prototype core site for a next generation Space Geodetic Network (SGN). Each of the sites in this planned network co-locate current state-of-the-art stations from all four space geodetic observing systems, GNSS, SLR, VLBI, and DORIS, with the goal of achieving modern requirements for the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). In particular, the driving ITRF requirements for this network are 1.0 mm in accuracy and 0.1 mm/yr in stability, a factor of 10-20 beyond current capabilities. Development of the prototype core site, located at NASA's Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory at the Goddard Space Flight Center, started in 2011 and will be completed by the end of 2013. In January 2012, two operational GNSS stations, GODS and GOON, were established at the prototype site within 100 m of each other. Both stations are being proposed for inclusion into the IGS network. In addition, work is underway for the inclusion of next generation SLR and VLBI stations along with a modern DORIS station. An automated survey system is being developed to measure inter-technique vectorties, and network design studies are being performed to define the appropriate number and distribution of these next generation space geodetic core sites that are required to achieve the driving ITRF requirements. We present the status of this prototype next generation space geodetic core site, results from the analysis of data from the established geodetic stations, and results from the ongoing network design studies.

  10. Lunar geodesy and cartography: a new era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, Thomas; Smith, David; Robinson, Mark; Zuber, Maria T.; Neumann, Gregory; Danton, Jacob; Oberst, Juergen; Archinal, Brent; Glaeser, Philipp

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) ushers in a new era in precision lunar geodesy and cartography. LRO was launched in June, 2009, completed its Commissioning Phase in Septem-ber 2009 and is now in its Primary Mission Phase on its way to collecting high precision, global topographic and imaging data. Aboard LRO are the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA -Smith, et al., 2009) and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC -Robinson, et al., ). LOLA is a derivative of the successful MOLA at Mars that produced the global reference surface being used for all precision cartographic products. LOLA produces 5 altimetry spots having footprints of 5 m at a frequency of 28 Hz, significantly bettering MOLA that produced 1 spot having a footprint of 150 m at a frequency of 10 Hz. LROC has twin narrow angle cameras having pixel resolutions of 0.5 meters from a 50 km orbit and a wide-angle camera having a pixel resolution of 75 m and in up to 7 color bands. One of the two NACs looks to the right of nadir and the other looks to the left with a few hundred pixel overlap in the nadir direction. LOLA is mounted on the LRO spacecraft to look nadir, in the overlap region of the NACs. The LRO spacecraft has the ability to look nadir and build up global coverage as well as looking off-nadir to provide stereo coverage and fill in data gaps. The LROC wide-angle camera builds up global stereo coverage naturally from its large field-of-view overlap from orbit to orbit during nadir viewing. To date, the LROC WAC has already produced global stereo coverage of the lunar surface. This report focuses on the registration of LOLA altimetry to the LROC NAC images. LOLA has a dynamic range of tens of km while producing elevation data at sub-meter precision. LOLA also has good return in off-nadir attitudes. Over the LRO mission, multiple LOLA tracks will be in each of the NAC images at the lunar equator and even more tracks in the NAC images nearer the poles. The registration of LOLA

  11. Potential capabilities of lunar laser ranging for geodesy and relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Jurgen; Williams, James G.; Turshev, Slava G.; Shelus, Peter J.

    2005-01-01

    Here, we review the LLR technique focusing on its impact on Geodesy and Relativity. We discuss the modem observational accuracy and the level of existing LLR modeling. We present the near-term objectives and emphasize improvements needed to fully utilize the scientific potential of LLR.

  12. Geodesy introduction to geodetic datum and geodetic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Zhiping; Qiao, Shubo

    2014-01-01

    A full introduction to geodetic data and systems written by well-known experts in their respective fields, this book is an ideal text for courses in geodesy and geomatics covering everything from coordinate and gravimetry data to geodetic systems of all types.

  13. The Use of Resonant Orbits in Satellite Geodesy: A Review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klokočník, Jaroslav; Gooding, R. H.; Wagner, C. A.; Kostelecký, J.; Bezděk, Aleš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 1 (2013), s. 43-72 ISSN 0169-3298 Grant - others:ESA(XE) ESA- PECS project No. 98056 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : satellite geodesy * Earth's gravitational field * geopotential Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.112, year: 2013

  14. Integration of space geodesy: A US National Geodetic Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunck, Thomas P.; Neilan, Ruth E.

    2005-11-01

    In the interest of improving the performance and efficiency of space geodesy a diverse group in the US, in collaboration with IGGOS, has begun to establish a unified National Geodetic Observatory (NGO). To launch this effort an international team will conduct a multi-year program of research into the technical issues of integrating SLR, VLBI, and GPS geodesy to produce a unified set of global geodetic products. The goal is to improve measurement accuracy by up to an order of magnitude while lowering the cost to current sponsors. A secondary goal is to expand and diversify international sponsorship of space geodesy. Principal benefits will be to open new vistas of research in geodynamics and surface change while freeing scarce NASA funds for scientific studies. NGO will proceed in partnership with, and under the auspices of, the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) as an element of the Integrated Global Geodetic Observation System project. The collaboration will be conducted within, and will make full use of, the IAG's existing international services: the IGS, IVS, ILRS, and IERS. Seed funding for organizational activities and technical analysis will come from NASA's Solid Earth and Natural Hazards Program. Additional funds to develop an integrated geodetic data system known as Inter-service Data Integration for Geodetic Operations (INDIGO), will come from a separate NASA program in Earth science information technology. INDIGO will offer ready access to the full variety of NASA's space geodetic data and will extend the GPS Seamless Archive (GSAC) philosophy to all space geodetic data types.

  15. Advancing geodesy in the U.S. Midcontinent: workshop report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamburger, Michael W.; Boyd, Oliver S.; Calais, Eric; King, Nancy E.; Stein, Seth A.

    2014-01-01

    The workshop on “Advancing Geodesy in the U.S. Midcontinent” was held from October 31 to November 1, 2012, at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. The workshop included 28 participants from academia, government, and private-sector organizations that are involved in research on geodesy and earthquake hazards in the seismically active areas of the U.S. midcontinent (the region of relatively undeformed crust roughly between the Great Plains and Appalachian Mountains). The workshop was intended to provide guidance to the U.S. Geological Survey’s internal and external Earthquake Hazards research programs in the U.S. midcontinent. The 2012 workshop was developed as a follow-up to the “Workshop on New Madrid Geodesy and Understanding Intraplate Earthquakes,” held in Norwood, Massachusetts, in March 2011. The goal of the 2012 workshop was to provide specific recommendations to the U.S. Geological Survey on priorities for infrastructure and research investments related to geodesy in the U.S. midcontinent.

  16. Space Geodesy Project Information and Configuration Management Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkowitz, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    This plan defines the Space Geodesy Project (SGP) policies, procedures, and requirements for Information and Configuration Management (CM). This procedure describes a process that is intended to ensure that all proposed and approved technical and programmatic baselines and changes to the SGP hardware, software, support systems, and equipment are documented.

  17. Accelerator Technology: Geodesy and Alignment for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Missiaen, D

    2013-01-01

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Accelerators and Colliders' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the the Section '8.9 Geodesy and Alignment for Particle Accelerators' of the Chapter '8 Accelerator Technology' with the content: 8.9 Geodesy and Alignment for Particle Accelerators 8.9.1 Introduction 8.9.2 Reference and Co-ordinate Systems 8.9.3 Definition of the Beam Line on the Accelerator Site 8.9.4 Geodetic Network 8.9.5 Tunnel Preliminary Works 8.9.6 The Alignment References 8.9.7 Alignment of Accelerator Components 8.9.8 Permanent Monitoring and Remote Alignment of Low Beta Quadrupoles 8.9.9 Alignment of Detector Components

  18. Cooperative research in space geodesy and crustal dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This research grant, which covered the period of July 1991 to August 1994, was concerned with a variety of topics within the geodesy and crustal dynamics fields. The specific topics of this grant included satellite tracking and gravity field determinations and crustal dynamics (this concentrated of space geodetic site stability for VLBI sites). Summaries of the specific research projects are included along with a list of publications and presentations supported by this research grant.

  19. Data management and processing plan, Department of Applied Geodesy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    This plan outlines Data Management and Data Processing requirements of the Department of Applied Geodesy (DAG) and presents the plan to meet these requirements (These requirements are derived from the functional needs of the Department to meet the SSCL alignment tolerances and schedules). In addition, this document presents a schedule for the implementation of this plan. This document is an integral part of the Alignment Plan of the SSCL

  20. Archiving Space Geodesy Data for 20+ Years at the CDDIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Carey E.; Dube, M. P.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1982, the Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS) has supported the archive and distribution of geodetic data products acquired by NASA programs. These data include GPS (Global Positioning System), GLONASS (GLObal NAvigation Satellite System), SLR (Satellite Laser Ranging), VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry), and DORIS (Doppler Orbitography and Radiolocation Integrated by Satellite). The data archive supports NASA's space geodesy activities through the Solid Earth and Natural Hazards (SENH) program. The CDDIS data system and its archive have become increasingly important to many national and international programs, particularly several of the operational services within the International Association of Geodesy (IAG), including the International GPS Service (IGS), the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS), the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS), the International DORIS Service (IDS), and the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS). The CDDIS provides easy and ready access to a variety of data sets, products, and information about these data. The specialized nature of the CDDIS lends itself well to enhancement and thus can accommodate diverse data sets and user requirements. All data sets and metadata extracted from these data sets are accessible to scientists through ftp and the web; general information about each data set is accessible via the web. The CDDIS, including background information about the system and its user communities, the computer architecture, archive contents, available metadata, and future plans will be discussed.

  1. Friedrich Robert Helmert, founder of modern geodesy, on the occasion of the centenary of his death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihde, Johannes; Reinhold, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    Friedrich Robert Helmert died in Potsdam in 1917 at the age of 74 after serving for over 30 years as director of the Royal Prussian Geodetic Institute and of the Central Bureau of the Internationale Erdmessung, the forerunner of today's International Association of Geodesy. He dedicated his life and his scientific career to the field of geodesy. His teachings on theoretical and physical geodesy were incorporated into university curricula around the world and hence into international endeavours to measure planet Earth. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the impact he has had on the development of modern geodesy and on the related sciences.

  2. Post-Newtonian reference ellipsoid for relativistic geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeikin, Sergei; Han, Wenbiao; Mazurova, Elena

    2016-02-01

    We apply general relativity to construct the post-Newtonian background manifold that serves as a reference spacetime in relativistic geodesy for conducting a relativistic calculation of the geoid's undulation and the deflection of the plumb line from the vertical. We chose an axisymmetric ellipsoidal body made up of a perfect homogeneous fluid uniformly rotating around a fixed axis, as a source generating the reference geometry of the background manifold through Einstein's equations. We then reformulate and extend hydrodynamic calculations of rotating fluids done by a number of previous researchers for astrophysical applications to the realm of relativistic geodesy to set up algebraic equations defining the shape of the post-Newtonian reference ellipsoid. To complete this task, we explicitly perform all integrals characterizing gravitational field potentials inside the fluid body and represent them in terms of the elementary functions depending on the eccentricity of the ellipsoid. We fully explore the coordinate (gauge) freedom of the equations describing the post-Newtonian ellipsoid and demonstrate that the fractional deviation of the post-Newtonian level surface from the Maclaurin ellipsoid can be made much smaller than the previously anticipated estimate based on the astrophysical application of the coordinate gauge advocated by Bardeen and Chandrasekhar. We also derive the gauge-invariant relations of the post-Newtonian mass and the constant angular velocity of the rotating fluid with the parameters characterizing the shape of the post-Newtonian ellipsoid including its eccentricity, a semiminor axis, and a semimajor axis. We formulate the post-Newtonian theorems of Pizzetti and Clairaut that are used in geodesy to connect the geometric parameters of the reference ellipsoid to the physically measurable force of gravity at the pole and equator of the ellipsoid. Finally, we expand the post-Newtonian geodetic equations describing the post-Newtonian ellipsoid to

  3. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry 2007 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrend, D. (Editor); Baver, K. D. (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    This volume of reports is the 2007 Annual Report of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS). The individual reports were contributed by VLBI groups in the international geodetic and astrometric community who constitute the components of IVS. The 2007 Annual Report documents the work of these IVS components over the period January 1, 2007 through December 31, 2007. The reports document changes, activities, and progress of the IVS. The entire contents of this Annual Report also appear on the IVS Web site at http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications/ar2007.

  4. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry 2008 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrend, Dirk; Baver, Karen D.

    2009-01-01

    This volume of reports is the 2008 Annual Report of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS). The individual reports were contributed by VLBI groups in the international geodetic and astrometric community who constitute the components of IVS. The 2008 Annual Report documents the work of these IVS components over the period January 1, 2008 through December 31, 2008. The reports document changes, activities, and progress of the IVS. The entire contents of this Annual Report also appear on the IVS Web site at http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications/ar2008.

  5. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry 2011 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baver, Karen D. (Editor); Behrend, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    This volume of reports is the 2011 Annual Report of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS). The individual reports were contributed by VLBI groups in the international geodetic and astrometric community who constitute the components of IVS. The 2011 Annual Report documents the work of these IVS components over the period January 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011. The reports document changes, activities, and progress of the IVS. The entire contents of this Annual Report also appear on the IVS Web site at http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications/ar2011.

  6. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry 2005 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrend, Dirk (Editor); Baver, Karen D. (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    This volume of reports is the 2005 Annual Report of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS). The individual reports were contributed by VLBI groups in the international geodetic and astrometric community who constitute the components of IVS. The 2005 Annual Report documents the work of these IVS components over the period January 1, 2005 through December 31, 2005. The reports document changes, activities, and progress of the IVS. The entire contents of this Annual Report also appear on the IVS Web site at http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications/ar2005.

  7. Geodesy, a Bibliometric Approach for 2000-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, G.; Landeros, C. F.

    2007-12-01

    In recent years, bibliometric science has been frequently applied in the development and evaluation of scientific research. This work presents a bibliometric analysis for the research work performed in the field of geodesy "science of the measurement and mapping of the earth surface including its external gravity field". The objective of this work is to present a complete overview of the generated research on this field to assemble and study the most important publications occurred during the past seven years. The analysis was performed including the SCOPUS and WEB OF SCIENCE databases for all the geodetic scientific articles published between 2000 and 2006. The search profile was designed considering a strategy to seek for titles and article descriptors using the terms geodesy and geodetic and some other terms associated with the topics: geodetic surfaces, vertical measurements, reference systems and frames, modern space-geodetic techniques and satellite missions. Some preliminary results had been achieved specifically Bradford law of distribution for journals and education institutes, and Lotka's law for authors that also includes the cooperation between countries in terms of writing together scientific articles. In the particular case of distributions, the model suggested by Egghe (2002) was adopted for determining the cores.

  8. Space Geodesy Monitoring Mass Transport in Global Geophysical Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    2004-01-01

    Mass transports occurring in the atmosphere-hydrosphere-cryosphere-solid Earth-core system (the 'global geophysical fluids') are important geophysical phenomena. They occur on all temporal and spatial scales. Examples include air mass and ocean circulations, oceanic and solid tides, hydrological water and idsnow redistribution, mantle processes such as post-glacial rebound, earthquakes and tectonic motions, and core geodynamo activities. The temporal history and spatial pattern of such mass transport are often not amenable to direct observations. Space geodesy techniques, however, have proven to be an effective tool in monitorihg certain direct consequences of the mass transport, including Earth's rotation variations, gravitational field variations, and the geocenter motion. Considerable advances have been made in recent years in observing and understanding of these geodynamic effects. This paper will use several prominent examples to illustrate the triumphs in research over the past years under a 'Moore's law' in space geodesy. New space missions and projects promise to further advance our knowledge about the global mass transports. The latter contributes to our understanding of the geophysical processes that produce and regulate the mass transports, as well as of the solid Earth's response to such changes in terms of Earth's mechanical properties.

  9. Improvements in Space Geodesy Data Discovery at the CDDIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, C.; Pollack, N.; Michael, P.

    2011-01-01

    The Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS) supports data archiving and distribution activities for the space geodesy and geodynamics community. The main objectives of the system are to store space geodesy and geodynamics related data products in a central data bank. to maintain information about the archival of these data, and to disseminate these data and information in a timely manner to a global scientific research community. The archive consists of GNSS, laser ranging, VLBI, and DORIS data sets and products derived from these data. The CDDIS is one of NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) distributed data centers; EOSDIS data centers serve a diverse user community and arc tasked to provide facilities to search and access science data and products. Several activities are currently under development at the CDDIS to aid users in data discovery, both within the current community and beyond. The CDDIS is cooperating in the development of Geodetic Seamless Archive Centers (GSAC) with colleagues at UNAVCO and SIO. TIle activity will provide web services to facilitate data discovery within and across participating archives. In addition, the CDDIS is currently implementing modifications to the metadata extracted from incoming data and product files pushed to its archive. These enhancements will permit information about COOlS archive holdings to be made available through other data portals such as Earth Observing System (EOS) Clearinghouse (ECHO) and integration into the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) portal.

  10. NASA space geodesy program: Catalogue of site information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, M. A.; Noll, C. E.

    1993-01-01

    This is the first edition of the NASA Space Geodesy Program: Catalogue of Site Information. This catalogue supersedes all previous versions of the Crustal Dynamics Project: Catalogue of Site Information, last published in May 1989. This document is prepared under the direction of the Space Geodesy and Altimetry Projects Office (SGAPO), Code 920.1, Goddard Space Flight Center. SGAPO has assumed the responsibilities of the Crustal Dynamics Project, which officially ended December 31, 1991. The catalog contains information on all NASA supported sites as well as sites from cooperating international partners. This catalog is designed to provde descriptions and occupation histories of high-accuracy geodetic measuring sites employing space-related techniques. The emphasis of the catalog has been in the past, and continues to be with this edition, station information for facilities and remote locations utilizing the Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR), Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR), and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) techniques. With the proliferation of high-quality Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers and Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) transponders, many co-located at established SLR and VLBI observatories, the requirement for accurate station and localized survey information for an ever broadening base of scientists and engineers has been recognized. It is our objective to provide accurate station information to scientific groups interested in these facilities.

  11. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry: General Meeting Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Nancy R. (Editor); Baver, Karen D. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the second General Meeting of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS), held in Tsukuba, Japan, February 4-7, 2002. The contents of this volume also appear on the IVS Web site at http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications/gm2002. The key-note of the second GM was prospectives for the future, in keeping with the re-organization of the IAG around the motivation of geodesy as 'an old science with a dynamic future' and noting that providing reference frames for Earth system science that are consistent over decades on the highest accuracy level will provide a challenging role for IVS. The goal of the meeting was to provide an interesting and informative program for a wide cross section of IVS members, including station operators, program managers, and analysts. This volume contains 72 papers and five abstracts of papers presented at the GM. The volume also includes reports about three splinter meetings held in conjunction with the GM: a mini-TOW (Technical Operations Workshop), the third IVS Analysis Workshop and a meeting of the analysis working group on geophysical modeling.

  12. [Surveying a zoological facility through satellite-based geodesy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böer, M; Thien, W; Tölke, D

    2000-06-01

    In the course of a thesis submitted for a diploma degree within the Fachhochschule Oldenburg the Serengeti Safaripark was surveyed in autumn and winter 1996/97 laying in the planning foundations for the application for licences from the controlling authorities. Taking into consideration the special way of keeping animals in the Serengeti Safaripark (game ranching, spacious walk-through-facilities) the intention was to employ the outstanding satellite based geodesy. This technology relies on special aerials receiving signals from 24 satellites which circle around the globe. These data are being gathered and examined. This examination produces the exact position of this aerial in a system of coordinates which allows depicting this point on a map. This procedure was used stationary (from a strictly defined point) as well as in the movement (in a moving car). Additionally conventional procedures were used when the satellite based geodesy came to its limits. Finally a detailed map of the Serengeti Safaripark was created which shows the position and size of stables and enclosures as well as wood and water areas and the sectors of the leisure park. Furthermore the established areas of the enclosures together with an already existing animal databank have flown into an information system with the help of which the stock of animals can be managed enclosure-orientated.

  13. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry: 1999 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Nancy R. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This volume of reports is the 1999 Annual Report of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry -IVS. The individual reports were contributed by VLBI groups in the international geodetic community who constitute the components of IVS. The 1999 Annual Report documents the work of the IVS components for the year ending March 1, 1999, the official inauguration date of IVS. As the newest of the space technique services, IVS decided to publish this Annual Report as a reference to our organization and its components. The entire contents of this Annual Report also appear on the IVS website at: http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/pub/arl999. The IVS 1999 Annual Report will be a valuable reference for information about IVS and its components. This Annual Report will serve as a baseline from which we can measure the anticipated progress of IVS in coming years.

  14. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry 2012 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baver, Karen D.; Behrend, Dirk; Armstrong, Kyla L.

    2013-01-01

    This volume of reports is the 2012 Annual Report of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS). The individual reports were contributed by VLBI groups in the international geodetic and astrometric community who constitute the permanent components of IVS. The IVS 2012 Annual Report documents the work of the IVS components for the calendar year 2012, our fourteenth year of existence. The reports describe changes, activities, and progress ofthe IVS. Many thanks to all IVS components who contributed to this Annual Report. With the exception of the first section and parts of the last section (described below), the contents of this Annual Report also appear on the IVS Web site athttp:ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications/ar2012

  15. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry 2013 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baver, Karen D.; Behrend, Dirk; Armstrong, Kyla L.

    2014-01-01

    This volume of reports is the 2013 Annual Report of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS). The individual reports were contributed by VLBI groups in the international geodetic and astrometric community who constitute the permanent components of IVS. The IVS 2013 Annual Report documents the work of the IVS components for the calendar year 2013, our fifteenth year of existence. The reports describe changes, activities, and progress of the IVS. Many thanks to all IVS components who contributed to this Annual Report. With the exception of the first section and the last section, the contents of this Annual Report also appear on the IVS Web site at http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications/ar2013.

  16. How the continents deform: The evidence from tectonic geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Wayne R.

    2009-01-01

    Space geodesy now provides quantitative maps of the surface velocity field within tectonically active regions, supplying constraints on the spatial distribution of deformation, the forces that drive it, and the brittle and ductile properties of continental lithosphere. Deformation is usefully described as relative motions among elastic blocks and is block-like because major faults are weaker than adjacent intact crust. Despite similarities, continental block kinematics differs from global plate tectonics: blocks are much smaller, typically ∼100–1000 km in size; departures from block rigidity are sometimes measurable; and blocks evolve over ∼1–10 Ma timescales, particularly near their often geometrically irregular boundaries. Quantitatively relating deformation to the forces that drive it requires simplifying assumptions about the strength distribution in the lithosphere. If brittle/elastic crust is strongest, interactions among blocks control the deformation. If ductile lithosphere is the stronger, its flow properties determine the surface deformation, and a continuum approach is preferable.

  17. CAS CERN Accelerator School: Applied geodesy for particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, S.

    1987-01-01

    This specialized course addresses the many topics involved in the application of geodesy to large particle accelerators, though many of the techniques described are equally applicable to large construction projects and surveillance systems where the highest possible surveying accuracies are required. The course reflects the considerable experience gained over many years, not only at CERN but in projects all over the world. The methods described range from the latest approach using satellites to recent developments in conventional techniques. They include the global positioning system (GPS), its development, deployment and precision, the use of the Terrameter and the combination or comparison of its results with those of the GPS, the automation of instruments, the management of measurements and data, and the highly evolved treatment of the observations. (orig.)

  18. Sciences of geodesy II innovations and future developments

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Guochang

    2014-01-01

    This series of reference books describes the sciences of different fields in and around geodesy. Each chapter, is written by experts in the respective fields and covers an individual field and describes the history, theory, the objective, the technology, and the development, the highlight of the research, the applications, the problems, as well as future directions. Contents of Volume II include: Geodetic LEO Satellite Missions, Satellite Altimetry, Airborne Lidar, GNSS Software Receiver, Geodetic Boundary Problem, GPS and INS, VLBI, Geodetic Reference Systems, Spectral Analysis, Earth Tide and Ocean Loading Tide, Remote Sensing, Photogrammetry, Occultation, Geopotential Determination, Geoid Determination, Local Gravity Field, Geopotential Determination, Magnet Field, Mobile Mapping, General Relativity, Wide-area Precise Positioning etc.

  19. Establishing a Modern Ground Network for Space Geodesy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, M.; Pavlis, E.; Altamimi, Z.; Noll, C.

    2010-01-01

    Ground-based networks of co-located space-geodesy techniques (VLBI, SLR, GLASS, DORIS) are the basis for the development and maintenance of the :International Terrestrial deference Frame (ITRE), which is the basis for our metric measurements of global change. The Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) within the International Association of Geodesy has established a task to develop a strategy to design, integrate and maintain the fundamental geodetic network and supporting infrastructure in a sustainable way to satisfy the long-term requirements for the reference frame. The GGOS goal is an origin definition at I mm or better and a temporal stability on the order of 0.1 mm/y, with similar numbers for the scale and orientation components. These goals are based on scientific requirements to address sea level rise with confidence. As a first step, simulations focused on establishing the optimal global SLR and VLBI network, since these two techniques alone are sufficient to define the reference frame. The GLASS constellations will then distribute the reference frame to users anywhere on the Earth. Using simulated data to be collected by the future networks, we investigated various designs and the resulting accuracy in the origin, scale and orientation of the resulting ITRF. We present here the results of extensive simulation studies aimed at designing optimal global geodetic networks to support GGOS science products. Current estimates are the network will require 24 - 32 globally distributed co-location sites. Stations in the near global network will require geologically stable sites witla good weather, established infrastructure, and local support and personnel. EGOS will seek groups that are interested in participation. GGOS intends to issues a Call for Participation of groups that would like to take part in the network implementation and operation_ Some examples of integrated stations currently in operation or under development will be presented. We will examine

  20. Space geodesy validation of the global lithospheric flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, M.; Cuffaro, M.; Doglioni, C.; Giannone, F.; Riguzzi, F.

    2007-02-01

    Space geodesy data are used to verify whether plates move chaotically or rather follow a sort of tectonic mainstream. While independent lines of geological evidence support the existence of a global ordered flow of plate motions that is westerly polarized, the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF) presents limitations in describing absolute plate motions relative to the mantle. For these reasons we jointly estimated a new plate motions model and three different solutions of net lithospheric rotation. Considering the six major plate boundaries and variable source depths of the main Pacific hotspots, we adapted the TRF plate kinematics by global space geodesy to absolute plate motions models with respect to the mantle. All three reconstructions confirm (i) the tectonic mainstream and (ii) the net rotation of the lithosphere. We still do not know the precise trend of this tectonic flow and the velocity of the differential rotation. However, our results show that assuming faster Pacific motions, as the asthenospheric source of the hotspots would allow, the best lithospheric net rotation estimate is 13.4 +/- 0.7 cm yr-1. This superfast solution seems in contradiction with present knowledge on the lithosphere decoupling, but it matches remarkably better with the geological constraints than those retrieved with slower Pacific motion and net rotation estimates. Assuming faster Pacific motion, it is shown that all plates move orderly `westward' along the tectonic mainstream at different velocities and the equator of the lithospheric net rotation lies inside the corresponding tectonic mainstream latitude band (~ +/-7°), defined by the 1σ confidence intervals.

  1. Digital Mapping Charting and Geodesy analysis Program (DMAP) Review of Technical Initiatives for FY03

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Breckenridge, John

    2003-01-01

    The Naval DMAP serves as a technical representative for the Oceanographer of the Navy, NO96 to address significant issues relevant to the Navy's use and development of digital Mapping, Charting & Geodesy (MC&G) data...

  2. VLBI: A Fascinating Technique for Geodesy and Astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, H.; Behrend, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Since the 1970s Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) has proven to be a primary space-geodetic technique by determining precise coordinates on the Earth, by monitoring the variable Earth rotation and orientation with highest precision, and by deriving many other parameters of the Earth system. VLBI provides an important linkage to astronomy through, for instance, the determination of very precise coordinates of extragalactic radio sources. Additionally, it contributes to determining parameters of relativistic and cosmological models. After a short review of the history of geodetic VLBI and a summary of recent results, this paper describes future perspectives of this fascinating technique. The International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS), as a service of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) and the International Astronomical Union (IAU), is well on its way to fully defining a next generation VLBI system, called VLBI2010. The goals of the new system are to achieve on scales up to the size of the Earth an accuracy of 1 mm in position and of 0.1 mm/year in velocity. Continuous observations shall be carried out 24 h per day 7 days per week in the future with initial results to be delivered within 24 h after taking the data. Special sessions, e.g. for monitoring the Earth rotation parameters, will provide the results in near real-time. These goals require a completely new technical and conceptual design of VLBI measurements. Based on extensive simulation studies, strategies have been developed by the IVS to significantly improve its product accuracy through the use of a network of small (approx 12 m) fast-slewing antennas. A new method for generating high precision delay measurements as well as improved methods for handling biases related to radio source structure, system electronics, and deformations of the antenna structures has been developed. Furthermore, as of January 2012, the construction of ten new VLBI2010 sites has been funded, with

  3. Geodesy and metrology with a transportable optical clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotti, Jacopo; Koller, Silvio; Vogt, Stefan; Häfner, Sebastian; Sterr, Uwe; Lisdat, Christian; Denker, Heiner; Voigt, Christian; Timmen, Ludger; Rolland, Antoine; Baynes, Fred N.; Margolis, Helen S.; Zampaolo, Michel; Thoumany, Pierre; Pizzocaro, Marco; Rauf, Benjamin; Bregolin, Filippo; Tampellini, Anna; Barbieri, Piero; Zucco, Massimo; Costanzo, Giovanni A.; Clivati, Cecilia; Levi, Filippo; Calonico, Davide

    2018-05-01

    Optical atomic clocks, due to their unprecedented stability1-3 and uncertainty3-6, are already being used to test physical theories7,8 and herald a revision of the International System of Units9,10. However, to unlock their potential for cross-disciplinary applications such as relativistic geodesy11, a major challenge remains: their transformation from highly specialized instruments restricted to national metrology laboratories into flexible devices deployable in different locations12-14. Here, we report the first field measurement campaign with a transportable 87Sr optical lattice clock12. We use it to determine the gravity potential difference between the middle of a mountain and a location 90 km away, exploiting both local and remote clock comparisons to eliminate potential clock errors. A local comparison with a 171Yb lattice clock15 also serves as an important check on the international consistency of independently developed optical clocks. This campaign demonstrates the exciting prospects for transportable optical clocks.

  4. 3rd Course of the International School of Advanced Geodesy

    CERN Document Server

    Sansò, Fernando

    1985-01-01

    During the period April 25th to May 10th, 1984 the 3rd Course of the International School of Advanced Geodesy entitled "Optimization and Design of Geodetic Networks" took place in Erice. The main subject of the course is clear from the title and consisted mainly of that particular branch of network analysis, which results from applying general concepts of mathematical optimization to the design of geodetic networks. As al­ ways when dealing with optimization problems, there is an a-priori choice of the risk (or gain) function which should be minimized (or maximized) according to the specific interest of the "designer", which might be either of a scientific or of an economic nature or even of both. These aspects have been reviewed in an intro­ ductory lecture in which the particular needs arising in a geodetic context and their analytical representations are examined. Subsequently the main body of the optimization problem, which has been conven­ tionally divided into zero, first, second and third order desi...

  5. Research-related intercultural higher education in satellite geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, M.; Heck, B.; Krueger, C. P.

    2009-04-01

    In order to improve the education of young researchers (master degree, PhD, PostDocs) a cooperation between the Department of Geomatics (DGEOM), Federal University of Paraná (UFPR), Curitiba (Brazil) and the Geodetic Institute (GIK), University Karlsruhe (TH), Karlsruhe (Germany) was established which now exists since more than five years. The joint venture is actually called "PROBRAL: Precise positioning and height determination by means of GPS: Modeling of errors and transformation into physical heights" and focuses on research and education within the field of satellite geodesy. PROBRAL is funded by the Brazilian academic exchange service CAPES and the German academic exchange service DAAD. The geodetic aim of the research project is to validate and improve the quality of 3d positions derived from observations related to satellite navigation systems like GPS. In order to fulfill this ambitious goal sustainably, research has to be carried out in close cooperation. At the same time, e.g. to guarantee continuous success, a coordinated education has to be ensured. Besides technical education aspects key competences (e.g. language, capacity for teamwork, project management skills) are trained. Within the presentation the lessons which were learned from this project are discussed in detail.

  6. Linear homotopy solution of nonlinear systems of equations in geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paláncz, Béla; Awange, Joseph L.; Zaletnyik, Piroska; Lewis, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental task in geodesy is solving systems of equations. Many geodetic problems are represented as systems of multivariate polynomials. A common problem in solving such systems is improper initial starting values for iterative methods, leading to convergence to solutions with no physical meaning, or to convergence that requires global methods. Though symbolic methods such as Groebner bases or resultants have been shown to be very efficient, i.e., providing solutions for determined systems such as 3-point problem of 3D affine transformation, the symbolic algebra can be very time consuming, even with special Computer Algebra Systems (CAS). This study proposes the Linear Homotopy method that can be implemented easily in high-level computer languages like C++ and Fortran that are faster than CAS by at least two orders of magnitude. Using Mathematica, the power of Homotopy is demonstrated in solving three nonlinear geodetic problems: resection, GPS positioning, and affine transformation. The method enlarging the domain of convergence is found to be efficient, less sensitive to rounding of numbers, and has lower complexity compared to other local methods like Newton-Raphson.

  7. Seafloor geodesy: Measuring surface deformation and strain-build up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Heidrun; Lange, Dietrich; Hannemann, Katrin; Petersen, Florian

    2017-04-01

    Seafloor deformation is intrinsically related to tectonic processes, which potentially may evolve into geohazards, including earthquakes and tsunamis. The nascent scientific field of seafloor geodesy provides a way to monitor crustal deformation at high resolution comparable to the satellite-based GPS technique upon which terrestrial geodesy is largely based. The measurements extract information on stress and elastic strain stored in the oceanic crust. Horizontal seafloor displacement can be obtained by acoustic/GPS combination to provide absolute positioning or by long-term acoustic telemetry between different beacons fixed on the seafloor. The GeoSEA (Geodetic Earthquake Observatory on the SEAfloor) array uses acoustic telemetry for relative positioning at mm-scale resolution. The transponders within an array intercommunicate via acoustic signals for a period of up to 3.5 years. The seafloor acoustic transponders are mounted on 4 m high tripod steel frames to ensure clear line-of-sight between the stations. The transponders also include high-precision pressure sensors to monitor vertical movements and dual-axis inclinometers in order to measure their level as well as any tilt of the seafloor. Sound velocity sensor measurements are used to correct for water sound speed variations. A further component of the network is GeoSURF, a self-steering autonomous surface vehicle (Wave Glider), which monitors system health and is able to upload the seafloor data to the sea surface and to transfer it via satellite. The GeoSEA array is capable of both continuously monitoring horizontal and vertical ground displacement rates along submarine fault zones and characterizing their behavior (locked or aseismically creeping). Seafloor transponders are currently installed along the Siliviri segment of the North Anatolian Fault offshore Istanbul for measurements of strain build-up along the fault. The first 18 month of baseline ranging were analyzed by a joint-least square inversion

  8. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry 2000 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, N. R. (Editor); Baver, K. D. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This volume of reports is the 2000 Annual Report of the International Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS). The individual reports were contributed by VLBI groups in the international geodetic and astrometric community who constitute the permanent components of IVS. The IVS 2000 Annual Report documents the work of the IVS components for the period March 1, 1999 (the official inauguration date of IVS) through December 31, 2000. The reports document changes, activities, and progress of the IVS. The entire contents of this Annual Report also appear on the IVS web site at http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications/ar2000. This book and the web site are organized as follows: (1) The first section contains general information about IVS, a map showing the location of the components, information about the Directing Board members, and the report of the IVS Chair; (2) The second section of Special Reports contains a status report of the IVS Working Group on GPS phase center mapping, a reproduction of the resolution making IVS a Service of the International Astronomical Union (IAU), and a reprint of the VLBI Standard Interface (VSI); (3) The next seven sections hold the component reports from the Coordinators, Network Stations, Operation Centers, Correlators, Data Centers, Analysis Centers, and Technology Development Centers; and (4) The last section includes reference information about IVS: the Terms of Reference, the lists of Member and Affiliated organizations, the IVS Associate Member list, a complete list of IVS components, the list of institutions contributing to this report, and a list of acronyms. The 2000 Annual Report demonstrates the vitality of the IVS and the outstanding progress we have made during our first 22 months.

  9. Geodesy and the UNAVCO Consortium: Three Decades of Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, L. R.; Miller, M. M.; Meertens, C. M.; Mattioli, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    UNAVCO, a non-profit, university consortium that supports geoscience research using geodesy, began with the ingenious recognition that the nascent Global Positioning System constellation (GPS) could be used to investigate earth processes. The consortium purchased one of the first commercially available GPS receivers, Texas Instrument's TI-4100 NAVSTAR Navigator, in 1984 to measure plate deformation. This early work was highlighted in a technology magazine, GPSWorld, in 1990. Over a 30-year period, UNAVCO and the community have helped advance instrument design for mobility, flexibility, efficiency and interoperability, so research could proceed with higher precision and under ever challenging conditions. Other innovations have been made in data collection, processing, analysis, management and archiving. These innovations in tools, methods and data have had broader impacts as they have found greater utility beyond research for timing, precise positioning, safety, communication, navigation, surveying, engineering and recreation. Innovations in research have expanded the utility of geodetic tools beyond the solid earth science through creative analysis of the data and the methods. For example, GPS sounding of the atmosphere is now used for atmospheric and space sciences. GPS reflectrometry, another critical advance, supports soil science, snow science and ecological research. Some research advances have had broader impacts for society by driving innovations in hazards risk reduction, hazards response, resource management, land use planning, surveying, engineering and other uses. Furthermore, the geodetic data is vital for the design of space missions, testing and advancing communications, and testing and dealing with interference and GPS jamming. We will discuss three decades (and counting) of advances by the National Science Foundation's premiere geodetic facility, consortium and some of the many geoscience principal investigators that have driven innovations in

  10. The New Geodesy: A Powerful Tool in the Mitigation of Natural Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBrecque, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    Geodesy has transitioned from a little understood arcane science into an indispensible tool that is used by most citizens in their everyday lives. Who does not use GNSS to navigate with little thought to the contributions of geodecists, physicists and the technological marvels that made this possible. Less understood is how geodetic science and technology is transforming our approach to disaster warning and mitigation. Space Geodesy and the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are directly impacting the effectiveness and efficiency of understanding, preparedness and response in such disparate areas as weather, water resources, earthquakes, climate change impacts, soil moisture, land cover, and tsunami early warning. However, the full benefits of geodesy to society cannot be achieved without international accords and investments to access the full spectrum geodetic information with minimal latency.

  11. Preparation and concept of geodesy work on the Temelin nuclear power plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincik, K.; Zdobinsky, J.

    1989-01-01

    Listed are the main partners in the Temelin nuclear power plant construction (investor, general designer, building and equipment parts suppliers), the main specifications of the power plant, the layout of buildings, the types of construction documentation, and the concept of geodesy work. A network was laid out comprising 9 points and a local coordinate system and an elevation system for design work were determined. Within the layout, a network of basic elevation points with depth stabilization and a starting 6-point level network were proposed. The updating is described of the layout network and of the organization of geodesy work during the construction of the Temelin nuclear power plant. (E.J.)

  12. Studying geodesy and earthquake hazard in and around the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Oliver Salz; Magistrale, Harold

    2011-01-01

    Workshop on New Madrid Geodesy and the Challenges of Understanding Intraplate Earthquakes; Norwood, Massachusetts, 4 March 2011 Twenty-six researchers gathered for a workshop sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and FM Global to discuss geodesy in and around the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) and its relation to earthquake hazards. The group addressed the challenge of reconciling current geodetic measurements, which show low present-day surface strain rates, with paleoseismic evidence of recent, relatively frequent, major earthquakes in the region. The workshop presentations and conclusions will be available in a forthcoming USGS open-file report (http://pubs.usgs.gov).

  13. [Value of the space perception test for evaluation of the aptitude for precision work in geodesy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remlein-Mozolewska, G

    1982-01-01

    The visual spatial localization ability of geodesy and cartography - employers and of the pupils trained for the mentioned profession has been examined. The examination has been based on work duration and the time of its performance. A correlation between the localization ability and the precision of the hand - movements required in everyday work has been proven. The better the movement precision, the more efficient the visual spatial localization. The length of work has not been significant. The test concerned appeared to be highly useful in geodesy for qualifying workers for the posts requiring good hands efficiency.

  14. RFI Mitigation and Testing Employed at GGAO for NASA's Space Geodesy Project (SGP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, L. M.; Rajagopalan, Ganesh; Turner, Charles; Stevenson, Thomas; Bulcha, Berhanu

    2017-01-01

    Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) Mitigation at Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory (GGAO) has been addressed in three different ways by NASA's Space Geodesy Project (SGP); masks, blockers, and filters. All of these techniques will be employed at the GGAO, to mitigate the RFI consequences to the Very Long Baseline Interferometer.

  15. CDDIS: NASA's Archive of Space Geodesy Data and Products Supporting GGOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Carey; Michael, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS) supports data archiving and distribution activities for the space geodesy and geodynamics community. The main objectives of the system are to store space geodesy and geodynamics related data and products in a central archive, to maintain information about the archival of these data,to disseminate these data and information in a timely manner to a global scientific research community, and provide user based tools for the exploration and use of the archive. The CDDIS data system and its archive is a key component in several of the geometric services within the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) and its observing systemthe Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS), including the IGS, the International DORIS Service (IDS), the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS), the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS), and the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS). The CDDIS provides on-line access to over 17 Tbytes of dataand derived products in support of the IAG services and GGOS. The systems archive continues to grow and improve as new activities are supported and enhancements are implemented. Recently, the CDDIS has established a real-time streaming capability for GNSS data and products. Furthermore, enhancements to metadata describing the contents ofthe archive have been developed to facilitate data discovery. This poster will provide a review of the improvements in the system infrastructure that CDDIS has made over the past year for the geodetic community and describe future plans for the system.

  16. Ensuring Credit to Data Creators: A Case Study for Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boler, F. M.; Gorman, A.

    2011-12-01

    facilitate citation for the purpose of ensuring credit to the data creators. UNAVCO's archiving and metadata management systems are generally well-suited to assigning and maintaining DOIs for two styles of logical collections of data: campaigns, which are spatially and temporally well-defined; and stations, which represent ongoing collection at a single spatial position at the Earth's surface. These two styles form the basis for implementing approximately 3,000 DOIs that can encompass the current holdings in the UNAVCO Archive. In addition, aggregations of DOIs into a superset DOI is advantageous for numerous cases where groupings of stations are naturally used in research studies. There are about 100 such natural collections of stations. However, research using GNSS data can also utilize several hundred or more stations in unique combinations, where tallying the individual DOIs within a reference list is cumbersome. We are grappling with the complexities that inevitably crop up when assigning DOIs, including subsetting, versioning, and aggregating. We also foresee the need for mechanisms for users to go beyond our predefined collections and/or aggregations to define their own ad-hoc collections. Our goal is to create a system for DOI assignment and utilization that succeeds in facilitating data citation within our community of geodesy scientists.

  17. New Collaboration Among Geodesy Data Centers in Europe and the US Facilitates Data Discovery and Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boler, Fran; Wier, Stuart; D'Agostino, Nicola; Fernandes, Rui R. M.; Ganas, Athanassios; Bruyninx, Carine; Ofeigsson, Benedikt

    2014-05-01

    COOPEUS, the European Union project to strengthen the cooperation between the US and the EU in the field of environmental research infrastructures, is linking the US NSF-supported geodesy Facility at UNAVCO with the European Plate Observing System (EPOS) in joint research infrastructure enhancement activities that will ultimately advance international geodesy data discovery and access. (COOPEUS also links a broad set of additional EU and US based Earth, oceans, and environmental science research entities in joint research infrastructure enhancement activities.) The UNAVCO Data Center in Boulder, Colorado, archives for preservation and distributes geodesy data and products, including hosting GNSS data from 2,500 continuously operating stations around the globe. UNAVCO is only one of several hundred data centers worldwide hosting GNSS data, which are valuable for scientific research, education, hazards assessment and monitoring, and emergency management. However, the disparate data holdings structures, metadata encodings, and infrastructures at these data centers represent a significant obstacle to use by scientists, government entities, educators and the public. Recently a NASA-funded project at UNAVCO and two partner geodesy data centers in the US (CDDIS and SOPAC) has successfully designed and implemented software for simplified data search and access called the Geodesy Seamless Archive Centers (GSAC). GSAC is a web services based technology that is intended to be simple to install and run for most geodesy data centers. The GSAC services utilize a repository layer and a service layer to identify and present both the required metadata elements along with any data center-specific services and capabilities. In addition to enabling web services and related capabilities at the data center level, GSAC repository code can be implemented to federate two or more GSAC-enabled data centers wishing to present a unified search and access capability to their user community. In

  18. Solving algebraic computational problems in geodesy and geoinformatics the answer to modern challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Awange, Joseph L

    2004-01-01

    While preparing and teaching 'Introduction to Geodesy I and II' to - dergraduate students at Stuttgart University, we noticed a gap which motivated the writing of the present book: Almost every topic that we taughtrequiredsomeskillsinalgebra,andinparticular,computeral- bra! From positioning to transformation problems inherent in geodesy and geoinformatics, knowledge of algebra and application of computer algebra software were required. In preparing this book therefore, we haveattemptedtoputtogetherbasicconceptsofabstractalgebra which underpin the techniques for solving algebraic problems. Algebraic c- putational algorithms useful for solving problems which require exact solutions to nonlinear systems of equations are presented and tested on various problems. Though the present book focuses mainly on the two ?elds,theconceptsand techniquespresented hereinarenonetheless- plicable to other ?elds where algebraic computational problems might be encountered. In Engineering for example, network densi?cation and robo...

  19. An overview of remote sensing and geodesy for epidemiology and public health application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, S I

    2000-01-01

    The techniques of remote sensing (RS) and geodesy have the potential to revolutionize the discipline of epidemiology and its application in human health. As a new departure from conventional epidemiological methods, these techniques require some detailed explanation. This review provides the theoretical background to RS including (i) its physical basis, (ii) an explanation of the orbital characteristics and specifications of common satellite sensor systems, (iii) details of image acquisition and procedures adopted to overcome inherent sources of data degradation, and (iv) a background to geophysical data preparation. This information allows RS applications in epidemiology to be readily interpreted. Some of the techniques used in geodesy, to locate features precisely on Earth so that they can be registered to satellite sensor-derived images, are also included. While the basic principles relevant to public health are presented here, inevitably many of the details must be left to specialist texts.

  20. Application of artificial intelligence in Geodesy - A review of theoretical foundations and practical examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiterer, Alexander; Egly, Uwe; Vicovac, Tanja; Mai, Enrico; Moafipoor, Shahram; Grejner-Brzezinska, Dorota A.; Toth, Charles K.

    2010-12-01

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is one of the key technologies in many of today's novel applications. It is used to add knowledge and reasoning to systems. This paper illustrates a review of AI methods including examples of their practical application in Geodesy like data analysis, deformation analysis, navigation, network adjustment, and optimization of complex measurement procedures. We focus on three examples, namely, a geo-risk assessment system supported by a knowledge-base, an intelligent dead reckoning personal navigator, and evolutionary strategies for the determination of Earth gravity field parameters. Some of the authors are members of IAG Sub-Commission 4.2 - Working Group 4.2.3, which has the main goal to study and report on the application of AI in Engineering Geodesy.

  1. Project for the Space Science in Moscow State University of Geodesy and Cartography (MIIGAiK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, M.; Oberst, J.; Malinnikov, V.; Shingareva, K.; Grechishchev, A.; Karachevtseva, I.; Konopikhin, A.

    2012-04-01

    Introduction: Based on the proposal call of the Government of Russian Federation 40 of international scientists came to Russia for developing and support-ing research capabilities of national educational institutions. Moscow State University of Geodesy and Cartography (MIIGAiK) and invited scientist Prof. Dr. Jurgen Oberst were awarded a grant to establish a capable research facility concerned with Planetary Geodesy, Cartography and Space Exploration. Objectives: The goals of the project are to build laboratory infrastructure, and suitable capability for MIIGAiK to participate in the planning, execution and analyses of data from future Russian planetary mis-sions and also to integrate into the international science community. Other important tasks are to develop an attractive work place and job opportunities for planetary geodesy and cartography students. For this purposes new MIIGAiK Extraterrestrial Laboratory (MExLab) was organized. We involved professors, researchers, PhD students in to the projects of Moon and planets exploration at the new level of Russian Space Science development. Main results: MExLab team prepare data for upcom-ing Russian space missions, such as LUNA-GLOB and LUNA-RESOURSE. We established cooperation with Russian and international partners (IKI, ESA, DLR, and foreign Universities) and actively participated in international conferences and workshops. Future works: For the future science development we investigated the old Soviet Archives and received the access to the telemetry data of the Moon rovers Lunokhod-1 and Lunokhod-2. That data will be used in education purposes and could be the perfect base for the analysis, development and support in new Russian and international missions and especially Moon exploration projects. MExLab is open to cooperate and make the consortiums for science projects for the Moon and planets exploration. Acknowledgement: Works are funded by the Rus-sian Government (Project name: "Geodesy, cartography and the

  2. A Lifetime of Geodesy and Geophysics: In Rememberence of Bill Kaula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David E.

    2000-01-01

    In the early 1960's the secrets that knowledge of the Earth's gravity field would eventually reveal about the processes that govern our planet were yet to be appreciated. It was the beginning of a new science known as space geodesy, which arose at a time when most efforts were devoted to understanding how to extract precise measurements of Earth structure and motions from an orbiting spacecraft. Bill Kaula was central to that beginning and showed the way for many who were to follow, both in time and in the development of approaches most likely to yield results. Bill laid out the theory, analyzed the data, and argued strenuously for a spacecraft mission devoted to measuring gravity to make it all come true in the way he knew it really could. That mission, GRACE, was a long time coming and Bill would not see its final staging, but his influence in making it happen was everywhere. With time, the concepts for measuring the static gravity field of the Earth and terrestrial planets became well advanced, although not universally agreed upon, and certainly not by Bill, who was always eager to argue and challenge traditional methods and thinking. The extension of space geodetic techniques to the planets and the development of new techniques to measure time variations in gravity have recently brought geodesy even closer to the geophysical processes that Bill sought to understand. This presentation will contain a little geodesy, a little history, and a little reminiscing about the leader in our field.

  3. UNAVCO: A Decade Supporting EarthScope - Three Decades of Supporting Geodesy for Science Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M.

    2013-12-01

    UNAVCO supports research that establishes Earth's reference frame, enabling mapping of the planet's shape and mass; determines changes in the distribution of ice, water resources, and sea level; characterizes processes that contribute to natural and man-made hazards; and recognizes land-use changes (including subsidence, soil moisture, and health of wetlands). UNAVCO began as an investigator cooperative in 1984 - with the goal of sharing equipment and technologies that were expensive, rapidly changing, and extraordinarily powerful. Today as NSF's National Earth Science Geodetic Facility, on the eve of our 30th anniversary, we are excited to highlight a decade of support for major components of EarthScope, especially the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO). Innovations by UNAVCO and the UNAVCO community have supported steady advancement towards millimeter-level global geodesy. Modern space geodesy provides new observational capability for contemporary deformation and magmatism in active convergent margin systems that operate over a spectrum of temporal and spatial scales, especially the PBO. Time scales vary from seconds to millennia, and spatial scales from borehole nanostrains to the global plate circuit. High-precision strain or 3-D point observations with borehole strainmeter or Global Positioning System (GPS) observations and geodetic imaging with SAR and LiDAR are used in combination to reveal these complex systems. GPS now combines with strong ground motion accelerometer time series to provide important enhancements to conventional seismology. The resulting 3-D fully georeferenced dynamic positioning time series are free of ambiguities associated with seismometer tilt and displacement. Geodesy constrains plate kinematics for convergence rate and direction, co-seismic deformation during great and moderate earthquakes, episodic tremor and slip events and related transient deformation, tectono-magmatic interactions, and the possible triggering effects of

  4. NASA Space Geodesy Program: GSFC data analysis, 1993. VLBI geodetic results 1979 - 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chopo; Ryan, James W.; Caprette, Douglas S.

    1994-01-01

    The Goddard VLBI group reports the results of analyzing Mark 3 data sets acquired from 110 fixed and mobile observing sites through the end of 1992 and available to the Space Geodesy Program. Two large solutions were used to obtain site positions, site velocities, baseline evolution for 474 baselines, earth rotation parameters, nutation offsets, and radio source positions. Site velocities are presented in both geocentric Cartesian and topocentric coordinates. Baseline evolution is plotted for the 89 baselines that were observed in 1992 and positions at 1988.0 are presented for all fixed stations and mobile sites. Positions are also presented for quasar radio sources used in the solutions.

  5. Investigation of a geodesy coexperiment to the Gravity Probe B relativity gyroscope program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, C. W. F.; Parkinson, Bradford W.; Tapley, Mark

    1993-01-01

    Geodesy is the science of measuring the gravitational field of and positions on the Earth. Estimation of the gravitational field via gravitation gradiometry, the measurement of variations in the direction and magnitude of gravitation with respect to position, is this dissertation's focus. Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is a Stanford satellite experiment in gravitational physics. GP-B will measure the precession the rotating Earth causes on the space time around it by observing the precessions of four gyroscopes in a circular, polar, drag-free orbit at 650 km altitude. The gyroscopes are nearly perfect niobium-coated spheres of quartz, operating at 1.8 K to permit observations with extremely low thermal noise. The permissible gyroscope drift rate is miniscule, so the torques on the gyros must be tiny. A drag-free control system, by canceling accelerations caused by nongravitational forces, minimizes the support forces and hence torques. The GP-B system offers two main possibilities for geodesy. One is as a drag-free satellite to be used in trajectory-based estimates of the Earth's gravity field. We described calculations involving that approach in our previous reports, including comparison of laser only, GPS only, and combined tracking and a preliminary estimate of the possibility of estimating relativistic effects on the orbit. The second possibility is gradiometry. This technique has received a more cursory examination in previous reports, so we concentrate on it here. We explore the feasibility of using the residual suspension forces centering the GP-B gyros as gradiometer signals for geodesy. The objective of this work is a statistical prediction of the formal uncertainty in an estimate of the Earth's gravitation field using data from GP-B. We perform an instrument analysis and apply two mathematical techniques to predict uncertainty. One is an analytical approach using a flat-Earth approximation to predict geopotential information quality as a function of spatial

  6. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry 2004 General Meeting Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Nancy R. (Editor); Baver, Karen D. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    This volume is the proceedings of the third General Meeting of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astromctry IVS), held in Otlawa, Canada, February 9-11,2004. The keynote of the third GM was visions for the next decade following the main theme of "Today's Results and Tomorrow's Vision". with a recognition that the outstanding VLBI results available today are the foundation and motivation for the next generation VLBI system requirements. The goal of the meeting was to provide an interesting and informative program for a wide cross section of IVS members, including station operators, program managers, and analysts.

  7. Workshop on New Madrid geodesy and the challenges of understanding intraplate earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Oliver; Calais, Eric; Langbein, John; Magistrale, Harold; Stein, Seth; Zoback, Mark

    2013-01-01

    On March 4, 2011, 26 researchers gathered in Norwood, Massachusetts, for a workshop sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey and FM Global to discuss geodesy in and around the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) and its relation to earthquake hazard. The group addressed the challenge of reconciling current geodetic measurements, which show low present-day surface strain rates, with paleoseismic evidence of recent, relatively frequent, major earthquakes in the region. Several researchers were invited by the organizing committee to give overview presentations while all participants were encouraged to present their most recent ideas. The overview presentations appear in this report along with a set of recommendations.

  8. Education of geodesy and cartography at the School of Higher Education In National Economy In Kutno, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sledzinski, Janusz

    2013-04-01

    School of Higher (university degree) Education in National Economy in Kutno is one of the rather younger university schools in Poland that were established in the last years of the XX century. It was founded in 1998, but the convenient location of Kutno in Central Poland seems to be a good opportunity for students coming from all parts of Poland. The School is continuously developed, number of faculties and new study directions and specialisations are steadily growing. The offer of the School include studies in the stationary, extra-mural and post-graduate systems in two Engineering (or licenciate) and M.Sc. levels. At the moment the geodesy and cartography is a part of the Faculty of Technical Sciences; students can chose one of three specialisations: 1.Economic geodesy, property and estate management, 2. Rural (agriculture) geodesy and property engineering and 3. Geoinformatic sciences.

  9. Geodesy in construction of the Belchatow brown coal mine. Geodezja w budowie KWB Belchatow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poltoranos, J.

    1984-01-01

    Nine papers were delivered at the conference on geodesy in construction of the Belchatow brown coal mine held in October 1984 in Belchatow. Participants representing the Belchatow mine, Technical Institutes in Warsaw and Wroclaw, the Academy of Mining and Metallurgy im. Stanislaw Staszic in Cracow, the Central Mining Institute in Katowice, other research institutes in Poland and the Ministry of Mining and Power Generation attended the conference, sponsored by the Committee of Geodesy of the Polish Academy of Sciences. The following problems were discussed: types of geodetic measuring networks used in coal surface mining, criteria for optimization of geodetic measuring networks, kinematic problems in surveying displacements in coal mines, investigating strata movement in slopes of large and deep coal surface mines using geodetic surveying, mine surveying in the Belchatow mine, recommendations for amendment of regulations for geodetic surveying in coal surface mines in Poland, character of coal deposit in the Belchatow fault valley, its origin and geology, and causes of seismicity induced by mining in Belchatow. Eight papers have been abstracted separately.

  10. Development of web tools to disseminate space geodesy data-related products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudarin, Laurent; Ferrage, Pascale; Mezerette, Adrien

    2015-04-01

    In order to promote the products of the DORIS system, the French Space Agency CNES has developed and implemented on the web site of the International DORIS Service (IDS) a set of plot tools to interactively build and display time series of site positions, orbit residuals and terrestrial parameters (scale, geocenter). An interactive global map is also available to select sites, and to get access to their information. Besides the products provided by the CNES Orbitography Team and the IDS components, these tools allow comparing time evolutions of coordinates for collocated DORIS and GNSS stations, thanks to the collaboration with the Terrestrial Frame Combination Center of the International GNSS Service (IGS). A database was created to improve robustness and efficiency of the tools, with the objective to propose a complete web service to foster data exchange with the other geodetic services of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG). The possibility to visualize and compare position time series of the four main space geodetic techniques DORIS, GNSS, SLR and VLBI is already under way at the French level. A dedicated version of these web tools has been developed for the French Space Geodesy Research Group (GRGS). It will give access to position time series provided by the GRGS Analysis Centers involved in DORIS, GNSS, SLR and VLBI data processing for the realization of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame. In this presentation, we will describe the functionalities of these tools, and we will address some aspects of the time series (content, format).

  11. Intrinsic Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1952-03-01

    to which astro - nomical latitudes and longitudes are referred. Moreover, the direction in space of the axis has a physical reality and maV be used for...product, or mixed product, or box product of three vectors i, U, E is the scalar V -i Bi~ F- iXiU.E - ’Exg . B - FXc i a- =1. .X F- F.x = .cx5 (EI-1) Z

  12. Closed-loop automatic photogrammetry-geodesy information system for the construction of the Paks nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detrekoei, Akos; Eoery, Karacson; Sarkoezy, Ferenc

    1984-01-01

    The stereo photogrammetric data collection, measurement and data processing system operating within the Geodesy Plan of the Paks nuclear power plant is described. The interactive graphic computer system, its functions and operation, together with plotters and displays for the generation of graphic output are presented. (R.P.)

  13. Theoretical Tools for Relativistic Gravimetry, Gradiometry and Chronometric Geodesy and Application to a Parameterized Post-Newtonian Metric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacôme Delva

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available An extensive review of past work on relativistic gravimetry, gradiometry and chronometric geodesy is given. Then, general theoretical tools are presented and applied for the case of a stationary parameterized post-Newtonian metric. The special case of a stationary clock on the surface of the Earth is studied.

  14. Contribution of GNSS CORS Infrastructure to the Mission of Modern Geodesy and Status of GNSS CORS in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalermchon Satirapod

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Geodesy is the science of measuring and mapping the geometry, orientation and gravity field of the Earth including the associated variations with time. Geodesy has also provided the foundation for high accuracy surveying and mapping. Modern Geodesy involves a range of space and terrestrial technologies that contribute to our knowledge of the solid earth, atmosphere and oceans. These technologies include: Global Positioning System/Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GPS/GNSS, Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR, Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI, Satellite Altimetry, Gravity Mapping Missions such as GRACE, CHAMP and GOCE, satelliteborne Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR, Absolute and Relative Gravimetry, and Precise Terrestrial Surveying (Levelling and Traversing. A variety of services have been established in recent years to ensure high accuracy and reliable geodetic products to support geoscientific research. The reference frame defined by Modern Geodesy is now the basis for most national and regional datums. Furthermore, the GPS/GNSS technology is a crucial geopositioning tool for both Geodesy and Surveying. There is therefore a blurring of the distinction between geodetic and surveying GPS/GNSS techniques, and increasingly the ground infrastructure of continuously operating reference stations (CORS receivers attempts to address the needs of both geodesists and other positioning professionals. Yet Geodesy is also striving to increase the level of accuracy by a factor of ten over the next decade in order to address the demands of “global change” studies. The Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS is an important component of the International Association of Geodesy. GGOS aims to integrate all geodetic observations in order to generate a consistent high quality set of geodetic parameters for monitoring the phenomena and processes within the “System Earth”. Integration implies the inclusion of all relevant

  15. The Space Geodesy Project and Radio Frequency Interference Characterization and Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Hilliard M.; Beaudoin, C.; Corey, B. E.; Tourain, C. L.; Petrachenko, B.; Dickey, John

    2013-01-01

    The Space Geodesy Project (SGP) development by NASA is an effort to co-locate the four international geodetic techniques Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR), Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), and Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) into one tightly referenced campus and coordinated reference frame analysis. The SGP requirement locates these stations within a small area to maintain line-of-sight and frequent automated survey known as the vector tie system. This causes a direct conflict with the new broadband VLBI technique. Broadband means 2-14 GHz, and RFI susceptibility at -80 dBW or higher due to sensitive RF components in the front end of the radio receiver.

  16. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry: 2000 General Meeting Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Nancy R. (Editor); Baver, Karen D. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This volume is the proceedings of the first General Meeting of the International Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS), held in Koetzting, Germany, February 21-24, 2000. The content of this volume also appears on the IVS web site at: http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications/gm2000. The goal of the program committee for the General Meeting was to provide an interesting and informative program for a wide cross section of IVS members, including station operators, program managers, and analysts. The program included reports, tutorials, invited and contributed papers, and poster presentations. The tutorial papers should be particularly useful references because each one provides an overview and introduction to a topic relevant to VLBI.

  17. Compilation of Published Estimates of Annual Geocenter Motions Using Space Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elosegui, P.

    2005-01-01

    The definition of the term "geocenter motion" depends on the adopted origin of the reference frame. Common reference frames used in Space Geodesy include: the center of mass of the whole Earth (CM), the center of mass of the Solid Earth without mass load (CE), and the center of figure of the outer surface of the Solid Earth (CF). There are two established definitions of the term geocenter: one, the vector offset of CF relative to CM and, two, the reverse, the vector offset of CM relative to CF. Obviously, their amplitude is the same and their phase differs by 180 deg. Following Dong et al. [2003], we label the first X(sub CF, sup CM) and the second X(sup CF, sup CM) (i.e., the superscript represents the frame, the subscript represents any point in the frame).

  18. Proceedings of the Sixth General Meeting of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrend, Dirk (Editor); Baver, Karen D. (Editor)

    2010-01-01

    This volume is the proceedings of the sixth General Meeting of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS), held in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, February 7-13, 2010. The contents of this volume also appear on the IVS Web site at http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications/gm2010. The keynote of the sixth GM was the new perspectives of the next generation VLBI system under the theme "VLBI2010: From Vision to Reality". The goal of the meeting was to provide an interesting and informative program for a wide cross-section of IVS members, including station operators, program managers, and analysts. This volume contains 88 papers. All papers were edited by the editors for usage of the English language, form, and minor content-related issues.

  19. Round-Trip System Available to Measure Path Length Variation in Korea VLBI System for Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hongjong; Kondo, Tetsuro; Lee, Jinoo; Kim, Tuhwan; Kim, Myungho; Kim, Suchul; Park, Jinsik; Ju, Hyunhee

    2010-01-01

    The construction project of Korea Geodetic VLBI officially started in October 2008. The construction of all systems will be completed by the end of 2011. The project was named Korea VLBI system for Geodesy (KVG), and its main purpose is to maintain the Korea Geodetic Datum. In case of the KVG system, an observation room with an H-maser frequency standard is located in a building separated from the antenna by several tens of meters. Therefore KVG system will adopt a so-called round-trip system to transmit reference signals to the antenna with reduction of the effect of path length variations. KVG s round-trip system is designed not only to use either metal or optical fiber cables, but also to measure path length variations directly. We present this unique round trip system for KVG.

  20. Surface and Subsurface Geodesy Combined with Active Borehole Experimentation for the Advanced Characterization of EGS Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsworth, Derek [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Im, Kyungjae [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Guglielmi, Yves [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mattioli, Glen [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States). UNAVCO

    2016-11-14

    We explore the utility of combining active downhole experimentation with borehole and surface geodesy to determine both the characteristics and evolving state of EGS reservoirs during stimulation through production. The study is divided into two parts. We demonstrate the feasibility of determining in situ reservoir characteristics of reservoir size, strain and fracture permeability and their dependence on feedbacks of stress and temperature using surface and borehole geodetic measurements (Part I). We then define the opportunity to apply the unique hydraulic pulse protocol (HPP) borehole tool to evaluate reservoir state. This can be accomplished by monitoring and co-inverting measured reservoir characteristics (from the HPP tool) with surface geodetic measurements of deformation, tilt and strain with continuous measurements of borehole-wall strain (via optical fiber and fiber Bragg gratings) and measured flow rates (Part II).

  1. Introduction to Individual Contribution by the VI Scientific and Professional Conferences with International Participation Geodesy, Cartography and Geographic Information Systems 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janka Sabová

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This contribution contains a selection of articles from 6th Scientific Conference with International Participation "Geodesy,Cartography and Geographical Information Systems 2010". Particular articles are focused on the field of geodesy, engineeringsurveying, mining surveying, deformation analysis, digital photogrammetry, cartography, cadastre of real estates and terrestrial laserscanning. The reader will become familiar with the recent trends and results of research that have been achieved in these areasat universities, as well as in the commercial sector that act in branch of geodesy in the Czech and Slovak Republic.

  2. The Global Geodetic Observing System: Space Geodesy Networks for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Michael; Pavlis, Erricos; Ma, Chopo; Altamini, Zuheir; Noll, Carey; Stowers, David

    2011-01-01

    Ground-based networks of co-located space geodetic techniques (VLBI, SLR, GNSS. and DORIS) are the basis for the development and maintenance of the International Terrestrial Reference frame (ITRF), which is our metric of reference for measurements of global change, The Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) has established a task to develop a strategy to design, integrate and maintain the fundamental geodetic network and supporting infrastructure in a sustainable way to satisfy the long-term requirements for the reference frame. The GGOS goal is an origin definition at 1 mm or better and a temporal stability on the order of 0.1 mm/y, with similar numbers for the scale and orientation components. These goals are based on scientific requirements to address sea level rise with confidence, but other applications are not far behind. Recent studies including one by the US National Research Council has strongly stated the need and the urgency for the fundamental space geodesy network. Simulations are underway to examining accuracies for origin, scale and orientation of the resulting ITRF based on various network designs and system performance to determine the optimal global network to achieve this goal. To date these simulations indicate that 24 - 32 co-located stations are adequate to define the reference frame and a more dense GNSS and DORIS network will be required to distribute the reference frame to users anywhere on Earth. Stations in the new global network will require geologically stable sites with good weather, established infrastructure, and local support and personnel. GGOS wil seek groups that are interested in participation. GGOS intends to issues a Call for Participation of groups that would like to contribute in the network implementation and operation. Some examples of integrated stations currently in operation or under development will be presented. We will examine necessary conditions and challenges in

  3. The Crustal Dynamics Data Information System: A Resource to Support Scientific Analysis Using Space Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll. Carey E.

    2010-01-01

    Since 1982. the Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS) has supported the archive and distribution of geodetic data products acquired by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as well as national and international programs. The CDDIS provides easy, timely, and reliable access to a variety of data sets, products, and information about these data. These measurements. obtained from a global network of nearly 650 instruments at more than 400 distinct sites, include DORIS (Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite), GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System), SLR and LLR (Satellite and Lunar Laser Ranging), and VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry). The CDDIS data system and its archive have become increasingly important to many national and international science communities, particularly several of the operational services within the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) and its observing system the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS), including the International DORIS Service (IDS), the International GNSS Service (IGS). the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS), the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS). and the International Earth rotation and Reference frame Service (IERS), Investigations resulting from the data and products available through the CDDIS support research in many aspects of Earth system science and global change. Each month, the CDDIS archives more than one million data and derived product files totaling over 90 Gbytes in volume. In turn. the global user community downloads nearly 1.2 TBytes (over 10.5 million files) of data and products from the CDDIS each month. The requirements of analysts have evolved since the start of the CDDIS; the specialized nature of the system accommodates the enhancements required to support diverse data sets and user needs. This paper discusses the CDDIS. including background information about the system and its. user communities

  4. Geodetic Imaging: Expanding the Boundaries of Geodesy in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez Diaz, J. C.; Carter, W. E.; Shrestha, R. L.; Glennie, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    High resolution (sub-meter) geodetic images covering tens to thousands of square kilometers have extended the boundaries of geodesy into related areas of the earth sciences, such as geomorphology and geodynamics, during the past decade, to archaeological exploration and site mapping during the past few years, and are now poised to transform studies of flora and fauna in the more remote regions of the world. Geodetic images produced from airborne laser scanning (ALS), a.k.a. airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) have proven transformative to the modern practice of geomorphology where researchers have used decimeter resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) to determine the spatial frequencies of evenly spaced features in terrain, and developed models and mathematical equations to explain how the terrain evolved to its present state and how it is expected to change in the future (Perron et al., 2009). In geodynamics researchers have used ';before' and ';after' geodetic images of the terrain near earthquakes, such as the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake, to quantify surface displacements and suggest models to explain the observed deformations (Oskin et. al., 2012). In archaeology, the ability of ALS to produce ';bare earth' DEMs of terrain covered with dense vegetation, including even tropical rain forests, has revolutionized the study of archaeology in highly forested areas, finding ancient structures and human modifications of landscapes not discovered by archaeologists working at sites for decades (Chase et al., 2011 & Evans et al., 2013), and finding previously unknown ruins in areas that ground exploration has not been able to penetrate since the arrival of the conquistadors in the new world in the 17th century (Carter et al., 2012). The improved spatial resolution and ability of the third generation ALS units to obtain high resolution bare earth DEMs and canopy models in areas covered in dense forests, brush, and even shallow water (steams, lakes, and

  5. Engaging students in geodesy: A quantitative InSAR module for undergraduate tectonics and geophysics classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, H.; Charlevoix, D. J.; Pritchard, M. E.; Lohman, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    In the last several decades, advances in geodetic technology have allowed us to significantly expand our knowledge of processes acting on and beneath the Earth's surface. Many of these advances have come as a result of EarthScope, a community of scientists conducting multidisciplinary Earth science research utilizing freely accessible data from a variety of instruments. The geodetic component of EarthScope includes the acquisition of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images, which are archived at the UNAVCO facility. Interferometric SAR complements the spatial and temporal coverage of GPS and allows monitoring of ground deformation in remote areas worldwide. However, because of the complex software required for processing, InSAR data are not readily accessible to most students. Even with these challenges, exposure at the undergraduate level is important for showing how geodesy can be applied in various areas of the geosciences and for promoting geodesy as a future career path. Here we present a module focused on exploring the tectonics of the western United States using InSAR data for use in undergraduate tectonics and geophysics classes. The module has two major objectives: address topics concerning tectonics in the western U.S. including Basin and Range extension, Yellowstone hotspot activity, and creep in southern California, and familiarize students with how imperfect real-world data can be manipulated and interpreted. Module questions promote critical thinking skills and data literacy by prompting students to use the information given to confront and question assumptions (e.g. 'Is there a consistency between seismic rates and permanent earthquake deformation? What other factors might need to be considered besides seismicity?'). The module consists of an introduction to the basics of InSAR and three student exercises, each focused on one of the topics listed above. Students analyze pre-processed InSAR data using MATLAB, or an Excel equivalent, and draw on GPS and

  6. Space Geodesy: The Cross-Disciplinary Earth science (Vening Meinesz Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, C. K.

    2012-04-01

    Geodesy during the onset of the 21st Century is evolving into a transformative cross-disciplinary Earth science field. The pioneers before or after the discipline Geodesy was defined include Galileo, Descartes, Kepler, Newton, Euler, Bernoulli, Kant, Laplace, Airy, Kelvin, Jeffreys, Chandler, Meinesz, Kaula, and others. The complicated dynamic processes of the Earth system manifested by interactions between the solid Earth and its fluid layers, including ocean, atmosphere, cryosphere and hydrosphere, and their feedbacks are linked with scientific problems such as global sea-level rise resulting from natural and anthropogenic climate change. Advances in the precision and stability of geodetic and fundamental instrumentations, including clocks, satellite or quasar tracking sensors, altimetry and lidars, synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR), InSAR altimetry, gravimetry and gradiometry, have enabled accentuate and transformative progress in cross-disciplinary Earth sciences. In particular, advances in the measurement of the gravity with modern free-fall methods have reached accuracies of 10-9 g (~1 μGal or 10 nm/s2) or better, allowing accurate measurements of height changes at ~3 mm relative to the Earth's center of mass, and mass transports within the Earth interior or its geophysical fluids, enabling global quantifications of climate-change signals. These contemporary space geodetic and in situ sensors include, but not limited to, satellite radar and laser altimetry/lidars, GNSS/SLR/VLBI/DORIS, InSAR, spaceborne gravimetry from GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment twin-satellite mission) and gradiometry from GOCE (Global Ocean Circulation Experiment), tide gauges, and hydrographic data (XBT/MBT/Argo). The 2007 Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) study, the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4), substantially narrowed the discrepancy between observation and the known geophysical causes of sea-level rise, but significant uncertainties

  7. 'A thorn in the side of European geodesy': measuring Paris-Greenwich longitude by electric telegraph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The difference in longitude between the observatories of Paris and Greenwich was long of fundamental importance to geodesy, navigation and timekeeping. Measured many times and by many different means since the seventeenth century, the preferred method of the later nineteenth and early twentieth centuries made use of the electric telegraph. I describe here for the first time the four Paris-Greenwich telegraphic longitude determinations made between 1854 and 1902. Despite contemporary faith in the new technique, the first was soon found to be inaccurate; the second was a failure, ending in Anglo-French dispute over whose result was to be trusted; the third failed in exactly the same way; and when eventually the fourth was presented as a success, the evidence for that success was far from clear-cut. I use this as a case study in precision measurement, showing how mutual grounding between different measurement techniques, in the search for agreement between them, was an important force for change and improvement. I also show that better precision had more to do with the gradually improving methods of astronomical, time determination than with the singular innovation of the telegraph, thus emphasizing the importance of what have been described as 'observatory techniques' to nineteenth-century practices of precision measurement.

  8. Vienna VLBI and Satellite Software (VieVS) for Geodesy and Astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Johannes; Böhm, Sigrid; Boisits, Janina; Girdiuk, Anastasiia; Gruber, Jakob; Hellerschmied, Andreas; Krásná, Hana; Landskron, Daniel; Madzak, Matthias; Mayer, David; McCallum, Jamie; McCallum, Lucia; Schartner, Matthias; Teke, Kamil

    2018-04-01

    The Vienna VLBI and Satellite Software (VieVS) is state-of-the-art Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) analysis software for geodesy and astrometry. VieVS has been developed at Technische Universität Wien (TU Wien) since 2008, where it is used for research purposes and for teaching space geodetic techniques. In the past decade, it has been successfully applied on Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations for the determination of celestial and terrestrial reference frames as well as for the estimation of celestial pole offsets, universal Time (UT1-UTC), and polar motion based on least-squares adjustment. Furthermore, VieVS is equipped with tools for scheduling and simulating VLBI observations to extragalactic radio sources as well as to satellites and spacecraft, features which proved to be very useful for a variety of applications. VieVS is now available as version 3.0 and we do provide the software to all interested persons and institutions. A wiki with more information about VieVS is available at http://vievswiki.geo.tuwien.ac.at/.

  9. Application of the Allan Variance to Time Series Analysis in Astrometry and Geodesy: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkin, Zinovy

    2016-04-01

    The Allan variance (AVAR) was introduced 50 years ago as a statistical tool for assessing the frequency standards deviations. For the past decades, AVAR has increasingly been used in geodesy and astrometry to assess the noise characteristics in geodetic and astrometric time series. A specific feature of astrometric and geodetic measurements, as compared with clock measurements, is that they are generally associated with uncertainties; thus, an appropriate weighting should be applied during data analysis. In addition, some physically connected scalar time series naturally form series of multidimensional vectors. For example, three station coordinates time series X, Y, and Z can be combined to analyze 3-D station position variations. The classical AVAR is not intended for processing unevenly weighted and/or multidimensional data. Therefore, AVAR modifications, namely weighted AVAR (WAVAR), multidimensional AVAR (MAVAR), and weighted multidimensional AVAR (WMAVAR), were introduced to overcome these deficiencies. In this paper, a brief review is given of the experience of using AVAR and its modifications in processing astrogeodetic time series.

  10. A New Era in Geodesy and Cartography: Implications for Landing Site Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, T. C.

    2001-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) global dataset has ushered in a new era for Mars local and global geodesy and cartography. These data include the global digital terrain model (Digital Terrain Model (DTM) radii), the global digital elevation model (Digital Elevation Model (DEM) elevation with respect to the geoid), and the higher spatial resolution individual MOLA ground tracks. Currently there are about 500,000,000 MOLA points and this number continues to grow as MOLA continues successful operations in orbit about Mars, the combined processing of radiometric X-band Doppler and ranging tracking of MGS together with millions of MOLA orbital crossover points has produced global geodetic and cartographic control having a spatial (latitude/longitude) accuracy of a few meters and a topographic accuracy of less than 1 meter. This means that the position of an individual MOLA point with respect to the center-of-mass of Mars is know to an absolute accuracy of a few meters. The positional accuracy of this point in inertial space over time is controlled by the spin rate uncertainty of Mars which is less than 1 km over 10 years that will be improved significantly with the next landed mission.

  11. Time biases in laser ranging observations: A concerning issue of Space Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exertier, Pierre; Belli, A.; Lemoine, J. M.

    2017-09-01

    Time transfer by Laser Ranging (LR) recently demonstrated a remarkable stability (a few ps over ∼1000 s) and accuracy (synchronizing both space and ground clocks over distances from a few thousands to tens of thousands kilometers. Given its potential role in navigation, fundamental physics and metrology, it is crucial that synergy between laser ranging and Time&Frequency (T/F) technologies improves to meet the present and future space geodesy requirements. In this article, we examine the behavior of T/F systems that are used in LR tracking stations of the international laser ranging service. The approach we investigate is to compute time synchronization between clocks used at LR stations using accurate data of the Time Transfer by Laser Link (T2L2) experiment onboard the satellite Jason-2 (Samain et al., 2014). Systematic time biases are estimated against the UTC time scale for a set of 22 observing stations in 2013, in the range of zero to a few μ s. Our results suggest that the ILRS network suffers from accuracy issues, due to time biases in the laser ranging observations. We discuss how these systematic effects impact the precise orbit determination of LAGEOS geodetic satellites over a 1-year analysis, and additionally give a measure of the local effect into station coordinates, regarding in particular the effect in the east-west component that is of 2-6 mm for a typical systematic time bias of one μ s.

  12. Theoretical and Applied Research in the Field of Higher Geodesy Conducted in Rzeszow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadaj Roman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Important qualitative changes were taking place in polish geodesy in last few years. It was related to application of new techniques and technologies and to introduction of European reference frames in Poland. New reference stations network ASG-EUPOS, together with Internet services which helps in precise positioning was created. It allows to fast setting up precise hybrid networks. New, accurate satellite networks became the basis of new definitions in the field of reference systems. Simultaneously arise the need of new software, which enables to execute the geodetic works in new technical conditions. Authors had an opportunity to participate in mentioned undertakings, also under the aegis of GUGiK, by creation of methods, algorithms and necessary software tools. In this way the automatic postprocessing module (APPS in POZGEO service, a part of ASG-EUPOS system came into being. It is an entirely polish product which works in Trimble environment. Universal software for transformation between PLETRF89, PL-ETRF2000, PULKOWO’42 reference systems as well as defined coordinate systems was created (TRANSPOL v. 2.06 and published as open product. An essential functional element of the program is the quasi-geoid model PL-geoid-2011, which has been elaborated by adjustment (calibration of the global quasi-geoid model EGM2008 to 570 geodetic points (satellite-leveling points. Those and other studies are briefly described in this paper.

  13. Geodesy and cartography methods of exploration of the outer planetary systems: Galilean satellites and Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubarev, Anatoliy; Kozlova, Natalia; Kokhanov, Alexander; Oberst, Jürgen; Nadezhdina, Irina; Patraty, Vyacheslav; Karachevtseva, Irina

    Introduction. While Galilean satellites have been observed by different spacecrafts, including Pioneer, Voyager-1 and -2, Galileo, New Horizons, and Enceladus by Cassini and Voyager-2, only data from Galileo, Cassini and the two Voyagers are useful for precise mapping [1, 2]. For purposes of future missions to the system of outer planets we have re-computed the control point network of the Io, Ganymede and Enceladus to support spacecraft navigation and coordinate knowledge. Based on the control networks, we have produced global image mosaics and maps. Geodesy approach. For future mission Laplace-P we mainly focused on Ganymede which coverage is nearly complete except for polar areas (which includes multispectral data). However, large differences exist in data resolutions (minimum global resolution: 30 km/pixel). Only few areas enjoy coverage by highest resolution images, so we suggest to obtain regional Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) from stereo images for selected areas. Also using our special software, we provide calculation of illumination conditions of Ganymede surface in various representations [3]. Finally, we propose a careful evaluation of all available data from the previous Voyager and Galileo missions to re-determine geodetic control and rotation model for other Galilean satellites - Callisto and Europe. Mapping. Based on re-calculated control point networks and global mosaics we have prepared new maps for Io, Ganymede and Enceladus [4]. Due to the difference in resolution between the images, which were also taken from different angles relative to the surface, we can prepare only regional high resolution shape models, so for demonstrating of topography and mapping of the satellites we used orthographic projection with different parameters. Our maps, which include roughness calculations based on our GIS technologies [5], will also be an important tool for studies of surface morphology. Conclusions. Updated data collection, including new calculation of

  14. Volcano geodesy: The search for magma reservoirs and the formation of eruptive vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, J.J.; Dzurisin, D.

    1997-01-01

    Routine geodetic measurements are made at only a few dozen of the world's 600 or so active volcanoes, even though these measurements have proven to be a reliable precursor of eruptions. The pattern and rate of surface displacement reveal the depth and rate of pressure increase within shallow magma reservoirs. This process has been demonstrated clearly at Kilauea and Mauna Loa, Hawaii; Long Valley caldera, California; Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy; Rabaul caldera, Papua New Guinea; and Aira caldera and nearby Sakurajima, Japan. Slower and lesser amounts of surface displacement at Yellowstone caldera, Wyoming, are attributed to changes in a hydrothermal system that overlies a crustal magma body. The vertical and horizontal dimensions of eruptive fissures, as well as the amount of widening, have been determined at Kilauea, Hawaii; Etna, Italy; Tolbachik, Kamchatka; Krafla, Iceland; and Asal-Ghoubbet, Djibouti, the last a segment of the East Africa Rift Zone. Continuously recording instruments, such as tiltmeters, extensometers, and dilatometers, have recorded horizontal and upward growth of eruptive fissures, which grew at rates of hundreds of meters per hour, at Kilauea; Izu-Oshima, Japan; Teishi Knoll seamount, Japan; and Piton de la Fournaise, Re??union Island. In addition, such instruments have recorded the hour or less of slight ground movement that preceded small explosive eruptions at Sakurajima and presumed sudden gas emissions at Galeras, Colombia. The use of satellite geodesy, in particular the Global Positioning System, offers the possibility of revealing changes in surface strain both local to a volcano and over a broad region that includes the volcano.

  15. A New Solution Assessment Approach and Its Application to Space Geodesy Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X.; Huang, C.; Liao, X.

    2001-12-01

    The statistics of the residuals are used in this paper to perform a quality assessment of the solutions from space geodesy data analysis. With the stochastic estimation and the relatively arbitrary empirical parameters being employed to absorb unmodelled errors, it has long been noticed that different estimate combinations or analysis strategies may achieve the same level of fitting yet result in significantly different solutions. Based on the postulate that no conceivable signals should remain in the residuals, solutions of the same level of root mean square error (RMS) and variance-covariance may be differentiated in the sense that for reasonable solutions, the residuals are virtually identical with noise. While it is possible to develop complex noise models, the Gaussian white noise model simplifies the solution interpretation and implies the unmodelled errors have been smoothed out. Statistical moments of the residuals as well as the Pearson chi-square are computed in this paper to measure the discrepancies between the residuals and Gaussian white noise. Applying to both satellite laser ranging (SLR) and global positioning system (GPS) data analysis, we evaluate different parameter estimate combinations and/or different strategies that would be hardly discriminated by the level of fitting. Unlike most solution assessment methods broadly termed as external comparison, no information independent of the data analyzed is required. This makes the immediate solution assessment possible and easy to carry out. While the external comparison is the best and most convincing quality assessment of the solution, the statistics of the residuals provide important information on the solutions and, in some cases as discussed in this paper, can be supported with external comparison.

  16. The Application of the Complex Field of Geodesy to an Entrance Level College Course using Cognitive Learning Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, J.; Beall King, A.; Larson, P. B.

    2017-12-01

    The study of the shape of the Earth is called geodesy. It is a complex and rich field, encompassing GPS, the development of satellites to measure Earth, and the many applications of these measurements to better understand our planet. What is the best way to explain complex concepts to an entry-level college student, such as geodesy or gravitation? What is the most efficient way to peek a student's interest in an abstract field? Two people are walking side by side on a crowded street. Do they talk? Do they look at each other? Do they laugh together? Do they touch? Even though the bond between these two people cannot necessarily be physically seen, it is possible, by looking at their behavior towards each other, to determine whether or not they know each other. If they do, they are attracted to one another, walking together in the same direction, exchanging ideas or laughs. The Moon attracts the Earth's oceans, forming tides. The Earth attracts the Moon into staying in orbit. They are attracted to each other by the invisible yet quantifiable force of gravitation. In order to ensure that first year college students understand the concept and applications of geodesy, and find interest in the field, several teaching and learning techniques must be used. These techniques are compared to one another in terms of efficiency both by comparing the students' success through quizzes and discussions, and by comparing the students' enjoyment of and interest in the class through evaluations at the beginning and end of each class in order to assess how much material was learned, understood, and retained. This study is conducted via a short course with volunteer students. The course is a combination of lecture, discussion, experiments, and field work. Quizzes are used to evaluate not the students, but their improvement as a result of the efficacy of the teaching method. In class group and one on one discussions are used as the main part of the final grade.

  17. Super-large optical gyroscopes for applications in geodesy and seismology: state-of-the-art and development prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velikoseltsev, A A; Luk'yanov, D P; Vinogradov, V I; Shreiber, K U

    2014-01-01

    A brief survey of the history of the invention and development of super-large laser gyroscopes (SLLGs) is presented. The basic results achieved using SLLGs in geodesy, seismology, fundamental physics and other fields are summarised. The concept of SLLG design, specific features of construction and implementation are considered, as well as the prospects of applying the present-day optical technologies to laser gyroscope engineering. The possibilities of using fibre-optical gyroscopes in seismologic studies are analysed and the results of preliminary experimental studies are presented. (laser gyroscopes)

  18. Super-large optical gyroscopes for applications in geodesy and seismology: state-of-the-art and development prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velikoseltsev, A A; Luk' yanov, D P [St. Petersburg Electrotechnical University ' ' LETI' ' , St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vinogradov, V I [OJSC Tambov factory Elektropribor (Russian Federation); Shreiber, K U [Forschungseinrichtung Satellitengeodaesie, Technosche Universitaet Muenchen, Geodaetisches Observatorium Wettzell, Sackenrieder str. 25, 93444 Bad Koetzting (Germany)

    2014-12-31

    A brief survey of the history of the invention and development of super-large laser gyroscopes (SLLGs) is presented. The basic results achieved using SLLGs in geodesy, seismology, fundamental physics and other fields are summarised. The concept of SLLG design, specific features of construction and implementation are considered, as well as the prospects of applying the present-day optical technologies to laser gyroscope engineering. The possibilities of using fibre-optical gyroscopes in seismologic studies are analysed and the results of preliminary experimental studies are presented. (laser gyroscopes)

  19. Analytical solution of perturbed relative motion: an application of satellite formations to geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wnuk, Edwin

    In the upcoming years, several space missions will be operated using a number of spacecraft flying in formation. Clusters of spacecraft with a carefully designed orbits and optimal formation geometry enable a wide variety of applications ranging from remote sensing to astronomy, geodesy and basic physics. Many of the applications require precise relative navigation and autonomous orbit control of satellites moving in a formation. For many missions a centimeter level of orbit control accuracy is required. The GRACE mission, since its launch in 2002, has been improving the Earth's gravity field model to a very high level of accuracy. This mission is a formation flying one consisting of two satellites moving in coplanar orbits and provides range and range-rate measurements between the satellites in the along-track direction. Future geodetic missions probably will employ alternative architectures using additional satellites and/or performing out-of-plane motion, e.g cartwheel orbits. The paper presents an analytical model of a satellite formation motion that enables propagation of the relative spacecraft motion. The model is based on the analytical theory of satellite relative motion that was presented in the previous our papers (Wnuk and Golebiewska, 2005, 2006). This theory takes into account the influence of the following gravitational perturbation effects: 1) zonal and tesseral harmonic geopotential coefficients up to arbitrary degree and order, 2) Lunar gravity, 3) Sun gravity. Formulas for differential perturbations were derived with any restriction concerning a plane of satellite orbits. They can be applied in both: in plane and out of plane cases. Using this propagator we calculated relative orbits and future relative satellite positions for different types of formations: in plane, out of plane, cartwheel and others. We analyzed the influence of particular parts of perturbation effects and estimated the accuracy of predicted relative spacecrafts positions

  20. The Geodetic Seamless Archive Centers Service Layer: A System Architecture for Federating Geodesy Data Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, J.; Boler, F. M.; Bock, Y.; Jamason, P.; Squibb, M. B.; Noll, C. E.; Blewitt, G.; Kreemer, C. W.

    2010-12-01

    Three geodesy Archive Centers, Scripps Orbit and Permanent Array Center (SOPAC), NASA's Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS) and UNAVCO are engaged in a joint effort to define and develop a common Web Service Application Programming Interface (API) for accessing geodetic data holdings. This effort is funded by the NASA ROSES ACCESS Program to modernize the original GPS Seamless Archive Centers (GSAC) technology which was developed in the 1990s. A new web service interface, the GSAC-WS, is being developed to provide uniform and expanded mechanisms through which users can access our data repositories. In total, our respective archives hold tens of millions of files and contain a rich collection of site/station metadata. Though we serve similar user communities, we currently provide a range of different access methods, query services and metadata formats. This leads to a lack of consistency in the userís experience and a duplication of engineering efforts. The GSAC-WS API and its reference implementation in an underlying Java-based GSAC Service Layer (GSL) supports metadata and data queries into site/station oriented data archives. The general nature of this API makes it applicable to a broad range of data systems. The overall goals of this project include providing consistent and rich query interfaces for end users and client programs, the development of enabling technology to facilitate third party repositories in developing these web service capabilities and to enable the ability to perform data queries across a collection of federated GSAC-WS enabled repositories. A fundamental challenge faced in this project is to provide a common suite of query services across a heterogeneous collection of data yet enabling each repository to expose their specific metadata holdings. To address this challenge we are developing a "capabilities" based service where a repository can describe its specific query and metadata capabilities. Furthermore, the architecture of

  1. Gravity field recovery in the framework of a Geodesy and Time Reference in Space (GETRIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauk, Markus; Schlicht, Anja; Pail, Roland; Murböck, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The study ;Geodesy and Time Reference in Space; (GETRIS), funded by European Space Agency (ESA), evaluates the potential and opportunities coming along with a global space-borne infrastructure for data transfer, clock synchronization and ranging. Gravity field recovery could be one of the first beneficiary applications of such an infrastructure. This paper analyzes and evaluates the two-way high-low satellite-to-satellite-tracking as a novel method and as a long-term perspective for the determination of the Earth's gravitational field, using it as a synergy of one-way high-low combined with low-low satellite-to-satellite-tracking, in order to generate adequate de-aliasing products. First planned as a constellation of geostationary satellites, it turned out, that an integration of European Union Global Navigation Satellite System (Galileo) satellites (equipped with inter-Galileo links) into a Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) constellation would extend the capability of such a mission constellation remarkably. We report about simulations of different Galileo and Low Earth Orbiter (LEO) satellite constellations, computed using time variable geophysical background models, to determine temporal changes in the Earth's gravitational field. Our work aims at an error analysis of this new satellite/instrument scenario by investigating the impact of different error sources. Compared to a low-low satellite-to-satellite-tracking mission, results show reduced temporal aliasing errors due to a more isotropic error behavior caused by an improved observation geometry, predominantly in near-radial direction within the inter-satellite-links, as well as the potential of an improved gravity recovery with higher spatial and temporal resolution. The major error contributors of temporal gravity retrieval are aliasing errors due to undersampling of high frequency signals (mainly atmosphere, ocean and ocean tides). In this context, we investigate adequate methods to reduce these errors. We

  2. The Phobos Atlas and Geo-portal: geodesy and cartography approach for planetary exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachevtseva, Irina; Kozlova, Natalia; Kokhanov, Alexander; Oberst, Jürgen; Zubarev, Anatoliy; Nadezhdina, Irina; Patraty, Vyacheslav; Konopikhin, Anatoliy; Garov, Andrey

    New Phobos mapping. Methods of image processing and modern GIS technologies provide the opportunity for high quality planetary mapping. The new Phobos DTM and global orthomosaic have been used for developing a geodatabase (Karachevtseva et al., 2012) which provides data for various surface spatial analyses: statistics of crater density, as well as studies of gravity field, geomorphology, and photometry. As mapping is the best way to visualize results of research based on spatial context we created the Phobos atlas. The new Phobos atlas includes: control points network which were calculated during photogrammetry processing of SRC images (Zubarev et al., 2012) and fundamental body parameters as a reference basis for Phobos research as well as GIS analyses of surface objects and geomorphologic studies. According to the structure of the atlas we used various scales and projections based on different coordinate system, including three-axial ellipsoid which parameters (a=13.24 km, b=11.49 km, c=9.48 km) derived from new Phobos shape model (Nadezhdina and Zubarev, 2014). The new Phobos atlas includes about 30 thematic original maps that illustrate the surface of the small body based on Mars Express data (Oberst et al., 2008) and illustrates results of various studies of Phobos:, geomorphology parameters of craters (Basilevsky et al., 2014), morphometry studies (Koknanov et al., 2012), statistics of crater size-frequency distributions based on multi-fractal approach (Uchaev Dm. et al., 2012). Phobos Geo-portal. The spatial data products which used for preparing maps for the Phobos atlas are available at the planetary data storage with access via Geo-portal (http://cartsrv.mexlab.ru/geoportal/), based on modern spatial and web-based technologies (Karachevtseva et al., 2013). Now we are developing Geodesy and Cartography node which can integrate various types of information not only for Phobos data, but other planets and their satellites, and it can be used for geo

  3. Undergraduate teaching modules featuring geodesy data applied to critical social topics (GETSI: GEodetic Tools for Societal Issues)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt-Sitaula, B. A.; Walker, B.; Douglas, B. J.; Charlevoix, D. J.; Miller, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    The GETSI project, funded by NSF TUES, is developing and disseminating teaching and learning materials that feature geodesy data applied to critical societal issues such as climate change, water resource management, and natural hazards (serc.carleton.edu/getsi). It is collaborative between UNAVCO (NSF's geodetic facility), Mt San Antonio College, and Indiana University. GETSI was initiated after requests by geoscience faculty for geodetic teaching resources for introductory and majors-level students. Full modules take two weeks but module subsets can also be used. Modules are developed and tested by two co-authors and also tested in a third classroom. GETSI is working in partnership with the Science Education Resource Center's (SERC) InTeGrate project on the development, assessment, and dissemination to ensure compatibility with the growing number of resources for geoscience education. Two GETSI modules are being published in October 2015. "Ice mass and sea level changes" includes geodetic data from GRACE, satellite altimetry, and GPS time series. "Imaging Active Tectonics" has students analyzing InSAR and LiDAR data to assess infrastructure earthquake vulnerability. Another three modules are in testing during fall 2015 and will be published in 2016. "Surface process hazards" investigates mass wasting hazard and risk using LiDAR data. "Water resources and geodesy" uses GRACE, vertical GPS, and reflection GPS data to have students investigating droughts in California and the High Great Plains. "GPS, strain, and earthquakes" helps students learn about infinitesimal and coseismic strain through analysis of horizontal GPS data and includes an extension module on the Napa 2014 earthquake. In addition to teaching resources, the GETSI project is compiling recommendations on successful development of geodesy curricula. The chief recommendations so far are the critical importance of including scientific experts in the authorship team and investing significant resources in

  4. Compositions of fuzzy relations applied to veryfication learning outcomes on the example of the major “Geodesy and Cartography”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mreła

    2015-05-01

        Abstract The paper presents discussion about using mathematical functions in order to help academic teachers to verify acquirement of learning outcomes by students on the example of the major “geodesy and cartography”. It is relatively easy to build fuzzy relation describing levels of realization and validation learning outcomes during subject examinations and the fuzzy relation with students’ grades is already built by teachers, the problem is to combine these two relations to get one which describes the level of acquiring learning outcomes by students. There are two main requirements facing this combinations and the paper shows that the best combination according to these requirements is algebraic composition.   Keywords: learning outcome, fuzzy relation, algebraic composition.

  5. Contribution of branch of the Geodesy, Cartography and Cadastre Authority of the Slovak Republic to the construction of information society in the Slovak Republic and in the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokacova, P.; Ofukany, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper authors deals with responsibilities of the Geodesy, Cartography and Cadastre Authority of the Slovak Republic in building of information society in the Slovak Republic and in the European Union

  6. New geoscience techniques for Earth and planetary studies developed in Moscow State University of Geodesy and Cartography (MIIGAiK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorov, Andrey; Karachevtseva, Irina; Oberst, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    The University was established in 1779 and for all these years it has been the centre of higher geodetic education in Russia, the largest specialized educational institution of this profile in Europe. The great historical past, long pedagogical and scientific traditions developed throughout almost the two and a half centuries' history of the University, importance of geodetic sciences and land survey branch for many fields of knowledge and national economy, a wide range of specialties in which MIIGAiK trains specialists have given the University the leading position as a specialized higher educational institution [1]. Now, the University is a large educational-and-scientific and production complex including six faculties of full-time training, a faculty of distance learning, a Training Centre for teachers of high schools and retraining of experts, postgraduate and doctoral courses, educational specialized laboratories in various directions of geodesy, cartography and remote sensing. In the University structure, there are also research-and-production centers Geodynamics, Geomonitoring, a Center for satellite technologies in geodesy, a Cartographic centre, Geodesy and Air Photography Journal Publishing House, two educational test fields, computing centers, an educational-and-geodetic museum and a library. New MIIGAiK Extraterrestrial Laboratory (MExLab) [2], which was established in 2010 under the leadership of invited scientist Prof. Dr. Jürgen Oberst (DLR, TUB, Germany), studies of characteristics of Solar System bodies with geodetic and cartographic methods. The several celestial bodies are chosen as subjects for new planetary project: Europa, Ganymede, Callisto (Galilean satellites of Jupiter), and Enceladus (a satellite of Saturn), as well as the Moon, Mars, its satellite Phobos, and Mercury. The significance of the project objectives is defined both by necessity of gaining fundamental knowledge about properties of the Solar System bodies, and practical needs

  7. 25 Jahre - Institut fuer Geodaesie, Teil 3: Aus dem Leben des Instituts (25 Years - Institute of Geodesy, Part 3: The Life of the Institute)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Welsch SCHRIFTENREIHE UNIVERSITAT DER BUNDESWEHR MONCHEN 20080707 028 A %°(w Der Druck dieses Heftes wurde aus Haushaltsmitteln der Universitdt der...Verwendung hi prliziser Ephemeriden. Espe Das Ergebnis der Be- Sali ferr ktal echnungen waren 3d - @ Koordinaten sowie geo- s1fr graphische Koordinaten...1982, Aalborg Un- B. Eissfeller, G. W. Hein: A Contribution to 3d - versity Centre, Denmark. 431 S. Operational Geodesy. Part 4: The Observation Heft 8

  8. Seafloor Geodesy usi­ng Wave Gliders to study Earthquake and Tsunami Hazards at Subduction Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiakumar, S.; Barbot, S.; Hill, E.; Peng, D.; Zerucha, J.; Suhaimee, S.; Chia, G.; Salamena, G. G.; Syahailatua, A.

    2016-12-01

    Land-based GNSS networks are now in place to monitor most subduction zones of the world. These provide valuable information about the amount of­ geodetic strain accumulated in the region, which in turn gives insight into the seismic potential. However, it is usually impossible to resolve activity on the megathrust near the trench using land-based GNSS data alone, given typical signal-to-noise ratios. Ship-based seafloor geodesy is being used today to fill this observation gap. However, surveys using ships are very expensive, tedious and impractical due to the large areas to be covered. Instead of discrete missions using ships, continuous monitoring of the seafloor using autonomous marine robots would aid in understanding the tectonic setting of the seafloor better at a potentially lower cost, as well as help in designing better warning systems. Thus, we are developing seafloor geodesy capabilities using Wave Gliders, a new class of wave-propelled, persistent marine autonomous vehicle using a combination of acoustic and GNSS technologies. We use GNSS/INS to position the platform, and acoustic ranging to locate the seafloor. The GNSS/INS system to be integrated with the Wave Gliders has stringent requirements of low power, light weight, and high accuracy. All these factors are equally important due to limited power and space in the Wave Gliders and the need for highly accurate and precise measurements. With this hardware setup, a limiting factor is the accuracy of measurement of the sound velocity in the water column. We plan to obtain precise positioning of seafloor by exploring a measurement setup that minimizes uncertainties in sound velocity. This will be achieved by making fine-resolution measurements of the two-way travel time of the acoustic waves underwater using the Wave Gliders, and performing statistical signal processing on this data to obtain more reliable sound velocity measurement. This enhanced seafloor geodetic technique using Wave Gliders should

  9. Geodesy- and geology-based slip-rate models for the Western United States (excluding California) national seismic hazard maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Mark D.; Zeng, Yuehua; Haller, Kathleen M.; McCaffrey, Robert; Hammond, William C.; Bird, Peter; Moschetti, Morgan; Shen, Zhengkang; Bormann, Jayne; Thatcher, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 National Seismic Hazard Maps for the conterminous United States incorporate additional uncertainty in fault slip-rate parameter that controls the earthquake-activity rates than was applied in previous versions of the hazard maps. This additional uncertainty is accounted for by new geodesy- and geology-based slip-rate models for the Western United States. Models that were considered include an updated geologic model based on expert opinion and four combined inversion models informed by both geologic and geodetic input. The two block models considered indicate significantly higher slip rates than the expert opinion and the two fault-based combined inversion models. For the hazard maps, we apply 20 percent weight with equal weighting for the two fault-based models. Off-fault geodetic-based models were not considered in this version of the maps. Resulting changes to the hazard maps are generally less than 0.05 g (acceleration of gravity). Future research will improve the maps and interpret differences between the new models.

  10. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry. Delivering high-quality products and embarking on observations of the next generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothnagel, A.; Artz, T.; Behrend, D.; Malkin, Z.

    2017-07-01

    The International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS) regularly produces high-quality Earth orientation parameters from observing sessions employing extensive networks or individual baselines. The master schedule is designed according to the telescope days committed by the stations and by the need for dense sampling of the Earth orientation parameters (EOP). In the pre-2011 era, the network constellations with their number of telescopes participating were limited by the playback and baseline capabilities of the hardware (Mark4) correlators. This limitation was overcome by the advent of software correlators, which can now accommodate many more playback units in a flexible configuration. In this paper, we describe the current operations of the IVS with special emphasis on the quality of the polar motion results since these are the only EOP components which can be validated against independent benchmarks. The polar motion results provided by the IVS have improved continuously over the years, now providing an agreement with IGS results at the level of 20-25 μas in a WRMS sense. At the end of the paper, an outlook is given for the realization of the VLBI Global Observing System.

  11. Revealing climate modes in steric sea levels: lessons learned from satellite geodesy, objective analyses and ocean reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, J.; Tregoning, P.; Purcell, A. P.

    2017-12-01

    Due to increased greenhouse gases emissions, the oceans are accumulating heat. In response to the ocean circulation and atmospheric forcing, the heat is irregularly redistributed within the oceans, causing sea level to rise at variable rates in space and time. These rates of steric expansion are extremely difficult to assess because of the sparsity of in-situ hydrographic observations available within the course of the 20th century. We compare here three methods to reconstruct the steric sea levels over the past 13, 25 and 58 years based on satellite geodesy, objective analyses and ocean reanalyses. The interannual to decadal variability of each dataset is explored with a model merging six climate indices representative of the natural variability of the ocean and climate system. Consistent regional patterns are identified for the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in all datasets at all timescales. Despite the short time coverage (13 years), the combination of satellite geodetic data (altimetry and GRACE) also reveals significant steric responses to the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO), Indian Dipole (IOD) and Indian ocean basinwide (IOBM) mode. The richer information content in the ocean reanalyses allows us to recover the regional fingerprints of the PDO, ENSO, NPGO, IOD and IOBM, but also of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) acting over longer time scales (40 to 60 years). Therefore, ocean reanalyses, coupled with climate mode analyses, constitute innovative and promising tools to investigate the mechanisms triggering the variability of sea level rise over the past decades.

  12. On the motion od the Caribbean relative to South-America: New results from GPS geodesy 1999-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Rosa, R.; Marquez, J.; Bravo, M.; Madriz, Y.; Mencin, D.; Wesnousky, S. G.; Molnar, P. H.; Bilham, R.; Perez, O. J.

    2013-05-01

    Our previous (1994-2006) collaborative GPS studies in southern Caribbean and northern South-America (SA) show that along its southern boundary in north-central and northeastern Venezuela (Vzla) the Caribbean plate (CP) slips easterly at ~20 mm/a relative to SA, and that in northwestern South-America slip-partitioning takes place resulting in 12 mm/a of dextral motion across the Venezuelan Andes, ~6 mm/a of which occur along the main trace of the NE-trending Bocono fault, and the rest is taken up by SE-subduction of the CP beneath northwestern SA. A series of new velocity vectors obtained in the region from GPS geodesy in 1999-2012 and their corresponding elastic modelings shows that in north-central Vzla part (~3 mm/a) of the C-SA relative dextral shear is taken up by the east-trending continental La Victoria fault, which runs ~50 kms south of San Sebastian fault off-shore and is sub-parallel to it, the later taken up the rest of the motion. The velocity we find for Aruba Is (~20 mm/y due ~east) is consistent with the motion predicted by the Euler pole (61,9° N; 75,7 °W; ω = 0,229 °/Ma) we previously calculated to describe the C-SA relative plate motion. New velocity vectors obtained across the Venezuelan Andes are consistent with a modeled surface velocity due to 12 mm/a of dextral shear below a locking depth of 14 km on one or more vertical N50°E striking faults located within the 100-km wide Andean ranges. The Andes also show a horizontal convergence rate of 2 to 4 mm/a suggesting an uplift rate of ~1.7 mm/a if thrust motion takes place on shallowly dipping faults parallel to the Andes.

  13. Characterization of Material Properties at Brady Hot Springs, Nevada by Inverse Modeling of Data from Seismology, Geodesy, and Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. F.; Feigl, K. L.; Patterson, J.; Parker, L.; Reinisch, E. C.; Zeng, X.; Cardiff, M. A.; Fratta, D.; Lord, N. E.; Thurber, C. H.; Robertson, M.; Miller, D. E.; Akerley, J.; Kreemer, C.; Morency, C.; Davatzes, N. C.

    2017-12-01

    The PoroTomo project consists of poroelastic tomography by adjoint inverse modeling of data from seismology, geodesy, and hydrology. The goal of the PoroTomo project is to assess an integrated technology for characterizing and monitoring changes in the rock mechanical properties of an enhanced geothermal system in 3 dimensions with a spatial resolution better than 50 meters. In March 2016, we deployed the integrated technology in a 1500-by-500-by-400-meter volume at Brady. The 15-day deployment included 4 distinct time intervals with intentional manipulations of the pumping rates in injection and production wells. The data set includes: active seismic sources, fiber-optic cables for Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) and Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) arranged vertically in a borehole to 400 m depth and horizontally in a trench 8700 m in length and 0.5 m in depth; 244 seismometers on the surface, 3 pressure sensors in observation wells, continuous geodetic measurements at 3 GPS stations, and 7 InSAR acquisitions. To account for the mechanical behavior of both the rock and the fluids, we are developing numerical models for the 3-D distribution of the material properties. We present an overview of results, including:Tomographic images of P-wave velocity estimated from seismic body waves [Thurber et al., this meeting].Tomographic images of phase velocity estimated from ambient noise correlation functions [Zeng et al., this meeting].Models of volumetric contraction to account for subsidence observed by InSAR and GPS [Reinisch et al., this meeting].Interpretation of pressure and temperature data [Patterson et al., this meeting].Taken together, these results support a conceptual model of highly permeable conduits along faults channeling fluids from shallow aquifers to the deep geothermal reservoir tapped by the production wells. The PoroTomo project is funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy.

  14. Preface to the Special Issue on "Geophysical and Climate Change Studies in Tibet, Xinjiang, and Siberia (TibXS from Satellite Geodesy"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheinway Hwang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This special issue publishes papers on recent results in geophysical and climate change studies over Tibet, Xinjiang and Siberia (TibXS based upon some of the key sensors used in satellite geodesy, including satellite gravimetric sensors (GRACE and GOCE, satellite altimeters (TOPEX, Jason-1 and -2, and ENVISAT, and Global Positioning System satellites. Results from ground- and airborne-based geodetic observations, notably those based on airborne gravimeter, superconducting gravimeter (SG and seismometers are also included in the special issue. In all, 22 papers were submitted for this special issue; 17 papers were accepted.

  15. EIGEN-5C - the new GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam / Groupe de Recherche de Geodesie Spatiale combined gravity field model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerste, C.; Flechtner, F.; Stubenvoll, R.; Rothacher, M.; Kusche, J.; Neumayer, H. K.; Biancale, R.; Lemoine, J.; Barthelmes, F.; Bruinsma, S.; Koenig, R.; Dahle, C.

    2008-12-01

    Global gravity field models play a fundamental role in geodesy and Earth sciences, ranging from practical purposes, like precise orbit determination, to applications in geosciences, like investigations of the density structure of the Earth's interior. In this presentation we report on the latest, recently released EIGEN-model, EIGEN-5C (EIGEN = European Improved Gravity model of the Earth by New techniques) and its associated satellite-only model EIGEN-5S. The global gravity field model EIGEN-5C is complete to degree and order 360 (corresponding to half-wavelength of 55 km) and was jointly elaborated by GFZ Potsdam and CNES/GRGS Toulouse. As its precursor EIGEN-GL04C (released in March 2006), this model is inferred from a combination of GRACE and LAGEOS satellite tracking data with surface gravity data, based on the accumulation of normal equations. However, this new model presents remarkable changes and improvements compared to its precursors. EIGEN-5C incorporates a further extended GRACE and LAGEOS data set, covering almost the entire GRACE period from mid 2002 to end of 2007, but also newly available gravity anomaly data sets for Europe and Australia. New processing features are the complete reprocessing of the GRACE and LAGEOS data using the recent RL04 standards and background models by GFZ (combined with the GRACE/LAGEOS 10-days time series derived at GRGS based on nearly identical standards and background models) and a further extension of the full normal equations (in contrast to block diagonal form) derived from terrestrial data to a maximum degree and order of 280 (which was restricted to 179 for EIGEN-GL04C). In particular, this presentation focuses on the inter-comparison of this latest EIGEN model with the recently presented EGM08 model, which was developed by the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) of the USA. The EIGEN-5C model and its associated satellite-only model EIGEN-5S are available for download at the ICGEM data base (International

  16. Lander Radioscience LaRa, a Space Geodesy Experiment to Mars within the ExoMars 2020 mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehant, V. M. A.; Le Maistre, S.; Yseboodt, M.; Peters, M. J.; Karatekin, O.; Van Hove, B.; Rivoldini, A.; Baland, R. M.; Van Hoolst, T.

    2017-12-01

    The LaRa (Lander Radioscience) experiment is designed to obtain coherent two-way Doppler measurements from the radio link between the 2020 ExoMars lander and Earth over at least one Martian year. The LaRa instrument consists of a coherent transponder with up- and downlinks at X-band radio frequencies. The signal received from Earth is a pure carrier at 7.178 GHz; it is transponded back to Earth at a frequency of 8.434 GHz. The transponder is designed to maintain its lock and coherency over its planed one-hour observation sessions. The transponder mass is at the one-kg level. There are one uplink antenna and two downlink antennas. They are small patch antennas covered by a radome of 130gr for the downlink ones and of 200gr for the uplink. The signals will be generated and received by Earth-based radio antennas belonging to the NASA deep space network (DSN), the ESA tracking station network, or the Russian ground stations network. The instrument lifetime is more than twice the nominal mission duration of one Earth year. The Doppler measurements will be used to observe the orientation and rotation of Mars in space (precession, nutations, and length-of-day variations), as well as polar motion. The ultimate objective is to obtain information/constraints on the Martian interior, and on the sublimation/condensation cycle of atmospheric CO2. Orientation and rotational variations will allow us to constrain the moment of inertia of the entire planet, the moment of inertia of the core, and seasonal mass transfer between the atmosphere and the ice caps. The LaRa experiment will be combined with other previous radio science experiments such as the InSight (Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) RISE experiment (Rotation and Interior Structure Experiment) with radio science data of the NASA Viking landers, Mars Pathfinder and Mars Exploration Rovers. In addition, other ExoMars2020 and TGO (Trace Gas Orbiter) experiments providing

  17. A new laser-ranged satellite for General Relativity and space geodesy: I. An introduction to the LARES2 space experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio; Paolozzi, Antonio; Pavlis, Erricos C.; Sindoni, Giampiero; Koenig, Rolf; Ries, John C.; Matzner, Richard; Gurzadyan, Vahe; Penrose, Roger; Rubincam, David; Paris, Claudio

    2017-08-01

    We introduce the LARES 2 space experiment recently approved by the Italian Space Agency (ASI). The LARES 2 satellite is planned for launch in 2019 with the new VEGA C launch vehicle of ASI, ESA and ELV. The orbital analysis of LARES 2 experiment will be carried out by our international science team of experts in General Relativity, theoretical physics, space geodesy and aerospace engineering. The main objectives of the LARES 2 experiment are gravitational and fundamental physics, including accurate measurements of General Relativity, in particular a test of frame-dragging aimed at achieving an accuracy of a few parts in a thousand, i.e., aimed at improving by about an order of magnitude the present state-of-the-art and forthcoming tests of this general relativistic phenomenon. LARES 2 will also achieve determinations in space geodesy. LARES 2 is an improved version of the LAGEOS 3 experiment, proposed in 1984 to measure frame-dragging and analyzed in 1989 by a joint ASI and NASA study.

  18. Laboratory volcano geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Færøvik Johannessen, Rikke; Galland, Olivier; Mair, Karen

    2014-05-01

    Magma transport in volcanic plumbing systems induces surface deformation, which can be monitored by geodetic techniques, such as GPS and InSAR. These geodetic signals are commonly analyzed through geodetic models in order to constrain the shape of, and the pressure in, magma plumbing systems. These models, however, suffer critical limitations: (1) the modelled magma conduit shapes cannot be compared with the real conduits, so the geodetic models cannot be tested nor validated; (2) the modelled conduits only exhibit shapes that are too simplistic; (3) most geodetic models only account for elasticity of the host rock, whereas substantial plastic deformation is known to occur. To overcome these limitations, one needs to use a physical system, in which (1) both surface deformation and the shape of, and pressure in, the underlying conduit are known, and (2) the mechanical properties of the host material are controlled and well known. In this contribution, we present novel quantitative laboratory results of shallow magma emplacement. Fine-grained silica flour represents the brittle crust, and low viscosity vegetable oil is an analogue for the magma. The melting temperature of the oil is 31°C; the oil solidifies in the models after the end of the experiments. At the time of injection the oil temperature is 50°C. The oil is pumped from a reservoir using a volumetric pump into the silica flour through a circular inlet at the bottom of a 40x40 cm square box. The silica flour is cohesive, such that oil intrudes it by fracturing it, and produces typical sheet intrusions (dykes, cone sheets, etc.). During oil intrusion, the model surface deforms, mostly by doming. These movements are measured by an advanced photogrammetry method, which uses 4 synchronized fixed cameras that periodically image the surface of the model from different angles. We apply particle tracking method to compute the 3D ground deformation pattern through time. After solidification of the oil, the intrusion can be excavated and photographed from several angles to compute its 3D shape with the same photogrammetry method. Then, the surface deformation pattern can be directly compared with the shape of underlying intrusion. This quantitative dataset is essential to quantitatively test and validate classical volcano geodetic models.

  19. Laboratory Volcano Geodesy

    OpenAIRE

    Johannessen, Rikke Færøvik

    2014-01-01

    Magma transport in volcanic plumbing systems induces surface deformation, which can be monitored by geodetic techniques, such as GPS and InSAR. These geode- tic signals are commonly analyzed through geodetic models in order to constrain the shape of, and the pressure in, magma plumbing systems. These models, how- ever, suffer critical limitations: (1) the modelled magma conduit shapes cannot be compared with the real conduits, so the geodetic models cannot be tested nor validated; (2) the mod...

  20. GEOdetic Data assimilation and EStimation of references for climate change InvEstigation. An overall presentation of the French GEODESIE project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahmani, S.; Coulot, D.; Biancale, R.; Bizouard, C.; Bonnefond, P.; Bouquillon, S.; Collilieux, X.; Deleflie, F.; Garayt, B.; Lambert, S. B.; Laurent-Varin, S.; Marty, J. C.; Mercier, F.; Metivier, L.; Meyssignac, B.; Pollet, A.; Rebischung, P.; Reinquin, F.; Richard, J. Y.; Tertre, F.; Woppelmann, G.

    2017-12-01

    Many major indicators of climate change are monitored with space observations. This monitoring is highly dependent on references that only geodesy can provide. The current accuracy of these references does not permit to fully support the challenges that the constantly evolving Earth system gives rise to, and can consequently limit the accuracy of these indicators. Thus, in the framework of the GGOS, stringent requirements are fixed to the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) for the next decade: an accuracy at the level of 1 mm and a stability at the level of 0.1 mm/yr. This means an improvement of the current quality of ITRF by a factor of 5-10. Improving the quality of the geodetic references is an issue which requires a thorough reassessment of the methodologies involved. The most relevant and promising method to improve this quality is the direct combination of the space-geodetic measurements used to compute the official references of the IERS. The GEODESIE project aims at (i) determining highly-accurate global and consistent references and (ii) providing the geophysical and climate research communities with these references, for a better estimation of geocentric sea level rise, ice mass balance and on-going climate changes. Time series of sea levels computed from altimetric data and tide gauge records with these references will also be provided. The geodetic references will be essential bases for Earth's observation and monitoring to support the challenges of the century. The geocentric time series of sea levels will permit to better apprehend (i) the drivers of the global mean sea level rise and of regional variations of sea level and (ii) the contribution of the global climate change induced by anthropogenic greenhouse gases emissions to these drivers. All the results and computation and quality assessment reports will be available at geodesie_anr.ign.fr.This project, supported by the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) for the period

  1. Geodezija od Mesopotamije do Globalnog geodetskog opažačkog sistema : Geodesy from Mesopotamie to Global Geodetic Observing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medžida Mulić

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tokom šest milenijuma postojanja civilizacije na Zemlji, geodetske tehnike su doživjele teško sagledive promjene. Definicija i uloga geodezije su se mijenjale u skladu s tim promijenila. Geodezija (viša je evoluirala od svoje originalne klasične definicije da „proučava kretanja nebeskih tijela, oblik i dimenzije Zemlje“ u „znanost koja osim naprijed rečenog, proučava njene promjene i kompleksne dinamičke procese, koji djeluju unutar Zemlje, na njenoj površini i iznad njene površine, kao i u svemiru koji je okružuje. Rad predstavlja detaljan pregled geodetskih tehnika, instrumenata, katastra i kartografije kod starih civilizacija: Mesopotamije, starog Egipta, antičke Grčke, starog Rima, pa sve do Evropljana, između 17. stoljeća do modernog doba. Posebno su opisani geodetski radovi u Bosni i Hercegovini, od doba osmanlija, austro-ugarskog premjera, do savremenih dostignuća u polju premjera i primjene satelitskih modernih tehnika. Globalni geodetski opažački sistem-GGOS, glavna komponenta Internacionalne asocijacije za geodeziju, kao projekat za buduće generacije geodeta, opisan je na kraju. : During the six millennia of the existence of the civilization on the Earth, surveying techniques have been experienced difficult foreseeable changes. The definition and role of geodesy have been changing accordingly. Geodesy has evolved from its original classic definition that "studying the movements of celestial bodies, the shape and dimensions of the Earth" in the "science which, beside it noted above, studies its changes and complex dynamic processes that ongoing inside the Earth, on the surface, above its surfaces, and evironment. The paper is overview of the geodetic techniques and the surveying instruments, cadastre and cartography in the ancien civilizations: Mesopotamia, ancient Egypt, antic Greece, ancient Rome, to the Europeans, from the 17th century to modern times. A detailed description devoted to surveying and geodetic

  2. A new laser-ranged satellite for General Relativity and space geodesy. III. De Sitter effect and the LARES 2 space experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio [Universita del Salento, Dipt. Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Lecce (Italy); Centro Fermi, Rome (Italy); Matzner, Richard [University of Texas, Theory Group, Austin (United States); Gurzadyan, Vahe [Alikhanian National Laboratory and Yerevan State University, Center for Cosmology and Astrophysics, Yerevan (Armenia); Penrose, Roger [University of Oxford, Mathematical Institute, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2017-12-15

    In two previous papers we presented the LARES 2 space experiment aimed at a very accurate test of frame-dragging and at other tests of fundamental physics and measurements of space geodesy and geodynamics. We presented the error sources of the LARES 2 experiment, its error budget and Monte Carlo simulations and covariance analyses confirming an accuracy of a few parts in one thousand in the test of frame-dragging. Here we discuss the impact of the orbital perturbation known as the de Sitter effect, or geodetic precession, in the error budget of the LARES 2 frame-dragging experiment. We show that the uncertainty in the de Sitter effect has a negligible impact in the final error budget because of the very accurate results now available for the test of the de Sitter precession and because of its very nature. The total error budget in the LARES 2 test of frame-dragging remains at a level of the order of 0.2%, as determined in the first two papers of this series. (orig.)

  3. A new laser-ranged satellite for General Relativity and space geodesy. III. De Sitter effect and the LARES 2 space experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio; Matzner, Richard; Gurzadyan, Vahe; Penrose, Roger

    2017-01-01

    In two previous papers we presented the LARES 2 space experiment aimed at a very accurate test of frame-dragging and at other tests of fundamental physics and measurements of space geodesy and geodynamics. We presented the error sources of the LARES 2 experiment, its error budget and Monte Carlo simulations and covariance analyses confirming an accuracy of a few parts in one thousand in the test of frame-dragging. Here we discuss the impact of the orbital perturbation known as the de Sitter effect, or geodetic precession, in the error budget of the LARES 2 frame-dragging experiment. We show that the uncertainty in the de Sitter effect has a negligible impact in the final error budget because of the very accurate results now available for the test of the de Sitter precession and because of its very nature. The total error budget in the LARES 2 test of frame-dragging remains at a level of the order of 0.2%, as determined in the first two papers of this series. (orig.)

  4. Theory of satellite geodesy applications of satellites to geodesy

    CERN Document Server

    Kaula, William M

    2000-01-01

    The main purpose of this classic text is to demonstrate how Newtonian gravitational theory and Euclidean geometry can be used and developed in the earth's environment. The second is to collect and explain some of the mathematical techniques developed for measuring the earth by satellite.Book chapters include discussions of the earth's gravitational field, with special emphasis on spherical harmonies and the potential of the ellipsoid; matrices and orbital geometry; elliptic motion, linear perturbations, resonance, and other aspects of satellite orbit dynamics; the geometry of satellite obser

  5. Seismology and geodesy of the sun: Solar geodesy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicke, R H

    1981-03-01

    Measurements of the elliptical figure of the sun made in 1966 are analyzed on an hourly basis. This analysis yields an improved measure of the previously found solar distortion, rotating rigidly with a sidereal period of 12.38+/-0.10 days. It also yields a set of residùals used to search for signals due to low-frequency solar oscillations.

  6. Lunar geophysics, geodesy, and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. G.; Dickey, J. O.

    2002-01-01

    Experience with the dynamics and data analyses for earth and moon reveals both similarities and differences. Analysis of Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) data provides information on the lunar orbit, rotation, solid-body tides, and retroreflector locations.

  7. Geodesy at Mercury with MESSENGER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria t.; Peale, Stanley J.; Phillips, Roger J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2006-01-01

    In 2011 the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft will enter Mercury orbit and begin the mapping phase of the mission. As part of its science objectives the MESSENGER mission will determine the shape and gravity field of Mercury. These observations will enable the topography and the crustal thickness to be derived for the planet and will determine the small libration of the planet about its axis, the latter critical to constraining the state of the core. These measurements require very precise positioning of the MESSENGER spacecraft in its eccentric orbit, which has a periapsis altitude as low as 200 km, an apoapsis altitude near 15,000 km, and a closest approach to the surface varying from latitude 60 to about 70 N. The X-band tracking of MESSENGER and the laser altimetry are the primary data that will be used to measure the planetary shape and gravity field. The laser altimeter, which has an expected range of 1000 to 1200 km, is expected to provide significant data only over the northern hemisphere because of MESSENGER's eccentric orbit. For the southern hemisphere, radio occultation measurements obtained as the spacecraft passes behind the planet as seen from Earth and images obtained with the imaging system will be used to provide the long-wavelength shape of the planet. Gravity, derived from the tracking data, will also have greater resolution in the northern hemisphere, but full global models for both topography and gravity will be obtained at low harmonic order and degree. The limiting factor for both gravity and topography is expected to be knowledge of the spacecraft location. Present estimations are that in a combined tracking, altimetry, and occultation solution the spacecraft position uncertainty is likely to be of order 10 m. This accuracy should be adequate for establishing an initial geodetic coordinate system for Mercury that will enable positioning of imaged features on the surface, determination of the planet's obliquity, and detection of the librational motion of the planet about its axis.

  8. Twin probes for space geodesy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertotti, B.

    1978-01-01

    The twin probe method, proposed by Bertotti and Colombo (1972) to get rid of nongravitational forces in interplanetary space, can be applied to a near-Earth orbit to eliminate the atmospheric drag. Two equal pairs of probes, each pair consisting of two passive, small and dense spheres of equal surface and different masses, are flown on a circular orbit at an altitude of about 300 km. Each pair determines the motion of an ideal point which feels only the gravitational forces. They are separated by a distance d of (100/200) km and are tracked from a spacecraft or the Space Shuttle, flying at the same altitude. The relative motion of the two ideal points is reconstructed and yields a measurement of the fine structure of the Earth gravitational field, corresponding to a harmonic order l approximately a/d (a is the radius of the Earth). The tracking can be done by laser ranging to the four spheres, covered by corner reflectors; Doppler ranging is more convenient for higher values of l and can also be used. The accuracy in the compensation of the non-gravitational forces and in the measurements one needs for a given l are discussed in detail. (author)

  9. Precise GPS orbits for geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Oscar L.

    1994-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) has become, in recent years, the main space-based system for surveying and navigation in many military, commercial, cadastral, mapping, and scientific applications. Better receivers, interferometric techniques (DGPS), and advances in post-processing methods have made possible to position fixed or moving receivers with sub-decimeter accuracies in a global reference frame. Improved methods for obtaining the orbits of the GPS satellites have played a major role in these achievements; this paper gives a personal view of the main developments in GPS orbit determination.

  10. Precision Geodesy via Radio Interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinteregger, H F; Shapiro, I I; Robertson, D S; Knight, C A; Ergas, R A; Whitney, A R; Rogers, A E; Moran, J M; Clark, T A; Burke, B F

    1972-10-27

    Very-long-baseline interferometry experiments, involving observations of extragalactic radio sources, were performed in 1969 to determine the vector separations between antenna sites in Massachusetts and West Virginia. The 845.130-kilometer baseline was estimated from two separate experiments. The results agreed with each other to within 2 meters in all three components and with a special geodetic survey to within 2 meters in length; the differences in baseline direction as determined by the survey and by interferometry corresponded to discrepancies of about 5 meters. The experiments also yielded positions for nine extragalactic radio sources, most to within 1 arc second, and allowed the hydrogen maser clocks at the two sites to be synchronized a posteriori with an uncertainty of only a few nanoseconds.

  11. At the dawn of geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Irene K.

    1981-06-01

    The first land surveyors were rope stretchers and rope knotters, remembered in ancient documents and tomb paintings and also in some terminology. The L-shaped carpenter’s square, one of the earliest and most versatile basic tools, represents the observed direction of the plumb line versus the water level and appears as the shadow-casting gnomon and also as the geometrical gnomon in magically-restricted enlargements of altars. The related “Pythagorean” theorem was known in antiquity centuries before Pythagoras, with algebraic proofs in Babylonia and China. The spherical shape of the earth, deduced from the observation of circumpolar stars, was part of a complete equatorial astronomical system in ancient China. But although shadow measurements were generally used to establish north-south distances, only the Greeks derived from them the size of the earth. The striking difference between the abstract, geometric approach of Greece and the concrete, algebraic approach of Babylonia and China represents not a difference in talents but a difference in culture-bound interests.

  12. Ocean tides for satellite geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, S. R.

    1990-01-01

    Spherical harmonic tidal solutions have been obtained at the frequencies of the 32 largest luni-solar tides using prior theory of the author. That theory was developed for turbulent, nonglobal, self-gravitating, and loading oceans possessing realistic bathymetry and linearized bottom friction; the oceans satisfy no-flow boundary conditions at coastlines. In this theory the eddy viscosity and bottom drag coefficients are treated as spatially uniform. Comparison of the predicted degree-2 components of the Mf, P1, and M2 tides with those from numerical and satellite-based tide models allows the ocean friction parameters to be estimated at long and short periods. Using the 32 tide solutions, the frequency dependence of tidal admittance is investigated, and the validity of sideband tide models used in satellite orbit analysis is examined. The implications of admittance variability for oceanic resonances are also explored.

  13. Equilibrium figures in geodesy and geophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, H.

    There is an enormous literature on geodetic equilibrium figures, but the various works have not always been interrelated, also for linguistic reasons (English, French, German, Italian, Russian). The author attempts to systematize the various approaches and to use the standard second-order theory for a study of the deviation of the actual earth and of the equipotential reference ellipsoid from an equilibrium figure.

  14. Andean tectonics: Implications for Satellite Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allenby, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Current knowledge and theories of large scale Andean tectonics as they relate to site planning for the NASA Crustal Dynamics Program's proposed high precision geodetic measurements of relative motions between the Nazca and South American plates are summarized. The Nazca Plate and its eastern margin, the Peru-Chile Trench, is considered a prototype plate marked by rapid motion, strong seismicity and well defined boundaries. Tectonic activity across the Andes results from the Nazca Plate subducting under the South American plate in a series of discrete platelets with different widths and dip angles. This in turn, is reflected in the tectonic complexity of the Andes which are a multitutde of orogenic belts superimposed on each other since the Precambrian. Sites for Crustal Dynamics Program measurements are being located to investigate both interplate and extraplate motions. Observing operations have already been initiated at Arequipa, Peru and Easter Island, Santiago and Cerro Tololo, Chile. Sites under consideration include Iquique, Chile; Oruro and Santa Cruz, Bolivia; Cuzco, Lima, Huancayo and Bayovar, Peru; and Quito and the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador. Based on scientific considerations, Santa Cruz, Huancayo (or Lima), Quito and the Galapagos Islands should be replaced by Isla San Felix, Chile; Brazilia or Petrolina, Brazil; and Guayaquil, Ecuador. If resources permit, additional important sites would be Buenaventura and Villavicencio or Puerto La Concordia, Colombia; and Mendoza and Cordoba, Argentina.

  15. Volcano geodesy in the Cascade arc, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael; Lisowski, Michael; Dzurisin, Daniel; Kramer, Rebecca; McLay, Megan; Pauk, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Experience during historical time throughout the Cascade arc and the lack of deep-seated deformation prior to the two most recent eruptions of Mount St. Helens might lead one to infer that Cascade volcanoes are generally quiescent and, specifically, show no signs of geodetic change until they are about to erupt. Several decades of geodetic data, however, tell a different story. Ground- and space-based deformation studies have identified surface displacements at five of the 13 major Cascade arc volcanoes that lie in the USA (Mount Baker, Mount St. Helens, South Sister, Medicine Lake, and Lassen volcanic center). No deformation has been detected at five volcanoes (Mount Rainier, Mount Hood, Newberry Volcano, Crater Lake, and Mount Shasta), and there are not sufficient data at the remaining three (Glacier Peak, Mount Adams, and Mount Jefferson) for a rigorous assessment. In addition, gravity change has been measured at two of the three locations where surveys have been repeated (Mount St. Helens and Mount Baker show changes, while South Sister does not). Broad deformation patterns associated with heavily forested and ice-clad Cascade volcanoes are generally characterized by low displacement rates, in the range of millimeters to a few centimeters per year, and are overprinted by larger tectonic motions of several centimeters per year. Continuous GPS is therefore the best means of tracking temporal changes in deformation of Cascade volcanoes and also for characterizing tectonic signals so that they may be distinguished from volcanic sources. Better spatial resolution of volcano deformation can be obtained through the use of campaign GPS, semipermanent GPS, and interferometric synthetic aperture radar observations, which leverage the accumulation of displacements over time to improve signal to noise. Deformation source mechanisms in the Cascades are diverse and include magma accumulation and withdrawal, post-emplacement cooling of recent volcanic deposits, magmatic-tectonic interactions, and loss of volatiles plus densification of magma. The Cascade Range thus offers an outstanding opportunity for investigating a wide range of volcanic processes. Indeed, there may be areas of geodetic change that have yet to be discovered, and there is good potential for addressing a number of important questions about how arc volcanoes work before, during, and after eruptions by continuing geodetic research in the Cascade Range.

  16. Alignment and geodesy for the ESRF project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, D.

    1990-01-01

    New generation accelerators and storage rings for synchrotron radiation require ever increasing precision of alignment, precision which moreover must be preserved over a maximum length of time. The use of ever smaller beam dimensions, and ever narrower vacuum chambers leads the magnet positioning tolerances to be reduced to a minimum. Thus, unlike in the past, annual realignment due to progressive deterioration of the ground stability can no longer be envisaged. Permanent monitoring of the ground stability must be guaranteed and its effects compensated, as soon as significant deterioration is recorded. It is this viewpoint that has dictated the choices made by ESRF in the field of alignment and monitoring

  17. MODEST: A Tool for Geodesy and Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovers, Ojars J.; Jacobs, Christopher S.; Lanyi, Gabor E.

    2004-01-01

    Features of the JPL VLBI modeling and estimation software "MODEST" are reviewed. Its main advantages include thoroughly documented model physics, portability, and detailed error modeling. Two unique models are included: modeling of source structure and modeling of both spatial and temporal correlations in tropospheric delay noise. History of the code parallels the development of the astrometric and geodetic VLBI technique and the software retains many of the models implemented during its advancement. The code has been traceably maintained since the early 1980s, and will continue to be updated with recent IERS standards. Scripts are being developed to facilitate user-friendly data processing in the era of e-VLBI.

  18. Art and science: geodesy in materials science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroto, Harold

    2010-09-01

    A 3-dimensional model based on a molecular structural recipe having some unique and unexpected shape characteristics is demonstrated. The project was originally initiated to satisfy the aesthetic creative impulse to build a 3-dimensional model or sculpture. Further scientific investigation explained some important nanoscale structural observations that had been seen many years beforehand and mistakenly explained. This is a rare example of artistic creativity resulting in a key scientific advance.

  19. Monitoring Global Geophysical Fluids by Space Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Benjamin F.; Dehant, V.; Gross, R. S.; Ray, R. D.; Salstein, D. A.; Watkins, M.

    1999-01-01

    Since its establishment on 1/1/1998 by the International Earth Rotation Service, the Coordinating Center for Monitoring Global Geophysical Fluids (MGGF) and its seven Special Bureaus have engaged in an effort to support and facilitate the understanding of the geophysical fluids in global geodynamics research. Mass transports in the atmosphere-hydrosphere-solid Earth-core system (the "global geophysical fluids") will cause the following geodynamic effects on a broad time scale: (1) variations in the solid Earth's rotation (in length-of-day and polar motion/nutation) via the conservation of angular momentum and effected by torques at the fluid-solid Earth interface; (2) changes in the global gravitational field according to Newton's gravitational law; and (3) motion in the center of mass of the solid Earth relative to that of the whole Earth ("geocenter") via the conservation of linear momentum. These minute signals have become observable by space geodetic techniques, primarily VLBI, SLR, GPS, and DORIS, with ever increasing precision/accuracy and temporal/spatial resolution. Each of the seven Special Bureaus within MGGF is responsible for calculations related to a specific Earth component or aspect -- Atmosphere, Ocean, Hydrology, Ocean Tides, Mantle, Core, and Gravity/Geocenter. Angular momenta and torques, gravitational coefficients, and geocenter shift will be computed for geophysical fluids based on global observational data, and from state-of-the-art models, some of which assimilate such data. The computed quantities, algorithm and data formats are standardized. The results are archived and made available to the scientific research community. This paper reports the status of the MGGF activities and current results.

  20. Geodesy and cartography of the Martian satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batson, R. M.; Edwards, Kathleen; Duxbury, T. C.

    1992-01-01

    The difficulties connected with conventional maps of Phobos and Deimos are largely overcome by producing maps in digital forms, i.e., by projecting Viking Orbiter images onto a global topographic model made from collections of radii derived by photogrammetry. The resulting digital mosaics are then formatted as arrays of body-centered latitudes, longitudes, radii, and brightness values of Viking Orbiter images. The Phobos mapping described was done with Viking Orbiter data. Significant new coverage was obtained by the Soviet Phobos mission. The mapping of Deimos is in progress, using the techniques developed for Phobos.

  1. Geodesy and metrology of the LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayoud, M.

    1985-01-01

    The accurate installation of an accelerator of 8,500 m diameter requires the most refined geodetic techniques. The instrumentation in use incorporates not only lasers and eventually satellites, but also the simple nylon wire. Over 20,000 measurement will be made to install to within 0.1 mm the 5,000 fonctional elements of the LEP machine (Large Electron-Positron Collider). This work will be controlled and checked by portable computers. Each instrument will be automatic and will contain a miniature micro-computer (on a ''flexible-rigid'' card) [fr

  2. Global Geodesy Using GPS Without Fiducial Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heflin, Michael B.; Blewitt, Geoffrey

    1994-01-01

    Global Positioning System, GPS, used to make global geodetic measurements without use of fiducial site coordinates. Baseline lengths and geocentric radii for each site determined without having to fix any site coordinates. Given n globally distributed sites, n baseline lengths and n geocentric radii form polyhedron with each site at vertex and with geocenter at intersection of all radii. Geodetic information derived from structure of polyhedron and its change with time. Approach applied to any global geodetic technique.

  3. Geometrical geodesy using information and computer technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hooijberg, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    Surveying a Century Ago As it was based on the principles of geometry and trigonometry, surveying may be may be looked upon as a branch of practical mathematics. Hence, it was necessary that land surveyors and hydrographers should have a fair general knowledge, not only of these subjects, but also of all the subjects comprised by the term mathemat­ ics. In addition, the knowledge of mathematics required in ordinary chain surveying and levelling was not very extensive but in geodetical work, the highest mathematical ability and great organising power were required for a proper conception and supervision of the operations (Threlfall, 1940). Only small area of a few hundred square kilometres can be accurately mapped and surveyed without a frame­ work, since no difficulty is encountered because of Earth-curvature. In the past, especially in hydrography due to the type of work, surveying was carried out on the principles of ordinary practice, but in a very rough man­ ner, rapidity of execution being of paramoun...

  4. Volcano geodesy in the Cascade arc, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Lisowski, Michael; Dzurisin, Daniel; Kramer, Rebecca; McLay, Megan; Pauk, Ben

    2017-08-01

    Experience during historical time throughout the Cascade arc and the lack of deep-seated deformation prior to the two most recent eruptions of Mount St. Helens might lead one to infer that Cascade volcanoes are generally quiescent and, specifically, show no signs of geodetic change until they are about to erupt. Several decades of geodetic data, however, tell a different story. Ground- and space-based deformation studies have identified surface displacements at five of the 13 major Cascade arc volcanoes that lie in the USA (Mount Baker, Mount St. Helens, South Sister, Medicine Lake, and Lassen volcanic center). No deformation has been detected at five volcanoes (Mount Rainier, Mount Hood, Newberry Volcano, Crater Lake, and Mount Shasta), and there are not sufficient data at the remaining three (Glacier Peak, Mount Adams, and Mount Jefferson) for a rigorous assessment. In addition, gravity change has been measured at two of the three locations where surveys have been repeated (Mount St. Helens and Mount Baker show changes, while South Sister does not). Broad deformation patterns associated with heavily forested and ice-clad Cascade volcanoes are generally characterized by low displacement rates, in the range of millimeters to a few centimeters per year, and are overprinted by larger tectonic motions of several centimeters per year. Continuous GPS is therefore the best means of tracking temporal changes in deformation of Cascade volcanoes and also for characterizing tectonic signals so that they may be distinguished from volcanic sources. Better spatial resolution of volcano deformation can be obtained through the use of campaign GPS, semipermanent GPS, and interferometric synthetic aperture radar observations, which leverage the accumulation of displacements over time to improve signal to noise. Deformation source mechanisms in the Cascades are diverse and include magma accumulation and withdrawal, post-emplacement cooling of recent volcanic deposits, magmatic-tectonic interactions, and loss of volatiles plus densification of magma. The Cascade Range thus offers an outstanding opportunity for investigating a wide range of volcanic processes. Indeed, there may be areas of geodetic change that have yet to be discovered, and there is good potential for addressing a number of important questions about how arc volcanoes work before, during, and after eruptions by continuing geodetic research in the Cascade Range.

  5. Data assimilation strategies for volcano geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yan; Gregg, Patricia M.

    2017-09-01

    Ground deformation observed using near-real time geodetic methods, such as InSAR and GPS, can provide critical information about the evolution of a magma chamber prior to volcanic eruption. Rapid advancement in numerical modeling capabilities has resulted in a number of finite element models targeted at better understanding the connection between surface uplift associated with magma chamber pressurization and the potential for volcanic eruption. Robust model-data fusion techniques are necessary to take full advantage of the numerical models and the volcano monitoring observations currently available. In this study, we develop a 3D data assimilation framework using the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) approach in order to combine geodetic observations of surface deformation with geodynamic models to investigate volcanic unrest. The EnKF sequential assimilation method utilizes disparate data sets as they become available to update geodynamic models of magma reservoir evolution. While the EnKF has been widely applied in hydrologic and climate modeling, the adaptation for volcano monitoring is in its initial stages. As such, our investigation focuses on conducting a series of sensitivity tests to optimize the EnKF for volcano applications and on developing specific strategies for assimilation of geodetic data. Our numerical experiments illustrate that the EnKF is able to adapt well to the spatial limitations posed by GPS data and the temporal limitations of InSAR, and that specific strategies can be adopted to enhance EnKF performance to improve model forecasts. Specifically, our numerical experiments indicate that: (1) incorporating additional iterations of the EnKF analysis step is more efficient than increasing the number of ensemble members; (2) the accuracy of the EnKF results are not affected by initial parameter assumptions; (3) GPS observations near the center of uplift improve the quality of model forecasts; (4) occasionally shifting continuous GPS stations to provide variability in the locations of observations results in better model predictions than utilizing fixed locations when the number of available instruments is limited; (5) spotty InSAR data coverage on the flanks of a volcano due to topographic shadows and/or atmospheric interference does not adversely impact the effectiveness of EnKF if the available coverage is > 50%; and (6) snow or glacial obstruction in the center of uplift can adversely impact EnKF forecasts. By utilizing these strategies, we conclude that the EnKF is an effective sequential model-data fusion technique for assimilating multiple geodetic observations to forecast volcanic activity at restless volcanoes.

  6. A Seafloor Benchmark for 3-dimensional Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwell, C. D.; Webb, S. C.; Nooner, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed an inexpensive, permanent seafloor benchmark to increase the longevity of seafloor geodetic measurements. The benchmark provides a physical tie to the sea floor lasting for decades (perhaps longer) on which geodetic sensors can be repeatedly placed and removed with millimeter resolution. Global coordinates estimated with seafloor geodetic techniques will remain attached to the benchmark allowing for the interchange of sensors as they fail or become obsolete, or for the sensors to be removed and used elsewhere, all the while maintaining a coherent series of positions referenced to the benchmark. The benchmark has been designed to free fall from the sea surface with transponders attached. The transponder can be recalled via an acoustic command sent from the surface to release from the benchmark and freely float to the sea surface for recovery. The duration of the sensor attachment to the benchmark will last from a few days to a few years depending on the specific needs of the experiment. The recovered sensors are then available to be reused at other locations, or again at the same site in the future. Three pins on the sensor frame mate precisely and unambiguously with three grooves on the benchmark. To reoccupy a benchmark a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) uses its manipulator arm to place the sensor pins into the benchmark grooves. In June 2014 we deployed four benchmarks offshore central Oregon. We used the ROV Jason to successfully demonstrate the removal and replacement of packages onto the benchmark. We will show the benchmark design and its operational capabilities. Presently models of megathrust slip within the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) are mostly constrained by the sub-aerial GPS vectors from the Plate Boundary Observatory, a part of Earthscope. More long-lived seafloor geodetic measures are needed to better understand the earthquake and tsunami risk associated with a large rupture of the thrust fault within the Cascadia subduction zone. Using a ROV to place and remove sensors on the benchmarks will significantly reduce the number of sensors required by the community to monitor offshore strain in subduction zones.

  7. Optimizing the African VLBI Network for Astronomy and Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Witt, A.; Mayer, D.; MacLeod, G.; Combrinck, L.; Petrov, L.; Nickola, M.

    2016-12-01

    The African VLBI Network will be a pan-African network of radio telescopes comprised of converted redundant satellite Earth-station antennas and new purpose-built radio telescopes. The first of these antennas, in Ghana, is currently being converted to a radio telescope and current funding is estimated to permit the conversion of two more antennas in Africa. These antennas will initially be equipped with a 5-GHz and 6.7-GHz receiver and the next receiver likely to be fitted is a 1.4-1.7-GHz receiver. While it would be advantageous for the AVN antennas to be able to participate also in geodetic and astrometric VLBI observations, there is no funding currently for this. In this paper we re-visit the scientific justifications for the AVN in an attempt to optimize the AVN for each science case, both astronomical and geodetic.

  8. ostglacial rebound from VLBI Geodesy: On Establishing Vertical Reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argus, Donald .

    1996-01-01

    I propose that a useful reference frame for vertical motions is that found by minimizing differences between vertical motions observed with VLBI [Ma and Ryan, 1995] and predictions from postglacial rebound predictions [Peltier, 1995].

  9. Review and comparison of recent methods in space geodesy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, M.

    1983-01-01

    The study of geodynamic processes requires the application of new space-born geodesic measuring methods. A terrestrial reference system (TRS) is required for describing geodynamic processes. For this purpose satisfactory knowledge of polar motions, Earth rotation and tidal forces determined by laser, global positioning system (GPS) and VLBI measurements are needed. In addition, gravity and magnetic field of the Earth have to be known, modelled by using satellite to satellite traching (SST), altimetry, gradiometry and magnetometry results. Motions of the Earth-Moon system, as well as the relation between the terrestrial reference system and the inertial system can be determined by means of VLBI measurements. (author)

  10. Geodesy and astrometry by transatlantic long base line interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, W.H.; Langley, R.B.; Petrachenko, W.T.; Kouba, J.

    1979-01-01

    We report geodetic and astrometric results from the analysis of fringe frequency observations from a series of three long base line interferometry (LBI) experiments carried out in 1973 between the 46-m antenna of the Algonquin Radio Observatory, Lake Traverse, Canada, and the 25-m antenna at Chilbolton Field Station, Chilbolton, England. The rms deviation from the mean of the estimates of the length and orientation of the 5251-km equatorial component of the base line from all three experiments is 1.05-m and 0.015'', respectively. The experiments also yielded positions of five extragalactic radio sources. The reported positions, each of which is from only a single experiment, have uncertainties of about 0.2'' in declination (except for low declination sources) and about 0.01 s in right ascension. The LBI determination of the length and orientation of the equatorial component of the base line is compared to the corresponding values derived from Naval Weapons Laboratory 9D (NWL-9D) coorinates for the antennae. The two length measurements agree in scale within quoted experimental errors; however, the NWL-9D coordinate frame is found to be rotated 0.867'' +- 0.1'' to the east relative to the average terrestrial frame of the Bureau Internationale de l'Heure (BIH),(LBI coordinate frame). This is in good agreement with the expected misalignment of 0.65'' +- 0.2''. The differences in the rates of the clocks used at each end of the base line were also determined and compared to Loran-C observations

  11. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry 2004 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrend, Dirk (Editor); Baver, Karen D. (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Combination Studies using the Cont02 Campaign. Coordinating Center report. Analysis coordinator report. Network coordinator report. IVS Technology coordinator report. Algonquin Radio observatory. Fortaleza Station report for 2004. Gilmore Creek Geophysical Observatory. Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical observatory. Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO). Hbart, Mt Pleasant, station report for 2004. Kashima 34m Radio Telescope. Kashima and Koganei 11-m VLBI Stations. Kokee Park Geophysical Observatory. Matera GGS VLBI Station. The Medicina Station status report. Report of the Mizusawa 10m Telescope. Noto Station Activity. NYAL Ny-Alesund 20 metre Antenna. German Antarctic receiving Station (GARS) O'higgins. The IVS network station Onsala space Observatory. Sheshan VLBI Station report for 2004. 10 Years of Geodetic Experiments at the Simeiz VLBI Station. Svetloe RAdio Astronomical Observatory. JARE Syowa Station 11-m Antenna, Antarctica. Geodetic Observatory TIGO in Concepcion. Tsukuba 32-m VLBI Station. Nanshan VLBI Station Report. Westford Antenna. Fundamental-station Wettzell 20m Radiotelescope. Observatorio Astroonomico Nacional Yebes. Yellowknife Observatory. The Bonn Geodetic VLBI Operation Center. CORE Operation Center Report. U.S. Naval Observatory Operation Center. The Bonn Astro/Geo Mark IV Correlator.

  12. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry 2014 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baver, Karen D. (Editor); Behrend, Dirk (Editor); Armstrong, Kyla L. (Editor)

    2015-01-01

    IVS is an international collaboration of organizations which operate or support Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) components. The goals are: 1. To provide a service to support geodetic, geophysical and astrometric research and operational activities. 2. To promote research and development activities in all aspects of the geodetic and astrometric VLBI technique. 3. To interact with the community of users of VLBI products and to integrate VLBI into a global Earth observing system.

  13. Seismology and geodesy of the sun: Low-frequency oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicke, R H

    1981-04-01

    The hourly averages of the solar ellipticity measured from June 13 to Sept. 17, 1966, are analyzed for indications of solar oscillations with periods in excess of 2 hr nu 0.1 hr(-1) but for lower frequencies the power spectrum shows a very complex structure containing about 20 strong narrow peaks. The complexity is illusionary. The signal apparently consists of only two frequencies. The complexity is due to aliasing by the window function with its basic 24-hr period, with many observational days missing, and with different numbers of hourly averages for the various observational days. Both signal frequencies are apparently due to odd-degree spherical harmonic oscillations of the sun.

  14. A clock network for geodesy and fundamental science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisdat, C; Grosche, G; Quintin, N; Shi, C; Raupach, S M F; Grebing, C; Nicolodi, D; Stefani, F; Al-Masoudi, A; Dörscher, S; Häfner, S; Robyr, J-L; Chiodo, N; Bilicki, S; Bookjans, E; Koczwara, A; Koke, S; Kuhl, A; Wiotte, F; Meynadier, F; Camisard, E; Abgrall, M; Lours, M; Legero, T; Schnatz, H; Sterr, U; Denker, H; Chardonnet, C; Le Coq, Y; Santarelli, G; Amy-Klein, A; Le Targat, R; Lodewyck, J; Lopez, O; Pottie, P-E

    2016-08-09

    Leveraging the unrivalled performance of optical clocks as key tools for geo-science, for astronomy and for fundamental physics beyond the standard model requires comparing the frequency of distant optical clocks faithfully. Here, we report on the comparison and agreement of two strontium optical clocks at an uncertainty of 5 × 10(-17) via a newly established phase-coherent frequency link connecting Paris and Braunschweig using 1,415 km of telecom fibre. The remote comparison is limited only by the instability and uncertainty of the strontium lattice clocks themselves, with negligible contributions from the optical frequency transfer. A fractional precision of 3 × 10(-17) is reached after only 1,000 s averaging time, which is already 10 times better and more than four orders of magnitude faster than any previous long-distance clock comparison. The capability of performing high resolution international clock comparisons paves the way for a redefinition of the unit of time and an all-optical dissemination of the SI-second.

  15. Space geodesy: subsidence and flooding in New Orleans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Timothy H; Amelung, Falk; Ferretti, Alessandro; Novali, Fabrizio; Rocca, Fabio; Dokka, Roy; Sella, Giovanni; Kim, Sang-Wan; Wdowinski, Shimon; Whitman, Dean

    2006-06-01

    It has long been recognized that New Orleans is subsiding and is therefore susceptible to catastrophic flooding. Here we present a new subsidence map for the city, generated from space-based synthetic-aperture radar measurements, which reveals that parts of New Orleans underwent rapid subsidence in the three years before Hurricane Katrina struck in August 2005. One such area is next to the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet (MRGO) canal, where levees failed during the peak storm surge: the map indicates that this weakness could be explained by subsidence of a metre or more since their construction.

  16. Postglacial Rebound from VLBI Geodesy: On Establishing Vertical Reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argus, Donald F.

    1996-01-01

    Difficulty in establishing a reference frame fixed to the earth's interior complicates the measurement of the vertical (radial) motions of the surface. I propose that a useful reference frame for vertical motions is that found by minimizing differences between vertical motions observed with VLBI [Ma and Ryan] and predictions from postglacial rebound predictions [Peltier]. The optimal translation of the geocenter is 1.7mm/year toward 36degN, 111degE when determined from the motions of 10 VLBI sites. This translation gives a better fit of observations to predictions than does the VLBI reference frame used by Ma and Ryan, but the improvement is statistically insignificant. The root mean square of differences decreases 20% to 0.73 mm/yr and the correlation coefficient increases from 0.76 to 0.87. Postglacial rebound is evident in the uplift of points in Sweden and Ontario that were beneath the ancient ice sheets of Fennoscandia and Canada, and in the subsidence of points in the northeastern U.S., Germany, and Alaska that were around the periphery of the ancient ice sheets.

  17. Seismology and geodesy of the sun: low-frequency oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicke, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    The hourly averages of the solar ellipticity measured from June 13 to September 17, 1966, are analyzed for indications of solar oscillations with periods in excess of 2 h ν -1 . Nothing significant is found for frequencies ν > 0.1 hr -1 but for lower frequencies the power spectrum shows a very complex structure containing about 20 strong narrow peaks. The complexity is illusionary. The signal apparently consists of only two frequencies. The complexity is due to aliasing by the window function with its basic 24-h period, with many observational days missing, and with different numbers of hourly averages for the various observational days. Both signal frequencies are apparently due to odd-degree spherical harmonic oscillations of the sun

  18. Ocean tide models for satellite geodesy and Earth rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    A theory is presented which predicts tides in turbulent, self-gravitating, and loading oceans possessing linearized bottom friction, realistic bathymetry, and continents (at coastal boundaries no-flow conditions are imposed). The theory is phrased in terms of spherical harmonics, which allows the tide equations to be reduced to linear matrix equations. This approach also allows an ocean-wide mass conservation constraint to be applied. Solutions were obtained for 32 long and short period luni-solar tidal constituents (and the pole tide), including the tidal velocities in addition to the tide height. Calibrating the intensity of bottom friction produces reasonable phase lags for all constituents; however, tidal amplitudes compare well with those from observation and other theories only for long-period constituents. In the most recent stage of grant research, traditional theory (Liouville equations) for determining the effects of angular momentum exchange on Earth's rotation were extended to encompass high-frequency excitations (such as short-period tides).

  19. Improving InSAR geodesy using Global Atmospheric Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolivet, Romain; Agram, Piyush Shanker; Lin, Nina Y.; Simons, Mark; Doin, Marie-Pierre; Peltzer, Gilles; Li, Zhenghong

    2014-03-01

    Spatial and temporal variations of pressure, temperature, and water vapor content in the atmosphere introduce significant confounding delays in interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) observations of ground deformation and bias estimates of regional strain rates. Producing robust estimates of tropospheric delays remains one of the key challenges in increasing the accuracy of ground deformation measurements using InSAR. Recent studies revealed the efficiency of global atmospheric reanalysis to mitigate the impact of tropospheric delays, motivating further exploration of their potential. Here we explore the effectiveness of these models in several geographic and tectonic settings on both single interferograms and time series analysis products. Both hydrostatic and wet contributions to the phase delay are important to account for. We validate these path delay corrections by comparing with estimates of vertically integrated atmospheric water vapor content derived from the passive multispectral imager Medium-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer, onboard the Envisat satellite. Generally, the performance of the prediction depends on the vigor of atmospheric turbulence. We discuss (1) how separating atmospheric and orbital contributions allows one to better measure long-wavelength deformation and (2) how atmospheric delays affect measurements of surface deformation following earthquakes, and (3) how such a method allows us to reduce biases in multiyear strain rate estimates by reducing the influence of unevenly sampled seasonal oscillations of the tropospheric delay.

  20. Central and South America GPS geodesy - CASA Uno

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, James N.; Dixon, Timothy H.

    1990-01-01

    In January 1988, scientists from over 25 organizations in 13 countries and territories cooperated in the largest GPS campaign in the world to date. A total of 43 GPS receivers collected approximately 590 station-days of data in American Samoa, Australia, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, Sweden, United States, West Germany, and Venezuela. The experiment was entitled CASA Uno. Scientific goals of the project include measurements of strain in the northern Andes, subduction rates for the Cocos and Nazca plates beneath Central and South America, and relative motion between the Caribbean plate and South America. A second set of measurements are planned in 1991 and should provide preliminary estimates of crustal deformation and plate motion rates in the region.

  1. Geodesy and contemporary strain in the Yucca Mountain region, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefer, W.R.; Coe, J.A.; Pezzopane, S.K.; Hunter, W.C.

    1997-01-01

    Geodetic surveys provide important information for estimating recent ground movement in support of seismotectonic investigations of the potential nuclear-waste storage site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Resurveys of established level lines document up to 22 millimeters of local subsidence related to the 1992 Little Skull Mountain earthquake, which is consistent with seismic data that show normal-slip rupture and with data from a regional trilateration network. Comparison of more recent surveys with a level line first established in 1907 suggests 3 to 13 centimeters of subsidence in the Crater Flat-Yucca Mountain structural depression that coincides with the Bare Mountain fault; small uplifts also were recorded near normal faults at Yucca Mountain. No significant deformation was recorded by a trilateration network over a 10-year period, except for coseismic deformation associated with the Little Skull Mountain earthquake, but meaningful results are limited by the short temporal period of that data set and the small rate of movement. Very long baseline interferometry that is capable of measuring direction and rates of deformation is likewise limited by a short history of observation, but rates of deformation between 8 and 13 millimeters per year across the basin and Range province are indicated by the available data

  2. Photometric geodesy of main-belt asteroids. III. Additional lightcurves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidenschilling, S.J.; Chapman, C.R.; Davis, D.R.; Greenberg, R.; Levy, D.H.

    1990-01-01

    A total of 107 complete or partial lightcurves are presented for 59 different asteroids over the 1982-1989 period. Unusual lightcurves with unequal minima and maxima at large amplitudes are preferentially seen for M-type asteroids. Some asteroids, such as 16 Psyche and 201 Penelope, exhibit lightcurves combining large amplitude with very unequal brightness for both maxima and both minima, even at small phase angles. An M-type asteroid is believed to consist of a metal core of a differentiated parent body that has had its rocky mantle completely removed by one or more large impacts. 39 refs

  3. Bernese advances towards a global analysis of Lunar geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertone, S.; Girardin, V.; Bourgoin, A.; Arnold, D.; Jaeggi, A.

    2017-12-01

    In this presentation we discuss our latest GRAIL-based lunar gravity fields generated with the Celestial Mechanics Approach using the planetary extension of the Bernese GNSS Software (BSW) developed at the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB).Based on one-way X band and two-way S-band Doppler data, we perform orbit determination by solving six initial orbital elements, dynamical parameters, and stochastic parameters in daily arcs using a least-squares adjustment. Significative improvements to our solutions come from the recent implementation of an accurate modeling of non-gravitational forces, including accelerations due to solar and planetary (albedo and IR) radiation pressure, based on the 28-plate macromodel to represent the GRAIL satellites. Also, as suggested in previous works, we deal with imperfections in the modeling of solar eclipses by both an accurate data screening at mid-latitudes and by taking into account solar panel voltage data in our processing. Empirical and pseudo-stochastic parameters are estimated on top of our dynamical modeling to absorb its deficiencies. We analyze the impact of different parametrizations using either pulses (i.e., instantaneous velocity changes) and piecewise constant accelerations (PCA) on our orbits.Based on these improved orbits, one- and two-way Doppler and KBRR data are then used together with an appropriate weighting for a combined orbit and gravity field determination process.We present our latest solutions of the lunar gravity field, based on the recent GRAIL GRGM900C gravity field (as validation of our modeling and parametrization) and on iterations from the SELENE SGM150J gravity field (to check the independence of our solution). We detail our procedure to gradually enlarge the parameter space while adding new data to our gravity field solution. In addition, we present our latest solution for the Moon tidal Love number k_2.Moreover, some important lunar geophysical parameters are best obtained by processing data from Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) stations. We analyze the impact of a combined processing on the recovery of a set of parameters and we provide some preliminary results.Finally, we compare all of our results with the most recent solutions of the lunar gravity field and of other geodetic parameters released by other groups.

  4. Volcano geodesy: Challenges and opportunities for the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzurisin, D.

    2000-01-01

    Intrusions of magma beneath volcanoes deform the surrounding rock and, if the intrusion is large enough, the overlying ground surface. Numerical models generally agree that, for most eruptions, subsurface volume changes are sufficient to produce measurable deformation at the surface. Studying this deformation can help to determine the location, volume, and shape of a subsurface magma body and thus to anticipate the onset and course of an eruption. This approach has been successfully applied at many restless volcanoes, especially basaltic shields and silicic calderas, using various geodetic techniques and sensors. However, its success at many intermediate-composition strato-volcanoes has been limited by generally long repose intervals, steep terrain, and structural influences that complicate the history and shape of surface deformation. These factors have made it difficult to adequately characterize deformation in space and time at many of the world's dangerous volcanoes. Recent technological advances promise to make this task easier by enabling the acquisition of geodetic data of high spatial and temporal resolution from Earth-orbiting satellites. Synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) can image ground deformation over large areas at metre-scale resolution over time-scales of a month to a few years. Global Positioning System (GPS) stations can provide continuous information on three-dimensional ground displacements at a network of key sites -information that is especially important during volcanic crises. By using InSAR to determine the shape of the displacement field and GPS to monitor temporal changes at key sites, scientists have a much better chance to capture geodetic signals that have so far been elusive at many volcanoes. This approach has the potential to provide longer-term warnings of impending volcanic activity than is possible with other monitoring techniques.

  5. A GPS measurement system for precise satellite tracking and geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunck, T. P.; Wu, S.-C.; Lichten, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    NASA is pursuing two key applications of differential positioning with the Global Positioning System (GPS): sub-decimeter tracking of earth satellites and few-centimeter determination of ground-fixed baselines. Key requirements of the two applications include the use of dual-frequency carrier phase data, multiple ground receivers to serve as reference points, simultaneous solution for use position and GPS orbits, and calibration of atmospheric delays using water vapor radiometers. Sub-decimeter tracking will be first demonstrated on the TOPEX oceanographic satellite to be launched in 1991. A GPS flight receiver together with at least six ground receivers will acquire delta range data from the GPS carriers for non-real-time analysis. Altitude accuracies of 5 to 10 cm are expected. For baseline measurements, efforts will be made to obtain precise differential pseudorange by resolving the cycle ambiguity in differential carrier phase. This could lead to accuracies of 2 or 3 cm over a few thousand kilometers. To achieve this, a high-performance receiver is being developed, along with improved calibration and data processing techniques. Demonstrations may begin in 1986.

  6. GPS-based system for satellite tracking and geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertiger, Willy I.; Thornton, Catherine L.

    1989-01-01

    High-performance receivers and data processing systems developed for GPS are reviewed. The GPS Inferred Positioning System (GIPSY) and the Orbiter Analysis and Simulation Software (OASIS) are described. The OASIS software is used to assess GPS system performance using GIPSY for data processing. Consideration is given to parameter estimation for multiday arcs, orbit repeatability, orbit prediction, daily baseline repeatability, agreement with VLBI, and ambiguity resolution. Also, the dual-frequency Rogue receiver, which can track up to eight GPS satellites simultaneously, is discussed.

  7. Status of the planar electrostatic gradiometer GREMLIT for airborne geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebat, V.; Foulon, B.; Christophe, B.; Huynh, P. A.; Liorzou, F.; Boulanger, D.

    2017-12-01

    Taking advantage of technologies, developed by ONERA for the GRACE, GOCE and GRACE FOLLOW-ON space missions, the GREMLIT airborne gravity gradiometer is based of a planar electrostatic gradiometer configuration. The feasibility of the instrument and of its performance was proved by realistic simulations, based on actual data and recorded environmental aircraft perturbations, with performance of about one Eötvös along the two horizontal components of the gravity gradient. The performance of the gradiometer is directly linked to the stabilized platform, controlled by the common mode outputs of the instrument itself, in order to reject the perturbations induced by the airborne environment in the horizontal directions. After the definition of the architecture of the stabilized platform to achieve the global performance of the gradiometer, the platform has been manufactured and integrated. In order to assess the operation of the electrostatic gradiometer on its associated stabilized platform, a one axis prototype has also been built. The poster will emphasize the status of realization and first tests of the instrument and of its stabilized platform.

  8. The use of GPS at IGN : Geodesy, geophysics, engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Claude; Willis, Pascal

    The Institut Géographique National has purchased since 1985 four GPS receivers (TR5S from SERCEL, 5 channels, single frequency type). For research and production purpose, a specific software, called GDVS, was then developed. This software is now operational and has been used with success to process several GPS campaigns. Two major campaigns were performed in 1986 : one between France and England and the second one between France and Italy. One of the main topic of these campaigns was to connect tide gauges in the Channel area or in the Mediterranean Sea area, to a global reference frame.

  9. Topological inversion for solution of geodesy-constrained geophysical problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltogianni, Vasso; Stiros, Stathis

    2015-04-01

    Geodetic data, mostly GPS observations, permit to measure displacements of selected points around activated faults and volcanoes, and on the basis of geophysical models, to model the underlying physical processes. This requires inversion of redundant systems of highly non-linear equations with >3 unknowns; a situation analogous to the adjustment of geodetic networks. However, in geophysical problems inversion cannot be based on conventional least-squares techniques, and is based on numerical inversion techniques (a priori fixing of some variables, optimization in steps with values of two variables each time to be regarded fixed, random search in the vicinity of approximate solutions). Still these techniques lead to solutions trapped in local minima, to correlated estimates and to solutions with poor error control (usually sampling-based approaches). To overcome these problems, a numerical-topological, grid-search based technique in the RN space is proposed (N the number of unknown variables). This technique is in fact a generalization and refinement of techniques used in lighthouse positioning and in some cases of low-accuracy 2-D positioning using Wi-Fi etc. The basic concept is to assume discrete possible ranges of each variable, and from these ranges to define a grid G in the RN space, with some of the gridpoints to approximate the true solutions of the system. Each point of hyper-grid G is then tested whether it satisfies the observations, given their uncertainty level, and successful grid points define a sub-space of G containing the true solutions. The optimal (minimal) space containing one or more solutions is obtained using a trial-and-error approach, and a single optimization factor. From this essentially deterministic identification of the set of gridpoints satisfying the system of equations, at a following step, a stochastic optimal solution is computed corresponding to the center of gravity of this set of gridpoints. This solution corresponds to a minimum variance numerical solution and requires only forward computations. The efficiency of the topological inversion technique was tested in the adjustment of conventional geodetic networks and in truth-based approaches (inversion of systems of equations with synthetic data produced by known values of variables) for up to about 20 variables and grids with 1010 gridpoints.

  10. Topography of the Lunar Poles and Application to Geodesy with the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A.; Rowlands, David D.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2012-01-01

    The Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) [1] onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) [2] has been operating continuously since July 2009 [3], accumulating approx.5.4 billion measurements from 2 billion on-orbit laser shots. LRO s near-polar orbit results in very high data density in the immediate vicinity of the lunar poles, which are each sampled every 2h. With more than 10,000 orbits, high-resolution maps can be constructed [4] and studied [5]. However, this requires careful processing of the raw data, as subtle errors in the spacecraft position and pointing can lead to visible artifacts in the final map. In other locations on the Moon, ground tracks are subparallel and longitudinal separations are typically a few hundred meters. Near the poles, the track intersection angles can be large and the inter-track spacing is small (above 80 latitude, the effective resolution is better than 50m). Precision Orbit Determination (POD) of the LRO spacecraft [6] was performed to satisfy the LOLA and LRO mission requirements, which lead to a significant improvement in the orbit position knowledge over the short-release navigation products. However, with pixel resolutions of 10 to 25 meters, artifacts due to orbit reconstruction still exist. Here, we show how the complete LOLA dataset at both poles can be adjusted geometrically to produce a high-accuracy, high-resolution maps with minimal track artifacts. We also describe how those maps can then feedback to the POD work, by providing topographic base maps with which individual LOLA altimetric measurements can be contributing to orbit changes. These direct altimetry constraints improve accuracy and can be used more simply than the altimetric crossovers [6].

  11. Satellite Geodesy Captures Offset Magma Supply Associated With Lava Lake Appearance at Masaya Volcano, Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, K. J.; Wauthier, C.

    2018-03-01

    Ascending and descending Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar data sets from various satellites (CSK, RSAT-2, ALOS-2, and Sentinel-1) show a maximum of ˜8 cm ground inflation in Masaya caldera over a 15 month period (6 November 2015 to 1 September 2016). The center of inflation is located in the NW part of the caldera, north of the active Santiago vent which has hosted a new lava lake since 11 December 2015. Simultaneous inversions of those Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar data sets using a neighbourhood algorithm demonstrate that a spherical magma reservoir explains the geodetic data, with a horizontal location ˜3 km north of the active Santiago vent and a depth-to-center ˜3 km. The associated modeled volume increase (˜0.0042 km3) is lower than the "excess" magma volume inferred from gas measurements from November 2015 to February 2016. The magma reservoir offset from the current center of eruptive activity may be the result of preexisting caldera structures.

  12. An analysis of the geodesy and relativity experiments of BepiColombo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperi, Luigi; Iess, Luciano; Mariani, Mirco J.

    2018-02-01

    BepiColombo is a ESA-JAXA mission aimed to a comprehensive exploration of Mercury, the innermost planet of the solar system. The Mercury Orbiter Radio science Experiment (MORE) will exploit a state of the art microwave tracking system, including an advanced Ka-band transponder, to determine the gravity field and the rotational state of the planet, and to perform extensive tests of relativistic gravity. In this work we analyze all the aspects of the radio science investigation, which include: (i) the solar conjunction experiment in cruise; (ii) the gravimetry and rotation experiments; (iii) the fundamental physics test. We report on the results of numerical simulations based on the latest mission scenario, with launch in October 2018 and arrival at Mercury in December 2025. We show that the gravity and rotation measurements expected from BepiColombo will allow to better characterize the size of an inner solid core inside the outer liquid core, and the properties of the outer mantle and the crust. We discuss how the current estimate of several parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) parameters can be improved by MORE through the determination of the heliocentric motion of Mercury and by measuring the propagation time of radio waves. We also assess in a quantitative way the benefits of an extended mission.

  13. Lunar Laser Ranging Science: Gravitational Physics and Lunar Interior and Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James G.; Turyshev, Slava G.; Boggs, Dale H.; Ratcliff, J. Todd

    2004-01-01

    Laser pulses fired at retroreflectors on the Moon provide very accurate ranges. Analysis yields information on Earth, Moon, and orbit. The highly accurate retroreflector positions have uncertainties less than a meter. Tides on the Moon show strong dissipation, with Q=33+/-4 at a month and a weak dependence on period. Lunar rotation depends on interior properties; a fluid core is indicated with radius approx.20% that of the Moon. Tests of relativistic gravity verify the equivalence principle to +/-1.4x10(exp -13), limit deviations from Einstein's general relativity, and show no rate for the gravitational constant G/G with uncertainty 9x10(exp -13)/yr.

  14. NASA Space Geodesy Program: GSFC data analysis, 1992. Crustal Dynamics Project VLBI geodetic results, 1979 - 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. W.; Ma, C.; Caprette, D. S.

    1993-01-01

    The Goddard VLBI group reports the results of analyzing 1648 Mark 3 data sets acquired from fixed and mobile observing sites through the end of 1991, and available to the Crustal Dynamics Project. Two large solutions were used to obtain Earth rotation parameters, nutation offsets, radio source positions, site positions, site velocities, and baseline evolution. Site positions are tabulated on a yearly basis for 1979 to 1995, inclusive. Site velocities are presented in both geocentric Cartesian and topocentric coordinates. Baseline evolution is plotted for 200 baselines, and individual length determinations are presented for an additional 356 baselines. This report includes 155 quasar radio sources, 96 fixed stations and mobile sites, and 556 baselines.

  15. Review of a relativity and geodesy mission with counter-orbiting polar satellites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Patten, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    A new test of general relativity, capable of measuring the Lense-Thirring precession on a satellite orbit was proposed in 1974. We have recently realized that the remarkable geophysical output of this experiment can be enriched by allowing the point of encounter between the two satellites to progress from the poles to the equator during the course of the mission. There is reason to believe that by performing the experiment in this mode, all tesseral harmonics up to about 60th order could be separated and determined to accuracies up to three orders of magnitude better than current knowledge, and still obtain a 1% Lense-Thirring measurement. (orig.) [de

  16. Toward 10(exp 9) GPS geodesy: Vector baselines, Earth rotation and reference frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutz, Bob E.

    1993-01-01

    The University of Texas Center for Space Research research efforts under NASA Grant No. NAG-1936 from 1 Jan. 1992 - 31 Dec. 1992 were in the following areas: GPS orbit accuracy assessments and efforts to improve the accuracy; analysis of global GPS data collected during the first three months of the IGS campaign, and analysis of regional data. A brief summary of each of the above activities is presented in the following.

  17. Very-Long-Baseline Radio Interferometry: The Mark III System for Geodesy, Astrometry, and Aperture Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, A E; Cappallo, R J; Hinteregger, H F; Levine, J I; Nesman, E F; Webber, J C; Whitney, A R; Clark, T A; Ma, C; Ryan, J; Corey, B E; Counselman, C C; Herring, T A; Shapiro, I I; Knight, C A; Shaffer, D B; Vandenberg, N R; Lacasse, R; Mauzy, R; Rayhrer, B; Schupler, B R; Pigg, J C

    1983-01-07

    The Mark III very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) system allows recording and later processing of up to 112 megabits per second from each radio telescope of an interferometer array. For astrometric and geodetic measurements, signals from two radio-frequency bands (2.2 to 2.3 and 8.2 to 8.6 gigahertz) are sampled and recorded simultaneously at all antenna sites. From these dual-band recordings the relative group delays of signals arriving at each pair of sites can be corrected for the contributions due to the ionosphere. For many radio sources for which the signals are sufficiently intense, these group delays can be determined with uncertainties under 50 picoseconds. Relative positions of widely separated antennas and celestial coordinates of radio sources have been determined from such measurements with 1 standard deviation uncertainties of about 5 centimeters and 3 milliseconds of arc, respectively. Sample results are given for the lengths of baselines between three antennas in the United States and three in Europe as well as for the arc lengths between the positions of six extragalactic radio sources. There is no significant evidence of change in any of these quantities. For mapping the brightness distribution of such compact radio sources, signals of a given polarization, or of pairs of orthogonal polarizations, can be recorded in up to 28 contiguous bands each nearly 2 megahertz wide. The ability to record large bandwidths and to link together many large radio telescopes allows detection and study of compact sources with flux densities under 1 millijansky.

  18. Towards 10(exp 9) GPS geodesy: Vector baselines, Earth rotation and reference frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutz, Bob E.

    1994-01-01

    Effort during the period form January 1, 1993 to December 31, 1993 were in the following areas: GPS orbit accuracy assessments and efforts to improve the accuracy; analysis and effects of GPS receiver antenna phase center variation; analysis of global GPS data being collected for the IGS campaign; and analysis of regional (south west Pacific) campaign data. A brief summary of each of the above activities is presented.

  19. Shortening and Thickening of Metropolitan Los Angeles Measured and Inferred Using Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argus, D.; Heflin, M.; Donnellan, A.; Webb, F.; Dong, D.; Hurst, K.; Jefferson, D.; Lyzenga, G.; Watkins, M.; Zumberge, J.

    1999-01-01

    Geodetic measurements using the Global Positioning System and other techniques show north-south shortening near Los Angeles to be fastest across the northern part of the metropolitan area, where an ESE-striking, 5- to 40-km-wide belt lying to the south of San Gabriel Mountains and to the north of downtown and West Los Angeles is shortening at 5 mm/yr.

  20. Buried shallow fault slip from the South Napa earthquake revealed by near-field geodesy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Benjamin A; Minson, Sarah E; Glennie, Craig L; Nevitt, Johanna M; Dawson, Tim; Rubin, Ron; Ericksen, Todd L; Lockner, David; Hudnut, Kenneth; Langenheim, Victoria; Lutz, Andrew; Mareschal, Maxime; Murray, Jessica; Schwartz, David; Zaccone, Dana

    2017-07-01

    Earthquake-related fault slip in the upper hundreds of meters of Earth's surface has remained largely unstudied because of challenges measuring deformation in the near field of a fault rupture. We analyze centimeter-scale accuracy mobile laser scanning (MLS) data of deformed vine rows within ±300 m of the principal surface expression of the M (magnitude) 6.0 2014 South Napa earthquake. Rather than assuming surface displacement equivalence to fault slip, we invert the near-field data with a model that allows for, but does not require, the fault to be buried below the surface. The inversion maps the position on a preexisting fault plane of a slip front that terminates ~3 to 25 m below the surface coseismically and within a few hours postseismically. The lack of surface-breaching fault slip is verified by two trenches. We estimate near-surface slip ranging from ~0.5 to 1.25 m. Surface displacement can underestimate fault slip by as much as 30%. This implies that similar biases could be present in short-term geologic slip rates used in seismic hazard analyses. Along strike and downdip, we find deficits in slip: The along-strike deficit is erased after ~1 month by afterslip. We find no evidence of off-fault deformation and conclude that the downdip shallow slip deficit for this event is likely an artifact. As near-field geodetic data rapidly proliferate and will become commonplace, we suggest that analyses of near-surface fault rupture should also use more sophisticated mechanical models and subsurface geomechanical tests.

  1. Very long baseline interferometry applied to polar motion, relativity, and geodesy. Ph.D. thesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.

    1978-01-01

    The causes and effects of diurnal polar motion are described. An algorithm was developed for modeling the effects on very long baseline interferometry observables. A selection was made between two three-station networks for monitoring polar motion. The effects of scheduling and the number of sources observed on estimated baseline errors are discussed. New hardware and software techniques in very long baseline interferometry are described

  2. Can Satellite Geodesy Disentangle Holocene Rebound and Present-Day Glacier Balance Signatures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvins, E.; James, T.; Yoder, C.

    1995-01-01

    The secular drift of the precession of the ascending node of the LAGOES -1 satellite is apparently linked to the Earth s paleoclimate through the slow viscous response of the mantle to ice sheet/ocean mass transfer during the last great continental deglaciation . The secular node acceleration is particularly sensitive to the longest wavelengths of the paleo -surface loading that have been memorized by the mantle glacio -isostatic flow. Tide gauge records for the last 130 years show a post-glacial rebound-corrected sea-level rise of 2.4 n 0.9 mm yr-1.

  3. Trilogy, a planetary geodesy mission concept for measuring the expansion of the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Mazarico, Erwan; Genova, Antonio; Neumann, Gregory A.; Sun, Xiaoli; Torrence, Mark H.; Mao, Dan-dan

    2018-04-01

    The scale of the solar system is slowly changing, likely increasing as a result of solar mass loss, with additional change possible if there is a secular variation of the gravitational constant, G. The measurement of the change of scale could provide insight into the past and the future of the solar system, and in addition a better understanding of planetary motion and fundamental physics. Estimates for the expansion of the scale of the solar system are of order 1.5 cm year-1 AU-1, which over several years is an observable quantity with present-day laser ranging systems. This estimate suggests that laser measurements between planets could provide an accurate estimate of the solar system expansion rate. We examine distance measurements between three bodies in the inner solar system - Earth's Moon, Mars and Venus - and outline a mission concept for making the measurements. The concept involves placing spacecraft that carry laser ranging transponders in orbit around each body and measuring the distances between the three spacecraft over a period of several years. The analysis of these range measurements would allow the co-estimation of the spacecraft orbit, planetary ephemerides, other geophysical parameters related to the constitution and dynamics of the central bodies, and key geodetic parameters related to the solar system expansion, the Sun, and theoretical physics.

  4. The Tropospheric Products of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinkelmann, Robert; Schwatke, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The IVS runs two tropospheric products: The IVS tropospheric parameter rapid combination monitors the zenith wet delay (ZWD) and zenith total delay (ZTD) of the rapid turnaround sessions R1 and R4. Goal of the combination is the identification and the exclusion of outliers by comparison and the assessment of the precision of current VLBI solutions in terms of tropospheric parameters. The rapid combination is done on a weekly basis four weeks after the observation files are released on IVS Data Centers. Since tropospheric and geodetic parameters, such as vertical station components, can significantly correlate, the consistency of the ZTD can be a measure of the consistency of the corresponding TRF as well. The ZWD mainly rely on accurate atmospheric pressure data. Thus, besides estimation techniques, modeling and analyst s noise, ZWD reflects differences in the atmospheric pressure data applied to the VLBI analysis. The second product, called tropospheric parameter long-term combination, aims for an accurate determination of climatological signals, such as trends of the atmospheric water vapor observed by VLBI. Therefore, the long-term homogeneity of atmospheric pressure data plays a crucial role for this product. The paper reviews the methods applied and results achieved so far and describes the new maintenance through DGFI.

  5. Displacement fields from point cloud data: Application of particle imaging velocimetry to landslide geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Arjun; Brooks, Benjamin A.; Reid, Mark E.; Bawden, Gerald W.; Pawlak, Geno

    2012-01-01

    Acquiring spatially continuous ground-surface displacement fields from Terrestrial Laser Scanners (TLS) will allow better understanding of the physical processes governing landslide motion at detailed spatial and temporal scales. Problems arise, however, when estimating continuous displacement fields from TLS point-clouds because reflecting points from sequential scans of moving ground are not defined uniquely, thus repeat TLS surveys typically do not track individual reflectors. Here, we implemented the cross-correlation-based Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) method to derive a surface deformation field using TLS point-cloud data. We estimated associated errors using the shape of the cross-correlation function and tested the method's performance with synthetic displacements applied to a TLS point cloud. We applied the method to the toe of the episodically active Cleveland Corral Landslide in northern California using TLS data acquired in June 2005–January 2007 and January–May 2010. Estimated displacements ranged from decimeters to several meters and they agreed well with independent measurements at better than 9% root mean squared (RMS) error. For each of the time periods, the method provided a smooth, nearly continuous displacement field that coincides with independently mapped boundaries of the slide and permits further kinematic and mechanical inference. For the 2010 data set, for instance, the PIV-derived displacement field identified a diffuse zone of displacement that preceded by over a month the development of a new lateral shear zone. Additionally, the upslope and downslope displacement gradients delineated by the dense PIV field elucidated the non-rigid behavior of the slide.

  6. Climate-driven vertical acceleration of Icelandic crust measured by continuous GPS geodesy

    KAUST Repository

    Compton, Kathleen

    2015-02-06

    © 2015 The Authors. Earth\\'s present-day response to enhanced glacial melting resulting from climate change can be measured using Global Positioning System (GPS) technology. We present data from 62 continuously operating GPS instruments in Iceland. Statistically significant upward velocity and accelerations are recorded at 27 GPS stations, predominantly located in the Central Highlands region of Iceland, where present-day thinning of the Iceland ice caps results in velocities of more than 30mm/yr and uplift accelerations of 1-2mm/yr2. We use our acceleration estimates to back calculate to a time of zero velocity, which coincides with the initiation of ice loss in Iceland from ice mass balance calculations and Arctic warming trends. We show, through a simple inversion, a direct relationship between ice mass balance measurements and vertical position and show that accelerated unloading is required to reproduce uplift observations for a simple elastic layer over viscoelastic half-space model.

  7. Atmospheric Pressure Corrections in Geodesy and Oceanography: a Strategy for Handling Air Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte, Rui M.; Ray, Richard D.

    2003-01-01

    Global pressure data are often needed for processing or interpreting modern geodetic and oceanographic measurements. The most common source of these data is the analysis or reanalysis products of various meteorological centers. Tidal signals in these products can be problematic for several reasons, including potentially aliased sampling of the semidiurnal solar tide as well as the presence of various modeling or timing errors. Building on the work of Van den Dool and colleagues, we lay out a strategy for handling atmospheric tides in (re)analysis data. The procedure also offers a method to account for ocean loading corrections in satellite altimeter data that are consistent with standard ocean-tide corrections. The proposed strategy has immediate application to the on-going Jason-1 and GRACE satellite missions.

  8. High-Speed Data Recorder for Space, Geodesy, and Other High-Speed Recording Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveniku, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    A high-speed data recorder and replay equipment has been developed for reliable high-data-rate recording to disk media. It solves problems with slow or faulty disks, multiple disk insertions, high-altitude operation, reliable performance using COTS hardware, and long-term maintenance and upgrade path challenges. The current generation data recor - ders used within the VLBI community are aging, special-purpose machines that are both slow (do not meet today's requirements) and are very expensive to maintain and operate. Furthermore, they are not easily upgraded to take advantage of commercial technology development, and are not scalable to multiple 10s of Gbit/s data rates required by new applications. The innovation provides a softwaredefined, high-speed data recorder that is scalable with technology advances in the commercial space. It maximally utilizes current technologies without being locked to a particular hardware platform. The innovation also provides a cost-effective way of streaming large amounts of data from sensors to disk, enabling many applications to store raw sensor data and perform post and signal processing offline. This recording system will be applicable to many applications needing realworld, high-speed data collection, including electronic warfare, softwaredefined radar, signal history storage of multispectral sensors, development of autonomous vehicles, and more.

  9. Geodesy and metrology at CERN a source of economy for the SPS programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervaise, J.

    1976-01-01

    This report gives a broad description of the major options adopted at the start of the project in order to meet the three challenges imposed on the geodesists engaged in survey work for the CERN 400 GeV proton synchrotron (SPS). The methods and means used are dealt with in a general manner. In the conclusion a critical study is made of the results obtained. From a different aspect, a description of the Survey Group's responsibilities highlights the extent of the savings that can be made by a well-trained group carrying out high-precision measurements. The physical dimensions of the project and the complexity of the work involved in building a second-generation accelerator demand high standards of precision since these condition the proper operation of the machine. Only by making extensive preliminary studies and precise survey work above and below ground-level over a number of years, was it possible to ensure that the final geodetic and metrological measurements would be completed at high speed and low cost. (Auth.)

  10. The State of GPS Vertical Positioning Precision : Separation of Earth Processes by Space Geodesy

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Observed signals in GPS data are the sum of noise and real crustal motions. Interpretation of the data depends on our ability to extract a signal of interest from the total signal. This workshop will highlight the difficulties associated with extracting a signal such as post-glacial rebound, plate tectonics or loading, from vertical geodetic data.

  11. Trilogy, a Planetary Geodesy Mission Concept for Measuring the Expansion of the Solar System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David E; Zuber, Maria T; Mazarico, Erwan; Genova, Antonio; Neumann, Gregory A; Sun, Xiaoli; Torrence, Mark H; Mao, Dan-Dan

    2018-04-01

    The scale of the solar system is slowly changing, likely increasing as a result of solar mass loss, with additional change possible if there is a secular variation of the gravitational constant, G . The measurement of the change of scale could provide insight into the past and the future of the solar system, and in addition a better understanding of planetary motion and fundamental physics. Estimates for the expansion of the scale of the solar system are of order 1.5 cm year -1 AU -1 , which over several years is an observable quantity with present-day laser ranging systems. This estimate suggests that laser measurements between planets could provide an accurate estimate of the solar system expansion rate. We examine distance measurements between three bodies in the inner solar system -- Earth's Moon, Mars and Venus -- and outline a mission concept for making the measurements. The concept involves placing spacecraft that carry laser ranging transponders in orbit around each body and measuring the distances between the three spacecraft over a period of several years. The analysis of these range measurements would allow the co-estimation of the spacecraft orbit, planetary ephemerides, other geophysical parameters related to the constitution and dynamics of the central bodies, and key geodetic parameters related to the solar system expansion, the Sun, and theoretical physics.

  12. Tsunami Scenarios Based on Interseismic Models Along the Nankai Trough, Japan, From Seafloor and Onshore Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Bock, Yehuda; Melgar, Diego; Tadokoro, Keiichi

    2018-03-01

    The recent availability of Global Positioning System-Acoustic seafloor geodetic observations enables us to resolve the spatial distribution of the slip deficit rate near the Nankai trough, southwestern Japan. Considering a tectonic block model and the transient deformation due to the major earthquakes in this area, the slip deficit rate between the two relevant blocks can be estimated. In this study, we remove the time-dependent postseismic deformation of the 2004 southeastern off the Kii Peninsula earthquakes (MJMA 7.1, 7.4), which had led to the underestimation of the slip deficit rate in earlier studies. We model the postearthquake viscoelastic relaxation using the 3D finite element model with bi-viscous Burgers rheology, as well as the afterslip on the finite faults. The corrected Global Positioning System-Acoustic and land-based Global Navigation Satellite Systems data are aligned to the existing tectonic model and used to estimate the slip deficit rate on the plate boundary. We then calculate the coseismic displacements and tsunami wave propagation with the simple assumption that a hundred years of constant slip deficit accumulation was released instantaneously. To evaluate the influence of uncertainties in the plate interface geometry on a tsunami model for the Nankai trough, we investigated two different geometries and performed checkerboard inversion simulations. Although the two models indicate roughly similar results, the peak height of the tsunami wave and its arrival time at several points are significantly different in terms of the expected hazard.

  13. Space Geodesy and Geochemistry Applied to the Monitoring, Verification of Carbon Capture and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swart, Peter

    2013-11-30

    This award was a training grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of this award was solely to provide training for two PhD graduate students for three years in the general area of carbon capture and storage (CCS). The training consisted of course work and conducting research in the area of CCS. Attendance at conferences was also encouraged as an activity and positive experience for students to learn the process of sharing research findings with the scientific community, and the peer review process. At the time of this report, both students have approximately two years remaining of their studies, so have not fully completed their scientific research projects.

  14. pyGFC - A Python Extension to the C++ Geodesy Foundation Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    imperative for a successful emulation of a dynamic MANET as intended. To achieve this objective, the same algorithm and its implementation for...solution has two options: (1) selecting, implementing, and integrating an appropriate algorithm into the tool and in the MANE system, or (2) using an...GFCCoord *estimate_southeast_coords(double, double); double lat; double lon; double alt; private: CEarth *earth; char * cstr

  15. Methods of Celestial Mechanics Volume II: Application to Planetary System, Geodynamics and Satellite Geodesy

    CERN Document Server

    Beutler, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    G. Beutler's Methods of Celestial Mechanics is a coherent textbook for students as well as an excellent reference for practitioners. Volume II is devoted to the applications and to the presentation of the program system CelestialMechanics. Three major areas of applications are covered: (1) Orbital and rotational motion of extended celestial bodies. The properties of the Earth-Moon system are developed from the simplest case (rigid bodies) to more general cases, including the rotation of an elastic Earth, the rotation of an Earth partly covered by oceans and surrounded by an atmosphere, and the rotation of an Earth composed of a liquid core and a rigid shell (Poincaré model). (2) Artificial Earth Satellites. The oblateness perturbation acting on a satellite and the exploitation of its properties in practice is discussed using simulation methods (CelestialMechanics) and (simplified) first order perturbation methods. The perturbations due to the higher-order terms of the Earth's gravitational potential and reso...

  16. BIRDY - Interplanetary CubeSat for planetary geodesy of Small Solar System Bodies (SSSB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hestroffer, D.; Agnan, M.; Segret, B.; Quinsac, G.; Vannitsen, J.; Rosenblatt, P.; Miau, J. J.

    2017-12-01

    We are developing the Birdy concept of a scientific interplanetary CubeSat, for cruise, or proximity operations around a Small body of the Solar System (asteroid, comet, irregular satellite). The scientific aim is to characterise the body's shape, gravity field, and internal structure through imaging and radio-science techniques. Radio-science is now of common use in planetary science (flybys or orbiters) to derive the mass of the scientific target and possibly higher order terms of its gravity field. Its application to a nano-satellite brings the advantage of enabling low orbits that can get closer to the body's surface, hence increasing the SNR for precise orbit determination (POD), with a fully dedicated instrument. Additionally, it can be applied to two or more satellites, on a leading-trailing trajectory, to improve the gravity field determination. However, the application of this technique to CubeSats in deep space, and inter-satellite link has to be proven. Interplanetary CubeSats need to overcome a few challenges before reaching successfully their deep-space objectives: link to ground-segment, energy supply, protection against radiation, etc. Besides, the Birdy CubeSat — as our basis concept — is designed to be accompanying a mothercraft, and relies partly on the main mission for reaching the target, as well as on data-link with the Earth. However, constraints to the mothercraft needs to be reduced, by having the CubeSat as autonomous as possible. In this respect, propulsion and auto-navigation are key aspects, that we are studying in a Birdy-T engineering model. We envisage a 3U size CubeSat with radio link, object-tracker and imaging function, and autonomous ionic propulsion system. We are considering two case studies for autonomous guidance, navigation and control, with autonomous propulsion: in cruise and in proximity, necessitating ΔV up to 2m/s for a total budget of about 50m/s. In addition to the propulsion, in-flight orbit determination (IFOD) and maintenance are studied, through analysis of images by an object-tracker and astrometry of solar system objects in front of background stars. Before going to deep-space, our project will start with BIRDY-1 orbiting the Earth, to validate the concepts of adopted propulsion, IFOD and orbit maintenance, as well as the radio-science and POD.

  17. Characterizing land subsidence mechanisms as a function of urban basin geohazards using space geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawden, G. W.

    2016-12-01

    Land subsidence in urban basins will likely become a more significant geohazard in many of the global sedimentary basins as population growth, resource availability, and climate change compound natural and anthropogenic contributors that influence basin elevation. Coastal basins are at the greatest risk where land subsidence is additive to sea level rise, thereby increasing the rate of exposure to coastal populations. Land surface elevation change is a function of many different parameters, including: elastic and inelastic surface response to managed and natural groundwater levels; anthropogenic activities (hydrocarbon extraction, wastewater injection, fracking, geothermal production, and mass redistribution); local tectonic deformation and regional tectonic drivers (such as repeated uplift and subsidence cycles above subduction zones); climate change (influencing the timing, magnitude, nature and duration of seasonal/annual precipitation and permafrost extent); material properties of the basin sediments (influencing susceptibility to soil compaction, oxidization, and dissolution); post glacial rebound; isostatic flexure associated with sea-level and local mass changes; and large scale gravitational processes (such as growth faults and landslides). Geodetic measurements, such as InSAR and GPS, help track spatial and temporal changes in both relative and absolute basin elevation thereby helping to characterize the mechanism(s) driving the geohazards. In addition to a number of commercial radar satellites, European Space Agency's Sentinel-1a/b satellites are beginning to provide a wealth of data over many basin targets with C-band (5.5 cm wavelength). The NISAR (NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar) L-band (24 cm wavelength) mission (anticipated 2021 launch) will image nearly every basin globally every 12 days and data from the mission will help characterize land subsidence and many other solid-Earth and hydrologic geohazards that impact urban basins.

  18. Climate-driven vertical acceleration of Icelandic crust measured by continuous GPS geodesy

    KAUST Repository

    Compton, Kathleen; Bennett, Richard A.; Hreinsdó ttir, Sigrú n

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 The Authors. Earth's present-day response to enhanced glacial melting resulting from climate change can be measured using Global Positioning System (GPS) technology. We present data from 62 continuously operating GPS instruments in Iceland. Statistically significant upward velocity and accelerations are recorded at 27 GPS stations, predominantly located in the Central Highlands region of Iceland, where present-day thinning of the Iceland ice caps results in velocities of more than 30mm/yr and uplift accelerations of 1-2mm/yr2. We use our acceleration estimates to back calculate to a time of zero velocity, which coincides with the initiation of ice loss in Iceland from ice mass balance calculations and Arctic warming trends. We show, through a simple inversion, a direct relationship between ice mass balance measurements and vertical position and show that accelerated unloading is required to reproduce uplift observations for a simple elastic layer over viscoelastic half-space model.

  19. A study of risk in the metropolitan area of Guadalajara through dense GPS geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez-Azua, B.; Saldana-Hernandez, F.; Medina de La Pena, H.

    2007-05-01

    Geodesic measurements from the Global Positioning System (GPS) are used extensively for basic earth science research into natural hazards and seismic risk. In the private sector, GPS technology is additionally used for cadastral and photogrammetric mapping surveys, definition of political-administrative limits, space analysis with thematic cartography, GIS, and land-use planning, with a wide variety of applied social, economic, and political purposes, including conservation of the environment. The city of Guadalajara and its surrounding urban area has expanded greatly in the last three decades as a result of industrial, commercial and housing activity that have substantially changed in their urban morphology. This period of unprecedented growth has occurred primarily in an unplanned and sometimes disarticulated and unbalanced manner, incongruous with the development of the most important city in western Mexico. The Department of Geography of the University of Guadalajara and the Institute of Territorial Information of the State of Jalisco (IITJ) have initiated a study of 89 geodetic sites that are located in the metropolitan zone of Guadalajara to assist in future planning and regulation of urban development, including urban and rural cadastral surveys and the establishment of diverse public services. Our work includes careful examination and evaluation of the quality and distribution of these geodetic sites with regard to anticipated growth of the metropolitan municipalities, and the vulnerability of urban zones to ground subsidence or landslides. Guadalajara is also located in a seismic zone, making precise continuous GPS measurements useful for identifying rates of strain accumulation and aseismic strain events that cannot be measured by seismographs.

  20. Temporal variability of the Antarctic Ice sheet observed from space-based geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memin, A.; King, M. A.; Boy, J. P.; Remy, F.

    2017-12-01

    Quantifying the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) mass balance still remains challenging as several processes compete to differing degrees at the basin scale with regional variations, leading to multiple mass redistribution patterns. For instance, analysis of linear trends in surface-height variations from 1992-2003 and 2002-2006 shows that the AIS is subject to decimetric scale variability over periods of a few years. Every year, snowfalls in Antarctica represent the equivalent of 6 mm of the mean sea level. Therefore, any fluctuation in precipitation can lead to changes in sea level. Besides, over the last decade, several major glaciers have been thinning at an accelerating rate. Understanding the processes that interact on the ice sheet is therefore important to precisely determine the response of the ice sheet to a rapid changing climate and estimate its contribution to sea level changes. We estimate seasonal and interannual changes of the AIS between January 2003 and October 2010 and to the end of 2016 from a combined analysis of surface-elevation and surface-mass changes derived from Envisat data and GRACE solutions, and from GRACE solutions only, respectively. While we obtain a good correlation for the interannual signal between the two techniques, important differences (in amplitude, phase, and spatial pattern) are obtained for the seasonal signal. We investigate these discrepancies by comparing the crustal motion observed by GPS and those predicted using monthly surface mass balance derived from the regional atmospheric climate model RACMO.

  1. Geodesy cannot presently detect the up-dip limit of frictional locking on megathrusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, R. V.; Lindsey, E. O.; Bradley, K.; Hubbard, J.; Sathiakumar, S.; Malick, R.; Hill, E.

    2017-12-01

    Most discussions of interseismic behavior on megathrust faults focus on whether they are frictionally locked or creeping. Unfortunately, many geodetic studies of subduction zone megathrusts equate fault coupling with frictional locking. This comparison is not appropriate, as one reflects the physical properties of the fault, and the other reflects the kinematics of the fault. Much of the uncertainty about slip behavior is because in subduction zones, the shallow part of the fault is far from land, and therefore creep is not detectable by land-based GPS. Published coupling maps of subduction zone megathrusts often assume a low coupling ratio near the trench, updip from fully coupled regions. Yet, if the megathrust attains a coupling ratio of 1 anywhere on the fault (i.e., the hanging wall is moving with the same velocity as the footwall), a lower value of coupling updip of this location requires interseismic extension at a rate proportional to the decrease (Wang and Dixon, 2004). We argue that the shallow region of megathrusts lie in updip stress shadows, and do not (except under rare circumstances) experience appropriate driving forces to cause significant creep during the interseismic period. Therefore it may not be possible to determine whether these regions are frictionally locked by examining interseismic geodetic records. We demonstrate this effect using a boundary element model with rate-strengthening friction and a simplified subduction zone geometry. We show that a coupling value of zero at the trench is physically unrealistic even if only a small portion of the downdip fault zone is locked. The maximum creep at the trench depends on the width of the transition of the frictionally locked zone, but should be small (<30% of plate rate) under most circumstances. During the interseismic period, even if the shallow parts of megathrusts are frictionally unlocked, creep is likely smaller than the resolution of current seafloor geodetic techniques (which is currently in the range of cms/yr). These results have important implications for various aspects of subduction studies, including physical limits on geodetic coupling inversions, the hazard posed by slip on shallow decollements (tsunamigenic or otherwise), the seismotectonic interpretation of shallow seismicity, and the utility of seafloor geodetic measurements.

  2. pyGFC - A Python Extension to the C++ Geodesy Foundation Classes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nguyen, Binh Q

    2008-01-01

    .... Army Research Laboratory (ARL). The pyGFC module was created to support the visualization of network topologies using the ARL Topodef tool, a graphical design and animation tool for custom-designing and editing a mobility scenario...

  3. Volcanic Surface Deformation in Dominica From GPS Geodesy: Results From the 2007 NSF- REU Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, R.; James, S.; Styron, R. H.; Turner, H. L.; Ashlock, A.; Cavness, C.; Collier, X.; Fauria, K.; Feinstein, R.; Staisch, L.; Williams, B.; Mattioli, G. S.; Jansma, P. E.; Cothren, J.

    2007-12-01

    GPS measurements have been collected on the island of Dominica in the Lesser Antilles between 2001 and 2007, with five month-long campaigns completed in June of each year supported in part by a NSF REU Site award for the past two years. All GPS data were collected using dual-frequency, code-phase receivers and geodetic-quality antenna, primarily choke rings. Three consecutive 24 hr observation days were normally obtained for each site. Precise station positions were estimated with GIPSY-OASISII using an absolute point positioning strategy and final, precise orbits, clocks, earth orientation parameters, and x-files. All position estimates were updated to ITRF05 and a revised Caribbean Euler pole was used to place our observations in a CAR-fixed frame. Time series were created to determine the velocity of each station. Forward and inverse elastic half-space models with planar (i.e. dike) and Mogi (i.e. point) sources were investigated. Inverse modeling was completed using a downhill simplex method of function minimization. Selected site velocities were used to create appropriate models for specific regions of Dominica, which correspond to known centers of pre-historic volcanic or recent shallow, seismic activity. Because of the current distribution of GPS sites with robust velocity estimates, we limit our models to possible magmatic activity in the northern, proximal to the volcanic centers of Morne Diablotins and Morne aux Diables, and southern, proximal to volcanic centers of Soufriere and Morne Plat Pays, regions of the island. Surface deformation data from the northernmost sites may be fit with the development of a several km-long dike trending approximately northeast- southwest. Activity in the southern volcanic centers is best modeled by an expanding point source at approximately 1 km depth.

  4. Buried shallow fault slip from the South Napa earthquake revealed by near-field geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Benjamin A.; Minson, Sarah E.; Glennie, Craig L.; Nevitt, Johanna M.; Dawson, Tim; Rubin, Ron; Ericksen, Todd L.; Lockner, David; Hudnut, Kenneth; Langenheim, Victoria; Lutz, Andrew; Mareschal, Maxime; Murray, Jessica; Schwartz, David; Zaccone, Dana

    2017-01-01

    Earthquake-related fault slip in the upper hundreds of meters of Earth’s surface has remained largely unstudied because of challenges measuring deformation in the near field of a fault rupture. We analyze centimeter-scale accuracy mobile laser scanning (MLS) data of deformed vine rows within ±300 m of the principal surface expression of the M (magnitude) 6.0 2014 South Napa earthquake. Rather than assuming surface displacement equivalence to fault slip, we invert the near-field data with a model that allows for, but does not require, the fault to be buried below the surface. The inversion maps the position on a preexisting fault plane of a slip front that terminates ~3 to 25 m below the surface coseismically and within a few hours postseismically. The lack of surface-breaching fault slip is verified by two trenches. We estimate near-surface slip ranging from ~0.5 to 1.25 m. Surface displacement can underestimate fault slip by as much as 30%. This implies that similar biases could be present in short-term geologic slip rates used in seismic hazard analyses. Along strike and downdip, we find deficits in slip: The along-strike deficit is erased after ~1 month by afterslip. We find no evidence of off-fault deformation and conclude that the downdip shallow slip deficit for this event is likely an artifact. As near-field geodetic data rapidly proliferate and will become commonplace, we suggest that analyses of near-surface fault rupture should also use more sophisticated mechanical models and subsurface geomechanical tests. PMID:28782026

  5. Deformation derived from GPS geodesy associated with Bárðarbunga 2014 rifting event in Iceland

    KAUST Repository

    Ofeigsson, Benedikt Gunnar; Hreinsdó ttir, Sigrú n; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Frið riksdó ttir, Hildur; Parks, Michelle; Dumont, Stephanie; Á rnadó ttir, Þ ó ra; Geirsson, Halldó r; Hooper, Andrew; Roberts, Matthew; Bennett, Rick; Sturkell, Erik; Jó nsson, Sigurjó n|

    2015-01-01

    On August 16, 2014 an intense seismic swarm started below the eastern part of Bárðarbunga Caldera in the north-western corner of Vatnajökull ice-cap, Iceland, marking the onset of the first rifting event in Iceland since the Krafla fires (1975-1984). The migration of the seismicity was corroborated by ground deformation in areas outside the ice cap and on nunataks within the ice cap suggesting a lateral propagation of magma, from the Bárðabunga system. The sesimicity migrated out of the caldera forming a dyke with roughly three segments, changing direction each time until August 28 when the migration stopped around 10 km south of Askja Volcano, eventually leading to a short lived eruption in Holuhraun north of Dyngjujökull. A second fissure eruption started in Holuhraun on August 31 which is still ongoing at the time of this writing. In the months prior to the onset of the activity, subtle signs of inflation where observed on continuous GPS sites around the Bárðarbunga indicating a volume increase in the roots of the volcanic system. When the activity started on August 16, the deformation pattern indicated a simultaneous deflation centered within the caldera and a lateral growth of a dyke also reflected in the migration of seismicity along segments of variable strike. A maximum widening of 1.3 m occurred between stations on opposite sides of the dyke spaced 25 km apart. Significant movements where detected on GPS site more then 80 km away from the tip of dyke. Displacements indicated the fastest rate of widening at any time in the most distal segment of the dyke throughout its evolution. After the dyke stopped propagating, the inflation continued, decaying exponentialy with time. On September 4, five days into the second fissure eruption, the movements associated with the dyke where no longer significant. As the fissure eruption continues, a slowly decaying contraction is observed around the Bárðarbunga central volcano, both shown in the piston like subsidence of the caldera floor, observed on a GPS instrument located on the ice surface within the caldera, as well as in the region around the caldera outside and within the ice cap, with no detectable deformation associated with the formed dyke or the eruptive fissure. Prior to the onset of the activity, extensive GPS campaign measurements had been conducted in the area. These observations allowed us to constrain the deformation field directly associated with the rifting. This proved essential when adding new continuous sites during the active rifting hence tracking the dyke formation as it propagated. To better constrain the deformation field in real time, 8 hour coordinate solutions where processed in real time enabling sub-daily updates to track the rapid deformation associated with the rifting.

  6. The Lunar Scout Program: An international program to survey the Moon from orbit for geochemistry, mineralogy, imagery, geodesy, and gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Donald A. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The Lunar Scout Program was one of a series of attempts by NASA to develop and fly an orbiting mission to the moon to collect geochemical, geological, and gravity data. Predecessors included the Lunar Observer, the Lunar Geochemical Orbiter, and the Lunar Polar Orbiter - missions studied under the auspices of the Office of Space Science. The Lunar Scout Program, however, was an initiative of the Office of Exploration. It was begun in late 1991 and was transferred to the Office of Space Science after the Office of Exploration was disbanded in 1993. Most of the work was done by a small group of civil servants at the Johnson Space Center; other groups also responsible for mission planning included personnel from the Charles Stark Draper Laboratories, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Boeing, and Martin Marietta. The Lunar Scout Program failed to achieve new start funding in FY 93 and FY 94 as a result of budget downturns, the de-emphasis of the Space Exploration Initiative, and the fact that lunar science did not rate as high a priority as other planned planetary missions, and was cancelled. The work done on the Lunar Scout Program and other lunar orbiter studies, however, represents assets that will be useful in developing new approaches to lunar orbit science.

  7. Combining Space Geodesy, Seismology, and Geochemistry for Monitoring Verification and Accounting of CO2 in Sequestration Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swart, Peter K. [Univ. of Miami, Key Biscayne, FL (United States); Dixon, Tim [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2014-09-30

    A series of surface geophysical and geochemical techniques are tested in order to demonstrate and validate low cost approaches for Monitoring, Verification and Accounting (MVA) of the integrity of deep reservoirs for CO2 storage. These techniques are (i) surface deformation by GPS; ii) surface deformation by InSAR; iii) passive source seismology via broad band seismometers; and iv) soil gas monitoring with a cavity ring down spectrometer for measurement of CO2 concentration and carbon isotope ratio. The techniques were tested at an active EOR (Enhanced Oil Recovery) site in Texas. Each approach has demonstrated utility. Assuming Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage (CCUS) activities become operational in the future, these techniques can be used to augment more expensive down-hole techniques.

  8. Down and Out at Pacaya Volcano: A Glimpse of Magma Storage and Diking as Interpreted From GPS Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, H. N.; Waite, G. P.; Wauthier, D. C.; Escobar-Wolf, R. P.; Lopez-Hetland, B.

    2017-12-01

    Geodetic data from an eight-station GPS network at Pacaya volcano Guatemala allows us to produce a simple analytical model of deformation sources associated with the 2010 eruption and the eruptive period in 2013-2014. Deformation signals for both eruptive time-periods indicate downward vertical and outward horizontal motion at several stations surrounding the volcano. The objective of this research was to better understand the magmatic plumbing system and sources of this deformation. Because this down-and-out displacement is difficult to explain with a single source, we chose a model that includes a combination of a dike and spherical source. Our modelling suggests that deformation is dominated the inflation of a shallow dike seated high within the volcanic edifice and deflation of a deeper, spherical source below the SW flank of the volcano. The source parameters for the dike feature are in good agreement with the observed orientation of recent vent emplacements on the edifice as well the horizontal displacement, while the parameters for a deeper spherical source accommodate the downward vertical motion. This study presents GPS observations at Pacaya dating back to 2009 and provides a glimpse of simple models of possible deformation sources.

  9. Deformation derived from GPS geodesy associated with Bárðarbunga 2014 rifting event in Iceland

    KAUST Repository

    Ofeigsson, Benedikt Gunnar

    2015-04-01

    On August 16, 2014 an intense seismic swarm started below the eastern part of Bárðarbunga Caldera in the north-western corner of Vatnajökull ice-cap, Iceland, marking the onset of the first rifting event in Iceland since the Krafla fires (1975-1984). The migration of the seismicity was corroborated by ground deformation in areas outside the ice cap and on nunataks within the ice cap suggesting a lateral propagation of magma, from the Bárðabunga system. The sesimicity migrated out of the caldera forming a dyke with roughly three segments, changing direction each time until August 28 when the migration stopped around 10 km south of Askja Volcano, eventually leading to a short lived eruption in Holuhraun north of Dyngjujökull. A second fissure eruption started in Holuhraun on August 31 which is still ongoing at the time of this writing. In the months prior to the onset of the activity, subtle signs of inflation where observed on continuous GPS sites around the Bárðarbunga indicating a volume increase in the roots of the volcanic system. When the activity started on August 16, the deformation pattern indicated a simultaneous deflation centered within the caldera and a lateral growth of a dyke also reflected in the migration of seismicity along segments of variable strike. A maximum widening of 1.3 m occurred between stations on opposite sides of the dyke spaced 25 km apart. Significant movements where detected on GPS site more then 80 km away from the tip of dyke. Displacements indicated the fastest rate of widening at any time in the most distal segment of the dyke throughout its evolution. After the dyke stopped propagating, the inflation continued, decaying exponentialy with time. On September 4, five days into the second fissure eruption, the movements associated with the dyke where no longer significant. As the fissure eruption continues, a slowly decaying contraction is observed around the Bárðarbunga central volcano, both shown in the piston like subsidence of the caldera floor, observed on a GPS instrument located on the ice surface within the caldera, as well as in the region around the caldera outside and within the ice cap, with no detectable deformation associated with the formed dyke or the eruptive fissure. Prior to the onset of the activity, extensive GPS campaign measurements had been conducted in the area. These observations allowed us to constrain the deformation field directly associated with the rifting. This proved essential when adding new continuous sites during the active rifting hence tracking the dyke formation as it propagated. To better constrain the deformation field in real time, 8 hour coordinate solutions where processed in real time enabling sub-daily updates to track the rapid deformation associated with the rifting.

  10. Postglacial Rebound and Current Ice Loss Estimates from Space Geodesy: The New ICE-6G (VM5a) Global Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, W. R.; Argus, D.; Drummond, R.; Moore, A. W.

    2012-12-01

    We compare, on a global basis, estimates of site velocity against predictions of the newly constructed postglacial rebound model ICE-6G (VM5a). This model is fit to observations of North American postglacial rebound thereby demonstrating that the ice sheet at last glacial maximum must have been, relative to ICE-5G,thinner in southern Manitoba, thinner near Yellowknife (northwest Territories), thicker in eastern and southern Quebec, and thicker along the British Columbia-Alberta border. The GPS based estimates of site velocity that we employ are more accurate than were previously available because they are based on GPS estimates of position as a function of time determined by incorporating satellite phase center variations [Desai et al. 2011]. These GPS estimates are constraining postglacial rebound in North America and Europe more tightly than ever before. In particular, given the high density of GPS sites in North America, and the fact that the velocity of the mass center (CM) of Earth is also more tightly constrained, the new model much more strongly constrains both the lateral extent of the proglacial forebulge and the rate at which this peripheral bulge (that was emplaced peripheral to the late Pleistocence Laurentia ice sheet) is presently collapsing. This fact proves to be important to the more accurate inference of the current rate of ice loss from both Greenland and Alaska based upon the time dependent gravity observations being provided by the GRACE satellite system. In West Antarctica we have also been able to significantly revise the previously prevalent ICE-5G deglaciation history so as to enable its predictions to be optimally consistent with GPS site velocities determined by connecting campaign WAGN measurements to those provided by observations from the permanent ANET sites. Ellsworth Land (south of the Antarctic peninsula), is observed to be rising at 6 ±3 mm/yr according to our latest analyses; the Ellsworth mountains themselves are observed to be rising at 5 ±4 mm/yr; Palmer Land is observed to be rising at 3 ±3 mm/yr. The predictions of the ICE-5G (VM2) model and those of the postglacial rebound component of the model of Simons, Ivins, and James [2010] had predicted uplift to be significantly faster than observed in this region, as previously documented in Argus et al [2011]. From a global perspective the new ICE-6G (VM5a) model is also a further significant improvement on the previous ICE-5G (VM2) model in that the degree two and order one components of its predicted time dependence of geoid height are tightly constrained by the recent inferences of Roy and Peltier [2011] of the post-GRACE-launch values of the speed and direction of true polar wander and the non-tidal acceleration of the lod. .

  11. Forearc Sliver Translation, a Lack of Arc-Normal Strain Accumulation, and Interplate Thrust Earthquakes: GPS Geodesy in Western Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, H. L.; Mattioli, G. S.; Jansma, P. E.; Styron, R. H.

    2007-05-01

    We have been investigating the kinematics of the Nicaraguan forearc using campaign GPS measurements of our geodetic network made over the last seven years (Turner et al., 2007). We currently have interseismic velocities for 18 campaign sites and have installed 10 additional sites in the backarc to investigate the nature of the transition from forearc sliver motion to stable Caribbean Plate motion. Our work focusing on the later issue is presented elsewhere at this meeting (Styron et al., 2007). Corrections for modeled coseismic offsets from the Jan. 13, 2001 Mw7.7 earthquake off the coast of El Salvador have been applied to our campaign site velocities. Some of our time-series are also strongly affected by coseismic and postseismic effects of the Oct. 9, 2004 Mw6.9 earthquake off of the coast of Nicaragua. The geodetic effects of this event are being removed from the affected time-series for interseismic velocity analysis. We have also derived interseismic velocities for five continuous GPS sites in the region. Our GPS results confirm previous predictions of northwest transport of a forearc sliver with an average Northwest velocity of ~15 mm yr-1, but show little evidence for an arc- normal component of strain accumulation associated with locking on the subduction interface. However, the amount of seismicity along this section of the Middle America Trench, including several recent large events such as the 1992 Mw7.6 and 2004 Mw6.9 earthquakes, indicates some amount of locking is present. Several possibilities may account for the apparent contradiction between the GPS results and observed seismicity. The locked zone may be too shallow and too far offshore for the arc-normal component to show up in our network, or the arc-normal signal may be masked by post-seismic effects from the 1992 offshore earthquake. If coupling between the downgoing slab and the overriding plate is weak or limited to a small seismogenic zone, then arc-parallel motion of the forearc sliver may be driven by a more strongly coupled region to the south in Costa Rica. We are developing regional FEM and half-space dislocation models constrained by the GPS-derived kinematics to distinguish between these possibilities and explore the possible driving mechanisms for sliver motion.

  12. Application of Satellite Geodesy in Analyzing the Accelerated Movement of the Back-arc Rifting in the Izu Bonin Islands, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisa, D.; Heki, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Izu-Bonin islands lies along the convergent boundary between the subducting Pacific plate (PA) and the overriding Philippine Sea plate (PH) in the western Pacific. Nishimura (2011) found that the back-arc rifting goes on behind the Izu arc by studying the horizontal velocities of GNSS stations on the Izu islands. Here we show that this rifting has accelerated in 2004 using GNSS data at Aogashima, Hachijoujima, and Mikurajima stations. The back-arc rifting behind the Izu islands can be seen as the increasing distance between stations in the Izu-Bonin islands and stations located in the stable part of PH. We found that their movement showed clear acceleration around the third quarter of 2004. Obtaining the Euler vector of the PH is necessary to analyzed the movement of each stations relative to the other stations on the same plate. The analyzing of GPS timeseries leads us to one initial conclusion that some accelerated movement started to occur in the third quarter of 2004. This event was closely related to the earthquake on May 29, 2004 in Nankai Trough and September 5, 2004 earthquake near the triple junction of Sagami Trough. The analyzing process help us to understand that this accelerated movement was not the afterslip of any of these earthquakes, but it was triggering these area to move faster and further than it was. We first rule out the best possible cause by constraining the onset time of the accelerated movement, and correlating it with the earthquakes. May 29, 2004 earthquake (M6.5) at the PA-PH boundary clearly lacked the jump which should mark the onset of the eastward slow movement. Moreover, additional velocity vectors do not converge to the epicenter, and onset time that minimizes the post-fit residual is significantly later than May. We therefore conclude that accelerated movement started in 2004 was not due to the afterslip of interplate earthquake in May 29. On the next step we found that the onset time coincides with the occurrence of September 5, 2004 We found that the accelerated movement vectors of these islands are almost parallel with each other, and perpendicular to the rift axis. We hypothesize that the seismic wave radiated from the epicenter of this earthquake dynamically triggered the acceleration of the back arc opening in the Izu Arc.

  13. Possible experiment with two counter-orbiting drag-free satellites to obtain a new test of Einstein's general theory of relativity and improved measurements in geodesy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Patten, R.A.; Everitt, C.W.F.

    1976-01-01

    In 1918, Lense and Thirring calculated that a moon orbiting a rotating planet would experience a nodal dragging effect due to general relativity. We describe an experiment to measure this effect to 1% with two counter-orbiting drag-free satellites in polar earth orbit. In addition to tracking data from existing ground stations, satellite-to-satellite Doppler ranging data are taken near the poles. New geophysical information is inherent in the polar data

  14. Slip pulse and resonance of Kathmandu basin during the 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha earthquake, Nepal imaged with space geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galetzka, John; Melgar, D.; Genrich, J.F.; Geng, J.; Owen, S.; Lindsey, E. O.; Xu, X.; Bock, Y.; Avouac, J.-P.; Adhikari, L. B.; Upreti, B. N.; Pratt-Sitaula, B.; Bhattarai, T. N.; Sitaula, B. P.; Moore, A.; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; Szeliga, W.; Normandeau, J.; Fend, M.; Flouzat, M; Bollinger, L.; Shrestha, P.; Koirala, B.; Gautam, U.; Bhatterai, M.; Gupta, R.; Kandel, T.; Timsina, C.; Sapkota, S.N.; Rajaure, S.; Maharjan, N.

    2015-01-01

    Detailed geodetic imaging of earthquake rupture enhances our understanding of earthquake physics and induced ground shaking. The April 25, 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha, Nepal earthquake is the first example of a large continental megathrust rupture beneath a high-rate (5 Hz) GPS network. We use GPS and InSAR data to model the earthquake rupture as a slip pulse of ~20 km width, ~6 s duration, and with peak sliding velocity of 1.1 m/s that propagated toward Kathmandu basin at ~3.3 km/s over ~140 km. The smooth slip onset, indicating a large ~5 m slip-weakening distance, caused moderate ground shaking at high >1Hz frequencies (~16% g) and limited damage to regular dwellings. Whole basin resonance at 4-5 s period caused collapse of tall structures, including cultural artifacts.

  15. Geodesy by radio interferometry - Determinations of baseline vector, earth rotation, and solid earth tide parameters with the Mark I very long baseline radio interferometery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. W.; Clark, T. A.; Coates, R. J.; Ma, C.; Wildes, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-seven very long baseline radio interferometry experiments performed between 1972 and 1978 are analyzed and estimates of baseline vectors between six sites, five in the continental United States and one in Europe are derived. No evidence of significant changes in baseline length is found. For example, with a statistical level of confidence of approximately 85 percent, upper bounds on such changes within the United States ranged from a low of 10 mm/yr for the 850 km baseline between Westford, Massachusetts, and Green Bank, West Virginia, to a high of 90 mm/yr for the nearly 4000 km baseline between Westford and Goldstone, California. Estimates for universal time and for the x component of the position of the earth's pole are obtained. For the last 15 experiments, the only ones employing wideband receivers, the root-mean-square differences between the derived values and the corresponding ones published by the Bureau International de l'Heure are 0.0012 s and 0.018 arc sec respectively. The average value obtained for the radial Love number for the solid earth is 0.62 + or - 0.02 (estimated standard error).

  16. 25 Jahre - Institut fuer Geodaesie, Teil 1: Wissenschaftliche Beitraege und Berichte (25 Years - Institute of Geodesy, Part 1: Scientific Contributions and Reports)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Analyse der Bahnbewegung des Mondes (E. W. BROWN, 1896) Polschwankung (SETH CARLO CHANDLER, 1885; KARL FRIEDRICH KOJSTNER, 1890; SIMON NEWCOMB, 1891, 1892...Photographic Zenith Tubes) wurden erstmals urn die Jahr- hundertwende von STOLZE (1893), RuNGE (1893), SCHNAUDER (1900) und SCHWARZSCHILD (1903) vor...Geburtstag, Eugen Kuntz zurn 70. Geburtstag, Herman MAilzer zumn 70. Geburtstag, Verbff Geod Inst U Karlsruhe, 23 5-241 SCHWARZSCHILD , K., 1903

  17. A possible experiment with two counter-orbiting drag-free satellites to obtain a new test of Einstein's general theory of relativity and improved measurements in geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Patten, R. A.; Everitt, C. W. F.

    1976-01-01

    In 1918, Lense and Thirring calculated that a moon in orbit around a massive rotating planet would experience a nodal dragging effect due to general relativity. We describe an experiment to measure this effect by means of two counter-orbiting drag-free satellites in polar orbit about the earth. For a 2-1/2 year experiment, the measurement should approach an accuracy of 1%. An independent measurement of the geodetic precession of the orbit plane due to the motion about the sun may also be possible to about 10% accuracy. In addition to precision tracking data from existing ground stations, satellite-to-satellite Doppler data are taken at points of passing near the poles to yield an accurate measurement of the separation distance between the two satellites. New geophysical information on both earth harmonics and tidal effects is inherent in this polar ranging data.

  18. 25 Jahre - Institut fuer Geodaesie, Teil 2: Forschungsarbeiten und Veroeffentlichungen (25 Years - Institute of Geodesy, Part 2: Research Areas and Publications)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Messungen mit Nivellements, Zenitdistanzmessungen oder astrono - mischen Azimut, Ulngen- und Breitenbestimmiungen liefert Informationen Ober die geometri...Using Geometric Hilfe des GPS in Ruanda. In: Institut ffir Geod1.sie Levelling, Trigonometric Heighting and Astrono - (Hrsg.): Das Global Positioning

  19. Evidence of magma recharge at Colli Albani (Italy), the volcanic district at the gates of Rome, from geodesy and gas geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trasatti, E.; Marra, F.; Polcari, M.; Etiope, G.; Ciotoli, G.; Darrah, T.; Tedesco, D.; Stramondo, S.; Florindo, F.; Ventura, G.

    2017-12-01

    Colli Albani (Italy) is an alkali-potassic volcanic district located about 20 km SE of Rome (3 M inhabitants) and lastly erupted 36 ka ago. Since the modern volcanic activity at Colli Albani seems not particularly intense, scientists have interpreted this volcano to be quiescent. Therefore, unlike other Italian volcanoes, the area has not undergone extensive monitoring. However, a seismic swarm during 1989-1990 has been related to a local uplift of ca. 30 cm since the 1950's along a line crossing the western side of the volcano, giving rise to a debate about its possible interpretation in terms of unrest. Furthermore, recent geological investigations indicate a coupling of eruption history, uplift history, and changes in the regional stress field, pointing to the conclusion that Colli Albani is in unrest. Here, we investigate the deformation processes and the gas geochemistry (He, CO2 and their isotopic ratios). From the analysis of about 20 years of InSAR data (1992-2010), we retrieve a puzzling deformation field at Colli Albani, consisting of long-term, constant rate, uplift of its western and southern flanks, and by coeval intra-caldera subsidence. This deformation setting cannot be related to a single cause, but reflects the interaction between different and spatially independent dynamic processes. Furthermore, we obtain information on the nature of the sources from the isotopic composition of the discharging CO2 and helium, showing that the Colli Albani dynamics are the result of decoupling between magma intrusion along pre-existing tectonic faults and caldera subsidence. In order to design a comprehensive geophysical model inclusive of all the above reported peculiarities, we consider potential sources related to magma/fluid migration or accumulation processes at depth through the main tectonic structures active at CA, by means of a numerical model. In summary, we demonstrate that despite the present-day phase of caldera deflation, the magmatic system at Colli Albani is in a rejuvenation stage and new, articulated dike-like magma storage zones are slowly forming below the western and southern flanks, with direct consequences for the volcanic hazard assessment at Rome.

  20. Constraining models of postglacial rebound using space geodesy: a detailed assessment of model ICE-5G (VM2) and its relatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argus, Donald F.; Peltier, W. Richard

    2010-05-01

    Using global positioning system, very long baseline interferometry, satellite laser ranging and Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite observations, including the Canadian Base Network and Fennoscandian BIFROST array, we constrain, in models of postglacial rebound, the thickness of the ice sheets as a function of position and time and the viscosity of the mantle as a function of depth. We test model ICE-5G VM2 T90 Rot, which well fits many hundred Holocene relative sea level histories in North America, Europe and worldwide. ICE-5G is the deglaciation history having more ice in western Canada than ICE-4G; VM2 is the mantle viscosity profile having a mean upper mantle viscosity of 0.5 × 1021Pas and a mean uppermost-lower mantle viscosity of 1.6 × 1021Pas T90 is an elastic lithosphere thickness of 90 km; and Rot designates that the model includes (rotational feedback) Earth's response to the wander of the North Pole of Earth's spin axis towards Canada at a speed of ~1° Myr-1. The vertical observations in North America show that, relative to ICE-5G, the Laurentide ice sheet at last glacial maximum (LGM) at ~26 ka was (1) much thinner in southern Manitoba, (2) thinner near Yellowknife (Northwest Territories), (3) thicker in eastern and southern Quebec and (4) thicker along the northern British Columbia-Alberta border, or that ice was unloaded from these areas later (thicker) or earlier (thinner) than in ICE-5G. The data indicate that the western Laurentide ice sheet was intermediate in mass between ICE-5G and ICE-4G. The vertical observations and GRACE gravity data together suggest that the western Laurentide ice sheet was nearly as massive as that in ICE-5G but distributed more broadly across northwestern Canada. VM2 poorly fits the horizontal observations in North America, predicting places along the margins of the Laurentide ice sheet to be moving laterally away from the ice centre at 2 mm yr-1 in ICE-4G and 3 mm yr-1 in ICE-5G, in disagreement with the observation that the interior of the North American Plate is deforming more slowly than 1 mm yr-1. Substituting VM5a T60 for VM2 T90, that is, introducing into the lithosphere at its base a layer with a high viscosity of 10 × 1021Pas, greatly improves the fit of the horizontal observations in North America. ICE-4G VM5a T60 Rot predicts most of the North American Plate to be moving horizontally more slowly than ~1 mm yr-1, in agreement with the data. ICE-5G VM5a T60 Rot well fits both the vertical and horizontal observations in Europe. The space geodetic data cannot distinguish between models with and without rotational feedback, in the vertical because the velocity of Earth' centre is uncertain, and in the horizontal because the areas of the plate interiors having geodetic sites is not large enough to detect the small differences in the predictions of rotational feedback going across the plate interiors.

  1. A demonstration of an independent-station radio interferometry system with 4-cm precision on a 16-km base line. [for geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J. B.; Fanselow, J. L.; Macdoran, P. F.; Skjerve, L. J.; Spitzmesser, D. J.; Fliegel, H. F.

    1976-01-01

    Radio interferometry promises eventually to measure directly, with accuracies of a few centimeters, both whole earth motions and relative crustal motions with respect to an 'inertial' reference frame. Interferometry measurements of arbitrarily long base lines require, however, the development of new techniques for independent-station observation. In connection with the development of such techniques, a series of short base line demonstration experiments has been conducted between two antennas. The experiments were related to a program involving the design of independent-station instrumentation capable of making three-dimensional earth-fixed base line measurements with an accuracy of a few centimeters. Attention is given to the instrumentation used in the experiments, aspects of data analysis, and the experimental results.

  2. The 2015 M7.2 Sarez, Central Pamir, Earthquake And The Importance Of Strike-Slip Faulting In The Pamir Interior: Insights From Geodesy And Field Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Sabrina; Schurr, Bernd; Ratschbacher, Lothar; Schöne, Tilo; Kufner, Sofia-Katerina; Zhang, Yong; Sudhaus, Henriette

    2017-04-01

    The Pamir mountain range, located in the Northwest of the India-Asia collision zone, accommodates approximately one third of the northward advance of the Indian continent at this longitude (i. e. ˜34 mm/yr) mostly by shortening at its northern thrust system. Geodetic and seismic data sets reveal here a narrow zone of high deformation and M7+ earthquakes of mostly thrust type with some dextral strike-slip faulting observed, too. The Pamir interior shows sinistral strike-slip and normal faulting indicating north-south compression and east-west extension. In this tectonic setting the two largest instrumentally recorded earthquakes, the M7+ 1911 and 2015 earthquake events in the central Pamir occurred with left-lateral shear along a NE-SW rupture plane. We present the co-seismic deformation field of the 2015 earthquake observed by radar satellite interferometry (InSAR), SAR amplitude pixel offsets and high-rate Global Positioning System (GPS). The InSAR and pixel offset results suggest a 50+ km long rupture with sinistral fault offsets at the surface of more than 2 m on a yet unmapped fault trace of the Sarez Karakul Fault System (SKFS). A distributed slip model with a data-driven slip patch resolution yields a sub-vertical fault plane with a strike of N39.5 degrees and a rupture area of ˜80 x 40 km with a maximum slip of 2 m in the upper 10 km of the crust near the surface rupture. Field observations collected some nine months after the earthquake confirm the rupture mechanism, surface trace location and fault offset measurements as constrained by geodetic data. Diffuse deformation was observed across a 1-2 km wide zone, hosting primary fractures sub-parallel to the rupture strike with offsets of 2 m and secondary, en echelon fractures including Riedel shears and hybrid fractures often related to gravitational mass movements. The 1911 and 2015 earthquakes demonstrate the importance of sinistral strike-slip faulting on the SKFS, contributing both to shear between the western and eastern Pamir and westward extrusion of critically thickened Pamir crust into the Tajik depression. Shear may also be transferred from below, where the tip of the Indian indenter is thought to have underthrusted the Pamir.

  3. 48 CFR 245.102 - Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY General 245.102 Policy. (1) Mapping, charting, and geodesy property. All Government-furnished mapping, charting, and geodesy (MC&G) property is under the control of...

  4. 76 FR 6003 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Marking of Government-Furnished Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ...-7000, Government-Furnished Mapping, Charting, and Geodesy Property, in solicitations and contracts when mapping, charting, and geodesy property is to be furnished. (b) Use the clause at 252.245-7001, Tagging...

  5. Global geodetic observing system meeting the requirements of a global society on a changing planet in 2020

    CERN Document Server

    Plag, Hans-Peter

    2009-01-01

    Geodesy plays a key role in geodynamics, geohazards, the global water cycle, global change, atmosphere and ocean dynamics. This book covers geodesy's contribution to science and society and identifies user needs regarding geodetic observations and products.

  6. 75 FR 75444 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Government Property (DFARS Case 2009-D008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-03

    ... clauses. (a) Use the clause at 252.245-7000, Government-Furnished Mapping, Charting, and Geodesy Property, in solicitations and contracts when mapping, charting, and geodesy property is to be furnished. (b... Government-Furnished Mapping, Charting, and Geodesy Property. As prescribed in 245.107(a), use the following...

  7. Global Empirical Model of the TEC Response to Geomagnetic Activity and Forcing from Below

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Pancheva Plamen Mukhtarov Borislav Andonov National Institute of Geophysics, Geodesy and Geography Bulgarian Academy of Sciences BL. 3...Geophysics, Geodesy and Geography Bulgarian Academy of Sciences BL. 3 Acad. Georgi Bonchev Sofia 1000 BULGARIA 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION... Geodesy and Geography, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences) April 2014 Distribution A: Approved for public release

  8. European Geophysical Society (23rd) General Assembly, Annales Geophysicae, Part 1, Society Symposia, Solid Earth Geophysics & Geodesy, Supplement 1 to Volume 16 Held in Nice, France on 20-24 April 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    means of recognising partial melting were tested there. 1) Macroscopic texture: because melt is mobile it collects in structural sites, e.g. boudin ...Janicot (3), A. Viltard (1), P. de Felice (1), H. Laurent (2) (1) Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique, CNRS Ecole Polytechnique, France (2...the main aircraft emissions injection area. AUTOMATIC TRACKING OF WEST AFRICAN CLOUD CLUSTERS V. Mathon and H. Laurent (ORSTOM, BP 5045, F-34Q32

  9. Application of Mensuration Technology to Improve the Accuracy of Field Artillery Firing Unit Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    8 U.S. Army Field Artillery Operations ............................................................................ 8 Geodesy ...Experts in this field of study have a full working knowledge of geodesy and the theory that allows mensuration to surpass the level of accuracy achieved...desired. (2) Fire that is intended to achieve the desired result on target.”6 Geodesy : “that branch of applied mathematics which determines by observation

  10. The Differential Vector Phase-Locked Loop for Global Navigation Satellite System Signal Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Precise Positioning”. Reports on Geodesy , 87(2):77–85, 2009. [6] Cellmer, S. “The Real-Time Precise Positioning Using MAFA Method”. Proceedings of...Wielgosz, and Z. Rzepecka. “Modified Ambiguity Function Approach for GPS Carrier Phase Positioning”. Journal of Geodesy , 84(4):267–275, 2010. [10] Chan, B...Journal of Geodesy , 70:330–341, 1996. [30] Hatch, R. “Instantaneous Ambiguity Resolution”. Proceedings of the International Symposium 107 on Kinematic

  11. The Future of the U.S. Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    components included accelerometer scale factor, gyro drift rates, gravity and geodesy models of both the launch area and the target area, winds and...Defense Research and Engineering John Walsh described the situation very candidly in 1976:17 In 1971 the gravity and geodesy term decreased

  12. IERS and its importance for global geodynamics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kostelecký, J.; Vondrák, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 131 (2003), s. 7-15 ISSN 1211-1910 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : astrometry * geodesy * geodynamics Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  13. Time-variable gravity fields derived from GPS tracking of Swarm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bezděk, Aleš; Sebera, Josef; da Encarnacao, J.T.; Klokočník, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 205, č. 3 (2016), s. 1665-1669 ISSN 0956-540X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14026; GA ČR GA13-36843S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : satellite geodesy * time variable gravity * global change from geodesy Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 2.414, year: 2016

  14. Prilog ispitivanju korištenja instrumentarija različitih tehničkih izvedbi pri uspostavljanju nivelmanskih mreža posebnih namjena u inženjerskoj geodeziji : Contribution on study possibilities in using instruments of different technical performances in establishing special purposes leveling networks in engineering geodesy

    OpenAIRE

    Nihad Kapetanović; Jusuf Topoljak; Admir Mulahusić; Ramiz Selmani

    2015-01-01

    Ispitivanje mogućnosti korištenja geodetskih instrumenata sličnih tehničkih karakteristika, ali različitih tehničkih izvedbi je uvijek zanimljiva geodetska tema. Osnovna svrha ovog istraživanja je analiziranje tačnosti testne nivelmanske mreže, unutar koje su visinske razlike izmjerene nivelirima Koni 007CZJ i Leica DNA 03. Rezultati dobiveni na kraju istraživanja pokazali su da oba nivelira zadovoljavaju kriterije preciznog nivelmana, ali se prednost daje niveliru DNA 03. : Examination of po...

  15. Prilog ispitivanju korištenja instrumentarija različitih tehničkih izvedbi pri uspostavljanju nivelmanskih mreža posebnih namjena u inženjerskoj geodeziji : Contribution on study possibilities in using instruments of different technical performances in establishing special purposes leveling networks in engineering geodesy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihad Kapetanović

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ispitivanje mogućnosti korištenja geodetskih instrumenata sličnih tehničkih karakteristika, ali različitih tehničkih izvedbi je uvijek zanimljiva geodetska tema. Osnovna svrha ovog istraživanja je analiziranje tačnosti testne nivelmanske mreže, unutar koje su visinske razlike izmjerene nivelirima Koni 007CZJ i Leica DNA 03. Rezultati dobiveni na kraju istraživanja pokazali su da oba nivelira zadovoljavaju kriterije preciznog nivelmana, ali se prednost daje niveliru DNA 03. : Examination of possibilities in using geodetic (survey instruments of the same specifications, but different technical performances is always an interesting geodetic topic. The main purpose of this research is to analyze the accuracy of special purposes leveling networks where height differences were measured with Koni 007 CZJ and Leica DNA 03 levels. Obtained results showed that both leveling results fulfill the required conditions of precision leveling, but the preference is given to level DNA 03.

  16. Relief of the Podyjí National Park and Geomorphologic Aspects of its Protection (Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kirchner, Karel; Demek, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 1 (2009), s. 91-98 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : geomorphology * landscape protection * nature conservation * NP Podyji Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  17. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Li Wei1 2 Cheng Pengfei2 Bei Jinzhong2 Wen Hanjiang2 Wang Hua1 2. School of Geodesy and Geomatics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430 079, China. Chinese Academic of Surveying and Mapping, Beijing 100 830, China.

  18. Assessment and Risk Mitigation Strategies for the Atom Interferometer Gravity Gradiometer Seed Lasers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA GSFC has been working on an ESTO IIP - Cold Atom Gravity Gradiometer (CAGG)/Atom Interferometer Gravity Gradiometer (AIGG) for Geodesy since 2014 (Saif/551 –...

  19. Utajovaná přívalová povodeň na jižní Moravě 9. června 1970. K 40. výročí přírodní katastrofy, která si vyžádala 35 lidských životů

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Munzar, Jan; Ondráček, Stanislav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 6 (2010), s. 376-379 ISSN 0042-4544 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : catastrophic flash flood * Southern Moravia * communist censorship Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  20. Přírodní prostředí Etiopské vysočiny a jeho predispozice ke svahovým pohybům a říční erozi jako podkladový materiál pro výuku regionální geografie v souvislostech

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kusák, Michal; Máca, V.; Stacke, V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, 1/2 (2016), s. 20-30 ISSN 1804-8366 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : Ethiopian Highland * mass movement * erosion Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography

  1. Local perceptions of climate change impacts and migration patterns in Male, Maldives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stojanov, R.; Duží, Barbora; Kelman, I.; Němec, D.; Procházka, D.

    -, 18. April 2016 (2016) ISSN 1475-4959 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Maldives * climate change impacts * migration Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/geoj.12177/full

  2. Regional Geography is Dead. Long Live Regional Geography!

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaishar, Antonín; Werner, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 3 (2006), s. 2-8 ISSN 1210-8812 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : regional geography * regions * geography * methodology * Ostrava region Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  3. Klippen Belt, Flysch Belt and Inner Western Carpathian Paleogene Basin Relations in the Northern Slovakia by Magnetotelluric Imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Majcin, D.; Bezák, V.; Klanica, Radek; Vozár, J.; Pek, Josef; Bilčík, D.; Telecký, Josef

    (2018) ISSN 0033-4553 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : magnetotellurics * Western Carpathians * Klippen Belt * Flysch Belt * Inner Carpathian Paleogene Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography Impact factor: 1.591, year: 2016

  4. A new method to quantify carbonate rock weathering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dubois, C.; Deceuster, J.; Kaufmann, O.; Rowberry, Matthew David

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 8 (2015), s. 889-935 ISSN 1874-8961 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : weathering index * alterite * limestone * physical model Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 1.777, year: 2015

  5. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program (1984). Program Management Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    6 Two-Color Refractometry for Dr. John D. R. Bahng Astronomical Geodesy 7 Long Wavelength infrared Emissions Dr. James C. Baird from a Recomnining...hardware, and conducting the experiment. 4 114 , -. ., -. . . . . . . . - ... . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TWO-ODLOR REFRACTOMETRY FOR

  6. Using the LANDSAT data collection system for field geophysics: Operations in the British Virgin Islands. [relaying borehole tiltmeter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, W. J., Jr.; Allen, W. K.; Gilbert, E. L.; Painter, J. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    This particular application was to vertical geodesy by tide gauge and tiltmeter on a small desert island in the British Virgin Islands. The performance of the LANDSAT system under potentially marginal circumstances was found to be excellent.

  7. Teplotní pole zemské kůry jako archiv klimatických změn

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafanda, Jan

    Roč. 26, č. 3 (2016/2017), s. 4-5 ISSN 1210-3004 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : deep boreholes * ground surface temperature * transient component Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography

  8. Spolupráce s vojenskou zeměpisnou službou při budování gravimetrických základů České republiky

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lederer, M.; Dušátko, D.; Mrlina, Jan

    -, č. 1 (2009), s. 24-30 ISSN 1214-3707 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : gravimetric base network * Czechoslovak levelling network * history Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  9. GCCS Spatial Data Base Module

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bell, Paul

    1998-01-01

    .... JMTK is divided into three primary areas: (1) Visual, (2) Analysis (non-visual), and (3) Spatial Data Base (SDBM). The primary objective of the SDBM effort is to define, design, develop and test mapping, charting and geodesy...

  10. GCCS Spatial Data Base Module Extensions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bell, Paul

    1998-01-01

    .... JMTK is divided into three primary areas: (1) Visual, (2) Analysis (nonvisual), and (3) Spatial Data Base (SDBM). The primary objective of the SDBM effort is to define, design, develop and test mapping, charting and geodesy...

  11. 20 let Oddělení environmentální geografie Ústavu geoniky AV ČR, v.v.i

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frantál, Bohumil; Kirchner, Karel; Klusáček, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 2 (2013), s. 54-56 ISSN 1213-1075 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Department of environmental geography * 20 years of founding * Brno Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  12. Earth study from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorenko, A. V.

    1981-01-01

    The significance that space studies are making to all Earth sciences in the areas of geography, geodesy, cartography, geology, meteorology, oceanology, agronomy, and ecology is discussed. It is predicted that cosmonautics will result in a revolution in science and technology.

  13. Geografická analýza vybraných populačních a sídelních charakteristik Krkonoš (1850–2001)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klapka, Pavel; Martinát, Stanislav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 42 (2005), s. 139-152 ISSN 0139-925X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : population * settlement * spatiotemporal comparison * Giant Mountains Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  14. Fully automated measurement of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility using 3D rotator

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Studýnka, J.; Chadima, Martin; Suza, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 629, 26 August (2014), s. 6-13 ISSN 0040-1951 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : AMS * Kappabridge * susceptibility tensor Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.872, year: 2014

  15. Relevancy of mathematical support for geophysics determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vîlceanu, Clara-Beatrice; Grecea, Carmen; Muşat, Cosmin

    2017-07-01

    The importance of gravity in geodesy is recognized even since the 16th century. Starting with the experiments and theories of Galileo Galilei, the gravity and its global variation has continued to play an important role for those preoccupied with measuring the Earth's surface. The benefits of Physical Geodesy (studying the Earth's gravitational field) are extended to other disciplines such as Seismology, Oceanography, Volcanology etc. The aim of the present paper consists in highlighting the connection between gravity and the geodesist's profession. This was possible only throughout an extended study of Physical Geodesy realized with the support given by the International Gravity Office, Military Topographic Direction, The National Centre of Cartography and different specialists from these domains. Gravity represents the main factor which influences the Earth's shape and dimensions and when it comes to geodetic measurements, the gravity and its influence upon the measurements realized by specialists in geodesy has to be considered.

  16. Magnetické pole Země a jeho možný vliv na živé organizmy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Střeštík, Jaroslav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 4 (2004), s. 249-251 ISSN 0009-0700 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : geomagnetic activity * geomagnetic storms * human beings Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  17. Characterisation of induced fracture networks within an enhanced geothermal system using anisotropic electromagnetic modelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    MacFarlane, J.; Thiel, S.; Pek, Josef; Peacock, J.; Heinson, G.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 288, November (2014), s. 1-7 ISSN 0377-0273 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : geothermal systems * magnetotellurics * fluid injection Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.543, year: 2014

  18. Analysis of the influence of tectonics on the evolution of valley networks based on SRTM DEM, Jemma River basin, Ethiopia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kusák, Michal; Kropáček, J.; Vilímek, V.; Schillaci, C.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 1 (2016), 37-50 ISSN 1724-4757 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : valley network * tectonic lineaments * Jemma River basin * Ethiopian Highlands Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  19. Micro-gravity studies in archeo-prospecting of the Valley of the Kings, Luxor, Egypt

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Issawy, E. A.; Tealeb, A. A.; Mrlina, Jan; Radwan, A. H.; Hassan, G. S.; Sakr, K. O.

    - (2001), s. 201-212 ISSN 1110-6417 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : micro-gravity investigations * archaeo-prospecting * Valley of the Kings * Egypt Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  20. Semiconductor Master Oscillator Power Amplifier for Gravity Gradiometer and Other Applications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA GSFC has been working on an ESTO funded Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) Cold Atom Gravity Gradiometer for Geodesy since 2014. Significant progresses have...

  1. Ohrožení mokřadů a vodní biodiverzity v Nepálu

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bhatta, B. P.; Kolejka, Jaromír; Silval, T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 3 (2013), s. 20-23 ISSN 0044-4863 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : wetland animals * wetland types * degradation factors * policy protection measures Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  2. Analysis of geodetic surveying on the margin of subsidence depression

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležalová, Hana; Müller, Karel; Bláha, P.

    -, č. 273 (2006), s. 103-112 ISSN 0372-9508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : subsidence depression * levelling * height changes Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  3. Nelinejnyje UNČ elektromagnitnyje volny Gercovogo diapazona

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feygin, F. Z.; Kleimenova, N. G.; Khabazin, J. G.; Prikner, Karel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2009), s. 27-37 ISSN 1818-3735 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : magnetosphere * ionosphere * nonlinearity * pulsing Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  4. Podoby městského zemědělství: příklad městečka Côte Saint-Luc

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Duží, Barbora

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, Podzim-zima/2016/2017 (2016), s. 6-6 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : urban agriculture * Côte Saint-Luc in Canada * local municipality Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  5. Mezinárodní workshop k rizikům připravil Ústav geoniky AV ČR

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolejka, Jaromír; Kirchner, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 1 (2017), s. 51-53 ISSN 1213-1075 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : international workshop * Strategy AV21 * Research Programme Natural hazards Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography

  6. Confirmation of a theory: reconstruction of an alluvial plain development in a flume experiment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bertalan, L.; Tóth, C. A.; Szabó, G.; Nagy, G.; Kuda, František; Szabó, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 3 (2016), s. 271-285 ISSN 0014-0015 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : fluvial geomorphology * flume experiment * avulsion Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.923, year: 2016

  7. Revize speleologické dokumentace pseudokrasových jeskyní „Ledové sluje“ z archívu Správy Národního parku Podyjí a její implementace do GIS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuda, František

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 10 (2013), s. 17-25 ISSN 1212-3560 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Podyji National Park * ice caves * speleological exploration Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  8. Extreme events in the Dudetes Mountains - Their long-term geomorphic impact and possible controlling factors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Migon, P.; Hrádek, Mojmír; Parzoch, K.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 36 (2002), s. 29-49 ISSN 0081-6434 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3086906 Keywords : extreme events * debris flow * landslide-floods Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  9. Životní jubileum prof. RNDr. Jaromíra Demka, DrSc.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kirchner, Karel; Mackovčin, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 2 (2010), s. 75-75 ISSN 1213-1075 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : life anniversary * Jaromír Demek * geography Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  10. 29TH Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Systems and Applications Meeting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    ...) Applications of PTTI technology to evolving military navigation and communication systems; geodesy; aviation; and pulsars; 4) Dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, geosynchronous communication satellites, and computer networks.

  11. Trendy v problematice panelových sídlišť s důrazem na filozofii jejich regenerace ů s příklady z České republiky

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kallabová, Eva

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2002), s. 26-31 ISSN 1210-8812 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK3046108 Keywords : prafab housing estates * humanization * regeneration Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  12. Analysis of the relationship of automatically and manually extracted lineaments from DEM and geologically mapped tectonic faults around the Main Ethiopian Rift and the Ethiopian highlands, Ethiopia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kusák, Michal; Krbcová, K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 1 (2017), s. 5-17 ISSN 0300-5402 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : azimuth * faults * lineaments * Main Ethiopian Rift * morphometry Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography

  13. Chronologie akutního koronárního syndromu

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sitar, J.; Střeštík, Jaroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2009), s. 32-34 ISSN 1212-4540 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : acute myocardial infarction * weekly variation * annual variation Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  14. Contrasting patterns of hot spell effects on morbidity and mortality for cardiovascular diseases in the Czech Republic, 1994-2009

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanzlíková, Hana; Plavcová, E.; Kynčl, J.; Kříž, B.; Kyselý, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 11 (2015), s. 1673-1684 ISSN 0020-7128 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : hot spells * cardiovascular disease * cerebrovascular disease Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.309, year: 2015

  15. Unseen space weather also relates to cardiac events

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cornélissen, G.; Halberg, F.; Singh, R. B.; Dušek, J.; Fišer, B.; Homolka, P.; Siegelová, J.; Střeštík, Jaroslav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2008), s. 15-21 ISSN 1556-4002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : coronary artery disease * seasonal variation * geographic distribution Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  16. Effect of the August 11, 1999 total solar eclipse on geomagnetic pulsations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pal, B.; Heilig, B.; Zieger, B.; Szendröi, J.; Verö, J.; Lühr, H.; Yumoto, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Střeštík, Jaroslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 1 (2007), s. 23-58 ISSN 1217-8977 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : field line resonance * geomagnetic pulsations * solar eclipse Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  17. Ivan Landek, PhD in Technical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Frangeš

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available On 12 June 2017, Ivan Landek, MSc defended his doctoral thesis Improvements to the Model of Topographic Data of the Republic of Croatia at the Faculty of Geodesy of the University of Zagreb, before a Commission whose members were Prof. Dr. Damir Medak, Assoc. Prof. Dr. Robert Župan and Assist. Prof. Dr. Slobodanka Ključanin, University of Sarajevo, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Institue of Geodesy. The mentor was Prof. Dr. Stanislav Frangeš.

  18. Danko Markovinović, PhD in Technical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljenko Lapaine

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Danko Markovinović defended his dissertation Gravimetric Reference System of the Republic of Croatia at the Faculty of Geodesy of the University of Zagreb on October 16, 2009. The dissertation was defended in front of the committee: Prof. Dr. Mario Brkić, Prof. Dr. Tomislav Bašić (mentor and Assist. Prof. Dr. Miran Kuhar from the Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geodesy of the University of Ljubljana.

  19. Present consequences of the post-war migration in the Czech borderland for regional developemnt

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaishar, Antonín; Dvořák, Petr; Nosková, Helena; Zapletalová, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 4 (2017), s. 5-15 ISSN 2081-6383 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 ; RVO:68378114 Keywords : borderland regions * resettlement * social consequences Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography ; DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography (USD-C) OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects); Environmental sciences (social aspects) (USD-C) https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/quageo.2017.36.issue-4/quageo-2017-0032/quageo-2017-0032.xml?format=INT

  20. Landslides in moraines as triggers of glacial lake outburst floods: example from Palcacocha Lake (Cordillera Blanca, Peru)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, Jan; Novotný, J.; Novotná, I.; Urries de, B.J.; Vilímek, V.; Emmer, Adam; Strozzi, T.; Kusák, Michal; Rapre, A.C.; Hartvich, Filip; Frey, H.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 6 (2016), s. 1461-1477 ISSN 1612-510X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/1000 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 ; RVO:67179843 Keywords : landslides * moraines * glacial lakes * slope stability calculation * glacial lake outburst floods * impact wave models * Cordillera Blanca Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography; DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography (UEK-B) Impact factor: 3.657, year: 2016

  1. Geography From Another Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The GEODESY software program is intended to promote geographical awareness among students with its remote sensing capabilities to observe the Earth's surface from distant vantage points. Students and teachers using GEODESY learn to interpret and analyze geographical data pertaining to the physical attributes of their community. For example, the program provides a digital environment of physical features, such as mountains and bodies of water, as well as man-made features, such as roads and parks, using aerial photography, satellite imagery, and geographic information systems data in accordance with National Geography Standards. The main goal is to have the students and teachers gain a better understanding of the unique forces that drive their coexistence. GEODESY was developed with technical assistance and financial support from Stennis Space Center's Commercial Remote Sensing Program Office, now known as the Earth Science Applications Directorate.

  2. Transformation procedures in 3D terrestrial coordinate systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedlák Vladimír

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Transformation procedures belong to the main tasks of surveyor working in a field of geodesy, for example in satellite geodesy or astronomical geodesy. It is necessary to know transformation procedures in 3D terrestrial (Earth coordinate systems. Increasingly a dynamic advance growth of application of satellite navigation systems, for example GPS (Global Positioning System into engineering surveying, real estate register and others spheres of applied geodesy and geo-surveying (mine surveying exacts knowledge of these transformation procedures between coordinates in various coordinate systems. These tasks are common for daily work for various practical surveyors too, not only for theoretical scientific working surveyors.Conventional Terrestrial System is 3D coordinate system what is the most important coordinate system in global geodesy. Conventional Terrestrial System is an approximation of the nature coordinate system of the Earth. The origin of this coordinate system is placed in the earth substantial centre of gravity and in the centre of geoid. Conventional Terrestrial System is the Cartesian right-handed coordinate system, i.e. positive one. The Local Astronomical System is 3D coordinate system too and it belongs to an important coordinate system in geodesy from its practical point of view. Many geodetic measurements are realized in this coordinate system. Designation of this coordinate system as astronomical system expresses its sticking to a normal line to an equipotential plane, i.e. to a vertical. Local Astronomical system is the left-handed cartesian coordinate system.Transformation procedures in 3D terrestrial coordinate systems with theory of these systems are presented in the paper. Transformation in the local astronomical coordinate system presents common transformation in a frame of an adjustment of various local geodetic networks. In a case of satellite measurements (GPS, satellite altimetry, etc. transformation between local and

  3. CityGuideTour Toruń - tourist application using augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Węgrzyn, Magdalena; Mościcka, Albina

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the article is to show the possibilities of augmented reality in the fi eld of geodesy and cartography. It discusses the concept of augmented reality, its origins and development, as well as areas of the existing applications. The practical functioning of augmented reality in the area of geodesy and cartography is presented on the example of an application developed for the tourist city of Toruń, created with the use of CityGuideTour software. The principles of developing an application and the way it operates are also discussed. As a result, a fully operational bilingual application is available free of charge on the Web.

  4. Characterization of chlorophyll-a over CAL-VAL site at Kavaratti in the Lakshadweep Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Babu, K.N.; Shukla, A.K.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Singh, S.K.; Sawant, S.S.

    Registered office: Mortimer House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK Marine Geodesy Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=t713657895 Characterization...',Marine Geodesy,32:4,345 — 354 To link to this Article: DOI: 10.1080/01490410903297733 URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01490410903297733 Full terms and conditions of use: http://www.informaworld.com/terms-and-conditions-of-access.pdf This article may be used...

  5. Mladen Zrinjski, PhD in Technical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Bašić

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Mladen Zrinjski defended his PhD thesis Defining the Calibration Baseline Scale of the Faculty of Geodesy by Applying Precise Electro-Optical Distance Meter and GPS at the Faculty of Geodesy of the University of Zagreb on April 8, 2010. The Defence Committee included Prof. Dr. Vedran Mudronja from the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture of the University of Zagreb, Prof. Dr. Tomislav Bašić (mentor 1 and Prof. Emeritus Nikola Solarić (mentor 2.

  6. Coordinate systems and map projections

    CERN Document Server

    Maling, DH

    1992-01-01

    A revised and expanded new edition of the definitive English work on map projections. The revisions take into account the huge advances in geometrical geodesy which have occurred since the early years of satellite geodesy. The detailed configuration of the geoid resulting from the GEOS and SEASAT altimetry measurements are now taken into consideration. Additionally, the chapter on computation of map projections is updated bearing in mind the availability of pocket calculators and microcomputers. Analytical derivation of some map projections including examples of pseudocylindrical and polyconic

  7. Studies on selected landslides and their societal impacts: activity report of the Prague World Centre of Excellence, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, Jan; Hartvich, Filip; Tábořík, Petr; Blahůt, Jan; Briestenský, Miloš; Stemberk, Josef; Emmer, Adam; Vargas, R.; Balek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 4 (2017), s. 1547-1553 ISSN 1612-510X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG15007; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA ČR(CZ) GJ16-12227Y; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015079 Grant - others:Česká rozvojová agentura(CZ) 25/2015/03 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 ; RVO:86652079 Keywords : Landslide hazard * Monitoring * Result dissemination * EarthCaching Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography; DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography (UEK-B) OBOR OECD: Physical geography; Physical geography (UEK-B) Impact factor: 3.657, year: 2016

  8. INTERNATIONAL SUMMER STUDENT SEMINAR (3S, FROM IDEA TO REALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Karpik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The article gives a spotlight on a three universities (Moscow State University of Geodesy and Cartography, Siberian State Academy of Geodesy, Wuhan University and ISPRS’ cooperation in organizing and holding summer student seminars for undergraduate, master, and PhD students of the universities specializing in photogrammetry, remote sensing, GIS, aerial and space cartography. Principles of topics of the seminar selection, lecture courses delivering and practical training as well as international joint team work on projects and their defence are described. The description of the basic stages of 3S implementation, and the goals of this sort of the international event is given.

  9. Milan Rezo, PhD in Technical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Bašić

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available On October, 7th 2010, Milan Rezo defended his dissertation The Meaning and the Application of Physical Parameters in Modern Approach in State Survey at the Faculty of Geodesy of the University of Zagreb, and in front of the Commission consisting of Assoc. Prof. Dr. Željko Bačić, Prof. Dr. Tomislav Bašić (mentor, both from the Faculty of Geodesy, University of Zagreb, and Assist. Prof. Božo Soldo from the Faculty of Geotechnical Engineering Varaždin of University of Zagreb.

  10. Recent advances in anisotropy of magnetic remanence: New software and practical examples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chadima, Martin

    -, special issue (2012), s. 59-60 ISSN 1335-2806. [Castle meeting New Trends in Geomagnetism : Paleo, rock and environmental magnetism/13./. 17.06.2012-23.06.2012, Zvolen] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : magnetic susceptibility * anisotropy * anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://gauss.savba.sk/GPIweb/conferences/Castle2012/abstrCastle.pdf

  11. Geomagnetic response to solar and interplanetary disturbances

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Saiz, E.; Cerrato, Y.; Cid, C.; Dobrica, V.; Hejda, Pavel; Nenovski, P.; Stauning, P.; Bochníček, Josef; Danov, D.; Demetrescu, C.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Maris, G.; Teodosiev, D.; Valach, F.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 3, July (2013), A26/1-A26/20 ISSN 2115-7251 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC09070 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : solar activity * interplanetary medium * indices * ionosphere (general) * ring current Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.519, year: 2013

  12. Změny využití krajiny v environmentálních souvislostech Slovácka - případová studie Vlčnovska

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trojan, Jakub; Milička, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2015), s. 43-46 ISSN 1337-9054 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : land use * landscape * Slovacko region Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://www.sevs.sk/sites/default/files/images/Dokumenty/01_vedecky_obzor_ekologia_201502.pdf

  13. Hajnova lípa a Žižkův stolec u Laviček

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cendelín, D.; Havlát, J.; Kirchner, Karel; Lacina, Jan; Maštera, L.; Štindl, M.; Unger, J.; Velek, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 18, 11/2014 (2014), s. 297-304 ISSN 1211-8931 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Locality Hajn linden and Žižka seat * cult historical place * landscape monument Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  14. 48 CFR 242.202 - Assignment of contract administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., charting, and geodesy services; (F) Base, post, camp, and station purchases; (G) Operation or maintenance of, or installation of equipment at, radar or communication network sites; (H) Communications..., post, camp, and station contracts on a military installation are normally the responsibility of the...

  15. Semantic map: the case of Ústí nad Orlicí

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Osman, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 3 (2016), s. 463-492 ISSN 1212-0014 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : image of the city * mental map * semantic map Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.580, year: 2016 http://geography.cz/sbornik/wp-content/uploads/downloads/2016/10/gcgs032016_osman.pdf

  16. A support for the existence of paleolakes and paleorivers buried under Saharan sand by means of “gravitational signal” from EIGEN 6C4

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klokočník, Jaroslav; Kostelecký, J.; Cílek, Václav; Bezděk, Aleš; Pešek, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 9 (2017), 199/1-199/28 ISSN 1866-7511 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 ; RVO:67985831 Keywords : gravitational field model EIGEN 6C4 * functions of disturbing geopotential * satellite digital topography models Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography; Geology (GLU-S) Impact factor: 0.955, year: 2016

  17. Social developmnet of ecologically sensitive rural areas: Case studies of the Moravian Karst (Czech Republic) and the Devetashko Plato (Bulgaria)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zapletalová, Jana; Stefanová, D.; Vaishar, Antonín; Stefanov, P.; Dvořák, Petr; Tcherkezova, E.

    3-4, 3-4 (2016), s. 65-84 ISSN 0204-7209 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : social development * rural sensitive areas * Devetashko Plato * Bulgaria * Moravian karst - Czech Republic Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Cultural and economic geography http://geoproblems.eu/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/2016_34/4_zapletalova.pdf

  18. The reconstruction of a glacial lake outburst flood using HEC-RAS and its significance for future hazard assessments: an example from Lake 513 in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, Jan; Benešová, M.; Vilímek, V.; Bouška, P.; Rapre, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 3 (2014), s. 1617-1638 ISSN 0921-030X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/1000 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : GLOFs * debris flow * natural hazard * HEC-RAS * Cordillera Blanca Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 1.719, year: 2014

  19. 76 FR 32957 - Hydrographic Services Review Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-07

    .... SUMMARY: This notice responds to the Hydrographic Service Improvements Act Amendments of 2002, Public Law...), to solicit nominations for membership on the Hydrographic Services Review Panel (HSRP). The HSRP, a...; fisheries management; coastal and marine spatial planning; geodesy; water levels; and other science-related...

  20. Identification of magnetic particulates in road dust accumulated on roadside snow using magnetic, geochemical and micro-morphological analyses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bućko, M. S.; Magiera, T.; Johanson, B.; Petrovský, Eduard; Pesonen, L. J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 159, č. 5 (2011), s. 1266-1276 ISSN 0269-7491 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : road dust * vehicle emissions * magnetic properties * snow * geochemical analyses Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 3.746, year: 2011

  1. Factors of the uneven regional development of wind energy projects (a case of the Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frantál, Bohumil; Kunc, Josef

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 3 (2010), s. 183-199 ISSN 0016-7193 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB700860801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : wind energy * diffusion of innovation * social acceptance * uneven development Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  2. The flood in August 1880 – one of the most severe natural disasterts of the 19th century in the Ostrava region (Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Munzar, Jan; Ondráček, Stanislav; Řehánek, T.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 3 (2007), s. 25-33 ISSN 1210-8812 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300860601 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : flood * Odra river * Ostrava region * Czech Republic Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  3. Povodně v povodí Moravy v srpnu 1880 – obdoba přírodní katastrofy v roce 1997?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Munzar, Jan; Ondráček, Stanislav; Řehánek, T.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 2007, č. 34 (2007), s. 149-161 ISSN 0323-0988 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300860601 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : floods * Morava river basin * August 1880 Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  4. The catastrophic flood in February/March 1784 - a natural disaster of European scope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Munzar, Jan; Elleder, L.; Deutsch, M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2005), s. 8-25 ISSN 1210-8812 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : winter flood 1784 * Central and West Europe * documentation and impacts Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  5. Geophysical anatomy of counter-slope scarps in sedimentary flysch rocks (Outer Western Carpathians)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tábořík, Petr; Lenart, J.; Blecha, V.; Vilhelm, J.; Turský, O.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 276, JAN 1 (2017), s. 59-70 ISSN 0169-555X Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : multidisciplinary geophysical survey * deep-seated landslide * integrated interpretation * counter-slope scarp * underground discontinuities * flysch rock Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography Impact factor: 2.958, year: 2016

  6. Algorithms for Global Positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borre, Kai; Strang, Gilbert

    and replaces the authors' previous work, Linear Algebra, Geodesy, and GPS (1997). An initial discussion of the basic concepts, characteristics and technical aspects of different satellite systems is followed by the necessary mathematical content which is presented in a detailed and self-contained fashion...

  7. Alternatívne prístupy k štúdiu územných identít obyvateľstva. Miera lokálneho povedomia na základe analýzy užívateľských profilov na sociálnej sieti

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nikischer, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 3 (2014), s. 381- 406 ISSN 1212-8112 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG12023 Institutional support: RVO:68378025 Keywords : local consciousness * identification * regional identity Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  8. Challenges for landslide hazard and risk management in ‘low-risk’ regions, Czech Republic—landslide occurrences and related costs (IPL project no. 197)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, Jan; Stemberk, Jakub; Blahůt, Jan; Krejčí, V.; Krejčí, O.; Hartvich, Filip; Kycl, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 2 (2017), s. 771-780 ISSN 1612-510X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG15007 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : landslide inventory * ICL/IPL activities * landslide cost * landslide risk * fatal landslides * public awareness Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography Impact factor: 3.657, year: 2016

  9. Landslide and glacial lake outburst flood hazard in the Chucchún river basin, Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, Jan; Vilímek, V.; Benešová, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 2 (2015), s. 173-180 ISSN 0300-5402 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/1000 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : landslide hazard * GLOFs * flood hazard * Cordillera Blanca * Peru Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  10. Settlement problems in the Czech borderland

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaishar, Antonín; Dvořák, Petr; Nováková, Eva; Zapletalová, Jana

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 3 (2008), s. 241-253 ISSN 0016-7193 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2D06001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : borderland * social infrastructure * education * micro-regions Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  11. The impact of disturbance on the dynamics of fluvial processes in mountain landscapes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Langhammer, J.; Hartvich, Filip; Kliment, Z.; Jeníček, M.; Bernsteinová (Kaiglová), J.; Vlček, L.; Su, Y.; Štych, P.; Miřijovský, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 1 (2015), s. 105-116 ISSN 1211-7420 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : runoff * fluvial dynamics * forest disturbance * climate change * Bohemian Forest Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://www.npsumava.cz/gallery/31/9345-sg_21_1_langhammeretal.pdf

  12. Větrná energie, člověk a krajina v proměnách času

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kallabová, Eva; Frantál, Bohumil; Nováková, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 1 (2009), s. 379-396 ISSN 0323-0988 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB700860801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : wind * regionalization * wind power plants * local identity * Czech republic * wind energy Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  13. Magnetic susceptibility and spectral gamma logs in the Tithonian-Berriasian pelagic carbonates in the Tatra Mts (Western Carpathians, Poland): Palaeoenvironmental changes at the Jurassic/Cretaceous boundary

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grabowski, J.; Schnyder, J.; Sobien, K.; Koptíková, Leona; Krzemiński, L.; Pszczółkowski, A.; Hejnar, J.; Schnabl, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 43, June 2013 (2013), s. 1-17 ISSN 0195-6671 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Berriasian * Gamma-ray spectrometry * magnetic susceptibility * palaeoenvironmental trends * Tithonian Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.390, year: 2013

  14. Chinese tombs oriented by a compass: evidence from paleomagnetic changes versus the age of tombs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Charvátová, Ivanka; Klokočník, Jaroslav; Kolmaš, J.; Kostelecký, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 1 (2011), s. 159-174 ISSN 0039-3169 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515; CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : Chinese tombs * magnetic compass * paleomagnetic declination * Fuson hypothesis Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.700, year: 2011

  15. Environmental factors influenting species composition of acidophilous grasslands patches in agricultural landscape

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Halas, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 1 (2012), s. 16-27 ISSN 1210-8812 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : acidophilous grasslands * hemeroby * patch isolation * patch area * regression trees Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://www.geonika.cz/EN/research/ENMgr/MGR_2012_01.pdf

  16. Local perceptions of climate change impacts and migration patterns in Malé, Maldives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stojanov, R.; Duží, Barbora; Kelman, I.; Němec, D.; Procházka, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 183, č. 4 (2017), s. 370-385 ISSN 0016-7398 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Maldives * climate change impacts * migration * risk management * quantitative survey Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Cultural and economic geography Impact factor: 3.132, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/geoj.12177/abstract

  17. Kuřim–the largest small town in the South-Moravian Region (Czechia)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaishar, Antonín

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 8 (2015), s. 135-147 ISSN 2084-5456 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : small town * suburbanization * Kuřim Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://annalesgeo.up.krakow.pl/article/view/2839/2502

  18. Decadal Cycles of Earth Rotation, Mean Sea Level and Climate, Excited by Solar Activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chapanov, Y.; Ron, Cyril; Vondrák, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 2 (2017), s. 241-250 ISSN 1214-9705 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-15943S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : Earth rotation * solar activity * mean sea level Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography Impact factor: 0.699, year: 2016

  19. Mineral magnetic environmental record in clastic cave deposits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlechta, Stanislav; Kadlec, Jaroslav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 38, special issue (2008), s. 134-134 ISSN 1335-2806. [Paleo, Rock and Environmental Magnetism. Castle Meeting /11./. 22.06.2008-28.06.2008, Bojnice] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : mineral magnetic environmental reconstruction * cave sediments * Moravian Karst Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  20. The weathered Carboniferous Limestone at Bullslaughter Bay, South Wales: the first example of ghost-rock recorded in the British Isles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rowberry, Matthew David; Battiau-Queney, Y.; Walsh, P.; Blažejowski, B.; Bout-Roumazeilles, V.; Trentesaux, A.; Křížová, L.; Griffiths, H.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2014), s. 33-42 ISSN 1374-8505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : deep weathering * saprolite * ghost -rock * Gash Breccia Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.782, year: 2014 http://popups.ulg.ac.be/1374-8505/index.php?id=4353&file=1&pid=4150

  1. Seismic anisotropy of serpentinite from Val Malenco, Italy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kern, H.; Lokajíček, Tomáš; Svitek, Tomáš; Wenk, H.-R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 6 (2015), s. 4113-4129 ISSN 2169-9313 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH13102 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : serpentinite * anisotropy Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 3.318, year: 2015

  2. Gd.sub.90./sub.Co.sub.2.5./sub.Fe.sub.7.5./sub. alloy displaying enhanced magnetocaloric properties.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Provenzano, V.; Shull, R. D.; Kletetschka, Günther; Stutzman, P. E.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 622, February (2015), s. 1061-1067 ISSN 0925-8388 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : magnetocaloric properties * bulk gadolinium * gadolinium-based alloy * magnetic refrigeration * magnetic hysteresis * refrigeration capacity Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 3.014, year: 2015

  3. The Role of Social Capital in Economic Life of the Ukrainian Entrepreneurs in Czechia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovály, K.; Čermáková, Dita

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2016), s. 135-144 ISSN 0300-5402 Institutional support: RVO:68378025 Keywords : social capital * migrant entrepreneurship * Ukrainian migrants Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://www.aucgeographica.cz/index.php/AUC_Geographica/article/view/64

  4. Gravity signal at Ghawar, Saudi Arabia, from the global gravitational field model EGM 2008 and similarities around

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klokočník, Jaroslav; Kostelecký, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 6 (2015), s. 3515-3522 ISSN 1866-7511 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : gravity disturbance (anomaly) * Marussi tensor * invariants of the gravity field Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 1.224, year: 2014

  5. Magnetometric method as a tool of measuring pollution of forest soils by heavy metals - example of the Orlické hory Mts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Semelová, V.; Fialová, Hana; Kapička, Aleš; Kacálek, D.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2009), s. 385-393 ISSN 0323-1046 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/07/0941 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : atmospheric deposition * forest soils * magnetic susceptibility * heavy metals * Orlické hory Mts. Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  6. Strongly magnetic soil developed on a non-magnetic rock basement: A case study from NW Bulgaria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grison, Hana; Petrovský, Eduard; Jordanova, N.; Kapička, Aleš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2011), s. 697-716 ISSN 0039-3169 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB300120604 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : magnetic susceptibility * magnetite * soil * pollution * climate * limestone Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.700, year: 2011

  7. Surveying the anthropogenic impact of the Moldau river sediments and nearby soils using magnetic susceptibility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knab, M.; Hoffmann, V.; Petrovský, Eduard; Kapička, Aleš; Jordanova, N.; Appel, E.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 4 (2006), s. 527-535 ISSN 0943-0105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : Moldau river sediments * magnetic susceptibility * anthropogenic impact Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.610, year: 2006

  8. Microregional development in border regions of Czechia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaishar, Antonín; Zapletalová, Jana

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 20 (2009), s. 89-106. ISBN 978-83-924797-6-5. ISSN 1642-4689 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2D06001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : borderland * microregions * Czechia Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  9. Effect of climate on morphology and development of sorted circles and polygons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uxa, Tomáš; Mida, P.; Křížek, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 4 (2017), s. 663-674 ISSN 1045-6740 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : patterned ground * sorted circles and polygons * morphology * active layer * Svalbard * high Arctic Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography Impact factor: 2.815, year: 2016

  10. Metody urgentního mapování v krizových situacích s využitím komunitních a participativních nástrojů GIS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trojan, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2015), s. 1-6 ISSN 1804-1795 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : crisis mapping * participative GIS * geoinformatics * crisis management * Ushahidi Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://trilobit.fai.utb.cz/metody-urgentniho-mapovani-v-krizovych-situacich-s-vyuzitim-komunitnich-a-participativnich-nastroju-gis

  11. An optical clock to go

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Andrew D.

    2018-05-01

    Bringing next-generation atomic clocks out of the lab is not an easy task, but doing so will unlock many new possibilities. As a crucial first step, a portable atomic clock has now been deployed for relativistic geodesy measurements in the Alps.

  12. Geodetic alignment of laser power installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shtorm, V.V.; Gostev, A.M.; Drobikov, A.V.

    1989-01-01

    Main problems occuring in applied geodesy under initial alignment of laser power installation optical channel are considered. Attention is paid to alignment of lens beamguide telescopic pairs and alignment quality control. Methods and means of geodetic measurements under alignment are indicated. Conclusions are made about the degree of working through certain aspects of the problem

  13. Space research in the Netherlands 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    The reports of the four working groups of the Netherlands Committee for Geophysics and Space Research are given for 1976. The research desribed includes the electromagnetic and particle radiation of the sun and stars, cosmic rays and non-solar X-and gamma-radiation, photometric observations in the far infrared and ultraviolet spectral regions and observational and geometric satellite geodesy. (Auth.)

  14. Magnetic characteristics and trace elements concentration in soils from Anthemountas River basin (North Greece): discrimination of different sources of magnetic enhancement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aidona, E.; Grison, Hana; Petrovský, Eduard; Kazakis, N.; Papadopoulou, L.; Voudouris, K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 20 (2016), 1375/1-1375/16 ISSN 1866-6280 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-10775S; GA MŠk(CZ) LG15036 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : magnetic susceptibility * day plot * trace elements * pollution * Greece Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 1.569, year: 2016

  15. Nonlinearity in a dynamo

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejda, Pavel; Reshetnyak, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 5-6 (2010), s. 491-504 ISSN 0309-1929 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300120704 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : Boussinesq convection * geostrophy * quenching * triads Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.831, year: 2010

  16. Změny využití krajiny u jihomoravských vodních nádrží

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havlíček, M.; Halas, Petr; Lacina, Jan; Mlejnková, H.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2014, č. 108 (2014), s. 25-35 ISSN 1805-921X Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : land use * water reservoir * vegetation Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://www.vukoz.cz/acta/dokumenty/acta_108/Acta-108_komplet-cz.pdf

  17. South-Moravian Rural Borderland

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaishar, A.; Šťastná, M.; Trnka, P.; Dvořák, Petr; Zapletalová, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2013), s. 115-132 ISSN 1803-8417 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : borderland * landscape * rural settlement * economy * Moravia Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/euco.2013.5.issue-2/euco-2013-0008/euco-2013-0008.xml?format=INT

  18. A Model for the Identification of Areas Favourable for the Development of Tourism: A Case Study of the Šumava Mts. and South Bohemia Tourist Regions (Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátil, J.; Pícha, K.; Martinát, Stanislav; Knotek, J.; Kučera, T.; Balounová, Z.; White Baravalle Gilliam, V. L.; Švec, R.; Rajchard, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 1 (2013), s. 25-40 ISSN 1210-8812 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : GIS * tourism * Czech Republic * Šumava Mts. and South Bohemia tourist regions * development Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.341, year: 2013 http://www.geonika.cz/EN/research/ENMgr/MGR_2013_01.pdf

  19. Cycle Transport in Cities – Best Practices versus Brno

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kallabová, Eva; Navrátil, Josef; Zemanová, V.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 2 (2009), s. 16-27 ISSN 1210-8812 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : cycle transport, Brno * good examples * questionnaire survey * Czech Republic Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://www.scopus.com/record/display.url?eid=2-s2.0-70449368206&origin=resultslist&sort

  20. Modelirovanije zemnoj kory Ukrajiny po rezultatam magnitotelluričeskich issledovanij s ispolzovanijem novych metodik inversij

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kováčiková, Světlana; Logvinov, I. M.; Pek, Josef; Tarasov, V. N.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 6 (2016), s. 83-100 ISSN 0203-3100 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : conductivity structure * Earth’s crust * Ukrainian Carpathians * Kirovograd anomaly of conductivity * Voronezh massif decline Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography

  1. Magnetic record of extreme marine inundation events at Las Salinas site, Jalisco, Mexican Pacific coast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, Jan; Ramírez-Herrera, M.-T.; Bógalo, M.-F.; Goguitchaichvili, A.; Castillo-Aja, R.; Morales, J.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J. A.; Ruiz-Fernandez, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 3 (2016), s. 342-357 ISSN 0020-6814 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) * rock magnetic properties * tsunami * thermomagnetic curves * Mexican Pacific coast * variability Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.262, year: 2016

  2. The HISTMAG database: combining historical, archaeomagnetic and volcanic data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arneitz, P.; Leonhardt, R.; Schnepp, E.; Heilig, B.; Mayrhofer, F.; Kovacs, P.; Hejda, Pavel; Valach, F.; Vadasz, G.; Hammerl, Ch.; Egli, R.; Fabian, K.; Kompein, N.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 210, č. 3 (2017), s. 1347-1359 ISSN 0956-540X Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : Europe * archaeomagnetism * magnetic field variations * through time * palaeomagnetism Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography Impact factor: 2.414, year: 2016

  3. Geomagnetic activity and the North Atlantic Oscillation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bucha, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 3 (2014), s. 461-472 ISSN 0039-3169 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : geomagnetic activity * solar wind * polar vortex intensification * downward winds Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.806, year: 2014

  4. Pedogennyje i litogennyje osobennosti mineralogičeskogo sostava černozema na krasnocvetnych porodach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lesovaja, S. N.; Kapička, Aleš; Petrovský, Eduard; Aparin, B. F.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 12 (2003), s. 1482-1490 ISSN 0032-180X Grant - others:RFFI(RU) 01-04-48815 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : mineralogical composition * chernozem * magnetic minerals Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  5. Pedogenic and lithogenic features in the mineralogical composition of chernozem developed from red-earth deposits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lesovaya, S. N.; Kapička, Aleš; Petrovský, Eduard; Aparin, B. F.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 12 (2003), s. 1325-1333 ISSN 1064-2293 Grant - others:RFFI(RU) 01-04-48815 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : mineralogical composition * chernozem * magnetic minerals Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.136, year: 2003

  6. Mapy energií v Atlase krajiny České republiky

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolejka, Jaromír

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 6 (2008), s. 292-297 ISSN 0044-4863 Grant - others:GA MŽP(CZ) SK/600/1/03 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : map * energy * Landscape atlas of Czech Republic Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  7. Litice – český dvojník peruánského Machu Picchu

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, Jan; Skořepa, H.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 23, 1/2 (2016), s. 19-34 ISSN 0475-0640 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG15007 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : Medieval castle * Inca town * Divoká Orlice valley * Urubamba valley * landslides Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography

  8. Landscape classification of the Czech Republic based on the distribution of natural habitats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Divíšek, Jan; Chytrý, M.; Grulich, V.; Poláková, L.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 3 (2014), s. 209-231 ISSN 0032-7786 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : biogeographical division * biotopes * constrained clustering * phytogeographical division * regionalization Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 4.104, year: 2014 http://www.preslia.cz/P143Divisek.pdf

  9. Effects of anisotropy in geostrophic turbulence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejda, Pavel; Reshetnyak, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 177, č. 3-4 (2009), s. 152-160 ISSN 0031-9201 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300120704 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : liquid core * thermal convection * geostrophic balance * cascade processes Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 1.993, year: 2009

  10. Observatory data as a proxy of space weather parameters: The importance of historical archives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejda, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 20, Č. 2 (2016), s. 47-53 ISSN 0257-7968 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2010008 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : geomagnetic observatory * geomagnetic indices * sunspot members * space weather Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography

  11. К вопросу преобразования геоцентрических декартовых координат в геодезические

    OpenAIRE

    Полещенков, В.; Любивая, Л.

    2009-01-01

    High precision determination of plane and vertical coordinates by GPS requires effective exact algorithm for converting geocentric orthogonal coordinates into geodetic ones. In the course of spheroid geodesy by V.P. Morozov the iterative method for this problem solution is given. In the present paper one more approach is considered, iterative solution and closed formula are presented. An example of computation is shown.

  12. Global conservation model for a mushy region over a moving substrate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyselica, Juraj; Šimkanin, Ján

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 276, March (2018), s. 60-67 ISSN 0031-9201 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : solidification * binary alloy * mushy region * global conservation * boundary-layer flow Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.075, year: 2016

  13. Results of palaeomagnetic research of karst sediments in Slovenia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zupan Hajna, N.; Mihevc, A.; Pruner, Petr; Bosák, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 34, 4/6 (2008), s. 1324797-1324797 ISSN 0161-6951. [International Geological Congress /33./. 06.08.2008-14.08.2008, Oslo ] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300130701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : palaeomagnetism * magnetostratigraphy * cave sediments Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  14. Vývoj antropogenních transformací reliéfu v oblasti historického Dolu Jeroným ve Slavkovském lese

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kirchner, Karel; Roštínský, Pavel

    Prosinec, č. 2012 (2013), s. 132-136 ISSN 0514-8057 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA105/09/0089 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Slavkovský les Mts. * Historical Jeroným Mine * anthropogenic landforms Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://www.geology.cz/zpravy/obsah/2012/Zpravy_2012-24.pdf

  15. GPS-based ionospheric tomography with a constrained adaptive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gauss weighted function is introduced to constrain the tomography system in the new method. It can resolve the ... the research focus in the fields of space geodesy and ... ment of GNSS such as GPS, Glonass, Galileo and. Compass, as these ...

  16. The Footfall of Shopping Centres in Olomouc (Czech Republic): An Application of the Gravity Model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klapka, Pavel; Erlebach, M.; Král, O.; Lehnert, M.; Mička, T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 3 (2013), s. 12-26 ISSN 1210-8812 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : footfall * spatial interaction * gravity model * shopping centre * Olomouc Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.341, year: 2013 http://www.geonika.cz/EN/research/ENMgr/MGR_2013_03.pdf

  17. Responses of the basic cycles of 178.7 and 2402 yr in solar–terrestrial phenomena during the Holocene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Charvátová, Ivanka; Hejda, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2, January (2014), s. 21-26 ISSN 2195-9242 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC09070 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : solar inertial motion * solar activity cycle * climatic variability Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  18. Human impact on open temperate woodlands during the middle Holocene in Central Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jamrichová, Eva; Hédl, Radim; Kolář, Jan; Tóth, P.; Bobek, Přemysl; Hajnalová, M.; Procházka, J.; Kadlec, Jaroslav; Szabó, Péter

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 245, OCT 2017 (2017), s. 55-68 ISSN 0034-6667 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 278065 - LONGWOOD Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:67985530 Keywords : temperate oakwoods * Quercus * human impact Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour; DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography (GFU-E) OBOR OECD: Ecology; Physical geography (GFU-E) Impact factor: 1.817, year: 2016

  19. A critical evaluation of the use of an inexpensive camera mounted on a recreational unmanned aerial vehicle as a tool for landslide research

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balek, Jan; Blahůt, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 3 (2017), s. 1217-1224 ISSN 1612-510X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015079 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : aerial photogrammetry * surface characterisation * 3D models * unmanned aerial vehicles * landslide monitoring Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography Impact factor: 3.657, year: 2016

  20. 3D pilot. Eindrapport werkgroep technische specificaties voor de opbouw van de 3D IMGeo-CityGML

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauboer, J.; Goos, J.; Ledoux, H.; Penninga, F.; Reuvers, M.; Stoter, J.E.; Vosselman, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Deze notitie is de eindrapportage van Activiteit 3 van de zes 3D Pilot NL Fase II activiteiten: Technische specificaties bestekteksten voor de opbouw van IMGeo-CityGML. De 3D Pilot is een initiatief van het Kadaster, Geonovum, de Nederlandse Commissie voor Geodesie en het Ministerie van

  1. Multitemporal monitoring of Karviná subsidence troughs using Sentinel-1 and TerraSAR-X interferometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lazecký, M.; Jiránková, E.; Kadlečík, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 1 (2017), s. 53-59 ISSN 1214-9705 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : subsidence * SAR Interferometry * Sentinel-1 * TerraSAR-X * mining Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography Impact factor: 0.699, year: 2016 https://www.irsm.cas.cz/index_en.php?page=acta_detail_doi&id=187

  2. Inertial effects on thermochemically driven convection and hydromagnetic dynamos in a spherical shell

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimkanin, Ján; Kyselica, Juraj; Guba, P.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 212, č. 3 (2018), s. 2194-2205 ISSN 0956-540X Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : composition and structure of the core * dynamo * nonlinear differential equations * numerical modelling Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.414, year: 2016

  3. Regionální diferenciace rozvoje větrné energetiky

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frantál, Bohumil; Nováková, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 4 (2017), s. 18-20 ISSN 1803-0394 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-04483S Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : wind energy * spatial patterns * regional differentiation Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects) http://energie21.cz/

  4. Tree-stem diameter fluctuates with the lunar tides and perhaps with geomagnetic activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Barlow, P. W.; Mikulecký, M.; Střeštík, Jaroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 247, č. 1-2 (2010), s. 25-43 ISSN 0033-183X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : lunisolar tidal acceleration * stem diameter variation * transpiration * Thule index Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 1.488, year: 2010

  5. A magnetotelluric profile across the German Deep Drilling Project (KTB) area: Two- and three-dimensional modeling results

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eisel, M.; Haak, V.; Pek, Josef; Červ, Václav

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 106, B8 (2001), s. 16061-16073 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/99/0917 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : magnetotelluric profile * KTB * German Deep Drilling Project Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.609, year: 2001

  6. Predikce rizika vzniku přívalové povodně s využitím dat meteorologických radarů

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rapant, P.; Kolejka, Jaromír; Inspektor, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 3 (2016), s. 162-166 ISSN 0044-4863 R&D Projects: GA MV VG20132015106 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : flash floods * prediction * weather radar * early warning Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://147.213.211.222/sites/ default /files/2016_3_162_166_Rapant_a_kol.pdf

  7. Debris flows risk analysis and direct loss estimation: the case study of Valtellina di Tirano, Italy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blahůt, Jan; Glade, T.; Sterlacchini, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2014), s. 288-307 ISSN 1672-6316 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : Debris flows * Risk analysis * Economic losses * Central Alps * Italy Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography Impact factor: 0.963, year: 2014

  8. Comparative Study of the Spherical Downward Continuation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sebera, Josef; Pitoňák, M.; Hamáčková, E.; Novák, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 2 (2015), s. 253-267 ISSN 0169-3298 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0090 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : limited airborne gravity * potential-field data * horizontal plane Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 3.622, year: 2015

  9. Rozšíření a modernizace systému náklonoměrného monitorování rizikových svahů velkolomu ČSA v Mostě

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chán, Bohumil; Mrlina, Jan; Polák, Václav

    č. 2 (2003), s. 28-39 ISSN 1213-1660 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS3012008; GA AV ČR IBS3012353 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : cant-measuring system * monitoring * hazardous slopes Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  10. Magnetic signature of industrial pollution of stream sediments and correlation with heavy metals: case study from South France

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Desenfant, F.; Petrovský, Eduard; Rochette, P.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 152, 1/4 (2004), s. 297-312 ISSN 0049-6979 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK3012103 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : Arc river * heavy metals * magnetic susceptibility Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 1.058, year: 2004

  11. Thematic survey of subsurface drainage systems in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tlapáková, L.; Žaloudík, J.; Kolejka, Jaromír

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 2 (2016), s. 55-65 ISSN 1744-5647 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : subsurface drainage system * remote sensing * image interpretation * drainage recognition and mapping Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.174, year: 2016 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17445647.2016.1259129?scroll=top&needAccess=true

  12. Impact of Polycentric Urban Systems on Intra-regional Disparities: A Microregional Approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malý, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 1 (2016), s. 116-138 ISSN 0965-4313 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : spatial development * polycentricity * intra-regional disparities * Czech Republic Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 1.332, year: 2016 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09654313.2015.1054792

  13. Geodynamic evolution of Permian to Neogene rock formations in the W. Carpathians based on summary of previously and recently derived palaeomagnetic data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krs, Miroslav; Krsová, M.; Pruner, Petr; Man, Otakar; Venhodová, Daniela

    1998-01-01

    Roč. 16, Supplement 1, Part 1 (1998), s. C 221 ISSN 0992-7689. [European Geophysical Society General Assembly /23./. Nice, 20.04.1998-24.04.1998] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK1042603; GA AV ČR KSK1012601 Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 1.423, year: 1998

  14. Realnosť modeli bauns-dviženija volnovych paketov geomagnitnych pulsacij Pc1 v magnitosfere Zemli

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fejgin, F. Z.; Prikner, Karel; Nekrasov, A. K.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 6 (2003), s. 752-759 ISSN 0016-7940 Grant - others:INTAS(XE) 99-0335; RFFR(RU) 02-05-64610; RFFR(RU) 02-05-64612 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : Pc1 bounce effect * ionosphere reflection coefficient * Poynting vector Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  15. Application of magnetic methods for assessment of soil restoration in the vicinity of metallurgical copper-processing plant in Bulgaria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jordanova, N.; Petrovský, Eduard; Kapička, Aleš; Jordanova, D.; Petrov, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 189, č. 4 (2017), 158/1-158/14 ISSN 0167-6369 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG15036 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : environmental magnetism * copper mining * technosols * pedogenic magnetic minerals Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography Impact factor: 1.687, year: 2016

  16. Magnetic mapping of distribution of wood ash used for fertilization of forest soil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrovský, Eduard; Remeš, J.; Kapička, Aleš; Podrázský, V.; Grison, Hana; Borůvka, L.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 626, June (2018), s. 228-234 ISSN 0048-9697 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : forest soil * wood ash * fertilizing * tree plants * iron oxides * rock magnetism Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 4.900, year: 2016

  17. Integrating AR services for the masses: geotagged POI transformation platform

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trojan, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2016), s. 254-265 ISSN 1757-9880 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : augmented reality * location-based services * geotagging * points of interest Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JHTT-07-2015-0028

  18. Character and dynamics of the floodplain of the Losenice River, Šumava Mts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartvich, Filip

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2008), s. 237-249 ISSN 1211-7420 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB300460501 Grant - others:MŽP(CZ) SM/2/57/05 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : floodplain * GIS delineation * flood consequences Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  19. Structural Control and Human Impacts on the Opava River Fluvial System, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrádek, Mojmír; Loučková, B.

    -, č. 6 (2009), s. 23-30 ISSN 1897-5100 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300860903 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : structural control * gold mining * alluvial placers * floods * wandering river Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  20. Modelování kamenitohlinitých přívalových proudů na Smědavské hoře v Jizerských horách

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blahůt, Jan; Smolíková, J.; Vilímek, V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2011, podzim (2012), s. 66-69 ISSN 0514-8057 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : Jizerské hory Mts. * debris flow * empirical modelling Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://www.geology.cz/zpravy/obsah/2011/zpravy_2011-15.pdf

  1. Historický a současný vývoj sesuvného území u Třebenic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balek, Jan; Marek, Tomáš; Kadlečík, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 2014, podzim (2015), s. 51-54 ISSN 0514-8057 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : České středohoří Mts. * historical * current * landslide activity * monitoring Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  2. Vývoj sesuvného území Malá kozí horka u Třebenic (České středohoří) v roce 2013

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marek, Tomáš; Balek, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 47, říjen (2014), s. 64-68 ISSN 0514-8057 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : České středohoří Mts. * slope deformation * above-average precipitation Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  3. Využití podrobného digitálního modelu reliéfu pro analýzu morfologie hluboké svahové deformace Čeřeniště

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blahůt, Jan; Dušánek, P.; Klimeš, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2011, podzim (2012), s. 63-65 ISSN 0514-8057 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : DTM * LIDAR * Čeřeniště landslide Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://www.geology.cz/zpravy/obsah/2011/zpravy_2011-14.pdf

  4. Možnosti studia antropogenních změn říční sítě na příkladech z povodí Sázavy a Svitavy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svobodová, E.; Kirchner, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 3 (2013), s. 172-174 ISSN 0044-4863 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : anthropogenic changes * river bed * quantification human impact * protected areas Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://www.elis.sk/index.php?page=shop.browse&category_id=41&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=1&vmcchk=1&Itemid=1

  5. A MATLAB code for counting the moiré interference fringes recorded by the optical-mechanical crack gauge TM-71

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marti, X.; Rowberry, Matthew David; Blahůt, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 52, MAR (2013), s. 164-167 ISSN 0098-3004 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2010008 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : MATLAB code * TM-71 * moiré interference fringes * relative displacement Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 1.562, year: 2013

  6. Assessing Success Factors of Brownfields Regeneration: International and Inter-stakeholder Perspective

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frantál, Bohumil; Kunc, Josef; Klusáček, Petr; Martinát, Stanislav

    44E, 44E (2015), s. 91-107 ISSN 2247-8310 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TD020259 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : brownfields * success factors * stakeholders perception Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://rtsa.ro/tras/index.php/tras/article/view/427/417

  7. Monitoring temporal gravity changes in different geological conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrlina, Jan

    20 (124) (2002), s. 125-131 ISSN 1211-1910 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3012807; GA ČR GA205/00/1470 Grant - others:Copernicus(XE) Project ASPELEA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : gravity changes * geodynamics * Western Bohemia * Corinth rift * Aswan Lake Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  8. Questioning territorial cohesion: (Un)equal access to services of general interest

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malý, Jiří

    -, August 2016 (2016), s. 1-21 ISSN 1056-8190 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : territorial cohesion * services of general interest * accessibility * spatial justice * Czech Republic Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 1.272, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/pirs.12250/full

  9. Application of magnetic susceptibility as a paleoclimatic proxy on Paleozoic sedimentary rocks and characterization of the magnetic signal – IGCP-580 projects and event

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    da Silva, A-Ch.; Whalen, M. T.; Hladil, Jindřich; Koptíková, Leona; Chen, D.; Spassov, S.; Boulvain, F.; Devleeschouwer, X.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 2 (2014), s. 87-95 ISSN 0705-3797 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : rock magnetism * high-resolution stratigraphy * palaeoclimatic archives * computing * Paleozoic * Phanerozoic * Recent Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.000, year: 2014 http://www.episodes.co.in/contents/2014/june/pp87-95.pdf

  10. Ekologické formy zemědělství v Krkonoších: krajina, ekoturismus, udržitelnost

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klapka, Pavel; Klapková, E.; Martinát, Stanislav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 42 (2005), s. 127-137 ISSN 0139-925X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3086906 Keywords : environmental-friendly farming * ecotourism * regional development * sustainability Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  11. Long-term trends in geomagnetic and climatic variability

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bucha, Václav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 27, 6/7 (2002), s. 427-731 ISSN 1474-7065 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3012806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : geomagnetic forcing * climatic variability * global warming Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  12. Environmental statement for Applications Technology Satellite program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-01

    The experiments, environmental impact, and applications of data collected by ATS are discussed. Data cover communications, navigation, meteorology, data collection (including data from small unattended remote stations such as buoys, seismology and hydrology monitors, etc.), geodesy, and scientific experiments to define the environment at synchronous orbit, and to monitor emissions from the sun.

  13. Magnetic properties of floodplain deposits along the banks of the Morava River (Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kadlec, Jaroslav; Diehl, J. F.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 3 (2005), s. 2-3 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA3013201 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : rock magnetic properties * floodplain deposits * Morava River Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  14. Geomorphologic impacts of the glacial lake outburst flood from Lake No. 513 (Peru)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vilímek, V.; Klimeš, Jan; Emmer, A.; Benešová, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 9 (2015), s. 5233-5244 ISSN 1866-6280 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/1000 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : GLOF * debris flow * natural hazard * deglaciation * Cordillera Blanca * Peru Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 1.765, year: 2014

  15. 882 lakes of the Cordillera Blanca: An inventory, classification, evolution and assessment of susceptibility to outburst floods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Emmer, Adam; Klimeš, Jan; Mergili, M.; Vilímek, V.; Cochachin, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 147, DEC (2016), s. 269-279 ISSN 0341-8162 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 ; RVO:67179843 Keywords : high mountain lakes * GLOFs * environmental change * natural dams * Huascarán NP Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 3.191, year: 2016

  16. A catastrophic landslide near Rampac Grande in the Cordillera Negra, northern Peru

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, Jan; Vilímek, V.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 3 (2011), s. 309-320 ISSN 1612-510X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : landslide * precipitation * evapotranspiration Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.216, year: 2011 http://www.springerlink.com/content/911l1026vr358424/

  17. Implications of geomorphological research for recent and prehistoric avalanches and related hazards at Huascaran, Peru

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, Jan; Vilímek, V.; Omelka, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 1 (2009), s. 193-209 ISSN 0921-030X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : rock debris avalanches * natural hazards * Huascaran Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 1.217, year: 2009

  18. Grain size distribution of soils within the Cordillera Blanca, Peru: An indicator of basic mechanical properties for slope stability evaluation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotný, J.; Klimeš, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2014), s. 563-577 ISSN 1672-6316 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/1000 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : moraines * grain size distribution * shear strength * hydraulic conductivity * Cordillera Blanca Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.963, year: 2014

  19. Využití laserových modelů terénu v geomorfologickém výzkumu

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolejka, Jaromír; Tejkal, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2011), s. 7-17 ISSN 1337-6799 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : ground and airborne laser scanning * DTM * land form research application Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://www.asg.sav.sk/gfsb/v0111/gfsb0110101.pdf

  20. Using magnetic susceptibility mapping for assessing soil degradation due to water erosion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakšík, O.; Kodešová, R.; Kapička, Aleš; Klement, A.; Fér, M.; Nikodém, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2016), s. 105-113 ISSN 1801-5395 R&D Projects: GA MZe QJ1230319 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : arable land * geomorphologically diverse areas * Chernozem Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.934, year: 2016

  1. Temporal behavior of deep-seated gravitational slope deformations: A review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pánek, T.; Klimeš, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 156, MAY (2016), s. 14-38 ISSN 0012-8252 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : deep-seated gravitational slope deformations * catastrophic slope failures * deformation rates * dating * monitoring Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 7.051, year: 2016

  2. Restoration of forest soils after bulldozer site preparation in the Ore Mountains over 20 years development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Podrázský, V.; Kapička, Aleš; Kouba, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 3 (2010), s. 281-289 ISSN 1335-342X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/07/0941 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : immission areas * soil degradation * trace elements Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  3. Speleogenesis of the Hermannshöhle cave system (Austria): Constraints from .sup. 230./sup.Th/U-dating and palaeomagnetic analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plan, L.; Schober, A.; Scholz, D.; Spötl, C.; Pruner, Petr; Bosák, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 3 (2015), s. 315-326 ISSN 0392-6672 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : 230 Th/U-dating * palaeomagnetics * paragenesis * speleogenesis * valley incision Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 1.559, year: 2015

  4. Netradiční oblasti svahových nestabilit v ČR a rozdílný způsob jejich mapování

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčí, O.; Kirchner, Karel

    -, - (2009) [Svahové deformace a pseudokras 2009. 13.05.2009-15.05.2009, Vsetín] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : slope instabilities * mapping * Czech Republic Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  5. The small towns in rural areas as an undersearched type of settlement. Editors´ introduction to the special issue

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Steinführer, A.; Vaishar, Antonín; Zapletalová, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 6 (2016), s. 322-332 ISSN 1803-8417 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : small towns * rural areas * urban-rural continuum Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography https://www.degruyter.com/downloadpdf/j/euco.2016.8.issue-4/euco-2016-0023/euco-2016-0023.xml

  6. An account of the bio- and magnetostratigraphy of the Upper Tithonian—Lower Berriasian interval at Le Chouet, Drôme (SE France)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wimbledon, W. A. P.; Reháková, D.; Pszczółkowski, A.; Casellato, K.; Halásová, E.; Frau, C.; Bulot, L. G.; Grabowski, J.; Sobien, K.; Pruner, Petr; Schnabl, Petr; Čížková, Kristýna

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 6 (2013), s. 437-460 ISSN 1335-0552 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Tithonian * Berriasian * integrated biostratigraphy * magnetostratigraphy * microfacies * ammonites * calcareous nannofossils * calcareous dinoflagellates * calpionellids Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.835, year: 2013

  7. Out-of-phase magnetic susceptibility and environmental magnetism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrouda, F.; Chadima, Martin; Ježek, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18 (2016), EGU2016-6808 ISSN 1607-7962. [European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016. 17.04.2016-22.04.2016, Vienna] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : paleomagnetism * magnetic susceptibility * environmental magnetism Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2016/EGU2016-6808.pdf

  8. Anisotropy of susceptibility in rocks that are magnetically non-linear even in weak fields

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chadima, Martin; Ježek, J.; Hrouda, F.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, EGU General Assembly 2017 (2017) ISSN 1029-7006. [European Geosciences Union General Assembly. 23.04.2017-28.04.2017, Vienna] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility * field-dependent susceptibility * second-rank tensor Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2017/EGU2017-7210-1.pdf

  9. Correlation between anisotropy of frequency-dependent susceptibility and anisotropy of out-of-phase susceptibility in loess/paleosol sequences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chadima, Martin; Hrouda, F.; Kadlec, Jaroslav; Ježek, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18 (2016), EGU2016-7053 ISSN 1607-7962. [European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016. 17.04.2016-22.04.2016, Vienna] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 ; RVO:67985530 Keywords : palaeomagnetism * magnetic sdusceptibility * AMS Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2016/EGU2016-7053.pdf

  10. General conclusions regarding the planetary–solar–terrestrial interaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mörner, N.-A.; Tattersall, R.; Solheim, J.-E.; Charvátová, Ivanka; Scafetta, N.; Jelbring, H.; Wilson, I. R.; Salvador, R.; Willson, R. C.; Hejda, Pavel; Soon, W.; Velasco Herrera, V. M.; Humlum, O.; Archibald, D.; Yndestad, H.; Easterbrook, D.; Casey, J.; Gregori, G.; Henriksson, G.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2013), s. 205-206 ISSN 2195-9242 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC09070 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : solar variability * solar inertial motion * climate change Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  11. Energy tourism: An emerging field of study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frantál, Bohumil; Urbánková, R.

    -, 12/2014 (2014) ISSN 1368-3500 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0025 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : energy tourism * industrial tourism * special interest tourism * energy landscapes Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.918, year: 2014 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13683500.2014.987734

  12. Vybrané abiotické charakteristiky krajinně-ekologických segmentů Národního parku Podyjí

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kirchner, Karel; Cibulková, P.; Demek, J.; Havlíček, M.; Škorpík, M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2007), s. 55-73 ISSN 1212-3560 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : Podyjí National Park * detailed geomorphological mapping * nature conservation * landscape- ecological segments Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  13. Landslide temporal analysis and susceptibility assessment as bases for landslide mitigation, Machu Picchu, Peru

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 2 (2013), s. 913-925 ISSN 1866-6280 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : landslide inventory * landslide frequency * susceptibility map Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 1.572, year: 2013

  14. Paleomagnetism and integrated stratigraphy of the Upper Berriasian hemipelagic succession in the Barlya section Western Balkan, Bulgaria: Implications for lithogenic input and paleoredox variations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grabowski, J.; Lakova, I.; Petrova, S.; Stoykova, K.; Ivanova, D.; Wójcik-Tabol, P.; Sobien, K.; Schnabl, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 461, 1 November (2016), s. 156-177 ISSN 0031-0182 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-09979S Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : biostratigraphy * carbon isotope stratigraphy * climate * magnetic susceptibility * magnetostratigraphy * sea-level changes Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.578, year: 2016

  15. Velké povodně na území České republiky – ztráta historické paměti

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Munzar, Jan; Ondráček, Stanislav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 33, - (2005), s. 97-118 ISSN 0323-0988 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA3086401 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : floods * historical memory * Czech Republic Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  16. Rock glaciers in the Western and High Tatra Mountains, Western Carpathians

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uxa, Tomáš; Mida, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 2 (2017), s. 844-857 ISSN 1744-5647 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : rock glaciers * inventory * Western and High Tatra Mts * Carpathians * Slovakia * Poland Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography Impact factor: 2.174, year: 2016

  17. Where AD plants wildly grow: The spatio-temporal diffusion of agricultural biogas production in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martinát, Stanislav; Navrátil, J.; Dvořák, Petr; Van der Horst, D.; Klusáček, Petr; Kunc, Josef; Frantál, Bohumil

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 95, September 2016 (2016), s. 85-97 ISSN 0960-1481 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : agricultural anaerobic digestion plants * Czech Republic * spatial determinants * Spatial analysis Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 4.357, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960148116302610

  18. Geomorphological aspects of slope deformations in Outer Western Carpathians (Eastern Moravia)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kirchner, Karel; Roštínský, P.; Krejčí, O.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 1 (2003), s. 38-38 ISSN 1335-9541 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/03/0211 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3086906 Keywords : svahové pohyby * sesuvy * vývoj reliéfu Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  19. Brownfield regeneration from the perspective of residents: Place circumstances versus character of respondents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martinát, S.; Navrátil, J.; Pícha, K.; Turečková, K.; Klusáček, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2017), s. 71-92 ISSN 1821-2506 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-26934S Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : brownfields * regeneration * perception Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects) http://www.deturope.eu/index.php?navi=101&vol=26

  20. Clastic cave deposits in Botovskaya cave (Eastern Siberia, Russian Federation)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kadlec, Jaroslav; Chadima, Martin; Lisá, Lenka; Hercman, H.; Osintsev, A.; Oberhänsli, H.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 3 (2008), s. 142-155 ISSN 1090-6924 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : cave sediments * mineral magnetism * Botovskaya Cave Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.532, year: 2008 http://www.caves.org/pub/journal/Journal_of_Cave_and_Karst_Studies_volume_70.htm

  1. Bouguer gravity anomalies for terrain modeling | Orupabo | Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gravity anomalies have been applied in geodesy to determine the geoid, and the associated composition and crustal properties of the earth. Applications of solution of the gravity inversion problems include the study of crustal dynamics as a result of the extraction of fluids in the form of oil, gas and water from ...

  2. Geomorphological Inventory as a Tool for Proclaiming Geomorphosite (a Case Study of Mt. Myslivna in the Novohradské hory Mts. — Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rypl, J.; Kirchner, Karel; Dvořáčková, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2016), s. 393-400 ISSN 1867-2485 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : geomorphological inventory * GPS mapping * Novohradské hory Mts. * Mt. Myslivna * geomorphosite Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12371-015-0169-5

  3. Geomorphological inventory of rock landforms on Mt. Kamenec in the Novohradské hory Mts. (the Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rypl, J.; Kirchner, Karel; Dvořáčková, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 3 (2014), s. 253-260 ISSN 1842-4090 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Novohradské hory Mts. * large protection * Mt. Kamenec * GPS mapping * geomorphological inventory Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.630, year: 2014 http://www.ubm.ro/sites/CJEES/viewTopic.php?topicId=464

  4. Accuracy and Sensitivity of a Method of Jump Detection, Evaluated by Simulated Time Series

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chapanov, Y.; Ron, Cyril; Vondrák, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 1 (2017), s. 73-82 ISSN 1214-9705 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-15943S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : time series * data jump detection * high-sensitive method Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography Impact factor: 0.699, year: 2016

  5. Assessment of Landscape Changes: Theoretical Starting Points for Study and the Research Reality

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolejka, Jaromír; Trnka, P.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 3 (2008), s. 2-15 ISSN 1210-8812 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : criteria of landscape changes * landscape structures * space- time - dynamics Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  6. Geophysical research at the Obora lokality (NW from Brno) and its aplication to the knowledge of the Svratka River development between the Veverská Bítýška and Brno.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peterková, L.; Kirchner, Karel; Hubatka, F.; Nehyba, S.

    -, č. 1 (2008), s. 55-62 ISSN 1337-6799 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/06/1024 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : The Svratka River * ground penetrating radar * vertical electrical sounding Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  7. Dendrochronological records of the floodplain morphology transformation of Desná river valley in the last 150 years, The Hrubý Jeseník Mts., Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrádek, Mojmír

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 3 (2007), s. 2-15 ISSN 1210-8812 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300860601 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : floodplain morphology * palaeochannels * historical floods * tree ring reductions * abrupt growth release * exposed roots Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  8. Bloková svahová deformace v krystalických horninách v údolí Svratky severozápadně od Tišnova

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roštínský, Pavel; Kirchner, Karel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 2 (2006), s. 217-220 ISSN 1210-115X. [Svahové deformace a pseudokras. Ostravice, 10.05.2006-13.05.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA205/03/0211 Keywords : Svratka river valley * slope deformations * crystalline rocks * tectonics * pseudokarst forms Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  9. Fyzická geografie – vize české vědy pro 21. století

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kirchner, Karel; Kolejka, Jaromír

    -, - (2009), s. 25-25 [Mezinárodní vědecká konference k 50. výročí geografie na PřF UP v Olomouci. 10.06.2009-11.06.2009, Olomouc] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : physical geography * landscape Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  10. Magnetic scanning and interpretation of paleomagnetic data from Prague Synform’s volcanics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kletetschka, Günther; Schnabl, Petr; Šifnerová, Kristýna; Tasáryová, Z.; Manda, Š.; Pruner, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 1 (2013), s. 103-117 ISSN 0039-3169 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP210/10/2351 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : paleomagnetism * magnetic scanner * magnetic mineralogy * amygdales * magnetic anomalies * magnetic texture * Barrandian Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.752, year: 2013

  11. Magnetic fabric and petrology of Miocene sub-volcanic sills and dykes emplaced into the SW Flysch Belt of the West Carpathians (S Moravia, Czech Republic) and their volcanological and tectonic implications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrouda, F.; Buriánek, D.; Krejčí, O.; Chadima, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 290, č. 1 (2015), s. 38 ISSN 0377-0273 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Miocene volcanics * Outer Western Carpathian Flysch belt * magnetic fabric Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.674, year: 2015

  12. Magnetic fabric and modeled strain distribution in the head of a nested granite diapir, the Melechov pluton, Bohemian Massif

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trubač, Jakub; Žák, J.; Chlupáčová, M.; Janoušek, V.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 66, September (2014), s. 271-283 ISSN 0191-8141 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) * diapir * emplecement * fabric * granite * strain Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.884, year: 2014

  13. Studium geografie na univerzitách v Tatarstánu

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolejka, Jaromír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 1 (2009), s. 31-32 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : geography * education * Tatarstan Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://geography.cz/2009/10/informace-cgs/

  14. Determination of the Overhauser magnetometer uncertainty

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ulvr, M.; Zikmund, A.; Kupec, J.; Janošek, M.; Vlk, Michal; Bayer, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 66, 7/s (2015), s. 26-29 ISSN 1335-3632 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : Overhauser magnetometer * Earth `s magnetic field * comparison * uncertainty Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.407, year: 2015

  15. A kinematic model of vertical geomagnetic field variation resulting from a steady convective flow

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marsenić, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 108, č. 2 (2014), s. 191-212 ISSN 0309-1929 Grant - others:VEGA(SK) 2/0137/12 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : magnetohydrodynamics * induction equation * geomagnetic variation * reversed flux patches Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.924, year: 2013

  16. Using local archive sources to reconstruct historical landslide occurrence in selected urban regions of the Czech Republic: examples from regions with different historical development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Raška, P.; Klimeš, Jan; Ďubišar, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 2 (2015), s. 142-157 ISSN 1085-3278 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP205/09/P383 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : landslides * rockfalls * landslide inventory * documentary sources * historical geomorphology * Czech Republic Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 8.145, year: 2015

  17. Landscape Painting in Evaluation of Changes in Landscape

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lacina, Jan; Halas, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2015), s. 60-68 ISSN 1803-2427 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : landscape painting * landscape ecology * land-use changes * biodiversity Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/jlecol.2015.8.issue-2/jlecol-2015-0009/jlecol-2015-0009. xml

  18. Targeted selection of brownfields from portfolios for sustainable regeneration: User experiences from five cases testing the Timbre\

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartke, S.; Martinát, Stanislav; Klusáček, Petr; Pizzol, L.; Alexandrescu, F.; Frantál, Bohumil; Critto, A.; Zabeo, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 184, č. 1 (2016), s. 94-107 ISSN 0301-4797 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E11035 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : brownfields * prioritisation * sustainability Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 4.010, year: 2016 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2016.07.037

  19. Evaluation of the subsidence based on dInSAR and GPS measurements near Karviná, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kadlečík, Pavel; Kajzar, Vlastimil; Nekvasilová, Z.; Wegmüller, U.; Doležalová, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 1 (2015), s. 51-61 ISSN 0300-5402 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC506; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 ; RVO:68145535 Keywords : InSAR * subsidence * Karviná region * undermining Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  20. Tomb of Nefertari signature in microgravity observations in the Valley of the Queens, Luxor, Egypt

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Issawy, E. S. A.; Mrlina, Jan; Radwan, A. H.; Hassan, G. S.; Sakr, K. O.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2002), s. 23-32 ISSN 1687-0999 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/00/1470 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : archaeological prospecting * Luxor * microgravity observations Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  1. Investigation of polluted alluvial soils by magnetic susceptibility methods: a case study of the Litavka River

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhá, Šárka; Petrovský, Eduard; Kapička, Aleš; Borůvka, L.; Ash, Ch.; Drábek, O.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2013), s. 151-157 ISSN 1801-5395 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : environmental magnetism * Fluvisols * magnetite/maghemite * risk elements Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.615, year: 2013

  2. Sinchronnyje magnitotelluričeskije i magnitovariacionnyje zondirovanija na zapadnom skloně Voroněžskogo massiva

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Varencov, I. M.; Kováčiková, Světlana; Kulikov, V. A.; Logvinov, I. M.; Tregubenko, V. I.; Jakovlev, A. G.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 4 (2012), s. 90-107 ISSN 0203-3100 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP210/10/2227 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : synchronous MT and MV soundings * project KIROVOGRAD * western slope of Voronezh Massive Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  3. Spatiotemporal patterns of high-mountain lakes and related hazards in western Austria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Emmer, Adam; Merkl, S.; Mergili, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 246, oct (2015), s. 602-616 ISSN 0169-555X Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : lake development * geoenvironmental change * GLOF * high-mountain lakes * susceptibility analysis Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.813, year: 2015

  4. Kinematic behaviour of a large earthflow defined by surface displacement monitoring, DEM differencing, and ERT imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prokešová, R.; Kardoš, M.; Tábořík, Petr; Medveďová, A.; Stacke, V.; Chudý, F.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 224, NOV 1 (2014), s. 86-101 ISSN 0169-555X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2010008 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : earthflow * surface displacement * strain modelling * DEM differencing * kinematic behaviour Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.577, year: 2013

  5. Antropogenní transformace reliéfu v oblasti dolu Jeroným

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kirchner, Karel; Roštínský, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 1 (2011), s. 92-98 ISSN 1803-1447 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA105/09/0089 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : geomorphology * anthropogenic transformation * Slavkovský les Forest Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography www.caag.cz

  6. Recent evolution and degradation of the bent Jatunraju glacier (Cordillera Blanca, Peru)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Emmer, A.; Loarte, E.C.; Klimeš, Jan; Vilímek, V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 228, JAN 1 (2015), s. 345-355 ISSN 0169-555X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/1000 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : debris-covered glacier * rock glacier * surface movements * buried ice degradation * supraglacial lakes Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.813, year: 2015

  7. Spatio-temporal patterns of recurrent slope instabilities affecting undercut slopes in flysch: A dendrogeomorphic approach using broad-leaved trees

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šilhán, K.; Pánek, T.; Turský, O.; Brázdil, R.; Klimeš, Jan; Kašičková, L.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 213, MAY 15 (2014), s. 240-254 ISSN 0169-555X Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : dendrogeomorphology * tree-ring eccentricity * bedrock landslides * hydrometeorological triggers Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.577, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169555X14000506

  8. Demographic Prognoses for Some Seats in the Ostrava Region

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaishar, Antonín

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 2 (2006), s. 16-26 ISSN 1210-8812 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS3086005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : economic restructuring * settlement system * population development * demographic prognoses * unemployment * Ostrava region Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  9. Der Strukturwandel der Kleinstädte in Mähren

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaishar, Antonín; Kallabová, Eva; Trávníček, Bohumír

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 4 (2002), s. 166-176 ISSN 0943-7142 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3086301 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3086906 Keywords : small cities * processes of urbanization * restructuralization Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  10. Problems of European inner cities and their residential environments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaishar, Antonín; Zapletalová, Jana

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2003), s. 24-35 ISSN 1210-8812 Grant - others:Evropská unie(XE) EVK4-CT-2002-00086 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3086906 Keywords : inner city, residential environment, sustainibility, re- urbanization , Brno Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  11. Rozvojové zájmy území Orlicka ve světle regionální a environmentální politiky

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaishar, Antonín; Nosková, Helena

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 45, - (2006), s. 532-539 ISSN 1336-6149 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : marginality * ethnical changes * regional policy * environmental protection * Králíky Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  12. Long-term predictive assessments of solar and geomagnetic activities made on the basis of the close similarity between the solar inertial motions in the intervals 1840–1905 and 1980–2045

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Charvátová, Ivanka

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 1 (2009), s. 25-30 ISSN 1384-1076 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA300120608 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : solar inertial motion * solar activity * geomagnetic activity * long-term predictive assessments Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 1.675, year: 2009

  13. Jižní Sachalin: Rusko, Japonsko, SSSR/Rusko

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolejka, Jaromír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 127, č. 3 (2013), s. 1-5 ISSN 1214-083X Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Karafuto * history * economy * population * present state Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://zemces.sweb.cz/cislo127.htm

  14. Anglers’ Fishing Site Choice on a Large Scale: The Case of the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátil, Josef; Martinát, Stanislav; Pícha, K.; Navrátilová, Jana

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 3 (2011), s. 18-29 ISSN 1210-8812 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : geography of tourism * fisheries * Czech Republic Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://www.geonika.cz/CZ/CZresearch/CZMgrArchive.html

  15. Environmental factors influencing the species composition of acidophilous grassland patches in agricultural lanscapes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Halas, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 1 (2012), s. 16-27 ISSN 1210-8812 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : acidophilous grasslands * hemeroby * patch isolation * regression trees * Bohemian-Moravian Highland Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://www.geonika.cz/CZ/CZresearch/CZMgrArchive.html

  16. ASCHFLOW - A dynamic landslide run-out model for medium scale hazard analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Quan Luna, B.; Blahůt, Jan; van Asch, T.W.J.; van Westen, C.J.; Kappes, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 3, 12 December (2016), č. článku 29. E-ISSN 2197-8670 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : landslides * run-out models * medium scale hazard analysis * quantitative risk assessment Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  17. Glacier-related landforms and glacial lakes in Huascarán National Park, Peru

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vilímek, V.; Klimeš, Jan; Červená, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2016), s. 193-202 ISSN 1744-5647 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/1000 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : moraines * rock glaciers * glacial lakes * Cordillera Blanca * Huascarán National Park * Peru Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.174, year: 2016

  18. Perception of Urban Renewal: Reflexions and Coherences of Socio-Spatial Patterns (Brno, Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kunc, J.; Navrátil, J.; Tonev, P.; Frantál, Bohumil; Klusáček, Petr; Martinát, Stanislav; Havlíček, M.; Černík, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2014), s. 66-77 ISSN 2065-4421 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0025 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : urban environment * revitalization * perception * Brno * Czech Republic Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://technicalgeography.org/pdf/1_2014/07_kunc.pdf

  19. Aplikace metod vizualizace v prostorovém plánování: příklad výstavby větrných elektráren

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Eva; Frantál, Bohumil

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 5 (2009), s. 1-3 ISSN 0016-7096 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB700860801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : visualization * mental mapping * wind turbines * visibility analyses * GIS * spatial planning Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  20. Gorstian palaeoposition and geotectonic setting of Suchomasty Volcanic Centre (Silurian, Prague Basin, Teplá-Barrandian Unit, Bohemian Massif)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tasáryová, Z.; Schnabl, Petr; Čížková, Kristýna; Pruner, Petr; Janoušek, V.; Rapprich, V.; Štorch, Petr; Manda, Š.; Frýda, J.; Trubač, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 136, č. 1 (2014), s. 262-265 ISSN 1103-5897 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP210/10/2351 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : basalt geochemistry * Gorstian * palaeolatitude * Prague Basin * Silurian * Suchomasty Volcanic Centre Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 1.309, year: 2014

  1. Magnetic particles as tracers of industrial pollution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrovský, Eduard; Kapička, Aleš; Jordanova, Neli; Fialová, Hana

    č. 26 (2002), s. 131-132 ISSN 1590-2595. [Fundamental rock magnetism and environmental applications. Erice, 26.06.2002-01.07.2002] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : magnetic particles * industrial pollution * fly ashes * magnetic susceptibility Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  2. Out-of-phase susceptibility and viscous magnetization: alternative tools for magnetic granulometry of sediments and soils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chadima, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, Special issue (2016) ISSN 2007-9656. [Biennial Meeting Latinmag /4./. 23.11.2015-27.11.2015, Sao Paulo] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : palaeomagnetism * sediments * soils Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://www. geofisica .unam.mx/LatinmagLetters/LL16-01-SP/D/D07.pdf

  3. Czech Republic - August 2002: another flood disaster of century after five years

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondráček, Stanislav; Klusáček, Petr; Munzar, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2002), s. 53-62 ISSN 1210-8812 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3086903 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3086906 Keywords : flood disaster * Czech Republic * August 2002 Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  4. Effects of dwarf pine stands on slope deformation processes, as a basis for their management in the Hrubý Jeseník Mts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roštínský, Pavel; Šenfeldr, M.; Maděra, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2013), s. 63-83 ISSN 1803-2427 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0004 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : hazardous slope deformation * non-indigenous dwarf pine * management approach Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://www.journaloflandscapeecology.cz/index.php?page=issues

  5. Determination of extent of the subsiding areas in the Czech part of Upper Silesian Basin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kadlečík, Pavel; Kajzar, Vlastimil; Marek, Tomáš

    -, Part 2 (2012), s. 715-721 ISSN 1314-2704. [International Multidisciplinary Scientific GeoConference & EXPO SGEM 2012 /12./. Albena, 17.06.2012-23.06.2012] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519; CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : Upper Silesian Basin * mining * subsidence Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  6. Pc1 pearl waves with magnetosonic dispersion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feygin, F. Z.; Nekrasov, A. K.; Pikkarainen, T.; Raita, T.; Prikner, Karel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 14 (2007), s. 1644-1650 ISSN 1364-6826 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : magnetosphere * geomagnetic pulsations * Alfvén waves * magnetosonic waves Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 1.566, year: 2007

  7. Low-temperature magnetic transition in troilite: A simple marker for highly stoichiometric FeS systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čuda, J.; Kohout, Tomáš; Tuček, J.; Haloda, J.; Filip, J.; Prucek, R.; Zbořil, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 11 (2011), art. B11205-B11205 ISSN 0148-0227 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : troilite * meteorite * Mössbauer spectroscopy * low-temperature magnetic behavior * magnetic transition Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 3.021, year: 2011

  8. Dimensions of a Planet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, O. T.; And Others

    This publication is one of a series of single-topic problem modules designed for use in undergraduate geology and earth science courses. The first section, "Ain't It Flat? A Series of Experiments in Geodesy," presents various experiments for determining the earth's circumference (historically) and describes the use of satellites in determining the…

  9. Results of the Sixth International Comparison of Absolute Gravimeters, ICAG-2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vitushkin, L.; Becker, M.; Jiang, Z.; Francis, O.; van Dam, T. M.; Faller, J.; Chartier, J.M.; Amalvict, M.; Bonvalot, S.; Debeglia, N.; Desogus, S.; Diament, M.; Dupont, F.; Falk, R.; Gabalda, G.; Gagnon, C. G. L.; Gattacceca, T.; Germak, A.; Hinderer, J.; Jamet, O.; Jeffries, G.; Käker, R.; Kopaev, A.; Liard, J.; Lindau, A.; Longuevergne, L.; Luck, B.; Maderal, E. N.; Mäkinen, J.; Meurers, B.; Mizushima, S.; Mrlina, Jan; Newell, D.; Origlia, C.; Pujol, E. R.; Reinhold, A.; Richard, P.; Robinson, I. A.; Ruess, D.; Thies, S.; Van Camp, M.; Van Ruymbeke, M.; de Villalta Compagni, M. F.; Williams, S.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 5 (2002), s. 407-424 ISSN 0026-1394 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : absolute gravimeters * BIPM gravity network * measurement Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.842, year: 2002

  10. Analysis of the development of land use in the Morava River floodplain, with special emphasis on the landscape matrix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kilianová, H.; Pechanec, V.; Brus, J.; Kirchner, Karel; Machar, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2017), s. 35-48 ISSN 1210-8812 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : historical maps * land use changes * floodplain * Morava River * Czech Republic Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography Impact factor: 2.149, year: 2016 http://www.geonika.cz/mgr.html#articles

  11. Snow avalanche hazard of the Krkonose National Park, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blahůt, Jan; Klimeš, Jan; Balek, Jan; Hájek, P.; Červená, L.; Lysák, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 2 (2017), s. 86-90 ISSN 1744-5647 R&D Projects: GA MV VG20132015115 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : snow avalanches * hazard * inventory * hazard mitigation * Krkonoše Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography Impact factor: 2.174, year: 2016

  12. Biogeografický model změn klimatických podmínek vegetační stupňovitosti v Česku

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machar, I.; Voženílek, V.; Kirchner, Karel; Vlčková, V.; Buček, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 1 (2017), s. 64-82 ISSN 1212-0014 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : climate change * landscape * mathematical model * register of biogeography Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography Impact factor: 0.580, year: 2016

  13. Towards the spatial coherence of biogeographical regionalizations at subcontinental and landscape scales

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Divíšek, Jan; Storch, D.; Zelený, D.; Culek, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 43 (2016), s. 2489-2501 ISSN 0305-0270 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : beta diversity * biogeographical regions * spatial scale Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 4.248, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jbi.12832/full

  14. Výstraha před nebezpečím sesouvání na svazích

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolejka, Jaromír; Rapant, P.; Batelková, Kateřina; Kirchner, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 3 (2016), s. 136-140 ISSN 0044-4863 R&D Projects: GA MV VG20132015106 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : landslide * risk assessment * landslide warning * GIS Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  15. Vodní nádrže a jejich krajina ve výtvarném umění

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lacina, Jan; Halas, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2017), s. 31-39 ISSN 0322-8916 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : landscape painting * dam * landscape changes Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: 60500 http://www.vtei.cz/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/5782-VTEI.pdf

  16. Secondary geodiversity and its potential for urban geotourism: a case study from Brno city, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubalíková, Lucie; Kirchner, Karel; Bajer, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 3 (2017), s. 63-73 ISSN 0137-477X Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : geosites * geodiversity * anthropogenic landforms * recreation * geoeducation Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography http://geoinfo.amu.edu.pl/qg/current/05quageo-2017-0024.pdf

  17. Biogeographical patterns in vertebrate assemblages of the Czech Republic: regional division in the context of species’ distributions in Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Divíšek, Jan; Culek, M.; Šťastný, K.; Anděra, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 3 (2016), s. 169-182 ISSN 0139-7893 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : beta diversity * biogeographical regions * terrestrial vertebrates Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.739, year: 2016 http://www.ivb.cz/folia-zoologica-archive.html?vol=65&no=3

  18. Czech Post-industrial Landscapes in the Border Zone with Austria: Identification, Typology nad Value

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolejka, Jaromír; Klimánek, M.; Hrádek, Mojmír; Kirchner, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 159, č. 159 (2017), s. 221-242 ISSN 0029-9138 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300860903 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : post-industrial landscape * mapping * GIS * border zone with Austria * classification Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography Impact factor: 0.167, year: 2016

  19. Township boundaries and the colonization of the Moravian landscape

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Szabó, Péter; Šipoš, Jan; Müllerová, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 57, JUL 2017 (2017), s. 89-99 ISSN 0305-7488 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-11805S Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : settlement morphology * township size * historical GIS Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography Impact factor: 0.772, year: 2016

  20. Scientific values of landforms as the basis for the declaration of protected sites (a case study of Mt. Kraví hora in the Novohradské hory Mts., Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rypl, J.; Kirchner, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 3 (2017), s. 1537-1550 ISSN 1589-1623 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : geomorphological inventory * geomorphologically significant sites * geoeducation * geotourism * geoconservation Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography Impact factor: 0.681, year: 2016 http://www.aloki.hu/pdf/1503_15371550.pdf