WorldWideScience

Sample records for geochemistry

  1. V Congress of Spanish Geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This proceedings book present the lectures of V Spanish geochemistry Congress. The sessions were: 1.- Materials geochemistry and geologic process. 2.- Geochemistry prospection 3.- Environmental geochemistry 4.- Isotopic geochemistry 5.- Organic geochemistry 6.- Natural materials geochemistry for industry 7.- Hydrogeochemistry 8.- Mathematical models in geochemistry 9.- Analysis methods in geochemistry 10.-Training of geochemistry 11.-Cosmochemistry

  2. Uranium project. Geochemistry prospection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, J.

    1983-01-01

    Geochemistry studies the distribution of the chemicals elements in the terrestrial crust and its ways to migrate. The terminology used in this report is the following one: 1) Principles of the prospection geochemistry 2) Stages of the prospection geochemistry 3)utility of the prospection geochemistry 4) geochemistry of uranium 5) procedures used within the framework of uranium project 6) Average available 7) Selection of the zones of prospection geochemistry 8) Stages of the prospection, Sample preparation and analisis 9) Presentation of the results

  3. Problems of applied geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovchinnikov, L N

    1983-01-01

    The concept of applied geochemistry was introduced for the first time by A. Ye. Fersman. He linked the branched and complicated questions of geochemistry with specific problems of developing the mineral and raw material base of our country. Geochemical prospecting and geochemistry of mineral raw materials are the most important sections of applied geochemistry. This now allows us the right to view applied geochemistry as a sector of science which applies geochemical methodology, set of geochemical methods of analysis, synthesis, geological interpretation of data based on laws governing theoretical geochemistry to the solution of different tasks of geology, petrology, tectonics, stratigraphy, science of minerals and other geological sciences, and also the technology of mineral raw materials, interrelationships of man and nature (ecogeochemistry, technogeochemistry, agrogeochemistry). The main problem of applied geochemistry, geochemistry of ore fields is the prehistory of ore formation. This is especially important for metallogenic and forecasting constructions, for an understanding of the reasons for the development of fields and the detection of laws governing their distribution, their genetic links with the general geological processes and the products of these processes.

  4. Geochemistry and ore prospecting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Caignec, R.

    1954-01-01

    Applied geochemistry is a new technique which helps the geologist in detecting ore deposits. Some deposits, even when they are covered with rather thick surface structures, form around these zones where the infinitesimal content of some elements of soils or waters is notably different. These 'anomalies' may be contemporaneous to the deposit-structure (primary dispersion) or may have occurred later (secondary dispersion). Various factors rule these anomalies: ore-stability, soil homogeneity, water conditions, topography, vegetation, etc... Applied geochemistry is in fact the study of analysis techniques of metal traces in soils as well as the geological interpretation of observed anomalies. This report gives practical data on sampling methods, yields, costs and also on special problems of uranium geochemistry. (author) [fr

  5. Geochemistry of silicon isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Tiping; Li, Yanhe; Gao, Jianfei; Hu, Bin [Chinese Academy of Geological Science, Beijing (China). Inst. of Mineral Resources; Jiang, Shaoyong [China Univ. of Geosciences, Wuhan (China).

    2018-04-01

    Silicon is one of the most abundant elements in the Earth and silicon isotope geochemistry is important in identifying the silicon source for various geological bodies and in studying the behavior of silicon in different geological processes. This book starts with an introduction on the development of silicon isotope geochemistry. Various analytical methods are described and compared with each other in detail. The mechanisms of silicon isotope fractionation are discussed, and silicon isotope distributions in various extraterrestrial and terrestrial reservoirs are updated. Besides, the applications of silicon isotopes in several important fields are presented.

  6. SHELL ISOTOPE GEOCHEMISTRY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: The land snail Limicolaria kambeul chudeaui Germain was collected ... Key words/phrases: Ethiopia, isotope geochemistry, Lake Tilo, Limicolaria .... 1984), (c) 6'80 values of precipitation at Addis Ababa, with i 1 S.D. bars for the .... (breakfast cereal), deionised water and cuttlefish bone, the carbon and oxygen.

  7. Proceedings of the 3. Brazilian Congress on Geochemistry; 1. Congress on Geochemistry from Portuguese Language Countries - Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This congress presents topics about geochemistry, including litho-geochemistry, environmental geochemistry, hydro-geochemistry and surface geochemistry. Works on geochronology and nuclear methods in rocks and minerals are also described. (C.G.C.)

  8. The genetics of geochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Croal, Laura R.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Malasarn, Davin; Newman, Dianne K.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria are remarkable in their metabolic diversity due to their ability to harvest energy from myriad oxidation and reduction reactions. In some cases, their metabolisms involve redox transformations of metal(loid)s, which lead to the precipitation, transformation, or dissolution of minerals. Microorganism/mineral interactions not only affect the geochemistry of modern environments, but may also have contributed to shaping the near-surface environment of the early Earth. For example, bacter...

  9. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  10. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree; Heuser, Alexander; Wombacher, Frank; Dietzel, Martin; Tipper, Edward; Schiller, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  11. Organic geochemistry of Czech amber

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havelcová, Martina; Sýkorová, Ivana; Mach, K.; Dvořák, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2015), s. 146 ISSN 1336-7242. [Zjazd chemikov /67./. 07.09.2015-11.09.2015, Horný Smokovec] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-18482S Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : fossil resin * amber * resinite Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry

  12. Molecular environmental geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Peggy A.

    1999-05-01

    The chemistry, mobility, and bioavailability of contaminant species in the natural environment are controlled by reactions that occur in and among solid, aqueous, and gas phases. These reactions are varied and complex, involving changes in chemical form and mass transfer among inorganic, organic, and biochemical species. The field of molecular environmental geochemistry seeks to apply spectroscopic and microscopic probes to the mechanistic understanding of environmentally relevant chemical processes, particularly those involving contaminants and Earth materials. In general, empirical geochemical models have been shown to lack uniqueness and adequate predictive capability, even in relatively simple systems. Molecular geochemical tools, when coupled with macroscopic measurements, can provide the level of chemical detail required for the credible extrapolation of contaminant reactivity and bioavailability over ranges of temperature, pressure, and composition. This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of molecular chemistry and reaction mechanisms at mineral surfaces and mineral-fluid interfaces spurred by the application of new spectroscopies and microscopies. These methods, such as synchrotron X-ray absorption and scattering techniques, vibrational and resonance spectroscopies, and scanning probe microscopies, provide direct chemical information that can elucidate molecular mechanisms, including element speciation, ligand coordination and oxidation state, structural arrangement and crystallinity on different scales, and physical morphology and topography of surfaces. Nonvacuum techniques that allow examination of reactions in situ (i.e., with water or fluids present) and in real time provide direct links between molecular structure and reactivity and measurements of kinetic rates or thermodynamic properties. Applications of these diverse probes to laboratory model systems have provided fundamental insight into inorganic and organic reactions at

  13. Global water cycle: geochemistry and environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berner, Elizabeth Kay; Berner, Robert A

    1987-01-01

    .... The book provides an integrated approach to global geochemistry and environmental problems and introduces the reader to some fundamental concepts of geology, oceanography, meteorology, environmental...

  14. NRC nuclear waste geochemistry 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.H.; Birchard, G.F.

    1984-05-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to present results from NRC-sponsored research and to identify regulatory research issues which need to be addressed prior to licensing a high-level waste repository. Important summaries of technical issues and recommendations are included with each paper. The issue reflect areas of technical uncertainty addressed by the NRC Research program in geochemistry. The objectives of the NRC Research Program in geochemistry are to provide a technical basis for waste management rulemaking, to provide the NRC Waste Management Licensing Office with information that can be used to support sound licensing decisions, and to identify investigations that need to be conducted by DOE to support a license application. Individual papers were processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  15. Geochemistry and mineralogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plecas, I.; Dimovic, S.; Orta, M.M.; Alba, M.D.; Alvero, R.; Becerro, A.I.; Castro, M.A.; Chain, P.; Escudero, A.; Naranjo, M.; Pavon, E.; Trillo, J.M.; Vejsada, J.; Vokal, A.; Zadvernyuk, H.P.; Fedorenko, Y.G.; Zlobenko, B.P.; Koromyslichenko, T.I.; Battaglia, S.; Cervelli, M.; Millot, R.; Girard, J.P.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Alonso, U.; Muurinen, A.; Carlsson, T.; Chain, P.; Alba, M.D.; Becerro, A.I.; Castro, M.A.; Escudero, A.; Gonzalez-Carrascosa, T.; Hurtado, S.; Pavon, E.; Villa, M.; Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.; Bourg, A.C.M.; Marques Fernandes, M.; Rabung, Th.; Dahn, R.; Baeyens, B.; Bradbury, M.H.; Breynaert, E.; Maes, A.; Bruggeman, C.; Maes, I.A.; Vancluysen, J.; Credoz, A.; Bildstein, O.; Jullien, M.; Raynal, J.; Petronin, J.C.; Trotignon, L.; Pokrovsky, O.; Jacquier, P.; Beaucaire, C.; Vuillaume, A.L.; Wittebroodt, Ch.; Ly, J.; Page, J.; Savoye, S.; Pitsch, H.; Jacques, D.; Wang, L.; Galunin, E.; Chain, P.; Alba, M.D.; Vidal, M.; Grandia, F.; Domenech, C.; Arcos, D.; Duro, L.; Bruno, J.; Andre, L.; Pauwels, H.; Azaroual, M.; Albrecht, A.; Romero, M.A.; Aerts, S.; Boven, P.; Van Geet, M.; Boever, P. de; Alonso, U.; Albarran, N.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Truche, L.; Berger, G.; Guillaume, D.; Jacquot, E.; Tournassat, Ch.; Lerouge, C.; Brendle, J.; Greneche, J.M.; Touzelet, St.; Blanc, Ph.; Gaucher, E.C.; Thoenen, T.; Klinkenberg, M.; Kaufhold, S.; Dohrmann, R.; Siegesmund, S.; Liu, D.J.; Bruggeman, C.; Maes, N.; Weber, T.; Trotignon, L.; Pozo, C.; Bildstein, O.; Combarieu, G. de; Frugier, P.; Menut, D

    2007-07-01

    This session gathers 52 articles (posters) dealing with: the influence of natural sorbents immobilization of spent ion exchange resins in cement; the chemical stability of rare-earth silicate; the mineralogical heterogeneity of Rokle bentonite and radionuclide adsorption: A case study for cesium; the rheological and sorption properties of clay-polymer composites; the clay mineral interactions with leachate solutions in landfills; the lithium isotope fractionation during adsorption onto mineral surfaces; the sorption of Sr{sup 2+} onto mixed smectite / illite clays; Eh and pH in the pore water of compacted bentonite; the chemical interaction of {sup 152}Eu with the clay barrier; the modeling of the acid-base surface chemistry of Montmorillonite; a time resolved laser fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of lanthanide/actinide sorption on clay minerals: influence of carbonate complexation; the structure elucidation and occurrence of Tc(IV) pyrogallol complexes; the geochemistry of Se(0) under boom clay conditions; an experimental and modelling study of pure secondary silicate minerals reactivity in geological CO{sub 2} sequestration conditions; an experimental evaluation of a retention model for major groundwater elements on the Tournemire argillite; modelling the long term interaction of cementitious pore water with Boom clay; the sorption-desorption of radionuclides and analogues in clays suitable for barriers; the modelling of the Redox evolution in the tunnel backfill of a high level nuclear waste repository; the reactivity of nitrates in the different storage compartments of type-b wastes; an investigation into the biodiversity of sulphate reducing bacteria in Boom clay; the colloid generation mechanisms from compacted bentonite under different geochemical conditions; the experimental reduction of aqueous sulphate by hydrogen in the context of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite; cation exchanged Fe(II) and Sr as compared to other divalent cations

  16. Applied Geochemistry Special Issue on Environmental geochemistry of modern mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Robert R.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    2015-01-01

    Environmental geochemistry is an integral part of the mine-life cycle, particularly for modern mining. The critical importance of environmental geochemistry begins with pre-mining baseline characterization and the assessment of environmental risks related to mining, continues through active mining especially in water and waste management practices, and culminates in mine closure. The enhanced significance of environmental geochemistry to modern mining has arisen from an increased knowledge of the impacts that historical and active mining can have on the environment, and from new regulations meant to guard against these impacts. New regulations are commonly motivated by advances in the scientific understanding of the environmental impacts of past mining. The impacts can be physical, chemical, and biological in nature. The physical challenges typically fall within the purview of engineers, whereas the chemical and biological challenges typically require a multidisciplinary array of expertise including geologists, geochemists, hydrologists, microbiologists, and biologists. The modern mine-permitting process throughout most of the world now requires that potential risks be assessed prior to the start of mining. The strategies for this risk assessment include a thorough characterization of pre-mining baseline conditions and the identification of risks specifically related to the manner in which the ore will be mined and processed, how water and waste products will be managed, and what the final configuration of the post-mining landscape will be.In the Fall 2010, the Society of Economic Geologists held a short course in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America in Denver, Colorado (USA) to examine the environmental geochemistry of modern mining. The intent was to focus on issues that are pertinent to current and future mines, as opposed to abandoned mines, which have been the focus of numerous previous short courses. The geochemical

  17. Radiogenic isotope geochemistry of sedimentary and aquatic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stille, P.; Shields, G.

    1997-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: Basic principles of isotopic geochemistry; weathering; isotopic geochemistry of river water; isotopic geochemistry in the environment; isotopic composition of seawater past and present (Sr, Nd, Pb, Os, Ce); isotope geochemistry of detrital and authigenic clay minerals in marine sediemnts (Rb-Sr, K-Ar, O); the Sm-N isotope system in detrital and authigenic argillaceous sediments. (SR), provided they are of exceptional interest and focused on a single topic. (orig./SR)

  18. Radiogenic isotope geochemistry of sedimentary and aquatic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stille, P.; Shields, G. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 67 - Strasbourg (France). Centre de Sedimentologie et Geochimie de la Surface

    1997-12-31

    The following topics are discussed: Basic principles of isotopic geochemistry; weathering; isotopic geochemistry of river water; isotopic geochemistry in the environment; isotopic composition of seawater past and present (Sr, Nd, Pb, Os, Ce); isotope geochemistry of detrital and authigenic clay minerals in marine sediemnts (Rb-Sr, K-Ar, O); the Sm-N isotope system in detrital and authigenic argillaceous sediments. (SR), provided they are of exceptional interest and focused on a single topic. (orig./SR)

  19. Uranium geochemistry of Orca Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, F.F. Jr.; Sackett, W.M.

    1981-01-01

    Orca Basin, an anoxic, brine-filled depression at a depth of 2200 m in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico continental slope, has been studied with respect to its uranium geochemistry. Uranium concentration profiles for four cores from within the basin were determined by delayed-neutron counting. Uranium concentrations ranged from 2.1 to 4.1 ppm on a salt-free and carbonate-corrected basis. The highest uranium concentrations were associated with the lowest percentage and delta 13 C organic carbon values. For comparison, cores from the brine-filled Suakin and Atlantis II Deeps, both in the Red Sea, were also analyzed. Uranium concentrations ranged from 1.2 to 2.6 ppm in the Suakin Deep and from 8.0 to 11.0 ppm in the Atlantis II Deep. No significant correlation was found between uranium concentrations and organic carbon concentrations and delta 13 C values for these cores. Although anoxic conditions are necessary for significant uranium uptake by non-carbonate marine sediments, other factors such as dilution by rapidly depositing materials and uranium supply via mixing and diffusion across density gradients may be as important in determining uranium concentrations in hypersaline basin sediments. (author)

  20. Geochemistry of radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    Safe, permanent disposal of radioactive wastes requires isolation of a number of elements including Se, Tc, I, Sr, Cs, Pd, u, Np, Pu and Cm from the environment for a long period of time. The aquatic chemistry of these elements ranges from simple anionic (I - ,IO 3 - ) and cationic (Cs + ,Sr ++ ) forms to multivalent hydrolyzed complexes which can be anionic or cationic (Pu(OH) 2 + ,Pu(OH) 3 + , PuO 2 (CO 3 )(OH) - ,PuO 2 Cl - ,etc.) depending on the chemical environment. The parameters which can affect repository safety are rate of access and composition of grounwater, stability of the waste container, stability of the waste form, rock-water-waste interactons, and dilution and dispersion as the waste moves away from the repository site. Our overall research program on radioactive waste disposal includes corrosion studies of containment systems hydrothermal stability of various waste forms, and geochemical behaviour of various nuclides including solubilities, redox equilibria, hydrolysis, colloid fomation and transport ion exchange equilibria and adsorption on mineral surfaces and irreversible precipitation reactions. This paper discusses the geochemistry of I, Se, Tc, Cs, Sr and the actinide elements and potential mechanisms by which the mobility could be retarded if necessary

  1. Geochemistry of Natural Redox Fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, B.A.

    1999-05-01

    U, V, Cu, Ni, Au and Ag. The mineralogy of redox fronts is extremely complex, with redox fronts formed at elevated temperature showing more complex assemblages than lower temperature redox fronts. The redox behaviour of individual elements is discussed based on results from natural redox fronts and, to a more limited extent, on experimental evidence. Other aspects of redox fronts such as organic geochemistry, mineral phases, microbial activity, radiolysis and geochemical self-organisation are briefly reviewed. A short overview of active and fossil redox fronts in Northern Switzerland and Southwest Germany is given. The review also includes information on commercially available analytical methods suitable for redox front geochemistry. The general conclusion of this report is that there is widespread evidence that the elements U, Se, Pd and many others are systematically and efficiently immobilised at variable types of redox fronts. Co-precipitation is widely observed for the rare earth elements and perhaps for Th. While these general observations conform to the known geochemical properties of these elements, unexplained differences exist between the behaviour of some elements in different types of redox fronts, e.g. the strongly contrasting behaviour of the otherwise geochemically similar elements Ni and Co in the fossil meteorite Brunflo. Th is another element for which evidence of unusual geochemical behaviour exists at certain localities. A strong influence of local parameters that may be hard to identify appears to be one of the main obstacles in the interpretation of data from natural systems. The systematic overview of natural and human-induced redox fronts in this report allows types of redox fronts suitable for natural analogue studies to be identified. Particularly promising in this respect are weathering phenomena in homogeneous dumps of ore processing products (type IVb) and redox fronts formed by injection of seawater into deep oil reservoirs. (author)

  2. Proceedings of the national symposium on current trends in geochemistry, exploration and environment: abstract book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The topics covered in this symposium are solid earth geochemistry and geochemical modeling, precambrian geology, geochemistry and petrogenesis, geochemistry, peterogenisis, sedimentology, chemostratigraphy and paleoclimate, atomic minerals, ferrous/non ferrous minerals, REE minerals, PGE and base metals, oil, hydrocarbons, industrial minerals and gem stones, hydrogeochemistry, environmental geochemistry, biogeochemistry and medical geology and analytical geochemistry and method development. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  3. Geochemistry Review Panel report on the SRP geochemistry program and draft geochemistry summary program plan (May, 1986) and discussion of panel recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    The Geochemistry Review Panel (GRP) was established by the Salt Repository Project Office (SRPO) to help evaluate geochemistry-related issues in the US Department of Energy's nuclear waste repository program. The May 1986 meeting of the GRP reviewed the Salt Repository Program (SRP) geochemistry program developed by the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI). This program is described in the Draft Geochemistry Plan of April 9, 1986. This report documents the GRP's comments and recommendations on this subject and the ONWI responses to the specific points raised by the GRP

  4. Historical foundations of chemical geology and geochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manten, A.A.

    1966-01-01

    Roughly, the name chemical geology has been used for as long as chemistry has been applied in geology; the name geochemistry was introduced by Schönbein, in 1838. Whereas initially the names were often regarded as synonymous, in our century there is a tendency to make a distinction between the two

  5. Geochemistry of sulphur in petroleum systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Orr, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    A renaissance in the 1980s concerning geochemistry of sulfur in fossil fuels makes an update of the subject timely. Papers developed from the 1989 ACS Symposium in Dallas provide a cross-section of recent research and progress in our understanding of the abundance and nature of organically bound

  6. Urban environmental geochemistry of trace metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Coby S.C.; Li Xiangdong; Thornton, Iain

    2006-01-01

    As the world's urban population continues to grow, it becomes increasingly imperative to understand the dynamic interactions between human activities and the urban environment. The development of urban environmental geochemistry has yielded a significant volume of scientific information about geochemical phenomena found uniquely in the urban environment, such as the distribution, dispersion, and geochemical characteristics of some toxic and potentially toxic trace metals. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the development of urban environmental geochemistry as a field of scientific study and highlight major transitions during the course of its development from its establishment to the major scientific interests in the field today. An extensive literature review is also conducted of trace metal contamination of the urban terrestrial environment, in particular of urban soils, in which the uniqueness of the urban environment and its influences on trace metal contamination are elaborated. Potential areas of future development in urban environmental geochemistry are identified and discussed. - Urban environmental geochemistry as a scientific discipline provides valuable information on trace metal contamination of the urban environment and its associated health effects

  7. Uranium project. Geochemistry prospection[Study of Uranium geochemical prospection in Uruguay]; Proyecto Uranio. Prospeccion geoquimica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, J

    1983-07-01

    Geochemistry studies the distribution of the chemicals elements in the terrestrial crust and its ways to migrate. The terminology used in this report is the following one: 1) Principles of the prospection geochemistry 2) Stages of the prospection geochemistry 3)utility of the prospection geochemistry 4) geochemistry of uranium 5) procedures used within the framework of uranium project 6) Average available 7) Selection of the zones of prospection geochemistry 8) Stages of the prospection, Sample preparation and analisis 9) Presentation of the results.

  8. Geochemistry of subduction zone serpentinites: A review

    OpenAIRE

    DESCHAMPS, Fabien; GODARD, Marguerite; GUILLOT, Stéphane; HATTORI, Kéiko

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decades, numerous studies have emphasized the role of serpentinites in the subduction zone geodynamics. Their presence and role in subduction environments are recognized through geophysical, geochemical and field observations of modern and ancient subduction zones and large amounts of geochemical database of serpentinites have been created. Here, we present a review of the geochemistry of serpentinites, based on the compilation of ~ 900 geochemical data of abyssal, mantle wedge ...

  9. Development of the near field geochemistry model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcos, D.; Bruno, J.; Duro, L.; Grive, M.

    2000-01-01

    This report discusses in a quantitative manner the evolution of the near field geochemistry as a result of the interactions between two different introducing granitic groundwaters and the FEBEX bentonite as a buffer material. The two granitic groundwaters considered are: SR-5 water, sampled in a borehole at 500 m depth in Mina Ratones, and a mean composition of different granitic groundwaters from the iberian Massif. The steel canister has also been introduced by considering the iron corrosion in anoxic conditions. (Author)

  10. Organic geochemistry of fossil resins from the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havelcová, Martina; Sýkorová, Ivana; Mach, K.; Dvořák, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 10, August (2014), s. 303-312 ISSN 1878-5220. [Geochemistry of the Earth's Surface (GES) Meeting /10./. Paris, 18.08.2014-23.08.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-18482S Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : fossil resin * amber * resinite * TMAH-Py-GC/MS Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry

  11. Geochemistry of sediments of the eastern continental shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mascarenhas, A.; Paropkari, A.L.; Murty, P.S.N.

    The bulk and partition geochemistry of Al, Fe, Ti, Mn, Zn, and Cu have been investigated in sediments of the eastern continental shelf of India. The results show that (1) the bulk geochemistry varies from one shelf unit to the other, (2) all...

  12. Contribution to uranium geochemistry in intrusive granites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulomb, R.

    1959-01-01

    This work aims to define the position of a certain number of French granitic deposits within the field of the geochemistry of granites in general, and of the geochemistry of uranium in particular. The regions concerned are: - 3 French Hercynian ranges, in the Vendee, in Brittany and in the Morvan, - 1 African range, probably precambrian, of the Hoggar. For each range, the petrochemical framework is first of all determined and then the degree of chemical homogeneity of the rocks is evaluated. In the petrochemical groups thus obtained the geochemical behaviour of the uranium is studied. From a point of view of the geochemistry of the granites under investigation, a comparison of the laws of distribution of the major elements in the 4 ranges shows up a convergence of average composition which was not anticipated by geological and petrographic considerations alone. The statistical and geochemical distribution laws of the total uranium as a function of the petrochemical variations are established. A study of the chemical forms of uranium in the rocks has drawn an attention to the qualitative and quantitative importance of the fraction of this uranium soluble in dilute acids. We have therefore reconsidered on the one hand, the laws of distribution of the insoluble uranium, which represents essentially the uranium fixed in crystalline structures (zircon, allanite...), and we have justified on the other hand the interest presented by the soluble uranium: this, although more complex in character, presents a geochemical unity in post magmatic phenomena which makes possible to find a genetic connection between the uraniferous deposits and the intrusive massifs. Finally we have given a plan of the geochemical cycle of uranium, in which we hope to have provided some more accurate data on the igneous phase. (author) [fr

  13. Uranium geochemistry, mineralogy, geology, exploration and resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vivo, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book comprises papers on the following topics: history of radioactivity; uranium in mantle processes; transport and deposition of uranium in hydrothermal systems at temperatures up to 300 0 C: Geological implications; geochemical behaviour of uranium in the supergene environment; uranium exploration techniques; uranium mineralogy; time, crustal evolution and generation of uranium deposits; uranium exploration; geochemistry of uranium in the hydrographic network; uranium deposits of the world, excluding Europe; uranium deposits in Europe; uranium in the economics of energy; role of high heat production granites in uranium province formation; and uranium deposits

  14. On models in the geochemistry of isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetzel, K.

    1978-01-01

    Models are playing an increasing role in the deepening of our understanding of the laws of occurrence of stable and radioactive isotopes in nature. The properties of concrete global and regional models of the geochemistry of isotopes are derived from a general model characterizing the cycling of chemical elements and their isotopes in nature. The importance of global models as well as the relationships between global and regional models are considered. The introduction of a parameter describing the velocity of both mass and isotope transfer, taking into consideration the global resources, renders possible the linkage of global models with regional ones. (author)

  15. Geochemistry and distribution of sediments in the East Indian shelf ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    29

    trace element geochemistry yielded interesting results about the sediment .... sediments and the core samples are as given in Table 1. ..... radioactive lead, thorium and uranium showed higher concentration in C3 than in C1 ...... Plant Soil, 267,.

  16. geochemistry of ekenkpon and nkporo shales, calabar flank, se

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    incorporated in the clay minerals of the shales. Also the values of .... analyzed for major oxides, trace elements and rare earth element .... Trace, and rare earth elements geochemistry ..... bearing source material, Ca is leached rapidly than Na.

  17. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of Proterozoic granitic rocks from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Geochemistry and petrogenesis of Proterozoic granitic ... This study presents the geochemical characteristics of granitic rocks located on the northern ... Frost and Frost 2013). ...... King P L, White A J R, Chappell B W and Allen C M 1997.

  18. Geochemistry and geochronology of the mafic dikes in the Taipusi ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    25

    several large linear faults as dividing lines (Fig. 1b; Jahn ... activity between Bainaimiao city and Chifeng city (Stampfli and Borel, 2002). The formation ... In addition, previous studies in the area paid more attention to the geochemistry and.

  19. Marine geochemistry ocean circulation, carbon cycle and climate change

    CERN Document Server

    Roy-Barman, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Marine geochemistry uses chemical elements and their isotopes to study how the ocean works. It brings quantitative answers to questions such as: What is the deep ocean mixing rate? How much atmospheric CO2 is pumped by the ocean? How fast are pollutants removed from the ocean? How do ecosystems react to the anthropogenic pressure? The book provides a simple introduction to the concepts (environmental chemistry, isotopes), the methods (field approach, remote sensing, modeling) and the applications (ocean circulation, carbon cycle, climate change) of marine geochemistry with a particular emphasis on isotopic tracers. Marine geochemistry is not an isolated discipline: numerous openings on physical oceanography, marine biology, climatology, geology, pollutions and ecology are proposed and provide a global vision of the ocean. It includes new topics based on ongoing research programs such as GEOTRACES, Global Carbon Project, Tara Ocean. It provides a complete outline for a course in marine geochemistry. To favor a...

  20. POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - GEOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    These reports summarize pollution prevention opportunity assessments conducted jointly by EPA and DOE at the Geochemistry Laboratory and the Manufacturing and Fabrication Repair Laboratory at the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories facility in Albuquerque, New Mex...

  1. An overview on geochemistry of Proterozoic massif-type ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A critical study of 311 published WR chemical analyses, isotopic and mineral chemistry of ... Keywords. Massif anorthosite complexes; overview; geochemistry; high-Al gabbro. J. Earth ...... (123–2920 ppm) unlike the experimental results of.

  2. Geochemistry of natural technetium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, D.B.; Cappis, J.H.; Perrin, R.E.; Rokop, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Technetium and plutonium in unprocessed nuclear reactor wastes are major concerns with regard to their containment in the geologic environment. Both nuclides have long half-lives; therefore, they will exist long after engineered barriers can be considered reliable. Consequently, strategies for the containment of these two elements depend on their retention in the geologic barrier until they have decayed to innocuous levels. Because these are the rarest elements in nature, there have been few direct observations of their geochemical behavior; predictions concerning their fate in the repository are based on properties that can be observed in the laboratory. The authors are attempting to complement the laboratory work by studying the geochemistry of natural plutonium and technetium. Ratios of anthropogenic to naturally occurring isotopes are discussed

  3. Geology and geochemistry of the Atacama Desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, J; González, R; Townley, B; Oliveros, V; Álvarez, F; Aguilar, G; Menzies, A; Calderón, M

    2018-02-14

    The Atacama Desert, the driest of its kind on Earth, hosts a number of unique geological and geochemical features that make it unlike any other environment on the planet. Considering its location on the western border of South America, between 17 and 28 °S, its climate has been characterized as arid to hyperarid for at least the past 10 million years. Notably dry climatic conditions of the Atacama Desert have been related to uplift of the Andes and are believed to have played an important role in the development of the most distinctive features of this desert, including: (i) nitrates and iodine deposits in the Central Depression, (ii) secondary enrichment in porphyry copper deposits in the Precordillera, (iii) Li enrichment in salt flats of the Altiplano, and (iv) life in extreme habitats. The geology and physiography of the Atacama Desert have been largely shaped by the convergent margin present since the Mesozoic era. The geochemistry of surface materials is related to rock geochemistry (Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, V, and Zn), salt flats, and evaporite compositions in endorheic basins (As, B, and Li), in addition to anthropogenic activities (Cu, Mo, and Pb). The composition of surface water is highly variable, nonetheless in general it presents a circumneutral pH with higher conductivity and total dissolved solids in brines. Major water constituents, with the exception of HCO 3 - , are generally related to the increase of salinity, and despite the fact that trace elements are not well-documented, surface waters of the Atacama Desert are enriched in As, B, and Li when compared to the average respective concentrations in rivers worldwide.

  4. Geochemistry of zinc in the sediments of the western continental shelf and slope of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, P.S.N.; Paropkari, A.L.; Rao, Ch.M.

    The bulk geochemistry of zinc in the sediments of the western continental shelf and slope of India and also the partition geochemistry of the sediments of the shelf and slope regions between Ratnagiri and Mangalore have been studied. The studies...

  5. DOE workshop: Sedimentary systems, aqueous and organic geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    A DOE workshop on sedimentary systems, aqueous and organic geochemistry was held July 15-16, 1993 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Papers were organized into several sections: Fundamental Properties, containing papers on the thermodynamics of brines, minerals and aqueous electrolyte solutions; Geochemical Transport, covering 3-D imaging of drill core samples, hydrothermal geochemistry, chemical interactions in hydrocarbon reservoirs, fluid flow model application, among others; Rock-Water Interactions, with presentations on stable isotope systematics of fluid/rock interaction, fluid flow and petotectonic evolution, grain boundary transport, sulfur incorporation, tracers in geologic reservoirs, geothermal controls on oil-reservoir evolution, and mineral hydrolysis kinetics; Organic Geochemistry covered new methods for constraining time of hydrocarbon migration, kinetic models of petroleum formation, mudstones in burial diagenesis, compound-specific carbon isotope analysis of petroleums, stability of natural gas, sulfur in sedimentary organic matter, organic geochemistry of deep ocean sediments, direct speciation of metal by optical spectroscopies; and lastly, Sedimentary Systems, covering sequence stratigraphy, seismic reflectors and diagenetic changes in carbonates, geochemistry and origin of regional dolomites, and evidence of large comet or asteroid impacts at extinction boundaries

  6. DOE workshop: Sedimentary systems, aqueous and organic geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    A DOE workshop on sedimentary systems, aqueous and organic geochemistry was held July 15-16, 1993 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Papers were organized into several sections: Fundamental Properties, containing papers on the thermodynamics of brines, minerals and aqueous electrolyte solutions; Geochemical Transport, covering 3-D imaging of drill core samples, hydrothermal geochemistry, chemical interactions in hydrocarbon reservoirs, fluid flow model application, among others; Rock-Water Interactions, with presentations on stable isotope systematics of fluid/rock interaction, fluid flow and petotectonic evolution, grain boundary transport, sulfur incorporation, tracers in geologic reservoirs, geothermal controls on oil-reservoir evolution, and mineral hydrolysis kinetics; Organic Geochemistry covered new methods for constraining time of hydrocarbon migration, kinetic models of petroleum formation, mudstones in burial diagenesis, compound-specific carbon isotope analysis of petroleums, stability of natural gas, sulfur in sedimentary organic matter, organic geochemistry of deep ocean sediments, direct speciation of metal by optical spectroscopies; and lastly, Sedimentary Systems, covering sequence stratigraphy, seismic reflectors and diagenetic changes in carbonates, geochemistry and origin of regional dolomites, and evidence of large comet or asteroid impacts at extinction boundaries.

  7. Organic geochemistry and environmental instrumentation programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The areas of research of the Organic Geochemistry Group include (1) computer-assisted gas chromatrographic, qualitative, and quantitative analyses of coal-derived complex mixtures; (2) chemodynamic measurements in complex organic mixtures to study the transport and transformation processes of chemicals in the environment; (3) bioassay-directed characterization of mutagenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-derived materials; (4) chemical and toxicological evaluation of condensates from mild coal gasification processes; (5) development of rapid (high-pressure liquid chromatography) characterization techniques for primary aromatic amines in coal-derived liquids; (6) study of flame ionization detector response factors and chemical structure in gas chromatography; (7) development of a simple, portable device for preconcentrating airborne aromatic amines to be analyzed by portable liquid chromatography; (8) initial uptake and release studies of perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene in pine needles; (9) application of stable carbon isotope techniques in tracing environmental pollutants; (10) development of control technology for hydrazine fuels by neutralization with hypochlorite II. The Environmental Instrumentation group is engaged in research to develop and build prototype field-portable devices and instruments for the detection, identification, and quantification of volatile hazardous gases in a variety of environmental and workplace settings

  8. Microbiology and Geochemistry of Antarctic Paleosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaney, W. C.; Malloch, D.; Hancock, R. G. V.; Campbell, I. B.; Sheppard, D.

    2000-08-01

    Samples of ancient soils from horizons in paleosols from the Quartermain Mountains (Aztec and New Mountain areas of the Antarctic Dry Valleys) were analyzed for their chemical composition and microbiology to determine the accumulation and movement of salts and other soluble constituents. The salt concentrations are of special interest because they are considered to be a function of age, derived in part from nearby oceanic and high altitude atmospheric sources. The geochemistry of ancient Miocene-age paleosols in these areas is the direct result of the deposition and weathering of till, derived principally from dolerite and sandstone source rock, in association with airborne-influxed salts. Paleosols nearer the coast have greater contents of chlorine, and farther inland near the Inland Ice Sheet, nitrogen tends to increase on a relative basis. The accumulation and vertical distribution of salts and other soluble chemical elements indicate relative amounts of movement in the profile over long periods of time, to the order of several million years. Iron, both in total concentration and in the form of various extracts, indicates it can be used as a geochronometer to assess the buildup of goethite plus hematite over time in the paleosols. Trends for ferrihydrite, a partially soluble Fe-hydroxide, shows limited profile translocation that might be related to the movement of salt. Six of the eight selected subsamples from paleosol horizons in three soil profiles contained nil concentrations of bacteria and fungi. However, two horizons at depths of between three to eight centimeters yielded several colonies of the fungi Beauveria bassiana and Penicillium spp., indicating some input of organic carbon. Beauveria bassiana is often reported in association with insects and is used commercially for the biological control of some insect pests. Penicillium species are commonly isolated from Arctic, temperate and tropical soils and are known to utilize a wide variety of organic

  9. Petrography and Geochemistry of the Proterozoic Sandstones of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    22

    studied to infer their provenance, intensity of paleo-weathering and ... geochemistry of clastic sedimentary rocks is widely studied to the tectonic setting, ...... Dickinson, W. R., 1985 Interpreting provenance relations from detrital modes ..... Carboniferous clastic rocks in west Junggar, Xinjiang, China: a case from the Hala-alat.

  10. Stratigraphy, sedimentology and bulk organic geochemistry of black ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stratigraphy, sedimentology and bulk organic geochemistry of black shales from the Proterozoic. Vindhyan Supergroup (central India). S Banerjee1,∗. , S Dutta. 2. , S Paikaray. 1 and U Mann. 2. 1. Department of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076, India. 2. Forschungszentrum ...

  11. Modal analysis and geochemistry of two sandstones of the Bhander ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and tectonic setting interpretations are based on modal analysis and whole rock geochemistry. The average ... that major part of the sediments were derived from the granitic source area. The sandstone ...... The geochemical gap shown by trace and rare ... of the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research,. New Delhi, in ...

  12. 10 CFR 960.4-2-2 - Geochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Postclosure Guidelines § 960.4-2-2 Geochemistry. (a) Qualifying condition. The present and... peak cumulative releases of radionuclides to the accessible environment by a factor of 10 as compared...

  13. Geochemistry and Petrogenesis of Biabanak–Bafq Mafic Mgmatism ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    59

    13185-1494. Email: m_poshtkoohi@yahoo.com; Mobile No: +98 912 209 39 73 ...... petrologie et tectonique du precambrien et de sa couverture, Ph.D. thesis, universite ..... Applications of the 190Pt–186OS isotope system to geochemistry and.

  14. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2004-01-01

    Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: thermometry, tracers, reaction mechanisms and chemostratigraphy. 52 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  15. The geochemistry of banded iron formations in the sukumaland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The geochemistry of banded iron formations in the sukumaland greenstone belt of Geita, northern Tanzania: evidence for mixing of hydrothermal and clastic ... the hydrothermal deposits have been contaminated, by up to 20% by weight, with detrital material having a composition similar to modern deep-sea pelagic clays.

  16. Stable isotope geochemistry. 3. rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefs, J.

    1987-01-01

    Stable Isotope Geochemistry is an authoritative book comprising theoretical and experimental principles; surveying important fractionation mechanisms affecting the most important elements; discussing the natural variations of geologically important reservoirs. This updated 3rd edition, with a completely rewritten and extended main part, contains two new chapters on stable isotope composition of mantle material and on changes of the ocean during the geological past. (orig.)

  17. Geochemistry of subduction zone serpentinites: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Fabien; Godard, Marguerite; Guillot, Stéphane; Hattori, Kéiko

    2013-09-01

    Over the last decades, numerous studies have emphasized the role of serpentinites in the subduction zone geodynamics. Their presence and role in subduction environments are recognized through geophysical, geochemical and field observations of modern and ancient subduction zones and large amounts of geochemical database of serpentinites have been created. Here, we present a review of the geochemistry of serpentinites, based on the compilation of ~ 900 geochemical data of abyssal, mantle wedge and exhumed serpentinites after subduction. The aim was to better understand the geochemical evolution of these rocks during their subduction as well as their impact in the global geochemical cycle. When studying serpentinites, it is essential to determine their protoliths and their geological history before serpentinization. The geochemical data of serpentinites shows little mobility of compatible and rare earth elements (REE) at the scale of hand-specimen during their serpentinization. Thus, REE abundance can be used to identify the protolith for serpentinites, as well as magmatic processes such as melt/rock interactions before serpentinization. In the case of subducted serpentinites, the interpretation of trace element data is difficult due to the enrichments of light REE, independent of the nature of the protolith. We propose that enrichments are probably not related to serpentinization itself, but mostly due to (sedimentary-derived) fluid/rock interactions within the subduction channel after the serpentinization. It is also possible that the enrichment reflects the geochemical signature of the mantle protolith itself which could derive from the less refractory continental lithosphere exhumed at the ocean-continent transition. Additionally, during the last ten years, numerous analyses have been carried out, notably using in situ approaches, to better constrain the behavior of fluid-mobile elements (FME; e.g. B, Li, Cl, As, Sb, U, Th, Sr) incorporated in serpentine phases

  18. Geomicrobiology; inseparable from low temperature geochemistry & mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southam, G.

    2009-05-01

    Bacteria play an important role in catalyzing a wide array of biogeochemical processes that affect the dissolution of minerals, the aqueous geochemistry of their surroundings and secondary mineral formation. Processes occurring at the bacteria-mineral interface can occur on the scale of nanoenvironments and will normally extend to microenvironments or even, to macroscopic features where extensive growth of bacteria is supported. The action of bacteria in these systems can produce a wide range of biomarkers that can be preserved over geologic time periods. Possible biomarkers include dissolution features in mineral substrates, fossil structures of individual cells to complex cell-cell associations, and chemical (isotopic and organic) signatures. In any system, we need to focus at the scale of the bacteria themselves to appreciate the actual chemistry of their surroundings and the kinds of reactions that they can catalyse. For example, photosynthetic microbial mats in an Atlin, BC wetland create ideal conditions for biologically induced precipitation of magnesium carbonates, specifically dypingite Mg5(CO3)4(OH)25H2O, which we were unable to reproduce abiotically. The preservation of biosignatures over geologic time presents obvious challenges, and the effect of diagenesis on fossils and their mineralogical assemblages deserves attention, especially with respect to the preservation and analysis of materials on (or from) Mars. For this, we need to rely on our Earth analogue sites as a way to triage the wide range of samples that are available for collection and analysis. The preservation of organic materials and cells in salts is particularly interesting. Conversely, the hematite nodules on Mars may not be good samples to target in the search for a Martian biosphere. The possibility of finding an extant biosphere increases with depth; however, evidence from Earth's deep subsurface demonstrates that it does not contain an abundant biosphere. Bacteria thrive in

  19. Au-bearing magnetite mineralizaion in Kashmar (alteration, mineralization, geochemistry, geochemistry and fluid inclusions;

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Almasi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The study area is located in the central part of the Khaf- Kashmar- Bardaskan volcano-plotunic belt (briefly KKBB. Several IOCG deposits such as Tanourjeh Au-bearing magnetite deposit and Kuh-e-Zar Specularite-rich Au deposit have been explored in KKBB. Geology, alteration, mineralization, geochemistry and fluid inclusion results in Kashmar suggest the IOCG type Au-bearing magnetite mineralization. These IOCG deposits at KKBB form at an active continental arc related to SSZ-type Sabzevar oceanic subduction. Materials and methods Use of Landsat 7+, IRS and Aster satellites. Petrography and alteration Studies in 150 thin sections of volcanic and intrusive rocks. Sampling of ore-bearing quartz vein and mineralography. Preparation of 28 geochemistry samples by the chip composite method of ore-bearing quartz vein and analyzing them in the ACME laboratory by Aqua Regia 1DX1. Fluid inclusions studies of 14 samples of quartz and barite related to the ore minerals of ore-bearing quartz vein by THM600 stage of Linkam company. Results Magmatic events in Kashmar occur at Paleocene-Eocene and include: (1 old mafic - intermediate volcano-plutonic series; (2 felsic volcanic and granitoids; and (3 parallel swarm dykes which are youngest (Almasi et al., 2016. Geochemically, Kashmar rocks are metaluminous to highly peraluminous and Tholeitic to calc-alkaline and shoshonitic in composition (Almasi et al., 2016. The field characteristics, together with isotope and geochemical analyses show that all rock types are essentially co-magmatic and post-collisional I-type (Almasi et al., 2016. Alteration of Kashmar is described in two ways: (1 intense ellipsoidal-linear Argillic-Sillicification and low sericitic with Silica caps and with medium widespread and propylitic alterations in triple regions, next to Dorouneh fault; and (2 Medium Hematite-Carbonate-Chlorite-Silicification alterations in Kamarmard heights. In parts of near the Doruneh fault, sometimes

  20. The 8th ICGG International Conference on Gas Geochemistry Preface: Fluids and tectonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Italiano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The 8th International Conference on Gas Geochemistry provided the opportunity for scientists from different countries to meet each other, exchange ideas on the state of the art in gas geochemistry, and discuss advance in fluid geochemistry. The 8th ICGG meeting focused on three main geologic environments currently interacting with the human life: volcanoes, earthquakes and hydrocarbons. Ninety-four presentations gave participants chance to cover a variety of important research topics on gas geochemistry in geosciences including: gas migration in terrestrial and marine environments, Earth degassing and its relation to seismicity, volcanic eruptions, rare gases and application of isotope techniques, measurement and analytical techniques.

  1. Strontium isotopic geochemistry of intrusive rocks, Puerto Rico, Greater Antilles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.M.; Kesler, S.E.

    1980-01-01

    The strontium isotope geochemistry is given for three Puerto Rican intrusive rocks: the granodioritic Morovis and San Lorenzo plutons and the Rio Blanco stock of quartz dioritic composition. The average calculated initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios are 0.70370, 0.70355 and 0.70408, respectively. In addition, the San Lorenzo data establish a whole-rock isochron of 71 +- 2 m.y., which agrees with the previously reported K-Ar age of 73 m.y. Similarity of most of the intrusive rocks in the Greater Antilles with respect to their strontium isotopic geochemistry regardless of their major element composition indicates that intrusive magmas with a wide range of composition can be derived from a single source material. The most likely source material, in view of the available isotopic data, is the mantle wedge overlying the subduction zone. (orig.)

  2. The geochemistry of stable chlorine and bromine isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggenkamp, Hans [Onderzock and Beleving, Bussum (Netherlands)

    2014-11-01

    First book solely dedicated to the geochemistry of chlorine and bromine isotopes. Detailed description of analytical techniques, including their advantages and disadvantages. Indication of research fields where measurement of these isotopes is especially useful. This book provides detailed information on the history, analysis and applications of chlorine and bromine isotope geochemistry. Chlorine and bromine are geochemically unique as they prefer to exist as single charged negative ions. For this reason isotope fractionation reflects mostly processes that are not related to changes in the redox state and this fractionation is generally modest. The book will describe the processes that are most easily detected using these isotopes. Also isotope variations, and processes that cause them, measured in oxidised species such as perchlorates and in organic molecules will be described in this book.

  3. Sedimentary basin geochemistry and fluid/rock interactions workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    Fundamental research related to organic geochemistry, fluid-rock interactions, and the processes by which fluids migrate through basins has long been a part of the U.S. Department of Energy Geosciences program. Objectives of this program were to emphasize those principles and processes which would be applicable to a wide range of problems associated with petroleum discovery, occurrence and extraction, waste disposal of all kinds, and environmental management. To gain a better understanding of the progress being made in understanding basinal fluids, their geochemistry and movement, and related research, and to enhance communication and interaction between principal investigators and DOE and other Federal program managers interested in this topic, this workshop was organized by the School of Geology and Geophysics and held in Norman, Oklahoma in November, 1991.

  4. Plutonium and Americium Geochemistry at Hanford: A Site Wide Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2012-08-23

    This report was produced to provide a systematic review of the state-of-knowledge of plutonium and americium geochemistry at the Hanford Site. The report integrates existing knowledge of the subsurface migration behavior of plutonium and americium at the Hanford Site with available information in the scientific literature regarding the geochemistry of plutonium and americium in systems that are environmentally relevant to the Hanford Site. As a part of the report, key research needs are identified and prioritized, with the ultimate goal of developing a science-based capability to quantitatively assess risk at sites contaminated with plutonium and americium at the Hanford Site and the impact of remediation technologies and closure strategies.

  5. Application of environmental isotope tracing technology to geothermal geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Yingnan

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent application and development of environmental isotope tracing technology to geothermal geochemistry in the following aspects: gas isotopes (He, C) tracing of warm springs; H, O isotope tracing on the origin and cause of geothermal water, environmental isotope dating of geothermal water, and the advantage of excess parameter of deuterium (d) in geothermal research. The author also suggests that isotope method should combine with other geological methods to expand its advantage. (authors)

  6. Ferromanganese nodules and their associated sediments from the Central Indian Ocean Basin: Rare earth element geochemistry

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Rao, Ch.M.; Migdisov, A.A.; Colley, S.; Higgs, N.C.; Demidenko, L.

    FerromanganeseNodulesandtheirAssociatedSedimentsfromtheCentralIndianOceanBasin:RareEarthElementGeochemistry J.N.PATTANCH.M.RAONationalInstituteofOceanography,DonaPaula Goa,IndiaA.A.MIGDISOV InstituteofGeochemistry,RussianAcademyofSciencesMoscow,Russia S.COLLEY,N.C.HIGGSSouthamptonOceanographyCentre,EmpressDockSouthampton...

  7. Geochemistry and ore prospecting; Geochimie et prospection miniere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Caignec, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay(France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1954-07-01

    Applied geochemistry is a new technique which helps the geologist in detecting ore deposits. Some deposits, even when they are covered with rather thick surface structures, form around these zones where the infinitesimal content of some elements of soils or waters is notably different. These 'anomalies' may be contemporaneous to the deposit-structure (primary dispersion) or may have occurred later (secondary dispersion). Various factors rule these anomalies: ore-stability, soil homogeneity, water conditions, topography, vegetation, etc... Applied geochemistry is in fact the study of analysis techniques of metal traces in soils as well as the geological interpretation of observed anomalies. This report gives practical data on sampling methods, yields, costs and also on special problems of uranium geochemistry. (author) [French] La geochimie appliquee est une nouvelle technique qui vient aider le geologue dans la detection des gisements de minerais. Certains gisements, meme lorsqu'ils sont recouverts par des formations superficielles relativement epaisses, creent autour d'eux des zones ou la teneur infinitesimale des sols ou des eaux en certains elements varie notablement. Ces ''anomalies'' peuvent etre contemporaines de la formation du gisement (dispersion primaire) ou posterieures a celle-ci (dispersion secondaire). De nombreux facteurs gouvernent ces anomalies: stabilite du minerai, homogeneite du sol, regime des eaux, topographie, vegetation, etc... L'etude des techniques d'analyse des traces de metaux dans les sols et l'interpretation geologique des anomalies obtenues constituent la geochimie appliquee. Ce rapport contient, en outre, des donnees pratiques sur les procedes d'echantillonnage, le rendement, les prix de revient, ainsi que sur quelques problemes particuliers a la geochimie de l'uranium. (auteur)

  8. Geochemistry and ore prospecting; Geochimie et prospection miniere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Caignec, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay(France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1954-07-01

    Applied geochemistry is a new technique which helps the geologist in detecting ore deposits. Some deposits, even when they are covered with rather thick surface structures, form around these zones where the infinitesimal content of some elements of soils or waters is notably different. These 'anomalies' may be contemporaneous to the deposit-structure (primary dispersion) or may have occurred later (secondary dispersion). Various factors rule these anomalies: ore-stability, soil homogeneity, water conditions, topography, vegetation, etc... Applied geochemistry is in fact the study of analysis techniques of metal traces in soils as well as the geological interpretation of observed anomalies. This report gives practical data on sampling methods, yields, costs and also on special problems of uranium geochemistry. (author) [French] La geochimie appliquee est une nouvelle technique qui vient aider le geologue dans la detection des gisements de minerais. Certains gisements, meme lorsqu'ils sont recouverts par des formations superficielles relativement epaisses, creent autour d'eux des zones ou la teneur infinitesimale des sols ou des eaux en certains elements varie notablement. Ces ''anomalies'' peuvent etre contemporaines de la formation du gisement (dispersion primaire) ou posterieures a celle-ci (dispersion secondaire). De nombreux facteurs gouvernent ces anomalies: stabilite du minerai, homogeneite du sol, regime des eaux, topographie, vegetation, etc... L'etude des techniques d'analyse des traces de metaux dans les sols et l'interpretation geologique des anomalies obtenues constituent la geochimie appliquee. Ce rapport contient, en outre, des donnees pratiques sur les procedes d'echantillonnage, le rendement, les prix de revient, ainsi que sur quelques problemes particuliers a la geochimie de l'uranium. (auteur)

  9. Origin of the Moon new concept geochemistry and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Galimov, Erik M

    2012-01-01

    The origin of the Moon remains an unsolved problem of the planetary science. Researchers engaged in celestial dynamics, geophysics, and geochemistry are still discussing various models of creation of our closest cosmic neighbour. The most popular scenario, the impact hypothesis involving a collision early in the Earth's history, has been substantially challenged by the new data. The birth and development of a planet-moon system always play a role in the formation of an entire planetary system around our Sun or around another star. This way, the story of our Moon acquires broader ramifications

  10. Contaminant geochemistry. Interactions and transport in the subsurface environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkowitz, Brian; Dror, Ishai; Yaron, Bruno [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Energy Research

    2008-07-01

    This book combines earth science, subsurface hydrology and environmental geochemistry, providing a comprehensive background for specialists interested in the protection and sustainable management of the subsurface environment. The reader is introduced to the chemistry of contaminants, which usually disturb the natural equilibrium in the subsurface as a result of human activity. The major focus of the book is on contaminant reactions in soil solutions, groundwater and porous media solid phases, accounting for their persistence and transformation in the subsurface, as they are transported from the land surface into groundwater. Discussions on selected case studies are provided. (orig.)

  11. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2005-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. (author). 52 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Marine geochemistry of the rare earth elements: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, H.; Elderfield, H.

    1984-01-01

    The rare earth elements (REE) form a coherent group because of their systematic decrease in atomic radii with increasing atomic number and predominant +3 oxidation state. This makes them particularly useful in the study of marine geochemistry. The fact that two members of the group are often found in anomalous oxidation states allows a study of the fractionation of these REE from their neighbours and provides an insight into the geochemical behaviour of the REE in the marine environment. Thus the chemistry and relative abundances of the REE can be used to assess the origin and depositional environments of modern sediments. (author)

  13. Simulation of Water Chemistry using and Geochemistry Code, PHREEQE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, J.H. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-07-01

    This report introduces principles and procedures of simulation for water chemistry using a geochemistry code, PHREEQE. As and example of the application of this code, we described the simulation procedure for titration of an aquatic sample with strong acid to investigate the state of Carbonates in aquatic solution. Major contents of this report are as follows; Concepts and principles of PHREEQE, Kinds of chemical reactions which may be properly simulated by PHREEQE, The definition and meaning of each input data, An example of simulation using PHREEQE. (author). 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Geochemistry of actinides and fission products in natural aquifer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.

    1989-06-01

    The progress in the research area of the community project MIRAGE: 'Geochemistry of actinides and fission products in natural aquatic systems' has been reviewed. This programme belongs to a specific research and technical development programme for the European Atomic Energy Community in the field of management and storage of radioactive waste. The review summarizes research progresses in subject areas: complexation with organics, colloid generation in groundwater and basic retention mechanisms in the framework of the migration of radionuclides in the geosphere. The subject areas are being investigated by 23 laboratories under interlaboratory collaborations or independent studies. (orig.)

  15. Petrology, mineralogy and geochemistry of surficial uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagel, M.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the petrology, mineralogy, and geochemistry of surficial uranium ore deposits is important for developing prospecting and evaluation strategies. Carnotite is the main uranium mineral and is found in those deposits that have the greatest potential uranium resources. The following uranium-bearing minerals have been reported to occur in surficial deposits: carnotite, tyuyamunite, soddyite, weeksite, haiweeite, uranophane, betauranophane, metaankoleite, torbernite, autunite, phosphuranylite, schroeckingerite, Pb-V-U hydroxide (unnamed mineral), uraninite and organourano complexes. The interrelationships between some of the minerals of the host rocks (especially the clays) are not well understood. (author)

  16. Infrared Spectroscopy and Stable Isotope Geochemistry of Hydrous Silicate Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolper, Edward

    2007-03-05

    The focus of this DOE-funded project has been the study of volatile components in magmas and the atmosphere. Over the twenty-one year period of this project, we have used experimental petrology and stable isotope geochemistry to study the behavior and properties of volatile components dissolved in silicate minerals and melts and glasses. More recently, we have also studied the concentration and isotopic composition of CO2 in the atmosphere, especially in relation to air quality issues in the Los Angeles basin.

  17. Future directions in geobiology and low-temperature geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Katherine H.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    2011-01-01

    Humanity is confronted with an enormous challenge, as succinctly stated by the late Steven Schneider (2001; quoted by Jantzen 2004*): “Humans are forcing the Earth’s environmental systems to change at a rate that is more advanced than their knowledge of the consequences.” Geobiologists and low-temperature geochemists characterize material from the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere to understand processes operating within and between these components of the Earth system from the atomic to the planetary scale. For this reason, the interwoven disciplines of geobiology and low-temperature geochemistry are central to understanding and ultimately predicting the behavior of these life-sustaining systems. We present here comments and recommendations from the participants of a workshop entitled “Future Directions in Geobiology and Low-Temperature Geochemistry,” hosted by the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Geophysical Laboratory, Washington, DC, on 27–28 August 2010. The goal of the workshop was to suggest ways to leverage the vast intellectual and analytical capabilities of our diverse scientific community to characterize the Earth’s past, present, and future geochemical habitat as we enter the second decade of what E. O. Wilson dubbed “the century of the environment.”

  18. Introduction to geochemistry and its applications. Tome 2. Transfer of elements. Geochemical evolution of exogenous domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemann, R.; Treuil, M.

    1998-01-01

    This second tome of the introduction to geochemistry and its applications is divided into 9 chapters dealing with: the chloro-fluoro-methanes as tracers of the oceanic circulation; the study of radioactive disequilibria and their applications; the submarine hydrothermal activity; geochemistry and diagenesis, example of the Trias and Lias of Ardeche (France); the chemistry of deep waters in granitic environment, application to the underground storage of radioactive wastes; the impact of volcanism on atmosphere chemistry; the role of methane and light hydrocarbons in the atmosphere; the challenges of carbon; and the polar caps as recorders of atmosphere geochemistry and climates. (J.S.)

  19. Comparative assessment of five potential sites for hydrothermal magma systems: geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, A.F.

    1980-08-01

    A brief discussion is given of the geochemical objectives and questions that must be addressed in such an evaluation. A summary of the currently published literature that is pertinent in answering these questions is presented for each of the five areas: The Geysers-Clear Lake region, Long Valley, Rio Grand Rift, Roosevelt Hot Springs, and the Salton Trough. The major geochemical processes associated with proposed hydrothermal sites are categorized into three groups for presentation: geochemistry of magma and associated volcanic rocks, geochemistry of hydrothermal solutions, and geochemistry of hydrothermal alteration. (MHR)

  20. Geochronology and geochemistry by nuclear tracks method: some utilization examples in geologic applied

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poupeau, G.; Soliani Junior, E.

    1988-01-01

    This article discuss some applications of the 'nuclear tracks method' in geochronology, geochemistry and geophysic. In geochronology, after rapid presentation of the dating principles by 'Fission Track' and the kinds of geological events mensurable by this method, is showed some application in metallogeny and in petroleum geolocy. In geochemistry the 'fission tracks' method utilizations are related with mining prospecting and uranium prospecting. In geophysics an important application is the earthquake prevision, through the Ra 222 emanations continous control. (author) [pt

  1. Petrology and organic geochemistry of the lower Miocene lacustrine sediments (Most Basin, Eger Graben, Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havelcová, Martina; Sýkorová, Ivana; Mach, K.; Trejtnarová, Hana; Blažek, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 139, Special issue (2015), s. 26-39 ISSN 0166-5162 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-18482S Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : Most Basin * Miocene * coal facies indices * coal petrology * organic geochemistry Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 3.294, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0166516214001529#

  2. Summary report on the geochemistry of Yucca Mountain and environs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, W.R.; Wolfsberg, K.; Rundberg, R.S.

    1982-12-01

    This report gives a detailed description of work at Los Alamos that will help resolve geochemical issues pertinent to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository in tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. It is necessary to understand the properties and setting of the host tuff because this rock provides the first natural barrier to migration of waste elements from a repository. The geochemistry of tuff is being investigated with particular emphasis on retardation processes. This report addresses the various aspects of sorption by tuff, physical and chemical makeup of tuff, diffusion processes, tuff/groundwater chemistry, waste element chemistry under expected repository conditions, transport processes involved in porous and fracture flow, and geochemical and transport modeling

  3. Study on surface geochemistry and microbiology for hydrocarbon exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The test results of the experimental device for extraction of dissolved gases from water show that the device can be utilized for the gas geochemistry of water. The device is capable of determining hydrocarbon gases in water to the concentration of less than 5 x 10{sup -4} ml/l of water. According to the results of microbiological studies, the plate count technique can be a useful supplementary method for hydrocarbon exploration. This is based on the facts that the average survival rate to hydrocarbons (pentane, hexane) for heterotrophs is higher in the area known as containing considerable hydrocarbon gases than other areas in the Pohang region. However, it is still necessary to develop techniques to treat the bacteria with gaseous hydrocarbons. (author). 2 figs., 41 tabs.

  4. Uranium districts defined by reconnaissance geochemistry in South Greenland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour-Brown, A.; Steenfelt, A.; Kunzendorf, H.

    1983-01-01

    A reconnaissance exploration survey over 14 000 km 2 of Precambrian terrain in South Greenland using stream-sediment and stream-water samples delineated a central uranium district of 2000 km 2 with enhanced uranium levels and smaller anomalous zones in the south of the field area. Limited follow-up work located 8 pitchblende occurrences in this extensive district. The pitchblende is in veins which contain quartz, calcite, iron oxide, fluorite and minor sulphides. The isotopic (U-Pb) age of the pitchblende, which ranges from 1180-1090 Ma, corresponds to the late stages of Gardar alkaline igneous activity. It is concluded, therefore, that the reconnaissance geochemistry reflects a district-wide hydrothermal event related to the late volatile differentiates derived from the highly fractionated alkaline magma. A combination of primary and secondary features have complemented each other in enhancing the geochemical reconnaissance data and emphasized its importance but has not materially altered the interpretation. (Auth.)

  5. The geochemistry and mobility of the lanthanides in marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elderfield, H.

    1988-07-01

    A study has been made to evaluate lanthanide mobility in sediments directly by measuring concentrations of 10 lanthanide elements in sediments and pore waters. Due to the very low concentrations of the lanthanides in sea water relative to marine sediments, evidence of lanthanide mobilization is usually difficult to detect from studies of solid-phase geochemistry. Results show that the lanthanides can be extremely mobile. Concentrations in pore waters up to 100 times sea water concentrations have been measured. The conclusions are tentative but the present data suggest that the lanthanides are mobilized during oxidation of organic-rich sediments and are relocated in part in association with secondary Fe-rich phases. The behaviour of Ce is, predictably, somewhat different from the other lanthanides and may be more mobile as a consequence of its redox chemistry. (author)

  6. Instrumental analytical techniques in geochemistry: Requirements and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    Geochemists must analyse an extremely wide range of terrestrial and planetary materials. The instrumental techniques necessary to cope with this difficult task are considered. The most important analytical techniques in use by the geochemist today are AAS, ICP-OES, INAA, MSID and XRFS, and the electron microscope for in situ mineral analysis. Some applications of these techniques to solving major problems in geochemistry are discussed. The importance of certified reference materials and of high quality geochemical data are emphasized. It is concluded that the general quality of trace element data has improved over the past 25 years, as a direct result of the application of modern instrumental techniques. Surprisingly, the quality of data reported for certain major elements has deteriorated over that time, when compared with data obtainable by classical chemical methods. Predictions are made concerning the instrumentation needs of the next generation of geochemists. (orig.) [de

  7. Workshop on fundamental geochemistry needs for nuclear waste isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, J.H. (ed.)

    1985-09-01

    In their deliberations, workshop participants did not attempt to incorporate the constraints that the 1982 National Nuclear Waste Management Policy Act placed upon the site-specific investigations. In particular, there was no attempt to (1) identify the research areas that apply most strongly to a particular potential repository site, (2) identify the chronological time when the necessary data or knowledge could be available, or (3) include a sensitivity analysis to prioritize and limit data needs. The workshop participants felt these are the purview of the site-specific investigations; the purpose of the workshop was to discuss the generic geochemistry research needs for a nuclear waste repository among as broad spectrum of individual scientists as possible and to develop a consensus of what geochemical information is important and why.

  8. Workshop on fundamental geochemistry needs for nuclear waste isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiken, J.H.

    1985-09-01

    In their deliberations, workshop participants did not attempt to incorporate the constraints that the 1982 National Nuclear Waste Management Policy Act placed upon the site-specific investigations. In particular, there was no attempt to (1) identify the research areas that apply most strongly to a particular potential repository site, (2) identify the chronological time when the necessary data or knowledge could be available, or (3) include a sensitivity analysis to prioritize and limit data needs. The workshop participants felt these are the purview of the site-specific investigations; the purpose of the workshop was to discuss the generic geochemistry research needs for a nuclear waste repository among as broad spectrum of individual scientists as possible and to develop a consensus of what geochemical information is important and why

  9. The Medical Geochemistry of Dusts, Soils, and Other Earth Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, G. S.; Ziegler, T. L.

    2003-12-01

    "Town clenched in suffocating grip of asbestos"USA Today, article on Libby,Montana, February, 2000"Researchers find volcanoes are bad for your health… long after they finish erupting"University of WarwickPress Release, 1999"Toxic soils plague city - arsenic, lead in 5 neighborhoods could imperil 17,000 residents"Denver Post, 2002"Ill winds - dust storms ferry toxic agents between countries and even continents"Science News, 2002A quick scan of newspapers, television, science magazines, or the internet on any given day has a fairly high likelihood of encountering a story (usually accompanied by a creative headline such as those above) regarding human health concerns linked to dusts, soils, or other earth materials. Many such concerns have been recognized and studied for decades, but new concerns arise regularly.Earth scientists have played significant roles in helping the medical community understand some important links between earth materials and human health, such as the role of asbestos mineralogy in disease (Skinner et al., 1988; Ross, 1999; Holland and Smith, 2001), and the role of dusts generated by the 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake in an outbreak of Valley Fever ( Jibson et al., 1998; Schneider et al., 1997).Earth science activities tied to health issues are growing (Skinner and Berger, 2003), and are commonly classified under the emerging discipline of medical geology (Finkelman et al., 2001; Selinus and Frank, 2000; Selinus, in press).Medical geochemistry (also referred to as environmental geochemistry and health: Smith and Huyck (1999), Appleton et al. (1996)) can be considered as a diverse subdiscipline of medical geology that deals with human and animal health in the context of the Earth's geochemical cycle ( Figure 1). Many medical geochemistry studies have focused on how chemical elements in rocks, soils, and sediments are transmitted via water or vegetation into the food chain, and how regional geochemical variations can result in disease

  10. Advancement in application of diamondoids on organic geochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anlai Ma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Diamondoids occur in all kinds of fossil fuels. Due to peculiar cage molecular structures, diamondoids have been widely used in the maturity assessment of high mature to over-mature oils as well as source rocks since the 1990s. New advancements in maturity, oil-cracking, oil mixing, oil biodegradation, organic facies, TSR, gas washing, migration, and oil spill identification using diamondoids during the 21st century will be further discussed in this paper; the origin and possible forming mechanisms of diamondoids are also explained. Owing to the vagueness of the origin of diamondoid, the results of the maturity and oil cracking among researchers brought about great differences. It is suggested that the research of the evolution of diamondoid in different type oils and source rocks are beneficial when applied in organic geochemistry, especially for the depth limits for the deep reservoirs.

  11. SPATIAL Short Courses Build Expertise and Community in Isotope Geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, E. M.; Bowen, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    The SPATIAL short course at the University of Utah is designed for graduate students and professionals in the earth and environmental sciences from around the globe. An integral part of the broader, NSF-funded Inter-university Training for Continental-scale Ecology (ITCE) project, the course is an intensive two-week field, classroom and laboratory experience with internationally-known researchers as instructors. The course focuses on stable isotope geochemistry coupled with spatial analysis techniques. Participants do not typically know each other or this research community well upon entering. One of the stated goals of the overall project is to build a community of practice around these techniques. This design is common in many professional fields, but is not often applied at the graduate level nor formally assessed in the earth sciences. Paired pre- and post-tests were administered before the start and after the close of the short courses over 3 years. The survey is a set of instruments adapted from social-cognitive psychology measuring changes in identity and community with other items to measure content knowledge outcomes. We see a subtle, consistent convergence of identities between large-scale isotope geochemistry and participants' research areas. Results also show that the course generates an increase in understanding about stable isotopes' use and application. The data show the SPATIAL course is very effective at bringing students together socially with each other and with faculty to create an environment that fosters community and scientific cooperation. Semi-structured pre-and post- interviews were conducted to understand the program elements that generated gains in learning and community. Participants were selected based on initial responses on the pre-survey to capture the range of initial conditions for the group. Qualitative analysis shows that the major factors for participants were 1) ready access to researchers in an informal setting during the

  12. The geochemistry of loess: Asian and North American deposits compared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, Daniel R.

    2018-04-01

    Loess is widely distributed over Asia and North America and constitutes one of the most important surficial deposits that serve as terrestrial records of the Quaternary. The oldest Pleistocene loess in China is likely ∼2.6 Ma, thus spanning much or all of the Pleistocene. In North America, most loess is no older than the penultimate glacial period, with the exception of Alaska, where the record may go back to ∼3.0 Ma. On both continents, loess deposits date primarily to glacial periods, and interglacial or interstadial periods are represented by paleosols. Both glacial and non-glacial sources of silts that comprise the bulk of loess deposits are found on both continents. Although loess has been considered to be representative of the average upper continental crust, there are regionally distinctive compositions of loess in both Asia and North America. Loess deposits in Asia from Yakutia, Tajikistan, and China have compositionally distinct major element compositions, due to varying abundances of silicate minerals, carbonate minerals, and clay minerals. In North America, loess in the Mississippi River valley, the Great Plains, and Alaska are also distinguishable with regard to major element composition that reflects highly diverse source sediments. Trace element geochemistry (Sc-Th-Zr and the rare earth elements) also shows regional diversity of loess bodies, in both Asia and North America. On both continents, most loess bodies show significant contributions from later-cycle, altered sedimentary rocks, as opposed to direct derivation from igneous rocks. Further, some loess bodies have detectable contributions from mafic igneous rocks as well as major contributions from average, upper-crustal, felsic rocks. Intercalated paleosols in loess sections show geochemical compositions that differ significantly from the underlying loess parent materials. Ratios of soluble-to-insoluble elements show depletions in paleosols due to chemical weathering losses of calcite

  13. The geochemistry of loess: Asian and North American deposits compared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, Daniel R.

    2018-01-01

    Loess is widely distributed over Asia and North America and constitutes one of the most important surficial deposits that serve as terrestrial records of the Quaternary. The oldest Pleistocene loess in China is likely ∼2.6 Ma, thus spanning much or all of the Pleistocene. In North America, most loess is no older than the penultimate glacial period, with the exception of Alaska, where the record may go back to ∼3.0 Ma. On both continents, loess deposits date primarily to glacial periods, and interglacial or interstadial periods are represented by paleosols. Both glacial and non-glacial sources of silts that comprise the bulk of loess deposits are found on both continents. Although loess has been considered to be representative of the average upper continental crust, there are regionally distinctive compositions of loess in both Asia and North America. Loess deposits in Asia from Yakutia, Tajikistan, and China have compositionally distinct major element compositions, due to varying abundances of silicate minerals, carbonate minerals, and clay minerals. In North America, loess in the Mississippi River valley, the Great Plains, and Alaska are also distinguishable with regard to major element composition that reflects highly diverse source sediments. Trace element geochemistry (Sc-Th-Zr and the rare earth elements) also shows regional diversity of loess bodies, in both Asia and North America. On both continents, most loess bodies show significant contributions from later-cycle, altered sedimentary rocks, as opposed to direct derivation from igneous rocks. Further, some loess bodies have detectable contributions from mafic igneous rocks as well as major contributions from average, upper-crustal, felsic rocks. Intercalated paleosols in loess sections show geochemical compositions that differ significantly from the underlying loess parent materials. Ratios of soluble-to-insoluble elements show depletions in paleosols due to chemical weathering losses of calcite

  14. Geochemistry of groundwater in the Beaver and Camas Creek drainage basins, eastern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattray, Gordon W.; Ginsbach, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, is studying the fate and transport of waste solutes in the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) aquifer at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in eastern Idaho. This effort requires an understanding of the natural and anthropogenic geochemistry of groundwater at the INL and of the important physical and chemical processes controlling the geochemistry. In this study, the USGS applied geochemical modeling to investigate the geochemistry of groundwater in the Beaver and Camas Creek drainage basins, which provide groundwater recharge to the ESRP aquifer underlying the northeastern part of the INL. Data used in this study include petrology and mineralogy from 2 sediment and 3 rock samples, and water-quality analyses from 4 surface-water and 18 groundwater samples. The mineralogy of the sediment and rock samples was analyzed with X-ray diffraction, and the mineralogy and petrology of the rock samples were examined in thin sections. The water samples were analyzed for field parameters, major ions, silica, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, trace elements, tritium, and the stable isotope ratios of hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen. Groundwater geochemistry was influenced by reactions with rocks of the geologic terranes—carbonate rocks, rhyolite, basalt, evaporite deposits, and sediment comprised of all of these rocks. Agricultural practices near and south of Dubois and application of road anti-icing liquids on U.S. Interstate Highway 15 were likely sources of nitrate, chloride, calcium, and magnesium to groundwater. Groundwater geochemistry was successfully modeled in the alluvial aquifer in Camas Meadows and the ESRP fractured basalt aquifer using the geochemical modeling code PHREEQC. The primary geochemical processes appear to be precipitation or dissolution of calcite and dissolution of silicate minerals. Dissolution of evaporite minerals, associated with Pleistocene Lake

  15. Application of Nonlinear Analysis Methods for Identifying Relationships Between Microbial Community Structure and Groundwater Geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schryver, Jack C.; Brandt, Craig C.; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Palumbo, A V.; Peacock, Aaron D.; White, David C.; McKinley, James P.; Long, Philip E.

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between groundwater geochemistry and microbial community structure can be complex and difficult to assess. We applied nonlinear and generalized linear data analysis methods to relate microbial biomarkers (phospholipids fatty acids, PLFA) to groundwater geochemical characteristics at the Shiprock uranium mill tailings disposal site that is primarily contaminated by uranium, sulfate, and nitrate. First, predictive models were constructed using feedforward artificial neural networks (NN) to predict PLFA classes from geochemistry. To reduce the danger of overfitting, parsimonious NN architectures were selected based on pruning of hidden nodes and elimination of redundant predictor (geochemical) variables. The resulting NN models greatly outperformed the generalized linear models. Sensitivity analysis indicated that tritium, which was indicative of riverine influences, and uranium were important in predicting the distributions of the PLFA classes. In contrast, nitrate concentration and inorganic carbon were least important, and total ionic strength was of intermediate importance. Second, nonlinear principal components (NPC) were extracted from the PLFA data using a variant of the feedforward NN. The NPC grouped the samples according to similar geochemistry. PLFA indicators of Gram-negative bacteria and eukaryotes were associated with the groups of wells with lower levels of contamination. The more contaminated samples contained microbial communities that were predominated by terminally branched saturates and branched monounsaturates that are indicative of metal reducers, actinomycetes, and Gram-positive bacteria. These results indicate that the microbial community at the site is coupled to the geochemistry and knowledge of the geochemistry allows prediction of the community composition

  16. The Mojave Subsurface Bio-Geochemistry Explorer (MOSBE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, J.; Beegle, L.; Abbey, W.; Bhartia, R.; Kounaves, S.; Russell, M.; Towles, D.

    2012-01-01

    The MOSBE Team has developed a terrestrial field campaign to explore two subsurface biological habitats under the Mojave Desert. This field campaign will not only help us understand terrestrial desert biology, but also will develop methodologies and strategies for potential future Mars missions that would seek to explore the Martian subsurface. We have proposed to the ASTEP program to integrate a suite of field demonstrated instruments with a 20 m subsurface drill as a coherent unit, the Mojave Subsurface Bio-geochemistry Explorer. The ATK Space Modular Planetary Drill System (MPDS) requires no drilling fluid, which allows aseptic sampling, can penetrate lithic ground up to 20 meters of depth, and utilizes less than 100 Watts throughout the entire depth. The drill has been developed and demonstrated in field testing to a depth of 10 meters in Arizona, December 2002. In addition to caching a continuous core throughout the drilling depth, it also generates and caches cuttings and fines that are strata-graphically correlated with the core. As a core segment is brought to the surface, it will be analyzed for texture and structure by a color microscopic imager and for relevant chemistry and mineralogy with a UV fluorescence/Raman spectrometer. Organic and soluble ionic species will be identified through two instruments -- a microcapillary electrophoresis, and an ion trap mass spectrometer that have been developed under PIDDP, ASTID and MIDP funding.

  17. Growth of the continental crust: constraints from radiogenic isotope geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.N.

    1988-01-01

    Most models for evolution of continental crust are expressed in the form of a diagram illustrating the cumulative crustal mass (normalized relative to the present crustal mass) as a function of time. Thus, geochronological data inevitably play a major role in either constructing or testing crustal growth models. For all models, determining the start-time for effective crustal accretion is of vital importance. To this end, the continuing search for, and reliable characterization of, the most ancient crustal rock-units remains a worthy enterprise. Another important role for geochronology and radiogenic isotope geochemistry is to assess the status of major geological events as period either of new crust generation or of reworking of earlier formed continental crust. For age characterization of major geological provinces, using the critieria outined, the mass (or volume) of crust surviving to the present day should be determinable as a function of crust formation age. More recent developments, however, appear to set severe limitations on recycling of crust, at least by the process of sediment subduction. In modeling crustal growth without recycling, valuable constaints on growth rate variations through time can be provided if variations in the average age of the continental crust can be monitored through geological history. The question of the average age of the exposed continental crust was addressed by determining Sm-Nd crustal residence model ages (T-CR) for fine-grained sediment loads of many of the world's major rivers

  18. Geochemistry of long lived transuranic actinides and fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The IAEA initiated in 1987 a new Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on geochemistry of long lived transuranic actinides and fission products for a duration of 5 years. The framework of the CRP consists of three main components: (1) development of a working hypothesis with focus on laboratory studies; (2) testing of the working hypothesis with the focus on the field studies; and (3) transport modelling. The contents of this document reflect the results reported on by a number of Member States who participated in this Co-ordinated Research Programme which investigated the geochemical processes and mechanisms which affect rock-water interactions and migration of the chemical elements in geological media as scientific background in support of safety assessments of repositories for high level radioactive wastes. Studies conducted considered the migration of the long lived radionuclides of Tc, I, Np and Pu in both the near and far field. The programme investigated natural occurrences and geochemical processes and mechanisms which may affect migration of the chemical elements under consideration in geological media which may be used for disposal of radioactive wastes. 47 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab

  19. Effectively Using Groundwater Geochemistry Data: A GIS Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollinger, J.S.

    1998-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has accumulated a wealth of groundwater geochemistry data during the past two decades from a large network of monitoring wells. These data, archived in an Oracle database, have been accessible only in quarterly reports or a spreadsheet format. An ArcView extension has been developed to extract the data using a simple interface. The data are filtered, processed, and returned as an ArcView theme, permitting rapid analysis and evaluation of contaminated areas.Typically, these data must be analyzed by hydrostratigraphic unit to be useful. Unfortunately, a compendium of well screen-versus-aquifer relationships for groundwater monitoring wells at SRS has not been available, making the geochemical data difficult to use and analyze. Therefore, a 3-D hydrostratigraphic model has been developed in geographic information systems (GIS) and used in conjunction with well construction data to determine the location of well screen zones within the SRS vertical hydrostratigraphy. This information has been incorporated into the ArcView extension so that geochemical data can be analyzed and displayed in ArcView by hydrostratigraphic unit

  20. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2009-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeolimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteroic waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 56 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2014-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author)

  2. Stable isotope geochemistry: definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2015-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author).

  3. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2012-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 89 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2008-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeolimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteroic waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 56 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2009-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeolimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteroic waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 56 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2016-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author).

  7. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2013-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 91 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Uranium geochemistry and dating of Pacific island apatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roe, K K; Burnett, W C [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee (USA). Dept. of Oceanography

    1985-07-01

    Uranium-series disequilibrium dating of island phosphate deposits is evaluated in terms of known associated coral ages, uranium geochemistry, and stratigraphic sequences as well as the concordance between the geochronometers /sup 234/U//sup 238/U, /sup 230/Th//sup 234/U and /sup 226/Ra//sup 238/U. U(VI) is the predominant oxidation state of uranium in island phosphorites and by analogy to the youngest surficial deposits, most of the uranium initially bound is in the form of U(VI) sorbed by surfaces from seawater. Insular deposits contain more organic matter than even very young ocean floor samples and this leads to a greater probability of reduction of available recoil uranium than occurs in marine deposits. As a consequence, R(VI) <= R(T) <= R(VI), where R represents the /sup 234/U//sup 238/U activity ratio. This situation is completely opposite from that observed for marine-origin phosphorites. We determined that a fraction of U(VI) in ancient insular phosphorites is very labile and lost to alkaline carbonate solutions with a uranium activity ratio even more depleted in /sup 234/U than the bulk R(VI). The results are discussed.

  9. Noble gas geochemistry to monitor CO2 geological storages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafortune, St.

    2007-11-01

    According to the last IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) report, a probability of 90 % can be now established for the responsibility of the anthropogenic CO 2 emissions for the global climate change observed since the beginning of the 20. century. To reduce these emissions and keep producing energy from coal, oil or gas combustions, CO 2 could be stored in geological reservoirs like aquifers, coal beds, and depleted oil or gas fields. Storing CO 2 in geological formations implies to control the efficiency and to survey the integrity of the storages, in order to be able to detect the possible leaks as fast as possible. Here, we study the feasibility of a geochemical monitoring through noble gas geochemistry. We present (1) the development of a new analytical line, Garodiox, developed to extract quantitatively noble gas from water samples, (2) the testing of Garodiox on samples from a natural CO 2 storage analogue (Pavin lake, France) and (3) the results of a first field work on a natural CO 2 accumulation (Montmiral, France). The results we obtain and the conclusions we draw, highlight the interest of the geochemical monitoring we suggest. (author)

  10. Rock geochemistry related to mineralization processes in geothermal areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kausar, A. Al; Indarto, S.; Setiawan, I.

    2018-02-01

    Abundant geothermal systems in Indonesia suggest high heat and mass transfer associated with recent or paleovolcanic arcs. In the active geothermal system, the upflow of mixed fluid between late stage hydrothermal and meteoric water might contain mass of minerals associated with epithermal mineralisation process as exemplified at Lihir gold mine in Papua New Guinea. In Indonesia, there is a lack of study related to the precious metals occurrence within active geothermal area. Therefore, in this paper, we investigate the possibility of mineralization process in active geothermal area of Guci, Central Java by using geochemical analysis. There are a lot of conducted geochemical analysis of water, soil and gas by mapping the temperature, pH, Hg and CO2 distribution, and estimating subsurface temperature based on geothermometry approach. Then we also apply rock geochemistry to find minerals that indicate the presence of mineralization. The result from selected geothermal area shows the presence of pyrite and chalcopyrite minerals on the laharic breccias at Kali Putih, Sudikampir. Mineralization is formed within host rock and the veins are associated with gold polymetallic mineralization.

  11. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of Mesoproterozoic A-type granitoids from the Danish island of Bornholm, southern Fennoscandia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Åke; Waight, Tod Earle; Andersen, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Granitoids and gneisses from the Danish island of Bornholm have been investigated using whole rock geochemistry, Sr and Nd isotope geochemistry and Hf isotopes in zircon. Recent U–Pb dating shows that the rocks were formed during a short time interval at 1.45 to 1.46 Ga, penecontemporaneous...

  12. Petrogenesis of Miocene alkaline volcanic suites from western Bohemia. Whole rock geochemistry and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic signatures.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ulrych, Jaromír; Krmíček, Lukáš; Tomek, Č.; Lloyd, F. E.; Ladenberger, A.; Ackerman, Lukáš; Balogh, K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 1 (2016), s. 77-93 ISSN 0009-2819 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Bohemian Massif * Cenozoic alkaline volcanism * Geochemistry * K-Ar ages * Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 1.380, year: 2016

  13. Cold seeps in Monterey Bay, California: Geochemistry of pore waters and relationship to benthic foraminiferal calcite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieskes, Joris, E-mail: jgieskes@ucsd.edu [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, IOD-0208, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0208 (United States); Rathburn, Anthony E. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, IOD-0208, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0208 (United States)] [Indiana State University, Department of Earth and Environmental Systems, Terre Haute, IN 47809 (United States); Martin, Jonathan B. [University of Florida, Department of Geological Sciences, Gainesville, FL 32611-2120 (United States); Perez, M. Elena [Indiana State University, Department of Earth and Environmental Systems, Terre Haute, IN 47809 (United States)] [The Natural History Museum, Department of Palaeontology, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Mahn, Chris [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, IOD-0208, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0208 (United States); Bernhard, Joan M. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Geology and Geophysics Department, MS52, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Day, Shelley [University of Florida, Department of Geological Sciences, Gainesville, FL 32611-2120 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: > We describe the geochemistry of pore waters in the Clam Flats area of Monterey Bay. > The geochemical data are compared with the {delta}{sup 13}C chemistry of benthic foraminifera. > Living foraminifera indicate little effects of pore water low {delta}{sup 13}C (DIC) in the clam bed. > This phenomenon and its implications are discussed in detail. > Implications with regards to paleo-methane seepage are discussed. - Abstract: An extensive geochemical and biogeochemical examination of CH{sub 4} seeps in the Clam Flats area of Monterey Bay provides insight into the character of relationships between seep geochemistry and benthic foraminiferal geochemistry. The area is characterized by sulfide-rich fluids. Sulfide increases are associated with large increases in alkalinity, as well as small decreases in dissolved Ca and Mg. In addition, only small increases in NH{sub 4} are observed, but values of {delta}{sup 13}C of dissolved inorganic C are as low as -60 per mille at shallow depths (<3 cm). These observations indicate that all these processes are related to the bacterial oxidation of CH{sub 4}, which is transported upward by slow seepage of pore fluids. The geochemistry of the pore fluids should be relevant to the geochemistry of the carbonate tests of living and dead foraminifera. However, a profound disequilibrium of approximately an order of magnitude occurs between the {delta}{sup 13}C values of stained (cytoplasm-containing) foraminiferal carbonate and the C isotope values of ambient pore water dissolved inorganic C. Reasons are unclear for this isotopic disequilibrium, but have important implications for interpretations of foraminiferal carbonate as a paleoenvironmental proxy. Much fine scale work is needed to fully understand the relationships between the biogeochemistry of benthic foraminifera and the geochemistry of the pore waters where they live.

  14. Cold seeps in Monterey Bay, California: Geochemistry of pore waters and relationship to benthic foraminiferal calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieskes, Joris; Rathburn, Anthony E.; Martin, Jonathan B.; Perez, M. Elena; Mahn, Chris; Bernhard, Joan M.; Day, Shelley

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We describe the geochemistry of pore waters in the Clam Flats area of Monterey Bay. → The geochemical data are compared with the δ 13 C chemistry of benthic foraminifera. → Living foraminifera indicate little effects of pore water low δ 13 C (DIC) in the clam bed. → This phenomenon and its implications are discussed in detail. → Implications with regards to paleo-methane seepage are discussed. - Abstract: An extensive geochemical and biogeochemical examination of CH 4 seeps in the Clam Flats area of Monterey Bay provides insight into the character of relationships between seep geochemistry and benthic foraminiferal geochemistry. The area is characterized by sulfide-rich fluids. Sulfide increases are associated with large increases in alkalinity, as well as small decreases in dissolved Ca and Mg. In addition, only small increases in NH 4 are observed, but values of δ 13 C of dissolved inorganic C are as low as -60 per mille at shallow depths ( 4 , which is transported upward by slow seepage of pore fluids. The geochemistry of the pore fluids should be relevant to the geochemistry of the carbonate tests of living and dead foraminifera. However, a profound disequilibrium of approximately an order of magnitude occurs between the δ 13 C values of stained (cytoplasm-containing) foraminiferal carbonate and the C isotope values of ambient pore water dissolved inorganic C. Reasons are unclear for this isotopic disequilibrium, but have important implications for interpretations of foraminiferal carbonate as a paleoenvironmental proxy. Much fine scale work is needed to fully understand the relationships between the biogeochemistry of benthic foraminifera and the geochemistry of the pore waters where they live.

  15. SRP baseline hydrogeologic investigation: Aquifer characterization. Groundwater geochemistry of the Savannah River Site and vicinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, R.N.; Kaback, D.S.

    1992-03-31

    An investigation of the mineralogy and chemistry of the principal hydrogeologic units and the geochemistry of the water in the principal aquifers at Savannah River Site (SRS) was undertaken as part of the Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation. This investigation was conducted to provide background data for future site studies and reports and to provide a site-wide interpretation of the geology and geochemistry of the Coastal Plain Hydrostratigraphic province. Ground water samples were analyzed for major cations and anions, minor and trace elements, gross alpha and beta, tritium, stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon, and carbon-14. Sediments from the well borings were analyzed for mineralogy and major and minor elements.

  16. Geochemistry's vital contribution to solving water resource problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmunds, W.M.

    2009-01-01

    As part of the events celebrating 40 a of IAGC, it is fitting to trace the modern evolution and development of hydrogeochemistry. However, fascination with water quality can be traced back more than 2 ka. In the post-war years, hydrogeochemistry was influenced heavily by the advances in other disciplines including physical chemistry, metallurgy and oceanography. Hydrological applications of isotope science also developed rapidly at this time, and important advances in analytical chemistry allowed multi-element and trace element applications to be made. Experimental studies on equilibrium processes and reaction kinetics allowed bench-scale insight into water-rock interaction. Consolidation of knowledge on processes in groundwaters and the current awareness of hydrogeochemistry by water professionals owe much to the work of Robert Garrels, John Hem, and co-workers in the early 1960s. Studies of down-gradient evolution enabled a field-scale understanding of groundwater quality and geochemical processes as a function of residence time (dissolution and precipitation processes in carbonate and non-carbonate aquifers; redox processes; cation exchange and salinity origins). Emerging water resource and water quality issues in the 1960s and 70s permitted the application of hydrogeochemistry to contaminant and related problems and this trend continues. The impacts of diffuse pollution from intensive agriculture, waste disposal and point source pollution from urban and industrial sources relied on geochemistry to solve questions of origin and attenuation. In semi-arid regions facing water scarcity, geochemical approaches have been vital in the assessment of renewability and characterising palaeowaters. The protection and new incoming regulation of water resources will rely increasingly on a sound geochemical basis for management.

  17. Environmental geophysics and geochemistry for contamination mapping and monitoring 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tai Sup; Lee, Sang Kyu; Hong, Young Kook [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); and others

    1995-12-01

    This study aims to provide the technologies which can be practically used for contamination mapping and monitoring. To accomplish this goal, the geophysical and geochemical expertise and techniques commonly used in the mineral resources exploration are employed. In the first year of the three-year-long project, the purpose of the study is to introduce the optimum methodologies among the geophysical and geochemical techniques to tackle the various cases of environmental contamination. To achieve the purpose, case studies of the developed countries were surveyed and analyzed through the various kinds of literatures. The followings are categorized to be solved by geophysical methods: 1) delineation of water system pollution by acid mine drainage and distributions of waste rocks in the closed mine area, 2) defining boundaries of subsurface contamination due to oil seepage, 3) zoning of sea water intrusion in the seashore or subsurface geology highly containing salt, 4) locating of buried metallic wastes such as pipes and drums which can cause the secondary pollution by corrosion, and 5) outlining of the subsurface area polluted by leachate from the landfill. To experiment the above items, various geophysical methods were applied to the corresponding test sites. From these experiments, the applicabilities of the respective geophysical method were analyzed, and the optimum methods were derived for the various pollution types. Furthermore, electric and electromagnetic surveys data processing software were developed to quantitatively interpret and highly resolve the geology. The environmental assignments which can be solved by geochemical methods include: 1) drainage pollution by coal mine effluents, 2)subsurface contamination of oil-spill, 3) sea water intrusion, 4) dispersion of toxic heavy metallic elements in the metal mines, and 5) radon environmental geochemistry. The appropriate test sites for applying the geochemical methods were selected. (Abstract Truncated)

  18. Flipping my environmental geochemistry classroom using Team-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, E. M.

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies indicate that active learning disproportionately benefits STEM students from disadvantaged backgrounds and women in male-dominated fields (Lorenzo et al., 2006; Haak et al., 2011). Freeman et al. (2014) went so far as to suggest that increasing the number of STEM graduates could be done, at least in part, by "abandoning traditional lecturing in favor of active learning". Motivated in part by these previous studies and working at a Hispanic-Serving Institution, I decided to flip my environmental geochemistry course, using Team-Based Learning (TBL) - an instructional strategy for using active learning in small groups (Michaelsen et al., 1982). The course is taught over a 3 hour long class period (once a week) with a mix of upper division undergraduate and graduate students from environmental science, geology, engineering, chemistry, and biological sciences. One of the major learning outcomes of my course is that students "will be able to explain and discuss environmental geochemical data and its significance with their peers." This is practiced each class period throughout the course using TBL, where both undergraduate and graduate students learn from each other and uncover misconceptions. It is essentially one version of a flipped classroom where the students' experience changes from acquiring course content in the classroom to applying course content in the classroom in teams. I will share an overview of the teaching and learning strategy and my experience as well as examples of activities done in the classroom. Cited references: Freeman et al. (2014) PNAS 111: 8410-8415; Haak et al. (2011) Science 332: 1213-1216; Lorenzo et al. (2006) Am J Phys 74: 118-122; Michaelsen et al. (1982) Organ Behav Teaching 7: 13-22.

  19. Geochemistry and petrology of basaltic rocks from the Marshall Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alice S.; Schwab, William C.; Haggerty, Janet A.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of volcanic rock was recovered from the flanks of seamounts, guyots, atolls, and islands in the Ratak chain of the Marshall Islands on the U.S. Geological Survey cruise L9-84-CP. The main objective of this cruise was to study the distribution and composition of ferromanganese oxide crusts. Preliminary results of managanese crust composition are reported by Schwab et al. (1985) and detailed studies are in preparation (Schwab et al., 1986). A total of seven seafloor edifices were studied using 12 khz, 3.5 khz and air gun seismic reflection, chain dredge and box corer. Bathymetry and ship track lines are presented by Schwab and Bailey (1985). Of the seven edifices surveyed two support atolls (Majuro and Taongi) and one is a tiny island (Jemo). Dredge locations and water depths are given in Table 1 and dredge locations are shown in Figure 1. Due to equipment failures depths of dredge hauls were limited to shallow depth for all except the first two sites occupied. Recovery consisted mostly of young, poorly-consolidated limestone of fore-reef slope deposit and minor volcanogenic breccia and loose talus. The breccia and pieces of talus are thickly encrusted with ferromanganese oxide, whereas the young limestone is only coated by a thin layer. Four of the seven sites surveyed yielded volcanic rock. The volcanic rock, volumetrically a minor part of each dredge haul, consists mostly of lapilli and cobble-size clasts in a calcareous matrix or as loose talus. Most clasts show evidence of reworking, being sub- to well rounded, sometimes with a thin ferromanganese crust of their own. This paper reports preliminary findings on the petrology and geochemistry of volcanic rock recovered.

  20. Atmospheric turbulence triggers pronounced diel pattern in karst carbonate geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, M.; Serrano-Ortiz, P.; Kowalski, A. S.; Goddéris, Y.; Sánchez-Cañete, E. P.; Ciais, P.; Domingo, F.; Cuezva, S.; Sanchez-Moral, S.; Longdoz, B.; Yakir, D.; Van Grieken, R.; Schott, J.; Cardell, C.; Janssens, I. A.

    2013-07-01

    CO2 exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere is key to understanding the feedbacks between climate change and the land surface. In regions with carbonaceous parent material, CO2 exchange patterns occur that cannot be explained by biological processes, such as disproportionate outgassing during the daytime or nighttime CO2 uptake during periods when all vegetation is senescent. Neither of these phenomena can be attributed to carbonate weathering reactions, since their CO2 exchange rates are too small. Soil ventilation induced by high atmospheric turbulence is found to explain atypical CO2 exchange between carbonaceous systems and the atmosphere. However, by strongly altering subsurface CO2 concentrations, ventilation can be expected to influence carbonate weathering rates. By imposing ventilation-driven CO2 outgassing in a carbonate weathering model, we show here that carbonate geochemistry is accelerated and does play a surprisingly large role in the observed CO2 exchange pattern of a semi-arid ecosystem. We found that by rapidly depleting soil CO2 during the daytime, ventilation disturbs soil carbonate equilibria and therefore strongly magnifies daytime carbonate precipitation and associated CO2 production. At night, ventilation ceases and the depleted CO2 concentrations increase steadily. Dissolution of carbonate is now enhanced, which consumes CO2 and largely compensates for the enhanced daytime carbonate precipitation. This is why only a relatively small effect on global carbonate weathering rates is to be expected. On the short term, however, ventilation has a drastic effect on synoptic carbonate weathering rates, resulting in a pronounced diel pattern that exacerbates the non-biological behavior of soil-atmosphere CO2 exchanges in dry regions with carbonate soils.

  1. Mining inventory of Uruguay. Geochemistry prospection results about the aerial photography - Moirones and Alborada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeegers, H.; Spangenberg, J.

    1981-01-01

    This report show the geochemistry prospect ion strategy used to do the Mining inventory of Uruguay about the aerial photography of Moirones and Alborada.The samples obtained and its analysis was carried out in the Orleans laboratory.For that study was selected : anomaly Pb-Zn-Mo, one Zn-Ba, two anomalies Zn, two anomalies Be and one radiometric anomaly.

  2. Geochemistry and analysis of uranium - an overview; with special reference to geochemical exploration in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choong, W Y; Seevaratnam, S

    1981-01-01

    The paper presents discussions of the general chemistry of uranium, its abundance and occurrence, and the geochemistry applications to exploration of uranium in Malaysia in silts vs. water. Methods of analysis at the Geological Survey of Malaysia are fluorimetry for uranium analysis of ores and minerals.

  3. Rare earth element mineralogy and geochemistry in a laterite profile from Madagascar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Alfons; Janots, Emilie; Gnos, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    . The discovery of this new mineral demonstrates that a natural process exists that that can fractionate REE to such an extent to produce a pure gadolinium end-member mineral. An understanding of such a mechanisms is crucial for the REE geochemistry of low temperature alteration processes as well...

  4. Nuclear chemistry and geochemistry research. Carnegie Institute of Technology and Carnegie--Mellon University. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohman, T.P.

    1976-01-01

    A summary is presented of the activities and results of research in nuclear chemistry, nuclear geochemistry, nuclear cosmochemistry, and other minor areas from 1950 to 1976. A complete listing is given of publications, doctoral dissertations, and reports resulting from the research. A chronological list provides an overview of the activities at any particular time

  5. Re–Os geochemistry and geochronology of the Ransko gabbro–peridotite massif, Bohemian Massif

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ackerman, Lukáš; Pašava, J.; Erban, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 7 (2013), s. 799-804 ISSN 0026-4598 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-15390S Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Re–Os * geochronology * gabbro * Bohemian Massif * Ni–Cu mineralization Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 2.667, year: 2013

  6. Exploration and comparison of geothermal areas in Indonesia by fluid-rock geochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deon, F.; Barnhoorn, A.; Lievens, C.; Saptadij, N.; Sutopo, S.; van der Meer, F; den Hartog, T.; Brehmer, M; Bruhn, D.F.; de Jong, M; Ryannugroho, R.; Hutami, R.; Sule, R.; Hecker, C.; Bonté, D

    2016-01-01

    Indonesia with its large, but partially unexplored geothermal potential is one of the most interesting and suitable places in the world to conduct geothermal exploration research.
    This study focuses on geothermal exploration based on fluid-rock geochemistry/geomechanics and aims to compile an

  7. Proceedings of the 3. International symposium environmental geochemistry in tropical countries. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental papers are presented in these proceedings covering the following subjects: uranium mining and milling, geochemistry, land and water pollution, mineral wastes, iodine isotopes, gas chromatography, separation processes, environmental quality, qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis, rare earths, uranium isotopes, ground water, radionuclide migration, and sedimentary basins

  8. Nuclear chemistry and geochemistry research. Carnegie Institute of Technology and Carnegie--Mellon University. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohman, T.P.

    1976-05-28

    A summary is presented of the activities and results of research in nuclear chemistry, nuclear geochemistry, nuclear cosmochemistry, and other minor areas from 1950 to 1976. A complete listing is given of publications, doctoral dissertations, and reports resulting from the research. A chronological list provides an overview of the activities at any particular time. (JSR)

  9. Geochemistry of serpentinites in subduction zones: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Fabien; Godard, Marguerite; Guillot, Stéphane; Hattori, Kéiko

    2013-04-01

    Over the last decades, numerous studies have emphasized the role of serpentinites in the subduction zones geodynamics. Their presence and effective role in this environment is acknowledged notably by geophysical, geochemical and field observations of (paleo-) subduction zones. In this context, with the increasing amount of studies concerning serpentinites in subduction environments, a huge geochemical database was created. Here, we present a review of the geochemistry of serpentinites, based on the compilation of ~ 900 geochemical analyses of abyssal, mantle wedge and subducted serpentinites. The aim was to better understand the geochemical evolution of these rocks during their subduction history as well as their impact in the global geochemical cycle. When studying serpentinites, it is often a challenge to determine the nature of the protolith and their geological history before serpentinisation. The present-day (increasing) geochemical database for serpentinites indicates little to no mobility of incompatible elements at the scale of the hand-sample in most serpentinized peridotites. Thus, Rare Earth Elements (REE) distribution can be used to identify the initial protolith for abyssal and mantle wedge serpentinites, as well as magmatic processes such as melt/rock interactions taking place before serpentinisation. In the case of subducted serpentinites, the interpretation of trace element data is more difficult due to secondary enrichments independent of the nature of the protolith, notably in (L)REE. We propose that these enrichments reflect complex interactions probably not related to serpentinisation itself, but mostly to fluid/rock or sediment/rock interactions within the subduction channel, as well as intrinsic feature of the mantle protolith which could derive from the continental lithosphere exhumed at the ocean-continent transition. Additionally, during the last ten years, numerous studies have been carried out, notably using in situ approaches, to better

  10. The occurrence and geochemistry of arsenic in groundwaters of Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Lu, H.; Liu, T.

    2008-12-01

    Blackfoot disease caused by digesting water with high concentration (>0.3 mg/L) of arsenic from deep wells affected thousands of people in Chianan of Taiwan during 1930 to 1960. Drinking water with arsenic, even in a lower concentration (0.1-0.01 mg/L) increase risk of cancer that had been demonstrated by a number of studies on Taiwan. By concerning the effects of long-term chronic exposure to arsenic, the EPA of United States had revised the regulatory limit of arsenic for drinking water from 0.05 to 0.01 mg/L in 2006. Many researches have investigated on the occurrence and chemistry of the arsenic-contained groundwater and its health effects in Chianan of Taiwan. However, there are only a few studies on the other groundwater basins of Taiwan that providing about one third of water supplies for a population of 21 million. In this study, we investigate the occurrence and redox geochemistry of arsenic in nine major groundwater basins of Taiwan. The values and concentrations of pH, Eh, dissolved oxygen, nitrate, sulfate, iron, methane, sulfide, bicarbonate and ammonium in groundwaters were determined with a total of 610 monitoring wells in 2006. More than 60% of wells in the GW6 basin with a concentration of arsenic exceed 0.05 mg/L. The groundwaters in GW6 basin also have the highest average arsenic concentration. The exceeding percent (>0.05 mg/L) of wells for GW7, GW5, GW9 and GW8 basins are 30%, 20%, 18% and 8%, respectively. All of arsenic concentrations in groundwaters of GW1 to GW4 basins are lower than 0.05 mg/L, but some samples are higher than 0.01 mg/L. The exceeding percent of samples for arsenic 0.01 mg/L in GW3, GW1, GW2 and GW4 basins are 28%, 24%, 23% and 6%, respectively. Our results suggest that the concentrations of arsenic as well as iron in groundwaters of Taiwan were elevated by the iron-reducing process in aquifers. Samples, especially those with higher concentration of bicarbonate (> 400 mg/L) and oversaturated methane, mostly in the GW6 basin

  11. Microbial Geochemistry in Shallow-Sea Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, J. P.; Pichler, T.

    2006-12-01

    Shallow-sea hydrothermal systems are far more ubiquitous than generally recognized. Approximately 50-60 systems are currently known, occurring world-wide in areas of high heat flow, such as, volcanic island arcs, near-surface mid-ocean ridges, and intraplate oceanic volcanoes. In contrast to deep-sea systems, shallow- sea vent fluids generally include a meteoric component, they experience phase separation near the sediment- water interface, and they discharge into the photic zone (thermophilic bacteria and archaea. Perhaps because deep-sea smokers and continental hot springs are visually more stunning, shallow-sea systems are often overlooked study sites. We will discuss their particular features that afford unique opportunities in microbial geochemistry. Two of the better studied examples are at Vulcano Island (Italy) and Ambitle Island (Papua New Guinea). The vents and sediment seeps at Vulcano are the "type locality" for numerous cultured hyperthermophiles, including the bacteria Aquifex and Thermotoga, the crenarchaeon Pyrodictium, and the Euryarchaeota Archaeoglobus and Pyrococcus. Isotope-labeled incubation experiments of heated sediments and an array of culturing studies have shown that simple organic compounds are predominantly fermented or anaerobically respired with sulfate. 16S rRNA gene surveys, together with fluorescent in situ hybridization studies, demonstrated the dominance of key thermophilic bacteria and archaea (e.g., Aquificales, Thermotogales, Thermococcales, Archaeoglobales) in the sediments and the presence of a broad spectrum of mostly uncultured crenarchaeota in several vent waters, sediment samples, and geothermal wells. Thermodynamic modeling quantified potential energy yields from aerobic and anaerobic respiration reactions and fermentation reactions. In contrast to their deep-sea counterparts, shallow-sea hydrothermal systems are often characterized by high arsenic concentrations of more than 500-times seawater levels. The arsenic

  12. Organic Geochemistry of the Tohoku Tsunami Deposits of 2011 (Japan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reicherter, K. R.; Schwarzbauer, J.; Szczucinski, W.; Jaffe, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    Geochemical investigations on paleotsunami deposits have mainly focused on inorganic proxies. Organic geochemistry has been used to distinguish between terrestrial and marine matter within the sediments, reflecting the mixture and transport of marine and terrestrial matter. The approach using organic substances with indicative properties (anthropogenic and xenobiotic compounds) for recent tsunami deposits is novel, but the approach of using specific bio- and anthropogenic markers indicators to determine (pre)historic and recent processes and impacts already exists. The Tohoku-oki tsunami in March 2011 showed the huge threat that tsunamis pose to society and landscape, including flooding of coastal lowlands and erosion/deposition of sediments. The mainly sandy tsunamites reach more than 4.5 km inland as there were run-up heights of ca. 10 m in the Sendai plain near the Sendai airport. The destruction of infrastructure by wave action and flooding was accompanied by the release of environmental pollutants (e.g. fuels, fats, tarmac, plastics, heavy metals, etc.) contaminating the coastal areas and ocean over large areas. To detect and characterize this process, we analyzed several sedimentary archives from the Bay of Sendai area (by using the same sample material as Szczucinski et al., 2012 from rice paddies of the Sendai Plain, Japan). The layers representing the tsunami deposits have been compared with pre-tsunami samples (supposedly to be unaffected) by means of organic-geochemical analyses based on GC/MS. Natural compounds and their diagenetic transformation products have been tested as marker compounds and proxies. The relative composition of fatty acids, n-alkanes, sesquiterpenes and further substances pointed to significant variations before and after the tsunami event. Additionally, anthropogenic marker compounds (such as soil derived pesticides, source specific PAHs, halogenated aromatics from industrial sources) have been detected and quantified

  13. Calcium Isotope Geochemistry: Research Horizons and Nanoscale Fractionation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, J. M.; Depaolo, D. J.; Richter, F. M.; Fantle, M. S.; Simon, J. I.; Ryerson, F. J.; Ewing, S. A.; Turchyn, A. V.; Yang, W.; Owens, T. L.

    2008-12-01

    Interest in studies of calcium isotope variations in nature continues to increase. Investigations span human biology, plants and soils, oceanography and paleoclimate, early solar system processes, aqueous geochemistry, and silicate liquid structure. Variations in the 44Ca/40Ca ratio are generally small, about 5 ‰, but gradual small improvements in analytical capability now yield 0.05 to 0.1 ‰ resolution. The field is still plagued by a lack of universal standards for isotope ratios and data representation, but these are secondary issues. Traditional isotopic systems have been based in equilibrium thermodynamics, which can explain the magnitude and sign of observed mass-dependent fractionation behavior. For Ca isotopes this is not the case. There is still no reliable way to estimate the equilibrium free energy associated with isotopic exchange between most phases of interest. Experiments are difficult to interpret because it is almost impossible to precipitate minerals from aqueous solution at equilibrium at low temperature. Some studies suggest that, for example, there is no equilibrium isotopic fractionation between calcite and dissolved aqueous Ca. There is good evidence that most Ca isotopic fractionation is caused by kinetic effects. The details of the controlling processes are still missing, and without this mechanistic understanding it is difficult to fully understand the implications of natural isotopic variations. Recent work on dissolved Ca, calcite, and sulfates in both laboratory and natural settings is shedding light on where the fractionation may arise. There is emerging evidence for mass dependent fractionation associated with aqueous diffusion, but probably the primary source of the effects is in the details of precipitation of minerals from solution. This makes the fractionation potentially dependent on a number of factors, including solution composition and mineral growth rate. The next challenge is to develop appropriate experimental tests and

  14. Carbon-14 geochemistry at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Kimberly A.; Kaplan, Daniel I.

    2013-01-01

    various materials and could not be desorbed by anion exchanged with high concentrations of carbonate or nitrate. High phosphate concentrations were able to desorb 14 C-carbonate from the 36-year-old concrete sample, but not the clayey sediment sample. Together these geochemistry studies support the use of non-zero K d values in risk calculations on the SRS. For performance assessment (PA) calculations, 14 C would be moving with the groundwater, remaining in contact with sediment for days, not months. Therefore for purposes of SRS risk calculations, it is appropriate to select sorption values after a couple days of contact, departing from the traditional definition that states K d values reflect the system under steady state conditions. Such an ''apparent K d value,'' would be expected to provide a better (and more conservative) estimate of what to expect under SRS PA conditions. Based on these results, recommended apparent K d values for use in the PA are 1 mL/g for sandy sediments and 30 mL/g for clayey sediments

  15. Water geochemistry to estimate reservoir temperature of Stabio springs, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pera, Sebastian; Soma, Linda

    2017-04-01

    Elettrica Ticinese References Balderer, W., Leuenberger, F., Frei, C., Surbeck, H., & Synal, H. A. (2007). Origin of the Thermal Waters of Stabio (Switzerland) and Sirmione (Italy) based on Isotope and Chemical Investigations. In Symposium on advances in isotope hydrology and its role in sustainable water resources management; Vienna (Austria); 21-25 May 2007 (Vol. 39, pp. 631-641). IAEA. Bernoulli, D. (1964). Zur Geologie des Monte Generoso. Ein Beitrag zur Kenntnis der südalpinen Sedimente. Beiträge zur Geologischen Karte der Schweiz Karte Schweiz. N.F. 118. Greber, E., Leu, W., Schumacher, M. E., & Wyss, R. (1997). Hydrocarbon provinces in the Swiss Southern Alps-a gas geochemistry and basin modelling study Fsl. Marine and Petroleum Geology, 14(1), 3-25 IAEA. (1984). Isotopes Hydrology 1983. In Proc. Vienna Symposium 1984. Vienna: IAEA

  16. Petrology and geochemistry of the marbles and calcosilicated rocks from Ipira, Bahia - Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M.A.F.T. de.

    1976-01-01

    This work explains a study of marbles and diopsitites from Serra das Panelas, Ipira, Bahia, Brazil. Petrographic analysis, chemistry some elements, trace elements and rare earths, isotopic analysis of Strontium, carbon and oxigen, and geochronological determinations were done. The ages founded correspond to Transamazonic Orogenetic cicle, with Archean age, confirmed by the 18 O values found, which give to marble, ages about 2.500 my. The mineralogy and the texture give to marble an invulgar aspect, making a confusion with carbonate. The petrochemical data and the geochemistry of 13 C and 18 O isotopes showed that the marble and diopsitites was formed from the old marine carbonates. The geochemistry of rare earth suggests a strong correlation with carbonitic and alkaline rocks. An hybrid origem to this rocks is proposed. (C.D.G.) [pt

  17. Hydrocarbon Reservoir Identification in Volcanic Zone by using Magnetotelluric and Geochemistry Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firda, S. I.; Permadi, A. N.; Supriyanto; Suwardi, B. N.

    2018-03-01

    The resistivity of Magnetotelluric (MT) data show the resistivity mapping in the volcanic reservoir zone and the geochemistry information for confirm the reservoir and source rock formation. In this research, we used 132 data points divided with two line at exploration area. We used several steps to make the resistivity mapping. There are time series correction, crosspower correction, then inversion of Magnetotelluric (MT) data. Line-2 and line-3 show anomaly geological condition with Gabon fault. The geology structure from the resistivity mapping show the fault and the geological formation with the geological rock data mapping distribution. The geochemistry information show the maturity of source rock formation. According to core sample analysis information, we get the visual porosity for reservoir rock formation in several geological structure. Based on that, we make the geological modelling where the potential reservoir and the source rock around our interest area.

  18. Geochemistry of rare earths in main media of clay formation and sedimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnot-Courtois, C.

    1981-01-01

    This work aims i) at a better knowledge of rare earth behavior in surface conditions and ii) possible use of rare earth as a marker for argilaceous mineral genesis. Chemical properties of rare earths and geochemistry of these elements in main rocks are recalled. Rare earth behaviour during continental alteration process, experimental hydrolysis of various magmatic materials and rare earth geochemistry in argilaceous minerals in continental shelf are examined. Then some aspects of rare earth behaviour in oceans are studied: alteration of sea bed and hydrothermalism rare earth distribution in pelagic sediments red clays of deep seas and manganese nodules. In conclusion rare earth behaviour in sedimentary processes of the exogenous cycle is summarized [fr

  19. The geochemistry of high-level waste disposal in granitic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, N.A.; Sargent, F.P.

    1984-01-01

    Under the auspices of the cooperative agreement between Euratom and Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd about radioactive waste management and disposal, a joint workshop was held on the topic of the geochemistry of high-level waste disposal in granitic rocks. The report covers (1) waste form leaching, (2) thermodynamics, (3) geochemical models, (4) the role of colloids, (5) sorption phenomena, (6) the linking of flow and geochemical models, (7) microbial activity

  20. Geochemistry as a prospecting method for uranium in Nuclebras (Empresas Nucleares Brasileiras)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, N.M.

    1982-01-01

    The geochemical services useful to the uranium prospecting, mainly those refering to the geochemical exploration, are discussed. The application to the geochemical services in the uranium research adopted by Nuclebras is basically oriented by the goals to be reached in each survey. Geochemistry has been more applied to: a) identification of ore-bodies and zones; b) delimitation of ore bodies and c) establishment of geochemical models. (E.G.) [pt

  1. Proceedings of 1. international symposium on applied isotope geochemistry (AIG-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaberg, G.; Joergensen, E.B.

    1993-09-01

    The publication is a compilation of abstracts from the ''1. international symposium on applied isotope geochemistry (AIG-1)'' in Norway. The symposium was the first of its kind taking up different applications of most of the available isotopic systems and thus covered a wide range of topics from: 1) Water resources, hydrology, geomedicine and environmental problems, 2) Petroleum exploration and production, 3) Mineral exploration and 4) Analytical methods

  2. Advances in geochemistry during the last four decades: A personal perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galimov, Eric M.

    2009-01-01

    This is the author's speech at the meeting in Cologne (2007) to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the International Association of Geochemistry and Cosmochemistry, which the author served as the President in 2000 to 2004. The paper narrates the author's personal involvement in important scientific programs during the last 4 decades, including implementation of isotope techniques, oil-and-gas research, diamond research, deep-sea drilling, space research, molecular biology and the origin of life.

  3. Geochemistry of Coal Ash in the Equatorial Wet Disposal System Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Kolay P. K.; Singh H.

    2013-01-01

    The coal utilization in thermal power plants in Malaysia has increased significantly which produces an enormous amount of coal combustion by-product (CCBP) or coal ash and poses severe disposal problem. As each coal ash is distinct, this study presents the geochemistry of the coal ash, in particular fly ash, produced from the combustion of local coal from Kuching Sarawak, Malaysia. The geochemical composition of the ash showed a high amount of silica, alumina, iron oxides and alkalies which w...

  4. Geochemistry at the sulfate reduction-methanogenesis transition zone in an anoxic aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Rasmus; Cold, L.

    2007-01-01

    The study addresses a 10 m deep phreatic postglacial sandy aquifer of vertically varying lithology and horizontally varying infiltration water chemistry, displaying calcite dissolution, ion-exchange, and anaerobic redox processes. The simple variations in lithology and infiltration combine into a...... by implementing specific energy yields for the microbial redox processes, could explain most of the observed groundwater geochemistry as an expression of a closely coupled system of mineral equilibria and redox processes occurring at partial equilibrium....

  5. Preparation of peat samples for inorganic geochemistry used as palaeoenvironmental proxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Le Roux

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a brief review of protocols used in peat inorganic geochemistry. We emphasise the key issues that could lead to inter-comparison problems. For each section (drying, grinding, non-destructive analyses, acid digestions and destructive analyses, recommendations are provided to guide the reader through an idealised protocol, which is the only workable approach for studies incorporating long-term comparisons.

  6. The compact AMS facility at Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Sanyuan; Ding, Ping; Wang, Ning; Shen, Chengde; Jia, Guodong; Zhang, Gan

    2015-10-01

    A compact 14C AMS facility manufactured by the National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC) has been installed at Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (GIGCAS). The system is based on a Model 1.5SDH-1 Pelletron accelerator with a maximum terminal volt 0.6 MV. This paper reports the performance and the operation of this machine in the first several months after installation.

  7. The compact AMS facility at Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Sanyuan [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ding, Ping; Wang, Ning; Shen, Chengde [State Key Laboratory of Isotopic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Jia, Guodong [Key laboratory of Marginal Sea Geology, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhang, Gan [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2015-10-15

    A compact {sup 14}C AMS facility manufactured by the National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC) has been installed at Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (GIGCAS). The system is based on a Model 1.5SDH-1 Pelletron accelerator with a maximum terminal volt 0.6 MV. This paper reports the performance and the operation of this machine in the first several months after installation.

  8. Development of the near field geochemistry model; Desarrollo de un modelo geoquimico de campo proximo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcos, D.; Bruno, J.; Duro, L.; Grive, M.

    2000-07-01

    This report discusses in a quantitative manner the evolution of the near field geochemistry as a result of the interactions between two different introducing granitic groundwaters and the FEBEX bentonite as a buffer material. The two granitic groundwaters considered are: SR-5 water, sampled in a borehole at 500 m depth in Mina Ratones, and a mean composition of different granitic groundwaters from the iberian Massif. The steel canister has also been introduced by considering the iron corrosion in anoxic conditions. (Author)

  9. Contribution of the geology and geochemistry modelling to the petroleum industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissot, B.

    1993-01-01

    Evolution of modelling and model interpretation in the domain of geology, geophysics and geochemistry applied to petroleum industry, is first summarized. Hydrocarbon geological formation modelling is then presented in details with examples of kinetic models such as the discrete distribution and the Gaussian distribution based models, and the kerogene to petroleum process modelling. Petroleum basin modelling is also discussed with methods such as back-stripping, conductive thermal transfers, etc. 14 figs., 26 refs

  10. Geochemistry and petrology of pyroxenite xenoliths from Cenozoic alkaline basalts, Bohemian Massif

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ackerman, Lukáš; Špaček, Petr; Medaris Jr., G.; Hegner, E.; Svojtka, Martin; Ulrych, Jaromír

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 4 (2012), s. 199-219 ISSN 1802-6222 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA205/09/1170 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516; CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 ; RVO:67985530 Keywords : pyroxenite * xenolith * Cenozoic * basalt * Sr-Nd isotopes * geothermobarometry Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 0.804, year: 2012

  11. The Role of Geochemistry and Basin Modelling in the Exploration of Mature province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Petroleum geochemistry and basin modelling has been an important tool in the reduction of risks in poorly explored basins. Historically the role of geochemistry is usually reduced once production is established and often in mature province is nonexistent. However, attempts to add reserves in mature provinces require an expansion of exploration programs based on new play concepts. Consequently, there is a clear role for geochemistry and basin modelling as this revitalization occurs.These new basin modelling and geochemical programs are aimed at answering three questions: . Can the petroleum system be extended? . Is a change in hydrocarbon character to be expected? . How much hydrocarbon potential remains?Unlike frontier exploration a significant sample base is normally available that can be used to more effectively constrain interpretations. Such programs have clearly aided exploration in the Niger Delta. For example, the collection of an extensive piston core dataset in conjunction with a basin modelling program provided strong support for the Niger Delta's petroleum system extending into deep water areas. While the geochemical character of the oils established the presence of multiple effective generative systems, each of which has different source characteristics and often-different ages. This information constraints model construction and hydrocarbon volume estimates. Oil data also established the importance of phase segregation. The presence of fractionated oils and maturation modelling results provides evidence for deeper hydrocarbon potential within the geographic limits of established hydrocarbon pays

  12. Integrating microsatellite DNA markers and otolith geochemistry to assess population structure of European hake (Merluccius merluccius)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Susanne E.; Pérez, Montse; Presa, Pablo; Thorrold, Simon R.; Cabral, Henrique N.

    2014-04-01

    Population structure and natal origins of European hake were investigated using microsatellite DNA markers and otolith geochemistry data. Five microsatellites were sequenced and otolith core geochemical composition was determined from age-1 hake collected in the northeast Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. Microsatellites provided evidence of a major genetic split in the vicinity of the Strait of Gibraltar, separating the Atlantic and the Mediterranean populations, with the exception of the Gulf of Cádiz. Based on classification models using otolith core geochemical values, individual natal origins were identified, although with an increased error rate. Coupling genotype and otolith data increased the classification accuracy of individuals to their potential natal origins while providing evidence of movement between the northern and southern stock units in the Atlantic Ocean. Information obtained by the two natural markers on population structure of European hake was complementary as the two markers act at different spatio-temporal scales. Otolith geochemistry provides information over an ecological time frame and on a fine spatial scale, while microsatellite DNA markers report on gene flow over evolutionary time scales and therefore act on a broader spatio-temporal resolution. Thus, this study confirmed the value of otolith geochemistry to complement the assessment of early life stage dispersal in populations with high gene flow and low genetic divergence.

  13. Microbial diversity and impact on carbonate geochemistry across a changing geochemical gradient in a karst aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Cassie J; Engel, Annette S

    2013-02-01

    Although microbes are known to influence karst (carbonate) aquifer ecosystem-level processes, comparatively little information is available regarding the diversity of microbial activities that could influence water quality and geological modification. To assess microbial diversity in the context of aquifer geochemistry, we coupled 16S rRNA Sanger sequencing and 454 tag pyrosequencing to in situ microcosm experiments from wells that cross the transition from fresh to saline and sulfidic water in the Edwards Aquifer of central Texas, one of the largest karst aquifers in the United States. The distribution of microbial groups across the transition zone correlated with dissolved oxygen and sulfide concentration, and significant variations in community composition were explained by local carbonate geochemistry, specifically calcium concentration and alkalinity. The waters were supersaturated with respect to prevalent aquifer minerals, calcite and dolomite, but in situ microcosm experiments containing these minerals revealed significant mass loss from dissolution when colonized by microbes. Despite differences in cell density on the experimental surfaces, carbonate loss was greater from freshwater wells than saline, sulfidic wells. However, as cell density increased, which was correlated to and controlled by local geochemistry, dissolution rates decreased. Surface colonization by metabolically active cells promotes dissolution by creating local disequilibria between bulk aquifer fluids and mineral surfaces, but this also controls rates of karst aquifer modification. These results expand our understanding of microbial diversity in karst aquifers and emphasize the importance of evaluating active microbial processes that could affect carbonate weathering in the subsurface.

  14. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of the Feshark intrusion (NE Isfahan city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Kananian

    2017-11-01

    the southern margin of the North China Craton: Constraints from bulk-rock geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotopic composition. Lithos, 114(1-2: 186-199. Hofmann, A.W., Jochum, K.P., Seufert, M. and White, W.M., 1986. Nb and Pb in oceanic basalts: new constraints on mantle evolution. Earth and Planetary Science Letters ,79(1-2: 33-45. Kuster, D. and Harms, U., 1998. post – collisional potassic granitoids from the southern and northwestern parts of the late neoporterozoic East African Orogen: a review. Lithos. 45(1-4:177-195. Pearce, J.A., 1983. The role of sub-continental lithosphere in magma genesis at destructive plate margins. In: C.J. Hawkesworth and M.j. Norry (Editors, continental basalts and mantle xenoliths. Shiva Publications, Nantwhich, pp. 230-249. Middlemost, E.A.A. 1994. Naming materials in the magma/igneous rock system. Earth- Science Review. 37(3-4: 215–224. Pearce, J.A., Harris, N.B.W. and Tindle, A.G., 1984. Trace element discrimination diagrams for the tectonic interpretation of granitic rocks. Journal of Petrology, 25(4: 956 – 983. Rickwood, P.C., 1989. Boundary lines within petrologic diagrams which use of major and minor element. Lithos, 22(4: 247-263. Rudnick, R.L., Barth, M., Horn, I. and McDonough, W. F., 2000. Rutile-Bearing Refractory Eclogites: Missing Link Between Continents and Depleted Mantle. Science, 287(5451: 278-281. Shand, S.J., 1943. The Eruptive Rocks. 2nd edition. John Wiley, New York, 444 pp. Sun, S.S. and McDonough, W.F., 1989. Chemical and isotopic systematics of oceanic basalts: implications for mantle composition and processes. Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 42, pp. 313-345. Taylor, S.R. and McLennan, S.M., 1985. The continental crust: its compositions and evolution. Blackwell, Oxford, 312 pp.

  15. Merging metagenomics and geochemistry reveals environmental controls on biological diversity and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsop, Eric B; Boyd, Eric S; Raymond, Jason

    2014-05-28

    The metabolic strategies employed by microbes inhabiting natural systems are, in large part, dictated by the physical and geochemical properties of the environment. This study sheds light onto the complex relationship between biology and environmental geochemistry using forty-three metagenomes collected from geochemically diverse and globally distributed natural systems. It is widely hypothesized that many uncommonly measured geochemical parameters affect community dynamics and this study leverages the development and application of multidimensional biogeochemical metrics to study correlations between geochemistry and microbial ecology. Analysis techniques such as a Markov cluster-based measure of the evolutionary distance between whole communities and a principal component analysis (PCA) of the geochemical gradients between environments allows for the determination of correlations between microbial community dynamics and environmental geochemistry and provides insight into which geochemical parameters most strongly influence microbial biodiversity. By progressively building from samples taken along well defined geochemical gradients to samples widely dispersed in geochemical space this study reveals strong links between the extent of taxonomic and functional diversification of resident communities and environmental geochemistry and reveals temperature and pH as the primary factors that have shaped the evolution of these communities. Moreover, the inclusion of extensive geochemical data into analyses reveals new links between geochemical parameters (e.g. oxygen and trace element availability) and the distribution and taxonomic diversification of communities at the functional level. Further, an overall geochemical gradient (from multivariate analyses) between natural systems provides one of the most complete predictions of microbial taxonomic and functional composition. Clustering based on the frequency in which orthologous proteins occur among metagenomes

  16. Geochemistry and the understanding of ground-water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Pierre D.; Plummer, L. Niel

    2005-03-01

    Geochemistry has contributed significantly to the understanding of ground-water systems over the last 50 years. Historic advances include development of the hydrochemical facies concept, application of equilibrium theory, investigation of redox processes, and radiocarbon dating. Other hydrochemical concepts, tools, and techniques have helped elucidate mechanisms of flow and transport in ground-water systems, and have helped unlock an archive of paleoenvironmental information. Hydrochemical and isotopic information can be used to interpret the origin and mode of ground-water recharge, refine estimates of time scales of recharge and ground-water flow, decipher reactive processes, provide paleohydrological information, and calibrate ground-water flow models. Progress needs to be made in obtaining representative samples. Improvements are needed in the interpretation of the information obtained, and in the construction and interpretation of numerical models utilizing hydrochemical data. The best approach will ensure an optimized iterative process between field data collection and analysis, interpretation, and the application of forward, inverse, and statistical modeling tools. Advances are anticipated from microbiological investigations, the characterization of natural organics, isotopic fingerprinting, applications of dissolved gas measurements, and the fields of reaction kinetics and coupled processes. A thermodynamic perspective is offered that could facilitate the comparison and understanding of the multiple physical, chemical, and biological processes affecting ground-water systems. La géochimie a contribué de façon importante à la compréhension des systèmes d'eaux souterraines pendant les 50 dernières années. Les avancées ont portées sur le développement du concept des faciès hydrochimiques, sur l'application de la théorie des équilibres, l'étude des processus d'oxydoréduction, et sur la datation au radiocarbone. D'autres concepts, outils et

  17. Geochemistry of impact glasses and target rocks from the Zhamanshin impact structure, Kazakhstan: Implications for mixing of target and impactor matter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jonášová, Šárka; Ackerman, Lukáš; Žák, Karel; Skála, Roman; Ďurišová, Jana; Deutsch, A.; Magna, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 190, 1 October (2016), s. 239-264 ISSN 0016-7037 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-22351S Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : impact glass * irghizites * geochemistry * meteoritic component * siderophile elements * osmium isotopes * Zhamanshin Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 4.609, year: 2016

  18. Gallium and germanium geochemistry during magmatic fractionation and post-magmatic alteration in different types of granitoids: A case study from the Bohemian Massif (Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Breiter, Karel; Gardenová, N.; Kanický, V.; Vaculovič, T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 3 (2013), s. 171-180 ISSN 1335-0552 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP210/10/1309 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : gallium * geochemistry * germanium * granites * ICP -MS Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 0.835, year: 2013

  19. Geology and Geochemistry of the Poco de Fora region-Curaca river valley-Bahia-Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, M.C.H. de.

    1976-01-01

    In the Poco de Fora region level rocks of light metamorphism, from Caraiba group, corresponding to: - a meta-sedimentar sequence from Lower Pre-cambrian (Archean) - maphic-ultramaphic bodies with Fe and Cu sulphides of volcanogenic origin, and - sienitic ortho-gneiss. Geological, petrographic, geochemistry and geochronological studies were done. The sienitic-intrusion, from the upper crust, occur during the Archean-beginning of the Proterozoic. All the region was re-mobilized, and the sienitic was metamorphosed during Transamazonic Orogeny (2.200 to 1.800 m.y.). (C.D.G.) [pt

  20. Impact of Mina Ratones (Albala, Caceres) in surface and ground waters: hydro geochemistry modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Gonzalez, P.

    2002-01-01

    Weathering of rock materials, tailings and mine dumps produce acidic and metal-enriched waters that contaminate surface and groundwaters. The understanding and quantification of the environmental impact of the Ratones old uranium mine (Albala, Caceres) are the main objectives of this work. For this purpose, the hydro geochemistry around the mine has been studied based on a precise knowledge of the structure and hydrogeology of the zone. The hydrochemical study aims to establish the chemical phases that control the concentration of the possible contaminants of the groundwaters. (Author)

  1. Geochemistry of the Upper Parana River floodplain. Study of the Garcas Pond and Patos Pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcelo Bevilacqua Remor; Silvio Cesar Sampaio; Marcio Antonio Vilas Boas; Ralpho Rinaldo dos Reis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the temporal evolution of the supply of chemical elements to the Upper Parana River floodplain and identify trends in the geochemistry of its drainage basin. The primary factor that regulates the supply of chemical elements of the Upper Parana River floodplain is the flood pulse, which can be magnified by the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Garcas Pond is affected by agriculture, urbanization, discharge of industrial effluents and hydroelectric power production activities. Patos Pond is affected by sugarcane burning, gold mining, agriculture and urbanization. (author)

  2. Cold aqueous planetary geochemistry with FREZCHEM from modeling to the search for life at the limits

    CERN Document Server

    Marion, Giles M

    2007-01-01

    This book explicitly investigates issues of astrobiological relevance in the context of cold aqueous planetary geochemistry. At the core of the technical chapters is the FREZCHEM model, initially developed over many years by one of the authors to quantify aqueous electrolyte properties and chemical thermodynamics at subzero temperatures. FREZCHEM, of general relevance to biogeochemists and geochemical modelers, cold planetary scientists, physicochemists and chemical engineers, is subsequently applied to the exploration of biogeochemical applications to solar systems bodies in general, and to speculations about the limits for life in cold environments in particular.

  3. EMSL Geochemistry, Biogeochemistry and Subsurface Science-Science Theme Advisory Panel Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Gordon E.; Chaka, Anne; Shuh, David K.; Roden, Eric E.; Werth, Charles J.; Hess, Nancy J.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Baer, Donald R.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Bowden, Mark E.; Grate, Jay W.; Hoyt, David W.; Kuprat, Laura R.; Lea, Alan S.; Mueller, Karl T.; Oostrom, Martinus; Orr, Galya; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Plata, Charity; Robinson, E. W.; Teller, Raymond G.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Wang, Hongfei; Wiley, H. S.; Wilkins, Michael J.

    2011-08-01

    This report covers the topics of discussion and the recommendations of the panel members. On December 8 and 9, 2010, the Geochemistry, Biogeochemistry, and Subsurface Science (GBSS) Science Theme Advisory Panel (STAP) convened for a more in-depth exploration of the five Science Theme focus areas developed at a similar meeting held in 2009. The goal for the fiscal year (FY) 2011 meeting was to identify potential topical areas for science campaigns, necessary experimental development needs, and scientific members for potential research teams. After a review of the current science in each of the five focus areas, the 2010 STAP discussions successfully led to the identification of one well focused campaign idea in pore-scale modeling and five longer-term potential research campaign ideas that would likely require additional workshops to identify specific research thrusts. These five campaign areas can be grouped into two categories: (1) the application of advanced high-resolution, high mass accuracy experimental techniques to elucidate the interplay between geochemistry and microbial communities in terrestrial ecosystems and (2) coupled computation/experimental investigations of the electron transfer reactions either between mineral surfaces and outer membranes of microbial cells or between the outer and inner membranes of microbial cells.

  4. The contribution of microbial mats to the arsenic geochemistry of an ancient gold mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drewniak, Lukasz; Maryan, Natalia; Lewandowski, Wiktor; Kaczanowski, Szymon; Sklodowska, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    The ancient Zloty Stok (SW Poland) gold mine is such an environment, where different microbial communities, able to utilize inorganic arsenic species As(III) and As(V), are found. The purpose of the present study was to (i) estimate prokaryotic diversity in the microbial mats in bottom sediments of this gold mine, (ii) identify microorganisms that can metabolize arsenic, and (iii) estimate their potential role in the arsenic geochemistry of the mine and in the environment. The oxidation/reduction experiments showed that the microbial mat community may significantly contribute to arsenic contamination in groundwater. The presence of both arsenite oxidizing and dissimilatory arsenate reducing bacteria in the mat was confirmed by the detection of arsenite oxidase and dissimilatory arsenate reductase genes, respectively. This work also demonstrated that microorganisms utilizing other compounds that naturally co-occur with arsenic are present within the microbial mat community and may contribute to the arsenic geochemistry in the environment. - Highlights: ► The microbial mats from this ancient gold mine are highly diverse community. ► As(III) oxidizing and As(V) reducing bacteria are present in the mats. ► As redox transformations are linked to the metabolism of microbial mats bacteria. ► Microbial mats play a crucial role in the As biogeochemical cycle within the mine. - The microbial mats from this ancient gold mine can mediate oxidation/reduction reaction of arsenic and in this way may significantly contribute to arsenic contamination in groundwater.

  5. Environmental changes in the western Amazonia: morphological framework, geochemistry, palynology and radiocarbon dating data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horbe, Adriana M.C.; Behling, Hermann; Nogueira, Afonso C.R.; Mapes, Russell

    2011-01-01

    The sediments from the Coari lake, a 'terra firme' lake sculpted into Plio-Pleistocene deposits, and the Acara lake, a flooding-type lake developed on Quaternary sediments in the flood plain of the mid-Solimoes river, in the western Amazonia, Brazil, were studied to investigate the environmental condition of their developing. This study includes mineral composition, geochemistry, Pb isotope, palinology, radiocarbon-age and morphological framework of the lakes obtained from SRTM satellite images. The geological and the environmental conditions in the two lakes are highly variable and suggest that their evolution reflect autogenic processes under humid rain forest condition. Although kaolinite, quartz, muscovite, illite, and smectite are the main minerals in both lakes, the geochemistry indicates distinct source, the Acara lake sediments have higher concentrations of Al 2 O 3 , Fe 2 O 3 , Fe O, Ca O, K 2 O, Mg O, Na 2 O, P 2 O 5 , Ba, V, Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb, Sr, Li, Y and La and have more radiogenic Pb than the Coari lake sediments. The radiocarbon ages suggest that at 10160 yr BP the Coari lake started to be developed due to avulsion of the Solimoes river, and the Acara lake was formed by the meander abandonment of Solimoes river retaining its grass dominated shore at ca. 3710 yr BP. (author)

  6. Assessment of Muria geochemistry evolution and related to volcanic hazard to NPP site at Muria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basuki Wibowo; June Mellawati; Heni Susiati

    2011-01-01

    Study of geochemistry evolution aspect in Mt. Muria cycle to predict the level of volcanic hazards posed in the future on Muria nuclear power plant site was conducted. The purpose of the study was to determine the Muria geochemistry condition, tectonic patterns and to predict the level of volcanic hazard in the future on Muria nuclear power plant sites. The methodology used is the collection of secondary data on the complex geochemical conditions Muria volcanic in their life cycle, perform correlation geochemical cycle in its path towards conditions that most likely experienced tectonic, volcanic, and interpretation of the hazard posed. The study shows that geochemical conditions in Muria Volcano complex composed of potassium, low-yield product predicted high-temperature molten magma (decompression) and high potassium levels (compression). Pattern of tectonic decompression geochemical conditions associated with low potassium in Muria old, while the pattern of tectonic compression geochemical conditions associated with high potassium in young Muria. The level of volcanic hazard in the future indicated by the nature of non capable of Mt. Muria. (author)

  7. Geochemistry of bed and suspended sediment in the Mississippi river system: provenance versus weathering and winnowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, D Z; Ludington, Steve; Duval, J S; Taylor, H E

    2006-06-01

    Stream-bed sediment for the size fraction less than 150 microm, examined in 14,000 samples collected mostly from minor tributaries to the major rivers throughout the Mississippi River drainage system, is composed of 5 mineral fractions identified by factor analysis-Al-silicate minerals, quartz, calcite and dolomite, heavy minerals, and an Fe-Mn fraction. The Al-silicate fraction parallels its distribution in the regolith, emphasizing the local sediment source as a primary control to its distribution. Quartz and the heavy-mineral fraction, and associated trace elements, exhibit a complementary distribution to that of the Al-silicate fraction, with a level of enrichment in the bed sediment that is achieved through winnowing and sorting. The carbonate fraction has a distribution suggesting its dissolution during transport. Trace elements partitioned onto the Fe-Mn, possibly amorphous oxyhydride, fraction are introduced to the streams, in part, through human activity. Except for the heavy-mineral fraction, these fractions are identified in suspended sediment from the Mississippi River itself. Although comparison of the tributary bed sediment with the riverine suspended sediment is problematic, the geochemistry of the suspended sediment seems to corroborate the interpretation of the geochemistry of the bed sediment.

  8. Alteration of organic matter during infaunal polychaete gut passage and links to sediment organic geochemistry. Part I: Amino acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woulds, C.; Middelburg, J.J.; Cowie, G.L.

    2012-01-01

    Of the factors which control the quantity and composition of organic matter (OM) buried in marine sediments, the links between infaunal ingestion and gut passage and sediment geochemistry have received relatively little attention. This study aimed to use feeding experiments and novel isotope tracing

  9. Teaching Mineralogy, Petrology and Geochemistry in the 21st Century: Instructional Resources for Geoscience Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogk, D. W.; Beane, R. J.; Whitney, D. L.; Nicolaysen, K. E.; Panero, W. R.; Peck, W. H.

    2011-12-01

    Mineralogy, petrology and geochemistry (MPG) are pillars of the geoscience curriculum because of their relevance in interpreting Earth history and processes, application to geo-hazards, resources, and environmental issues, and contributions to emerging fields such as geology and human health. To keep faculty current in scientific advances in these fields, and in modern instructional methods, the On the Cutting Edge program convened a workshop at the University of Minnesota in August, 2011. This workshop builds on the previous 15 year's work that has been focused on identifying, aggregating, and developing high-quality collections of teaching activities and related resources, and in building a community of scholars in support of excellence in instruction in MPG courses. The goals of the workshop were to: a) develop an integrated, comprehensive and reviewed curriculum for MPG courses, and to seek ways to make connections with the larger geoscience curriculum; b) to explore emerging topics in MPG such as geobiology and climate change; c) demonstrate effective methods in teaching MPG in the context of Earth system science; d) share effective teaching activities and strategies for the classroom, laboratory and field including advances in pedagogy, assessments and research on learning; e) keep faculty current on recent advances in mineralogy, petrology and geochemistry research and to apply these findings to our teaching; f) explore and utilize current societal and global issues that intersect mineralogy, petrology and geochemistry to heighten the relevancy of course content for students; and h) meet colleagues and foster future teaching and research collaborations. A significant outcome of this workshop is a peer reviewed of collection of 300+ existing teaching activities, and a gap analysis to identify teaching activities needed to make these collections comprehensive and coherent. In addition, a series of thematic collections were developed to assist high priority

  10. Archean and proterozoic in the West-European Hercynian chain: isotopic geochemistry (Sr-Nd-Pb) and U-Pb geochronology on zircons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrot, C.

    1989-01-01

    The first part of this research thesis reports the study of isotopic (Sr-Nd-Pb) geochemistry and U-Pb geochronology on zircons in the immersed granulites of the Bay of Biscay: U-Pb geochronology on zircons, Nd isotopic geochemistry, Sr isotopic geochemistry, common Pb, Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd and rare earth data on minerals, comparison with other European granulites, comparison with West-Africa, study of Archean and proterozoic in the Hercynian chain. The second part reports the study of the U-Pb geochronology on zircon in the Cadomian, and the third part addresses the Sr-Nd isotopic geochemistry of some Cadomian granitoid, and the crust contamination in different regions [fr

  11. Highly siderophile element geochemistry of peridotites and pyroxenites from Horní Bory, Bohemian Massif: Implications for HSE behaviour in subduction-related upper mantle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ackerman, Lukáš; Pitcher, L.; Strnad, L.; Puchtel, I. S.; Jelínek, E.; Walker, R. J.; Rohovec, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 1 (2013), s. 158-175 ISSN 0016-7037 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB300130902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : alloy * high pressure * high temperature * igneous geochemistry * isotopic composition * mass balance * nappe * osmium isotope * peridotite * petrography * platinum group element * precipitation (chemistry) * pyroxenite * siderophile element * subduction * sulfide * upper mantle Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 4.250, year: 2013

  12. Elemental Geochemistry of Sedimentary Rocks at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, S. M.; Anderson, R. B.; Bell, J. F.; Bridges, J. C.; Calef, F.; Campbell, J. L.; Clark, B. C.; Clegg, S.; Conrad, P.; Cousin, A.; Des Marais, D. J.; Dromart, G.; Dyar, M. D.; Edgar, L. A.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Fabre, C.; Forni, O.; Gasnault, O.; Gellert, R.; Gordon, S.; Grant, J. A.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Gupta, S.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Hurowitz, J. A.; King, P. L.; Le Mouélic, S.; Leshin, L. A.; Léveillé, R.; Lewis, K. W.; Mangold, N.; Maurice, S.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Nachon, M.; Newsom, H. E.; Ollila, A. M.; Perrett, G. M.; Rice, M. S.; Schmidt, M. E.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Stack, K.; Stolper, E. M.; Sumner, D. Y.; Treiman, A. H.; VanBommel, S.; Vaniman, D. T.; Vasavada, A.; Wiens, R. C.; Yingst, R. A.; Kemppinen, Osku; Bridges, Nathan; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Minitti, Michelle; Cremers, David; Farmer, Jack; Godber, Austin; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Wellington, Danika; McEwan, Ian; Newman, Claire; Richardson, Mark; Charpentier, Antoine; Peret, Laurent; Blank, Jennifer; Weigle, Gerald; Li, Shuai; Milliken, Ralph; Robertson, Kevin; Sun, Vivian; Baker, Michael; Edwards, Christopher; Farley, Kenneth; Griffes, Jennifer; Miller, Hayden; Newcombe, Megan; Pilorget, Cedric; Siebach, Kirsten; Brunet, Claude; Hipkin, Victoria; Marchand, Geneviève; Sánchez, Pablo Sobrón; Favot, Laurent; Cody, George; Steele, Andrew; Flückiger, Lorenzo; Lees, David; Nefian, Ara; Martin, Mildred; Gailhanou, Marc; Westall, Frances; Israël, Guy; Agard, Christophe; Baroukh, Julien; Donny, Christophe; Gaboriaud, Alain; Guillemot, Philippe; Lafaille, Vivian; Lorigny, Eric; Paillet, Alexis; Pérez, René; Saccoccio, Muriel; Yana, Charles; Armiens-Aparicio, Carlos; Rodríguez, Javier Caride; Blázquez, Isaías Carrasco; Gómez, Felipe Gómez; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Hettrich, Sebastian; Malvitte, Alain Lepinette; Jiménez, Mercedes Marín; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Martín-Soler, Javier; Martín-Torres, F. Javier; Jurado, Antonio Molina; Mora-Sotomayor, Luis; Caro, Guillermo Muñoz; López, Sara Navarro; Peinado-González, Verónica; Pla-García, Jorge; Manfredi, José Antonio Rodriguez; Romeral-Planelló, Julio José; Fuentes, Sara Alejandra Sans; Martinez, Eduardo Sebastian; Redondo, Josefina Torres; Urqui-O'Callaghan, Roser; Mier, María-Paz Zorzano; Chipera, Steve; Lacour, Jean-Luc; Mauchien, Patrick; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Manning, Heidi; Fairén, Alberto; Hayes, Alexander; Joseph, Jonathan; Squyres, Steven; Sullivan, Robert; Thomas, Peter; Dupont, Audrey; Lundberg, Angela; Melikechi, Noureddine; Mezzacappa, Alissa; DeMarines, Julia; Grinspoon, David; Reitz, Günther; Prats, Benito; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Genzer, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti; Haukka, Harri; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kauhanen, Janne; Kemppinen, Osku; Paton, Mark; Polkko, Jouni; Schmidt, Walter; Siili, Tero; Wray, James; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Poitrasson, Franck; Patel, Kiran; Gorevan, Stephen; Indyk, Stephen; Paulsen, Gale; Bish, David; Schieber, Juergen; Gondet, Brigitte; Langevin, Yves; Geffroy, Claude; Baratoux, David; Berger, Gilles; Cros, Alain; d'Uston, Claude; Lasue, Jérémie; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Pallier, Etienne; Parot, Yann; Pinet, Patrick; Schröder, Susanne; Toplis, Mike; Lewin, Éric; Brunner, Will; Heydari, Ezat; Achilles, Cherie; Oehler, Dorothy; Sutter, Brad; Cabane, Michel; Coscia, David; Israël, Guy; Szopa, Cyril; Robert, François; Sautter, Violaine; Buch, Arnaud; Stalport, Fabien; Coll, Patrice; François, Pascaline; Raulin, François; Teinturier, Samuel; Cameron, James; DeLapp, Dorothea; Dingler, Robert; Jackson, Ryan Steele; Johnstone, Stephen; Lanza, Nina; Little, Cynthia; Nelson, Tony; Williams, Richard B.; Jones, Andrea; Kirkland, Laurel; Baker, Burt; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Davis, Scott; Duston, Brian; Edgett, Kenneth; Fay, Donald; Hardgrove, Craig; Harker, David; Herrera, Paul; Jensen, Elsa; Kennedy, Megan R.; Krezoski, Gillian; Krysak, Daniel; Lipkaman, Leslie; Malin, Michael; McCartney, Elaina; McNair, Sean; Nixon, Brian; Posiolova, Liliya; Ravine, Michael; Salamon, Andrew; Saper, Lee; Stoiber, Kevin; Supulver, Kimberley; Van Beek, Jason; Van Beek, Tessa; Zimdar, Robert; French, Katherine Louise; Iagnemma, Karl; Miller, Kristen; Summons, Roger; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter; Hviid, Stubbe; Johnson, Micah; Lefavor, Matthew; Lyness, Eric; Breves, Elly; Fassett, Caleb; Blake, David F.; Bristow, Thomas; Edwards, Laurence; Haberle, Robert; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Kahre, Melinda; Keely, Leslie; McKay, Christopher; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William; Choi, David; Dworkin, Jason P.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Floyd, Melissa; Freissinet, Caroline; Garvin, James; Glavin, Daniel; Harpold, Daniel; Jones, Andrea; Mahaffy, Paul; Martin, David K.; McAdam, Amy; Pavlov, Alexander; Raaen, Eric; Smith, Michael D.; Stern, Jennifer; Tan, Florence; Trainer, Melissa; Meyer, Michael; Posner, Arik; Voytek, Mary; Anderson, Robert C.; Aubrey, Andrew; Beegle, Luther W.; Behar, Alberto; Blaney, Diana; Brinza, David; Christensen, Lance; Crisp, Joy A.; DeFlores, Lauren; Ehlmann, Bethany; Feldman, Jason; Feldman, Sabrina; Flesch, Gregory; Jun, Insoo; Keymeulen, Didier; Maki, Justin; Mischna, Michael; Morookian, John Michael; Parker, Timothy; Pavri, Betina; Schoppers, Marcel; Sengstacken, Aaron; Simmonds, John J.; Spanovich, Nicole; Juarez, Manuel de la Torre; Webster, Christopher R.; Yen, Albert; Archer, Paul Douglas; Cucinotta, Francis; Jones, John H.; Niles, Paul; Rampe, Elizabeth; Nolan, Thomas; Fisk, Martin; Radziemski, Leon; Barraclough, Bruce; Bender, Steve; Berman, Daniel; Dobrea, Eldar Noe; Tokar, Robert; Williams, Rebecca M. E.; Cleghorn, Timothy; Huntress, Wesley; Manhès, Gérard; Hudgins, Judy; Olson, Timothy; Stewart, Noel; Sarrazin, Philippe; Vicenzi, Edward; Wilson, Sharon A.; Bullock, Mark; Ehresmann, Bent; Hamilton, Victoria; Hassler, Donald; Peterson, Joseph; Rafkin, Scot; Zeitlin, Cary; Fedosov, Fedor; Golovin, Dmitry; Karpushkina, Natalya; Kozyrev, Alexander; Litvak, Maxim; Malakhov, Alexey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Mokrousov, Maxim; Nikiforov, Sergey; Prokhorov, Vasily; Sanin, Anton; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Varenikov, Alexey; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Wolff, Michael; Botta, Oliver; Drake, Darrell; Bean, Keri; Lemmon, Mark; Lee, Ella Mae; Sucharski, Robert; Hernández, Miguel Ángel de Pablo; Ávalos, Juan José Blanco; Ramos, Miguel; Kim, Myung-Hee; Malespin, Charles; Plante, Ianik; Muller, Jan-Peter; Navarro-González, Rafael; Ewing, Ryan; Boynton, William; Downs, Robert; Fitzgibbon, Mike; Harshman, Karl; Morrison, Shaunna; Dietrich, William; Kortmann, Onno; Palucis, Marisa; Williams, Amy; Lugmair, Günter; Wilson, Michael A.; Rubin, David; Jakosky, Bruce; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Frydenvang, Jens; Jensen, Jaqueline Kløvgaard; Kinch, Kjartan; Koefoed, Asmus; Madsen, Morten Bo; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Boyd, Nick; Pradler, Irina; Jacob, Samantha; Owen, Tobias; Rowland, Scott; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Savijärvi, Hannu; Boehm, Eckart; Böttcher, Stephan; Burmeister, Sönke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; García, César Martín; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; McConnochie, Timothy; Benna, Mehdi; Franz, Heather; Bower, Hannah; Brunner, Anna; Blau, Hannah; Boucher, Thomas; Carmosino, Marco; Atreya, Sushil; Elliott, Harvey; Halleaux, Douglas; Rennó, Nilton; Wong, Michael; Pepin, Robert; Elliott, Beverley; Spray, John; Thompson, Lucy; Williams, Joshua; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Bentz, Jennifer; Nealson, Kenneth; Popa, Radu; Kah, Linda C.; Moersch, Jeffrey; Tate, Christopher; Day, Mackenzie; Kocurek, Gary; Hallet, Bernard; Sletten, Ronald; Francis, Raymond; McCullough, Emily; Cloutis, Ed; ten Kate, Inge Loes; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Arvidson, Raymond; Fraeman, Abigail; Scholes, Daniel; Slavney, Susan; Stein, Thomas; Ward, Jennifer; Berger, Jeffrey; Moores, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Sedimentary rocks examined by the Curiosity rover at Yellowknife Bay, Mars, were derived from sources that evolved from an approximately average martian crustal composition to one influenced by alkaline basalts. No evidence of chemical weathering is preserved, indicating arid, possibly cold, paleoclimates and rapid erosion and deposition. The absence of predicted geochemical variations indicates that magnetite and phyllosilicates formed by diagenesis under low-temperature, circumneutral pH, rock-dominated aqueous conditions. Analyses of diagenetic features (including concretions, raised ridges, and fractures) at high spatial resolution indicate that they are composed of iron- and halogen-rich components, magnesium-iron-chlorine-rich components, and hydrated calcium sulfates, respectively. Composition of a cross-cutting dike-like feature is consistent with sedimentary intrusion. The geochemistry of these sedimentary rocks provides further evidence for diverse depositional and diagenetic sedimentary environments during the early history of Mars.

  13. Geochemistry and source of iron-formation from Guanhaes group, Guanhaes district, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sad, J.H.G.; Chiodi Filho, C.; Magalhaes, J.M.M.; Carelos, P.M.

    1990-01-01

    The Guanhaes district is underlain by metavolcano-sedimentary rocks of the Guanhaes Group, emplaced over an older Archean basement and intruded by granitic bodies. The Guanhaes Group is composed of pelitic, mafic and ultramafic schists at the base; silicate and carbonate facies iron-formation, calcarious schists, calcsilicates rocks and quartzites at the median portion and para-gneisses (meta-graywacks) at the top. Geochemistry of iron-formation suggest a hydrothermal affinity comparable to the hydrothermal sediments flanking East Pacific Rise. Paragenetic studies indicates that the rocks were submited to two metamorphic processes: one of regional character (high-amphibolite facies) and one of themal character (pyroxene-hornfels facies). Chemical analysis, as X-ray and optic spectrography, atomic absorption and plasma spectrography are presented. (author)

  14. Genesis of hydrothermal alterations using stable isotope geochemistry in Takestan area (Tarom zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batool Taghipou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal alteration processes are extensively took place on volcanic and pyroclstics of Takestan area. Existence of abundant, deep fracturing and subvolcanic intrusions are enhanced extend hydrothermal alteration zones. The following alteration zones are determined: propylitic, argillic, advanced argillic and sillicic. There are outcropped and widespread in different size and limit. Formation of siliceous sinter, silicified tuffs with preserved primary sedimentary layering including pure mineralized alunite patches are most outstanding. Quartz, sussoritic plagioclase, chlorite, sericite and alunite are main mineral constituents in the volcanics. On the basis of geochemical data volcanic rocks are rhyolite, dacite, andesite, andesitic-basalt and basalt in composition. Acid-sulfate zone is the type of alteration in Tarom area and alunite is an index mineral of this zone. Results of 18O, D and 34S stable isotope geochemistry on altered minerals (muscovite, kaolinite and alunite, revealed that alteration fluids are magmatic in origin.

  15. A routine high-precision method for Lu-Hf isotope geochemistry and chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchett, P.J.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1981-01-01

    A method for chemical separation of Lu and Hf from rock, meteorite and mineral samples is described, together with a much improved mass spectrometric running technique for Hf. This allows (i) geo- and cosmochronology using the176Lu???176Hf+??- decay scheme, and (ii) geochemical studies of planetary processes in the earth and moon. Chemical yields for the three-stage ion-exchange column procedure average 90% for Hf. Chemical blanks are international mass spectrometric standard; suitable aliquots, prepared from a single batch of JMC 475, are available from Denver. Lu-Hf analyses of the standard rocks BCR-1 and JB-1 are given. The potential of the Lu-Hf method in isotope geochemistry is assessed. ?? 1980 Springer-Verlag.

  16. Facies discrimination in a mixed fluvio-eolian setting using elemental whole rock geochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Johan; Friis, Henrik; Stollhofen, Harald

    2007-01-01

    -eolian successions. The method is developed on the modern fluvio-eolian sediments from the Skeleton Coast dune field, Namibia. The examined sediments comprise eight different facies types; eolian dune sands, inter dune fluvial channel sands, intra erg mass flow deposits, intra erg hyperconcentrated flow deposits......, fluvial channel sands, fluvial mud, lacustrine heterolithic sand and lacustrine heterolithic mud. The contrasting provenance of the fluvial and eolian sediments results in a distinct source fingerprint which can be discriminated using elemental whole rock geochemistry. Multivariate statistical technique...... performed on the geochemical data has enabled discrimination of seven of the eight facies types. Furthermore, the facies discrimination method allowed a quantitative estimate of the degree of fluvial reworking of eolian sand. We believe that the method presented here, when calibrated to a reference well...

  17. Geochemistry of water in the Fort Union formation of the northern Powder River basin, southeastern Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Roger W.

    1981-01-01

    Shallow water in the coal-bearing Paleocene Fort Union Formation of southeastern Montana was investigated to provide a better understanding of its geochemistry. Springs, wells less than 200 feet deep, and wells greater than 200 feet deep were observed to have different water qualities. Overall, the ground water exists as two systems: a mosaic of shallow, chemically dynamic, and localized recharge-discharge cells superimposed on a deeper, chemically static regional system. Water chemistry is highly variable in the shallow system; whereas, waters containing sodium and bicarbonate characterize the deeper system. Within the shallow system, springs and wells less than 200 feet deep show predominantly sodium and sulfate enrichment processes from recharge to discharge. These processes are consistent with the observed aquifer mineralogy and aqueous chemistry. However, intermittent mixing with downward moving recharge waters or upward moving deeper waters, and bacterially catalyzed sulfate reduction, may cause apparent reversals in these processes.

  18. Organic geochemistry of petroleum seepages within the Jurassic Bencliff Grit, Osmington Mills, Dorset, UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, D.F.; Farrimond, P. [University of Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). Fossil Fuels and Environmental Geochemistry; Hindle, A.D. [Egdon Resources (UK) Ltd., Odiham (United Kingdom)

    2000-11-01

    Occurrences of oil within the Bencliff Grit at Osmington Mills were studied through an integration of organic geochemistry and a consideration of the geological setting. Oil-stained sandstones dominate the cliff outcrop with localized regions of particularly concentrated oil impregnation. A second 'live' seep of oil occurs where the Bencliff Grit beds pass below high tide level at Bran Point. Organic geochemical analyses showed both oils to be at least moderately biodegraded, with the oils in the cliff outcrop showing enrichment in polar constituents compared with the active seep. Multivariate statistical analysis of the molecular composition identified an enrichment in diasterane biomarkers in the oils of the live seep; this difference is ascribed to source and/or maturity differences. The oil within the outcrop is considered to represent the residual staining of an unroofed oil field, whilst the live seepage at Bran Point represents a migration pathway towards the eroded anticline. (Author)

  19. Geological controls on soil parent material geochemistry along a northern Manitoba-North Dakota transect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    As a pilot study for mapping the geochemistry of North American soils, samples were collected along two continental transects extending east–west from Virginia to California, and north–south from northern Manitoba to the US–Mexican border and subjected to geochemical and mineralogical analyses. For the northern Manitoba–North Dakota segment of the north–south transect, X-ray diffraction analysis and bivariate relations indicate that geochemical properties of soil parent materials may be interpreted in terms of minerals derived from Shield and clastic sedimentary bedrock, and carbonate sedimentary bedrock terranes. The elements Cu, Zn, Ni, Cr and Ti occur primarily in silicate minerals decomposed by aqua regia, likely phyllosilicates, that preferentially concentrate in clay-sized fractions; Cr and Ti also occur in minerals decomposed only by stronger acid. Physical glacial processes affecting the distribution and concentration of carbonate minerals are significant controls on the variation of trace metal background concentrations.

  20. Geological controls on soil parent material geochemistry along a northern Manitoba-North Dakota transect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klassen, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    As a pilot study for mapping the geochemistry of North American soils, samples were collected along two continental transects extending east-west from Virginia to California, and north-south from northern Manitoba to the US-Mexican border and subjected to geochemical and mineralogical analyses. For the northern Manitoba-North Dakota segment of the north-south transect, X-ray diffraction analysis and bivariate relations indicate that geochemical properties of soil parent materials may be interpreted in terms of minerals derived from Shield and clastic sedimentary bedrock, and carbonate sedimentary bedrock terranes. The elements Cu, Zn, Ni, Cr and Ti occur primarily in silicate minerals decomposed by aqua regia, likely phyllosilicates, that preferentially concentrate in clay-sized fractions; Cr and Ti also occur in minerals decomposed only by stronger acid. Physical glacial processes affecting the distribution and concentration of carbonate minerals are significant controls on the variation of trace metal background concentrations.

  1. Trace-element speciation and partitioning in environmental geochemistry and health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J.G.; Gibson, M.J.; Lovell, M.A.

    1983-09-01

    Establishment of the chemical form and associations of trace elements is important in the scientifc and medical fields related to environmental geochemistry and health. Fundamental understanding of trace-element behavior, the realistic formulation of historical perspectives of trace-element contamination, an assessment of environmental transformation processes and a thorough appraisal of environment-related ill health and disease all depend on knowledge of the chemical speciation and partitioning of trace elements. These topics and the development of analytical speciation techniques and procedures are discussed with reference to trace-element studies in the Department of Forensic Medicine and Science, University of Glasgow, on lacustrine sediments and water, the atmosphere, soil and street dirt of an urban environment, and human biological fluids. 206 references, 4 figures.

  2. Geochemistry of metavolcanic rocks in the Archean Greenstone Belt of Identidade, SE Para, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Zorano S.

    1995-01-01

    The paper discusses the geochemistry of the ultramafic and mafic volcanic rocks of the Identidade belt (IDB), in order to present hypothesis about their possible sources and magmatic evolution. The chemical data were obtained by ICP method. The analytical errors are less then 5% for major elements, less than 10% for the minor ones, and around 5% for trace elements. Save additional data from the meta ultramafic rocks of the Seringa belt, situated 100 km to the west of the IDB, were also considered. The XLFRAC program was employed for fractional crystallization modelling of major elements. For trace element modelling the equations of fractional crystallization and equilibrium partial melting were applied, using an unpublished program written in Pascal. 10 figs. 8 tabs

  3. Elemental geochemistry of sedimentary rocks at Yellowknife Bay, Gale crater, Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, S M; Anderson, R B; Bell, J F; Bridges, J C; Calef, F; Campbell, J L; Clark, B C; Clegg, S; Conrad, P; Cousin, A; Des Marais, D J; Dromart, G; Dyar, M D; Edgar, L A; Ehlmann, B L; Fabre, C; Forni, O; Gasnault, O; Gellert, R; Gordon, S; Grant, J A; Grotzinger, J P; Gupta, S; Herkenhoff, K E; Hurowitz, J A; King, P L; Le Mouélic, S; Leshin, L A; Léveillé, R; Lewis, K W; Mangold, N; Maurice, S; Ming, D W; Morris, R V; Nachon, M; Newsom, H E; Ollila, A M; Perrett, G M; Rice, M S; Schmidt, M E; Schwenzer, S P; Stack, K; Stolper, E M; Sumner, D Y; Treiman, A H; VanBommel, S; Vaniman, D T; Vasavada, A; Wiens, R C; Yingst, R A

    2014-01-24

    Sedimentary rocks examined by the Curiosity rover at Yellowknife Bay, Mars, were derived from sources that evolved from an approximately average martian crustal composition to one influenced by alkaline basalts. No evidence of chemical weathering is preserved, indicating arid, possibly cold, paleoclimates and rapid erosion and deposition. The absence of predicted geochemical variations indicates that magnetite and phyllosilicates formed by diagenesis under low-temperature, circumneutral pH, rock-dominated aqueous conditions. Analyses of diagenetic features (including concretions, raised ridges, and fractures) at high spatial resolution indicate that they are composed of iron- and halogen-rich components, magnesium-iron-chlorine-rich components, and hydrated calcium sulfates, respectively. Composition of a cross-cutting dike-like feature is consistent with sedimentary intrusion. The geochemistry of these sedimentary rocks provides further evidence for diverse depositional and diagenetic sedimentary environments during the early history of Mars.

  4. The application of INAA in a study of environment geochemistry on the Xizang (Tibet) Plateau, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junliang Tian; Puling Liu; Yaqi Li

    1993-01-01

    INAA as a routine analysis method has been used in a study of environment geochemistry on the Xizang (Tibet) Plateau in China, and 34 elements in soil samples were determined by INAA with both short and long irradiations. Some primary results from the study, including mean element concentrations in Tibetian soil, patterns of element distribution in soils developed from main types of parent materials on the plateau are described. The results confirm the expectation that soil formed in such cold and dry environment on the the plateau retained the main geochemical characteristics of the parent materials. However, the results still imply the possible migration of some elements in different bio-climatic environments during the soil formation. The elements in the top soils, mainly the alkalis and alkaline earths, and also As, Br, etc., were enriched or depleted in varying degrees in proportion to their abundance in the parent materials. (author) 9 refs.; 4 tabs

  5. The mineralogy and geochemistry of some of the iron-formations of Bushmanland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, T.Q.

    1986-01-01

    A great diversity of metasedimentary and metavolcanic rock types form inselbergs on the sandcovered plains of Bushmanland in the north-western Cape Province. Algoma-type iron-formation occurs as isolated units in the Proterozoic metasediments of Namaqualand and Bushmanland, varying in size and stratigraphical position. In many cases, the iron-formations are closely associated with base metal mineralization. Examples are the huge base metal deposits at Black Mountain, Gamsberg and Broken Hill in the Aggeneys area. The oxidation zones are expressed as black magnetite-rich outcrops which can in some cases be traced for as much as a kilometre. This study was undertaken to investigate the mineralogy and geochemistry of a selection of the iron-formations of Bushmanland. Some of the iron-formations, associated ferriferous metasediments and gossans contain a wide variety of secondary minerals. These minerals were examined by X-ray diffraction and analyses were obtained by means of an electron microprobe

  6. Isotope geochemistry of sulfur in forest soils and in new groundwater below forest soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, B.

    1993-04-01

    The isotope geochemistry of sulphur in aerobic forest soils and new groundwater below forest soils was investigated for the purpose of investigating the transport and transformation behaviour of sulfate in the water-unsaturated zone. The effects of hydrodynamic and biogeochemical processes on the development of seepage water sulfate isotopes between depositions and groundwater were investigated by means of laboratory experiments, profile studies, lysimeter experiments, and field studies in order to determine the sulphur conversion processes. Dissolved sulphur from precipitates, seepage water, creek water and groundwater, as well as sulphur extracted from soil samples, were precipitated in the form of BaSO 4 or AgS 2 , decomposed thermally into SO 2 or CO 2 , and the 34 S/ 32 S and 18 O/ 16 O isotope ratios were determined by mass spectrometry. (orig.) [de

  7. Baseline geochemistry of soil and bedrock Tshirege Member of the Bandelier Tuff at MDA-P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, R.G.; McDonald, E.V.; Ryti, R.T.

    1997-08-01

    This report provides baseline geochemistry for soils (including fill), and for bedrock within three specific areas that are planned for use in the remediation of Material Disposal Area P (MDA-P) at Technical Area 16 (TA-16). The baseline chemistry includes leachable element concentrations for both soils and bedrock and total element concentrations for all soil samples and for two selected bedrock samples. MDA-P operated from the early 1950s to 1984 as a landfill for rubble and debris generated by the burning of high explosives (HE) at the TA-16 Burning Ground, HE-contaminated equipment and material, barium nitrate sand, building materials, and trash. The aim of this report is to establish causes for recognizable chemical differences between the background and baseline data sets. In many cases, the authors conclude that recognizable differences represent natural enrichments. In other cases, differences are best attributed to analytical problems. But most importantly, the comparison of background and baseline geochemistry demonstrates significant contamination for several elements not only at the two remedial sites near the TA-16 Burning Ground, but also within the entire region of the background study. This contamination is highly localized very near to the surface in soil and fill, and probably also in bedrock; consequently, upper tolerance limits (UTLs) calculated as upper 95% confidence limits of the 95th percentile are of little value and thus are not provided. This report instead provides basic statistical summaries and graphical comparisons for background and baseline samples to guide strategies for remediation of the three sites to be used in the restoration of MDA-P

  8. The geology and geochemistry of some epigenetic uranium deposits near the Swakop River, South West Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hambleton-Jones, B.B.

    1983-10-01

    This study comprises a geological and geochemical investigation of the uranium deposits in the region near the Swakop River which extends from the Langer Heinrich Mountain in the east to the end of the Tumas River in the west. The general geology of the basement rocks in the Langer Heinrich region only is discussed. The general geology of the younger duricrust formations is discussed. Analytical methods were developed for the separation of thorium, protactinium and uranium from geological materials using various chromatographic procedures. Alpha spectrometry, neutron activation analysis and delayed neutron counting were the main techniques used. The occurrence of uranium in the region of study follows a unique geochemical cycle, and the geochemistry at each stage in the cycle was examined. The first stage in the uranium-geochemical cycle was the basement rocks. The second stage in the geochemical cycle of uranium was the subsurface water. The third stage in the geochemical cycle of uranium concerns its occurrence in the duricrust deposits. Isotopic disequilibrium measurements showed that uranium is still migrating, and that the age of the carnotite precipitation is 30 000 years, based on the open-system model of uranium migration. In the final stage of the geochemical cycle, the geochemistry of uranium in seawater and the diatomaceous muds is discussed. A classification system for the uranium deposits near the Swakop River, based on genetic relationships, is proposed and described in terms of the geochemical cycle of uranium, the mode of transport and mode of deposition. The relationships between the duricrust uranium deposits and the other uranium deposits of South Africa are compared

  9. Late Guadalupian evolution of the Delaware Basin: insights from stable isotope and trace element geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B.; Kerans, C.

    2017-12-01

    Accurate characterization of mixed carbonate and evaporite deposits requires an understanding of basin-scale physical, chemical, and biological processes. In these settings, carbonate geochemistry often responds to changes in the prevailing conditions in the water column. It follows that the geochemical record presents a potential aid for interpretation of depositional systems provided that it is relatively free of diagenetic overprint. This is seldom the case in shallow-water settings as processes such as meteoric diagenesis and early dolomitization obscure or erase the original geochemical signal. Fine grained deep-water sediments are more likely to retain their original geochemical characteristics. If reliable shelf-to-basin correlations can be established, then basinal deposits provide critical data not only for the interpretation of deep water environments, but overall basin evolution as well. This study examines variations in trace element and stable isotope geochemistry from the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico. Interpretation of geochemical data within a pre-existing shelf-to-basin stratigraphic framework suggests a link between basin water chemistry and sea level changes during the entirety of the Guadalupian. This link is supported analogies to modern silled basins where changes in sea level and thus recharge across the sill can control nutrient input, circulation, and bottom water oxygenation. In light of these relationships, the filling of the Delaware Basin with basin-centered evaporites at the end of the Guadalupian likely represents the culmination of a more gradual, cyclic evolution towards basin restriction. Ongoing work will continue to focus on tying regional-scale changes in basin water chemistry to the combined geochemical and physical sedimentological records.

  10. Major, trace and REE geochemistry of recent sediments from lower Catumbela River (Angola)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinha, Manuela; Silva, M. G.; Cabral Pinto, Marina M. S.; Carvalho, Paula Cristina S.

    2016-03-01

    The mineralogy, texture, major, trace and rare earth elements, from recent sediment samples collected in the lower Catumbela River, were analysed in this study to characterize and discuss the factors controlling its geochemistry and provide data that can be used as tracers of Catumbela River inputs to the Angolan continental shelf. The sediments are mainly sands and silty-sands, but sandy-silt also occurs and the mineralogy is composed of quartz, feldspar, phyllosilicates, magnetite, ilmenite and also carbonates when the river crosses limestones and marls in the downstream sector. The hydraulic sorting originates magnetite-ilmenite and REE-enriched minerals placers. The mineralogy of the sediments is controlled by the source rocks and the degree of chemical weathering is lower than erosion. The texture is mainly controlled by location. There is enrichment in all the analysed trace elements in the fine grained, clay minerals and Fe-oxy-hydroxides rich sediments, compared to the coarse grained and quartz plus feldspar rich ones. The coarse grained sediments (without the placers) are impoverished in ΣREE when compared with UCC and NASC compositions, while the fine grained sediments have ΣREE contents similar to UCC and NASC. The placers have ΣREE contents up to 959.59 mg/kg. The source composition is the dominant factor controlling the REE geochemistry of the analysed sediments as there is no difference in the (La/Yb)N, (La/Sm)N and (Gd/Yb)N ratios in coarse and fine grained sediments. The sorting of magnetite, ilmenite, zircon, throrite, thorianite, rutile and titanite explain the HREE/LREE enriched patterns of the coarse grained sediments.

  11. Reservoir Characterization using geostatistical and numerical modeling in GIS with noble gas geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, D. A.; Swift, J. N.; Tan, S.; Darrah, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    The integration of precise geochemical analyses with quantitative engineering modeling into an interactive GIS system allows for a sophisticated and efficient method of reservoir engineering and characterization. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is utilized as an advanced technique for oil field reservoir analysis by combining field engineering and geological/geochemical spatial datasets with the available systematic modeling and mapping methods to integrate the information into a spatially correlated first-hand approach in defining surface and subsurface characteristics. Three key methods of analysis include: 1) Geostatistical modeling to create a static and volumetric 3-dimensional representation of the geological body, 2) Numerical modeling to develop a dynamic and interactive 2-dimensional model of fluid flow across the reservoir and 3) Noble gas geochemistry to further define the physical conditions, components and history of the geologic system. Results thus far include using engineering algorithms for interpolating electrical well log properties across the field (spontaneous potential, resistivity) yielding a highly accurate and high-resolution 3D model of rock properties. Results so far also include using numerical finite difference methods (crank-nicholson) to solve for equations describing the distribution of pressure across field yielding a 2D simulation model of fluid flow across reservoir. Ongoing noble gas geochemistry results will also include determination of the source, thermal maturity and the extent/style of fluid migration (connectivity, continuity and directionality). Future work will include developing an inverse engineering algorithm to model for permeability, porosity and water saturation.This combination of new and efficient technological and analytical capabilities is geared to provide a better understanding of the field geology and hydrocarbon dynamics system with applications to determine the presence of hydrocarbon pay zones (or

  12. Geology, mineralogy and geochemistry of Ferezneh ferromanganese anomaly, east of Sangan mines complex, NE Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazi Mazhari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Ferezneh prospect area is one of the eastern anomalies of Khaf’s Sangan iron mine. The Sangan mines complex is located within the Khaf-Kashmar-Bardeskan volcano-plutonic and metallogenic belt in northeastern Iran. The Sangan mine is the largest Fe skarn in western Asia, having a proven reserve of over 1000 Mt iron ore @ 53% Fe (Golmohammadi et al., 2015 and consisting of three parts; western, central and eastern Sangan, each part including several anomalies. In this study, Ferezneh (North and West prospect area which is an eastern anomaly of the Sangan iron ore is discussed. Ferezneh anomaly is located in 60°36'7" - 60°34'27"E and 34°30'47" - 34°29'46"N, 35 km south of the city of Taybad, 10 km southeast of Karat and 1.5 km southwest of Ferezneh village. The purpose of this study was to prepare a geologic map for separation and identification of the intrusions, determining their relationships with mineralization, distinguishing the type of mineralization, mineralogy, petrology and geochemistry of the mineral deposits, and finally their relationship with other major Sangan’s deposits. Materials and methods In order to achieve the objectives of the study: 1- 140 thin sections of the intrusive rocks, marble limestone and dolomite, as well as 40 polished sections of ore were taken in an area of 9.5 km2. Mineralogy and mineralization studies were performed in the Economic Geology Laboratory of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. 2- A few samples were selected for X-ray diffraction analysis in order to ensure accuracy of mineralogical studies and were sent to Binalood Laboratory in Tehran. 3- In addition to major and minor elements geochemistry study of the ores, 10 samples were sent to East Amitis Laboratory in Mashhad for XRF analysis and also to Canada S.G.S Laboratory for ICP-MS analysis. Discussion and results Mineralization in the Ferezneh prospect area was limited to iron and manganese oxides in the form of massive and

  13. Petrography and geochemistry of iron formations of the Paleoproterozoic Koegas Subgroup, Transvaal Supergroup, Griqualand West, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    M.Sc. (Geology) Nel, B.P. (2013). Petrography and geochemistry of iron formations of the Paleoproterozoic Koegas Subgroup, Transvaal Supergroup, Griqualand West, South Africa. MSc thesis (unpublished), University of Johannesburg, Aucklandpark, pp. 133. The Early Paleoproterozoic Koegas Subgroup comprises a succession of siltstone, mudstone, iron-­‐formation, chert and carbonate rocks that overlies the iron-­‐formations of the Asbestos Hills Subgroup with sharp contact. It is overlain with ...

  14. Palaeomagnetism and geochemistry of Early Palaeozoic rocks of the Barrandian (Teplá-Barrandian Unit, Bohemian Massif):palaeotectonic implications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Patočka, František; Pruner, Petr; Štorch, Petr

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 28, 16/19 (2003), s. 735-749 ISSN 1474-7065 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK3012103; GA AV ČR IAA3013802; GA ČR GA205/99/0594 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3013912 Keywords : palaeomagnetism * siliclastic geochemistry * Barrandian Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.574, year: 2003

  15. Sulfur Geochemistry of a Lacustrine Record from Taiwan Reveals Enhanced Marine Aerosol Input during the Early Holocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaodong; Li, Dawei; Zheng, Liwei; Bao, Hongyan; Chen, Huei-Fen; Kao, Shuh-Ji

    2016-12-12

    Lacustrine record of marine aerosol input has rarely been documented. Here, we present the sulfur geochemistry during the last deglaciation and early Holocene of a sediment core retrieved from the Dongyuan Lake in southern Taiwan. An unusually high sulfur peak accompanying pyrite presence is observed at 10.5 ka BP. Such high sulfur content in lacustrine record is unusual. The δ 34 S of sulfur varied from +9.5 to + 17.1‰ with two significant positive shifts at 10.5 and 9.4 ka BP. The sources of sulfur and potential processes involving the sulfur isotope variation including bacterial sulfate reduction, volcanic emissions, in-catchment sulfide oxidation and marine aerosol input are discussed. Enhanced marine aerosol input is the most likely explanation for such sulfur peaks and δ 34 S shifts. The positive δ 34 S shifts appeared concurrently with the maximum landslide events over Taiwan resulted from enhanced typhoon activities. The synchronicity among records suggests that increased typhoon activities promoted sea spray, and consequently enhanced the marine aerosol input with 34 S-enriched sulfate. Our sulfur geochemistry data revealed sea spray history and marine influence onto terrestrial environment at coastal regions. Wider coverage of spatial-temporal lacustrine sulfur geochemistry record is needed to validate the applicability of sulfur proxy in paleoenvironmental research.

  16. Progress in 1988 1990 with computer applications in the ``hard-rock'' arena: Geochemistry, mineralogy, petrology, and volcanology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Nicholas M. S.

    This review covers rock, mineral and isotope geochemistry, mineralogy, igneous and metamorphic petrology, and volcanology. Crystallography, exploration geochemistry, and mineral exploration are excluded. Fairly extended comments on software availability, and on computerization of the publication process and of specimen collection indexes, may interest a wider audience. A proliferation of both published and commercial software in the past 3 years indicates increasing interest in what traditionally has been a rather reluctant sphere of geoscience computer activity. However, much of this software duplicates the same old functions (Harker and triangular plots, mineral recalculations, etc.). It usually is more efficient nowadays to use someone else's program, or to employ the command language in one of many general-purpose spreadsheet or statistical packages available, than to program a specialist operation from scratch in, say, FORTRAN. Greatest activity has been in mineralogy, where several journals specifically encourage publication of computer-related activities, and IMA and MSA Working Groups on microcomputers have been convened. In petrology and geochemistry, large national databases of rock and mineral analyses continue to multiply, whereas the international database IGBA grows slowly; some form of integration is necessary to make these disparate systems of lasting value to the global "hard-rock" community. Total merging or separate addressing via an intelligent "front-end" are both possibilities. In volcanology, the BBC's videodisk Volcanoes and the Smithsonian Institution's Global Volcanism Project use the most up-to-date computer technology in an exciting and innovative way, to promote public education.

  17. Groundwater denitrification in two agricultural river catchments: influence of hydro-geological setting and aquifer geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAleer, Eoin; Mellander, Per-Erik; Coxon, Catherine; Richards, Karl G.; Jahangir, Mohammad M. R.

    2015-04-01

    Identifying subsurface environments with a natural capacity for denitrification is important for improving agricultural management. At the catchment scale, a complex hierarchy of landscape, hydro-geological and physico-chemical characteristics combine to affect the distribution of groundwater nitrate (NO3-). This study was conducted along four instrumented hillslopes in two ca. 10km2 agricultural river catchments in Ireland, one dominated by arable and one by grassland agriculture. Both catchments are characterised by well drained soils, but have differing aquifer characteristics. The arable catchment is underlain by weathered Ordovician slate bedrock which is extensively fractured with depth. The grassland catchment is characterised by Devonian sandstone bedrock, exhibiting both lateral (from upslope to near stream) and vertical variations in permeability along each hillslope. The capacity for groundwater denitrification was assessed by examining the concentration and distribution patterns of N species (total nitrogen, nitrate, nitrite, ammonium), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved oxygen (DO) and redox potential (Eh) in monthly samples from shallow and deep groundwater piezometers (n=37). Additionally, the gaseous products of denitrification: nitrous oxide (N2O) and excess dinitrogen (excess N2) were measured seasonally using gas chromatography and membrane inlet mass spectroscopy, respectively. The slate catchment was characterised by uniformity, both laterally and vertically, in aquifer geochemistry and gaseous denitrification products. The four year spatial mean groundwater NO3--N concentration was 6.89 mg/l and exhibited low spatial and temporal variability (temporal SD: 1.19 mg/l, spatial SD: 1.185 mg/l). Elevated DO concentrations (mean: 9.75 mg/l) and positive Eh (mean: +176.5mV) at all sample horizons indicated a setting with little denitrification potential. This non-reducing environment was reflected in a low accumulation of denitrification

  18. Geochemistry and geobiology of a present-day serpentinization site in California: The Cedars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Penny L.; Kuenen, J. Gijs; Johnson, Orion J.; Suzuki, Shino; Rietze, Amanda; Sessions, Alex L.; Fogel, Marilyn L.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2013-05-01

    Ultra-basic (pH 11-12) reducing (-656 to -585 mV) groundwater springs discharging from serpentinized peridotite of The Cedars, CA, were investigated for their geochemistry and geobiology. The spring waters investigated were of meteoric origin; however, geochemical modeling suggests that there were two sources of groundwater, a shallow source with sufficient contact with The Cedars' peridotite body to be altered geochemically by serpentinization, and a deeper groundwater source that not only flows through the peridotite body but was also in contact with the marine sediments of the Franciscan Subduction Complex (FSC) below the peridotite body. We propose that the groundwater discharging from lower elevations (GPS1 and CS1) reflect the geochemistry of the deeper groundwater in contact with FSC, while groundwaters discharging from springs at higher elevations (NS1 and BSC) were a mixture of the shallow peridotite-only groundwater and the deeper groundwater that has been in contact with the FSC. Cell densities of suspended microbes within these waters were extremely low. In the NS1 and BSC spring fluids, cell densities ranged from 102 to 103 cells/ml, while suspended cells at GPS were lower than 10 cells/mL. However, glass slides incubated in the BSC and GPS1 springs for 2-3 weeks were colonized by cells with densities ranging from 106 to 107 cells/cm2 attached to their surfaces. All of the springs were very low (⩽1 μM) in several essential elements and electron acceptors (e.g. nitrate/ammonium, sulfate, and phosphate) required for (microbial) growth, which is not uncommon at sites of continental serpentinization. Gases rich in N2, H2, and CH4 were exsolving from the springs. The stable carbon isotope value (δ13CCH4 = -68 ± 0.6‰) and the CH4/C2+ (>103) of methane and other gaseous hydrocarbons exsolving from NS1 were typical of microbially sourced methane, whereas the isotope values and the CH4/C2+ of BSC and CS1 springs were more enriched in 13C and had CH4/C2

  19. Microbial ecology of two hot springs of Sikkim: Predominate population and geochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najar, Ishfaq Nabi; Sherpa, Mingma Thundu; Das, Sayak; Das, Saurav; Thakur, Nagendra

    2018-10-01

    Northeastern regions of India are known for their floral and faunal biodiversity. Especially the state of Sikkim lies in the eastern Himalayan ecological hotspot region. The state harbors many sulfur rich hot springs which have therapeutic and spiritual values. However, these hot springs are yet to be explored for their microbial ecology. The development of neo generation techniques such as metagenomics has provided an opportunity for inclusive study of microbial community of different environment. The present study describes the microbial diversity in two hot springs of Sikkim that is Polok and Borong with the assist of culture dependent and culture independent approaches. The culture independent techniques used in this study were next generation sequencing (NGS) and Phospholipid Fatty Acid Analysis (PLFA). Having relatively distinct geochemistry both the hot springs are thermophilic environments with the temperature range of 50-77 °C and pH range of 5-8. Metagenomic data revealed the dominance of bacteria over archaea. The most abundant phyla were Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes although other phyla were also present such as Acidobacteria, Nitrospirae, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Parcubacteria and Spirochaetes. The PLFA studies have shown the abundance of Gram Positive bacteria followed by Gram negative bacteria. The culture dependent technique was correlative with PLFA studies. Most abundant bacteria as isolated and identified were Gram-positive genus Geobacillus and Anoxybacillus. The genus Geobacillus has been reported for the first time in North-Eastern states of India. The Geobacillus species obtained from the concerned hot springs were Geobacillus toebii, Geobacillus lituanicus, Geobacillus Kaustophillus and the Anoxybacillus species includes Anoxybacillus gonensis and Anoxybacillus Caldiproteolyticus. The distribution of major genera and their statistical correlation analyses with the geochemistry of the springs predicted that the temperature, p

  20. Iodine and human health, the role of environmental geochemistry and diet, a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuge, Ron; Johnson, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    Iodine is an essential element in the human diet and a deficiency can lead to a number of health outcomes collectively termed iodine deficiency disorders (IDD). The geochemistry of iodine is dominated by its volatility with volatilisation of organo-iodine compounds and elemental iodine from biological and non-biological sources in the oceans being a major component of its global cycle. As a result of the dominant oceanic source, iodine is strongly enriched in near-coastal soils, however, the major zone of marine influence generally stretches to only 50–80 km inland and terrestrial sources of volatilised iodine, from wetlands, soils and plants are also an important aspect of its global geochemical cycle. Iodine in soils is strongly bound with transfer factors from soil to plants being generally small and as a consequence there is only limited uptake of iodine through the plant root system. It is likely that uptake of atmospheric iodine by the aerial parts of plants is an essential process and, along with iodine deposited on plant surfaces, is a major source for grazing animals. Human intake of iodine is mainly from food with some populations also obtaining appreciable quantities of iodine from drinking water. Plant-derived dietary iodine is generally insufficient as evidenced from the low dietary iodine of strict vegan diets. Seafood provides major iodine-rich dietary items but other inputs are mainly from adventitious sources, such as the use of iodised salt and from dairy produce, which is a rich source mainly due to cattle-feed being fortified with iodine, and to the use of iodine-containing sterilants in the dairy industry. While the distribution and geochemistry of iodine are reflected in the global distribution of IDD, the recent upsurge of IDD in developed countries would seem to reflect changes in diet. - Highlights: • Iodine is an ultra-trace element in the lithosphere. • Volatilisation from marine and terrestrial sources is vital in iodine's global

  1. Initial Results on the Mineralogy and Geochemistry of the Mar Exploration Rover Gusev Landing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, P. R.

    2004-05-01

    The Spirit rover has investigated the geochemistry and mineralogy of the Gusev crater site using in situ Alpha Proton X-Ray, Mossbauer, visible, and infrared spectroscopy. The Gusev site is covered with angular to sub-rounded rocks that are typically less than 1 m in maximum dimension. More than 90 percent of these rocks are dark-toned, with the remainder being lighter-toned rocks that may predominantly be dark rocks with a thin (10's of microns) coating of easily removed fines. APXS analysis has been obtained of a rock (Adirondack) following the removal by grinding of the surface dust and the upper few mm of the rock surface. These data give a modal mineralogy corresponding to olivine basalt. High quality Mini-TES data have not been obtained of a completely dust-free rock surface. The Mini-TES data of Adirondack do show long wavelength (15-25 microns) absorptions due to olivine of composition ~Fo60. All of the rocks observed are very compositionally homogeneous in the Mini-TES spectra. These findings are consistent with the detection of olivine-bearing basalt at this site from orbital TES infrared spectroscopy. Mossbauer spectra of Adirondack show the presence of forsteritic olivine and magnetite, with possible pyroxene. The soils at Gusev are a mixture of reddish fine-grained to sandy materials, granular-sized particles that occur in ripple forms, and minor pebbles. Mini-TES spectra of the soil show an excellent match to the TES spectra of high-albedo, fine-grained material found in regional bright regions that is interpreted to be windblown dust. This agreement suggests at least the uppermost layer of the soil at Gusev has been accumulated from airfall dust. By analogy with prior analysis of TES data these materials contain several percent carbonate, minor bound water, and a framework silicate interpreted to be either feldspar or zeolite. APXS spectra show similar oxide abundances to those determined for the Pathfinder site, except for higher MgO, and lower

  2. Gas geochemistry of the hot spring in the Litang fault zone, Southeast Tibetan Plateau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Xiaocheng; Liu, Lei; Chen, Zhi; Cui, Yueju; Du, Jianguo

    2017-01-01

    The southeast Tibetan Plateau is a region with high level seismic activity and strong hydrothermal activity. Several large (7.5 > M > 7) historical earthquakes have occurred in the Litang fault zone (LFZ), eastern Tibetan Plateau since 1700. Litang Ms 5.1 earthquake occurred On Sept 23, 2016, indicating the reactivation of the LFZ. This study was undertaken to elucidate spatial-temporal variations of the hot spring gas geochemistry along the LFZ from Jun 2010 to April 2016. The chemical components, He, Ne and C isotropic ratios of bubbling gas samples taken from 18 hot springs along LFZ were investigated. Helium isotope ratios ( 3 He/ 4 He) measured in hot springs varied from 0.06 to 0.93 Ra (Ra = air 3 He/ 4 He = 1.39 × 10 −6 ), with mantle-derivd He up to 11.1% in the LFZ (assuming R/Ra = 8 for mantle) indicated the fault was a crustal-scale feature that acts as a conduit for deep fluid from the mantle. CO 2 concentrations of the majority of hot spring gas samples were ≥80 vol%, CO 2 / 3 He ratios varied from 1.4 to 929.5 × 10 10 , and δ 13 C CO2 values varied from −19.2‰ to −2.3‰ (vs. PDB). The proportions of mantle-derived CO 2 varied from 0 to 1.8%. Crustal marine limestone was the major contributor (>75%) to the carbon inventory of the majority of hot spring gas samples. Before Litang Ms 5.1 earthquake, the 3 He/ 4 He ratios obviously increased in the Heni spring from May 2013 to Apr 2016. The geographical distribution of the mantle-derivd He decreased from east to west along 30°N in the southeast Tibetan Plateau relative to a corresponding increase in the radiogenic component. The gas geochemical data suggested that the upwelling mantle fluids into the crust play an important role in seismic activity in the strike-slip faults along 30°N in the southeast Tibetan Plateau. - Highlights: • Gas geochemistry of hot springs along Litang fault, Southeast Tibetan Plateau were surveyed. • Mantle-derived He decreased from east to

  3. Integrated modelling of enhanced in situ biodenitrification in a fractured aquifer: biogeochemistry and isotope geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Escales, Paula; Folch, Albert; van Breukelen, Boris M.; Vidal-Gavilan, Georgina; Soler, Albert

    2014-05-01

    Enhanced in-situ biodenitrification is a feasible technology to recovery groundwater polluted by nitrates and achieves drinking water standards. Under optimum conditions, nitrate is reduced by autochthonous bacteria trough different reactions until arrive to harmless dinitrogen gas. Isotopic fractionation monitoring in field applications allows knowing the exact degree and the real scope of this technology. Using the Rayleigh equation the change in the isotope ratio of the nitrate molecule (δ15N-NO3-, δ18O-NO3-) is related to the fraction of molecules remaining as a result of biodenitrification. However, Rayleigh application at field scale is sometimes limited due to other processes involved during groundwater flow such as dispersion or adsorption and geological media heterogeneities that interferes in concentration values. Then, include isotope fractionation processes in reactive transport models is a useful tool to interpret and predict data from in-situ biodenitrification. We developed a reactive transport model of enhanced in situ application at field scale in a fractured aquifer that considers biogeochemical processes as well as isotope fractionation to enable better monitoring and management of this technology. Processes considered were: microbiological- exogenous and endogenous nitrate and sulfate respiration coupled with microbial growth and decay, geochemical reactions (precipitation of calcite) and isotopic fractionation (δ15N-NO3-; δ18O- NO3- and carbon isotope network). The 2-D simulations at field scale were developed using PHAST code. Modeling of nitrate isotope geochemistry has allowed determining the extent of biodenitrification in model domain. We have quantified which is the importance in decreasing of nitrate concentrations due to biodegradation (percentage of biodegradation, 'B%') and due to dilution process (percentage of dilution, 'D%'). On the other hand, the stable carbon isotope geochemistry has been modeled. We have considered the

  4. Onondaga Lake: A Forsaken Superfund Site, or a Sampling Playground for Environmental Geochemistry Classes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmosky, C. C.; Harpp, K. S.

    2004-05-01

    Onondaga Lake, in Syracuse, NY, is described by the EPA as one of the most polluted lakes in the US. High levels of heavy metal and semi-volatile organic contamination provide an excellent case study that serves as the cornerstone for an environmental geochemistry course at Colgate University. Our course is designed to teach students basic environmental analysis skills including experimental design, sample preparation, analytical instrumentation operation, data processing and statistical analysis, and preparation of a collaborative scientific paper. Participating students generally have some background in environmental geology, but rarely more than one semester of chemistry. The Onondaga Lake project is the focus of the course for approximately half the semester. At the outset of the project, students are presented with a driving question that is answered through a series of guided field and lab investigations, such as an assessment of the environmental consequences of a proposed marina along the lakefront. The students' first task is to delve into the lake's environmental history, including identification of contaminants, location of point and non-point pollution sources, and clean-up efforts. Students then participate in 2 field trips to the site. First, students learn the geography of the lake system, collect sediment and water samples, and observe mitigation efforts at the wastewater treatment plant. The second trip is 2-3 weeks later, after students have assessed further sampling needs. Identification and quantification of organic compounds are accomplished by GC-MS, and heavy metal contents are determined by ICP-MS. Students compile their results, perform statistical analyses, and collaboratively draw their conclusions regarding the impact of the proposed project. The final product is a single report written by the entire class, an exercise in organization, cooperation, and planning that is usually the most challenging, but ultimately the most rewarding

  5. Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Microbiology of Molybdenum in Mining-Affected Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Frascoli

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum is an essential element for life, with growing production due to a constantly expanding variety of industrial applications. The potentially harmful effects of Mo on the environment, and on human and ecosystem health, require knowledge of Mo behavior in mining-affected environments. Mo is usually present in trace amounts in ore deposits, but mining exploitation can lead to wastes with very high Mo concentrations (up to 4000 mg/kg Mo for tailings, as well as soil, sediments and water contamination in surrounding areas. In mine wastes, molybdenum is liberated from sulfide mineral oxidation and can be sorbed onto secondary Fe(III-minerals surfaces (jarosite, schwertmannite, ferrihydrite at moderately acidic waters, or taken up in secondary minerals such as powellite and wulfenite at neutral to alkaline pH. To date, no Mo-metabolising bacteria have been isolated from mine wastes. However, laboratory and in-situ experiments in other types of contaminated land have suggested that several Mo-reducing and -oxidising bacteria may be involved in the cycling of Mo in and from mine wastes, with good potential for bioremediation. Overall, a general lack of data is highlighted, emphasizing the need for further research on the contamination, geochemistry, bio-availability and microbial cycling of Mo in mining-affected environments to improve environmental management and remediation actions.

  6. Geochemistry of the near surface sediments of the Nares Abyssal Plain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, M.S.N.; Colley, S.; Elderfield, H.; Kennedy, H.A.; Thomson, J.; Wilson, T.R.S.

    1983-01-01

    The geochemistry of a suite of box and 2m gravity cores from the Nares Abyssal Plain has been characterised by means of pore water analyses, XRF determination of major and trace element concentrations, mineralogy and 230 Thsub(excess) dating. The interstitial fluid environment of those deep-sea clays is mildly reducing, although one site exhibits manganese remobilisation and precipitation. Despite their marked colour differences, there is a similarity in clay mineralogy between the grey silt/clay turbidites and the brown clays found in the area. Sediment accumulation rates of pelagic brown clays range between 0.5 and 1.0 cm/10 3 yr. These pelagic brown clays are metal-rich relative to the grey clays, and a model is used to estimate the hydrogenous metal fluxes on the assumption that they are constant over the Plain. This model gives values of approx. 1300 μg/cm 2 /10 3 yr for Mn, approx. 2600 μg/cm 2 /10 3 yr for Fe and Co, Ni, Cu, V and Zn in the range 6 to 26 μg/cm 2 /10 3 yr. An associated model-derived estimate of the detrital contents of the same elements agrees well with the mean values of the grey clays and of average shale. Metal-poor brown clays and assorted minor lithologies are intermediate in composition between these two end-members. (author)

  7. Geochemistry of soil around a fluoride contaminated area in Nayagarh District, Orissa, India: factor analytical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, S; Panigrahi, M K; Kundu, N

    2005-09-01

    Fluoride contamination in soil was studied in the vicinity of a hot spring in Nayagarh district of Orissa. Both bulk soil from 0 to 30 cm depth and profile soils from 0 to 90 cm depth were analyzed for total fluoride (F(t)) and 0.01 M CaCl(2) extractable fluoride (F(ca)), major elements, pH, EC and Organic Carbon (OC). High concentrations of both F(t) and F(ca) were observed in the area surrounding the hot spring and the village of Singhpur. Principal factor analysis (PFA) on the parameters of the bulk soils suggests that two major chemical processes due to three factors, control the soil geochemistry of the area. Factor-1 contributes 37.11% of the total variance and is strongly loaded with Al, Si, Fe, F(t)and F(ca), and explains the fluoride enrichment of the soil, whereas the second and the third factors contribute 16.6 and 12.2%, respectively and explain the controlling process of carbonate precipitation and soil alkalinity. Multiple regression analysis of the scores of the factors was performed to derive a fluoride contamination index in soil. The magnitude of the factor effect on the contamination index follows the order of Factor-1 > Factor-2 > Factor-3. The spatial distribution of the contamination index is used to classify the area into highly contaminated, moderately contaminated and uncontaminated zones.

  8. Geochemistry and petrology of selected coal samples from Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, and Papua, Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkin, Harvey E.; Tewalt, Susan J. [U.S. Geological Survey, 956 National Center, Reston, VA 20192 (United States); Hower, James C. [University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, 2540 Research Park Drive, Lexington, KY 40511 (United States); Stucker, J.D. [University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, 2540 Research Park Drive, Lexington, KY 40511 (United States)]|[University of Kentucky Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); O' Keefe, J.M.K. [Morehead State University, Department of Physical Science, Morehead, KY 40351 (United States)

    2009-01-31

    Indonesia has become the world's largest exporter of thermal coal and is a major supplier to the Asian coal market, particularly as the People's Republic of China is now (2007) and perhaps may remain a net importer of coal. Indonesia has had a long history of coal production, mainly in Sumatra and Kalimantan, but only in the last two decades have government and commercial forces resulted in a remarkable coal boom. A recent assessment of Indonesian coal-bed methane (CBM) potential has motivated active CBM exploration. Most of the coal is Paleogene and Neogene, low to moderate rank and has low ash yield and sulfur (generally < 10 and < 1 wt.%, respectively). Active tectonic and igneous activity has resulted in significant rank increase in some coal basins. Eight coal samples are described that represent the major export and/or resource potential of Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, and Papua. Detailed geochemistry, including proximate and ultimate analysis, sulfur forms, and major, minor, and trace element determinations are presented. Organic petrology and vitrinite reflectance data reflect various precursor flora assemblages and rank variations, including sample composites from active igneous and tectonic areas. A comparison of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) elements abundance with world and US averages show that the Indonesian coals have low combustion pollution potential. (author)

  9. Geochemistry of aquatic and terrestrial sediments, Precambrian shield of southeastern Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornbrook, E H.W.; Kettles, I M; Shilts, W W

    1986-12-01

    Lake water and sediment samples from approximately 2200 lakes and glacial sediment (sub-solum) samples from about 1800 sites were collected throughout a 38,000 km/sup 2/ rectangular area extending from Georgian Bay east to the Ottawa and St. Lawrence Rivers, Ontario, Canada. Lake water alkalinity and pH patterns are similar to the distribution of carbonate components in glacial drift. Carbonate-rich drift derived from the Paleozoic limestone terrain on the northeast flank of the Precambrian Frontenac Arch has been dispersed in a south-westward direction across a variety of non-calcareous metasedimentary and igneous rocks of the Canadian Shield, providing a buffering capacity to lakes situated in granitic terrain. The distribution patterns of mobile trace and minor elements are influenced by geochemical processes associated with subaerial weathering, ground and surface water transport, and the geochemical environment within the lakes themselves. Although composition of the drift is generally reflected by lake geochemistry, these post depositional processes can cause significant variations between patterns derived from the two sample types. Anions and cations such as SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, Cl/sup -/, Na/sup +/, and F/sup -/ exhibit concentration patterns thought to reflect both anthropogenic inputs and natural variations due to differences in the geology. All regional geochemical patterns may show evidence of local enhancement caused by high concentrations of chemically distinctive minerals in drift or nearby bedrock. 4 references.

  10. Estimation of groundwater velocities from Yucca Flat to the Amargosa Desert using geochemistry and environmental isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershey, R.L.; Acheampong, S.Y.

    1997-06-01

    Geochemical and isotopic data from groundwater sampling locations can be used to estimate groundwater flow velocities for independent comparison to velocities calculated by other methods. The objective of this study was to calculate groundwater flow velocities using geochemistry and environmental isotopes from the southern end of Yucca Flat to the Amargosa Desert, considering mixing of different groundwater inputs from sources each and southeast of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The approach used to accomplish the objective of this study consisted of five steps: (1) reviewing and selecting locations where carbon isotopic groundwater analyses, reliable ionic analysis, and well completion information are available; (2) calculating chemical speciation with the computer code WATEQ4F (Ball and Nordstrom, 1991) to determine the saturation state of mineral phases for each ground water location; (3) grouping wells into reasonable flowpaths and mixing scenarios from different groundwater sources; (4) using the computer code NETPATH (Plummer et al., 1991) to simulate mixing and the possible chemical reactions along the flowpath, and to calculate the changes in carbon-13/carbon-12 isotopic ratios (δ 13 C) as a result of these reactions; and (5) using carbon-14 ( 14 C) data to calculate velocity

  11. Geochemistry research planning for the underground storage of high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apps, J.A.

    1983-09-01

    This report is a preliminary attempt to plan a comprehensive program of geochemistry research aimed at resolving problems connected with the underground storage of high-level nuclear waste. The problems and research needs were identified in a companion report to this one. The research needs were taken as a point of departure and developed into a series of proposed projects with estimated manpowers and durations. The scope of the proposed research is based on consideration of an underground repository as a multiple barrier system. However, the program logic and organization reflect conventional strategies for resolving technological problems. The projects were scheduled and the duration of the program, critical path projects and distribution of manpower determined for both full and minimal programs. The proposed research was then compared with ongoing research within DOE, NRC and elsewhere to identify omissions in current research. Various options were considered for altering the scope of the program, and hence its cost and effectiveness. Finally, recommendations were made for dealing with omissions and uncertainties arising from program implementation. 11 references, 6 figures, 4 tables

  12. Geochemistry of trace elements and REE in phosphate deposits of el Sibaiya west AREA, nile valley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, M.M.; Hussein, H.A.; Elkammar, A.A.; Mahdy, A.I.

    1994-01-01

    The present work deals essentially with the study of the geochemistry of trace elements and rare earth elements (REE s) patterns in the upper cretaceous phosphate deposit in El Sibaiya west area located on the western side of the River Nile. About 20 Km south from Esna town, upper Egypt. It was evident throughout this study that the average shale normalized pattern of six analyzed rare earth elements indicates that the phosphate deposits under study were deposited under marine environment. In addition some geochemical ratios such as Cl/Br and Na/Br have been proposed as indicators of the paleosalinity of the upper cretaceous tethys compared with the nowadays sea. Uranium equilibrium status of the studied phosphate deposits suggests a remarkably secondary enrichment at the lower horizon at the expense of the upper one due to downward leaching. Such secondary enrichment of uranium is thought to take place under oxidizing vadose conditions by the action of descending meteoric water. 6 fig., 4 tab

  13. Geochemistry and genesis of the Pegmatite Limoeiro (Virgem da Lapa-MG-Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves, J.M.C.; Soares, A.C.P.; Valle, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    The structure, mineralogy, geochemistry, and geological setting of the Pegmatite Limoeiro (Virgem da Lapa - MG) are presented. The country rock of this pegmatite is the Precambrian Macaubas quartz - biotite schist. The pegmatites of this region seem to be genetically related to the Coronel Murta granitoids which in the Streckeisen's diagram are scattered between granite and granodiorite. The structure of the Pegmatite Limoeiro is well displayed throught the quarring work and the following zones have been mapped: border zone, wall zone, intermediate zone, quartz core and the replacement bodies. A sample of twenty K,Na-feldspars specimens, collected according to the structure of the pegmatite, have been analysed for major elements and for Rb, Sr and Zr, using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Sequences of perthites from different zones, sampled all over the pegmatite, showed enrichment of Rb from the wall zone inward. This pattern supports the assumption that the studied pegmatite from Limoeiro crystallized in a restricted system from the contacts inward. The regional variation pattern of the ratios K/Rb and Rb/Ba seems to have metallogenetic implications as in other world pegmatite provinces. (Athor) [pt

  14. Trace elements geochemistry of fractured basement aquifer in southern Malawi: A case of Blantyre rural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapoma, Harold Wilson Tumwitike; Xie, Xianjun; Nyirenda, Mathews Tananga; Zhang, Liping; Kaonga, Chikumbusko Chiziwa; Mbewe, Rex

    2017-07-01

    In this study, twenty one (21) trace elements in the basement complex groundwater of Blantyre district, Malawi were analyzed. The majority of the analyzed trace elements in the water were within the standards set by World Health Organization (WHO) and Malawi Standards Board (MSB). But, iron (Fe) (BH16 and 21), manganese (Mn) (BH01) and selenium (Se) (BH02, 13, 18, 19 and 20) were higher than the WHO and MSB standards. Factor analysis (FA) revealed up to five significant factors which accounted for 87.4% of the variance. Factor 1, 2 and 3 suggest evaporite dissolution and silicate weathering processes while the fourth factor may explain carbonate dissolution and pH influence on trace element geochemistry of the studied groundwater samples. According to PHREEQC computed saturation indices, dissolution, precipitation and rock-water-interaction control the levels of trace elements in this aquifer. Elevated concentrations of Fe, Mn and Se in certain boreholes are due to the geology of the aquifer and probable redox status of groundwater. From PHREEQC speciation results, variations in trace element species were observed. Based on this study, boreholes need constant monitoring and assessment for human consumption to avoid health related issues.

  15. Alchemy in the underworld - recent progress and future potential of organic geochemistry applied to speleothems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, Alison

    2016-04-01

    Speleothems are well used archives for chemical records of terrestrial environmental change, and the integration of records from a range of isotopic, inorganic, and organic geochemical techniques offers significant power in reconstructing both changes in past climates and identifying the resultant response in the overlying terrestrial ecosystems. The use of organic geochemistry in this field offers the opportunity to recover new records of vegetation change (via biomarkers and compound specific isotopes), temperature change (via analysis of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers, a compound group derived from microbes and varying in structure in response to temperature and pH), and changes in soil microbial behaviour (via combined carbon isotope analysis). However, to date the use of organic geochemical techniques has been relatively limited, due to issues relating to sample size, concerns about contamination, and unanswered questions about the origins of the preserved organic matter and rates of transport. Here I will briefly review recent progress in the field, and present a framework for the future research needed to establish organic geochemical analysis in speleothems as a robust palaeo-proxy approach.

  16. Geochemistry of the alkaline volcanicsubvolcanic rocks of the Fernando de Noronha Archipelago, southern Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Peporine Lopes

    Full Text Available The Fernando de Noronha Archipelago presents, on its main island, a centrally-located stratigraphic unit, the Remédios Formation (age around 8 - 12 Ma constituted by basal pyroclastic rocks intruded by dikes, plugs and domes of varied igneous rocks, capped by flows and pyroclastics of mafic to ultramafic rocks of the Quixaba Formation (age around 1 - 3 Ma, which is limited from the underlying unit by an extensive irregular erosion surface. A predominant sodic Remédios series (basanites, tephrites, tephriphonolites, essexite, phonolites can be separated from a moderately potassic Remédios sequence (alkali basalts, trachyandesites, trachytes, both alkaline series showing mostly continuous geochemical trends in variation diagrams for major as well as trace elements, indicating evolution by crystal fractionation (mainly, separation of mafic minerals, including apatites and titanites. There are textural and mineralogical evidences pointing to hybrid origin of some intermediate rocks (e.g., resorbed pyroxene phenocrysts in basaltic trachyandesites, and in some lamprophyres. The primitive Quixaba rocks are mostly melanephelinites and basanites, primitive undersaturated sodic types. Geology (erosion surface, stratigraphy (two distinct units separated by a large time interval, petrography (varied Remédios Formation, more uniform Quixaba unit and geochemistry indicate that the islands represent the activity of a protracted volcanic episode, fueled by intermittent melting of an enriched mantle, not related to asthenospheric plume activity.

  17. Contaminant geochemistry. Interactions and transport in the subsurface environment. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkowitz, Brian; Dror, Ishai; Yaron, Bruno [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences

    2014-07-01

    In this updated and expanded second edition, new literature has been added on contaminant fate in the soil-subsurface environment. In particular, more data on the behavior of inorganic contaminants and on engineered nanomaterials were included, the latter comprising a group of ''emerging contaminants'' that may reach the soil and subsurface zones. New chapters are devoted to a new perspective of contaminant geochemistry, namely irreversible changes in pristine land and subsurface systems following chemical contamination. Two chapters were added on this topic, focusing attention on the impact of chemical contaminants on the matrix and properties of both liquid and solid phases of soil and subsurface domains. Contaminant impacts on irreversible changes occurring in groundwater are discussed and their irreversible changes on the porous medium solid phase are surveyed. In contrast to the geological time scale controlling natural changes of porous media liquid and solid phases, the time scale associated with chemical pollutant induced changes is far shorter and extends over a ''human lifetime scale''.

  18. The sedimentology, mineralogy and geochemistry of the Mooifontein deposit, Orange Free State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynard, H.J.; Jakob, W.R.O.; Le Roux, J.P.

    1982-08-01

    The sedimentology, mineralogy and geochemistry of the Mooifontein deposit, which is situated north-west of Edenburg, Orange Free State, has been investigated. The orebody is located stratigraphically in the Adelaide Subgroup of the Karoo Sequence. Palaeocurrent and geological sections afford a picture of a fan-shaped distributary system and together with features such as small-scale channeling, cyclical deposition and an upward coarsening cycle, suggest a lacustrine-delta model of formation. The rocks constituting the deposit are feldspathic greywackes and feldspathic silt- and mudstones and can be divided into five texturally distinguishable groups. The mineralised lenses of the Mooifontein deposit attain a thickness of 7 m which can be split into two or three zones. The average grade of 0,85 kg U 3 O 8 /t is lower than that of the southern Karoo deposits (1 kg U 3 O 8 /t). The shallow depth of the orebody makes it amenable to open-cast mining. Molybdenum concentrations in the deposit are too low to be of economic significance. The sediments have low copper, vanadium and arsenic contents and the above-average calcite content of 9% will result in high acid consumption should an acid leaching process be used for uranium recovery. Both calcite and fluorite are unrelated to the uranium mineralisation. The deposit as a whole appears to have been little affected by post-genetic processes with only minor redistribution of uranium and moderate oxidation of organic carbon and sulphides

  19. Research Coordination Network: Geothermal Biology and Geochemistry in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inskeep, W. P.; Young, M. J.; Jay, Z.

    2006-12-01

    The number and diversity of geothermal features in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) represent a fascinating array of high temperature geochemical environments that host a corresponding number of unique and potentially novel organisms in all of the three recognized domains of life: Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. The geothermal features of YNP have long been the subject of scientific inquiry, especially in the fields of microbiology, geochemistry, geothermal hydrology, microbial ecology, and population biology. However, there are no organized forums for scientists working in YNP geothermal areas to present research results, exchange ideas, discuss research priorities, and enhance synergism among research groups. The primary goal of the YNP Research Coordination Network (GEOTHERM) is to develop a more unified effort among scientists and resource agencies to characterize, describe, understand and inventory the diverse biota associated with geothermal habitats in YNP. The YNP RCN commenced in January 2005 as a collaborative effort among numerous university scientists, governmental agencies and private industry. The YNP RCN hosted a workshop in February 2006 to discuss research results and to form three working groups focused on (i) web-site and digital library content, (ii) metagenomics of thermophilic microbial communities and (iii) development of geochemical methods appropriate for geomicrobiological studies. The working groups represent one strategy for enhancing communication, collaboration and most importantly, productivity among the RCN participants. If you have an interest in the geomicrobiology of geothermal systems, please feel welcome to join and or participate in the YNP RCN.

  20. Chronology and geochemistry of late Holocene eolian deposits in the Brandon Sand Hills, Manitoba, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, S.A.; Muhs, D.R.; David, P.P.; McGeehin, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry and conventional radiocarbon age determinations of organic matter from paleosols indicate that the Brandon Sand Hills area of southern Manitoba has been subjected to recurrent intervals of eolian activity in the past 5000 years. Although precise regional correlations are precluded by dating uncertainties, periods of most notable paleosol development occurred around 2300 to 2000, 1400 to 1000, and 600 to 500 cal yr BP with eolian activity occurring before and after each of these periods. Episodes of eolian activity may correspond to periods of regional drought, whereas paleosols mark periods of increased moisture availability and stabilization by vegetation. The geochemistry of the eolian sands, paleosols and source sediments indicates that partial leaching of carbonates occurs from pedogenesis during humid climatic phases, and that this is probably the primary mechanism of carbonate depletion of eolian sands in this area. Recent trends in sand dune activity from historic aerial photography and early explorers' accounts indicate that the few active dunes that presently exist have stabilized at a rate of 10-20% per decade, despite several severe droughts in the 20th century. This may be attributed to pre-settlement droughts that were more severe than those in historic times although regional dune stabilization may also be related, in part, to the spread of forest cover in the past few hundred years. Crown copyright (C) 2000 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Site Wide Perspective on Uranium Geochemistry at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachara, John M.; Brown, Christopher F.; Christensen, J. N.; Davis, Jim A.; Dresel, P. Evan; Liu, Chongxuan; Kelly, S. D.; McKinley, James P.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Um, Wooyong

    2007-10-26

    Uranium (U) is an important risk-driving contaminant at the Hanford Site. Over 200,000 kg have been released to the vadose zone over the course of site operations, and a number of vadose zone and groundwater plumes containing the uranyl cation [UO22+, U(VI)] have been identified. U is recognized to be of moderate-to-high mobility, conditions dependent. The site is currently making decisions on several of these plumes with long-lasting implications, and others are soon to come. Uranium is one of nature’s most intriguing and chemically complex elements. The fate and transport of U(VI) has been studied over the long lifetime of the Hanford Site by various contractors, along with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and its collaborators. Significant research has more recently been contributed by the national scientific community with support from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Science through its Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD). This report represents a first attempt to integrate these findings into a cohesive view of the subsurface geochemistry of U at the Hanford Site. The objective is to inform all interested Hanford parties about the in-ground inventory of U and its geochemical behavior. This report also comments on the prospects for the development of a robust generic model to more accurately forecast future U(VI) migration at different Hanford waste sites, along with further research necessary to reach this goal.

  2. Determination of trace elements: Neutron-activation analysis in geochemistry and cosmochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolesov, G.M.

    1994-01-01

    Geochemistry, like cosmochemistry, open-quotes studies chemical elements hor-ellipsis of the crust and hor-ellipsis the Earth hor-ellipsis their history, their distribution hor-ellipsis their genetic hor-ellipsis connectionsclose quotes and is based on data on the abundance and distribution of elements obtained by various analytical methods. Neutron-activation analysis (NAA) plays a particular role in this respect. This is due to its high sensitivity (detection limit as small as 10 -14 g), which makes possible the use of samples of arbitrary mass, and also due to the possibility of obtaining information about composition without destruction of the object, conserving, if required, the unique material under investigation. Of the most interest are the data on the contents for a number of trace elements (at a level of 10 -7 - 10 -4 %), among which are rare-earth elements (REE), U, Th, Zr, Hf, Ta, W, Ga, Ni, Rb, Cs, platinum-group metals, Ag, Au, etc. These elements are considered as indicators of geochemical processes associated with the genesis and evolution of solar system bodies in early and more recent stages of evolution; they are also used to study processes and phenomena at zone boundaries: river-sea, ocean-atmosphere, and so on. The aim of this work is to show the capabilities of NAA in the determination of trace elements

  3. Petrology and geochemistry of Late Proterozoic hornblende gabbros from southeast of Fariman, Khorasan Razavi province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Masoud Homam

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Hornblende-bearing gabbroic rocks are quite common in subduction-related magmatic suites and considered to represent magmatic differentiation process in arc magmas (Heliker, 1995; Hickey-Vargas et al., 1995; Mandal and Ray, 2012. The presence of hornblende as an important mineral phase in gabbroic rocks of subduction zone has been considered either as an early crystallizing mineral from water-bearing mafic magmas (Beard and Borgia 1989; Mandal and Ray, 2012 or as a product of reaction of early crystallized minerals (olivine, pyroxene and plagioclase and water-rich evolved melt/aqueous fluid (Costa et al., 2002; Mandal and Ray, 2012. The careful study of petrology and geochemistry of hornblende-bearing gabbroic rocks from Chahak area, of Neoproterozoic age, can provide important information about their petrogenesis. Because of the special characteristics of Chahak hornblende gabbros according to their age and their situation in the main structural units of Iran, their study can present critical keys for the knowledge of geological history of Iran specially central Iran zone. Material and Methods This study carried out in two parts including field and laboratory works. Sampling and structural studies were carried out during field work. Geological map for the study area was also prepared. 65 thin and polished thin sections for petrographical purpose were studied. Major oxides, rare earth elements and trace elements were analyzed for 4 samples (92P-1, 92P-3, B1and B6 from hornblende gabbros on the basis of 4AB1 method using ICP-MS of ACME Laboratory from Canada. In addition, major oxides of three hornblende gabbro samples (89P-62, 89P-59 and 89P-46 were used from Partovifar (Partovifar, 2012. Results and discussion Fariman metamorphic terrains, of Proterozoic age, consist of metamorphosed sedimentary and igneous (plutonic and volcanic rocks. Hornblende gabbros of the study area include plagioclase, hornblende, biotite pyroxene and

  4. Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Economic Potential of a Pan-African Pegmatite from Wadi Huwar, Southwest Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saffarini, G.; Jarrar, G.

    2002-01-01

    The Wadi Huwar pegmatite (WHP) is hosted in a two-mice monzogranite (TMG). The host rock is a post-tectonic granitoid intrusion, belongs to the Rahma suite of the Aqaba complex and represents a late stage of the Pan-African orogeny. The emplacement of the pegmatite was controlled by the late Pan-African tectonics. The pegmatites and their host are mainly composed of quartz, alkali feldspar, Na-plagioclase, muscovite and biotite. Garnet and zircon are accessories in the monzogranite, whereas in the hosted pegmatites both minerals are abundant. Major, minor and trace element geochemistries indicate that the pegmatites and their host are peraluminous in nature and were intruded under a syn-collision tectonic regime. The mineralogical simplicity, decrease in abundance of ferromagnesian minerals in pegmatite and the sharp contacts with the host, as well as phase equilibria calculations using muscovite chemistry imply that the studied pegmatites might have crystallized during magma ascent to low crustal levels (2 Kbar and 550 deg C). Based on pegtrographic, geochemical and economic evaluation, the studied pegmatites were found to be unprofitable. (authors) 32., 9 figs., 6 tabs

  5. Trace-element geochemistry of coal resource development related to environmental quality and health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    This report assesses for decision makers and those involved in coal resource development the environmental and health impacts of trace-element effects arising from significant increases in the use of coal, unless unusual precautions are invoked. Increasing demands for energy and the pressing need for decreased dependence of the United States on imported oil require greater use of coal to meet the nation's energy needs during the next decade. If coal production and consumption are increased at a greatly accelerated rate, concern arises over the release, mobilization, transportation, distribution, and assimilation of certain trace elements, with possible adverse effects on the environment and human health. It is, therefore, important to understand their geochemical pathways from coal and rocks via air, water, and soil to plants, animals, and ultimately humans, and their relation to health and disease. To address this problem, the Panel on Trace Element Geochemistry of Coal Resource Development Related to Health (PECH) was established. Certain assumptions were made by the Panel to highlight the central issues of trace elements and health and to avoid unwarranted duplication of other studies. Based on the charge to the Panel and these assumptions, this report describes the amounts and distribution of trace elements related to the coal source; the various methods of coal extraction, preparation, transportation, and use; and the disposal or recycling of the remaining residues or wastes. The known or projected health effects are discussed at the end of each section.

  6. Impact of pine needle leachates from a mountain pine beetle infested watershed on groundwater geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryhoda, M.; Sitchler, A.; Dickenson, E.

    2013-12-01

    The mountain pine beetle (MPB) epidemic in the northwestern United States is a recent indicator of climate change; having an impact on the lodgepole pine forest ecosystem productivity. Pine needle color can be used to predict the stage of a MPB infestation, as they change color from a healthy green, to red, to gray as the tree dies. Physical processes including precipitation and snowfall can cause leaching of pine needles in all infestation stages. Understanding the evolution of leachate chemistry through the stages of MPB infestation will allow for better prediction of the impact of MPBs on groundwater geochemistry, including a potential increase in soil metal mobilization and potential increases in disinfection byproduct precursor compounds. This study uses batch experiments to determine the leachate chemistry of pine needles from trees in four stages of MPB infestation from Summit County, CO, a watershed currently experiencing the MPB epidemic. Each stage of pine needles undergoes four subsequent leach periods in temperature-controlled DI water. The subsequent leaching method adds to the experiment by determining how leachate chemistry of each stage changes in relation to contact time with water. The leachate is analyzed for total organic carbon. Individual organic compounds present in the leachate are analyzed by UV absorption spectra, fluorescence spectrometry, high-pressure liquid chromatography for organic acid analysis, and size exclusion chromatography. Leachate chemistry results will be used to create a numerical model simulating reactions of the leachate with soil as it flows through to groundwater during precipitation and snowfall events.

  7. Geochemistry and petrology of selected coal samples from Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, and Papua, Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkin, Harvey E.; Tewalt, Susan J.; Hower, James C.; Stucker, J.D.; O'Keefe, J.M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Indonesia has become the world's largest exporter of thermal coal and is a major supplier to the Asian coal market, particularly as the People's Republic of China is now (2007) and perhaps may remain a net importer of coal. Indonesia has had a long history of coal production, mainly in Sumatra and Kalimantan, but only in the last two decades have government and commercial forces resulted in a remarkable coal boom. A recent assessment of Indonesian coal-bed methane (CBM) potential has motivated active CBM exploration. Most of the coal is Paleogene and Neogene, low to moderate rank and has low ash yield and sulfur (generally < 10 and < 1 wt.%, respectively). Active tectonic and igneous activity has resulted in significant rank increase in some coal basins. Eight coal samples are described that represent the major export and/or resource potential of Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, and Papua. Detailed geochemistry, including proximate and ultimate analysis, sulfur forms, and major, minor, and trace element determinations are presented. Organic petrology and vitrinite reflectance data reflect various precursor flora assemblages and rank variations, including sample composites from active igneous and tectonic areas. A comparison of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) elements abundance with world and US averages show that the Indonesian coals have low combustion pollution potential. (author)

  8. Rare earth element geochemistry characteristics of seawater and porewater from deep sea in western Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yinan; Ren, Jiangbo; Guo, Qingjun; Cao, Jun; Wang, Haifeng; Liu, Chenhui

    2017-11-28

    Deep-sea sediments contain high concentrations of rare earth element (REE) which have been regarded as a huge potential resource. Understanding the marine REE cycle is important to reveal the mechanism of REE enrichment. In order to determine the geochemistry characteristics and migration processes of REE, seawater, porewater and sediment samples were systematically collected from the western Pacific for REE analysis. The results show a relatively flat REE pattern and the HREE (Heavy REE) enrichment in surface and deep seawater respectively. The HREE enrichment distribution patterns, low concentrations of Mn and Fe and negative Ce anomaly occur in the porewater, and high Mn/Al ratios and low U concentrations were observed in sediment, indicating oxic condition. LREE (Light REE) and MREE (Middle REE) enrichment in upper layer and depletion of MREE in deeper layer were shown in porewater profile. This study suggests that porewater flux in the western Pacific basin is a minor source of REEs to seawater, and abundant REEs are enriched in sediments, which is mainly caused by the extensive oxic condition, low sedimentation rate and strong adsorption capacity of sediments. Hence, the removal of REEs of porewater may result in widespread REE-rich sediments in the western Pacific basin.

  9. Cretaceous alkaline volcanism in south Marzanabad, northern central Alborz, Iran: Geochemistry and petrogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roghieh Doroozi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The alkali-basalt and basaltic trachy-andesites volcanic rocks of south Marzanabad were erupted during Cretaceous in central Alborz, which is regarded as the northern part of the Alpine-Himalayan orogenic belt. Based on petrography and geochemistry, en route fractional crystallization of ascending magma was an important process in the evolution of the volcanic rocks. Geochemical characteristics imply that the south Marzanabad alkaline basaltic magma was originated from the asthenospheric mantle source, whereas the high ratios of (La/YbN and (Dy/YbN are related to the low degree of partial melting from the garnet bearing mantle source. Enrichment pattern of Nb and depletion of Rb, K and Y, are similar to the OIB pattern and intraplate alkaline magmatic rocks. The K/Nb and Zr/Nb ratios of volcanic rocks range from 62 to 588 and from 4.27 to 9 respectively, that are some higher in more evolved samples which may reflect minor crustal contamination. The isotopic ratios of Sr and Nd respectively vary from 0.70370 to 0.704387 and from 0.51266 to 0.51281 that suggest the depleted mantle as a magma source. The development of south Marzanabad volcanic rocks could be related to the presence of extensional phase, upwelling and decompressional melting of asthenospheric mantle in the rift basin which made the alkaline magmatism in Cretaceous, in northern central Alborz of Iran.

  10. Uranium geochemistry in estuarine sediments: Controls on removal and release processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.E.; Cochran, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    Porewater uranium profiles from Long Island Sound (LIS) and Amazon shelf sediments and LIS sediment incubation experiments indicate that both removal and release processes control U geochemistry in estuarine sediments. Release of U from sediments occurs in association with Fe reduction. A correlation between U and Fe (and Mn) observed in sediment incubation experiments suggests that there is release of U from Fe-Mn-oxides as they are reduced, consistent with data from the Amazon shelf. In both sediment porewater profiles (LIS and Amazon) and sediment incubation experiments (LIS), there is removal of U from porewater under conditions of sulfate reduction. Sediment incubation experiments indicate that the removal rate is first-order with respect to U concentration, and the rate constant is linearly correlated to sulfate reduction rates. The link between U removal and sulfate reduction (a measure of diagenetic microbial activity) is consistent with a microbial mediation of U reduction. The diffusion flux of U into LIS sediments is estimated from porewater profiles. The inclusion of this estuarine removal term in the oceanic U balance increases the importance of the sediment sink. 62 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  11. One-carbon (bio ?) Geochemistry in Subsurface Waters of the Serpentinizing Coast Range Ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; Mccollom, Tom; Schrenk, Matt; Cardace, Dawn

    2011-01-01

    Serpentinization - the aqueous alteration of ultramafic rocks - typically imparts a highly reducing and alkaline character to the reacting fluids. In turn, these can influence the speciation and potential for metabolism of one-carbon compounds in the system. We examined the aqueous geochemistry and assessed the biological potential of one-carbon compounds in the subsurface of the McLaughlin Natural Reserve (Coast Range Ophiolite, California, USA). Fluids from wells sunk at depths of 25-90 meters have pH values ranging from 9.7 to 11.5 and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC concentrations) generally below 60 micromolar. Methane is present at concentrations up to 1.3 millimolar (approximately one-atmosphere saturation), and hydrogen concentrations are below 15 nanomolar, suggesting active consumption of H2 and production of CH4. However, methane production from CO2 is thermodynamically unfavorable under these conditions. Additionally, the speciation of DIC predominantly into carbonate at these high pH values creates a problem of carbon availability for any organisms that require CO2 (or bicarbonate) for catabolism or anabolism. A potential alternative is carbon monoxide, which is present in these waters at concentrations 2000-fold higher than equilibrium with atmospheric CO. CO is utilized in a variety of metabolisms, including methanogenesis, and bioavailability is not adversely affected by pH-dependent speciation (as for DIC). Methanogenesis from CO under in situ conditions is thermodynamically favorable and would satisfy biological energy requirements with respect to both Gibbs Energy yield and power.

  12. Petrology and geochemistry of dolerite dykes of Dharmapuri and Salem districts of Tamil Nadu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayabalan, M.; Umamaheswaran, O.; Suresh, A.

    2012-01-01

    Dolerite dyke sets occur distributed in the Dharmapuri and Salem districts of northern Tamil nadu. These dykes have been emplaced in the older basement composed of granulite and gneissic rocks and cut across the later formed lineament controlled alkaline complexes. They are composed of medium to coarse calcic plagioclase and clinopyroxene with biotite, amphibole, uralite, olivine, orthopyroxene, and anhedral quartz as accessories. Based on geochemical characters, the olivine bearing dykes are classed as Type I and the quartz bearing dykes as Type II. The Type I dykes resemble basalt and the Type II dykes, basaltic andesite. They display LILE> HFSE in terms of abundance. The REE values indicate enrichment of LREE relative to MREE and HREE and an E-MORB or Plume MORB signature. The geochemistry of the sampled dykes suggests derivation from a mantle plume. This plume was emplaced into the garnet lherzolite layer and subsequently into the shallower spinel lherzolite layer in the mantle. Polybaric melting of lherzolite protoliths with varying proportions of garnet and spinel occurred with subsequent fractionation to produce a source melts with E-MORB characteristics. Emplacement of these dykes was aided by crustal extension and associated fracturing to develop a dyke swarm. (author)

  13. Models, validation, and applied geochemistry: Issues in science, communication, and philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk Nordstrom, D.

    2012-01-01

    Models have become so fashionable that many scientists and engineers cannot imagine working without them. The predominant use of computer codes to execute model calculations has blurred the distinction between code and model. The recent controversy regarding model validation has brought into question what we mean by a ‘model’ and by ‘validation.’ It has become apparent that the usual meaning of validation may be common in engineering practice and seems useful in legal practice but it is contrary to scientific practice and brings into question our understanding of science and how it can best be applied to such problems as hazardous waste characterization, remediation, and aqueous geochemistry in general. This review summarizes arguments against using the phrase model validation and examines efforts to validate models for high-level radioactive waste management and for permitting and monitoring open-pit mines. Part of the controversy comes from a misunderstanding of ‘prediction’ and the need to distinguish logical from temporal prediction. Another problem stems from the difference in the engineering approach contrasted with the scientific approach. The reductionist influence on the way we approach environmental investigations also limits our ability to model the interconnected nature of reality. Guidelines are proposed to improve our perceptions and proper utilization of models. Use of the word ‘validation’ is strongly discouraged when discussing model reliability.

  14. Use of neutron activation techniques for studying elements distribution. Applications in geochemistry, ecology and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flitsyan, E.S.

    1997-01-01

    The essence of the radiography method, sensitivity of which is within a range of 10 -2 - 10 -7 g · mm -2 and resolution ability extend from 0,01 to 100 μm, consists in determining the distributions of ionising irradiation sources on a surface under study by using the two-dimensional field of their irradiation registered by means of photoemulsion or dielectric track detector. Statistical analysis and computer processing of the radiographic images have allowed one to solve the two main tasks of the method , namely, the determination of true distributions of ionising irradiation sources on the surface of an object under study and the quantitative estimation within given accuracy of the content of an element under study in a sample. A complex of radiographic techniques based on the registration of secondary irradiation of the activated nuclei, instantaneous products of the nuclear reactions, and fusion fragments of the transuranium elements, has been developed to solve a series of the problem in geology and geochemistry, as well as for an analysis of technological and environment samples. Upon designing and constructing special comparison standards modelling a sample in composition and structure, the quantitative data on distributions of more than forty elements in rock sections and these of the main microcomponents, including oxygen, in the superconducting ceramics samples have also been obtained. (author)

  15. Padrt'stock (Teplá–Barrandian unit, Bohemian Massif): Petrology, geochemistry, U-Pb zircon dating of granodiorite, and Re-Os age and origin of related molybdenite mineralization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žák, Karel; Svojtka, Martin; Breiter, Karel; Ackerman, Lukáš; Zachariáš, J.; Pašava, J.; Veselovský, F.; Litochleb, J.; Ďurišová, Jana; Haluzová, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 4 (2014), s. 351-366 ISSN 1802-6222 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-15390S Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : geochemistry * petrology * Re–Os molybdenite dating * Teplá–barrandian unit * U–Pb zircon dating * Variscan granitoids Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 1.405, year: 2014

  16. Characterizing the proposed geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada: hydrology and geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckless, John S.; Levich, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    This hydrology and geochemistry volume is a companion volume to the 2007 Geological Society of America Memoir 199, The Geology and Climatology of Yucca Mountain and Vicinity, Southern Nevada and California, edited by Stuckless and Levich. The work in both volumes was originally reported in the U.S. Department of Energy regulatory document Yucca Mountain Site Description, for the site characterization study of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as the proposed U.S. geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. The selection of Yucca Mountain resulted from a nationwide search and numerous committee studies during a period of more than 40 yr. The waste, largely from commercial nuclear power reactors and the government's nuclear weapons programs, is characterized by intense penetrating radiation and high heat production, and, therefore, it must be isolated from the biosphere for tens of thousands of years. The extensive, unique, and often innovative geoscience investigations conducted at Yucca Mountain for more than 20 yr make it one of the most thoroughly studied geologic features on Earth. The results of these investigations contribute extensive knowledge to the hydrologic and geochemical aspects of radioactive waste disposal in the unsaturated zone. The science, analyses, and interpretations are important not only to Yucca Mountain, but also to the assessment of other sites or alternative processes that may be considered for waste disposal in the future. Groundwater conditions, processes, and geochemistry, especially in combination with the heat from radionuclide decay, are integral to the ability of a repository to isolate waste. Hydrology and geochemistry are discussed here in chapters on unsaturated zone hydrology, saturated zone hydrology, paleohydrology, hydrochemistry, radionuclide transport, and thermally driven coupled processes affecting long-term waste isolation. This introductory chapter reviews some of the reasons for choosing to study Yucca Mountain as a

  17. Characterizing the proposed geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada--hydrology and geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckless, John S.; Levich, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    This hydrology and geochemistry volume is a companion volume to the 2007 Geological Society of America Memoir 199, The Geology and Climatology of Yucca Mountain and Vicinity, Southern Nevada and California, edited by Stuckless and Levich. The work in both volumes was originally reported in the U.S. Department of Energy regulatory document Yucca Mountain Site Description, for the site characterization study of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as the proposed U.S. geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. The selection of Yucca Mountain resulted from a nationwide search and numerous committee studies during a period of more than 40 yr. The waste, largely from commercial nuclear power reactors and the government's nuclear weapons programs, is characterized by intense penetrating radiation and high heat production, and, therefore, it must be isolated from the biosphere for tens of thousands of years. The extensive, unique, and often innovative geoscience investigations conducted at Yucca Mountain for more than 20 yr make it one of the most thoroughly studied geologic features on Earth. The results of these investigations contribute extensive knowledge to the hydrologic and geochemical aspects of radioactive waste disposal in the unsaturated zone. The science, analyses, and interpretations are important not only to Yucca Mountain, but also to the assessment of other sites or alternative processes that may be considered for waste disposal in the future. Groundwater conditions, processes, and geochemistry, especially in combination with the heat from radionuclide decay, are integral to the ability of a repository to isolate waste. Hydrology and geochemistry are discussed here in chapters on unsaturated zone hydrology, saturated zone hydrology, paleohydrology, hydrochemistry, radionuclide transport, and thermally driven coupled processes affecting long-term waste isolation. This introductory chapter reviews some of the reasons for choosing to study Yucca Mountain as a

  18. Gas geochemistry: a new technology to evaluate petroleum systems; Geoquimica de gases: uma nova tecnologia em avaliacao de sistemas petroliferos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos Neto, Eugenio Vaz dos [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas. Gerencia de Geoquimica]. E-mail: eugenioneto@petrobras.com.br

    2004-11-01

    In the last decade hydrocarbon gas geochemistry has significantly evolved especially regarding to the widespread use of GC-C-IRMS (Gas chromatography-combustion-ion ratio monitoring system) techniques that allowed accurate measurements of {delta}{sup 13} C in the C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} fraction. Also, due to the improvement of the sampling procedures, sample collection - relatively small amounts of gas samples at low pressure - has become easier, sample transportation has become safer - the risk of accidents has been reduced - and analysis has become faster. The 'state-of-the-art' of the use of gas geochemistry to study processes within petroleum systems is discussed in this paper. The discussion is mainly focused on the identification of the hydrocarbon gas origin (biogenesis versus thermo genesis, mixing) and hydrocarbon gas generation (primary versus secondary cracking), including the inference of the relative thermal evolution and possible secondary alterations caused by biodegradation, secondary migration and eventually leakage from petroleum accumulations. Brief comments were also made about the new technologies involving noble gases and their potential use as tracers of processes in petroleum systems. Additionally, the origin of non-hydrocarbon gases in petroleum accumulations is succinctly discussed, as well as their possible economic impacts. The use of gas geochemistry techniques has brought a significant improvement in the understanding of petroleum systems under exploration in Brazil and in other parts of the world. Besides, on-going research projects suggest that there is a great potential for technological advances, e.g., adding the hydrogen isotopic composition of hydrocarbons to the interpretations, and also integrating the available results to the isotopic variations of noble gases. (author)

  19. Investigation of lanthanide ions and other paramagnetic impurities in natural fluorite by electron paramagnetic resonance: examples of application to mining exploration and geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatagnon, B.

    1981-01-01

    This research thesis reports the application to geology, and more particularly to geochemistry and mining exploration, of a physical method: the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). After a report of a bibliographical investigation on mineralogy and geochemistry of fluorite and lanthanides, as well as on paramagnetic centres observed by physicists in synthetic fluorite, the author reports an experimental work, and describes two examples of application of EPR: firstly, the exploration of radioactive ores, and secondly, with the joint use of neutron activation analysis, the characterization of the redox status of the hydrothermal solution which is at the origin of fluorinated mineralisation

  20. Mineralogy and geochemistry of rocks and fracture fillings from Forsmark and Oskarshamn: Compilation of data for SR-Can

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, Henrik; Sandstroem, Bjoern [Isochron GeoConsulting HB, Goeteborg (Sweden); Tullborg, Eva-Lena [Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden)

    2006-11-15

    This report is a compilation of the so far available data for the safety assessment SR-Can carried out by SKB. The data consists of mineralogy, geochemistry, porosity, density and redox properties for both dominating rock types and fracture fillings at the Forsmark and Oskarshamn candidate areas. In addition to the compilation of existing information, the aim has been to identify missing data and to clarify some conception of e.g. deformation zones. The objective of the report is to present the available data requested for the modelling of the chemical stability of the two sites. The report includes no interpretation of the data.

  1. Geochemistry and migration of contaminants at the Weldon Spring chemical plant site, St. Charles County, Missouri, 1989--91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, J.G.

    1993-01-01

    Investigations were conducted by the US Geological Survey in cooperation with the US Department of Energy at the Weldon Spring chemical plant site to determine the geochemistry of the shallow aquifer and geochemical controls on the migration of uranium and other constituents from the raffinate (waste) pits. Water-quality analyses from monitoring wells at the site and vicinity property indicate that water in the shallow aquifer is a calcium magnesium bicarbonate type that is at equilibrium with respect to calcite and slightly supersaturated with respect to dolomite

  2. Geochemistry of rare earths elements from ferriferous formations of the Serpentina's range, Conceicao do Mato Dentro, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dossin, T.M.; Dossin, I.A.; Dardenne, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The banded iron formations of the Serpentina's Range constitute the aim of this report. Their stratigraphy and geochemistry are suggestive that deposits formed under epicontinental basin environments of Lake Superior type. Their mineralogy is essentially represented by hematite and magnetite, locally with siderite and ankerite. Rare earth elements data from the iron formations of the are show Eu and Ce anomalies relatively the other elements, which is interpreted as a response to intermediate oxigenation levels of atmosphere and hidrosphere between the Archean and the Upper Proterozoic. (author) [pt

  3. A critical review of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for geoanalysis, geochemistry and hydrology, Part 1. Analytical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, I.B.; Taylor, Howard E.

    1992-01-01

    Present-day inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) instrumentation is described briefly. Emphasis is placed on performance characteristics for geoanalysis, geochemistry, and hydrology. Applications where ICP-MS would be indispensable are indicated. Determination of geochemically diagnostic trace elements (such as the rare earth elements [REE], U and Th), of isotope ratios for fingerprinting, tracer and other geo-isotope applications, and benchmark isotope dilution determinations are considered to be typical priority applications for ICP-MS. It is concluded that ICP-MS furnishes unique geoanalytical and environmental data that are not readily provided by conventional spectroscopic (emission and absorption) techniques.

  4. Geology, mineralogy, geochemistry and origin of phosphates from Jandia, Cansa Perna, Itacupim (Para) and Pirocaua and Trauira (Maranhao)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, M. L. da.

    1980-01-01

    The phosphate occurrences of Northeastern Para and Northwestern Maranhao were formed by strong lateritic weathering of phosphorus-rich Precambrian rocks. The rock formation affected by those processes were phyllites and schists of the Gurupi Group in Cansa Perna and Pirocaua, a complex of felsic to mafic and ultramafic rocks metamorphosed in the greenschist facies in Itacupim and Trauira and probably phosphoritic sandstone in Jandia. The geology, the mineralogy of phosphates, oxides, hydroxides and silicates, the geochemistry of element distribution (aluminium, silicon, iron, calcium, etc) and trace elements distribution (strontium, rubidium, barium, rare earths, zirconium, niobium uranium, thorium, etc) and the phosphates origin are studied. (C.G.C.)

  5. East-China Geochemistry Database (ECGD):A New Networking Database for North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Ma, W.

    2010-12-01

    North China Craton is one of the best natural laboratories that research some Earth Dynamic questions[1]. Scientists made much progress in research on this area, and got vast geochemistry data, which are essential for answering many fundamental questions about the age, composition, structure, and evolution of the East China area. But the geochemical data have long been accessible only through the scientific literature and theses where they have been widely dispersed, making it difficult for the broad Geosciences community to find, access and efficiently use the full range of available data[2]. How to effectively store, manage, share and reuse the existing geochemical data in the North China Craton area? East-China Geochemistry Database(ECGD) is a networking geochemical scientific database system that has been designed based on WebGIS and relational database for the structured storage and retrieval of geochemical data and geological map information. It is integrated the functions of data retrieval, spatial visualization and online analysis. ECGD focus on three areas: 1.Storage and retrieval of geochemical data and geological map information. Research on the characters of geochemical data, including its composing and connecting of each other, we designed a relational database, which based on geochemical relational data model, to store a variety of geological sample information such as sampling locality, age, sample characteristics, reference, major elements, rare earth elements, trace elements and isotope system et al. And a web-based user-friendly interface is provided for constructing queries. 2.Data view. ECGD is committed to online data visualization by different ways, especially to view data in digital map with dynamic way. Because ECGD was integrated WebGIS technology, the query results can be mapped on digital map, which can be zoomed, translation and dot selection. Besides of view and output query results data by html, txt or xls formats, researchers also can

  6. Fish otolith geochemistry, environmental conditions and human occupation at Lake Mungo, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Kelsie; Stern, Nicola; Williams, Ian S.; Kinsley, Les; Wood, Rachel; Sporcic, Katarina; Smith, Tegan; Fallon, Stewart; Kokkonen, Harri; Moffat, Ian; Grün, Rainer

    2014-03-01

    Fish otoliths from the Willandra Lakes Region World Heritage Area (south-western New South Wales, Australia) have been analysed for oxygen isotopes and trace elements using in situ techniques, and dated by radiocarbon. The study focused on the lunettes of Lake Mungo, an overflow lake that only filled during flooding events and emptied by evaporation, and Lake Mulurulu, which was part of the running Willandra Creek system. Samples were collected from two different contexts: from hearths directly associated with human activity, and isolated surface finds. AMS radiocarbon dating constrains the human activity documented by five different hearths to a time span of less than 240 years around 19,350 cal. BP. These hearths were constructed in aeolian sediments with alternating clay and sand layers, indicative of fluctuating lake levels and occasional drying out. The geochemistry of the otoliths confirms this scenario, with shifts in Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca marking the entry of the fish into Lake Mungo several years before their death, and a subsequent increase in the δ18O by ˜4‰ indicating increasing evaporation of the lake. During sustained lake-full conditions there are considerably fewer traces of human presence. It seems that the evaporating Lake Mungo attracted people to harvest fish that might have become sluggish through oxygen starvation in an increasingly saline water body (easy prey hypothesis). In contrast, surface finds have a much wider range in radiocarbon age as a result of reworking, and do not necessarily indicate evaporative conditions, as shown by comparison with otoliths from upstream Lake Mulurulu.

  7. Mineralogy and geochemistry of the No. 6 Coal (Pennsylvanian) in the Junger Coalfield, Ordos Basin, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Shifeng [Key Laboratory of Resource Exploration Research of Hebei Province, Handan 056038 (China); Ren, Deyi; Li, Shengsheng; Jiang, Yaofa [China University of Mining and Technology, D11, Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Chou, Chen-Lin [Illinois State Geological Survey (Emeritus), 615 East Peabody Drive, Champaign, IL 61820 (United States)

    2006-04-03

    This paper discusses the mineralogy and geochemistry of the No. 6 Coal (Pennsylvanian) in the Junger Coalfield, Ordos Basin, China. The results show that the vitrinite reflectance (0.58%) is lowest and the proportions of inertinite and liptinite (37.4% and 7.1%, respectively) in the No. 6 Coal of the Junger Coalfield are highest among all of the Late Paleozoic coals in the Ordos Basin. The No. 6 Coal may be divided vertically into four sections based on their mineral compositions and elemental concentrations. A high boehmite content (mean 6.1%) was identified in the No. 6 Coal. The minerals associated with the boehmite in the coal include goyazite, rutile, zircon, and Pb-bearing minerals (galena, clausthalite, and selenio-galena). The boehmite is derived from weathered and oxidized bauxite in the weathered crust of the underlying Benxi Formation (Pennsylvanian). A high Pb-bearing mineral content of samples ZG6-2 and ZG6-3 is likely of hydrothermal origin. The No. 6 coal is enriched in Ga (44.8 {mu}g/g), Se (8.2 {mu}g/g), Sr (423 {mu}g/g), Zr (234 {mu}g/g), REEs (193.3 {mu}g/g), Hg (0.35 {mu}g/g), Pb (35.7 {mu}g/g), and Th (17.8 {mu}g/g). Gallium and Th in the No. 6 Coal mainly occur in boehmite, and the Pb-bearing selenide and sulfide minerals contribute not only to Se and Pb contents in the coal, but also probably to Hg content. A high Zr content is attributed to the presence of zircon, and Sr is related to goyazite. The REEs in the coal are supplied from the sediment-source region, and the REEs leached from the adjacent partings by groundwater. (author)

  8. Geochemistry of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, southeastern New Mexico, U.S.A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    An extensive geochemical data base, including analyses of major and minor solutes, mineralogical studies of core samples, and isotopic studies of waters, carbonates and sulfates, has been assembled for evaporites and related rocks in the northern Delaware Basin of southeastern New Mexico. These data were compiled for the geological and hydrological characterization of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is excavated in the evaporites of the Salado Formation. These data were evaluated in order:(1) to determine the stability of the evaporite mineralogy over geological time; (2) to compare the aqueous geochemistry with host rock mineralogy; (3) to delineate the nature and timing of water-rock interactions, such as dissolution and recrystallization; and (4) to determine the geological and climatic conditions that have governed groundwater recharge. The resulting synthesis of data and current hypotheses concerning the origin, composition and history of waters in the evaporite rocks and related units of the Delaware Basin provides a tentative conceptual model for the behavior of the water-rock system since the deposition of the evaporites in the Permian. Essential components of this model include: (1) widespread Late Triassic/Early Jurassic evaporite recrystallization; (2) accumulation of deep-basin brines isolated from meteoric recharge; (3) evaporite dissolution by meteoric waters flowing in carbonates and sulfates interbedded in the uppermost Permian section and at the basin margin; (4) lateral rather than vertical infiltration of pre-Holocene meteoric waters in the uppermost Permian section; and (5) climatic conditions presently less conductive to recharge than in the Late Pleistocene. (author)

  9. Links between environmental geochemistry and rate of birth defects: Shanxi Province, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Haiying [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, School of Geography, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Sichuan Agricultural University, Ya' an, Sichuan 625014 (China); Zhang Keli, E-mail: keli@bnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, School of Geography, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2011-01-01

    The rate of birth defects in Shanxi Province is among the highest worldwide. In order to identify the impacts of geochemical and environmental factors on birth defect risk, samples of soil, water and food were collected from an area with an unusually high rate of birth defects (study area) and an area with a low rate of birth defects (control area) in Shanxi Province, China. Element contents were determined by ICP-OES, and the results were analyzed using a non-parametric test and stepwise regression. Differences in the level and distribution of 14 geochemical elements, namely arsenic (As), selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), zinc (Zn), strontium (Sr), iron (Fe), tin (Sn), magnesium (Mg), vanadium (V), calcium (Ca), copper (Cu), aluminum (Al), potassium (K) and sulfur (S) were thus compared between the study and control areas. The results reveal that the geochemical element contents in soil, water and food show a significant difference between the study area and control area, and suggest that the study area was characterized by higher S and lower Sr and Al contents. These findings, based on statistical analysis, may be useful in directing further epidemiological investigations identifying the leading causes of birth defects. - Research Highlights: {yields} Environmental geochemistry has an significant impact on birth defects in the regions with an unusually high rate of birth defects. {yields} An excess of S and deficiency of Sr and Al are the distinctive environmental features associated with the high rate of birth defects in the Shanxi Province of China. {yields} Geochemical anomalies is a non-medical basis for effective prevention and cure of birth defects.

  10. Geochemistry of the triassic-Jurassic alpine continental deposits: origin and geodynamic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poinssot, Ch.; Goffe, B.; Toulhoat, P.

    1997-01-01

    Mid-Triassic to mid-Jurassic Alpine continental deposits are known all along the former Brianconnais peninsula. They constitutes small karstic pockets on the thick Triassic calcareous series and their chemistry evolves between bauxites s.s. and aluminous argilites. Most of them were deeply buried during the Alpine orogenesis as recorded by HP-LT metamorphism. Only the deposits of the Pre-Alps were submitted to lower PT conditions (diagenesis-anchizone boundary) during their incorporation in the thrust wedge of the 'Prealpes Medianes'. These formations are known for containing traces of light elements (Li, F) and heavy elements (Zn, REE...). In order to understand the possible origin of these elements, we studied the geochemistry (major and trace elements) of two representative deposits, one in Vanoise which underwent a HP-LT metamorphism, the other one in the Pre-Alps, which was only submitted to diagenesis. Trace elements patterns allow us to preclude an autochthonous origin for these formations as well as the intervention of metasomatism, and demonstrate a granitic origin. Moreover, discrimination diagrams for granites indicate an obvious alkaline granitic origin for these deposits. In the framework of the Alpine palaeogeography, we then discuss the possible granitic sources. Two main sources can be invoked: either a Brianconnais s.s. formation (crystalline or sediments), which supposes a more intense erosion as classically admitted, or more distant sources such as the Corso-Sardinian alkaline acid-rocks, which supposes a complex palaeo-hydrography. This confirms the sedimentary origin of the light elements in these rocks and precludes the intervention of light elements-rich hydrothermal fluids migrating through Alpine metamorphic units. (author)

  11. Assessment of hydro-geochemistry and groundwater quality of Rajshahi City in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, M. G.; Uddin, S. M. Helal; Haque, A. B. M. H.

    2017-12-01

    The study was carried out to understand the hydro-geochemistry and ground water quality in the Rajshahi City of Bangladesh. A total of 240 groundwater samples were collected in 2 years, i.e., 2009 and 2010 covering the pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon seasons. Aquifer soil samples were collected from 30 locations during the monsoon in 2000. All the samples were analyzed for various physicochemical parameters according to standard methods of analysis, these includes pH, electrical conductivity, total dissolved solids, total hardness, and total alkalinity, major cations such as Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, and Fe2+, major anions such as HCO3 -, NO3 -, Cl-, and SO4 2- and heavy metals such as Mn, Zn, Cu, As, Cd and Pb. The results illustrated that the groundwater was slightly acidic to neutral in nature, total hardness observed in all samples fall under the hard to a very hard category. The bicarbonate and calcium concentration in the groundwater exceeded the permissible limits may be due to the dissolution of calcite. The concentration of calcium, iron, manganese, arsenic and lead were far above the permissible limit in most of the shallow tube well samples. The study found that the major hydrochemical facies was identified to be calcium-bicarbonate-type (CaHCO3). A higher concentration of metals including Fe, Mn, As and Pb was found indicating various health hazards. The rock-water interaction was the major geochemical process controlling the chemistry of groundwater in the study area. The study results revealed that the quality of the groundwater in Rajshahi City area was of great concern and not suitable for human consumption without adequate treatment.

  12. Zircon ages in granulite facies rocks: decoupling from geochemistry above 850 °C?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Barbara E.; Regis, Daniele; Engi, Martin

    2018-03-01

    Granulite facies rocks frequently show a large spread in their zircon ages, the interpretation of which raises questions: Has the isotopic system been disturbed? By what process(es) and conditions did the alteration occur? Can the dates be regarded as real ages, reflecting several growth episodes? Furthermore, under some circumstances of (ultra-)high-temperature metamorphism, decoupling of zircon U-Pb dates from their trace element geochemistry has been reported. Understanding these processes is crucial to help interpret such dates in the context of the P-T history. Our study presents evidence for decoupling in zircon from the highest grade metapelites (> 850 °C) taken along a continuous high-temperature metamorphic field gradient in the Ivrea Zone (NW Italy). These rocks represent a well-characterised segment of Permian lower continental crust with a protracted high-temperature history. Cathodoluminescence images reveal that zircons in the mid-amphibolite facies preserve mainly detrital cores with narrow overgrowths. In the upper amphibolite and granulite facies, preserved detrital cores decrease and metamorphic zircon increases in quantity. Across all samples we document a sequence of four rim generations based on textures. U-Pb dates, Th/U ratios and Ti-in-zircon concentrations show an essentially continuous evolution with increasing metamorphic grade, except in the samples from the granulite facies, which display significant scatter in age and chemistry. We associate the observed decoupling of zircon systematics in high-grade non-metamict zircon with disturbance processes related to differences in behaviour of non-formula elements (i.e. Pb, Th, U, Ti) at high-temperature conditions, notably differences in compatibility within the crystal structure.

  13. Geochemistry of REE in Acid Mine Drainage: Sorption onto Basaluminite and Schwertmannite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano Letellier, A.; Ayora, C.; Fernandez-Martinez, A.

    2017-12-01

    The geochemistry of Rare Earth Elements (REE) has been investigated in natural streams and in mine areas during the last decades. Most of these studies agree that REE are mobile in acidic waters and they transferred to a solid phase when pH increases. However, there is no agreement on the pH range, on which precipitates can retain REE and the mechanisms responsible for the retention. Thus, whereas some authors determined that hydrous ferric oxides (HFOs) scavenge REE from pH 3, other authors observed REE retention by hydrous aluminum oxides (HAOs) from pH 4 to 6.1. A field survey conducted in the Odiel River in the SW Spain showed that pH values higher than 5, REE, Cu, Al and Fe concentrations in the river were lower than expected from a theoretical mixture because they were trapped in the precipitates. For pH below 4, however, only schwertmannite (Fe8O8OH6SO4) and no basaluminite (Al4SO4OH10·5H2O) precipitated. Then, REE, Cu and Al behaved conservatively and Fe does not, indicating that REE are trapped in the Al but not in the Fe solid phase. These observations are perfectly consistent with the REE accumulation in the Al-rich precipitates in the AMD treatment systems. Taking into account these observations, sorption experiments with synthetic basaluminite and schwertmannite at different pH were performed in the laboratory. For Lanthanides and Yttrium, sorption edge took place at pH higher than 5, whereas Sc sorption started at pH 4. A surface complexation model is proposed to explain the retention mechanism onto these two precipitates. Both minerals, schwertmannite and basaluminite showed similar sorption behavior. However, as schwertmannite formation occurs at pH lower than 4, no REE elements are sorbed on it.

  14. Pedogenic calcretes from Coimbatore area, Tamil Nadu: Micromorphology, geochemistry and palaeoclimate significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hema, A.; Navin, S.

    2004-06-01

    In this paper we present geochemistry and micromorphology (petrography and SEM data) study of Quaternary calcretes formed in association with the vertisol and hardpan calcretes-dolocretes formed on bedrock occurring in Coimbatore area, Tamil Nadu. Coimbatore receives an annual average rainfall of 400-500 mm year -1 . Understanding the formation of calcretes is important as this region falls in the rain shadow region receiving both the south west as well as northeast monsoon. In the study area the calcretes formed within the vertisols representing the Bk horizon occur as thick profiles (∼3m) in the foothill zone while the laminar hardpan calcretes are found in the topographic lows on the bedrock (0.80-1m). Calcretes occurring in association with the vertisols are powdery calcrete, nodular calcrete and rhizoliths with 95.22% to 64.5% of CaCO 3 . Nficromorphology study (thin section and SEM study) of the calcretes in vertisols show the occurrence of features such as alveolar septal structures, calcified filaments, coated grains, spherulites, calcified root cells and calcispheres that indicate the biogenic origin of the calcretes, mainly induced by plant root related microbial activity. They consist of quartzose sand grains cemented by fine crystalline, glaebular, grain-coating and pore-filling micrite. Micro fabrics of hardpan calcretes with detritus hosts show evidence of replacement, displacement and shrinkage, indicating that the calcretes formed under relatively ad conditions. These characteristics reflect that the calcretes formed in a relatively near-surface environment with relatively high rates of evaporation. Development of the calcretes in the vertisol profiles took place in phases of soil formation, erosion and reworking. The relationships between these processes caused the formation of different accrete profiles in the foothill region. (author)

  15. Sr isotope geochemistry of East Alpine mineral deposits and mass spectrometric analyses of fluid inclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grum, W.

    1995-05-01

    Strontium isotope geochemistry and deformational history of selected carbonate-hosted deposits from different tectonic positions in the Eastern Alps were studied. In this context an equipment has been constructed to analyze the composition of volatile components of fluid inclusions (FI). Based on the results of Sr-isotopic investigations two groups of deposits are discriminated: Deposits formed by formation waters and/or metamorphogenic fluids: Tux (magnesite, scheelite), Otterzug (barite), Lassing (magnesite), Rabenwald (talc), Laussa and Mooseck (fluorite). The mineralizing fluids are derived from different sedimentary rock series and therefore 87 Sr/ 86 Sr-ratios vary between 0.707 and 0.719. Deposits situated along fault zones: Lassing (talc), Gasteiner Tal (Silberpfennig area; gold), Schlaining (stibnite) and Waldenstein (specularite). Sr isotope ratios of the mineralizing fluids from Lassing, Waldenstein and Schlaining ranges from 0.7112 to 0.7127 and are therefore thought to have scavenged the East Alpine crystalline. The mineralizing solutions of the Gasteiner Tal deposit may either have equilibrated with low radiogenic sedimentary or with (ultra-)basic rocks. A cracking chamber has been constructed in order to open FI by cracking for mass spectrometric analysis of volatile components. Gases are analysed using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The desorption of gas from metal and sample surfaces during cracking can be neglected. The amount of gas released from the mineral lattices was studied. With that fast method ore bearing from barren host rocks have been distinguished by different composition of the FI at the Brixlegg barite mineralization (Eastern Alps). Within the Galway fluorite deposit (Ireland) different fluids were involved and mass spectrometric analysis were carried out to characterize these different fluids and to identify their origin. (author)

  16. Can hydrocarbons entrapped in seep carbonates serve as gas geochemistry recorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenberg, Martin; Pape, Thomas; Seifert, Richard; Bohrmann, Gerhard; Schlömer, Stefan

    2018-04-01

    The geochemistry of seep gases is useful for an understanding of the local petroleum system. Here it was tested whether individual light hydrocarbons in seep gases are representatively entrapped in authigenic carbonates that formed near active seep sites. If applicable, it would be possible to extract geochemical information not only on the origin but also on the thermal maturity of the hydrocarbon source rocks from the gases entrapped in carbonates in the past. Respective data could be used for a better understanding of paleoenvironments and might directly serve as calibration point for, amongst others, petroleum system modeling. For this approach, (sub)-recent seep carbonates from the Black Sea (Paleodnjepr region and Batumi seep area), two sites of the Campeche Knoll region in the Gulf of Mexico, and the Venere mud volcano (Mediterranean Sea) were selected. These seep carbonates derive from sites for which geochemical data on the currently seeping gases exist. During treatment with phosphoric acid, methane and higher hydrocarbons were released from all carbonates, but in low concentrations. Compositional studies demonstrate that the ratio of methane to the sum of higher hydrocarbons (C1/(C2+C3)) is (partly strongly) positively biased in the entrapped gas fraction. δ13C values of C1 were determined for all samples and, for the samples from the Gulf of Mexico and the Mediterranean Sea, also of C2 and C3. The present dataset from six seep sites indicates that information on the seeped methane can be—although with a scatter of several permil—recorded in seep carbonate matrices, but other valuable information like the composition and δ13C of ethane and propane appears to be modified or lost during, for example, enclosure or at an early stage of diagenesis.

  17. Geochemistry of aquifer sediments and arsenic-rich groundwaters from Kandal Province, Cambodia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowland, Helen A.L.; Gault, Andrew G.; Lythgoe, Paul; Polya, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Elevated As is well known to be present in aquifers utilised for drinking water and irrigation in West Bengal and Bangladesh. This problem has also more recently been discovered in other parts of Asia, including Vietnam, Cambodia, Inner Mongolia and the Middle Ganges Plain. Analysis of groundwaters in Kandal Province of Cambodia found waters with comparable geochemistry to the As-rich groundwaters of the West Bengali Delta. Similarities included high but heterogeneous As distributions, predominantly in the form As(III), high Fe, moderate to high HCO 3 - , circumneutral pH, low SO 4 2- and geochemical components indicative of reducing conditions. Good positive correlations between As, Fe, HCO 3 - and NH 4 + , and dissolved organic C is consistent with As release predominantly via microbially mediated reductive dissolution of As bearing Fe(III) oxides. Further evidence for such a process is found from correlations between As, Fe and organic matter from analysis of aquifer sediments, by the presence of goethite in the finer fractions and from the association of As with amorphous, poorly crystalline and well crystallised hydrous Fe oxides. The presence of several high As, but low Fe, wells implies that microbes could have a more direct role in mediating As release via the direct utilisation of Fe(III) or As(V) as electron acceptors. The presence of elevated As in waters with short aquifer residence times (as indicated by their geochemical signature) highlights the possible vulnerability of these aquifers to the influx of surface derived waters, providing an additional source of labile organic C that could exacerbate As release by stimulating microbial activity

  18. Hydrology and geochemistry of a surface coal mine in northwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R.S.; Clark, G.M.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrology and geochemistry of a reclaimed coal mine in northwestern Colorado were monitored during water years 1988 and 1989. Some data also were collected in water years 1987 and 1990. This report describes (1) the sources of hydrologic recharge to and discharge from reclaimed spoil, (2) the relative contributions of recharge to the reclaimed spoil aquifer from identified source waters and the rate of water movement from those sources to the reclaimed spoil, and (3) the geochemical reactions that control water quality in reclaimed spoil. The study area was at a dip-slope coal mine encompassing about 7 square miles with land slopes of varying aspect. The area was instrumented and monitored at five sites; two sites had unmined and reclaimed- spoil areas adjacent to each other and three sites were unmined. The mined areas had been reclaimed. Instrumentation at the study sites included 1 climate station, 3 rain gages, 19 soil-water access tubes, 2 lysimeters, 18 wells completed in bedrock, 7 wells completed in reclaimed spoil, and 2 surface- water gaging stations. The results of the study indicate that the reclaimed spoil is recharged from surface recharge and underburden aquifers. Discharge, as measured by lysimeters, was about 3 inches per year and occurred during and after snowmelt. Hydraulic-head measurements indicated a potential for ground-water movement from deeper to shallower aquifers. Water levels rose in the reclaimed-spoil aquifer and spring discharge at the toe of the spoil slopes increased rapidly in response to snowmelt. Water chemistry, stable isotopes, geochemical models, and mass-balance calculations indicate that surface recharge and the underburden aquifers each contribute about 50 percent of the water to the reclaimed-spoil aquifers. Geochemical information indicates that pyrite oxidation and dissolution of carbonate and efflorescent sulfate minerals control the water chemistry of the reclaimed-spoil aquifer.

  19. Phosphate rock formation and marine phosphorus geochemistry: the deep time perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippelli, Gabriel M

    2011-08-01

    The role that phosphorite formation, the ultimate source rock for fertilizer phosphate reserves, plays in the marine phosphorus (P) cycle has long been debated. A shift has occurred from early models that evoked strikingly different oceanic P cycling during times of widespread phosphorite deposition to current thinking that phosphorite deposits may be lucky survivors of a series of inter-related tectonic, geochemical, sedimentological, and oceanic conditions. This paradigm shift has been facilitated by an awareness of the widespread nature of phosphogenesis-the formation of authigenic P-bearing minerals in marine sediments that contributes to phosphorite formation. This process occurs not just in continental margin sediments, but in deep sea oozes as well, and helps to clarify the driving forces behind phosphorite formation and links to marine P geochemistry. Two processes come into play to make phosphorite deposits: chemical dynamism and physical dynamism. Chemical dynamism involves the diagenetic release and subsequent concentration of P-bearing minerals particularly in horizons, controlled by a number of sedimentological and biogeochemical factors. Physical dynamism involves the reworking and sedimentary capping of P-rich sediments, which can either concentrate the relatively heavy and insoluble disseminated P-bearing minerals or provide an episodic change in sedimentology to concentrate chemically mobilized P. Both processes can result from along-margin current dynamics and/or sea level variations. Interestingly, net P accumulation rates are highest (i.e., the P removal pump is most efficient) when phosphorites are not forming. Both physical and chemical pathways involve processes not dominant in deep sea environments and in fact not often coincide in space and time even on continental margins, contributing to the rarity of high-quality phosphorite deposits and the limitation of phosphate rock reserves. This limitation is becoming critical, as the human demand

  20. Novel geochemistry-inspired method for the deep removal of vanadium from molybdate solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jialiang [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Green Recycling and Extraction of Metals, Beijing, 100083 (China); Deng, Yuping; Zhou, Qiuyue; Qin, Peixin; Liu, Yubo [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Wang, Chengyan, E-mail: chywang@yeah.net [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China)

    2017-06-05

    Highlights: • A geochemistry-inspired method was developed for removal of V from molybdates. • Magnetic separation of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} adsorbent took 10 s. • Vanadium can be deeply removed in 5 min at pH of 7.0–11.0. • Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} adsorbent has excellent V selectivity and reusability. • A flowchart is presented for Mo/V separation in the leachate of spent HDS catalyst. - Abstract: Separation of vanadium from molybdates is an essential task for processing the leaching solution of hazardous spent hydrodesulphurization (HDS) catalyst. In this study, the difference in the main naturally occurring mineral forms of Mo and V inspired us to develop a method for the deep removal of V from molybdate solution using Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} as an adsorbent. First, the adsorbent was synthesized with coprecipitation method, and then it was characterized by XRD, TEM, and VSM. The synthesized material consisted of pure Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles that exhibited paramagnetic property, with a saturated magnetization of 68.6 emu g{sup −1}. The V removal efficiency was investigated using batch adsorption experiments in varying conditions. Results indicated that V could be deeply removed from various concentrations of molybdate solution at pH of 7.0–11.0 within 5 min. A slight decrease was found in the adsorption ratio after the adsorbent had been reused for 4 cycles. The resulting molybdate solution contained less than 0.02 g L{sup −1} of V, which satisfies the requirement for preparing high-quality products. Finally, a process flowchart is presented for the separation of Mo and V from the leaching solution of spent HDS catalyst, based on the excellent V removal performance and rapid separation rate of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} adsorbent.

  1. Mineralogy and geochemistry of the No. 6 Coal (Pennsylvanian) in the Junger Coalfield, Ordos Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Ren, D.; Chou, C.-L.; Li, S.; Jiang, Y.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the mineralogy and geochemistry of the No. 6 Coal (Pennsylvanian) in the Junger Coalfield, Ordos Basin, China. The results show that the vitrinite reflectance (0.58%) is lowest and the proportions of inertinite and liptinite (37.4% and 7.1%, respectively) in the No. 6 Coal of the Junger Coalfield are highest among all of the Late Paleozoic coals in the Ordos Basin. The No. 6 Coal may be divided vertically into four sections based on their mineral compositions and elemental concentrations. A high boehmite content (mean 6.1%) was identified in the No. 6 Coal. The minerals associated with the boehmite in the coal include goyazite, rutile, zircon, and Pb-bearing minerals (galena, clausthalite, and selenio-galena). The boehmite is derived from weathered and oxidized bauxite in the weathered crust of the underlying Benxi Formation (Pennsylvanian). A high Pb-bearing mineral content of samples ZG6-2 and ZG6-3 is likely of hydrothermal origin. The No. 6 coal is enriched in Ga (44.8 ??g/g), Se (8.2 ??g/g), Sr (423 ??g/g), Zr (234 ??g/g), REEs (193.3 ??g/g), Hg (0.35 ??g/g), Pb (35.7 ??g/ g), and Th (17.8 ??g/g). Gallium and Th in the No. 6 Coal mainly occur in boehmite, and the Pb-bearing selenide and sulfide minerals contribute not only to Se and Pb contents in the coal, but also probably to Hg content. A high Zr content is attributed to the presence of zircon, and Sr is related to goyazite. The REEs in the coal are supplied from the sediment-source region, and the REEs leached from the adjacent partings by groundwater. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Links between environmental geochemistry and rate of birth defects: Shanxi Province, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Haiying; Zhang Keli

    2011-01-01

    The rate of birth defects in Shanxi Province is among the highest worldwide. In order to identify the impacts of geochemical and environmental factors on birth defect risk, samples of soil, water and food were collected from an area with an unusually high rate of birth defects (study area) and an area with a low rate of birth defects (control area) in Shanxi Province, China. Element contents were determined by ICP-OES, and the results were analyzed using a non-parametric test and stepwise regression. Differences in the level and distribution of 14 geochemical elements, namely arsenic (As), selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), zinc (Zn), strontium (Sr), iron (Fe), tin (Sn), magnesium (Mg), vanadium (V), calcium (Ca), copper (Cu), aluminum (Al), potassium (K) and sulfur (S) were thus compared between the study and control areas. The results reveal that the geochemical element contents in soil, water and food show a significant difference between the study area and control area, and suggest that the study area was characterized by higher S and lower Sr and Al contents. These findings, based on statistical analysis, may be useful in directing further epidemiological investigations identifying the leading causes of birth defects. - Research Highlights: → Environmental geochemistry has an significant impact on birth defects in the regions with an unusually high rate of birth defects. → An excess of S and deficiency of Sr and Al are the distinctive environmental features associated with the high rate of birth defects in the Shanxi Province of China. → Geochemical anomalies is a non-medical basis for effective prevention and cure of birth defects.

  3. Organic geochemistry and pore water chemistry of sediments from Mangrove Lake, Bermuda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, P.G.; Simoneit, B.R.T.; MacKenzie, F.T.; Neumann, A.C.; Thorstenson, D.C.; Gerchakov, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    Mangrove Lake, Bermuda, is a small coastal, brackish-water lake that has accumulated 14 m of banded, gelatinous, sapropelic sediments in less than 104 yr. Stratigraphic evidence indicates that Mangrove Lake's sedimentary environment has undergone three major depositional changes (peat, freshwater gel, brackish-water gel) as a result of sea level changes. The deposits were examined geochemically in an effort to delineate sedimentological and diagenetic changes. Gas and pore water studies include measurements of sulfides, ammonia, methane, nitrogen gas, calcium, magnesium, chloride, alkalinity, and pH. Results indicate that sulfate reduction is complete, and some evidence is presented for bacterial denitrification and metal sulfide precipitation. The organic-rich sapropel is predominantly algal in origin, composed mostly of carbohydrates and insoluble macromolecular organic matter called humin with minor amounts of proteins, lipids, and humic acids. Carbohydrates and proteins undergo hydrolysis with depth in the marine sapropel but tend to be preserved in the freshwater sapropel. The humin, which has a predominantly aliphatic structure, increases linearly with depth and composes the greatest fraction of the organic matter. Humic acids are minor components and are more like polysaccharides than typical marine humic acids. Fatty acid distributions reveal that the lipids are of an algal and/or terrestrial plant source. Normal alkanes with a total concentration of 75 ppm exhibit two distribution maxima. One is centered about n-C22 with no odd/even predominance, suggestive of a degraded algal source. The other is centered at n-C31 with a distinct odd/even predominance indicative of a vascular plant origin. Stratigraphic changes in the sediment correlate to observed changes in the gas and pore water chemistry and the organic geochemistry. ?? 1982.

  4. Tracing of variabilities within a geological barrier by molecular organic geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hautevelle, Yann; Michels, Raymond; Malartre, Fabrice; Elie, Marcel; Trouiller, Alain

    2007-01-01

    and sub-horizontal paleotopography on which they were deposited. This study demonstrates the efficiency of organic geochemistry in the assessment of the variability of geological barriers

  5. Pore water geochemistry and the oxidation of sedimentary organic matter: Hatteras Abyssal Plain 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heggie, D.; Lewis, T.; Graham, D.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the pore water geochemistry from R/V an Endeavor cruise to an area of the Hatteras Abyssal Plain between 31 0 45' - 34 0 00'N and 69 0 37.5 - 72 0 07.5'W. The authors report on the down core variations of the products of organic matter oxidation, the stoichiometry of reactions and make a preliminary assessment of the rates of organic matter oxidation at several core locations. The authors found concentrations of total inorganic nitrogen species; nitrate, nitrite and ammonia in pore waters to be less than those predicted from a model of organic matter oxidation (Froelich et al. 1979) in sediments. The observations indicate that nitrogen is depleted over carbon as compared to typical marine organic matter. The down-core nitrate profiles over the study area were used to infer depths at which oxygen is near totally consumed in the sediments and hence to compute rates of oxygen consumption. The authors found oxygen consumption rates to vary by nearly an order of magnitude between core locations (1.7 - >15μmO 2 cm -2 yr -1 ). A simple model which combines the computed rates of oxidant consumption and the stoichiometry of organic matter oxidation was used to make estimates of organic carbon oxidation rates. These latter were found to vary between 1.3 and > 11.5 μm C cm -2 yr -1 . Highest carbon oxidation rates were found at the western boundary of the study area, and in all cases oxygen consumption was responsible for >85% of carbon oxidized. 11 references, 5 figures, 4 tables

  6. Organic geochemistry of deep ground waters and radionuclide-partitioning experiments under hydrothermal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Means, J.L.; Maest, A.S.; Crear, D.A.

    1983-07-01

    This report summarizes research on two separate tasks. In the first task, the organic geochemistry of groundwater samples from the Permian Basin of Texas, the Paradox Basin of Utah, and the Nevada Test Site has been characterized. Acidic compounds were derivatized and analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the molecular weight characteristics of the organic constituents present were determined using dialysis and gel filtration chromatography. The total organic carbon contents of the groundwaters from the Permian and Paradox Basins are very high, ranging from 12 to 76 mg/l. Although the specific organic composition varies from aquifer to aquifer, the organic components of these groundwaters appear to be composed principally of low molecular weight polar compounds derived from local hydrocarbon deposits. The total organic carbon contents of the groundwaters from the Nevada Test Site are very low, ranging from 0.1 to 0.6 mg/l. Here the principal organic species appear to be humic compounds and low molecular weight fatty acids. In the second task the adsorption of certain radionuclides by geologic substrates has been measured in the presence and absence of organic complexing agents from 25 to 250 0 C. Major findings include the following: (a) in some cases the extent of adsorption of Sr, Co, and U actually increases with increasing temperature; (b) oxalic acid either has little effect on the adsorption or actually increases the adsorption of Cs and Sr by kaolinite, illite, and montmorillonite; (c) the thermal degradation of natural organic compounds in the near-field environment may be significant; and (d) the adsorption of U, Co, and Sr, and Cs onto kaolinite and montmorillonite reaches a steady state in less than an hour at 25 0 C, 1 atm. 10 figures, 4 tables

  7. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of the Kolah-Ghazi granitoid assemblage, south of Esfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshid Ahmadian

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Kolah-Ghazi granitoid assemblage is located in the south of Esfahan and in the Sanandaj-Sirjan magmatic-metamorphic zone. The Sanandaj-Sirjan zone is extended for 1500 km from Sirjan in the southeast to Sanandaj in the northwest of Iran and is situated in the west of Central Iranian terrane. The Sanandaj-Sirjan zone represents the metamorphic belt of the Zagros orogeny which is part of the Alpine- Himalayan orogenic belt. The Kolah-Ghazi granitoid assemblage consists of granodiorite, granites, quartz-rich granitoid and minor tonalite. The aim of this paper is to represent the mineralogy, geochemistry, petrogenesis and tectonic setting of this plutonic assemblage. Materials and methods More than 60 samples representing all of the rock units in the study area were chosen for microscopic studies. Then, 22 samples were selected for geochemical studies. The major elements were determined with XRF in the Naruto University, Japan. The trace and rare earth elements were analyzed by ICP-MS in the Acmelab, Canada. The geochemical results are presented in Table 1. Results and Discussion The Kolah-Ghazi granitoid assemblage intruded into the Jurassic sedimentary units and overlaid by lower Cretaceous sandstone and conglomerate which suggest Upper Jurassic as the possible age of the Kolah-Ghazi intrusion. Based on the modal studies, this granitoid assemblage is comprised of granite, granodiorite, quartz-rock granitoid and tonalite with different igneous textures including symplectic, myrmekitic, rapakivi, poikilitic and porphyroid. There are some xenoliths, microgranular enclaves and sur micaceous enclaves in the Kolah-Ghazi granitoid assemblage. Xenoliths are mostly derived from Jurassic shale and sandstones which have been trapped in the magma. The sur micaceousenclaves have tonalite composition. The sur micaceous enclaves are biotite-rich rock fragments which display metamorphic texture. The sur micaceous enclaves are classified as

  8. Time-scales of hydrological forcing on the geochemistry and bacterial community structure of temperate peat soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Flavia L. D.; Aquilina, Luc; De Ridder, Jo; Francez, André-Jean; Quaiser, Achim; Caudal, Jean-Pierre; Vandenkoornhuyse, Philippe; Dufresne, Alexis

    2015-10-01

    Peatlands are an important global carbon reservoir. The continued accumulation of carbon in peatlands depends on the persistence of anoxic conditions, in part induced by water saturation, which prevents oxidation of organic matter, and slows down decomposition. Here we investigate how and over what time scales the hydrological regime impacts the geochemistry and the bacterial community structure of temperate peat soils. Peat cores from two sites having contrasting groundwater budgets were subjected to four controlled drought-rewetting cycles. Pore water geochemistry and metagenomic profiling of bacterial communities showed that frequent water table drawdown induced lower concentrations of dissolved carbon, higher concentrations of sulfate and iron and reduced bacterial richness and diversity in the peat soil and water. Short-term drought cycles (3-9 day frequency) resulted in different communities from continuously saturated environments. Furthermore, the site that has more frequently experienced water table drawdown during the last two decades presented the most striking shifts in bacterial community structure, altering biogeochemical functioning of peat soils. Our results suggest that the increase in frequency and duration of drought conditions under changing climatic conditions or water resource use can induce profound changes in bacterial communities, with potentially severe consequences for carbon storage in temperate peatlands.

  9. Diagenesis and geochemistry of Australian ochre deposits: a review of methods and prospects for geochemically finger-printing major sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.A. [National Museum of Australia, Canberra, ACT (Australia). People and Environment Section; Fankhauser, B. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Division of Archaeology and Natural History

    1997-12-31

    Full text: The potential to examine prehistoric trade, exchange systems, social boundaries or regional interconnections through characterising the major ethnographic red ochre sources has long been recognised by Australian archaeologists. Recently several teams have made a start in characterising major ochre deposits and in attempting to source ochres recovered in archaeological contexts. Here we review prospects and progress with this line of research. We present case studies of the geochemistry of several major Australian ochre deposits - including Bookartoo, Karrku and Wilgie Mia -looking at their diagenesis, geochemistry and variability and explore the application of various analytical techniques, principally XRD, SEM/EDXA, ICP/MS and stable isotope analysis. We then explore an archaeological application at the Puritjarra shelter in central Australia where ochre sourcing has major implications for understanding prehistoric land use. Our results show that a systematic program of characterising ochre sources and archaeological ochres has great potential in Australia. Major ochre sources often have distinctive chemical fingerprints, particularly if a range of analytical techniques are used in conjunction to characterise ochres. Ochre is frequently found in both late Pleistocene and Holocene contexts, often in sufficient quantity to permit systematic study of temporal changes in prehistoric systems. To fully realize the potential of this research however it will be important to work collaboratively to build up centralized data files of compositional analyses of Australian ochres.

  10. Diagenesis and geochemistry of Australian ochre deposits: a review of methods and prospects for geochemically finger-printing major sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.A.; Fankhauser, B.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: The potential to examine prehistoric trade, exchange systems, social boundaries or regional interconnections through characterising the major ethnographic red ochre sources has long been recognised by Australian archaeologists. Recently several teams have made a start in characterising major ochre deposits and in attempting to source ochres recovered in archaeological contexts. Here we review prospects and progress with this line of research. We present case studies of the geochemistry of several major Australian ochre deposits - including Bookartoo, Karrku and Wilgie Mia -looking at their diagenesis, geochemistry and variability and explore the application of various analytical techniques, principally XRD, SEM/EDXA, ICP/MS and stable isotope analysis. We then explore an archaeological application at the Puritjarra shelter in central Australia where ochre sourcing has major implications for understanding prehistoric land use. Our results show that a systematic program of characterising ochre sources and archaeological ochres has great potential in Australia. Major ochre sources often have distinctive chemical fingerprints, particularly if a range of analytical techniques are used in conjunction to characterise ochres. Ochre is frequently found in both late Pleistocene and Holocene contexts, often in sufficient quantity to permit systematic study of temporal changes in prehistoric systems. To fully realize the potential of this research however it will be important to work collaboratively to build up centralized data files of compositional analyses of Australian ochres

  11. The organic geochemistry characteristic simple analyse of Shihongtan sandstone-type uranium deposit in Turpan-Hami basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Haiming; Cai Jinfang; Shang Gaofeng; Song Zhe

    2007-12-01

    The Shihongtan uranium deposit in Turpan-Hami basin is an interlayer oxi- dized zone type sandstone uranium deposit. The deposit occurs in the coal-bear- ing detrital rocks of braided meandering steam facies in the Middle Jurassic Xishanyao formation. There is a great deal of organic matter in the ore-hosting bed. There is distinct content of organic carbon, soluble organic matter, acidolysis hydrocarbon in various geochemistry belt rock, and the maximum content in the ore belt. Organics carbon mother-material type is sapropelic humus, organic matter is under mature stage, Acidolysis hydrocarbon is coal-gas type. Uranium content in rock is positive correlativity to soluble organics and acidolysis hydrocarbon by statistical count, The role of organic matter in sandstone type uranium metallogenetic process is analysed, it is thought that material decomposed under oxygenic coalition is advantage to uranium dissolution and migration in groundwater, material decomposed and polymerized under oxygen-deficient condition forms reducing and adsorption geochemistry barrier for uranium precipitation, play a important role in uranium metallogenetic process. (authors)

  12. Geochemistry of ferromanganese micronodules and associated Mn and trace metals diagenesis at high terrigenous depositional site of middle fan region, Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chauhan, O

    The influence of sedimentation on the morphology, growth and geochemistry of the micronodules, and on Mn enrichment in the sediments of the Bay of Bengal has been evaluated. Mn accumulation is 307-219 mg cm u2 kyr u-1 in cores having 20-17 cm kyr u...

  13. Trace element geochemistry of self-burning and weathering of a mineralized coal waste dump: The Novátor mine, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kříbek, B.; Sýkorová, Ivana; Veselovský, F.; Laufek, F.; Malec, J.; Knésl, I.; Majer, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 173, MAR 15 (2017), s. 158-175 ISSN 0166-5162 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-11674S Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : coal wastes * organic matter * uranium * mineralization * self-heating * biomarkers Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry OBOR OECD: Geology Impact factor: 4.783, year: 2016

  14. Geochemistry of the Drahotín and Mutěnín intrusions, West Bohemian shear zone, Bohemian massif: contrasting evolution of mantle-derived melts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ackerman, Lukáš; Krňanská, M.; Siebel, W.; Strnad, L.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 99, 3/4 (2010), s. 185-199 ISSN 0930-0708 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB300130612 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : Teplá-Barrandian * fractional crystallization * assimilation * gabbro Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 1.287, year: 2010

  15. Niobium-Thorium-Strontium-Rare Earth Element Mineralogy and Preliminary Sulphur Isotope Geochemistry of the Eaglet Property, East-Central British Columbia (NTS 093A/10W)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hora, Z. D.; Langrová, Anna; Pivec, Edvín; Žák, Karel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2009, č. 1 (2010), s. 93-96 ISSN 0381-243X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : fluorite * celestite * pyrochlore * thorite * titanbetafite * bastnaesite * sulphur isotopes * Eaglet deposit * MINFILE 093A46 Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry http://www.empr.gov.bc.ca/Mining/Geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/Fieldwork/Documents/2009/08_Hora_2009.pdf

  16. Springwater geochemistry at Honey Creek State Natural Area, central Texas: Implications for surface water and groundwater interaction in a karst aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrove, M.; Stern, L. A.; Banner, J. L.

    2010-06-01

    SummaryA two and a half year study of two adjacent watersheds at the Honey Creek State Natural Area (HCSNA) in central Texas was undertaken to evaluate spatial and temporal variations in springwater geochemistry, geochemical evolution processes, and potential effects of brush control on karst watershed hydrology. The watersheds are geologically and geomorphologically similar, and each has springs discharging into Honey Creek, a tributary to the Guadalupe River. Springwater geochemistry is considered in a regional context of aquifer components including soil water, cave dripwater, springwater, and phreatic groundwater. Isotopic and trace element variability allows us to identify both vadose and phreatic groundwater contributions to surface water in Honey Creek. Spatial and temporal geochemical data for six springs reveal systematic differences between the two watersheds. Springwater Sr isotope values lie between values for the limestone bedrock and soils at HCSNA, reflecting a balance between these two primary sources of Sr. Sr isotope values for springs within each watershed are consistent with differences between soil compositions. At some of the springs, consistent temporal variability in springwater geochemistry (Sr isotopes, Mg/Ca, and Sr/Ca values) appears to reflect changes in climatic and hydrologic parameters (rainfall/recharge) that affect watershed processes. Springwater geochemistry was unaffected by brush removal at the scale of the HCSNA study. Results of this study build on previous regional studies to provide insight into watershed hydrology and regional hydrologic processes, including connections between surface water, vadose groundwater, and phreatic groundwater.

  17. Petrology and geochemistry of the Miocene-Pliocene fluvial succession, Katawaz Basin, Western Pakistan: Implications on provenance and source area weathering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasi, Aimal K.; Kassi, Aktar Muhammad; Friis, Henrik

    Petrology and geochemistry of sandstones and mudstones of the Miocene Dasht Murgha Group (DMG) and Pliocene Malthanai Formation (MF) of the Pishin Belt (Katawaz Basin), northwestern Pakistan have been carried out to find out their provenance and source area weathering. Sandstones of the Dasht...

  18. Organic, Gas, and Element Geochemistry of Hydrothermal Fluids of the Newly Discovered Extensive Hydrothermal Area in the Wallis and Futuna Region (SW Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Konn

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Two newly discovered hydrothermal vent fields of the Wallis and Futuna region, Kulo Lasi and Fatu Kapa, were sampled for fluid geochemistry. A great geochemical diversity was observed and assigned to the diversity of lithologies as well as the occurrence of various processes. Kulo Lasi fluids likely formed by interaction with fresh volcanic rocks, phase separation, and mixing with magmatic fluid. Conversely, the geochemistry of the Fatu Kapa fluids would be mostly due to water/felsic lavas reactions. In terms of organic geochemistry, fluids from both fields were found to be enriched in formate, acetate, and semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs: n-alkanes, n-fatty acids, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. Concentrations of SVOCs reached a few ppb at most. The distribution patterns of SVOCs indicated that several processes and sources, at once of biogenic, thermogenic, and abiogenic types, likely controlled organic geochemistry. Although the contribution of each process remains unknown, the mere presence of organics at the μM level has strong implications for metal dispersion (cycles, deposition (ore-forming, and bioavailability (ecosystems, especially as our fluxes estimations suggest that back-arc hosted vent fields could contribute as much as MOR to the global ocean heat and mass budget.

  19. Strontium isotope geochemistry of groundwater affected by human activities in Nandong underground river system, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Yongjun, E-mail: jiangjyj@swu.edu.cn [School of Geographical Sciences, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)] [Institute of Karst Environment and Rock Desertification Rehabilitation, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Spatio-temporal variations of Sr concentrations and Sr isotopic composition of groundwater were investigated in a karst underground river system. {yields} Agricultural fertilizers and sewage effluents significantly modified the natural Sr isotopic signature of karst groundwater. {yields} Sr in the carbonate aquifers was relatively non-radiogenic, with low Sr concentrations, while anthropogenic Sr correlated with agricultural fertilizers and sewage effluents was relatively radiogenic, with higher Sr concentrations. {yields} {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios can provide key information for natural and anthropogenic sources in karst groundwater. - Abstract: The Nandong Underground River System (NURS) is located in a typical karst area dominated by agriculture in SE Yunnan Province, China. Groundwater plays an important role in the social and economical development in the area. The effects of human activities (agriculture and sewage effluents) on the Sr isotope geochemistry were investigated in the NURS. Seventy-two representative groundwater samples, which were collected from different aquifers (calcite and dolomite), under varying land-use types, both in summer and winter, showed significant spatial differences and slight seasonal variations in Sr concentrations and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios. Agricultural fertilizers and sewage effluents significantly modified the natural {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios signature of groundwater that was otherwise dominated by water-rock interaction. Three major sources of Sr could be distinguished by {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios and Sr concentrations in karst groundwater. Two sources of Sr are the Triassic calcite and dolomite aquifers, where waters have low Sr concentrations (0.1-0.2 mg/L) and low {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios (0.7075-0.7080 and 0.7080-0.7100, respectively); the third source is anthropogenic Sr from agricultural fertilizers and sewage effluents with waters affected having radiogenic {sup 87

  20. Geochemistry, environmental and provenance study of the Middle Miocene Leitha limestones (Central Paratethys)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ahmed; Wagreich, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Mineralogical, major, minor, REE and trace element analyses of rock samples were performed on Middle Miocene limestones (Leitha limestones, Badenian) collected from four localities from Austria (Mannersdorf, Wöllersdorf, Kummer and Rosenberg quarries) and the Fertőrákos quarry in Hungary. Impure to pure limestones (i.e. limited by Al2O3 contents above or below 0.43 wt. %) were tested to evaluate the applicability of various geochemical proxies and indices in regard to provenance and palaeoenvironmental interpretations. Pure and impure limestones from Mannersdorf and Wöllersdorf (southern Vienna Basin) show signs of detrital input (REEs = 27.6 ± 9.8 ppm, Ce anomaly = 0.95 ± 0.1 and the presence of quartz, muscovite and clay minerals in impure limestones) and diagenetic influence (low contents of, e.g., Sr = 221 ± 49 ppm, Na is not detected, Ba = 15.6 ± 8.8 ppm in pure limestones). Thus, in both limestones the reconstruction of original sedimentary palaeoenvironments by geochemistry is hampered. The Kummer and Fertőrákos (Eisenstadt-Sopron Basin) comprise pure limestones (e.g., averages Sr = 571 ± 139 ppm, Na = 213 ± 56 ppm, Ba = 21 ± 4 ppm, REEs = 16 ± 3 ppm and Ce anomaly = 0.62 ± 0.05 and composed predominantly of calcite) exhibiting negligible diagenesis. Deposition under a shallow-water, well oxygenated to intermittent dysoxic marine environment can be reconstructed. Pure to impure limestones at Rosenberg-Retznei (Styrian Basin) are affected to some extent by detrital input and volcano-siliciclastic admixture. The Leitha limestones at Rosenberg have the least diagenetic influence among the studied localities (i.e. averages Sr = 1271 ± 261 ppm, Na = 315 ± 195 ppm, Ba = 32 ± 15 ppm, REEs = 9.8 ± 4.2 ppm and Ce anomaly = 0.77 ± 0.1 and consist of calcite, minor dolomite and quartz). The siliciclastic sources are characterized by immobile elemental ratios (i.e. La/Sc and Th/Co) which apply not only for the siliciclastics, but also for marls and

  1. A preliminary study of mineralogy and geochemistry of four coal samples from northern Iran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodarzi, F.; Sanei, H.; Stasiuk, L.D.; Reyes, J. [Natural Resources Canada, Geological Survey of Canada-Calgary Division, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Bagheri-Sadeghi, H. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Azad University, Central Campus, Tehran (Iran)

    2006-01-03

    This study is related to four Jurassic-age bituminous coal (0.69-1.02 Ro%) samples collected from coal mines from the west, central and east of central, Alborz in northern Iran. Geological settings played key roles in determining the geochemistry and mineralogy of coals from the central Alborz region of northern Iran. The mineralogy of coals from the eastern part of the region is dominated by kaolinite; halloysite; and carbonates such as calcite, dolomite/ankerite, and siderite. The coals were deposited in a lacustrine environment. In the western part of the region, where the depositional setting was also lacustrine with volcanic input and tonstein deposition (glass shards present), the coal primarily contains kaolinite (68%) and fluorapatite (26%). In contrast, coal from the central part of the region, which was deposited in a terrestrial environment and on eroded limestone and dolomite rocks, is dominated by dolomite (98%) with little input by kaolinite. These coals have low sulphur (0.35-0.70 wt.%), which is mostly in the organic form (0.34-0.69 wt.%). Pyritic sulphur is detected only in one coal and in small quantities. The boron contents of these coals range from 9 to 33 mg/kg, indicating that deposition occurred in a fresh water environment. Coal with higher concentrations of Ba, Sr, and P contain fluorapatite and goyazite-gorceixite series [BaAl{sub 3} (PO{sub 4}){sub 2} (OH){sub 5}, H{sub 2}O] minerals, which indicates volcanoclastic input. Compared to world coal averages, these coals exhibit low concentrations of elements of environmental concern, such as As (1.3-5.9 mg/kg), Cd (<0.02-0.06 mg/kg), Hg (<0.01-0.07 mg/kg) Mo (<0.6-1.7 mg/kg), Pb (4.8-13 mg/kg), Th (0.5-21 mg/kg), Se (<0.2-0.8 mg/kg) and U (0.2-4.6 mg/kg). Two of the northern Iranian coals have concentrations of Cl (2560 and 3010 mg/kg) that are higher than world coal average. (author)

  2. Geochemistry and genesis of apatite bearing Fe oxide Dizdaj deposit, SE Zanjan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasem Nabatian

    2009-09-01

    magnetites. Fluid inclusion studies were conducted on two generations of apatite in the deposit. Based on the studies, the temperature and salinity of the first generation apatites are higher than those for the second generation apatites. The most important characteristics of the Sorkheh-Dizaj iron-oxide apatite deposit indicated magmatic Fe-P-REE-rich fluids source for the mineralization. Comparison of the most important characteristics of the Sorkheh-Dizaj iron-oxide apatite deposit (including tectonic setting, host rock, mineralogy, alteration, structure and texture and geochemistry with those of various types of iron mineralization in the world suggest that Sorkheh-Dizaj iron-oxide apatite deposit shows the most similarity with the Kiruna type iron-oxide apatite deposits classified as a subgroup of hydrothermal Iron Oxide Copper Gold (IOCG deposits.

  3. The Practical Application of Aqueous Geochemistry in Mapping Groundwater Flow Systems in Fractured Rock Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursey, G.; Seok, E.; Gale, J. E.

    2017-12-01

    groundwater samples can plot to the left of the meteoric water line as a result of isotopic exchange between meteoric water and silicate rock in near-surface environments at low temperatures. These and other examples are considered in the practical application of aqueous geochemistry in helping to map flow systems in fractured-rock systems.

  4. Evaluating controls on planktonic foraminiferal geochemistry in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Kelly Ann; Thunell, Robert C.; Machain-Castillo, Maria Luisa; Fehrenbacher, Jennifer; Spero, Howard J.; Wejnert, Kate; Nava-Fernández, Xinantecatl; Tappa, Eric J.

    2016-10-01

    To explore relationships between water column hydrography and foraminiferal geochemistry in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific, we present δ18O and Mg/Ca records from three species of planktonic foraminifera, Globigerinoides ruber, Globigerina bulloides, and Globorotalia menardii, collected from a sediment trap mooring maintained in the Gulf of Tehuantepec from 2006-2012. Differences in δ18O between mixed-layer species G. ruber and G. bulloides and thermocline-dweller G. menardii track seasonal changes in upwelling. The records suggest an increase in upwelling during the peak positive phase of El Niño, and an overall reduction in stratification over the six-year period. For all three species, Mg/Ca ratios are higher than what has been reported in previous studies, and show poor correlations to calcification temperature. We suggest that low pH (7.6-8.0) and [3 2-CO] values (∼70-120 μmol/kg) in the mixed layer contribute to an overall trend of higher Mg/Ca ratios in this region. Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry analyses of G. bulloides with high Mg/Ca ratios (>9 mmol/mol) reveal the presence of a secondary coating of inorganic calcite that has Mg/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios up to an order of magnitude higher than these elemental ratios in the primary calcite, along with elevated Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios. Some of the samples with abnormally high Mg/Ca are found during periods of high primary productivity, suggesting the alteration may be related to changes in carbonate saturation resulting from remineralization of organic matter in oxygen-poor waters in the water column. Although similar shell layering has been observed on fossil foraminifera, this is the first time such alteration has been studied in shells collected from the water column. Our results suggest a role for seawater carbonate chemistry in influencing foraminiferal calcite trace element:calcium ratios prior to deposition on the seafloor, particularly in high-productivity, low

  5. Geochemistry Model Abstraction and Sensitivity Studies for the 21 PWR CSNF Waste Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernot, P.; LeStrange, S.; Thomas, E.; Zarrabi, K.; Arthur, S.

    2002-01-01

    The CSNF geochemistry model abstraction, as directed by the TWP (BSC 2002b), was developed to provide regression analysis of EQ6 cases to obtain abstracted values of pH (and in some cases HCO 3 - concentration) for use in the Configuration Generator Model. The pH of the system is the controlling factor over U mineralization, CSNF degradation rate, and HCO 3 - concentration in solution. The abstraction encompasses a large variety of combinations for the degradation rates of materials. The ''base case'' used EQ6 simulations looking at differing steel/alloy corrosion rates, drip rates, and percent fuel exposure. Other values such as the pH/HCO 3 - dependent fuel corrosion rate and the corrosion rate of A516 were kept constant. Relationships were developed for pH as a function of these differing rates to be used in the calculation of total C and subsequently, the fuel rate. An additional refinement to the abstraction was the addition of abstracted pH values for cases where there was limited O 2 for waste package corrosion and a flushing fluid other than J-13, which has been used in all EQ6 calculation up to this point. These abstractions also used EQ6 simulations with varying combinations of corrosion rates of materials to abstract the pH (and HCO 3 - in the case of the limiting O 2 cases) as a function of WP materials corrosion rates. The goodness of fit for most of the abstracted values was above an R 2 of 0.9. Those below this value occurred during the time at the very beginning of WP corrosion when large variations in the system pH are observed. However, the significance of F-statistic for all the abstractions showed that the variable relationships are significant. For the abstraction, an analysis of the minerals that may form the ''sludge'' in the waste package was also presented. This analysis indicates that a number a different iron and aluminum minerals may form in the waste package other than those described in the EQ6 output files which are based on the use

  6. Oxygen isotope geochemistry of Laurentide ice-sheet meltwater across Termination I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Lael; Spero, Howard J.; Eggins, Stephen M.; Williams, Carlie; Flower, Benjamin P.

    2017-12-01

    We present a new method that quantifies the oxygen isotope geochemistry of Laurentide ice-sheet (LIS) meltwater across the last deglaciation, and reconstruct decadal-scale variations in the δ18O of LIS meltwater entering the Gulf of Mexico between ∼18 and 11 ka. We employ a technique that combines laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) and oxygen isotope analyses on individual shells of the planktic foraminifer Orbulina universa to quantify the instantaneous δ18Owater value of Mississippi River outflow, which was dominated by meltwater from the LIS. For each individual O. universa shell, we measure Mg/Ca (a proxy for temperature) and Ba/Ca (a proxy for salinity) with LA-ICP-MS, and then analyze the same O. universa for δ18O using the remaining material from the shell. From these proxies, we obtain δ18Owater and salinity estimates for each individual foraminifer. Regressions through data obtained from discrete core intervals yield δ18Ow vs. salinity relationships with a y-intercept that corresponds to the δ18Owater composition of the freshwater end-member. Our data suggest that from 15.5 through 14.6 ka, estimated δ18Ow values of Mississippi River discharge from discrete core intervals range from -11‰ to -21‰ VSMOW, which is consistent with δ18O values from both regional precipitation and the low-elevation, southern margin of the LIS. During the Bølling and Allerød (14.0 through 13.3 ka), estimated δ18Ow values of Mississippi River discharge from discrete core intervals range from -22‰ to -38‰ VSMOW. These values suggest a dynamic melting history of different parts of the LIS, with potential contributions to Mississippi River outflow from both the low-elevation, southern margin of the LIS and high-elevation, high-latitude domes in the LIS interior that were transported to the ablation zone. Prior to ∼15.5 ka, the δ18Owater value of the Mississippi River was similar to that of regional precipitation or low-latitude LIS meltwater, but the Ba

  7. Origin and geochemistry of saline spring waters in the Athabasca oil sands region, Alberta, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gue, Anita E.; Mayer, Bernhard; Grasby, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Saline groundwater enters the Athabasca and Clearwater rivers in the AOSR via springs. • High TDS is due to subsurface dissolution of Devonian evaporites and carbonates. • Low δ 18 O values, and 3 H and 14 C data suggest some Laurentide glacial meltwater input. • Bacterial sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, and CH 4 oxidation were identified. • Metal and PAH contents are reported; bitumen does not appear to be major influence. - Abstract: The geochemistry of saline spring waters in the Athabasca oil sands region (AOSR) in Alberta (Canada) discharging from Devonian carbonate rocks into the Athabasca and Clearwater rivers was characterized for major ions, trace elements, dissolved gases, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In addition, stable isotope analyses of H 2 O, SO 4 , dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), Sr, and CH 4 were used to trace the sources of spring waters and their dissolved solutes, and to identify subsurface processes affecting water chemistry. The spring waters had δ 18 O values as low as −23.5‰, suggesting they are composed of up to 75% Laurentide glacial meltwater. Tritium and radiocarbon age-dating results, analyzed for three spring waters, supported a glacial origin. The high salinity of the spring waters (TDS 7210–51,800 mg/L) was due to dissolution of Devonian evaporite and carbonate deposits in the subsurface. Spring waters were affected by bacterial (dissimilatory) sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, and methane oxidation. Trace elements were present in spring waters at varying concentrations, with only one spring containing several predominant oil sands metals (As, Fe, Mo, Ni, Se, Zn) suggesting bitumen as a source. Five springs contained elements (Al, As, B, Fe, Se) at concentrations exceeding water quality guidelines for the protection of aquatic life. Seven PAHs were detected in spring waters (total PAH concentrations ranged from 7.3 to 273.6 ng/L), but most springs contained a maximum of two PAHs

  8. Geochemistry, environmental and provenance study of the Middle Miocene Leitha limestones (Central Paratethys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ahmed

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mineralogical, major, minor, REE and trace element analyses of rock samples were performed on Middle Miocene limestones (Leitha limestones, Badenian collected from four localities from Austria (Mannersdorf, Wöllersdorf, Kummer and Rosenberg quarries and the Fertőrákos quarry in Hungary. Impure to pure limestones (i.e. limited by Al2O3 contents above or below 0.43 wt. % were tested to evaluate the applicability of various geochemical proxies and indices in regard to provenance and palaeoenvironmental interpretations. Pure and impure limestones from Mannersdorf and Wöllersdorf (southern Vienna Basin show signs of detrital input (REEs = 27.6 ± 9.8 ppm, Ce anomaly = 0.95 ± 0.1 and the presence of quartz, muscovite and clay minerals in impure limestones and diagenetic influence (low contents of, e.g., Sr = 221 ± 49 ppm, Na is not detected, Ba = 15.6 ± 8.8 ppm in pure limestones. Thus, in both limestones the reconstruction of original sedimentary palaeoenvironments by geochemistry is hampered. The Kummer and Fertőrákos (Eisenstadt–Sopron Basin comprise pure limestones (e.g., averages Sr = 571 ± 139 ppm, Na = 213 ± 56 ppm, Ba = 21 ± 4 ppm, REEs = 16 ± 3 ppm and Ce anomaly = 0.62 ± 0.05 and composed predominantly of calcite exhibiting negligible diagenesis. Deposition under a shallow-water, well oxygenated to intermittent dysoxic marine environment can be reconstructed. Pure to impure limestones at Rosenberg–Retznei (Styrian Basin are affected to some extent by detrital input and volcano-siliciclastic admixture. The Leitha limestones at Rosenberg have the least diagenetic influence among the studied localities (i.e. averages Sr = 1271 ± 261 ppm, Na = 315 ± 195 ppm, Ba = 32 ± 15 ppm, REEs = 9.8 ± 4.2 ppm and Ce anomaly = 0.77 ± 0.1 and consist of calcite, minor dolomite and quartz. The siliciclastic sources are characterized by immobile elemental ratios (i.e. La/Sc and Th/Co which apply not only for the siliciclastics, but also

  9. Geochemistry and Fuid-Inclusion Microthermometry of the Farsesh Barite Deposit, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarasvandi Alireza

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Permian carbonate-hosted Farsesh barite deposit is located southeast of the City of Aligudarz in the province of Lorestan, Iran. Structurally, this deposit lies in the Zagros metallogenic belt and the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone. Barite mineralisations occur as open-space flling veins, and as massive and replacement ores along fractures, faults and shear zones of the Permian carbonate host rocks. In order to determine the structure, in addition to pe-trographic and fuid-inclusions studies, an ICP-MS analysis was carried out in order to measure the major as well as the trace and rare earth elements. The Farsesh barite deposit has a simple mineralogy, of which barite is the main mineral, followed by calcite, dolomite, quartz, and opaque minerals such as Fe-oxides. Replacement of bar-ite by calcite is common and is more frequent than space-flling mineralisation. Sulphide minerals are minor and mainly consist of chalcopyrite and pyrite, which are altered by weathering to covellite, malachite and azurite. Petrographic analysis and micro-thermometry were carried out on the two-phase liquid/vapour inclusions in ellipsoidal or irregularly shaped minerals ranging in size from 5–10 µm. The measurements were conducted on fuid inclusions during the heating and subsequent homogenisation in the liquid phase. The low homogenisation temperatures (200–125°C and low to moderate salinity (4.2–20 eq wt% NaCl indicate that the barite had precipitated from hydrothermal basinal water with low to moderate salinity. It appears from the major and trace elements that geochemical features such as Ba and Sr enrichment in the barite samples was accompanied by depletion of Pb, Zn, Hg, Cu and Sb. The geochemistry of the rare earth elements, such as low σREE concentrations, LREE-enrichment chondrite-normalised REE patterns, the negative Ce and positive Eu anomalies, the low Ce/La ratio and the positive La and Gd anomalies, suggest that the Farsesh barite was deposited

  10. Geochemistry of K/T-boundary Chicxulub ejecta of NE-Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harting, M.; Deutsch, A.; Rickers, K.

    2003-12-01

    Many K/T sections all over the world contain impact spherules supposed related to the Chicxulub event. This study focus on ejecta layers in NE-Mexican profiles. We carried out systematic XRF and synchrotron radiation measurements on such spherules at the HASYLAB and ANKA facilities as well as microprobe analyses (CAMECA SX50). Area scans on tektite-like material of the Bochil section reveal a pronounced zonation in the inner part, dominated by Ba and Sr whereas secondary CaCO3 dominates in the altered margin. The composition of the spherules from the Mesa-Juan Perez section differ significantly from the Beloc (Haiti) and Bochil tektite glasses. At Mesa-Juan Perez, spherules are either extremely rich in Fe and Ca or consist of smectite, some of those carry carbonate inclusions. Yttrium, La and Ce are zoned within the smectite with concentrations below the detection limit and up to 20 æg/g The Ca-rich inclusions are enriched in Y (up to 35 æg/g) and La (18 æg/g) and, compared to the surrounding smectite, also in Ce (up to 34 æg/g). The Ce enrichment in spherules from the Mesa-Juan Perez section indicates impact-melted carbonates of the Yucatan carbonate platform as possible precursor rocks. Recent investigations focus on the chemistry of melt rock samples from the PEMEX wells Yucatan-6 and Chicxulub-1: Their average composition (mean of 250 data points in wt-percent ) is 61.6 for SiO2, 0.16 for TiO2, 18.07 for Al2O3, 0.01 for Cr2O3, 1.98 for Na2O, 1.5 for FeO, 0.05 for MnO, 0.01 for NiO, 0.31 for MgO, 9.14 for K2O, 3.44 for CaO, and 0.01 for SO2. These results are in some cases comparable to the geochemistry of ejecta glasses, e.g. from Beloc (Haiti).

  11. Radionuclide activities, geochemistry, and accumulation rates of sediments in the Gulf of Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srisuksawad, K.; Porntepkasemsan, B.; Nouchpramool, S.; Yamkate, P.; Carpenter, R.; Peterson, M.L.; Hamilton, T.

    1997-01-01

    Downcore concentration profiles of 210 Pb , U, and Th isotopes, Al, Fe, Ti, Mn and Sc were measured in sediment box cores collected at 22 stations (16-70 m water depth) covering most of the Thai zone of the Gulf of Thailand. Distributions of excess 210 Pb and the detrital elements were used to study spatial variations in sedimentary processes, mineralogy, and geochemistry between different regions of the gulf. Steady-state depositional concentrations and fluxes of excess 210 Pb are 3-10 times lower in Gulf of Thailand sediments than in sediments from mid-latitudes in the northern hemisphere, reflecting lower 210 Pb inputs from atmospheric fallout at 6-13 o N latitude and from lower production of 210 Pb from 226 Ra in the shallower waters of the Gulf. U and Th concentrations are approximately 2-3 times higher than those in shelf sediments from mid-latitudes of North America, consistent with a higher proportion of granitic source rocks in the Thai environment. Downcore variations in 228 Th/ 232 Th activity ratios and in U activities reveal that exchange of interstitial and overlying waters and their dissolved chemicals occurs down to 20 cm in 8 of 10 cores. This benthic exchange may be important in budgets of fluxes of other soluble chemicals in this shallow shelf sea. A net flux of U isotopes from overlying water into Gulf of Thailand sediments occurs in contrast to their release from sediments of the tropical Amazon shelf. Detectable levels of 137 Cs were found only in sediments near the mouth of the largest river, the Chao Phraya. The detrital elements 232 Th, 230 Th, Al, Ti, and Sc all show relatively uniform downcore concentration profiles. This supports a key assumption in calculations of sediment accumulation rates from downcore profiles of 210 Pb activity, that steady-state depositional conditions exist and that basic sediment mineralogy and grain size does not change. 210 Pb model derived mass accumulation rates vary between 270 and 490 mg/cm 2 per year in

  12. The distribution of methane in groundwater in Alberta (Canada) and associated aqueous geochemistry conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humez, Pauline; Mayer, Bernhard; Nightingale, Michael; Becker, Veith; Kingston, Andrew; Taylor, Stephen; Millot, Romain; Kloppmann, Wolfram

    2016-04-01

    Development of unconventional energy resources such as shale gas and coalbed methane has generated some public concern with regard to the protection of groundwater and surface water resources from leakage of stray gas from the deep subsurface. In terms of environmental impact to and risk assessment of shallow groundwater resources, the ultimate challenge is to distinguish: (a) natural in-situ production of biogenic methane, (b) biogenic or thermogenic methane migration into shallow aquifers due to natural causes, and (c) thermogenic methane migration from deep sources due to human activities associated with the exploitation of conventional or unconventional oil and gas resources. We have conducted a NSERC-ANR co-funded baseline study investigating the occurrence of methane in shallow groundwater of Alberta (Canada), a province with a long record of conventional and unconventional hydrocarbon exploration. Our objective was to assess the occurrence and sources of methane in shallow groundwaters and to also characterize the hydrochemical environment in which the methane was formed or transformed through redox processes. Ultimately our aim was to determine whether methane was formed in-situ or whether it migrated from deeper formations into shallow aquifers. Combining hydrochemical and dissolved and free geochemical gas data from 372 groundwater samples obtained from 186 monitoring wells of the provincial groundwater observation well network (GOWN) in Alberta, it was found that methane is ubiquitous in groundwater in Alberta and is predominantly of biogenic origin. The highest concentrations of dissolved biogenic methane (> 0.01 mM or > 0.2 mg/L), characterized by δ13CCH4 values deep thermogenic gas that had migrated in significant amounts into shallow aquifers either naturally or via anthropogenically induced pathways. This study shows that the combined interpretation of aqueous geochemistry data in concert with the chemical and isotopic composition of dissolved and

  13. Petrogenesis of Malaysian tin granites: geochemistry, fractional crystallization, U-Pb zircon geochronology and tectonic setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai-Pan Ng, Samuel; Searle, Mike; Whitehouse, Martin; Chung, Sun-Lin; Ghani, Azman; Robb, Laurence; Sone, Masatoshi; Oliver, Grahame; Gardiner, Nick; Roselee, Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    The Malaysian tin granites forming the backbone of the Thai-Malay Peninsula has been long recognized with two distinct granitic provinces:- 1. Early Permian to Late Triassic Eastern Province with mainly "I-type" (Hbl)-Bt granites with associated Cu-Au deposits, with subordinate Bt granites hosting limited Sn-W deposits, and 2. Late Triassic Main Range Province with mainly "S-type" Bt granites with associated Sn-W deposits, and subordinate (Hbl)-Bt granites. New geochemical data show that Chappell and White's (1974) I-S granite classification adopted in the existing model does not adequately distinguish the granites from one another as previously implied. Trace element geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotopic compositions show that the Malaysian tin granites in both provinces have transitional I-S characteristics. In addition, they inherited within-plate signature from Cambro-Ordovician Gondwana-related source rocks. Previous ages were obtained by whole rock Rb-Sr and biotite K-Ar geochronology in the 70s and 80s, dating methods that may not accurately represent the crystallization age of granites. We re-sampled the entire Malaysian Peninsula and 40 samples were collected for high-precision U-Pb SIMS dating on extracted zircon grains in order to better constrain the magmatic and tectonic evolution of Southeast Asia. The crystallization ages of the Eastern Province granitoids have been constrained ranging from 220 to 290 Ma, while the Main Range (Western) Province granitoids have ages ranging from 200 to 230 Ma. A progressive westward younging trend is apparent across the Eastern Province, but becomes less obvious in the Main Range Province. Our model suggests two east dipping subduction zones. We suggest that subduction roll-back along the Bentong-Raub suture might account for the westward younging trend, in the Eastern province. A second Late Triassic east-dipping subduction zone beneath western Malaysia is proposed in order to explain the "I-type" components to the Main

  14. Small scale changes of geochemistry and flow field due to transient heat storage in aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, S.; Boockmeyer, A.; Li, D.; Beyer, C.

    2013-12-01

    Heat exchangers in the subsurface are increasingly installed for transient heat storage due to the need of heating or cooling of buildings as well as the interim storage of heat to compensate for the temporally fluctuating energy production by wind or solar energy. For heat storage to be efficient, high temperatures must be achieved in the subsurface. Significant temporal changes of the soil and groundwater temperatures however effect both the local flow field by temperature dependent fluid parameters as well as reactive mass transport through temperature dependent diffusion coefficients, geochemical reaction rates and mineral equilibria. As the use of heat storage will be concentrated in urban areas, the use of the subsurface for (drinking) water supply and heat storage will typically coincide and a reliable prognosis of the processes occurring is needed. In the present work, the effects of a temporal variation of the groundwater temperature, as induced by a local heat exchanger introduced into a groundwater aquifer, are studied. For this purpose, the coupled non-isothermal groundwater flow, heat transport and reactive mass transport is simulated in the near filed of such a heat exchanger. By explicitly discretizing and incorporating the borehole, the borehole cementation and the heat exchanger tubes, a realistic geometrical and process representation is obtained. The numerical simulation code OpenGeoSys is used in this work, which incorporates the required processes of coupled groundwater flow, heat and mass transport as well as temperature dependent geochemistry. Due to the use of a Finite Element Method, a close representation of the geometric effects can be achieved. Synthetic scenario simulations for typical settings of salt water formations in northern Germany are used to investigate the geochemical effects arising from a high temperature heat storage by quantifying changes in groundwater chemistry and overall reaction rates. This work presents the

  15. The application of soil-gas geochemistry to precisely locate La Victoria fault near Paracotos (Venezuela)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaBrecque, J.J.; Rosales, P.A.; Cordoves, P.R.

    1999-01-01

    concluded that soil-gas geochemistry studies can precisely locate active faults and in this case one, which only has about one mm of movement (displacement) per year. Copyright (1999) Geological Society of Australia

  16. Continental lithospheric evolution: Constraints from the geochemistry of felsic volcanic rocks in the Dharwar Craton, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikyamba, C.; Ganguly, Sohini; Saha, Abhishek; Santosh, M.; Rajanikanta Singh, M.; Subba Rao, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    Felsic magmatism associated with ocean-ocean and ocean-continent subduction processes provide important evidence for distinct episodes of crust-generation and continental lithospheric evolution. Rhyolites constitute an integral component of the tholeiitic to calc-alkaline basalt-andesite-dacite-rhyolite (BADR) association and contribute to crustal growth processes at convergent plate margins. The evolution of the Dharwar Craton of southern peninsular India during Meso- to Neoarchean times was marked by extensive development of greenstone belts. These granite-greenstone terranes have distinct volcano-sedimentary associations consistent with their geodynamic setting. The present study deals with geochemistry of rhyolites from the Chitradurga-Shimoga greenstone belts of western (WDC) and the Gadwal-Kadiri greenstone belts of eastern (EDC) sectors of Dharwar Craton to compare and evaluate their petrogenesis and geodynamic setting and their control on the continental lithospheric evolution of the Dharwar Craton. At a similar range of SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, the rhyolites of WDC are more potassic, whereas the EDC rhyolites are more sodic and less magnesian with slight increase in TiO2. Minor increase in MgO content of WDC rhyolites reflects their ferromagnesian trace elements which are comparatively lower in the rhyolites of EDC. The relative enrichment in LILE (K, Rb) and depletion in HFSE (Nb, Ta, Zr, Hf) marked by negative Nb-Ta, Zr-Hf and Ti anomalies endorse the convergent margin processes for the generation of rhyolites of both the sectors of Dharwar Craton. The high silica potassic rhyolites of Shimoga and Chitradurga greenstone belts of WDC showing prominent negative Eu and Ti anomalies, flat HREE patterns correspond to Type 3 rhyolites and clearly point towards their generation and emplacement in an active continental margin environment. The geochemical characteristics of Gadwal and Kadiri rhyolites from eastern Dharwar Craton marked by aluminous compositions with

  17. Petrology, Palynology, and Geochemistry of Gray Hawk Coal (Early Pennsylvanian, Langsettian in Eastern Kentucky, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C. Hower

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents recently collected data examining the organic petrology, palynology, mineralogy and geochemistry of the Gray Hawk coal bed. From the Early Pennsylvanian, Langsettian substage, Gray Hawk coal has been mined near the western edge of the eastern Kentucky portion of the Central Appalachian coalfield. While the coal is thin, rarely more than 0.5-m thick, it has a low-ash yield and a low-S content, making it an important local resource. The Gray Hawk coal palynology is dominated by Lycospora spp., and contains a diverse spectrum of small lycopods, tree ferns, small ferns, calamites, and gymnosperms. The maceral assemblages show an abundance of collotelinite, telinite, vitrodetrinite, fusinite, and semifusinite. Fecal pellet-derived macrinite, albeit with more compaction than is typically seen in younger coals, was observed in the Gray Hawk coal. The minerals in the coal are dominated by clay minerals (e.g., kaolinite, mixed-layer illite/smectite, illite, and to a lesser extent, pyrite, quartz, and iron III hydroxyl-sulfate, along with traces of chlorite, and in some cases, jarosite, szomolnokite, anatase, and calcite. The clay minerals are of authigenic and detrital origins. The occurrence of anatase as cell-fillings also indicates an authigenic origin. With the exception of Ge and As, which are slightly enriched in the coals, the concentrations of other trace elements are either close to or much lower than the averages for world hard coals. Arsenic and Hg are also enriched in the top bench of the coal and probably occur in pyrite. The elemental associations (e.g., Al2O3/TiO2, Cr/Th-Sc/Th indicate a sediment-source region with intermediate and felsic compositions. Rare metals, including Ga, rare earth elements and Ge, are highly enriched in the coal ashes, and the Gray Hawk coals have a great potential for industrial use of these metals. The rare earth elements in the samples are weakly fractionated or are characterized by heavy

  18. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of serpentinite from the Ingalls ophiolite complex, central Cascades, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, J. H., Jr.; Milliken, S. H.; Zalud, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    The Jurassic Ingalls ophiolite complex is located in the central Cascades, Washington State. This ophiolite predominantly consists of three variably serpentinized mantle units. Serpentinite occurs as massive replacing peridotite, or as highly sheared fault zones cutting other rocks. Mylonitic serpentinite forms a large-scale mélange in the middle of the ophiolite, and is interpreted as a fracture zone. Whole-rock and mineral geochemistry of the massive serpentinite was done to understand the metasomatic process and identify the possible protoliths of these rocks. Whole-rock major and trace elements of the massive serpentinite are similar to modern peridotites. The majority of samples analyzed are strongly serpentinized, while a few were moderately to weakly altered. Ca, Mg, and Al suggest these rocks formed from serpentinized harzburgite and dunite with minor lherzolite. All samples have positive Eu/Eu*. Serpentinites plot in fields defined by modern abyssal and forearc peridotites. Trace elements suggests the protoliths underwent variable amounts of mantel depletion (5-20%). Serpentine and relic igneous minerals were analyzed by EPMA at the Florida Center for Analytical Electron Microscopy. The serpentine dose not chemically display brucite mixing, has minor substitution of Fe, Ni, and Cr for Mg, and minor Al substitution for Si. Bastites have higher Ni than replaced olivine. Mineral chemistry, high LOI, and X-ray diffraction suggest lizardite is the primary serpentine polymorph, with minor chrysotile also occurring. Relic Al-chromite and Cr-spinel commonly have Cr-magnetite rims. These relic cores have little SiO2 and Fe3+, suggesting the spinels are well preserved. Most spinels plot in overlap fields defined by abyssal and arc peridotite, while two samples plot entirely in arc fields. Relic olivine have Fo90 to Fo92 and plot along the mantle array. Relic pyroxene are primarily enstatite, with lesser high-Ca varieties. Relic minerals plot near fields defined by

  19. Geochemistry and the origin of the Mamouniyeh iron ore-terra rossa deposit, Markazi Province - Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marziyeh Mahboubiyan Fard

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Iron is among the metals whose ore deposits are not confined to a specific geologic period of crustal formation and they have formed in various geologic environments during previous periods (Ghorbani, 2007. About 95% of iron ore deposits have sedimentary origin and have formed due to chemical deposition from ancient sea water. The remaining percent is the result of alteration and magmatic activities (Gutzmer and Beukes, 2009. In sedimentary environments, a large amount of sedimentary iron minerals have formed resulting in different iron facies. Iron oxide facies are of the most important facies (James, 1954. The most important Iranian iron deposits are located in Central Iran, Sanandaj- Sirjan and East Iran zones, and the Kordestan area (Ghorbani, 2007. In the Orumiyeh-Dokhtar Zone, many iron ore deposits have been formed in conjunction with granitic and granodioritic plutons related to Oligocene-Miocene plutonic and volcanic activities (Hoshmandzadeh, 1995. The Mamouniyeh iron ore-terra rossa deposit is located in the Orumiyeh-Dokhtar volcanic zone. Iron mineralization have occurred in trachytic-trachyandesitic lavas and pyroclastic rocks of Pliocene age. Materials and methods A total of 28 rock samples were picked up from ore and host rocks during field observations. Petrographical and mineralogical studies were performed on 15 thin sections of ore and host rocks. XRD studies were performed on 3 ore samples. In order to investigate the geochemistry of the ore, 10 samples were analyzed for major, trace and rare earth elements (REEs using the ICP-MS method. Result Field and mineralogical studies reveal that the ore is composed of hematite along with crypto-crystalline silica as alternating layers of various thickness and color. The existence of alternating layers of hematite and quartz implies that the ore is similar to banded iron formations, but on a smaller scale, related to submarine hydrothermal activities. Silica is found as

  20. The geochemistry during management of lake acidification caused by the rewetting of sulfuric (pH < 4) acid sulfate soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosley, Luke M.; Shand, Paul; Self, Peter; Fitzpatrick, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The dynamic geochemistry of a lake acidification event and its management was assessed. • Sulfate complexes dominated the aqueous metal speciation at low pH. • Iron oxydroxysulfate minerals (schwertmannite, jarosite) were identified. • Aerial additions of limestone to the acidic water slowly returned the pH to near neutral. • Coating of the limestone with gypsum and metal precipitates limited its neutralisation efficiency. - Abstract: Understanding the geochemistry and kinetics of acidification events arising from acid sulfate soils is important to enable effective management and risk assessment. Large-scale exposure and oxidation of acid sulfate soils occurred during a drought in the Lower Lakes (Murray–Darling Basin) of South Australia. We examined the geochemical changes that occurred in one region (Boggy Lake) that experienced surface water acidification and was subsequently neutralised via aerial limestone (CaCO 3 ) dosing and dilution via natural lake refill. Very low pH (< 3) and high concentrations (≈10–1000 mg/L Fe, Al, Mn) of dissolved metals were initially found in surface water. The water chemistry exhibited pH-dependent enhancement of constituents typically associated with acid sulfate soils (SO 4 , Al and Fe). Geochemical speciation calculations indicated that most (60–80%) of the acidity was present as dissolved metal-sulfate complexes at low pH. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses showed that the orange-brown precipitates present after an initial limestone dosing were secondary oxyhydroxysulfate minerals (schwertmannite, jarosite). Further limestone dosing resulted in neutralisation of the pH, reduction in dissolved metal concentrations, dissolution of jarosite and schwertmannite precipitates, and formation of other metal oxyhydroxide phases. The results were consistent with a pE-pH diagram constructed for metal-sulfur geochemistry. Assessment of the measured and simulated (using PHREEQC) pH and Ca/Cl ratio during

  1. Fracture mapping in clays: the design and application of a mobile gas geochemistry laboratory for the analysis of soil gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, R.G.

    1988-02-01

    Integrated soil gas analyses for helium, radon, carbon dioxide, oxygen and organic gases allow the accurate interpretation of soil gas signatures as indicators of underlying structure. The most important features observed in the patterns of soil gas behaviour are large variations over faults and fractures. Structures such as these provide channelways for fluid movement in the upper crust. The construction of a mobile gas geochemistry laboratory for the analysis of soil gases at field investigation sites, and the subsequent trials carried out to evaluate the laboratory, clearly show that the soil gas investigation technique is accurate and viable as an independent site investigation method for the study of fracturing and groundwater movement around potential waste repository sites. (author)

  2. Geochemistry of groundwater in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer, Idaho National Laboratory and vicinity, eastern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattray, Gordon W.

    2018-05-30

    Nuclear research activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in eastern Idaho produced radiochemical and chemical wastes that were discharged to the subsurface, resulting in detectable concentrations of some waste constituents in the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) aquifer. These waste constituents may pose risks to the water quality of the aquifer. In order to understand these risks to water quality the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the DOE, conducted a study of groundwater geochemistry to improve the understanding of hydrologic and chemical processes in the ESRP aquifer at and near the INL and to understand how these processes affect waste constituents in the aquifer.Geochemistry data were used to identify sources of recharge, mixing of water, and directions of groundwater flow in the ESRP aquifer at the INL. The geochemistry data were analyzed from 167 sample sites at and near the INL. The sites included 150 groundwater, 13 surface-water, and 4 geothermal-water sites. The data were collected between 1952 and 2012, although most data collected at the INL were collected from 1989 to 1996. Water samples were analyzed for all or most of the following: field parameters, dissolved gases, major ions, dissolved metals, isotope ratios, and environmental tracers.Sources of recharge identified at the INL were regional groundwater, groundwater from the Little Lost River (LLR) and Birch Creek (BC) valleys, groundwater from the Lost River Range, geothermal water, and surface water from the Big Lost River (BLR), LLR, and BC. Recharge from the BLR that may have occurred during the last glacial epoch, or paleorecharge, may be present at several wells in the southwestern part of the INL. Mixing of water at the INL primarily included mixing of surface water with groundwater from the tributary valleys and mixing of geothermal water with regional groundwater. Additionally, a zone of mixing between tributary valley water and

  3. Study the mechanisms of recharge of the phreatic aquifers, south east egypt, using environmental isotopes and hydro geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, T.M.; Awad, M.A.; Hamza, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    The recharge rate is the most critical factor to groundwater resources management especially in semi-arid and arid areas. This paper presents a study on the feasibility of a groundwater development plan for south east egypt area. Environmental stable isotopes (oxygen-18 and deuterium), and hydro geochemistry techniques were used to investigate the recharge sources of groundwater. The examined groundwater wells tap the quaternary, basement and Nubian sandstone aquifers. The isotopic compositions of these groundwater samples indicate that there is a mixing among three different sources of recharge, local precipitation, palaeo water and sea water intrusion along the coastal plain, from the hydrochemical point of view, the predominant water types reflect meteoric, as well as marine waters genesis. The changes in salinity depend upon the dissolution of terrestrial salts, distance from the catchment area and seepage from deep aquifers. 7 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Fracture mapping in clays, using gas geochemistry: background, design of a mobile laboratory, and surveys in England and Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, R.G.; Duddridge, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    Integrated soil gas analyses for helium, radon, carbon dioxide and oxygen allow the accurate interpretation of soil gas signatures as indicators of underlying structure, due to large variations over faults and fractures. Structures such as these provide channelways for fluid movement in the upper crust. A mobile gas geochemistry laboratory for the analysis of soil gases was constructed and surveys were carried out at sites in England and Italy. At the Down Ampney site, Gloucestershire, gas was injected into a fault plane, and recorded some hours later at the surface. Refinement of this experiment would allow a full characterization of permeable pathways at a site to be made. The soil gas technique has been shown to be viable as an independent site investigation method for the study of fracturing and groundwater movement around potential waste repository sites

  5. Fracture mapping in clays: using gas geochemistry. Background, design of a mobile laboratory and surveys in England and Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duddridge, G.A.

    1991-06-01

    Integrated soil gas analyses for helium, radon, carbon dioxide and oxygen allow the accurate interpretation of soil gas signatures as indicators of underlying structure, due to large variations over faults and fractures. Structures such as these provide channelways for fluid movement in the upper crust. A mobile gas geochemistry laboratory for the analysis of soil gases was constructed and surveys were carried out at sites in England and Italy. At the Down Ampney site, Gloucestershire, gas was injected into a fault plane, and recorded some hours later at the surface. Refinement of this experiment would allow a full characterisation of permeable pathways at a site to be made. The soil gas technique has been shown to be viable as an independent site investigation method for the study of fracturing and groundwater movement around potential waste repository sites. (author)

  6. The geochemistry of deep-sea coral skeletons: A review of vital effects and applications for palaeoceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Laura F.; Adkins, Jess F.; Frank, Norbert; Gagnon, Alexander C.; Prouty, Nancy G.; Brendan Roark, E.; de Flierdt, Tina van

    2014-01-01

    Deep-sea corals were discovered over a century ago, but it is only over recent years that focused efforts have been made to explore the history of the oceans using the geochemistry of their skeletal remains. They offer a promising archive of past oceanic environments given their global distribution, layered growth patterns, longevity and preservation as well as our ability to date them using radiometric techniques. This paper provides an overview of the current state-of-the-art in terms of geochemical approaches to using deep-sea coral skeletons to explore the history of the ocean. Deep-sea coral skeletons have a wide array of morphologies (e.g. solitary cup corals, branching colonial corals) and materials (calcite, aragonite and proteins). As such their biomineralization strategies are diverse, leading to complex geochemistry within coral skeletons. Notwithstanding these complications, progress has been made on developing methods for reconstructing the oceanographic environment in the past using trace elements and isotopic methods. Promising approaches within certain coral groups include clumped isotopes and Mg/Li for temperature reconstructions, boron isotopes and radiocarbon for carbon cycling, εNd, and radiocarbon for circulation studies and δ15N, P/Ca and Ba/Ca for nutrient tracer studies. Likewise there is now a range of techniques for dating deep-sea corals skeletons (e.g. U-series, radiocarbon), and determining their growth rates (e.g. radiocarbon and 210Pb). Dating studies on historic coral populations in the Atlantic, Southern Ocean and Pacific point to climate and environmental changes being dominant controls on coral populations over millennial and orbital timescales. This paper provides a review of a range of successes and promising approaches. It also highlights areas in which further research would likely provide new insights into biomineralization, palaeoceanography and distribution of past coral populations.

  7. Advances in authigenic silicate geochemistry: Evidence for Precessional Control of Pleistocene Lake Salinity at Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deocampo, D.; Simpson, A. J.; Cuadros, J.; Beverly, E.; Ashley, G. M.; Delaney, J. S.; Longstaffe, F. J.

    2017-12-01

    Magnesium enrichment of authigenic clays is an indicator of elevated salinity in hydrologically closed lake basins. Studies at Olduvai Gorge over the last four decades have shown that chemically-precipitated clay minerals form a substantial portion of the sedimentary succession, in some intervals even dominating the sediment. Outcrops of lacustrine mud in two localities near the depocenter were examined using a new geochronological framework based on Ar/Ar dating of volcaniclastic sanidine (Deino, 2012). Olduvai's clay mineralogy is dominated by 2:1 clays, including smectite, illite, and interstratified illite-smectite. Previous work has shown that clay alteration includes octahedral Mg-enrichment, Fe-reduction, K-fixation, and low-temperature illitization. Here we show that long term environmental conditions in Paleolake Olduvai indicated by sub-micron clay geochemistry were generally saline and alkaline between 1.78 and 1.92 Ma, but 6 episodes of freshened paleolake water are indicated by intervals of lower Mg content. Five of these freshening episodes occurred at peak climatic precession. The sub-micron clay geochemistry agrees with infrared spectroscopy and whole-rock geochemical compositions, and the same stratigraphic variation is observed at both localities, separated laterally by 330m. Preliminary analyses show that the values are associated stratigraphically with geochemically defined freshening events. This suggests that isotopic and elemental equilibrium may not be reached at the same time, or that diagenetic events may have differentially altered the isotopic record. The environmental changes recorded in the Olduvai sediments occurred at a time when zonal Walker circulation increasingly affected global climate, new stone technologies emerged, and the genus Homo spread beyond Africa. Unraveling the details of mineralogical records such as those at Olduvai will be important in characterizing details of continental Quaternary environmental change

  8. Palaeoenvironmental assessment of Westphalian fluvio-lacustrine deposits of Lorraine (France) using a combination of organic geochemistry and sedimentology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleck, Stephanie; Michels, Raymond; Izart, Alain; Elie, Marcel; Landais, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    The quality and the quantity of organic carbon preserved in modern and ancient terrestrial sediments is the result of a complex interactions of sedimentological factors, such as in-situ productivity, allochtonous supply of organic matter, oxidation processes, biodegradation and sediment accumulation rates. The study aims at utilizing multidisciplinary information in order to characterize the palaeoenvironment in Westphalian fluvio-lacustrine deposits of the Lorraine Coal Basin (NE France). In this basin, the lack of outcrops is the major difficulty. To compensate for this problem, sedimentology, and molecular geochemistry are combined in order to significantly improve the palaeoenvironmental assessment of the area. Geochemical analyses and sedimentology have been carried out on several core samples of the Saulcy drill hole to evaluate local palaeoenvironmental variability. The lithofacies associations in the Upper Carboniferous of the Lorraine basin suggest an alluvial plain environment without marine incursions. Sedimentological interpretations of the core, as well as comparison with sedimentological models, suggests the recognition of different depositional environments from braided and/or meandering rivers to swamp and lakes. The organic geochemistry is focussed on the recognition of aliphatic hydrocarbons and especially on molecular biomarkers, which provide valuable information about the original organic matter and the transformations that took place during sedimentation and diagenesis. In the Lorraine basin, the botanical variability is high and clearly related to the position of the vegetation communities in the fluvial system. The biomarkers (e.g., diterpanes, steranes) show variations, which can be related to the diversity of this ecosystem. In this study, a reinterpretation of the environmental zonation in the sterane ternary diagram adapted to a fluvio-lacustrine sedimentology is proposed. The correlation between sedimentological and geochemical

  9. Rare earth element mineralogy and geochemistry in a laterite profile from Madagascar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Alfons; Janots, Emilie; Gnos, Edwin; Frei, Robert; Bernier, Felix

    2014-01-01

    account for the accumulation of redox-sensitive elements in B-horizon (e.g., Mn, Fe, Co). Under oxidizing conditions, cerianite precipitation causes a Ce fractionation from other trivalent REE. In comparison to the ion adsorption clay of southern China, preferential heavy REE enrichment was not observed in the weathering profile. Another remarkable peculiarity of the studied profile is the occurrence of Gd 2 SO 6 grains. The discovery of this new mineral demonstrates that a natural process exists that that can fractionate REE to such an extent to produce a pure gadolinium end-member mineral. An understanding of such a mechanisms is crucial for the REE geochemistry of low temperature alteration processes as well as for the formation of REE ore deposits or industrial processing

  10. Geochemistry and arsenic behaviour in groundwater resources of the Pannonian Basin (Hungary and Romania)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowland, Helen A.L.; Omoregie, Enoma O.; Millot, Romain; Jimenez, Cristina; Mertens, Jasmin; Baciu, Calin; Hug, Stephan J.; Berg, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Elevated As levels in the Pannonian Basin are mainly present in very old (Palaeo) groundwater of methanogenic Pliocene/Quaternary aquifers, which is in contrast to Asian regions where arsenic-enriched groundwater is generally much younger. Display Omitted Research highlights: → Arsenic originates from Late Pliocene/Quaternary aquifers and some very old waters. → Arsenic levels are controlled by both mobilisation and retention mechanisms. → Mobilisation is caused by biogeochemical reductive dissolution. → Sufficient sulfate supply triggers arsenic retention in sulfide precipitates. → Nearly 500,000 people are exposed to elevated arsenic in their drinking water. - Abstract: Groundwater resources in the Pannonian Basin (Hungary, Romania, Croatia and Serbia) are known to contain elevated naturally occurring As. Published estimates suggest nearly 500,000 people are exposed to levels greater than the EU maximum admissible concentration of 10 μg/L in their drinking water, making it the largest area so affected in Europe. In this study, a variety of groundwaters were collected from Romania and Hungary to elucidate the general geochemistry and identify processes controlling As behaviour. Concentrations ranged from 4 2- reduction containing low As levels ( 7 Li (an indicator of geothermal inputs) and As(tot) in geothermal/saline influenced waters indicate that elevated As is not from an external input, but is released due to an in-aquifer process. Geochemical reasoning, therefore, implies As mobilisation is controlled by redox processes, most likely microbially mediated reductive dissolution of As bearing Fe-oxides, known to occur in sediments from the area. More important is an overlying retention mechanism determined by the presence or absence of SO 4 2- . Ongoing SO 4 2- reduction will release S 2- , removing As from solution either by the formation of As-sulfides, or from sorption onto Fe-sulfide phases. In methanogenic waters, As released

  11. Geochemistry and age of the Essimingor volcano, northern Tanzania (East Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mana, S.; Mollel, G. F.; Feigenson, M.; Carr, M. J.; Turrin, B. D.; Furman, T.; Swisher, C. C.

    2009-12-01

    Essimingor is the oldest of a line of north-south trending pre-rift volcanoes in northern Tanzania associated with the opening of the southern sector of the Gregory Rift, part of the East African Rift system (EAR). Essimingor is centrally located within the present day rift, on the East-West alignment between the large volcanoes of Kilimanjaro and Ngorongoro. Based on K-Ar data of Bagdasaryan et al. (1973), Essimingor is commonly reported to be about 8 Ma, although Evans et al. (1971) reports it to be between 5 to 3 Ma. Geochemically, Essimingor is characterized by alkaline magmatism and it is compositionally similar to adjacent albeit younger volcanoes (e.g. Burko, Tarosero and Monduli). Although the regional trend in magmatic evolution is from basalt to alkaline basalt, and then to more evolved rock types enriched in alkalis (Dawson, 2008), Essimingor appears to be an exception given its age. In fact, this volcano precedes or is, perhaps, contemporaneous with the dominantly basaltic regional magmatism. Essimingor’s age and geochemistry are crucial to providing the earliest record for the tectonomagmatic reconstruction of the EAR in northern Tanzania. To better characterize this pivotal pre-rift volcano we present new 40Ar/39Ar laser-incremental heating and geochemical analyses (major, minor and trace element compositions, and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data) on twelve carefully chosen lava samples. Laser-incremental heating of whole rock matrix, bulk whole rock and nepheline, yield 40Ar/39Ar ages ranging from 5.81±0.01 Ma to 6.20±0.03 Ma. These ages restrict the duration of volcanism of Essimingor to approximately 370 kyr, and its maximum age to about 6.2 Ma, approximately 2 myr earlier than previously considered. Preliminary geochemical data suggest the presence of large variations in radiogenic isotopes: 87Sr/86Sr ranges from 0.7036 to 0.7056, 143Nd/144Nd from 0.5124 to 0.5126 and 206Pb/204Pb are about 20-21. The isotopic and incompatible trace element variations

  12. Geology, mineralization, geochemistry and petrology of intrusions in the Kuh Zar Au-Cu deposit, Damghan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payam Roohbakhsh

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Kuh Zar Au-Cu deposit is located in the central part of the Torud-Chah Shirin Volcanic-Plutonic Belt, 100 km southeast of the city of Damghan. Mineralization including quartz-base metal veins are common throughout this Cenozoic volcano-plutonic belt (Liaghat et al., 2008; Mehrabi and Ghasemi Siani, 2010. The major part of the study area is covered with Cenozoic pyroclastic and volcanic rocks that are intruded by subvolcanic rocks. This paper aims to study the geological, geochemical and petrogenesis of the area using exploration keys for new mineral deposits in the Torud-Chah Shirin zone. Materials and methods To better understand the geological units and identify the alteration zones of the area, 200 rock samples were collected from the field and 132 thin sections with 15 polished thin sections were prepared for petrography and mineralization studies. Ten samples of intrusions with the least alteration were analyzed using the XRF at the East Amethyst Laboratory in Mashhad, Iran. These samples were also analyzed for trace and rare earth elements using ICP-MS, following a lithium metaborate/tetraborate fusion in the Acme Analytical Laboratories Ltd, Vancouver, Canada. 137 geochemistry samples were prepared by the chip composite method of alteration and mineralization zones and were analyzed in the Acme laboratory by Aqua Regia AQ250. Results The geology of the area consists of pyroclastic (crystal tuff and volcanic rocks with andesite and latite composition, which were intruded by subvolcanic intrusive rocks with porphyritic texture and monzonitic composition. Monzonite rocks were intruded by younger subvolcanic units with dioritic composition. The intrusion of monzonitic pluton and stocks led to the formation of QSP, propylitic, carbonate and silicification-tourmaline broad alteration zones in the area. Monzonite rocks accompanied with disseminated mineralization of about 1 to 10% of pyrite and these sulfides have been converted to

  13. Petrography, geochemistry and tectonic setting of Salmabad Tertiary volcanic rocks, southeast of Sarbisheh, eastern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Goodarzi

    2014-10-01

    is attributed to the mantle source, presumably metasomatized by the Sistan ocean subduction. The trace element features are consistent with the roles played by subducted sediments and fluid released from the subducted slab in magma genesis. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank reviewers for the constructive comments which greatly contributed to the improvement of the manuscript. References Berberian, F., Muir, I.D., Pankhurst, R.J. and Berberian, M., 1982. Late Cretaceous and early Miocene Andean type plutonic activity in northern Makran and Central Iran. Journal of the Geological Society, 139(5: 605-614. Camp, V.E. and Griffis, R., 1982. Character, genesis and tectonic setting of igneous rocks in the Sistan suture zone, eastern Iran. Lithos, 15(3: 221-239. Gill, R., 2010. Igneous rocks and processes. Wiley-Blackwell, Malaysia, 428 pp. Harangi, S., Downes, H., Thirlwall, M., Gmeling, K., 2007. Geochemistry, Petrogenesis and Geodynamic Relationships of Miocene Calc-alkalineVolcanic Rocks in the Western Carpathian arc, Eastern Central Europe. Journal of petrology, 48(12: 2261-2287. Jung, D., Keller, J., Khorasani, R., Marcks, Chr., Baumann, A. and Horn, P., 1983. Petrology of the Tertiary magmatic activity the northern Lut area, East of Iran. Ministry of mines and metals, Geological survey of Iran, geodynamic project (geotraverse in Iran, Tehran, Report 51, pp. 285-336. Karimpour, M.H., Stern, C.R., Farmer, L., Saadat, S. and Malekezadeh, A., 2011. Review of age, Rb-Sr geochemistry and petrogenesis of Jurassic to Quaternary igneous rocks in Lut Block, Eastern Iran. Geopersia, 1(1:19-36. Kuscu, G.G. and Geneli, F., 2010. Review of post-collisional volcanism in the central Anatolian volcanic province(Turkey, with special reference to the Tepekoy volcanic complex. International Journal of Earth Sciences, 99(3: 593-621. Richards, J.P., Spell, T., Rameh, E., Razique, A. and Fletcher T., 2012. High Sr/Y Magmas Reflect Arc Maturity,High Magmatic Water Content, and

  14. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: peer review of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation's report on the Organic Geochemistry of Deep Groundwaters from the Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenster, D.F.; Brookins, D.G.; Harrison, W.; Seitz, M.G.; Lerman, A.; Stamoudis, V.C.

    1984-08-01

    This report summarizes Argonne's review of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation's (ONWI's) final report entitled The Organic Geochemistry of Deep Ground Waters from the Palo Duro Basin, Texas, dated September 1983. Recommendations are made for improving the ONWI report. The main recommendation is to make the text consistent with the title and with the objective of the project as stated in the introduction. Three alternatives are suggested to accomplish this

  15. Mineralogy, geochemistry and microfacies of late Quaternary periplatform sediments: Carbonate export cycles and secondary processes - Sanganeb Atoll and Abington Reef, Sudan, Central Red Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Emmermann, Peter

    2000-01-01

    A set of sediment cores was obtained in the periplatform realm close to Sanganeb Atoll and Abington Reef, about 20 miles offshore the Sudanese coast in the central Red Sea. Microfacies, mineralogy and geochemistry of periplatform sediments were analysed to quantify glacial-interglacial variations in carbonate production and sediment export of the reefs in response to late Quaternary sealevel fluctuations. The present study showed that the periplatform sediments from the Sudanese shelf to grea...

  16. An attempt to reconstruct geodynamically the Belgian palaeogene basin from mineralogical clay data, from radioelement (U, Th, K2O) geochemistry and palynology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinif, Yves; Mercier, Monique; Dupuis Christian; Roche, Emile

    1983-01-01

    By analysing clay mineralogy, U-Th-K 2 O geochemistry and palynology data, we find that the Belgian Palaeogene is dominated by the action of a biostasic period toward the end of the lower Eocene. At the middle Eocene starts a new phase, at least a rhexistasic one at the begining. In the Basin, the geochemical and mineralogical traces of this phase just start from the upper Eocene [fr

  17. Field-scale study of the influence of differing remediation strategies on trace metal geochemistry in metal mine tailings from the Irish Midlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, William T; Bird, Graham; Jacobs, Suzanne R; Devoy, Cora

    2016-03-01

    Mine tailings represent a globally significant source of potentially harmful elements (PHEs) to the environment. The management of large volumes of mine tailings represents a major challenge to the mining industry and environmental managers. This field-scale study evaluates the impact of two highly contrasting remediation approaches to the management and stabilisation of mine tailings. The geochemistry of the tailings, overlying amendment layers and vegetation are examined in the light of the different management approaches. Pseudo-total As, Cd and Pb concentrations and solid-state partitioning (speciation), determined via sequential extraction, were established for two Tailings Management Facilities (TMFs) in Ireland subjected to the following: (1) a 'walk-away' approach (Silvermines) and (2) application of an amendment layer (Galmoy). PHE concentrations in roots and herbage of grasses growing on the TMFs were also determined. Results identify very different PHE concentration profiles with depth through the TMFs and the impact of remediation approach on concentrations and their potential bioavailability in the rooting zone of grass species. Data also highlight the importance of choice of grass species in remediation approaches and the benefits of relatively shallow-rooting Agrostis capillaris and Festuca rubra varieties. In addition, data from the Galmoy TMF indicate the importance of regional soil geochemistry for interpreting the influence of the PHE geochemistry of capping and amendment layers applied to mine tailings.

  18. Geochemistry and arsenic behaviour in groundwater resources of the Pannonian Basin (Hungary and Romania)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowland, Helen A.L., E-mail: helen.rowland@aquatrain.eu [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)] [Faculty of Environmental Sciences, University of Babes-Bolyai, Cluj Napoca (Romania); Omoregie, Enoma O. [School of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences and Williamson Research Centre for Molecular Environmental Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Millot, Romain [BRGM, Metrology Monitoring Analysis Department, Orleans (France); Jimenez, Cristina; Mertens, Jasmin [Faculty of Environmental Sciences, University of Babes-Bolyai, Cluj Napoca (Romania)] [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics (IBP), ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Baciu, Calin [Faculty of Environmental Sciences, University of Babes-Bolyai, Cluj Napoca (Romania); Hug, Stephan J. [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Berg, Michael, E-mail: michael.berg@eawag.ch [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2011-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Elevated As levels in the Pannonian Basin are mainly present in very old (Palaeo) groundwater of methanogenic Pliocene/Quaternary aquifers, which is in contrast to Asian regions where arsenic-enriched groundwater is generally much younger. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Arsenic originates from Late Pliocene/Quaternary aquifers and some very old waters. {yields} Arsenic levels are controlled by both mobilisation and retention mechanisms. {yields} Mobilisation is caused by biogeochemical reductive dissolution. {yields} Sufficient sulfate supply triggers arsenic retention in sulfide precipitates. {yields} Nearly 500,000 people are exposed to elevated arsenic in their drinking water. - Abstract: Groundwater resources in the Pannonian Basin (Hungary, Romania, Croatia and Serbia) are known to contain elevated naturally occurring As. Published estimates suggest nearly 500,000 people are exposed to levels greater than the EU maximum admissible concentration of 10 {mu}g/L in their drinking water, making it the largest area so affected in Europe. In this study, a variety of groundwaters were collected from Romania and Hungary to elucidate the general geochemistry and identify processes controlling As behaviour. Concentrations ranged from <0.5 to 240 {mu}g/L As(tot), with As predominantly in the reduced As(III) form. Using cluster analysis, four main groups of water were identified. Two groups (1 and 2) showed characteristics of water originating from reducing aquifers of the area with both groups having similar ranges of Fe concentrations, indicating that Fe-reduction occurs in both groups. However, As levels and other redox characteristics were very different. Group 1, indicative of waters dominated by methanogenesis contained high As levels (23-208 {mu}g/L, mean 123 {mu}g/L), with group 2 indicative of waters dominated by SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}reduction containing low As levels (<0.5-58 {mu}g/L, mean 11.5 {mu}g/L). The remaining two groups

  19. Geology, mineralization and geochemistry of the Aqkand Cu occurrence (north of Zanjan, Tarom-Hashtjin zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Feyzi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Aqkand Cu occurrence, 48 km north of Zanjan, is located in the Tarom subzone of the Western Alborz-Azerbaijan structural zone. Apart from small scale geological maps of the area, i.e., 1:250,000 geological maps of Bandar-e-Anzali (Davies, 1977 and 1:100,000 geological maps of Hashtjin (Faridi and Anvari, 2000 and a number of unpublished perlite exploration reports, prior to this research no work has been done on Cu mineralization at Aqkand. The present paper provides an overview of the geological framework, the mineralization characteristics, and the results of geochemistry study of the Aqkand Cu occurrence with an application to the ore genesis. Identification of these characteristics can be used as a model for exploration of this type of copper mineralization in the Tarom area and elsewhere. Materials and methods Detailed field work has been carried out at different scales in the Aqkand area. About 35 polished thin and thin sections from host rocks and mineralized and altered zones were studied by conventional petrographic and mineralogic methods at the University of Zanjan. In addition, a total of 6 samples from ore zones at the Aqkand occurrence were analyzed by ICP-MS for trace elements and REE compositions at Kimia Pazhuh Alborz Co., Isfahan, Iran. Results and Discussion The oldest units exposed in the Aqkand area are Eocene volcanic rocks which are overlain unconformably by Oligocene acidic rocks. The Eocene units consist of lithic and vitric tuff with intercalations of andesitic basalt lavas (equal to Karaj Formation, Hirayama et al., 1966. The andesitic basalt lavas show porphyritic texture consisting of plagioclase and altered ferromagnesian minerals set in a fine-grained groundmass. The Oligocene acidic rocks consist of rhyolite-rhyodacite, perlite, pitchstone and ignimbrite. These rocks are exposed as domes and lava flows. The rhyolite-rhyodacite lavas usually show onion-skin weathering and locally display flow bands

  20. Contribution to uranium geochemistry in intrusive granites; Contribution a la geochimie de l'uranium dans les granites intrusifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulomb, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-01-15

    This work aims to define the position of a certain number of French granitic deposits within the field of the geochemistry of granites in general, and of the geochemistry of uranium in particular. The regions concerned are: - 3 French Hercynian ranges, in the Vendee, in Brittany and in the Morvan, - 1 African range, probably precambrian, of the Hoggar. For each range, the petrochemical framework is first of all determined and then the degree of chemical homogeneity of the rocks is evaluated. In the petrochemical groups thus obtained the geochemical behaviour of the uranium is studied. From a point of view of the geochemistry of the granites under investigation, a comparison of the laws of distribution of the major elements in the 4 ranges shows up a convergence of average composition which was not anticipated by geological and petrographic considerations alone. The statistical and geochemical distribution laws of the total uranium as a function of the petrochemical variations are established. A study of the chemical forms of uranium in the rocks has drawn an attention to the qualitative and quantitative importance of the fraction of this uranium soluble in dilute acids. We have therefore reconsidered on the one hand, the laws of distribution of the insoluble uranium, which represents essentially the uranium fixed in crystalline structures (zircon, allanite...), and we have justified on the other hand the interest presented by the soluble uranium: this, although more complex in character, presents a geochemical unity in post magmatic phenomena which makes possible to find a genetic connection between the uraniferous deposits and the intrusive massifs. Finally we have given a plan of the geochemical cycle of uranium, in which we hope to have provided some more accurate data on the igneous phase. (author) [French] Le but du travail presente est de situer sur le plan de la geochimie des granites en general, sur le plan de la geochimie de l'uranium en particulier, un

  1. Contribution to uranium geochemistry in intrusive granites; Contribution a la geochimie de l'uranium dans les granites intrusifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulomb, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-01-15

    This work aims to define the position of a certain number of French granitic deposits within the field of the geochemistry of granites in general, and of the geochemistry of uranium in particular. The regions concerned are: - 3 French Hercynian ranges, in the Vendee, in Brittany and in the Morvan, - 1 African range, probably precambrian, of the Hoggar. For each range, the petrochemical framework is first of all determined and then the degree of chemical homogeneity of the rocks is evaluated. In the petrochemical groups thus obtained the geochemical behaviour of the uranium is studied. From a point of view of the geochemistry of the granites under investigation, a comparison of the laws of distribution of the major elements in the 4 ranges shows up a convergence of average composition which was not anticipated by geological and petrographic considerations alone. The statistical and geochemical distribution laws of the total uranium as a function of the petrochemical variations are established. A study of the chemical forms of uranium in the rocks has drawn an attention to the qualitative and quantitative importance of the fraction of this uranium soluble in dilute acids. We have therefore reconsidered on the one hand, the laws of distribution of the insoluble uranium, which represents essentially the uranium fixed in crystalline structures (zircon, allanite...), and we have justified on the other hand the interest presented by the soluble uranium: this, although more complex in character, presents a geochemical unity in post magmatic phenomena which makes possible to find a genetic connection between the uraniferous deposits and the intrusive massifs. Finally we have given a plan of the geochemical cycle of uranium, in which we hope to have provided some more accurate data on the igneous phase. (author) [French] Le but du travail presente est de situer sur le plan de la geochimie des granites en general, sur le plan de la geochimie de l'uranium en particulier

  2. Sulfur and carbon geochemistry of the Santa Elena peridotites: Comparing oceanic and continental processes during peridotite alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzenbach, Esther M.; Gill, Benjamin C.; Gazel, Esteban; Madrigal, Pilar

    2016-05-01

    Ultramafic rocks exposed on the continent serve as a window into oceanic and continental processes of water-peridotite interaction, so called serpentinization. In both environments there are active carbon and sulfur cycles that contain abiogenic and biogenic processes, which are eventually imprinted in the geochemical signatures of the basement rocks and the calcite and magnesite deposits associated with fluids that issue from these systems. Here, we present the carbon and sulfur geochemistry of ultramafic rocks and carbonate deposits from the Santa Elena ophiolite in Costa Rica. The aim of this study is to leverage the geochemistry of the ultramafic sequence and associated deposits to distinguish between processes that were dominant during ocean floor alteration and those dominant during low-temperature, continental water-peridotite interaction. The peridotites are variably serpentinized with total sulfur concentrations up to 877 ppm that is typically dominated by sulfide over sulfate. With the exception of one sample the ultramafic rocks are characterized by positive δ34Ssulfide (up to + 23.1‰) and δ34Ssulfate values (up to + 35.0‰). Carbon contents in the peridotites are low and are isotopically distinct from typical oceanic serpentinites. In particular, δ13C of the inorganic carbon suggests that the carbon is not derived from seawater, but rather the product of the interaction of meteoric water with the ultramafic rocks. In contrast, the sulfur isotope data from sulfide minerals in the peridotites preserve evidence for interaction with a hydrothermal fluid. Specifically, they indicate closed system abiogenic sulfate reduction suggesting that oceanic serpentinization occurred with limited input of seawater. Overall, the geochemical signatures preserve evidence for both oceanic and continental water-rock interaction with the majority of carbon (and possibly sulfate) being incorporated during continental water-rock interaction. Furthermore, there is

  3. Zircon U-Pb geochronology and geochemistry of granites in the Zhuguangshan complex, South China: Implications for uranium mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Long; Chen, Zhenyu; Li, Xiaofeng; Li, Shengrong; Santosh, M.; Huang, Guolong

    2018-05-01

    The Zhuguangshan complex, composed of Caledonian, Indosinian, and Yanshanian granites, and Cretaceous mafic dykes, is one of the most important granite-hosted uranium producers in South China. Here we present LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb and hornblende 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and whole-rock and biotite geochemistry for the granites in this complex to evaluate the magmatism and its constraints on uranium mineralization. Samples collected from the Fuxi, Youdong, Longhuashan, Chikeng, Qiling, and Sanjiangkou intrusions yield zircon weighted 206Pb/238U ages of 426.7 ± 5.4 Ma, 226.4 ± 3.5 Ma, 225.0 ± 2.7 Ma, 152.2 ± 3.0 Ma, 153.9 ± 2.1 Ma, and 155.2 ± 2.1 Ma, respectively. A new Ar-Ar dating of the hornblende of the diabase from the Changjiang uranium ore field yields a plateau age of 145.1 ± 1.5 Ma. These results coupled with published geochronological data indicate that six major magmatic events occurred in the study area at 420-435 Ma, 225-240 Ma, 150-165 Ma, 140 Ma, 105 Ma, and 90 Ma. Both U-bearing and barren granites occur in this complex, and they display differences in whole-rock and biotite geochemistry. The barren granites show higher Al2O3, CaO, TFMM, Rb, Zr, Ba, SI, Mg#, (La/Yb)N, and Eu/Eu*, but lower SiO2, ALK, Rb, DI, Rb/Sr, and TiO2/MgO than those of the U-bearing granites. Biotites in the U-bearing granites are close to the Fe-rich siderophyllite-annite end member with Fe/(Fe + Mg) ratios higher than 0.66, whereas those in the barren granites are relatively close to the Mg-rich eastonite-phlogopite end member with Fe/(Fe + Mg) ratios uranium ore potential of the granites in the Zhuguangshan complex. The geochemical variations of U-bearing and barren granites can serve as a potential detector for granite-hosted uranium deposits.

  4. Elemental geochemistry and strontium-isotope stratigraphy of Cenomanian to Santonian neritic carbonates in the Zagros Basin, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navidtalab, Amin; Rahimpour-Bonab, Hossain; Huck, Stefan; Heimhofer, Ulrich

    2016-12-01

    A Neo-Tethyan upper Cenomanian-Santonian neritic carbonate ramp succession (Sarvak and Ilam formations), drilled in the Zagros Basin in southwest Iran, was investigated via detailed sedimentology, microfacies analysis, elemental geochemistry and Sr-isotope stratigraphy (SIS). The succession contains two exposure surfaces, which are known as the CT-ES and mT-ES (Cenomanian-Turonian and middle Turonian, respectively), and associated prominent negative carbon-isotope excursions that represent important regional stratigraphic marker horizons. Precise knowledge about the onset of platform exposure and the duration of the exposure-related hiatus, however, is currently lacking due to a rather low-resolved shallow-water biostratigraphic framework and a bulk carbonate carbon-isotope pattern that clearly differs from global Late Cretaceous reference curves. Therefore, the existing bio-chemostratigraphic framework was complemented by bulk carbonate strontium-isotope stratigraphy (SIS). As bulk carbonate material is in particular prone to diagenetic alteration, a careful selection of least altered samples has been carried out by means of elemental geochemistry and petrography. In contrast to what could be expected, the meteoric alteration of limestones beneath both exposure surfaces is not clearly expressed by increasing iron and manganese and coeval decreasing strontium contents. On the contrary, the impact of meteoric diagenesis is well illustrated via pronounced increases in Rb concentrations and concomitant prominent positive shifts to radiogenic strontium-isotope values, an observation that clearly reflects the decay of continentally derived 87Rb into 87Sr. Rubidium corrected strontium-isotope values place the CT-ES around the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary and point to an exposure duration of less than 0.4 Myr. This rather short-term CT-ES related hiatus is supported by petrographic evidence, which indicates a youth karstification stage of strata beneath the CT

  5. Trace Element Geochemistry of Silica Phases: Understanding the Evolution of the Cerro Pabellón Geothermal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvear, B.; Morata, D.; Leisen, M.; Reich, M.; Barra, F.

    2017-12-01

    The study of mineral textures coupled with trace element geochemistry has proven to be a useful tool to understand the evolution of geological environments. The purpose of this study is to provide new constrains on the formation of an active geothermal system, specifically the Cerro Pabellón field. The Cerro Pabellón system is located at 4500 m above sea level and is the first geothermal power plant in operation in Chile and South America. Thirteen samples were collected from a 550 m long drill core. Samples were first studied under petrographic microscopy followed by scanning electron microscopy coupled with a cathodoluminescence detector (CL-SEM). The different textures recognized using petrography and the CL-SEM technique were later analyzed by Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) in order to determine variations in the trace element concentrations as a function of silica textures. Two vein types (A and B) with different silica polymorphs were identified by CL-SEM. Vein type A has only a colloform texture, whereas vein type B, younger and crosscutting the type A, shows zonation, colloform, and jigsaw textures. LA-ICPMS results show high concentrations of Li, Al, Na, K, As, and Sb for all types of silica. A comparison between vein type A and B, show that vein type A is Al-Na-K-Li poor (2088, 36, 309, and 122 ppm average, respectively) and As-Sb rich (43 and 249 ppm average, respectively). On the other hand, vein type B has variable concentrations of Al-Na-K-Li-Sb, but usually higher than in vein type A. Overall, the Cerro Pabellón geothermal system shows high concentrations of Li and Sb, reaching up to 360 and 703 ppm, respectively. Our preliminary results show that the trace element geochemistry is strongly related to the different silica textures, which formed as a response to different thermodynamic conditions and fluid-rock ratios. This work is a contribution to the FONDAP-CONICYT 15090013 Project.

  6. Rock Geochemistry and Mineralogy from Fault Zones and Polymetallic Fault Veins of the Central Front Range, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Jonathan S.; Bove, Dana J.

    2010-01-01

    During the 2004 to 2008 field seasons, approximately 200 hand samples of fault and polymetallic vein-related rocks were collected for geochemical and mineralogical analyses. The samples were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of the Evolution of Brittle Structures Task under the Central Colorado Assessment Project (CCAP) of the Mineral Resources Program (http://minerals.cr.usgs.gov/projects/colorado_assessment/index.html). The purpose of this work has been to characterize the relation between epithermal, polymetallic mineral deposits, paleostress, and the geological structures that hosted fluid flow and localization of the deposits. The data in this report will be used to document and better understand the processes that control epithermal mineral-deposit formation by attempting to relate the geochemistry of the primary structures that hosted hydrothermal fluid flow to their heat and fluid sources. This includes processes from the scale of the structures themselves to the far field scale, inclusive of the intrusive bodies that have been thought to be the sources for the hydrothermal fluid flow. The data presented in this report are part of a larger assessment effort on public lands. The larger study area spans the region of the southern Rocky Mountains in Colorado from the Wyoming to New Mexico borders and from the eastern boundary of the Front Range to approximately the longitude of Vail and Leadville, Colorado. Although the study area has had an extensive history of geological mapping, the mapping has resulted in a number of hypotheses that are still in their infancy of being tested. For example, the proximity of polymetallic veins to intrusive bodies has been thought to reflect a genetic relation between the two features; however, this idea has not been well tested with geochemical indicators. Recent knowledge regarding the coupled nature of stress, strain, fluid flow, and geochemistry warrant new investigations and approaches to test a variety of

  7. Using geochemistry to identify the source of groundwater to Montezuma Well, a natural spring in Central Arizona, USA: Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Raymond H.; DeWitt, Ed; Wirt, Laurie; Manning, Andrew H.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    Montezuma Well is a unique natural spring located in a sinkhole surrounded by travertine. Montezuma Well is managed by the National Park Service, and groundwater development in the area is a potential threat to the water source for Montezuma Well. This research was undertaken to better understand the sources of groundwater to Montezuma Well. Strontium isotopes (87Sr/86Sr) indicate that groundwater in the recharge area has flowed through surficial basalts with subsequent contact with the underlying Permian aged sandstones and the deeper, karstic, Mississippian Redwall Limestone. The distinctive geochemistry in Montezuma Well and nearby Soda Springs (higher concentrations of alkalinity, As, B, Cl, and Li) is coincident with added carbon dioxide and mantle-sourced He. The geochemistry and isotopic data from Montezuma Well and Soda Springs allow for the separation of groundwater samples into four categories: (1) upgradient, (2) deep groundwater with carbon dioxide, (3) shallow Verde Formation, and (4) mixing zone. δ18O and δD values, along with noble gas recharge elevation data, indicate that the higher elevation areas to the north and east of Montezuma Well are the groundwater recharge zones for Montezuma Well and most of the groundwater in this portion of the Verde Valley. Adjusted groundwater age dating using likely 14C and δ13C sources indicate an age for Montezuma Well and Soda Springs groundwaters at 5,400–13,300 years, while shallow groundwater in the Verde Formation appears to be older (18,900). Based on water chemistry and isotopic evidence, groundwater flow to Montezuma Well is consistent with a hydrogeologic framework that indicates groundwater flow by (1) recharge in higher elevation basalts to the north and east of Montezuma Well, (2) movement through the upgradient Permian and Mississippian units, especially the Redwall Limestone, and (3) contact with a basalt dike/fracture system that provides a mechanism for groundwater to flow to the surface

  8. Indoor radon measurements in south west England explained by topsoil and stream sediment geochemistry, airborne gamma-ray spectroscopy and geology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Antonio; Daraktchieva, Zornitza; Beamish, David; Kirkwood, Charles; Lister, T Robert; Cave, Mark; Wragg, Joanna; Lee, Kathryn

    2018-01-01

    Predictive mapping of indoor radon potential often requires the use of additional datasets. A range of geological, geochemical and geophysical data may be considered, either individually or in combination. The present work is an evaluation of how much of the indoor radon variation in south west England can be explained by four different datasets: a) the geology (G), b) the airborne gamma-ray spectroscopy (AGR), c) the geochemistry of topsoil (TSG) and d) the geochemistry of stream sediments (SSG). The study area was chosen since it provides a large (197,464) indoor radon dataset in association with the above information. Geology provides information on the distribution of the materials that may contribute to radon release while the latter three items provide more direct observations on the distributions of the radionuclide elements uranium (U), thorium (Th) and potassium (K). In addition, (c) and (d) provide multi-element assessments of geochemistry which are also included in this study. The effectiveness of datasets for predicting the existing indoor radon data is assessed through the level (the higher the better) of explained variation (% of variance or ANOVA) obtained from the tested models. A multiple linear regression using a compositional data (CODA) approach is carried out to obtain the required measure of determination for each analysis. Results show that, amongst the four tested datasets, the soil geochemistry (TSG, i.e. including all the available 41 elements, 10 major - Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Si, Ti - plus 31 trace) provides the highest explained variation of indoor radon (about 40%); more than double the value provided by U alone (ca. 15%), or the sub composition U, Th, K (ca. 16%) from the same TSG data. The remaining three datasets provide values ranging from about 27% to 32.5%. The enhanced prediction of the AGR model relative to the U, Th, K in soils suggests that the AGR signal captures more than just the U, Th and K content in the soil. The

  9. Geochemistry and sedimentary provenance of the Upper Cretaceous Uberaba Formation (Southeastern Triângulo Mineiro, MG, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Arthuso Quintão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The campanian Uberaba Formation, which crops out around the homonymous town, is composed of greenish lithic sandstones and conglomerates with possible volcanoclastic contribution. In this unit, heavy minerals such as ilmenite, garnet, perovskite and magnetite, besides clinopyroxene, plagioclase, quartz, calcite and apatite, are found. The Uberaba Formation geochemistry is marked by high grades of Ba, Ta, La, Nb and Th, with flat (no Eu anomaly and highly fractionated (LaN/YbN = ca. 128 chondrite-normalized rare earth elements. Mineral chemistry analyses of detrital garnets from the Uberaba Formation indicate the predominance of chorlomite with an affinity to crustal garnets (G3. The sedimentary provenance of the Uberaba Formation corresponds to a mixing of materials from the alkaline districts of the Alto Paranaíba and from the erosion of the Serra Geral Formation and the Canastra and Araxá groups. Diamond-producing conglomerates which crop out nearby, in Romaria, were considered by some authors as correlated to the Uberaba Formation. However, the composition of garnets recovered from those conglomerates is different, plotting in the field of mantle garnets (G9/G10. We consider, then, that those units are not correlated, and that the Uberaba Formation is not a possible source for the alluvial diamonds found in the homonymous river.

  10. A Review of the Stable Isotope Bio-geochemistry of the Global Silicon Cycle and Its Associated Trace Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill N. Sutton

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon (Si is the second most abundant element in the Earth's crust and is an important nutrient in the ocean. The global Si cycle plays a critical role in regulating primary productivity and carbon cycling on the continents and in the oceans. Development of the analytical tools used to study the sources, sinks, and fluxes of the global Si cycle (e.g., elemental and stable isotope ratio data for Ge, Si, Zn, etc. have recently led to major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms and processes that constrain the cycling of Si in the modern environment and in the past. Here, we provide background on the geochemical tools that are available for studying the Si cycle and highlight our current understanding of the marine, freshwater and terrestrial systems. We place emphasis on the geochemistry (e.g., Al/Si, Ge/Si, Zn/Si, δ13C, δ15N, δ18O, δ30Si of dissolved and biogenic Si, present case studies, such as the Silicic Acid Leakage Hypothesis, and discuss challenges associated with the development of these environmental proxies for the global Si cycle. We also discuss how each system within the global Si cycle might change over time (i.e., sources, sinks, and processes and the potential technical and conceptual limitations that need to be considered for future studies.

  11. Geofluids Assessment of the Ayub and Shafa Hot Springs in Kopet-Dagh Zone (NE Iran: An Isotopic Geochemistry Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Mohammadzadeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Geothermal energy has a wide range of uses in our life. It is very important to characterize the temperature and the depth of geothermal reservoirs. The aim of this paper is the determination of type, origin source of water temperature, and depth of water circulation in the Ayub-Peighambar and Shafa (AP and SH hot springs, located in NE Iran, using hydrogeochemistry and environmental isotopes (2H and 18O. AP hot spring has elevated temperature (36–40°C and as such is very important for balneotherapy and geotourism industry purposes. The average values of δ18O and δ2H for this hot spring (−10‰ and −73‰, resp. are analogous to that of geothermal and meteoric waters. This indicates that the heat source cannot be related to volcanic activities (with average δ18O value of about 5‰ and it is most probably associated with geothermal gradient with deep circulation of groundwater through faults. Based on Na-K geothermometers coupled with isotopic (18O and 2H geochemistry the temperature of the AP geothermal reservoir was estimated to be in the range of 100–150°C with 3–5 and 4.2 kilometres’ depth, respectively. Chemically, the AP samples are CaSO4 facies with a chemically homogeneous source and steam heated waters type.

  12. Interface COMSOL-PHREEQC (iCP), an efficient numerical framework for the solution of coupled multiphysics and geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Albert; Idiart, Andrés; Trinchero, Paolo; de Vries, Luis Manuel; Molinero, Jorge

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents the development, verification and application of an efficient interface, denoted as iCP, which couples two standalone simulation programs: the general purpose Finite Element framework COMSOL Multiphysics® and the geochemical simulator PHREEQC. The main goal of the interface is to maximize the synergies between the aforementioned codes, providing a numerical platform that can efficiently simulate a wide number of multiphysics problems coupled with geochemistry. iCP is written in Java and uses the IPhreeqc C++ dynamic library and the COMSOL Java-API. Given the large computational requirements of the aforementioned coupled models, special emphasis has been placed on numerical robustness and efficiency. To this end, the geochemical reactions are solved in parallel by balancing the computational load over multiple threads. First, a benchmark exercise is used to test the reliability of iCP regarding flow and reactive transport. Then, a large scale thermo-hydro-chemical (THC) problem is solved to show the code capabilities. The results of the verification exercise are successfully compared with those obtained using PHREEQC and the application case demonstrates the scalability of a large scale model, at least up to 32 threads.

  13. Flowage differentiation in an andesitic dyke of the Motru Dyke Swarm (Southern Carpathians, Romania) inferred from AMS, CSD and geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkono, Collin; Féménias, Olivier; Diot, Hervé; Berza, Tudor; Demaiffe, Daniel

    2006-06-01

    Two dykes of different thickness (5.5 m for TJ31 and 23 m for TJ34) from the late Pan-African calc-alkaline Motru Dyke Swarm (S. Carpathians, Romania) have been studied by electron microprobe (mineral chemistry), crystal size distribution (CSD), anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and whole-rock geochemistry. All the physical and chemical variations observed across the dyke's width point to concordant results and show that the variations of both modal abundance and size of the amphibole and biotite microphenocrysts inside the dykes (deduced from the classical CSD measurements) are the result of a mechanical segregation of suspended crystals during magmatic transport. Despite a pene-contemporaneous regional tectonic, the flow-induced differentiation in the thicker dyke is characterized by the concentration of pre-existing Ti-rich pargasite-tschermakite, clinopyroxene and plagioclase crystals in the core of the dyke and of the extracted differentiated liquid near the walls. This mechanical differentiation induces a chemical differentiation with a basaltic andesite composition for the core of the dyke whereas the margins are andesitic. Thus the chilled margins appear as a slightly more evolved liquid with a Newtonian behaviour when compared to the average composition of the dyke. The localization of the liquid on both sides of the dyke has certainly facilitated the ascent of the central part of the dyke that behaved as a Binghamian mush.

  14. MESSENGER, MErcury: Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging; A Mission to Orbit and Explore the Planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    MESSENGER is a scientific mission to Mercury. Understanding this extraordinary planet and the forces that have shaped it is fundamental to understanding the processes that have governed the formation, evolution, and dynamics of the terrestrial planets. MESSENGER is a MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging mission to orbit Mercury for one Earth year after completing two flybys of that planet following two flybys of Venus. The necessary flybys return significant new data early in the mission, while the orbital phase, guided by the flyby data, enables a focused scientific investigation of this least-studied terrestrial planet. Answers to key questions about Mercury's high density, crustal composition and structure, volcanic history, core structure, magnetic field generation, polar deposits, exosphere, overall volatile inventory, and magnetosphere are provided by an optimized set of miniaturized space instruments. Our goal is to gain new insight into the formation and evolution of the solar system, including Earth. By traveling to the inner edge of the solar system and exploring a poorly known world, MESSENGER fulfills this quest.

  15. Nano-mineralogy and -geochemistry of high-grade diasporic karst-type bauxite from Parnassos-Ghiona mines, Greece

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gkamaletsos, Platon; Godelitsas, Athanasios; Kasama, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    and electron microscopy in microscale and mesoscale (SEM-EDS including STEM mode), proved the presence of “Fe-Cr-Ti-containing diaspore”, anatase and minor rutile. The study by means of 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, in correlation with magnetic susceptibility measurements and, complemented, with Synchrotron......In the present work, a combination of various techniques is utilized for the study of nano-mineralogy and -geochemistry of high-grade karst-type bauxite (Al-rich and Fe-depleted samples; Al2O3 ca. 80 wt.%) from the Parnassos-Ghiona mines located in Greece. Initial characterization using PXRD......-based spectroscopies at the microscale (SR micro-XRF and micro-XANES/-EXAFS), indicated that Fe3+, in contrast to [6]Cr3+, is not exclusively a component of the diaspore structure. While Cr3 + substitutes Al3 + in octahedral sites of diaspore ([6]Cr3+ ↔ [6]Al3+), the electron microscopy in nanoscale (TEM-EDS & EELS...

  16. Sustainable rehabilitation of mining waste and acid mine drainage using geochemistry, mine type, mineralogy, texture, ore extraction and climate knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anawar, Hossain Md

    2015-08-01

    The oxidative dissolution of sulfidic minerals releases the extremely acidic leachate, sulfate and potentially toxic elements e.g., As, Ag, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Th, U, Zn, etc. from different mine tailings and waste dumps. For the sustainable rehabilitation and disposal of mining waste, the sources and mechanisms of contaminant generation, fate and transport of contaminants should be clearly understood. Therefore, this study has provided a critical review on (1) recent insights in mechanisms of oxidation of sulfidic minerals, (2) environmental contamination by mining waste, and (3) remediation and rehabilitation techniques, and (4) then developed the GEMTEC conceptual model/guide [(bio)-geochemistry-mine type-mineralogy- geological texture-ore extraction process-climatic knowledge)] to provide the new scientific approach and knowledge for remediation of mining wastes and acid mine drainage. This study has suggested the pre-mining geological, geochemical, mineralogical and microtextural characterization of different mineral deposits, and post-mining studies of ore extraction processes, physical, geochemical, mineralogical and microbial reactions, natural attenuation and effect of climate change for sustainable rehabilitation of mining waste. All components of this model should be considered for effective and integrated management of mining waste and acid mine drainage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Contribution to the application of nuclear microprobe in geochemistry. Carbon and nitrogen microanalysis in glasses and minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosbah, M.

    1988-01-01

    The morphological complexity of geological materials implies the use of microanalysis techniques utilization. Nuclear microprobe allows selective and no destructive light elements determination, through nuclear reactions. Nuclear microanalysis has been used to characterize carbon and nitrogen in volatile phase dissolved in magmatic samples. The application of some microanalysis techniques in geochemistry are discussed, nuclear microprobe theory and techniques are developed. Minerals, glasses and glassy inclusions are described, and more particularly, the interest of these investigations. Optimal conditions of carbon and nitrogen analysis ( 12 C(d.p) 13 C and 14 N(d,p) 15 N reaction respectively), as deuteron energy and observation angle are studied. A methodology has been established for this purpose. Several results are exposed: Punctual analysis, carbon concentration profile in depth surface scanning, surficial mapping in glassy inclusions. The carbon content interpretation in glassy inclusions measured conveniently for the first time agrees with data obtained through other techniques. In conclusion, degazing schedule improvements require more analysis. Perspective research axis are evocated [fr

  18. Rare earth element geochemistry of South Atlantic deep sea sediments: Ce anomaly change at approx. 54 My

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.L.; Liu, Y.-G.; Schmitt, R.A.; Oregon State Univ., Corvallis; Oregon State Univ., Corvallis; Oregon State Univ., Corvallis

    1986-01-01

    The geochemistry of the REE (rare earth elements) in oceanic sediments is discussed, based mainly on samples from DSDP Holes 530A and 530B, Leg 75, and Hole 525A, Leg 74. The proposed mechanisms for incorporation of the REE into the marine carbonate phases are adsorption, chiefly onto the carbonate minerals and on Sc, Hf, and Ta-rich FE-Mn hydroxide flocs as carbonate coatings. The Ce anomaly of marine carbonate was used as an indicator of paleo-ocean water redox conditions: the bottom water of the Angola Basin was in a reducing condition in the Cretaceous. At ca. 54 My, the South Atlantic water condition became oxidizing, similar to the present seawater redox condition. This change was related to the improvement of circulation due to the widening of South Atlantic and the subsidence of water circulation barriers such as the Walvis Ridge and perhaps the Romanche Fracture Zone. The REE abundances and patterns of younger sediments in the Angola Basin (YSAB) are very similar to those observed in NASC, PAAS, and ES sediments. The YSAB REE abundances and patterns may represent the average REE distribution of the exposed African continental crust. The strong resemblance of REE distributions of YSAB, NASC, PAAS and ES suggests thorough REE mixing from different sources and the uniformity of the average crustal compositions of different continents: Africa, North America, Australia, and Europe. (author)

  19. Using isotope geochemistry to discuss the role of crust-mantle interaction in the formation of endogenetic mega-deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lisheng

    2005-01-01

    Isotope characteristics of some mega-deposits from literature and new results on twenty deposits (ten of them are mega-deposits) show that there exists traces of crust-mantle interaction. It has been established that the interaction all took place in the mantle under many situations. The theory of isotope geochemistry on the genesis of mega-deposits has been discussed. According to the theory, these deposits are a kind of special phenomena, but they have a common factor, i.e. mantle metasomatism produced by the crust-mantle interaction in the mantle no matter what the ore-forming elements diversity may be. The granites with great accumulation of uncompatible elements can be considered as the analogues of mega-deposits. According to the statistical results, it is possible that they formed at a period before about 2 Ga during which the recycling of the materials was accompanied with the obvious crust-mantle interaction and can produce the volatile components which are poor in the mantle. (authors)

  20. Multivariate analysis of the geochemistry and mineralogy of soils along two continental-scale transects in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, L.J.; Grunsky, E.C.; Sutphin, D.M.; Woodruff, L.G.

    2010-01-01

    Soils collected in 2004 along two North American continental-scale transects were subjected to geochemical and mineralogical analyses. In previous interpretations of these analyses, data were expressed in weight percent and parts per million, and thus were subject to the effect of the constant-sum phenomenon. In a new approach to the data, this effect was removed by using centered log-ratio transformations to 'open' the mineralogical and geochemical arrays. Multivariate analyses, including principal component and linear discriminant analyses, of the centered log-ratio data reveal the effects of soil-forming processes, including soil parent material, weathering, and soil age, at the continental-scale of the data arrays that were not readily apparent in the more conventionally presented data. Linear discriminant analysis of the data arrays indicates that the majority of the soil samples collected along the transects can be more successfully classified with Level 1 ecological regional-scale classification by the soil geochemistry than soil mineralogy. A primary objective of this study is to discover and describe, in a parsimonious way, geochemical processes that are both independent and inter-dependent and manifested through compositional data including estimates of the elements and corresponding mineralogy. ?? 2010.

  1. Clumped-isotope geochemistry of carbonates: A new tool for the reconstruction of temperature and oxygen isotope composition of seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernasconi, Stefano M., E-mail: Stefano.bernasconi@erdw.ethz.ch [Geological Institute, ETH Zuerich, Sonneggstrasse 5, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Schmid, Thomas W.; Grauel, Anna-Lena [Geological Institute, ETH Zuerich, Sonneggstrasse 5, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Mutterlose, Joerg [Institut fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Geophysik, Ruhr Universitaet Bochum, Universitaetsstr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Clumped-isotope thermometry of carbonates is discussed. > Clumped isotopes of Belemnites show higher sea surface temperatures than commonly assumed for the lower Cretaceous. > The potential of clumped-isotope measurement on foraminifera is discussed. - Abstract: Clumped-isotope geochemistry deals with State of ordering of rare isotopes in molecules, in particular with their tendency to form bonds with other rare isotopes rather than with the most abundant ones. Among its possible applications, carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry is the one that has gained most attention because of the wide potential of applications in many disciplines of the earth sciences. In particular, it allows reconstructing the temperature of formation of carbonate minerals without knowledge of the isotopic composition of the water from which they were formed. In addition, the O isotope composition of the waters from which they were formed can be calculated using the {delta}{sup 18}O of the same carbonate sample. This feature offers new approaches in paleoclimatology for reconstructing past global geochemical cycles. In this contribution two applications of this method are presented. First the potential of a new analytical method of measurement of clumped isotopes on small samples of foraminifera, for high-resolution SST and seawater {delta}{sup 18}O reconstructions from marine sediments is shown. Furthermore the potential of clumped isotope analysis of belemnites, for reconstructing seawater {delta}{sup 18}O and temperatures in the Cretaceous is shown.

  2. Sulfur and lead isotope geochemistry of the orogenic gold deposits in the eastern Kunlun area, Qinghai province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Chengyou; Zhang Dequan; Li Daxin; She Hongquan; Zhu Huaping

    2003-01-01

    Based on researches on the basic geological characteristics and sulfur and lead isotopic geochemistry of four typical gold deposits, it is considered that they have many similar geo-geochemical characteristics and are all related genetically to orogenic process. Therefore, they should belong to a type of orogenic gold deposits according to the newest classification of gold deposits provided by Kerrich et al. (2000). There is a big change in the average 34 S values of the sulfides selected from different deposits, varying from -3.7‰-4.4‰ and tower-shape distribution is apparent. The lead isotope in four gold deposits is characterized by high compositions and minor changes, with 206 Pb/ 204 Pb > 18.3380, 207 Pb/ 204 Pb > 15.5555, 208 Pb/ 204 Pb >38.1796 in ores and wall-rocks, it can be concluded that the ore-forming material consisting of sulfur and lead are mainly derived from wall-rocks. Intensive subduction and collision during late Paleozoic and early Mesozoic not only formed deep faults, large-scale shear belt, and low-order folds and faults but also induced fluidization and mineralization, and resulted in formation and zonal distribution of several large or medium gold deposits in this area. (authors)

  3. Evolution of hydrologic systems and brine geochemistry in a deforming salt medium: Data from WIPP brine seeps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deal, D.E.; Roggenthen, W.M.

    1991-01-01

    The Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) is a formalized continuation of studies that began in 1982 as part of the Site Validation Program. The program was established in 1985. The mission was to document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and the seepage of that brine into the WIPP excavations. This document focuses on the cumulative data obtained from the BSEP. The overall activities of the BSEP described and quantified the brine. It includes documentation and study of brine inflow into boreholes in the facility. The BSEP investigated the occurrence and development of brine weeps, crusts, and brine geochemistry. The presence of salt-tolerant bacteria in the workings was recorded and their possible interactions with experiments and operations, was assessed. The formation properties associated with the occurrence of brine was characterized. The determination of formation properties included the water content of various geologic units, direct examination of these units in boreholes using a video camera system, and measurement of electrical properties relatable to the brine contents. Modeling examined the interaction of salt deformation near the workings and the flow of brine through the deforming rocks. 34 refs

  4. Rb-Sr and Nd-Sr isotope geochemistry and petrogenesis of the Misho Mountains mafic dikes (NW Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ahankoub

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction There are some theories about the Paleotethys event during the Paleozoic that have been proposed by geologists (Metcalfe, 2006. Some scientist offered some pieces of evidence about the northern margin of Gondwana (Zhu et al., 2010. The Paleotethys Ocean and Hercynian orogenic report first in Iran, have been Offered from the Morrow and Misho Mountain (Eftekharnejad, 1981. Misho Mountains is located between the north and south Misho faults and cause the formation of a positive flower structure (Moayyed and Hossainzade, 2011. There is theory about Misho southern fault as the best candidate of the Paleotethys suture zone (Moayyed and Hossainzade, 2011. Geochemistry and Sr –Nd isotopic data of the A2 granitic and Synite rocks of the East Misho, indicate that the magmatism post collision has occurred in the active continental margin by extensional zones of the following the closure of the Paleotethys (Ahankoub, 2012. Granite and syenite rocks have been cut by mafic dikes. Mafic dikes are often formed in extensional tectonic settings related to mantle plume or continental break –up (Zhu et al., 2009. In this paper, we use the geochemistry and Nd-Sr isotope data to determined petrogenesis, tectono-magmatic setting and age of Misho mafic dikes. Materials and methods After petrography study of 30 thin sections of mafic dike rocks, 8 samples were selected for whole-rock chemical analyses using ICP-MS and ICP-AES instruments by ACME Company in Vancouver, Canada. We prepared 6 sample For Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr analysis. Sr and Nd isotope ratios were measured with a thermal ionization mass spectrometer, VG Sector 54–30 at the Nagoya University. The isotope abundances of Rb, Sr, Nd, and Sm were measured by the ID method with a Finnigan MAT Thermoquad THQ thermal ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer at the Nagoya University. NBS987 and JNdi-1 were measured as natural Sr and Nd isotope ratio standards (Tanaka et al., 2000. Averages and 2σ errors

  5. Stratigraphy, palynology and organic geochemistry of the Devonian-Mississippian metasedimentary Albergaria-a-Velha Unit (Porto-Tomar shear zone, W Portugal)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machado, G.; Franců, E.; Vavrdová, Milada; Flores, D.; Fonseca, P. E.; Rocha, F.; Gama Pereira, L. C.; Gomes, A.; Fonseca, M.; Chaminé, H. I.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 2 (2011), s. 139-164 ISSN 1641-7291. [International Palynological Conference of the International Commission of the Paleozoic Microflora ( CIMP ). Warsaw-Kielce, 13.09.2010-19.09.2010] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : Mississippian * Late Devonian * Ossa-Morena Zone * Porto-Tomar shear zone * palynology * organic geochemistry * turbidite systems * provenance * phytoplankton Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.844, year: 2011 http://gq.pgi.gov.pl/gq/article/viewFile/7606/pdf_4

  6. Environmental changes in the western Amazônia: morphological framework, geochemistry, palynology and radiocarbon dating data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana M.C. Horbe

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The sediments from the Coari lake, a “terra firme” lake sculpted into Plio-Pleistocene deposits, and the Acará lake, a flooding-type lake developed on Quaternary sediments in the floodplain of the mid-Solimões river, in the western Amazônia, Brazil, were studied to investigate the environmental condition of their developing. This study includes mineral composition, geochemistry, Pb isotope, palinology, radiocarbon-age and morphological framework of the lakes obtained from SRTM satellite images. The geological and the environmental conditions in the two lakes are highly variable and suggest that their evolution reflect autogenic processes under humid rainforest condition. Although kaolinite, quartz, muscovite, illite, and smectite are the main minerals in both lakes, the geochemistry indicates distinct source, the Acará lake sediments have higher concentrations of Al2O3, Fe2O3, FeO, CaO, K2O, MgO, Na2O, P2O5, Ba, V, Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb, Sr, Li, Y and La and have more radiogenic Pb than the Coari lake sediments. The radiocarbon ages suggest that at 10160 yr BP the Coari lake started to be developed due to avulsion of the Solimões river, and the Acará lake was formed by the meander abandonment of Solimões river retaining its grass dominated shore at ca. 3710 yr BP.Os sedimentos do lago Coari, de ambiente de terra firme eesculpido nos depósitos do Plio-Pleistocenos, e o Acará, típico lago de várzea e ambos formados nos sedimentos quaternários da planície de inundação do médio Solimões, no oeste da Amazônia, Brasil, foram estudados para investigar as condições ambientais durante sua formação. Este estudo inclui dados da composição mineralógica, química, isótopos de Pb, palinologia, datações de radiocarbono e a configuração morfológica dos lagos obtida por imagens SRTM. As condições geológica e ambiental dos lagos variam e sugerem que suas evoluções refletem processos autogenéticos em condições de floresta úmida

  7. Mini-Journals: Incorporating Inquiry, Quantitative Skills and Writing into Homework Assignments for Geochemistry and Planetary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, A. G.; Speck, A.; Witzig, S.

    2011-12-01

    As part of an NSF-funded project, "CUES: Connecting Undergraduates to the Enterprise of Science," new inquiry-based homework materials were developed for two upper-level classes at the University of Missouri: Geochemistry (required for Geology majors, fulfills the computing requirement by having 50% of the grade come from five spreadsheet-based homework assignments), and Solar System Science (open to seniors and graduate students, co-taught and cross-listed between Geology and Physics & Astronomy). Inquiry involves activities where the learner engages in scientifically oriented questions, gives priority to evidence in responding to questions, formulates explanations from evidence, connects explanations to scientific knowledge, and communicates and justifies explanations. We engage students in inquiry-based learning by presenting homework exercises as "mini-journal" articles that follow the format of a scientific journal article, including a title, authors, abstract, introduction, methods, results, discussion and citations to peer-reviewed literature. The mini-journal provides a scaffold and serves as a springboard for students to develop and carry out their own follow-up investigation. They then present their findings in the form of their own mini-journal. Mini-journals replace traditional homework problem sets with a format that more directly reflects and encourages scientific practice. Students are engaged in inquiry-based homework which encompass doing, thinking, and communicating, while the mini-journal allows the instructor to contain lines of inquiry within the limits posed by available resources. In the examples we present, research is conducted via spreadsheet modeling, where the students develop their own spreadsheets. Example assignments from Geochemistry include "Trace Element Partitioning During Mantle Melting and MORB Crystallization" and "Isotopic Investigations of Crustal Evolution in the Midcontinent US". The key differences between the old and new

  8. Geochemistry of dissolved and suspended loads of the Seine River, France: anthropogenic impact, carbonate and silicate weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S.; Gaillardet, J.; Allègre, C. J.

    1999-05-01

    This study focuses on the chemistry of the Seine river system, one of the major rivers in Europe, and constitutes the first geochemical investigation of both suspended and dissolved loads of this river. The Seine river drains a typical Mesozoic-Cenozoic sedimentary basin: the Paris basin, constituted of limestones mixed or interbedded with terrigenous sediments derived from the paleoreliefs bordering the Mesozoic and Cenozoic seas. In the context of quantifying the global influence of carbonate and silicate weathering on atmospheric CO 2 consumption, the Seine river offers the possibility of examining weathering rates in a flat sedimentary environment, under temperate climatic conditions. One of the major problems associated with the Seine river, as with many temperate rivers, is pollution. We propose, in this paper, 2 approaches in order to correct the dissolved load of the Seine river for anthropogenic inputs and to calculate weathering rates of carbonates and silicates. The first uses the dissolved load of rivers and tries to allocate the different solutes to different sources. A mixing model, based on elemental ratios, is established and solved by an inversion technique. The second approach consists in using the suspended load geochemistry. Under steady state conditions, we show that the geochemistry of suspended sediments makes it possible to estimate the amount of solutes released during the chemical weathering of silicates, and thus to calculate weathering rates of silicates. The total dissolved load of the Seine river at Paris can be decomposed into 2% of solutes derived from natural atmospheric sources, 7% derived from anthropogenic atmospheric sources, 6% derived from agriculture, 3% derived from communal inputs, and 82% of solutes derived from rock weathering. During high floods, the contribution of atmospheric and agriculture inputs predominates. The weathering rate of carbonates is estimated to be 48 t/km 2/yr (25 mm/1000 yr). Only 10% of carbonates

  9. The role of amphibole in Merapi arc magma petrogenesis: insights from petrology and geochemistry of lava hosted xenoliths and xenocrysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, J. P.; Troll, V. R.; Schulz, B.; Dallai, L.; Freda, C.; Schwarzkopf, L. M.; Annersten, H.; Skogby, H.

    2010-05-01

    Recently, increasing attention has been paid to the role of amphibole in the differentiation of arc magmas. The geochemical composition of these magmas suggests that deep to mid crustal fractionation of amphibole has occurred. However, this phase is typically an infrequent modal phenocryst phase in subduction zone eruptive deposits(1). Nevertheless, erupted material only represents a portion of the magmatism produced in subduction zone settings, with many opportunities for melts to stall on route to the surface. This discrepancy between whole rock geochemistry and petrological interpretation of arc magmas has lead many scientists to postulate that, at mid to deep crustal levels, there may be significant volumes of amphibole bearing lithologies. Amphibole instability at shallow levels can also contribute to its scarcity in eruptive deposits. This argument is strengthened by field and petrological evidence, including the widespread occurrence of amphibole-rich intrusive rocks in exhumed orogenicbelts formed during subduction zone activity, e.g. the Adamello batholith (2),as well as the presence of amphibole-rich xenoliths and xenocrysts preserved in arc lavas worldwide, e.g. in Indonesia, Antilles, and Central America. Thus, amphibole appears to play an integral role in subduction zone magmatism and identifying and constraining this role is central to understanding arc magma petrogenisis. Amphibole-rich melts or bodies in the deep to mid crust could be a significant hydrous reservoir for intra-crustal melts and fluids (1). In this preliminary study, we have carried out petrological and geochemical analyses of recent basaltic andesite and amphibole bearing crystalline igneous inclusions and xenocrysts from Merapi volcano in Java, Indonesia. The basaltic andesite geochemistry is consistent with amphibole fractionation and the crystalline inclusions are cogenetic to the Merapi magmatic system. These inclusions are likely to represent fractionation residues reflecting

  10. The Punta del Este terrain and its volcano sedimentary cover, metamorphic and sedimentary: geology, geochemistry and geochronology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preciozzi, F.

    2015-01-01

    Gariep belt it develops over the West Africa coastal region of Namibia underlying on Namaqua metamorphic complex.It characterized by supra crustal rocks affected for a very low to low metamorphism and in two tecto no-stratigraphic units identified by Base i et al 2005 showing that sediments of Formation Rocha in Uruguay and the Group Oranjemund Gariep in S E Africa have similar ages in the provenance of the zircons, suggesting that they were probably deposited in the same basin. This unit exhibits detrital zircons around 600my, sedimentation and metamorphism and deformación occur in a narrow time interval from 600-610 to 574 m (Granite de Castillo intrusion) .Cam pal et al, 2005 proposed to the Cerros Aguirre Formation similar in a range of age of different events. To the east separated from the Punta del Este Terrane –Pelotas. Aigua .Florianopolis batholith s by the shear zone Alferez Cordillera (Preciozzi et al. 1999, Basei et al. 2000) Another option develops this granitic belt is an integral part of Land Punta del Este Terrane(Preciozzi in this work), being deployed on a thin cratonic granite edge. The climax of the post-brasilian magmatism is 580my, strongly related to trans current movements (eg shear zones Major Gercino-Alferez- Cordillera and Sierra Ballena.In South America an old west domain is formed by the Piedra Alta Terrane which integrate the Río de la Pl ata Craton, a central domain intensely reworked by Neoproterozoic events known so far as Nico Perez . The primary coverage is integrated by two volcano-sedimentary basins (San Carlos Formation and Cerros de Aguirre Formation)In this study are considered the Geology,Geochemistry and Geochronology of the different units of Rocha Formation

  11. Geochemistry of the uranium mineralized Achala granitic complex, Argentina: Comparison with Hercynian peraluminous leucogranites of western Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuney, M.; Leroy, J.; Valdiviezo, P.A.; Daziano, C.; Gamba, M.; Zarco, A.J.; Morello, O.; Ninci, C.; Molina, P.

    1989-01-01

    The Achala granitic complex belongs to the Sierras Pampeanas Hercynian belt, located west of the city of Cordoba, Argentina. This complex is very large (about 100 km N-S and 40 km E-W) and is composed of biotite, biotite with muscovite and muscovite with tourmaline granites intruded in amphibolite grade metamorphic rocks, along a main N 20 deg. E structural direction. Numerous uranium mineralizations are located within the granitic massif and tungsten mineralizations are present both in the enclosing metamorphic rocks and in the granite. The geochemistry of the granite has been studied in four test areas (Southern, Copina, Median and Don Vincente). Two test areas (Median and Don Vicente) present clear evidence of hydrothermal alteration: albitization and dequartzification similar to the French 'episyenites', silicification and argillic alteration. Potassic alteration is rare and weakly developed. The two test areas with hydrothermal alteration present a high uranium geochemical background (5-30 ppm). High thorium contents (up to 65 ppm) are essentially observed in the less differentiated granites of the Copina and Median areas. Thorium/uranium ratios are highly variable (1-10). Uranium minerals are related to different environments - (1) apatite-biotite enclave mineralized with uraninite and uranothorite, (2) gneiss from the contact metamorphism rim, (3) granite with incipient dequartzification, (4) granite associated with albitic episyenites and (5) silicified granite - but are all located in the two test areas presenting clear evidence of hydrothermal alteration. The three petrogenetic events are clearly related to very different mechanisms, separated from each other by several tens of millions of years in the west European Hercynian chain. In the same period the same succession of events leading to uranium deposits is observed in Argentina. 34 refs, 10 figs, 1 tab

  12. Geochemistry and mercury contamination in receiving environments of artisanal mining wastes and identified concerns for food safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichelt-Brushett, Amanda J., E-mail: amanda.reichelt-brushett@scu.edu.au [Marine Ecology Research Centre, School of Environment, Science and Engineering, Southern Cross University, PO Box 157, Lismore, NSW (Australia); School of Environment, Science and Engineering Southern Cross University, PO Box 157, Lismore, NSW (Australia); Stone, Jane [School of Environment, Science and Engineering Southern Cross University, PO Box 157, Lismore, NSW (Australia); Howe, Pelli [Marine Ecology Research Centre, School of Environment, Science and Engineering, Southern Cross University, PO Box 157, Lismore, NSW (Australia); School of Environment, Science and Engineering Southern Cross University, PO Box 157, Lismore, NSW (Australia); Thomas, Bernard [School of Environment, Science and Engineering Southern Cross University, PO Box 157, Lismore, NSW (Australia); Clark, Malcolm [Marine Ecology Research Centre, School of Environment, Science and Engineering, Southern Cross University, PO Box 157, Lismore, NSW (Australia); School of Environment, Science and Engineering Southern Cross University, PO Box 157, Lismore, NSW (Australia); Male, Yusthinus [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Pattimura University, Ambon (Indonesia); Nanlohy, Albert [Department of Fisheries and Marine Science, Pattimura University, Ambon (Indonesia); Butcher, Paul [School of Environment, Science and Engineering Southern Cross University, PO Box 157, Lismore, NSW (Australia); NSW Department of Primary Industries, National Marine Science Centre, PO Box 4321, Coffs Harbour, NSW (Australia)

    2017-01-15

    Artisanal small-scale gold mining (ASGM) using mercury (Hg) amalgamation has been occurring on Buru Island, Indonesia since early 2012, and has caused rapid accumulation of high Hg concentrations in river, estuary and marine sediments. In this study, sediment samples were collected from several sites downstream of the Mount Botak ASGM site, as well as in the vicinity of the more recently established site at Gogrea where no sampling had previously been completed. All sediment samples had total Hg (THg) concentrations exceeding Indonesian sediment quality guidelines and were up to 82 times this limit at one estuary site. The geochemistry of sediments in receiving environments indicates the potential for Hg-methylation to form highly bioavailable Hg species. To assess the current contamination threat from consumption of local seafood, samples of fish, molluscs and crustaceans were collected from the Namlea fish market and analysed for THg concentrations. The majority of edible tissue samples had elevated THg concentrations, which raises concerns for food safety. This study shows that river, estuary and marine ecosystems downstream of ASGM operations on Buru Island are exposed to dangerously high Hg concentrations, which are impacting aquatic food chains, and fisheries resources. Considering the high dietary dependence on marine protein in the associated community and across the Mollucas Province, and the short time period since ASGM operations commenced in this region, the results warrant urgent further investigation, risk mitigation, and community education. - Highlights: • Mercury contamination of sediments and seafood due to artisanal gold mining. • Considerable risks to human and ecosystem health are identified. • Results emphasise the urgent need for risk mitigation and community education.

  13. Aeolian controls of soil geochemistry and weathering fluxes in high-elevation ecosystems of the Rocky Mountains, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Corey R.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Kettterer, Michael E.; Neff, Jason C.

    2013-01-01

    When dust inputs are large or have persisted for long periods of time, the signature of dust additions are often apparent in soils. The of dust will be greatest where the geochemical composition of dust is distinct from local sources of soil parent material. In this study the influence of dust accretion on soil geochemistry is quantified for two different soils from the San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado, USA. At both study sites, dust is enriched in several trace elements relative to local rock, especially Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn. Mass-balance calculations that do not explicitly account for dust inputs indicate the accumulation of some elements in soil beyond what can be explained by weathering of local rock. Most observed elemental enrichments are explained by accounting for the long-term accretion of dust, based on modern isotopic and geochemical estimates. One notable exception is Pb, which based on mass-balance calculations and isotopic measurements may have an additional source at one of the study sites. These results suggest that dust is a major factor influencing the development of soil in these settings and is also an important control of soil weathering fluxes. After accounting for dust inputs in mass-balance calculations, Si weathering fluxes from San Juan Mountain soils are within the range observed for other temperate systems. Comparing dust inputs with mass-balanced based flux estimates suggests dust could account for as much as 50–80% of total long-term chemical weathering fluxes. These results support the notion that dust inputs may sustain chemical weathering fluxes even in relatively young continental settings. Given the widespread input of far-traveled dust, the weathering of dust is likely and important and underappreciated aspect of the global weathering engine.

  14. Geochemistry and tectonic implications of the Early Carboniferous Keketuobie intrusion in the West Junggar foldbelt, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yu-Feng; Yuan, Feng; Zhou, Taofa; Hollings, Pete; Zhang, Dayu

    2018-06-01

    The Keketuobie intrusion is situated in the northern part of the West Junggar foldbelt at the southern margin of the Central Asian Orogeic Belt. The intrusion consists of medium- to coarse-grained gabbro, fine-grained gabbro and diorite. Igneous zircons from the medium- to coarse-grained gabbro yielded a LA-ICP-MS U-Pb age of 320.8 ± 5.7 Ma, indicating that the intrusion was emplaced in the Early Carboniferous. The intrusive contact between the medium- to coarse-grained gabbro and the fine-grained gabbro indicates they formed from distinct magma pulses. Magnetite crystals from the fine-grained gabbro have lower V2O3 but higher TiO2 and Al2O3 contents than those of the medium- to coarse-grained gabbro, suggesting that the fine-grained gabbro crystallized in a relatively higher fO2 and temperature magma than the medium- to coarse-grained gabbro. The Keketuobie intrusive rocks are characterized by enriched large ion lithophile elements and depleted high field strength elements relative to N-MORB with restricted (87Sr/86Sr)t ratios (0.70370-0.70400) and εNd(t) values (+5.85 to +6.97). The petrography and geochemistry are comparable to those of subduction-related volcanic rocks. The trace elements and isotopic compositions of the mafic intrusive rocks suggest that the primary magmas were derived from mixing of metasomatized lithospheric mantle and depleted asthenospheric melts, perhaps triggered by slab break-off. The Keketuobie intrusion is younger than adjacent ophiolite sequences, island arc volcanic rocks and porphyry deposits, but predates the post-collisional A-type granites and bimodal volcanic rocks in the district, suggesting that the Keketuobie intrusion likely formed in a syn-collisional setting.

  15. Sediment geochemistry and accumulation rates on the northeastern shelf of the Gulf of Cádiz (SW Iberian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Guerra

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Geochemistry, total organic carbon and total nitrogen of three sediment cores collected in the Gulf of Cádiz and the Guadalquivir prodelta areas in Spain were investigated. The C/N ratio, mostly around 10, seems to indicate a predominantly marine origin for the sedimentary organic matter. Major and minor elements (Si, Ti, Al, Fe, Mg, Ca, K, Na, P, S and trace elements (Mn, Sc, V, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, Ce, Pb, Hg showed significant differences in bulk chemical composition between the two areas. Despite the effects of bioturbation, vertical changes in downcore profiles of heavy metals occur only in the cores of the Cádiz area, although the concentrations keep to low levels. The relatively high concentrations of Zr and Y, elements commonly associated with the heavy minerals fraction, at the top of cores from the Cádiz area are attributed to an enrichment of heavy minerals related to selective transport that concentrates this fraction. 137Cs and 210Pb activities in one of the two sediment cores collected in the Gulf of Cádiz were also measured. The distribution of excess 210Pb was used to determine the modern (last 100 yr mass accumulation rate and the depth of sediment mixing on the continental shelf of the gulf. Estimated sediment accumulation rate was 0.1 g cm-2 yr-1. The uppermost 4 cm had uniform excess 210Pb activity profiles above a region of steadily decreasing 210Pb activity, and this phenomenon was attributed to sediment mixing (bioturbation. 137Cs activity was lower than 3 Bq kg-1 and the profile does not show evidence of fallout peaks.

  16. Geochemistry and mercury contamination in receiving environments of artisanal mining wastes and identified concerns for food safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichelt-Brushett, Amanda J.; Stone, Jane; Howe, Pelli; Thomas, Bernard; Clark, Malcolm; Male, Yusthinus; Nanlohy, Albert; Butcher, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Artisanal small-scale gold mining (ASGM) using mercury (Hg) amalgamation has been occurring on Buru Island, Indonesia since early 2012, and has caused rapid accumulation of high Hg concentrations in river, estuary and marine sediments. In this study, sediment samples were collected from several sites downstream of the Mount Botak ASGM site, as well as in the vicinity of the more recently established site at Gogrea where no sampling had previously been completed. All sediment samples had total Hg (THg) concentrations exceeding Indonesian sediment quality guidelines and were up to 82 times this limit at one estuary site. The geochemistry of sediments in receiving environments indicates the potential for Hg-methylation to form highly bioavailable Hg species. To assess the current contamination threat from consumption of local seafood, samples of fish, molluscs and crustaceans were collected from the Namlea fish market and analysed for THg concentrations. The majority of edible tissue samples had elevated THg concentrations, which raises concerns for food safety. This study shows that river, estuary and marine ecosystems downstream of ASGM operations on Buru Island are exposed to dangerously high Hg concentrations, which are impacting aquatic food chains, and fisheries resources. Considering the high dietary dependence on marine protein in the associated community and across the Mollucas Province, and the short time period since ASGM operations commenced in this region, the results warrant urgent further investigation, risk mitigation, and community education. - Highlights: • Mercury contamination of sediments and seafood due to artisanal gold mining. • Considerable risks to human and ecosystem health are identified. • Results emphasise the urgent need for risk mitigation and community education.

  17. Urban soil geochemistry in Athens, Greece: The importance of local geology in controlling the distribution of potentially harmful trace elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyraki, Ariadne; Kelepertzis, Efstratios

    2014-06-01

    Understanding urban soil geochemistry is a challenging task because of the complicated layering of the urban landscape and the profound impact of large cities on the chemical dispersion of harmful trace elements. A systematic geochemical soil survey was performed across Greater Athens and Piraeus, Greece. Surface soil samples (0-10cm) were collected from 238 sampling sites on a regular 1×1km grid and were digested by a HNO3-HCl-HClO4-HF mixture. A combination of multivariate statistics and Geographical Information System approaches was applied for discriminating natural from anthropogenic sources using 4 major elements, 9 trace metals, and 2 metalloids. Based on these analyses the lack of heavy industry in Athens was demonstrated by the influence of geology on the local soil chemistry with this accounting for 49% of the variability in the major elements, as well as Cr, Ni, Co, and possibly As (median values of 102, 141, 16 and 24mg kg(-1) respectively). The contribution to soil chemistry of classical urban contaminants including Pb, Cu, Zn, Sn, Sb, and Cd (medians of 45, 39, 98, 3.6, 1.7 and 0.3mg kg(-1) respectively) was also observed; significant correlations were identified between concentrations and urbanization indicators, including vehicular traffic, urban land use, population density, and timing of urbanization. Analysis of soil heterogeneity and spatial variability of soil composition in the Greater Athens and Piraeus area provided a representation of the extent of anthropogenic modifications on natural element loadings. The concentrations of Ni, Cr, and As were relatively high compared to those in other cities around the world, and further investigation should characterize and evaluate their geochemical reactivity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Baseline Geochemistry of Natural Occurring Methane and Saline Groundwater in an Area of Unconventional Shale Gas Development Through Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, J.; Darrah, T.; Warner, N. R.; Whyte, C. J.; Moore, M. T.; Millot, R.; Kloppmann, W.; Jackson, R. B.; Vengosh, A.

    2017-12-01

    Naturally occurring methane is nearly ubiquitous in most sedimentary basins and delineating the effects of anthropogenic contamination sources from geogenic sources is a major challenge for evaluating the impact of unconventional shale gas development on water quality. This study employs a broadly integrated study of various geochemical techniques to investigate the geochemical variations of groundwater and surface water before, during, and after hydraulic fracturing.This approache combines inorganic geochemistry (major cations and anions), stable isotopes of select inorganic constituents including strontium (87Sr/86Sr), boron (δ11B), lithium (δ7Li), and carbon (δ13C-DIC), select hydrocarbon molecular (methane, ethane, propane, butane, and pentane) and isotopic tracers (δ13C-CH4, δ13C-C2H6), tritium (3H), and noble gas elemental and isotopic composition (He, Ne, Ar) to apportion natural and anthropogenic sources of natural gas and salt contaminants both before and after drilling. Methane above 1 ccSTP/L in groundwater samples awas strongly associated with elevated salinity (chloride >50 mg/L).The geochemical and isotopic analysis indicate saline groundwater originated via naturally occurring processes, presumably from the migration of deeper methane-rich brines that have interacted extensively with coal lithologies. The chemistry and gas compostion of both saline and fresh groundwater wells did not change following the installation of nearby shale-gas wells.The results of this study emphasize the value of baseline characterization of water quality in areas of fossil fuel exploration. Overall this study presents a comprehensive geochemical framework that can be used as a template for assessing the sources of elevated hydrocarbons and salts to water resources in areas potentially impacted by oil and gas development.

  19. Rn, He and CO{sub 2} soil gas geochemistry for the study of active and inactive faults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardi, S. [Earth Science Department - University ' La Sapienza' , Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Voltattorni, N., E-mail: nunzia.voltattorni@ingv.it [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Via di Vigna Murata 605, 00143 Rome (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    Two Italian areas, characterized by different seismological histories, were investigated to enhance the basic knowledge of gas migration mechanisms during earthquakes. Sharp variations occur in the movement and concentration of some gaseous species due to the evolution of the local stress regime. The first area (Colpasquale) is located in the central Italian region of Marche and provided a good location to study gas migration in a seismically active region. The area was devastated by a sequence of shallow earthquakes over a 3 month-long period (September-December, 1997). The occurrence of this catastrophic event, as well as the long duration of the 'seismic sequence', presented a unique opportunity to study gas migration in a zone undergoing active displacement. Soil gas surveys were performed 1 day, 1 week, 1 year and 2 years after the main shock (Ms 5.6) in the Colpasquale area. In particular, results highlight a change in the Rn distribution during the three monitoring years indicating a variation of gas migration that may be linked to the evolution of the stress regime. The second study area is located in the Campidano Graben (southern part of Sardinia Island). This area is characterized by seismic quiescence, displaying an almost complete lack of historical earthquakes and instrumentally recorded seismicity. The consistently low values observed for all analyzed gases suggest that the studied area is likely characterized by sealed, non-active faults that prevent significant gas migration. The comparison of data from both studied areas indicate that soil gas geochemistry is useful to locate tectonic discontinuities even when they intersect non-cohesive clastic rocks near the surface and thus are not visible (i.e., 'blind faults').

  20. Isotopic Geochemistry Applied on Mortars of the Katholikon of the Monastery of Timios Prodromos in the Prefecture of Serres, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotsika, Elissavet; Iliadis, Efstathios; Kyropoulou, Daphne; Karalis, Petros

    2017-12-01

    The Monastery of Timios Prodromos is the most important Byzantine monument in the prefecture of Serres and one of the most important monastic foundations of Byzantine times in Northern Greece. It was founded in the late 13th century from Ioannikios and then renovated by his nephew, Joachim. The catholic dates back to the 14th century, and specifically between 1300-1333, under the rule of the second founder Joachim. Considering the pathology of Byzantine mural, for the most effective work on removal of over-paintings layer, fixing, restoration, recovery and maintenance of the painted surface and the substrate, it was decided the sampling from exact points of the mural painting representing the different phases, in order to determine their composition, the technology of construction materials, corrosion mechanisms and the proposal for restoration methodology. The methods to be used require very small quantities of material. The measurements are considered almost non-destructive and based on isotopic geochemistry. The techniques used are X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM / EDXA) and isotopic analyzes (d18O and d13C) in a mass spectrometer (IRMS). The study of the samples was carried out by scanning electron microscopy with X-ray microanalyser and analysis of stable isotopes. The study shows that apart from the calcite present in all pigment samples, straw was used as a binder. There is also a mixing of dyes to produce the desired tint while in many cases there are different colour layers. The decay in the mural is extensive, especially in the lower layers of the wall, which have been severely affected by humidity and candle smoke. The creation of gypsum on the surface of the murals is intense and evident in most of the spectra taken

  1. An investigation of the stable isotopes, geochemistry and morphology of major streams in Dominica, Lesser Antilles: 2014 - 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopas, D. C.; Joseph, E. P.; Frey, H. M.

    2017-12-01

    The island of Dominica is a recently active (pH and temperature, were recorded and water samples taken and analyzed for alkalinity, major elements (cations and anions), trace elements and stable isotopes (carbon, deuterium, and oxygen). Variations in water chemistry and river morphology were compared to various parameters, including precipitation, landslide locations, and lithology for each of the catchments. Within the study period, on August 27th, 2015, a significant tropical storm, Erika, made landfall in Dominica, depositing more than 500 mm of rainfall in 10 hours. There was little infiltration of the rainwater (over 50-60% run-off), which resulted in significant landslides, flash floods and damage to infrastructure and loss of life. Despite the obvious morphologic changes to the streams and high discharge during the storm event, preliminary analysis has shown little change in major stream geochemistry following the passage of Tropical Storm Erika. The 10-month time gap between the storm and the post-storm field sampling in June 2016 may be a factor of why geochemical changes were not observed. One of the most significant variations of stream composition during the study period was annual shifts in δD between -1.3 to -5.8 ‰ and δ18O between -1.98 to -2.61 ‰. A possible factor influencing the δ18O of surface waters is seasonal variation in rainfall. The dominant control on precipitation δ18O values is the amount effect, whereby rainfall amount and δ18O are inversely correlated. This relationship is a proxy for changes in δ18O values of surface waters. The data also suggest that hydrothermal fluids are not a prominent contributor to Dominican rivers, despite the presence of active volcanism and numerous hydrothermal systems on the island. The exceptions are the White River, which drains the Valley of Desolation and Boiling Lake and the Lamothe River, which drains the Cold Soufrierre.

  2. Using a mass balance to understand the geology and geochemistry of a reservoir receiving and discharging acid mine drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turney, D.C.; Edwards, K.

    1996-01-01

    Howard-Williams Lake is a 14.5 acre reservoir located in an abandoned coal mine in Perry County, Ohio. With a pH of 3.0 and acidity values of 300--400 mg/L, the reservoir has no plants or fish currently surviving in the lake. Reclamation of spoil piles adjacent to the lake to the north in the late 1980s was not successful in reducing the acidity of the lake. Currently, papermill sludge is being used on the reclaimed area to the north to promote vegetation, but the reservoir has shown no signs of improving. The goal of this project is to transform the lake into a fishable and swimmable one. The reservoir is receiving about 175 gallons per minute of acid mine drainage, not including seepage into the lake, from eight different sources. Three of the sources account for about 165 gallons per minute of the surface water that enters the lake. These inflows have relatively low acidity readings, which range from 66 mg/L to 568 mg/L. The other five sources of acid mine drainage have much lower flowrates, but have acidity values as high as 3,000 mg/L. Samples of all of the surface inflows and the outflow of the lake were taken and sent to a laboratory and tested for the following parameters: total acidity as CaCO 3 , total alkalinity as CaCO 2 , specific conductivity, total suspended solids, sulfate, chloride calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, total iron, total manganese, aluminum, and hardness. During sampling of the surface inflows, volumetric flowrates were measured for each inflow. Once the flowrates and the concentrations of the various parameters were known, a mass balance could be constructed which would show how much of each parameter was entering the lake each day. These data were then used to gain an understanding of the geochemistry and geology of the site

  3. Geology, Petrography, Geochemistry and Radioactivity Studies on The Dyke Swarms of Gabal Al Aglab area, North Eastern Desert, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldabe, M.M.M.

    2016-01-01

    Gabal Al Aglab area is located in the North Eastern Desert of Egypt bounded by lat. 27° 14'-27° 19' N and long. 33° 00'-33° 05' E. It is covered by pan African basement rocks. The present study concern with the geology, petrography, geochemistry and radioactivity of various types of the dyke swarms in Gabal Al Aglab area. The field studies revealed that the area comprises the following litho-tectonic units ; Dokhan volcanic (oldest) and Hamammat sedimentary rocks and younger granites are represented by both Gabal Um Twier and Gabal Al Aglab syenogranites (youngest). Many dykes of acidic, intermediate and basic composition have a large extension and dissect all the mentioned rock units. The dyke swarms intruding Gabal Al Aglab area include the acidic (felsite and granite porphyry) dykes, while the intermediate comprise andesite and andesite porphyry and the basic dykes show basalt and dolerites. The chronologic relations of these dykes indicate the following sequence of emplacement beginning with the oldest acidic, followed by intermediate and then basic ones. The geochemical studies indicate that the acidic dykes were derived from a highly differentiated calc- alkaline magma, while the basic and intermediate dykes were developed from magma of subalkaline nature. The dykes were derived from separate magmas and not by magmatic differentiation of single mother magma. The radioactivity of the studied dyke rocks revealed that the high levels of radioactivity mainly linked to the acidity, differentiation and alkalinity characters. Radioactive granitic spot was observed along the contact with some basic dykes due to their thermal effect during its emplacement on the granite, at the northern part of the studied area. This radioactive spot display anomalies with higher values in U and Th contents, than the normal background value of the younger granite.

  4. Evaluation of the Tindouf Basin Region in Southern Morocco as an Analog Site for Soil Geochemistry on Noachian Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlin, Elizabeth A; Claire, Mark W; Kounaves, Samuel P

    2018-02-09

    Locations on Earth that provide insights into processes that may be occurring or may have occurred throughout martian history are often broadly deemed "Mars analog environments." As no single locale can precisely represent a past or present martian environment, it is important to focus on characterization of terrestrial processes that produce analogous features to those observed in specific regions of Mars or, if possible, specific time periods during martian history. Here, we report on the preservation of ionic species in soil samples collected from the Tindouf region of Morocco and compare them with the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica, the Atacama Desert in Chile, the martian meteorite EETA79001, and the in situ Mars analyses from the Phoenix Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL). The Moroccan samples show the greatest similarity with those from Victoria Valley, Beacon Valley, and the Atacama, while being consistently depleted compared to University Valley and enriched compared to Taylor Valley. The NO 3 /Cl ratios are most similar to Victoria Valley and Atacama, while the SO 4 /Cl ratios are similar to those from Beacon Valley, Victoria Valley, and the Atacama. While perchlorate concentrations in the Moroccan samples are typically lower than those found in samples of other analog sites, conditions in the region are sufficiently arid to retain oxychlorines at detectable levels. Our results suggest that the Tindouf Basin in Morocco can serve as a suitable analogue for the soil geochemistry and subsequent aridification of the Noachian epoch on Mars. Key Words: Mars analogues-Antarctica-Morocco-Oxyanions-Perchlorate-Nitrate. Astrobiology 18, xxx-xxx.

  5. Elemental Geochemistry of Samples From Fault Segments of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) Drill Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourscher, S. N.; Schleicher, A. M.; van der Pluijm, B. A.; Warr, L. N.

    2006-12-01

    Elemental geochemistry of mudrock samples from phase 2 drilling of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) is presented from bore hole depths of 3066 m to 3169 m and from 3292 m to 3368 m, which contain a creeping section and main trace of the fault, respectively. In addition to preparation and analysis of whole rock sample, fault grains with neomineralized, polished surfaces were hand picked from well-washed whole rock samples, minimizing the potential contamination from drilling mud and steel shavings. The separated fractions were washed in deionized water, powdered using a mortar and pestle, and analyzed using an Inductively Coupled Plasma- Optical Emission Spectrometer for major and minor elements. Based on oxide data results, systematic differences in element concentrations are observed between the whole rock and fault rock. Two groupings of data points are distinguishable in the regions containing the main trace of the fault, a shallow part (3292- 3316 m) and a deeper section (3320-3368 m). Applying the isocon method, assuming Zr and Ti to be immobile elements in these samples, indicates a volume loss of more than 30 percent in the shallow part and about 23 percent in the deep part of the main trace. These changes are minimum estimates of fault-related volume loss, because the whole rock from drilling samples contains variable amount of fault rock as well. Minimum estimates for volume loss in the creeping section of the fault are more than 50 percent when using the isocon method, comparing whole rock to plucked fault rock. The majority of the volume loss in the fault rocks is due to the dissolution and loss of silica, potassium, aluminum, sodium and calcium, whereas (based on oxide data) the mineralized surfaces of fractures appear to be enriched in Fe and Mg. The large amount of element mobility within these fault traces suggests extensive circulation of hydrous fluids along fractures that was responsible for progressive dissolution and leaching

  6. Organic petrology and geochemistry of Eocene Suzak bituminous marl, north-central Afghanistan: Depositional environment and source rock potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackley, Paul C.; Sanfilipo, John

    2016-01-01

    Organic geochemistry and petrology of Eocene Suzak bituminous marl outcrop samples from Madr village in north-central Afghanistan were characterized via an integrated analytical approach to evaluate depositional environment and source rock potential. Multiple proxies suggest the organic-rich (TOC ∼6 wt.%) bituminous marls are ‘immature’ for oil generation (e.g., vitrinite Ro  1) indicating organic input from marine algae and/or bacterial biomass, and sterane/hopane ratios are low (0.12–0.14). Monoaromatic steroids are dominated by C28clearly indicating a marine setting. High gammacerane index values (∼0.9) are consistent with anoxia stratification and may indicate intermittent saline-hypersaline conditions. Stable C isotope ratios also suggest a marine depositional scenario for the Suzak samples, consistent with the presence of marine foraminifera including abundant planktic globigerinida(?) and rare benthic discocyclina(?) and nummulites(?). Biomarker 2α-methylhopane for photosynthetic cyanobacteria implies shallow photic zone deposition of Madr marls and 3β-methylhopane indicates presence of methanotrophic archaea in the microbial consortium. The data presented herein are consistent with deposition of Suzak bituminous marls in shallow stratified waters of a restricted marine basin associated with the southeastern incipient or proto-Paratethys. Geochemical proxies from Suzak rock extracts (S content, high polar content, C isotopes, normal (αααR) C27–29 steranes, and C29/C30 and C26/C25 hopane ratios) are similar to extant data from Paleogene oils produced to the north in the Afghan-Tajik Basin. This observation may indicate laterally equivalent strata are effective source rocks as suggested by previous workers; however, further work is needed to strengthen oil-source correlations.

  7. Mineralogical anomalies and their influences on elemental geochemistry of the main workable coal beds from the Dafang Coalfield, Guizhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Ren, D.; Li, D.; Chou, C.-L.; Luo, K.

    2006-01-01

    Mineralogy and geochemistry of the No. 11 Coal bed were investigated by using inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX), sequential chemical extraction procedure (SCEP), and optical microscopy. The results show that the No. 11 Coal bed has very high contents of veined quartz (Vol. 11.4%) and veined ankerite (Vol. 10.2 %). The veined ankerite was generally coated by goethite and the veined quartz embraced chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and selenio-galena. In addition, a trace amount of kaolinite was filled in the veins. These seven minerals often occur in the same veins. The formation temperatures of the veined ankerite and quartz are 85??C and 180??C respectively, indicating their origins of iron-rich calcic and siliceous low-temperature hydrothermal fluids in different epigenetic periods. Studies have also found that the veined quartz probably formed earlier than the veined ankerite, and at least three distinct ankerite formation stages were observed by the ration of Ca/Sr and Fe/Mn of ankerite. The mineral formation from the early to late stage is in order of sulfide, quartz, kaolinite, ankerite, and goethite. The veined ankerite is the dominant source of Mn, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn, which are as high as 0.09%, 74.0 ??g/g, 33.6 ??g/g, 185 ??g/g, and 289 ??g/g in this coal seam, respectively. However, the veined quartz is the main carrier of Pd, Pt, and Ir, which are 1.57 ??g/g, 0.15 ??g/g, and 0.007 ??g/g in this coal seam, respectively. In addition, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and selenio-galena of hydrothermal origin were determined in the veined quartz, and these three sulfide minerals are also important carriers of Cu, Zn and Pb in the No. 11 Coal bed.

  8. Aeolian controls of soil geochemistry and weathering fluxes in high-elevation ecosystems of the Rocky Mountains, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Corey R.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Ketterer, Michael E.; Neff, Jason C.

    2013-04-01

    When dust inputs are large or have persisted for long periods of time, the signature of dust additions are often apparent in soils. The of dust will be greatest where the geochemical composition of dust is distinct from local sources of soil parent material. In this study the influence of dust accretion on soil geochemistry is quantified for two different soils from the San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado, USA. At both study sites, dust is enriched in several trace elements relative to local rock, especially Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn. Mass-balance calculations that do not explicitly account for dust inputs indicate the accumulation of some elements in soil beyond what can be explained by weathering of local rock. Most observed elemental enrichments are explained by accounting for the long-term accretion of dust, based on modern isotopic and geochemical estimates. One notable exception is Pb, which based on mass-balance calculations and isotopic measurements may have an additional source at one of the study sites. These results suggest that dust is a major factor influencing the development of soil in these settings and is also an important control of soil weathering fluxes. After accounting for dust inputs in mass-balance calculations, Si weathering fluxes from San Juan Mountain soils are within the range observed for other temperate systems. Comparing dust inputs with mass-balanced based flux estimates suggests dust could account for as much as 50-80% of total long-term chemical weathering fluxes. These results support the notion that dust inputs may sustain chemical weathering fluxes even in relatively young continental settings. Given the widespread input of far-traveled dust, the weathering of dust is likely and important and underappreciated aspect of the global weathering engine.

  9. Time-series analysis of ion and isotope geochemistry of selected springs of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyles, B.F.; Edkins, J.; Jacobson, R.L.; Hess, J.W.

    1990-11-01

    The temporal variations of ion and isotope geochemistry were observed at six selected springs on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada and included: Cane, Whiterock, Captain Jack, Topopah, Tippipah, and Oak Springs. The sites were monitored from 1980 to 1982 and the following parameters were measured: temperature, pH, electrical conductance, discharge, cations (Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}. Na{sup +}, K{sup +}), anions Cl{sup {minus}}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}. HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, silica, stable isotopes ({delta}{sup 18}O, {delta}D, {delta}{sup 13}C), and radioactive isotopes ({sup 3}H, {sup 14}C). A more detailed study was continued from 1982 to 1988 at Cane and Whiterock Springs. Field microloggers were installed at these sites in 1985 to measure the high frequency response of temperature, electrical conductance, and discharge to local precipitation. Stage fluctuations near the discharge point dissolve minerals/salts as groundwater inundates the mineralized zone immediately above the equilibrium water table. This phenomena was most noticeable at Whiterock Spring and lagged the discharge response by several hours. Stable isotope analysis of precipitation and groundwater suggests a 1.5 to 2 month travel time for meteoric water to migrate from the recharge area to the discharge point. Groundwater age determinations suggest a mean age of approximately 30 years at Whiterock Spring and possibly older at Cane Spring. However, the short travel time and geochemical integrity of recharge pulses suggest that the waters are poorly mixed along the flow paths. 25 refs., 25 figs., 24 tabs.

  10. Petrography, Geochemistry and Proposed Genesis of Ordovician Oolitic Iron Formation Members of the Lashkarak Formation, Eastern Alborz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoore Maghsoudloo Mahalli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Oolitic iron formations are sedimentary rocks with >5 vol.% oolites and >15 wt.% iron, corresponding to 21.4 wt.% Fe2O3 (Young, 1989; Petranek and Van Houten, 1997; Mucke and Farshad, 2005. In Iran, new iron oolite-bearing members have been identified in the Lashkarak Formation (lower-middle Ordovician in the Abarsej, Dehmola and Simehkuh sections, eastern Alborz (Ghobadi Pour et al., 2011. At present, the mineralogy and geochemistry of these members are not known. Consequently, research reported here was conducted to reveal the mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of Ordovician oolitic iron formationmembers and to discuss their genesis and economic importance. Materials and Analyses Field geology and sampling was carried out to collect 25 samples from the ooliticiron formation members in the Abarsej, Dehmola and Simehkuh section in eastern Alborz. Samples were prepared for polished-thin sections (n=10, XRD analysis (n=15. Whole-rock chemical analysis (n=15 by XRF for major elements and by ICP-ES for trace elements was performed by laboratories at the SarCheshmeh copper mine complex, Kerman, Iran. One sample was analyzed by SEM at the Wales Museum, UK. Results Microscopic studies show that the oolitic iron formation members are hosted by carbonate argillite rocks. They are mainly composed of oolites rather than pisoliths (small bodies somewhat larger and more irregular than oolites, whereas oolites have mainly ellipsoidal forms and locally spherical shapes. Most (6 oolites show banding with a central core. Simple oolites without a core are scarce. Mineralogically, oolites are mainly chamositic and hematitic in composition; goethite, pyrite and glauconite occur in traces and siderite is absent. Quartz, calcite and zircon are accessory minerals which are present in the groundmass. Geochemically, TFeO % of the oolitic iron formation horizons ranges from 8 to 48 % with an average of 21%. The CaO content ranges from 2 to 37% and

  11. Determination of Cr geochemistry anomaly zones in the Orzooiyeh area, Hormozgan province using Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP

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    Mehrdad Barati

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Using stream sediment geochemical exploration has been considered as a useful approach to explore the good potentials for many years. Problems might come up in the course of implementing resolving which may requires the use of more recent findings or auxiliary methods. One of the areas which has faced special problems during the conducting geochemical exploration is the Orzooiyeh region on the border of Kerman and Hormozgan provinces. Stream sediment exploration was carried out in the area in the scale of 1: 100,000. This region includes two different geological zones that are the Sanandaj-Sirjan in the northern part and the Zagros in the southern part. During the statistical analysis and method of eliminating the effects of the upstream rock it was determined that most of the element of chromium’s anomalies are in compliance with the Bakhtiari and Aghajari units which are lacking in the economic importance in the chromium ore. Current geochemical exploration methods often extract the anomalies based on classical statistical methods (Yazdi, 2002. In these methods, the range of the anomaly is just determined based on simple numerical calculations and except for grade, any of the other parameters do not have a significant role in determining the anomaly areas. However, procedures such as fuzzy logic, neural system, regression and hierarchical analysis process enable the users to involve more parameters in data processing (Oh and Lee, 2010; Kumar and Hassan, 2013; Carranza, 2008. For instance, using special algorithms has made parameters such as lithology and tectonic, geophysics and geochemistry effective in processing and determining the anomaly zones, and ranking each of the affective parameters in the anomaly based on their importance, and eventually achieving the maps and valuable anomaly areas possible (Bonham-carter, 1994; Carranza, 2008. This study was conducted to identify the significant anomalies zones using AHP and GIS

  12. Geochemistry and Mineral Chemistry of Zeolites Bearing Basic Volcanic Rocks from the Boumehen-Roudehen Area, East of Tehran

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    Amir Ali Tabbakh Shabani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Upper Eocene basic volcanic rocks that have cropped out in Karaj formation in the Boumehen and Roudehen area in the east of Tehran are characterized by fibrous zeolites filling their vesicles, cavities and fractures creating amygdale texture. The study area is located structurally in the Central Alborz orogenic belt. The presence of large volumes of shoshonitic magma during the Middle to Late Eocene in southern–central Alborz implies that partial melting to produce shoshsonitic melts was not a local petrological event. Thus, their ages, formation processes, and interpretations are of regional tectonic significance. In this study, we present a detailed petrography, mineral chemistry, and whole-rock geochemistry of high-K (shoshonitic basic rocks to understand the petrogenesis and source region and to deduce the nature of the tectonomagmatic regime of the Alborz. Materials and methods In this study, we present new major and trace element data for a selection of 4 of the least altered samples by a combination of X-ray fluorescence (XRF and ICP-OES techniques at the Zarazma Mineral Studies Company. Mineral analyses were obtained by wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometry on polished thin sections prepared from each rock sample described above for 12 elements using a Cameca SX-50 electron microprobe at the Istituto di Geologia e Geoingegneria Ambientale, C.N.R., University La Sapienza of Rome, Italy. Typical beam operating conditions were 15 kV and probe current of 15 nA. The accuracy of the analyses is 1% for major and 10% for minor elements. A total of 24 point analyses were collected. Results and Discussion The extent of alteration in the study rocks varies from slight to severe and shows porphyritic to glomeroporphyritic textures. Pyroxenes are generally subhedral to euhedral and occur as discrete crystals as well as aggregates. Olivine may occur only as relics filled with iddingsite, chlorite and calcite. Plagioclase is

  13. Mineralogy and geochemistry of picro-dolerite dykes from the central Deccan Traps flood basaltic province, India, and their geodynamic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongre, Ashish; Viljoen, K. S.; Rathod, A.

    2018-04-01

    Constituent mineral compositions and whole rock major element geochemistry of picro-dolerite dykes from the central part of the Deccan flood basalt province are presented and discussed. The dykes are characterized by an MgO content of about 13 wt%, coupled with 13-16 modal percents of olivine. A high whole rock molar Mg# value of 71 and the presence of magnesian olivine phenocrysts ( Fo78) are consistent with a primitive (i.e. unevolved) geochemistry. The nature and composition of clinopyroxene (augite and pigeonite), plagioclase feldspar (labradorite) and Fe-Ti oxides (mostly ilmenite and magnetite) are also discussed, with implications drawn with respect to the geodynamics. High MgO magmas and rocks such as picrites are generally considered to be indicative of plume magmatism, formed by high degrees of partial melting in, e.g. the high-temperature region of a plume head. Recent age data is consistent with a model in which the Deccan LIP picritic magmatism is associated with the main phase of Deccan Trap activity at 66 Ma, as a result of a syn- to post rifting phase associated with the impact of the Rèunion mantle plume. It is speculated that the differentiation of primary olivine basaltic magma of picritic composition, may have been the mechanism for the generation of alkalic basalts which occurs in the Deccan Trap basaltic sequence.

  14. Zircon Geochronology (U-Pb, Petrography, Geochemistry and Radioisotopes of Bornaward Metarhyolites (Central Taknar Zone-Northwest of Bardaskan

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    Reza Monazzami Bagherzadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Bornaward area is located in the Northeastern Iran (in the Khorasan Razavi province 28 km northwest of the city of Bardaskan at 57˚ 46΄ to 57˚ 52΄ N latitude and 35˚ 21΄ to 35˚ 24΄E longitude. The Taknar structural zone, situated in the North central Iranian micro continent, is part of the Lut block (Forster, 1978. The Taknar zone is an allochthonous block bounded by the Darouneh and Taknar major faults. Much of this zone consists of metarhyolite-rhyodacite volcanic rocks, and rhyolitic tuff with interlayers of sandstone and dolomite (Taknar Formation. Analytical Results ICP-MS analysis of REE and minor elements of samples of the Bornaward metarhyolites was carried out at the ACME Laboratory in Vancouver, Canada. U-Pb dating of the metarhyolites was performed on isolated zircons in Crohn's Laser Lab, in Arizona (Gehrels et al., 2008. Measurement of Rb, Sr, Sm and Nd isotopes and (143Nd/144Ndi and (87Sr/86Sri ratios took place in the radioisotope laboratory of the University of Aveiro in Portugal. Petrography The volcanic rocks are porphyritic, commonly containing phenocrysts of orthoclase and rarely sanidine, quartz and intermediate plagioclase in a groundmass of fine-grained quartz and feldspar. An alteration has produced oriented needles of sericite and clay minerals, clusters of fine-grained green biotite and clots of epidote and chlorite. Geochemistry The compositions of the volcanic rocks are calc alkaline and high K- calc alkaline. The obtained Shand index (Al2O3/( CaO+Na2O+K2O is above 1.1, in the peraluminous S-type granite field (Chappell and White, 2001. Plotted on the TAS diagram (Middlemost, 1994, all the metarhyolite-rhyodacite samples are located in the sub-alkaline field and the majority fall into the rhyolite group. The metarhyolite-rhyodacites show enrichment of LREE with a moderately ascending pattern ((La/YbN=2.51-10.11 and La=46.45-145.48. Europium shows a negative anomaly (Eu/Eu*=0.23-0.71. U

  15. Hydrogeology and geochemistry of low-permeability oil-shales - Case study from HaShfela sub-basin, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Avihu; Gersman, Ronen

    2016-09-01

    Low permeability rocks are of great importance given their potential role in protecting underlying aquifers from surface and buried contaminants. Nevertheless, only limited data for these rocks is available. New appraisal wells drilled into the oil shale unit (OSU) of the Mt. Scopus Group in the HaShfela sub-basin, Central Israel, provided a one-time opportunity for detailed study of the hydrogeology and geochemistry of this very low permeability unit. Methods used include: slug tests, electrical logs, televiewer imaging, porosity and permeability measurements on core samples, chemical analyses of the rock column and groundwater analyses. Slug tests yielded primary indication to the low permeability of the OSU despite its high porosity (30-40%). Hydraulic conductivities as low as 10-10-10-12 m/s were calculated, using both the Hvorslev and Cooper-Bredehoeft-Papadopulos decoding methods. These low conductivities were confirmed by direct measurements of permeability in cores, and from calculations based on the Kozeny-Carman approach. Storativity was found to be 1 · 10-6 and specific storage - 3.8 · 10-9 m-1. Nevertheless, the very limited water flow in the OSU is argued to be driven gravitationally. The extremely slow recovery rates as well as the independent recovery of two adjacent wells, despite their initial large head difference of 214 m, indicate that the natural fractures are tight and are impermeable due to the confining stress at depth. Laboratory measured permeability is similar or even higher than the field-measured values, thereby confirming that fractures and bedding planes do not form continuous flow paths. The vertical permeability along the OSU is highly variable, implying hydraulic stratification and extremely low vertical hydraulic conductivity. The high salinity of the groundwater (6300-8000 mgCl/L) within the OSU and its chemical and isotopic compositions are explained by the limited water flow, suggesting long residence time of the water

  16. Geochemistry of organic-rich river waters in Amazonia: Insights on weathering processes of intertropical cratonic terrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horbe, Adriana Maria Coimbra; Lages, Anderson da Silva; Moquet, Jean-Sébastien; Santos, Roberto Ventura; Seyler, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In this study, eight organic-rich rivers that flow through the Brazilian craton in the southwestern Amazon rainforest are investigated. This investigation is the first of its type in this area and focuses on the effects of lithology, long-term weathering, thick soils, forest cover and hydrological period on the dissolved load compositions in rivers draining cratonic terrain. The major dissolved ion concentrations, alkalinity (TAlk), SiO 2 , trace element concentrations, and Sr isotope contents in the water were determined between April 2009 and January 2010. In addition, the isotopic values of oxygen and hydrogen were determined between 2011 and 2013. Overall, the river water is highly dilute and dominated by the major dissolved elements TAlk, SiO 2 and K + and the major dissolved trace elements Al, Fe, Ba, Mn, P, Zn and Sr, which exhibit large temporal and spatial variability and are closely correlated with the silicatic bedrock and hydrology. Additionally, rainwater and recycled water vapor and the size of the basin contribute to the geochemistry of the waters. The total weathering flux estimated from our results is 2–4 t km −2 .yr −1 , which is one of the lowest fluxes in the world. The CO 2 consumption rate is approximately 21–61 10 3  mol km −2  yr −1 , which is higher than expected given the stability of the felsic to basic igneous and metamorphic to siliciclastic basement rocks and the thick tropical soil cover. Thus, weathering of the cratonic terrain under intertropical humid conditions is still an important consumer of CO 2 . - Highlights: • Were studied rivers flowing the Brazilian craton covered by lateritic soils. • The river waters are highly diluted and dominated by TAlk, SiO 2 and K + . • There is spatial and temporal variability in the chemical composition. • The rain amount and recycled water vapor affect the O and D isotopes. • Geology, weathering, discharge and seasonality highlight a singular composition.

  17. Geochemistry of coal-measure source rocks and natural gases in deep formations in Songliao Basin, NE China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mi, Jingkui; Zhang, Shuichang; Hu, Guoyi; He, Kun [State Key Laboratory for Enhanced Oil Recovery, Beijing (China); Petroleum Geology Research and Laboratory Center, Research Institute of Petroleum Exploration and Development, PetroChina (China); Key Laboratory for Petroleum Geochemistry, China National Petroleum Corp. (China)

    2010-12-01

    The natural gases developed in deep volcanic rock reservoirs of the Songliao Basin, NE China are characterized by enriched {delta}{sup 13}C value for methane and frequently reversal carbon isotopic distribution pattern. Although many researchers consider such gas type as an abiogenic origin, we believe the natural gases have a biogenic origin mainly except little inorganic gases and the reversal carbon isotopic distribution pattern of gases is caused by mixing of different origin gases. Methane carbon isotopic values for majority samples fall in the range from - 24 permille to - 32 permille, which is heavier than typical coal-type gases in other Chinese basins. There are several reasons caused heavy carbon isotope of methane: (1) Carbon isotopic values of source kerogen are 3-5 permille heavier than these from other basins; (2) Source rocks are at extremely high maturity stage with vitrinite reflectance mostly above 3.0%; (3) Portion of gas is derived from basement mudrock or slate with higher maturity. The observation on the organic from deep formation reveals that there is a relatively high content for liptinite, which reaches approximately 8 to 10%. The macerals component of source rock shows that the source rocks have some ability to generate oil. Small portion of oil was generated from high hydrogen content macerals in coals and shales as proof by oil found in microcrack and in micropore of coal and oil-bearing fluid inclusions grown in volcanic reservoir. The occurrence of pyrobitumen in volcanic reservoir indicates preexisted oil had been cracked into wet gas, and this kind of gas had also been found in gas pools. Heavy isotopic methane is derived from coal at extremely high maturity stage. There may be little inorganic alkane gases in deep layers for their geochemistry and special geological setting of Songliao Basin. Artificial mixing experiments of different origins gases confirm that inorganic gas such as gas from well FS1 mixed with other end members

  18. Deriving spatial patterns from a novel database of volcanic rock geochemistry in the Virunga Volcanic Province, East African Rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Sam; Barette, Florian; Smets, Benoît; Benbakkar, Mhammed; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    The Virunga Volcanic Province (VVP) is situated within the western branch of the East-African Rift. The geochemistry and petrology of its' volcanic products has been studied extensively in a fragmented manner. They represent a unique collection of silica-undersaturated, ultra-alkaline and ultra-potassic compositions, displaying marked geochemical variations over the area occupied by the VVP. We present a novel spatially-explicit database of existing whole-rock geochemical analyses of the VVP volcanics, compiled from international publications, (post-)colonial scientific reports and PhD theses. In the database, a total of 703 geochemical analyses of whole-rock samples collected from the 1950s until recently have been characterised with a geographical location, eruption source location, analytical results and uncertainty estimates for each of these categories. Comparative box plots and Kruskal-Wallis H tests on subsets of analyses with contrasting ages or analytical methods suggest that the overall database accuracy is consistent. We demonstrate how statistical techniques such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and subsequent cluster analysis allow the identification of clusters of samples with similar major-element compositions. The spatial patterns represented by the contrasting clusters show that both the historically active volcanoes represent compositional clusters which can be identified based on their contrasted silica and alkali contents. Furthermore, two sample clusters are interpreted to represent the most primitive, deep magma source within the VVP, different from the shallow magma reservoirs that feed the eight dominant large volcanoes. The samples from these two clusters systematically originate from locations which 1. are distal compared to the eight large volcanoes and 2. mostly coincide with the surface expressions of rift faults or NE-SW-oriented inherited Precambrian structures which were reactivated during rifting. The lava from the Mugogo

  19. Age and geochemistry of the Newania dolomite carbonatites, India: implications for the source of primary carbonatite magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Jyotiranjan S.; Pande, Kanchan; Bhutani, Rajneesh; Shukla, Anil D.; Rai, Vinai K.; Kumar, Alok; Awasthi, Neeraj; Smitha, R. S.; Panda, Dipak K.

    2013-12-01

    The Newania carbonatite complex of India is one of the few dolomite-dominated carbonatites of the world. Intruding into Archean basement gneisses, the rocks of the complex have undergone limited diversification and are not associated with any alkaline silicate rock. Although the magmatic nature of the complex was generally accepted, its age of emplacement had remained equivocal because of the disturbed nature of radioisotope systems. Many questions about the nature of its mantle source and mode of origin had remained unanswered because of lack of geochemical and isotopic data. Here, we present results of our effort to date the complex using 147Sm-143Nd, 207Pb-206Pb and 40Ar-39Ar dating techniques. We also present mineral chemistry, major and trace element geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotopic ratio data for these carbonatites. Our age data reveal that the complex was emplaced at ~1,473 Ma and parts of it were affected by a thermal event at ~904 Ma. The older 207Pb-206Pb ages reported here (~2.4 Ga) and by one earlier study (~2.3 Ga; Schleicher et al. Chem Geol 140:261-273, 1997) are deemed to be a result of heterogeneous incorporation of crustal Pb during the post-emplacement thermal event. The thermal event had little effect on many magmatic signatures of these rocks, such as its dolomite-magnesite-ankerite-Cr-rich magnetite-magnesio-arfvedsonite-pyrochlore assemblage, mantle like δ13C and δ18O and typical carbonatitic trace element patterns. Newania carbonatites show fractional crystallization trend from high-Mg to high-Fe through high-Ca compositions. The least fractionated dolomite carbonatites of the complex possess very high Mg# (≥80) and have similar major element oxide contents as that of primary carbonatite melts experimentally produced from peridotitic sources. In addition, lower rare earth element (and higher Sr) contents than a typical calcio-carbonatite and mantle like Nb/Ta ratios indicate that the primary magma for the complex was a magnesio

  20. Geochemistry of Toxic Elements and Their Removal via the Preparation of High-Uranium Coal in Southwestern China

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    Piaopiao Duan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available High-uranium (U coal is the dominant form of coal in Southwestern China. However, directly utilizing this resource can also harm the environment because this element is radioactive; it is, therefore, necessary to clean this kind of coal before burning. This research studied the geochemistry of toxic elements and their partitioning during the preparation of high-U coal in China. The results show that high-U coals are mainly distributed in Southwestern China and are characterized by a high organic sulfur (S content and vanadium (V-chromium (Cr-molybdenum (Mo-U element assemblage. These elements are well-correlated with one another, but are all negatively related to ash yield, indicating that all four are syngenetic in origin and associated with organic materials. A mineralogical analysis shows that U in Ganhe and Rongyang coal occurs within fine-grained anatase, clay minerals, guadarramite, and pyrite, while V occurs in clay minerals, pyrite, and dolomite, and Cr occurs in dolomite. Other elements, such as fluorine (F, lead (Pb, selenium (Se, and mercury (Hg, mainly occur in pyrite. By applying a gravity separation method to separate minerals from coal, the content of the enrichment element assemblage of V-Cr-Mo-U in Rongyang coal is still shown to be higher than, or close to, that of the original feed because this element assemblage is derived from hydrothermal fluids during syngenetic or early diagenetic phases, but other elements (beryllium [Be], F, manganese [Mn], zinc [Zn], Pb, arsenic [As], Se, Hg can be efficiently removed. Once cleaned, the coal obtained by gravity separation was subject to a flotation test to separate minerals; these results indicate that while a portion of V and Cr can be removed, Mo and U remain difficult to extract. It is evident that the two most commonly utilized industrialized coal preparation methods, gravity separation and flotation, cannot effectively remove U from coal where this element occurs in large

  1. Granitoids of the Dry Valleys area, southern Victoria Land : geochemistry and evolution along the early Paleozoic Antarctic Craton margin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allibone, A.H.; Cox, S.C.; Smillie, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    Field relationships and geochemistry indicate granitoid plutons of the Dry Valleys area comprise at least three petrogenetically distinct suites. The older Dry Valleys 1a (DV1a) suite, comprising the Bonney, Catspaw, Denton, Cavendish, and Wheeler Plutons and hornblende-biotite orthogneisses, and Dry Valleys 1b (DV1b) suite, comprising the Hedley, Valhalla, St Johns, Dun, Calkin, and Suess Plutons, biotite granitoid dikes and biotite orthogneisses, were emplaced before prominent swarms of Vanda mafic and felsic dikes. Both the DV1a and DV1b suites are time transgressive, with older intrusions in each suite being emplaced during the later stages of deformation of the Koettlitz Group. Younger granitoids that postdate the majority of the Vanda dikes include: the Dry Valleys 2 (DV2) suite, comprising the Pearse and Nibelungen Plutons plus several smaller, unnamed plugs; and the Harker, Swinford, Orestes, and Brownworth Plutons with identical field relationships and enclaves but distinct chemistries. Chemical characteristics and limited Rb-Sr isotopic dating indicate plutonism before c. 500 Ma was dominated by the Cordilleran I-type DV1a suite, inferred to have developed during melting above a west-dipping subduction zone along the Antarctic Craton margin. The chemical characteristics of the DV1b suite indicate large-scale melting of a quartzo-feldspathic protolith lacking residual plagioclase, but containing refractory garnet. Potential DV1b suite source rocks include metamorphosed immature sediments, possibly underplated along the subduction zone associated with DV1a magmatism, or older granitoid orthogneisses. Major DV1b plutonism at 490 Ma marks the end of subduction-related plutonism in southern Victoria Land. Younger DV2 alkali-calcic, Caledonian I-type plutonism is inferred to have formed in response to uplift and extension between 480 and 455 Ma. Lack of DV2 suite correlatives and Vanda mafic and felsic dikes in northern Victoria Land suggests significantly

  2. Reconciling the shadow of a subduction signature with rift geochemistry and tectonic environment in Eastern Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMasurier, Wesley E.; Choi, Sung Hi; Hart, Stanley R.; Mukasa, Sam; Rogers, Nick

    2016-09-01

    Basalt-trachyte volcanoes in the Marie Byrd Land (MBL) Cenozoic province lie along the Amundsen Sea coast on the north flank of the West Antarctic rift. Basalts here are characterized by OIB-like geochemistry, restricted ranges of 87Sr/86Sr (0.702535-0.703284) and 143Nd/144Nd (0.512839-0.513008) and a wide range of 206Pb/204Pb (19.357-20.934). Basalts at three MBL volcanoes display two anomalies compared with the above and with all other basalts in West Antarctica. They include 143Nd/144Nd (0.512778-0.512789) values at Mt. Takahe and Mt. Siple that are 2σ lower than other West Antarctic basalts, and Ba/Nb, Ba/La, and Ba/Th values at Mt. Murphy and Mt. Takahe that are 3-8 times higher than normal OIB. Isotope and trace element data do not support crustal and lithospheric mantle contamination, or the presence of residual mantle amphibole or phlogopite as explanations of these anomalies. The apparent coincidence of these anomalies with the site of a pre-Cenozoic convergence zone along the Gondwanaland margin suggests a subduction influence. Major episodes of subduction and granitic plutonism took place in MBL during the Devonian, Permian, and Late Cretaceous. Relicts in the source region, of components from these subducted slabs, provide a credible explanation for the uncoupling of Ba from other large ion lithophile elements (LILE), for its erratic distribution, and for the anomalously low 143Nd/144Nd at Mt. Takahe. The last episode of subduction ended 85 Ma, and was followed by continental break-up, rifting and lithospheric attenuation that produced the West Antarctic rift as we know it today. Thus, the enigmatic geochemical signatures in these three volcanoes seem to have been preserved roughly 61-85 m.y. after subduction ended. New calculations of source melting depth and a new determination of lithospheric thickness suggest that the source of the anomalies resides in a fossil mélange diapir that rose from the Cretaceous subducting slab, became attached to the

  3. U-Pb dating, geochemistry, and tectonic implications of the Songpan-Ganzi block and the Longmen Shan, Chiba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.L.; Li, D.P.; Zhou, J.

    2009-01-01

    The Songpan-Ganzi triangular tectonic block is surrounded by the East Kunlun-Qaidam block in the north, the Qiangtang block in the southwest, and the Longmen Shan in the southeast. The Longmen Shan is the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau in Central Asia. The tectonic affinity and relationship of these regions with the Yangtze and North China blocks have been rigorously debated. In this paper, we present our recent studies on the geochemistry of the Precambrian to Triassic classic sedimentary rocks from this area. Detrital zircons were extracted from the sedimentary rocks for U-Pb dating by SHRIMP and LA-ICP-MS. Nd depleted mantle model ages indicate that these provenances have an affinity to the Yangtze craton and Qinling Shan, in contrast to those of the North China craton. All strata, from Cambrian to late Triassic, contain detrital zircon U-Pb ages of 1400 to 600 Ma, with most falling between 900-720 Ma. The Songpan-Ganzi block was the most important part of the Northern Tethys in the Triassic period, in addition to being the largest flysch basin in the world. The Longmen Shan thrust belt comprises both the telescoped, unmetamorphosed, shallow water carbonate-dominated passive margin of the Yangtze craton and its crystalline basement. The western and northern margins of the Yangtze craton, as well as the Qinling Shan, were the sources of sediments in the Songpan-Ganzi block and the Longmen Shan. The oldest dated detrital zircons indicate that the Yangtze craton started forming during the period 2800-2200 Ma. Because the basement of the Yangtze craton experienced multi-episodic intracrustal processes, the oldest basement components account for only a small portion of the provenance components. The detrital zircon ages of 2200-1400 Ma indicate a major contribution of the Qinling Shan and/or the northwestern margin of the Yangtze craton to the clastic sediments in the Songpan-Ganzi block. The presence of detrital zircon of Neoproterozoic to Triassic ages

  4. Chemical weathering from the CoDA (Compositional Data Analysis) point of view: new insights for the Alpine rivers geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozzi, Caterina; Buccianti, Antonella; Frondini, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    compositional matrix. In both cases the idea is to probe the behaviour of geochemical processes to be analysed in time or space. An application example is presented for the chemistry of the surficial waters of the Alpine region (Donnini et al., 2016). The emergence of fractal structures indicates the presence of dissipative systems, which require complexity, large numbers of inter-connected elements and stochasticity requiring caution in the use of classical spatial methods to represent geochemical phenomena. Buccianti A. & Zuo R., 2016. Weathering reactions and isometric log-ratio coordinates: Do they speak to each other? Applied Geochemistry, 75, 189-199. Donnini M., Frondini F., Probst J.L., Probst A., Cardellini C., Marchesini I., Guzzetti F., 2016. Chemical weathering and consumption of atmospheric carbon dioxide in the Alpine region. Global and Planetary Change, 136 (2016) 65-81.

  5. Aqueous geochemistry in icy world interiors: Equilibrium fluid, rock, and gas compositions, and fate of antifreezes and radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, Marc; Desch, Steven J.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.

    2017-09-01

    serpentines, NH4-phyllosilicates, and carbonates on Ceres' surface; and of Na and NH4-carbonate and chloride in Ceres' bright spots. They also match results from previous modeling studies with similar assumptions, and systematically expand these results to heretofore unexplored physico-chemical conditions. This work involved the compilation and careful validation of a comprehensive PHREEQC database, which combines the advantages of the default databases phreeqc.dat (carefully vetted data, molar volumes) and llnl.dat (large diversity of species), and should be of broad use to anyone seeking to model aqueous geochemistry at pressures that differ from 1 bar with PHREEQC.

  6. Mineralogy and geochemistry of trace and Rare Earth Element from the Manaila massive sulphide deposit (Eastern Carpathians, Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldoveanu, S.; Iancu, O. G.; Kasper, H. U.

    2012-04-01

    Keywords: Eastern Carpathians, Mănăila deposit, REE, trace elements, pyrite The present paper deal with the mineralogy and trace elements geochemistry of sulphide deposits from Mănăila mine field located in NE area of Eastern Carpathians Mountains (Romania). The mineralization occurs within metamorphic rocks of Tulgheş terrane, part of Crystalline-Mezozoic zone of the Eastern Carpathians. The metamorphic rocks in Mănăila area consist of felsic metavolcanics rocks with quartzites and quartz-feldspathic rocks as prevailing types. The P-T metamorphic conditions are typical of greenschis facies with biotite and garnet (Mn-Grt) in mineral assemblage. The mineralogical study was performed using reflected light microscope and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) methods. Thus, the both methods show that the main sulphides minerals are represented by pyrite and chalcopyrite, being followed by sphalerite, galena and little amount of Cu sulphosalts (tetrahedrite and bournonite) and also by gangue minerals (quartz and carbonates). Pyrite occurs as large euhedral to subhedral grains in quartz and small rounded inclusion in chalcopyrite. The trace elements analysis was achieved on whole-rock samples and involved the determination of REE, LIL (Rb, Ba, Sr) and HFS (Y, Zr, Hf, U, Th, Nb, Ta) by ICP-MS method. The concentration of LIL and HFS trace elements in mineralized rocks decrease as follows: Ba > Bi > As > Sb > Co > Ga > Ni > Cd. Even if the barium contents in Mănăila ore is high, baritina (BaSO4) was not identified throught the mineralogical analyses carried out so far. The total rare earth element content (REE) of the samples from Mănăila range from 26.84 to 246.46 ppm. Chondrite - normalized REE patterns of the mineralized rocks show that the LREE are enriched in relation to the HREE. Also a positive Ce anomalies and negative Eu anomalies are present. Y/Ho and Zr/Hf ratios are close to the chondritic ratios indicating Charge-and-Radius-Controlled (CHARAC

  7. X-ray fluorescence analysis with micro glass beads using milligram-scale siliceous samples for archeology and geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, Shintaro, E-mail: sichi@meiji.ac.jp [Organization for the Strategic Coordination of Research and Intellectual Properties, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Nakamura, Toshihiro [Department of Applied Chemistry, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    A micro glass bead technique was developed to assay precious siliceous samples for geochemical and archeological analyses. The micro-sized (approximately 3.5 mm in diameter and 0.8 mm in height) glass beads were prepared by mixing and fusing 1.1 mg of the powdered sample and 11.0 mg of the alkali lithium tetraborate flux for wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence determination of major oxides (Na{sub 2}O, MgO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}, P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, K{sub 2}O, CaO, TiO{sub 2}, MnO, and total Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The preparation parameters, including temperature and agitation during the fusing process, were optimized for the use of a commercial platinum crucible rather than a custom-made crucible. The procedure allows preparation of minute sample amounts of siliceous samples using conventional fusing equipment. Synthetic calibration standards were prepared by compounding chemical reagents such as oxides, carbonates, and diphosphates. Calibration curves showed good linearity with r values > 0.997, and the lower limits of detection were in the 10s to 100s of μg g{sup −1} range (e.g., 140 μg g{sup −1} for Na{sub 2}O, 31 μg g{sup −1} for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and 8.9 μg g{sup −1} for MnO). Using the present method, we determined ten major oxides in igneous rocks, stream sediments, ancient potteries, and obsidian. This was applicable to siliceous samples with various compositions, because of the excellent agreement between the analytical and recommended values of six geochemical references. This minimal-scale analysis may be available for precious and limited siliceous samples (e.g., rock, sand, soil, sediment, clay, and archeological ceramics) in many fields such as archeology and geochemistry. - Highlights: • X-ray fluorescence determination of major oxides was performed using 1.1 mg of sample. • Preparation and measurement techniques of the XRF micro glass bead specimen were optimized. • Calibration curves using synthetic standards showed good

  8. Using hydraulic heads, geochemistry and 3H to understand river bank infiltration; an example from the Ovens Valley, southeast Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Matthew; Cartwright, Ian

    2014-05-01

    Defining the relationship between the river and its river bank is important in constraining baseflow to a river and enhancing our ability in protecting water resources and riparian ecology. Hydraulic heads, geochemistry and 3H were measured in river banks along the Ovens River, southeast Australia. The Ovens River is characterised by the transition from a single channel river residing within a mountain valley to a multi-channel meandering river on broad alluvial plains in the lower catchment. The 3H concentrations of most near-river groundwater (less than 10 m from river channel) and bank water (10 - 30 m from the river channel) in the valley range between 1.93 and 2.52 TU. They are similar to those of the river, which are between 2.37 and 2.24 TU. These groundwater also have a Na/Cl ratio of 2.7 - 4.7 and are close to the river Na/Cl ratios. These similarities suggest that most river banks in the valley are recharged by the river. The hydraulic heads and EC values indicate that some of these river banks are recharged throughout the year, while others are only recharged during high flow events. Some near-river groundwater and bank water in the valley have a much lower 3H concentration, ranging from 0.97 to 1.27 TU. They also have a lower Na/Cl ratio of 1.6 - 3.1. These differences imply that some of the river banks in the valley are rarely recharged by the river. The lack of infiltration is supported by the constant head gradient toward the river and the constant EC values in these river banks. The river banks with bank infiltration are located in the first few hundred kilometres in the valley and in the middle catchment where the valley is broaden. In the first few hundred kilometres in the valley, it has a relatively flat landscape and does not allow a high regional water table to form. The river thus is always above the water table and recharges the river banks and the valley aquifers. In the broader valley, the relatively low lateral hydraulic gradient is

  9. Sedimentary sources and processes in the eastern Arabian Sea: Insights from environmental magnetism, geochemistry and clay mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Avinash

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution patterns of surficial sediment samples from different sedimentary domains (shallow to deep-sea regions of the eastern Arabian Sea were studied using sediment proxies viz. environmental magnetism, geochemistry, particle size and clay mineralogy. Higher concentrations of magnetic minerals (high χlf were recorded in the deep-water sediments when compared with the shallow water sediments. The magnetic mineralogy of one of the shallow water samples is influenced by the presence of bacterial magnetite as evidenced from the χARM/χlf vs. χARM/χfd biplot. However, the other samples are catchment-derived. The high correlation documented for χlf, anhysteretic remanent magnetisation (χARM and isothermal remanent magnetisation (IRM with Al indicates that the deep-sea surficial sediments are influenced by terrigenous fluxes which have been probably derived from the southern Indian rivers, the Sindhu (the Indus and the Narmada-Tapti rivers. A lower Mn concentration is recorded in the upper slope sediments from the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ but a higher Mn/Al ratio is documented in the lower slope and deep-sea sediments. Clay minerals such as illite (24–48.5%, chlorite (14.1–34.9%, smectite (10.6–28.7% and kaolinite (11.9–27.5% dominate the sediments of shallow and deep-sea regions and may have been derived from different sources and transported by fluvial and aeolian agents. Organic carbon (OC data indicate a low concentration in the shallow/shelf region (well oxygenated water conditions and deeper basins (increased bottom-water oxygen concentration and low sedimentation rate. High OC concentrations were documented in the OMZ (very low bottom-water oxygen concentration with high sedimentation rate. The calcium carbonate concentration of the surface sediments from the continental shelf and slope regions (<1800 m up to the Chagos-Laccadive Ridge show higher concentrations (average = 58% when compared to deep basin

  10. Using simulated maps to interpret the geochemistry, formation and quality of the Blue Gem Coal Bed, Kentucky, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geboy, Nicholas J.; Olea, Ricardo A.; Engle, Mark A.; Martin-Fernandez, Jose Antonio

    2013-01-01

    This study presents geostatistical simulations of coal-quality parameters, major oxides and trace metals for an area covering roughly 812 km2 of the Blue Gem coal bed in southeastern Kentucky, USA. The Blue Gem, characterized by low ash yield and low sulfur content, is an important economic resource. Past studies have characterized the Blue Gem's geochemistry, palynology and petrography and inferred a depositional setting of a planar peat deposit that transitioned to slightly domed later in its development. These studies have focused primarily on vertical geochemical trends within the coal bed. Simulated maps of chemical elements derived from 45 measured sample locations across the study area provide an opportunity to observe changes in the horizontal direction within the coal bed. As the Blue Gem coal bed shows significant vertical chemical trends, care was taken in this study to try to select samples from a single, middle portion of the coal. By revealing spatial distribution patterns of elements across the middle of the bed, associations between different components of the coal can be seen. The maps therefore help to provide a picture of the coal-forming peat bog at an instant in geologic time and allow interpretation of a depositional setting in the horizontal direction. Results from this middle portion of the coal suggest an association of SiO2 with both K2O and TiO2 in different parts of the study area. Further, a pocket in the southeast of the study area shows elevated concentrations of elements attributable to observed carbonate-phase minerals (MgO, CaO, Ba and Sr) as well as elements commonly associated with sulfide-phase minerals (Cu, Mo and Ni). Areas of relatively high ash yield are observed in the north and south of the mapped area, in contrast to the low ash yields seen towards the east. Additionally, we present joint probability maps where multiple coal-quality parameters are plotted simultaneously on one figure. This application allows researchers

  11. Magma genesis, storage and eruption processes at Aluto volcano, Ethiopia: lessons from remote sensing, gas emissions and geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, William; Biggs, Juliet; Mather, Tamsin; Pyle, David; Gleeson, Matthew; Lewi, Elias; Yirgu, Gezahgen; Caliro, Stefano; Chiodini, Giovanni; Fischer, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    One of the most intriguing aspects of magmatism during the transition from continental rifting to sea-floor spreading is that large silicic magmatic systems develop within the rift zone. In the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) these silicic volcanoes not only pose a significant hazard to local populations but they also sustain major geothermal resources. Understanding the journey magma takes from source to surface beneath these volcanoes is vital for determining its eruption style and for better evaluating the geothermal resources that these complexes host. We investigate Aluto, a restless silicic volcano in the MER, and combine a wide range of geochemical and geophysical techniques to constrain magma genesis, storage and eruption processes and shed light on magmatic-hydrothermal-tectonic interactions. Magma genesis and storage processes at Aluto were evaluated using new whole-rock geochemical data from recent eruptive products. Geochemical modelling confirms that Aluto's peralkaline rhyolites, that constitute the bulk of recent erupted products, are generated from protracted fractionation (>80 %) of basalt that is compositionally similar to rift-related basalts found on the margins of the complex. Crustal melting did not play a significant role in rhyolite genesis and melt storage depths of ~5 km can reproduce almost all aspects of their geochemistry. InSAR methods were then used to investigate magma storage and fluid movement at Aluto during an episode of ground deformation that took place between 2008 and 2010. Combining new SAR imagery from different viewing geometries we identified an accelerating uplift pulse and found that source models support depths of magmatic and/or fluid intrusion at ~5 km for the uplift and shallower depths of ~4 km for the subsidence. Finally, gas samples collected on Aluto in 2014 were used to evaluate magma and fluid transport processes. Our results show that gases are predominantly emanating from major fault zones on Aluto and that they

  12. Seeking evidence of multidisciplinarity in environmental geochemistry and health: an analysis of arsenic in drinking water research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderibigbe, Abiodun D; Stewart, Alex G; Hursthouse, Andrew S

    2018-02-01

    A multidisciplinary approach to research affords the opportunity of objectivity, creation of new knowledge and potentially a more generally acceptable solution to problems that informed the research in the first place. It increasingly features in national programmes supporting basic and applied research, but for over 40 years, has been the arena for many research teams in environmental geochemistry and health. This study explores the nature of multidisciplinary research in the earth and health sciences using a sample selected from co-authored articles reporting research on arsenic (As) in drinking water from 1979 to 2013. A total of 889 relevant articles were sourced using the online version of the science citation index-expanded (SCI-expanded). The articles were classified according to author affiliation and later by author discipline/research interests using the Revised Field of Science and Technology Frascati manual DSTI/EAS/STP/NESTI (2006) 19/FINAL and a decision algorithm. Few articles were published on the topic until 2000. More articles were published across all affiliations in the last 10 years of the review period (2004-2013) than in the first 10 years (1979-1988). Only 84 (~9%) articles fell within the "earth and health" only and "earth, health and other" categories when classification was undertaken by author affiliation alone. This suggests that level of collaboration between earth and health scientists in arsenic in drinking water research may be very low. By refining the classification further using author discipline/research interests, only 28 of the 84 articles appear to be co-authored by earth and health scientists alongside professionals in other fields. More than half of these 28 articles involved descriptive non-experimental, observational study designs, limited in direct causal hypotheses and mechanistic investigation. If collaborative research is to lead to the increased multidisciplinary research, early interaction should be encouraged

  13. Age and geochemistry of the Charlestown Group, Ireland: Implications for the Grampian orogeny, its mineral potential and the Ordovician timescale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrington, Richard J.; Hollis, Steven P.; Cooper, Mark R.; Stobbs, Iain; Tapster, Simon; Rushton, Adrian; McConnell, Brian; Jeffries, Teresa

    2018-03-01

    Accurately reconstructing the growth of continental margins during episodes of ocean closure has important implications for understanding the formation, preservation and location of mineral deposits in ancient orogens. The Charlestown Group of county Mayo, Ireland, forms an important yet understudied link in the Caledonian-Appalachian orogenic belt located between the well documented sectors of western Ireland and Northern Ireland. We have reassessed its role in the Ordovician Grampian orogeny, based on new fieldwork, high-resolution airborne geophysics, graptolite biostratigraphy, U-Pb zircon dating, whole rock geochemistry, and an examination of historic drillcore from across the volcanic inlier. The Charlestown Group can be divided into three formations: Horan, Carracastle, and Tawnyinah. The Horan Formation comprises a mixed sequence of tholeiitic to calc-alkaline basalt, crystal tuff and sedimentary rocks (e.g. black shale, chert), forming within an evolving peri-Laurentian affinity island arc. The presence of graptolites Pseudisograptus of the manubriatus group and the discovery of Exigraptus uniformis and Skiagraptus gnomonicus favour a latest Dapingian (i.e. Yapeenian Ya 2/late Arenig) age for the Horan Formation (equivalent to c. 471.2-470.5 Ma according to the timescale of Sadler et al., 2009). Together with three new U-Pb zircon ages of 471.95-470.82 Ma from enclosing felsic tuffs and volcanic breccias, this fauna provides an important new constraint for calibrating the Middle Ordovician timescale. Overlying deposits of the Carracastle and Tawnyinah formations are dominated by LILE- and LREE-enriched calc-alkaline andesitic tuffs and flows, coarse volcanic breccias and quartz-feldspar porphyritic intrusive rocks, overlain by more silicic tuffs and volcanic breccias with rare occurrences of sedimentary rocks. The relatively young age for the Charlestown Group in the Grampian orogeny, coupled with high Th/Yb and zircon inheritance (c. 2.7 Ga) in intrusive

  14. Geology, geochemistry and fluid inclusion of Qarachilar Cu-Mo-Au quartz veins, northeast of Kharvana, East Azerbaijan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Asiay Soufiani

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Qarachilar Cu-Mo-Au occurrence is located in the Arasbaran ore zone (AZ, NW Iran, some 70 km north of Tabriz. The AZ is characterized by occurrence of different types of mineralization and hosts many Cu-Mo porphyry (PCD, Cu skarn, and epithermal Au deposits (Jamali et al., 2010; Jamali and Mehrabi, 2015. The main rock unit exposed in the area is Qaradagh batholith (QDB. A variety of porphyry and vein-type Cu–Mo–Au mineralization are associated with QDB. The most pronounced occurrences are in Qarachilar, Qara-Dareh, Zarli-Dareh, Aniq and Pirbolagh. This type of mineralization can be followed in other parts of northwest Iran, such as Masjed-Daghi porphyry Cu–Au deposit and Mivehrood vein-type Au mineralization in the southwest of the QDB, the Sungun PCD and the related skarn in its southeast, and Astamal Fe skarn deposit in the south of the QDB. To date, no detailed study has been undertaken to understand the characteristics of the Qarachilar occurrence and its mineralization type is controversial. The recent work by Simmonds and Moazzen (2015 also did not present relevant information for an understanding of the Qarachilar occurrence. The Re–Os age data obtained in their work were compared with similar events along the Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic arc (UDMA and southern Lesser Caucasus in order to elucidate the temporal pattern of mineralization across the whole QDB and the UDMA. The present paper provides an overview of the geological framework, the mineralization characteristics, and the results of geochemistry and fluid inclusion studies of the Qarachilar Cu-Mo-Au occurrence with an application to the ore genesis. Materials and methods More than 37 polished thin sections from Qarachilar host rocks and mineralized and altered zones were studied by conventional petrographic and mineralogic methods at the University of Zanjan. In addition, 9 samples from non-altered and altered host rocks and mineralized veins were analyzed by

  15. The Ellsworth terrane, coastal Maine: Geochronology, geochemistry, and Nd-Pb isotopic composition - Implications for the rifting of Ganderia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, K.J.; Stewart, D.B.; Tucker, R.D.; Pollock, J.C.; Ayuso, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    The Ellsworth terrane is one of a number of fault-bounded blocks that occur along the eastern margin of Ganderia, the western-most of the peri-Gondwanan domains in the northern Appalachians that were accreted to Laurentia in the Paleozoic. Geologic relations, detrital zircon ages, and basalt geochemistry suggest that the Ellsworth terrane is part of Ganderia and not an exotic terrane. In the Penobscot Bay area of coastal Maine, the Ellsworth terrane is dominantly composed of bimodal basalt-rhyolite volcanic sequences of the Ellsworth Schist and unconformably overlying Castine Volcanics. We use new U-Pb zircon geochronology, geochemistry, and Nd and Pb isotopes for these volcanic sequences to constrain the petrogenetic history and paleotectonic setting of the Ellsworth terrane and its relationship with Ganderia. U-Pb zircon geochronology for rhyolites indicates that both the Ellsworth Schist (508.6 ?? 0.8 Ma) and overlying Castine Volcanics (503.5 ?? 2.5 Ma) are Middle Cambrian in age. Two tholefitic basalt types are recognized. Type Tb-1 basalt, present as pillowed and massive lava flows and as sills in both units, has depleted La and Ce ([La/Nd]N = 0.53-0.87) values, flat heavy rare earth element (REE) values, and no positive Th or negative Ta anomalies on primitive mantle-normalized diagrams. In contrast, type Th-2 basalt, present only in the Castine Volcanics, has stightly enriched LREE ([La/Yb]N = 1.42-2.92) values and no Th or Th anomalies. Both basalt types have strongly positive ??Nd (500) values (Th-1 = +7.9-+8.6; Th-2 = +5.6-+7.0) and relatively enriched Pb isotopic compositions (206Ph/204Pb = 18.037-19.784; 207/204Pb = 15.531-15.660; 2088Pb/204Pb = 37.810-38.817). The basalts have compositions transitional between recent normal and enriched mid-ocean-ridge basalt, and they were probably derived by partial melting of compositionatly heterogeneous asthenosphenc mantle. Two types of rhyolite also are present. Type R-1 rhyolite, which mostly occurs as tuffs

  16. Subseabed Disposal Project annual report, FY85 to termination of project: Physical Oceanography and Water Column Geochemistry Studies, October 1984 through May 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupferman, S.L. (ed.)

    1987-05-01

    This report covers the work of the Physical Oceanography and Water Column Geochemistry (POWCG) Studies Group of the Subseabed Disposal Project (SDP) from October 1984 to termination of the project in May 1986. The overview of the work includes an introduction, general descriptions of the activities, and a summary. Detailed discussions are included as appendices. During the period of this report the POWCG Studies Group held a meeting to develop a long-term research plan for the Nares Abyssal Plain, which was recently designated as a study area for the Environmental Study Group of the SDP. The POWCG Studies Group has also planned and participated in two interdisciplinary oceanographic missions to the Nares which have resulted in the acquisition of data and samples which can be used to begin to understand the workings of the ecosystem at the site, and for developing a preliminary site assessment. The papers in the appendices have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  17. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: geochemistry of brine in rock salt in temperature gradients and gamma-radiation fields - a selective annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, A.B.; Williams, L.B.

    1985-07-01

    Evaluation of the extensive research concerning brine geochemistry and transport is critically important to successful exploitation of a salt formation for isolating high-level radioactive waste. This annotated bibliography has been compiled from documents considered to provide classic background material on the interactions between brine and rock salt, as well as the most important results from more recent research. Each summary elucidates the information or data most pertinent to situations encountered in siting, constructing, and operating a mined repository in salt for high-level radioactive waste. The research topics covered include the basic geology, depositional environment, mineralogy, and structure of evaporite and domal salts, as well as fluid inclusions, brine chemistry, thermal and gamma-radiation effects, radionuclide migration, and thermodynamic properties of salts and brines. 4 figs., 6 tabs

  18. Experimental microcosm study of the effects of Deepwater Horizon MC-252 oil on the geochemistry and microbiology of Gulf Coast sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahoe, R. J.; Bej, A.; Raulerson, A.; Rentschler, E. K.

    2011-12-01

    Microcosm experiments were conducted to examine the impact of oil contamination on Gulf Coast sediment geochemistry and microbial population dynamics. Coastal sediment and seawater were collected from a salt marsh at Bayou la Batre, Alabama, which was not severely impacted by the BP Deepwater Horizon accident of April 2010. Sediment/seawater microcosms were set up in glass jars combusted for 5 hours at 450 degrees C. Non-sterile microcosms spiked with 500 ppm of MC-252 oil were sacrificed in duplicate at various time intervals over a 14 day period to establish a data time series. Sterile controls with and without oil and a non-sterile control without oil were sacrificed in duplicate at 14 days for comparison with the time-series experiments. Solid and aqueous phases were separated by centrifugation and prepared for analysis. Sediment mineralogy was determined using X-ray diffraction and acid-extractable sediment chemistry determined using EPA Method 3051A and ICP-OES analysis. The aqueous phase chemistry was analyzed by ICP-OES and ion chromatography. The mineralogy of the salt marsh sediment is predominantly quartz, but includes reactive phases such as clays (smectite, illite), feldspar, and iron oxide. Iron-bearing clays and iron oxides can serve as electron acceptors for the growth of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria. Microwave digestions of the microcosm substrate samples were performed in triplicate and show no significant variation in major element chemistry over the course of the two week experiment, suggesting that observed temporal trends in aqueous geochemistry may be due to ion exchange processes, rather than mineral dissolution reactions. Microcosm substrate trace element data which indicate possible differences with time are being analyzed for statistical significance. Analysis of aqueous solution geochemistry reveals several interesting temporal trends. Iron and manganese were released to solution after 2 days, suggesting the presence of facultative

  19. Quelques aspects de la géochimie organique dans la prospection des hydrocarbures Several Aspects of Organic Geochemistry in Prospection for Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubler B.

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available La classification, d'après la composition des huiles brutes, permet maintenant de reconnaître des origines semblables ou différentes. Dans certains cas, les corrélations non seulement entre indices et accumulations, mais entre roches mères et accumulations sont devenues sûres. L'étude, selon un fil logique du devenir des composés de la matière organique vivante, morte, fossilisée puis diagénisée, a permis de préciser l'origine organique des pétroles mais encore de lier la composition de ceux-ci aux types dominants de matière organique des bassins sédimentaires, donc de fixer les conditions de sédimentation, les environnements les plus favorables à l'accumulation et la préservation de matière organique pétroligène. Cependant, la contribution la plus importante de la géochimie organique à l'exploration est certainement d'avoir pu fixer, dans un premier temps, une fourchette de température, puis de température et de durée : le facteur thermo-temporel de naissance de production maximale puis de conservation des hydrocarbures liquides : la fenêtre à huile potentielle. Plus récemment la géochimie des gaz hydrocarburés a pu montrer que cette fenêtre à huile était encadrée par la génération de gaz légers. Ce développement récent remet en valeur des objectifs de prospection abandonnés ou classés sans intérêt. Cependant par essence même la géochimie organique, comme la majorité. des sciences qui utilisent le laboratoire, donne des résultats ponctuels : ceux-ci ne trouvent toute leur signification que si les échantillons géologiques sont bien situés dans la configuration géologique à laquelle ils appartiennent. Organic geochemistry has made great strides, thanks in particular to the range of analytical tools, often in the forefront of technological progress, which have been developed for medical and biochemical research. Classification according to the composition of crude oils now make it possible to

  20. Subseabed Disposal Project annual report, FY85 to termination of project: Physical Oceanography and Water Column Geochemistry Studies, October 1984 through May 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupferman, S.L.

    1987-05-01

    This report covers the work of the Physical Oceanography and Water Column Geochemistry (POWCG) Studies Group of the Subseabed Disposal Project (SDP) from October 1984 to termination of the project in May 1986. The overview of the work includes an introduction, general descriptions of the activities, and a summary. Detailed discussions are included as appendices. During the period of this report the POWCG Studies Group held a meeting to develop a long-term research plan for the Nares Abyssal Plain, which was recently designated as a study area for the Environmental Study Group of the SDP. The POWCG Studies Group has also planned and participated in two interdisciplinary oceanographic missions to the Nares which have resulted in the acquisition of data and samples which can be used to begin to understand the workings of the ecosystem at the site, and for developing a preliminary site assessment. The papers in the appendices have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  1. Mineralogy, geochemistry, porosity and redox properties of rocks from Forsmark. Compilation of data from the regional model volume for SR-Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, Bjoern (WSP Sverige AB, Stockholm (Sweden)); Stephens, Michael B. (Geological Survey of Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2009-11-15

    This report is a compilation of the data acquired during the Forsmark site investigation programme on the mineralogy, geochemistry, redox properties and porosity of different rock types at Forsmark. The aim is to provide a final summary of the available data for use during the SR-Site modelling work. Data presented in this report represent the regional model volume and have previously been published in various SKB reports. The data have been extracted from the SKB database Sicada and are presented as calculated median values, data range and lower/upper quartile. The representativity of all samples used for the calculations have been evaluated and data from samples where there is insufficient control on the rock type have been omitted. Rock samples affected by alteration have been omitted from the unaltered samples and are presented separately based on type of alteration (e.g. oxidised or albitized rock)

  2. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: geochemistry of brine in rock salt in temperature gradients and gamma-radiation fields - a selective annotated bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, A.B.; Williams, L.B.

    1985-07-01

    Evaluation of the extensive research concerning brine geochemistry and transport is critically important to successful exploitation of a salt formation for isolating high-level radioactive waste. This annotated bibliography has been compiled from documents considered to provide classic background material on the interactions between brine and rock salt, as well as the most important results from more recent research. Each summary elucidates the information or data most pertinent to situations encountered in siting, constructing, and operating a mined repository in salt for high-level radioactive waste. The research topics covered include the basic geology, depositional environment, mineralogy, and structure of evaporite and domal salts, as well as fluid inclusions, brine chemistry, thermal and gamma-radiation effects, radionuclide migration, and thermodynamic properties of salts and brines. 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Trace-element geochemistry of metabasaltic rocks from the Yukon-Tanana Upland and implications for the origin of tectonic assemblages in east-central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusel-Bacon, C.; Cooper, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    We present major- and trace- element geochemical data for 27 amphibolites and six greenstones from three structural packages in the Yukon-Tanana Upland of east-central Alaska: the Lake George assemblage (LG) of Devono-Mississippian augen gneiss, quartz-mica schist, quartzite, and amphibolite; the Taylor Mountain assemblage (TM) of mafic schist and gneiss, marble, quartzite, and metachert; and the Seventymile terrane of greenstone, serpentinized peridotite, and Mississippian to Late Triassic metasedimentary rocks. Most LG amphibolites have relatively high Nb, TiO2, Zr, and light rare earth element contents, indicative of an alkalic to tholeiitic, within-plate basalt origin. The within-plate affinities of the LG amphibolites suggest that their basaltic parent magmas developed in an extensional setting and support a correlation of these metamorphosed continental-margin rocks with less metamorphosed counterparts across the Tintina fault in the Selwyn Basin of the Canadian Cordillera. TM amphibolites have a tholeiitic or calc-alkalic composition, low normalized abundances of Nb and Ta relative to Th and La, and Ti/V values of the proximity of the arc and marginal basin to continental crust. The arc geochemistry of TM amphibolites is consistent with a model in which the TM assemblage includes arc rocks generated above a west-dipping subduction zone outboard of the North American continental margin in mid-Paleozoic through Triassic time. The ocean-floor or within-plate basalt geochemistry of the Seventymile greenstones supports the correlation of the Seventymile terrane with the Slide Mountain terrane in Canada and the hypothesis that these oceanic rocks originated in a basin between the continental margin and an arc to the west.

  4. Platinum Group Elements (PGE) geochemistry of komatiites and boninites from Dharwar Craton, India: Implications for mantle melting processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Abhishek; Manikyamba, C.; Santosh, M.; Ganguly, Sohini; Khelen, Arubam C.; Subramanyam, K. S. V.

    2015-06-01

    High MgO volcanic rocks having elevated concentrations of Ni and Cr are potential hosts for platinum group elements (PGE) owing to their primitive mantle origin and eruption at high temperatures. Though their higher PGE abundance is economically significant in mineral exploration studies, their lower concentrations are also valuable geochemical tools to evaluate petrogenetic processes. In this paper an attempt has been made to evaluate the PGE geochemistry of high MgO volcanic rocks from two greenstone belts of western and eastern Dharwar Craton and to discuss different mantle processes operative at diverse geodynamic settings during the Neoarchean time. The Bababudan greenstone belt of western and Gadwal greenstone belt of eastern Dharwar Cratons are dominantly composed of high MgO volcanic rocks which, based on distinct geochemical characteristics, have been identified as komatiites and boninites respectively. The Bababudan komatiites are essentially composed of olivine and clinopyroxene with rare plagioclase tending towards komatiitic basalts. The Gadwal boninites contain clinopyroxene, recrystallized hornblende with minor orthopyroxene, plagioclase and sulphide minerals. The Bababudan komatiites are Al-undepleted type (Al2O3/TiO2 = 23-59) with distinctly high MgO (27.4-35.8 wt.%), Ni (509-1066 ppm) and Cr (136-3036 ppm) contents. These rocks have low ΣPGE (9-42 ppb) contents with 0.2-2.4 ppb Iridium (Ir), 0.2-1.4 ppb Osmium (Os) and 0.4-4.4 ppb Ruthenium (Ru) among Iridium group PGE (IPGE); and 1.4-16.2 ppb Platinum (Pt), 2.8-19 ppb Palladium (Pd) and 0.2-9.8 ppb Rhodium (Rh) among Platinum group PGE (PPGE). The Gadwal boninites are high-Ca boninites with CaO/Al2O3 ratios varying between 0.8 and 1.0, with 12-24 wt.% MgO, 821-1168 ppm Ni and 2307-2765 ppm Cr. They show higher concentration of total PGE (82-207 ppb) with Pt concentration ranging from 13 to 19 ppb, Pd between 65 and 180 ppb and Rh in the range of 1.4-3 ppb compared to the Bababudan komatiites. Ir

  5. Ages, geochemistry and tectonic implications of the Cambrian igneous rocks in the northern Great Xing'an Range, NE China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhiqiang; Liu, Yongjiang; Li, Yanrong; Li, Weimin; Wen, Quanbo; Liu, Binqiang; Zhou, Jianping; Zhao, Yingli

    2017-08-01

    The Xinlin-Xiguitu suture zone, located in the Great Xing'an Range, NE China, in the eastern segment of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), represents the boundary between the Erguna and Xing'an micro-continental blocks. The exact location of the Xinlin-Xiguitu suture zone has been debated, especially, the location of the northern extension of the suture zone. In this study, based on a detailed field, geochemical, geochronological and Sr-Nd-Hf isotope study, we focus our work on the Cambrian igneous rocks in the Erguna-Xing'an block. The Xinglong granitoids, mainly include ∼520 Ma diorite, ∼470 Ma monzogranite and ∼480 Ma pyroxene diorite. The granitoids show medium to high-K calc-alkaline series characteristics with post-collision granite affinity. The circa 500 Ma granitoids have low εHf (t) values (-16.6 to +2.2) and ancient two-stage model (TDM2) ages between 1317 Ma and 2528 Ma. These results indicate the primary magmas of the Xinglong granitoids were probably derived from the partial melting of a dominantly Paleo-Mesoproterozoic ;old; crustal source with possible different degrees of addition of juvenile materials, and formed in a post-collision tectonic setting after the amalgamation of the Erguna and Xing'an blocks. Compared with the Xinglong granitoids, the Duobaoshan igneous rocks are consisted of the approximately coeval rhyolitic tuffs (491 ± 5 Ma) and ultramafic intrusions (497 ± 5 Ma) within the Duobaoshan Formation. They are generally enriched in large ion lithophile elements (LILEs) and depleted in high field strength elements (HFSEs; e.g., Nb, Ta, and Ti), consistent with the geochemistry of igneous rocks from island arcs or active continental margins. The ultramafic rocks have high positive εHf (t) values (+1.3 to +15) and εNd (t) (+1.86 to +2.28), and relatively young two-stage model (TDM2) ages and low initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.70628-0.70853), indicating the partial melting of a depleted mantle source from a subducted slab in

  6. Influence of geological features (geochemistry and mineralogy) of soil wich constitutes adobes in their durability - Huambo, Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Isabel; Pedro, Elsa; Varum, Humberto; Mirão, José; Pinho, António

    2014-05-01

    mineralogy and geochemistry of soils used in the production of adobes applied in the construction of habitations, mainly, because from this knowledge, we can develop alternatives to the resolution of recorded pathologies and to improve the strength and durability of those adobes. For this purpose, soil samples were collected, in which mineralogical and geochemical tests were performed. Simultaneously, durability and erodibility tests were done by the method of Geelong in the selected adobes. The results obtained from this research will identify, select and characterize the materials and methods used in construction in raw earth, contributing to the development of knowledge of these sustainable buildings solutions with a strong presence in the Huambo region. From the analysis of the data obtained will be defined a strategy for the next steps of the scientific research project in course designated "Earth Construction in Angola. Characterization, applications and potentialities.". This project aims to encourage the use of the geomaterials in ecological construction and contribute, however modestly, in building solutions with better performance characteristics, comfort, safety, durability and sustainability.

  7. Detrital rutile geochemistry and thermometry from the Dabie orogen: Implications for source-sediment links in a UHPM terrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Xiao, Yilin; Wörner, G.; Kronz, A.; Simon, K.; Hou, Zhenhui

    2014-08-01

    This study explores the potential of detrital rutile geochemistry and thermometry as a provenance tracer in rocks from the Central Dabie ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic (UHPM) zone in east-central China that formed during Triassic continental collision. Trace element data of 176 detrital rutile grains selected from local river sediments and 91 rutile grains from distinct bedrocks in the Shuanghe and Bixiling areas, obtained by both electron microprobe (EMP) and in situ LA-ICP-MS analyses, suggest that geochemical compositions and thermometry of detrital rutiles are comparable to those from their potential source rocks. After certification of the Cr-Nb discrimination method for the Central Dabie UHPM zone, we show that 29% of the detrital rutiles in the Shuanghe area were derived from metamafic sources whereas in the Bixiling area that it is up to 76%. Furthermore, the proportion of distinct types of detrital rutiles combined with modal abundances of rutile in metapelites and metamafic bedrocks can be used to estimate the proportion of different source lithologies. Based on this method the proportion of mafic source rocks was estimated to ∼10% at Shuanghe and >60% at Bixiling, respectively, which is consistent with the proportions of eclogite (the major rutile-bearing metamafic rock) distribution in the field. Therefore, the investigation of detrital rutiles is a potential way to evaluate the proportion of metamafic rocks and even to prospect for metamafic bodies in UHPM terranes. Zr-in-rutile temperatures were calculated at different pressures and compared with temperatures derived from rock-in rutiles and garnet-clinopyroxene Fe-Mg thermometers. Temperatures calculated for detrital rutiles range from 606 °C to 707 °C and 566 °C to 752 °C in Shuanghe and Bixiling, respectively, at P = 3 GPa with an average temperatures of ca. 630 °C for both areas. These temperature averages and ranges are similar to those calculated for rutiles from surrounding source rocks

  8. Environmental geochemistry of 238U, 232Th, 40K and some heavy metals in River Nile sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddeeg, S. M. B.

    2007-06-01

    Environmental geochemistry is concerned with the abundance, distribution, and mobility of chemical elements in surface materials at the surface of earth crust. This study aimed at better understanding of geochemical behavior of 238 U, 23 '2Th and 40 K in river sediments and some heavy elements with emphasis on Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb. The analysis was conducted for a total of 33 bulk sediment samples from White Nile, Blue Nile and River Nile within Khartoum, the samples were fractionated into seven grain sizes each (2000-1000, 1000-500, 500-250, 250-200, 200-125, 125-100 and > 100 μm), using high resolution gamma spectrometer for radionuclides measurements, whereas Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) was used for heavy metals analysis. On the average, the activity concentration of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K were 17.90±5.23, 16.38±5.34 and 379.82±107.76 Bq -1 Kg in White Nile, 19.56±5.04, 17.72±4.69, and 494.36±105.79 Bq -1 Kg in Blue Nile and 19.27±2.88, 17.48±2.78, 359.50±83.15 Bq -1 Kg in the River Nile sediments. Results revealed inverse relationship between activity concentration and grain size in White and Blue Nile, while the trend is not clear in the River Nile. In general, the variation of the measured values within single grain size was smaller in White Nile compare to Blue and River Nile sediments, and it was observed that the data are highly scattered in grain size (200-125μm). The ratio between 238 U/ 232 Th is grater than unity in the three rivers indicating that there is relative enrichment of 238 U in the surface sediments. The activity concentration of the fallout radionuclide 137 Cs is one order of magnitude lower in the White Nile sediments (0.89±0.96) Bq -1 Kg compared to values in the Blue Nile sediments (3.60±1.55) Bq -1 Kg. Comparison of the values obtained for natural radionuclides and the fallout radionuclide ( 137 Cs in the three sites with the global data reflect low and /or insignificant difference. For heavy metal

  9. Geochemistry and tectonomagatic setting of Tertiary volcanic rocks of the Kangan area, northeast of Sarbisheh, southern Khorasan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahshid Malekian Dastjerdi

    2017-02-01

    and negative anomaly of Eu, Nb, P, Ti, Ba and Sr in intermediate to acid lavas are characteristics of subduction related calc-alkaline magmatism. Geochemical characteristics such as high ratio of La/Yb (8.18, low content of Rb with tectonic setting discriminant diagrams show within plate environment for basalt. The constituent magma of the studied rocks originated from an enriched garnet lherzolite source in 100 to 110km depth. Discussion Enrichment in LREE relative to HREE (Ce/Yb= 21.14-28.7, high ratio of Zr/Y (4.79- 10.81, enrichment in LILE and negative anomaly of Eu, Nb, P, Ti, Ba and Sr in intermediate to acid lavas are characteristics of subduction related calc-alkaline magmatism. Tectonic setting discrimination diagrams show that andesite to dacitic rocks are located in active continental margin (Schandle and Gorton, 2002 and basalt is placed within the volcanic plate zone and continental rift type (Verma et al., 2006. Intermediate to acid rocks of Kangan area originated from lithospheric mantle (Moharami et al., 2014 that is enriched by sediment melt related metasomatism (Ersoy et al., 2010 whereas Kangan basaltic lava origin is Nb enriched (Wang et al., 2008; Sajona et al., 1996 mixed lithospheric - asthenospheric mantle (Moharamiet al., 2014. According to the trace elements diagrams (Ellam, 1992, partial melting depth for generation of Kangan area lavas was determined to be about 100 to 110Km. Because of absent crustal contamination instances in the basalt, it can be argued that ascending of magma has been rapid and probably similar to other alkali basalts in east of Iran, it may be related to deep fault systems. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the reviewers for their constructive comments which greatly contributed to the improvement of the manuscript. References Ellam, R.M., 1992. Lithospheric thickness as a control on basalt geochemistry. Geology, 20(2: 153-156. Ersoy, E.Y., Helvaci, C. and Palmer, M.R., 2010. Mantle source

  10. Regional Geochemistry - an Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Clemens

    2017-04-01

    Building on the pioneering ideas and work of V. Vernadsky (1883-1945) and V.M. Goldschmidt (1888-1947) the Geological Surveys of Europe have more than 60 years experience with geochemical mapping at a large variety of scales. Surveys using hundreds of samples per km2 for mineral exploration projects, 1 to 4 sites per km2 for mapping the urban environment, 1 site per 2 to 10 km2 in county or country-wide mapping projects to 1 site per 1000 to 5000 km2 for mapping at the continental scale have been successfully completed. Sample materials for these surveys include groundwater, surface water, stream sediments, floodplain sediments, different soil horizons (preferably soil O, A, B and C horizon) and plant materials from moss to trees. Surveys combining several sample materials from local to sub-continental scale in multi-media, multi-element geochemical investigations reflecting the interplay of chemical elements between the different compartments (lithosphere, pedosphere, biosphere and hydrosphere) of the ecosystem have also been carried out. These surveys provide ample empirical evidence that different geochemical processes become visible at different scales. Not all sample materials are suitable for all scales. A variety of scales in combination with a variety of different sample materials are needed to fully understand geochemical processes in the critical zone. Examples are shown that highlight the importance of a strategy to optimize sampling density and design for the chosen scale already during the planning stages of a project. Anthropogenic element sources are visible at a local scale and the major impact of geology, mineralogy and climate (as a driving force for weathering) dominates geochemical maps at the continental scale. Interestingly, mineralisation can generate features which are visible at a variety of scales. Some further issues that need attention when carrying out geochemical surveys at a variety of scales are (a) the need for an excellent and well documented analytical quality control, (b) the choice of the elements to be analysed (as many as possible) (c) the required detection limits (the lowest possible) and (d) the choice of extraction (several if feasible).

  11. Geochemistry and radionuclide migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isherwood, D.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretically, the geochemical barrier can provide a major line of defense in protecting the biosphere from the hazards of nuclear waste. The most likely processes involved are easily identified. Preliminary investigations using computer modeling techniques suggest that retardation is an effective control on radionuclide concentrations. Ion exchange reactions slow radionuclide migration and allow more time for radioactive decay and dispersion. For some radionuclides, solubility alone may limit concentrations to less than the maximum permissible now considered acceptable by the Federal Government. The effectiveness of the geochemical barrier is ultimately related to the repository site characteristics. Theory alone tells us that geochemical controls will be most efficient in an environment that provides for maximum ion exchange and the precipitation of insoluble compounds. In site selection, consideration should be given to rock barriers with high ion exchange capacity that might also act as semi-permeable membranes. Also important in evaluating the site's potential for effective geochemical controls are the oxidation potentials, pH and salinity of the groundwater

  12. The geochemistry of pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbash, Jack E.

    2007-01-01

    The mid-1970s marked a major turning point in human history, for it was at that moment that the ability of the Earth’s ecosystems to absorb most of the biological impacts of human activities appears to have been exceeded by the magnitude of those impacts. This conclusion is based partly upon estimates of the rate of carbon dioxide emission during the combustion of fossil fuels, relative to the rate of its uptake by terrestrial ecosystems (Loh, 2002). A very different threshold, however, had already been crossed several decades earlier with the birth of the modern chemical industry, which produced novel substances for which no such natural assimilative capacity existed. Among these new chemical compounds, none has posed a greater challenge to the planet’s ecosystems than synthetic pesticides, compounds that have been intentionally released into the hydrologic system in vast quantities—several hundred million pounds of active ingredient (a.i.) per year in the United States alone (Donaldson et al., 2002)—for many decades. To gauge the extent to which we are currently able to assess the environmental implications of this new development in the Earth’s history, this chapter presents an overview of current understanding regarding the sources, transport, fate, and biological effects of pesticides, their transformation products, and selected adjuvants in the hydrologic system. (Adjuvants are the so-called inert ingredients included in commercial pesticide formulations to enhance the effectiveness of the active ingredients.)

  13. Geochemistry and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, I.; Doyle, H.; Moir, A.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-seven papers were presented on various aspects of trace elements in soils on human health. One paper, on the dispersion and deposition of radionuclides from Chernobyl has been abstracted and indexed separately. (UK)

  14. Germanium geochemistry and mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    Germanium is enriched in the following geologic environments: 1. (1) iron meteorites and terrestrial iron-nickel; 2. (2) sulfide ore deposits, particularly those hosted by sedimentary rocks; 3. (3) iron oxide deposits; 4. (4) oxidized zones of Ge-bearing sulfide deposits; 5. (5) pegmatites, greisens, and skarns; and 6. (6) coal and lignitized wood. In silicate melts, Ge is highly siderophile in the presence of native iron-nickel; otherwise, it is highly lithophile. Among silicate minerals, Ge is concentrated in those having less polymerized silicate tetrahedra such as olivine and topaz. In deposits formed from hydrothermal solutions, Ge tends to be enriched mostly in either sulfides or in fluorine-bearing phases; it is thus concentrated both in some hydrothermal sulfide deposits and in pegmatites, greisens, and skarns. In sulfide deposits that formed from solutions having low to moderate sulfur activity, Ge is concentrated in sphalerite in amounts up to 3000 ppm. Sulfide deposits that formed from solutions having higher sulfur activity allowed Ge to either form its own sulfides, particularly with Cu, or to substitute for As, Sn, or other metals in sulfosalts. The Ge in hydrothermal fluids probably derives from enrichment during the fractional crystallization of igneous fluids, or is due to the incorporation of Ge from the country rocks, particularly from those containing organic material. Germanium bonds to lignin-derivative organic compounds that are found in peat and lignite, accounting for its common concentration in coals and related organic material. Germanium is precipitated from water together with iron hydroxide, accounting for its concentration in some sedimentary and supergene iron oxide deposits. It also is able to substitute for Fe in magnetite in a variety of geologic environments. In the oxidized zone of Ge-bearing sulfide deposits, Ge is concentrated in oxides, hydroxides, and hydroxy-sulfates, sometimes forming its own minerals. It is particularly enriched in some iron- and manganese-bearing oxides and hydroxides, including goethite (up to 5300 ppm) and hematite (up to 7000 ppm). ?? 1985.

  15. Marine geochemistry of iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, H.; Elderfield, H.

    1985-01-01

    Iodine has long been classified as a biophilic element with analyses showing that iodine is strongly enriched, relative to seawater concentrations in both plankton and particulate matter and that the concentration of iodine found in surface sediments is still further enriched relative to that found in the sedimenting particulate matter. The extent of enrichment of iodine relative to carbon in deep sea surface sediments has been shown to depend on the carbon accumulation rate. Iodine decomposition rates have been calculated and are shown to vary with the sedimentation rate in the same manner as has been shown for organic carbon. Vertical profiles of total dissolved iodine, iodate and iodide in interstitial waters of sediments from the north east Atlantic are characterised by three zones of reaction as identified by changes in the concentration of iodate and iodide. These reaction zones represent (i) iodide production (ii) iodide oxidation and (iii) iodate reduction. Pore water and solid phase iodine profiles from cores containing turbidite units have shown that iodine, released to pore waters as iodide during the oxidation of the organic matter, has been scavenged after diffusing upwards into a less reducing region of the sediment. (author)

  16. Geochemistry of sedimentary carbonates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morse, John W; Mackenzie, Fred T

    1990-01-01

    .... The last major section is two chapters on the global cycle of carbon and human intervention, and the role of sedimentary carbonates as indicators of stability and changes in Earth's surface environment...

  17. Geochemistry of sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.

    Considering the potential of elemental data in marine sediments as diagnostic tools of various geological and oceanographic processes, sediment geochemical data from the Indian Ocean region has been reviewed in this article. Emphasis is laid...

  18. Geochemistry of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, J.

    1976-01-01

    A highly sensitive fluorometric technique is developed for the determination of biological and geo-organic compounds in ancient sediments and extraterrestrial samples. This technique is used to establish chemical evidence for fossil pigments in an extraterrestrial sample. Also developed is a highly sensitive and specific fluorometric method for the determination of total primary amine nitrogen in soil samples.

  19. Isotopic geochemistry at Wairakei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.K.

    1985-12-01

    Deuterium measurements on geothermal water at Wairakei are consistent with the water being derived from rainfall which has percolated down from the surface. The oxygen-18 content, however, is enriched compared to average rainfall. This 18 O shift is due to isotopic exchange between water and rock at greater-than-explored depths. The magnitude of the shift implied that the mass ration (W/R) of water that has passed through the system (W) to the rock it has exchanged with (R) is about 1 assuming open (i.e. single-pass) conditions. (The ratio is about 2 if it has been a closed system, but this is thought to be less likely). The residence time of water underground cannot be determined from tritium and carbon-14 measurements at present, but arguments based on the argon isotope and deuterium contents suggest mean residence times of a few tens of thousand years. The water-rock ratio and large natural outflow of thermal water prior to exploitation are consistent with this. The 18 O content of the water has changed only slightly, and the D content not at all, during exploitation at Wairakei (measurements from 1963, 1974 and 1981). An initial tendency for the 18 O to increase because of steam loss (also shown more clearly by chloride), has been followed by decrease of 18 O (and chloride) because of dilution with infiltrating near-surface water in parts of the field

  20. Geology, mineralization, U-Pb dating and Sr-Nd isotope geochemistry of intrusive bodies in northeast of Kashmar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Almasi

    2015-04-01

    similar scenario to Neotethys subduction. Khaf-Kashmar-Bardeskan volcano-plutonic belt is located between Neotethys suture and Alborz- Sabzevar Back- arc (Asiabanha and Foden, 2012. We suggest Khaf-Kashmar-Bardeskan volcano-plutonic belt forms at the arc-parallel fault and shear zones in the back of continental magmatic arc. In the basis of all evidences (Shear zone system, high-K to shoshonitic calc-alkaline I- and A-type magmatism, typical alterations related to upper zones of IOCG deposits and IOCG mineralization, we suggest IOCG (Au-Cu mineralization in Kashmar. Discussion On the basis of former regional (Muller and Walter, 1983 and local structural studies (this research, regional compression causes sinistral strike-slip movements of Dorouneh and Taknar faults, shear zone, pull-apart and Riedel fractures (P, R and R' types in the study area. These events cause magma intrusion and circulation of hydrothermal fluids. On the basis of geology, geochemistry and magnetic susceptibility measuring of intrusive rocks, several high K to shoshonitic calc-alkaline to alkaline I-type and one A-type intrusive rocks are intruded in Kashmar area. Swarm dykes are the youngest and the agent for alteration and mineralization. U-Pb dating related to quartz monzonite body (preventative sample for I-type intrusive rocks which are older than A-type series show 40 Ma (Middle Eocene for this rock group in Kashmar. The mean of initial 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd are 0.705-0.707 and 0.5135-0.5126 for I-type series, respectively. εNd(i amounts for I-type series are in negative to positive limit ranges (-1.65 to 1.33. These amounts show subduction source with contamination to continental crust. Two type alteration and mineralization occur in Kashmar: 1 primary alterations (advanced argillic+ sericite+ silicification which are synchronous with sulfide base-metal veins (chalcopyrite+ pyrite± galena± quartz± chloride and 2 Lateral alterations (carbonatization+ Fe-oxides+ silicification

  1. Present status of the interlaboratorial co-operative study for standards rocks of granite (GB-1) and basalt (BB-1) from the Geochemistry Department of I.G.U.F. Ba./Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linhares, P.S.

    1987-01-01

    Results for major, minor and trace elements obtained by twelve laboratories for the standards rocks, Granite (GB-1) and Basalte (BB-1), of the Geochemistry Department of Geociences Institute-U-F.Ba are presented. At present status of the study it is possible to approach the most probably correct value (usable value) for the concentration of each of the major and minor elements. (author) [pt

  2. Shallow groundwater quality and geochemistry in the Fayetteville Shale gas-production area, north-central Arkansas, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresse, Timothy M.; Warner, Nathaniel R.; Hays, Phillip D.; Down, Adrian; Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    The Mississippian Fayetteville Shale serves as an unconventional gas reservoir across north-central Arkansas, ranging in thickness from approximately 50 to 550 feet and varying in depth from approximately 1,500 to 6,500 feet below the ground surface. Primary permeability in the Fayetteville Shale is severely limited, and successful extraction of the gas reservoir is the result of advances in horizontal drilling techniques and hydraulic fracturing to enhance and develop secondary fracture porosity and permeability. Drilling and production of gas wells began in 2004, with a steady increase in production thereafter. As of April 2012, approximately 4,000 producing wells had been completed in the Fayetteville Shale. In Van Buren and Faulkner Counties, 127 domestic water wells were sampled and analyzed for major ions and trace metals, with a subset of the samples analyzed for methane and carbon isotopes to describe general water quality and geochemistry and to investigate the potential effects of gas-production activities on shallow groundwater in the study area. Water-quality analyses from this study were compared to historical (pregas development) shallow groundwater quality collected in the gas-production area. An additional comparison was made using analyses from this study of groundwater quality in similar geologic and topographic areas for well sites less than and greater than 2 miles from active gas-production wells. Chloride concentrations for the 127 groundwater samples collected for this study ranged from approximately 1.0 milligram per liter (mg/L) to 70 mg/L, with a median concentration of 3.7 mg/L, as compared to maximum and median concentrations for the historical data of 378 mg/L and 20 mg/L, respectively. Statistical analysis of the data sets revealed statistically larger chloride concentrations (p-value gas extraction activities. Major ions and trace metals additionally had lower concentrations in data gathered for this study than in the historical

  3. The study of major, trace and rare earth elements geochemistry in Shahrestanak Mn deposit, south of Qom: Implications for genesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Maanijou

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Shahrestanak Mn deposit is located in southern Qom province, 12 km southwest of the city of Kahak. Based on geological-structural divisions of Iran, the deposit belongs to central volcanic belt or Urumieh-Dokhtar zone. The Venarch deposit is one the most important known manganese deposits in Iran. The Sharestanak and Venarch deposits are spatially and temporally related to each other, and have similar geology, mineral texture and structure, host rocks, relationships with faults, and depositional environment. So, their magmatism and deposition conditions can be related to each other. Since no systematic study on the Shahrestanak deposit had been performed before discussing its geological and geochemical characteristics, here it is being attempted to study the geology, petrography, geochemistry of major, minor and trace elements, and Rare Earth Elements (REE of ore, to distinguish the depositional environments and genesis of this deposit and to compare REE of ore in this deposit with other deposits. Sampling and method of study Fourteen samples of manganese ore were selected for geochemical study and analyzing of major, minor, trace elements and REE by ICP-AES and ICP-MS and were sent to SGS Co., Toronto. Detection limits for major elements and trace elements are 0.01% and 0.05ppm, respectively. Result and discussion The deposit is characterized by various lithology and stratigraphy units, consist of: 1 Middle to -Upper Eocene volcano-sedimentary rocks, 2 Oligocene lower red conglomerate and sandstone, 3 Oligo-Miocene limestone and marl (Qom Formation, and 4 Eocene and Lower Miocene basic to intermediate dykes. The most abundant minerals of the deposit are braunite, hausmannite, pyrolusite, and manganite. Evidences such as high Mn/Fe (11.33 and Si/Al (4.86 ratios, low contents of trace elements specially Co (11.40 ppm, Ni (24 ppm, Cu (81.85 ppm, and Ce, with high amounts of SiO2, Mn, Fe, Ba, Zn, As and Sr, all represent

  4. Groundwater flow and geochemistry in the lower reaches of the Yellow River: a case study in Shandang Province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. Y.; Tang, C. Y.; Sakura, Y.; Kondoh, A.; Shen, Y. J.

    2002-08-01

    Water samples were collected from the Yellow River and from wells for chemical and isotopic measurement in the counties of Yucheng and Qihe, to which 6-9×108 m3 of water is diverted annually from the Yellow River. A zone of high electrical conductivity (EC) in groundwater corresponds well on the regional scale with a ridge in groundwater level, which is the main flow path through the region, but has a low gradient. The zone of highest EC along this ridge occurs at a position with the lowest ground altitude in the study area. The unique characteristic of the groundwater is the linear relationship among the principal anions as the result of mixing. The mixing effect is confirmed by its isotopic signature, which was then used to calculate the contributions from three sources: rainfall, old water, and diverted water with an average mixing rate of 18, 17, and 65%, respectively. As an indicator of water movement, Cl- content varies across a wide range in the profile from 30-10 m with a maximum concentration at about 1.2 m depth. Concentrations are relatively stable at about 2 m, which is the average boundary of the saturated and unsaturated zone. The water from the Yellow River has proved to be dominant in mixing in the aquifer in terms of groundwater flow and geochemistry. Résumé. En vue d'analyses chimiques et isotopiques, des échantillons d'eau ont été prélevés sur le Fleuve Jaune et dans des puits des comtés de Yucheng et Qihe, où l'on prélève sur le fleuve 6-9×108 m3. Une zone de forte conductivité électrique dans la nappe correspond bien, à l'échelle régionale, avec une crête piézométrique liée au principal canal traversant la région, mais avec une faible pente. La zone de plus fortes conductivités le long de cette crête se situe là où l'altitude est la plus basse dans la région. La caractéristique remarquable de la nappe est la relation linéaire entre les principaux anions, résultant d'un mélange. L'effet de mélange est confirm

  5. Volcanic stratigraphy and geochemistry of the Soufrière Volcanic Centre, Saint Lucia with implications for volcanic hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Jan M.; Trumbull, Robert B.; Schmitt, Axel K.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Shane, Phil A.; Howe, Tracy M.

    2013-05-01

    John (104 ± 4 ka) and La Pointe (59.8 ± 2.1 ka), Anse Noir and Piaye were all previously grouped with or associated with the Choiseul tuff (all uncertainties 1σ). We suggest that these units represent individual periods of activity spanning a range of ages, whereas Choiseul pumice at the type locality has yielded a (U-Th)/He zircon age of 515 ± 19 ka. Their overall geochemical and mineralogical similarities with the Choiseul at the type locality suggest that they might have all originated from the same centre. Morne Tabac (532 ± 21 ka) is a dome truncated by the depression escarpment, whereas Morne Bonin (273 ± 15 ka), Gros Piton and Petit Piton (71 ± 3 ka and 109 ± 4 ka, resp.), Belfond (13.6 ± 0.4 ka) and Terre Blanche (15.3 ± 0.4 ka) are domes within the Qualibou Depression. Belfond and Terre Blanche have whole rock geochemistry and mineral assemblages similar to the Belfond pyroclastic flow deposit, thus possibly representing late-erupted degassed portions of the magma that produced the Belfond pyroclastics. The geochemical characteristics and similar zircon age distributions of the silicic lava domes and pyroclastics of the SVC suggest that these share a common magma source beneath the Qualibou depression. The distribution of the pyroclastic flows and the wide range in their eruption ages makes it unlikely that these were erupted during caldera-forming activity, and we instead invoke a series of smaller-volume explosive eruptions from the area of the current depression, the earliest of which occurred from a large proto-Qualibou edifice that subsequently underwent sector collapse. Activity from this proto-Qualibou centre may have ceased sometime between 38 and 59 ka ago, it therefore seems unlikely given our present understanding that there will be another eruption from the southern central highland region. However, the young dome-forming activity in the Qualibou depression may have occurred in or close to the Holocene, and there have been dome collapse

  6. The radiogenic and stable Sr isotope geochemistry of basalt weathering in Iceland: Role of hydrothermal calcite and implications for long-term climate regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, M. Grace; Jacobson, Andrew D.

    2017-10-01

    Several studies have examined the geochemistry of Icelandic rivers to quantify the relationship between basalt weathering and long-term climate regulation. Recent research has suggested that the chemical weathering of hydrothermal and metamorphic calcite contributes significant quantities of HCO3- to the Icelandic riverine flux (Jacobson et al., 2015). Because the HCO3- derives from volcanic CO2 that was sequestered in mineral form prior to atmospheric injection, the strength of the basalt weathering feedback occurring in Iceland may be lower than previously realized. To test these hypotheses, we analyzed the radiogenic and stable Sr isotope composition (87Sr/86Sr and δ88/86Sr) of the same suite of water, rock, and mineral samples as examined in Jacobson et al. (2015), and we developed a simple model of the long-term C cycle that considers the transformation of volcanic CO2 to HCO3- during subsurface silicate weathering, which is a precursor to hydrothermal calcite formation. Interpretations based on 87Sr/86Sr and Ca/Sr ratios suggest that conservative, three-component mixing between basalt, calcite, and atmospheric deposition adequately explains river geochemistry. On average, the δ88/86Sr values of glacial and non-glacial rivers (0.414‰ and 0.388‰, respectively) are generally higher than those for basalt (0.276‰); however, calcite δ88/86Sr values (0.347‰) are also higher than those for basalt and span the range of riverine values. Thus, riverine δ88/86Sr values are also consistent three-component mixing between basalt, calcite, and atmospheric deposition. Isotopic fractionation is not required to explain riverine trends. Finally, model equations for the long-term C cycle demonstrate that subsurface silicate weathering reduces the magnitude of the volcanic CO2 degassing flux, which in turn causes the atmosphere to stabilize at lower pCO2 values compared to the case where no subsurface silicate weathering occurs. However, the proportion of the net

  7. Microbial Impacts to the Near-Field Environment Geochemistry (MING): A Model for Estimating Microbial Communities in Repository Drifts at Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. Jolley; T.F. Ehrhorn; J. Horn

    2002-03-19

    Geochemical and microbiological modeling was performed to evaluate the potential quantities and impact of microorganisms on the geochemistry of the area adjacent to and within nuclear waste packages in the proposed repository drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The microbial growth results from the introduction of water, ground support, and waste package materials into the deep unsaturated rock. The simulations, which spanned one million years, were accomplished using a newly developed computer code, Microbial Impacts to the Near-Field Environment Geochemistry (MING). MING uses environmental thresholds for limiting microbial growth to temperatures below 120 C and above relative humidities of 90 percent in repository drifts. Once these thresholds are met, MING expands upon a mass balance and thermodynamic approach proposed by McKinley and others (1997), by using kinetic rates to supply constituents from design materials and constituent fluxes including solubilized rock components into the drift, to perform two separate mass-balance calculations as a function of time. The first (nutrient limit) assesses the available nutrients (C, N, P and S) and calculates how many microorganisms can be produced based on a microorganism stoichiometry of C{sub 160}(H{sub 280}O{sub 80})N{sub 30}P{sub 2}S. The second (energy limit) calculates the energy available from optimally combined redox couples for the temperature, and pH at that time. This optimization maximizes those reactions that produce > 15kJ/mol (limit on useable energy) using an iterative linear optimization technique. The final available energy value is converted to microbial mass at a rate of 1 kg of biomass (dry weight) for every 64 MJ of energy. These two values (nutrient limit and energy limit) are then compared and the smaller value represents the number of microorganisms that can be produced over a specified time. MING can also be adapted to investigate other problems of interest as the model can be used in saturated

  8. Impacts of changes in groundwater recharge on the isotopic composition and geochemistry of seasonally ice-covered lakes: insights for sustainable management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoux, Marie; Barbecot, Florent; Gibert-Brunet, Elisabeth; Gibson, John; Noret, Aurélie

    2017-11-01

    Lakes are under increasing pressure due to widespread anthropogenic impacts related to rapid development and population growth. Accordingly, many lakes are currently undergoing a systematic decline in water quality. Recent studies have highlighted that global warming and the subsequent changes in water use may further exacerbate eutrophication in lakes. Lake evolution depends strongly on hydrologic balance, and therefore on groundwater connectivity. Groundwater also influences the sensitivity of lacustrine ecosystems to climate and environmental changes, and governs their resilience. Improved characterization of groundwater exchange with lakes is needed today for lake preservation, lake restoration, and sustainable management of lake water quality into the future. In this context, the aim of the present paper is to determine if the future evolution of the climate, the population, and the recharge could modify the geochemistry of lakes (mainly isotopic signature and quality via phosphorous load) and if the isotopic monitoring of lakes could be an efficient tool to highlight the variability of the water budget and quality. Small groundwater-connected lakes were chosen to simulate changes in water balance and water quality expected under future climate change scenarios, namely representative concentration pathways (RCPs) 4.5 and 8.5. Contemporary baseline conditions, including isotope mass balance and geochemical characteristics, were determined through an intensive field-based research program prior to the simulations. Results highlight that future lake geochemistry and isotopic composition trends will depend on four main parameters: location (and therefore climate conditions), lake catchment size (which impacts the intensity of the flux change), lake volume (which impacts the range of variation), and lake G index (i.e., the percentage of groundwater that makes up total lake inflows), the latter being the dominant control on water balance conditions, as revealed by

  9. Impacts of changes in groundwater recharge on the isotopic composition and geochemistry of seasonally ice-covered lakes: insights for sustainable management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Arnoux

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Lakes are under increasing pressure due to widespread anthropogenic impacts related to rapid development and population growth. Accordingly, many lakes are currently undergoing a systematic decline in water quality. Recent studies have highlighted that global warming and the subsequent changes in water use may further exacerbate eutrophication in lakes. Lake evolution depends strongly on hydrologic balance, and therefore on groundwater connectivity. Groundwater also influences the sensitivity of lacustrine ecosystems to climate and environmental changes, and governs their resilience. Improved characterization of groundwater exchange with lakes is needed today for lake preservation, lake restoration, and sustainable management of lake water quality into the future. In this context, the aim of the present paper is to determine if the future evolution of the climate, the population, and the recharge could modify the geochemistry of lakes (mainly isotopic signature and quality via phosphorous load and if the isotopic monitoring of lakes could be an efficient tool to highlight the variability of the water budget and quality. Small groundwater-connected lakes were chosen to simulate changes in water balance and water quality expected under future climate change scenarios, namely representative concentration pathways (RCPs 4.5 and 8.5. Contemporary baseline conditions, including isotope mass balance and geochemical characteristics, were determined through an intensive field-based research program prior to the simulations. Results highlight that future lake geochemistry and isotopic composition trends will depend on four main parameters: location (and therefore climate conditions, lake catchment size (which impacts the intensity of the flux change, lake volume (which impacts the range of variation, and lake G index (i.e., the percentage of groundwater that makes up total lake inflows, the latter being the dominant control on water balance conditions, as

  10. Microbial Impacts to the Near-Field Environment Geochemistry (MING): A Model for Estimating Microbial Communities in Repository Drifts at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, D.M.; Ehrhorn, T.F.; Horn, J.

    2002-01-01

    Geochemical and microbiological modeling was performed to evaluate the potential quantities and impact of microorganisms on the geochemistry of the area adjacent to and within nuclear waste packages in the proposed repository drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The microbial growth results from the introduction of water, ground support, and waste package materials into the deep unsaturated rock. The simulations, which spanned one million years, were accomplished using a newly developed computer code, Microbial Impacts to the Near-Field Environment Geochemistry (MING). MING uses environmental thresholds for limiting microbial growth to temperatures below 120 C and above relative humidities of 90 percent in repository drifts. Once these thresholds are met, MING expands upon a mass balance and thermodynamic approach proposed by McKinley and others (1997), by using kinetic rates to supply constituents from design materials and constituent fluxes including solubilized rock components into the drift, to perform two separate mass-balance calculations as a function of time. The first (nutrient limit) assesses the available nutrients (C, N, P and S) and calculates how many microorganisms can be produced based on a microorganism stoichiometry of C 160 (H 280 O 80 )N 30 P 2 S. The second (energy limit) calculates the energy available from optimally combined redox couples for the temperature, and pH at that time. This optimization maximizes those reactions that produce > 15kJ/mol (limit on useable energy) using an iterative linear optimization technique. The final available energy value is converted to microbial mass at a rate of 1 kg of biomass (dry weight) for every 64 MJ of energy. These two values (nutrient limit and energy limit) are then compared and the smaller value represents the number of microorganisms that can be produced over a specified time. MING can also be adapted to investigate other problems of interest as the model can be used in saturated and unsaturated

  11. Komatiites and nickel sulfide ores of the Black Swan area, Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia. 3: Komatiite geochemistry, and implications for ore forming processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Stephen J.; Hill, Robin E. T.; Evans, Noreen J.

    2004-11-01

    The Black Swan komatiite sequence is a package of dominantly olivine-rich cumulates with lesser volumes of spinifex textured rocks, interpreted as a section through an extensive komatiite lava flow field. The sequence hosts a number of nickel sulfide orebodies, including the Silver Swan massive shoot and the Cygnet and Black Swan disseminated orebodies. A large body of whole rock analyses on komatiitic rocks from the Black Swan area has been filtered for metasomatic effects. With the exception of mobile elements such as Ca and alkalis, most samples retain residual igneous geochemistry, and can be modelled predominantly by fractionation and accumulation of olivine. Whole rock MgO FeO relationships imply a relatively restricted range of olivine compositions, more primitive than the olivine which would have been in equilibrium with the transporting komatiite lavas, and together with textural data indicate that much of the cumulus olivine in the sequence was transported. Flow top compositions show evidence for chromite saturation, but the cumulates are deficient in accumulated chromite. Chromite compositions are typical of those found in compound flow-facies komatiites, and are distinct from those in komatiitic dunite bodies. Incompatible trace element abundances show three superimposed influences: control by the relative proportion of olivine to liquid; a signature of crustal contamination and an overprint of metasomatic introduction of LREE, Zr and Th. This overprint is most evident in cumulates, and relatively insignificant in the spinifex rocks. Platinum and palladium behaved as incompatible elements and are negatively correlated with MgO. They show no evidence for wholesale depletion due to sulfide extraction, which was evidently restricted to specific lava tubes or pathways. The lack of correspondence between PGE depletion and contamination by siliceous material implies that contamination alone is insufficient to generate S-saturation and ore formation in the

  12. Development of CA-ID-TIMS zircon U–Pb dating technique at Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ting Zhong

    2017-06-01

    Pretreatment protocols for zircon analysis, and community-wide innovations spurred on by EARTHTIME tends to be at the leading edge of technological development. Also, more and more Chinese researchers perform lots of laboratory work in improving the technique in China. Here we present the running condition, procedural blanks and zircon standards measurement results in the clean laboratory of the Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (GIGCAS. The results show the total procedural blanks (Pbc are below ∼1 pg mostly, suitable for the sample pretreatment and operation. The 206Pb/238U dates of R33 and 500 Ma solution are 419.88 ± 0.94 Ma (n = 7; MSWD = 6.8 and 500.50 ± 0.19 Ma (n = 9; MSWD = 0.84, respectively. These results demonstrate that the CA-ID-TIMS procedure is well established at GIGCAS. Our efforts are beneficial to the development of EARTHTIME-CN program. In particular, when this technique is combined with the SIMS technique, it provides an efficient way to solve a number of geochronological problems encountered in China and worldwide.

  13. Using Recent Advances in 2D Seismic Technology and Surface Geochemistry to Economically Redevelop a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir: Vernon Field, Isabella County, M, Class III; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, James R.; Bornhorst, T.J.; Chittick, S.D.; Harrison, William B.; Tayjor, W. Quinlan

    2001-01-01

    In this project a consortium consisting of Cronus Exploration (Traverse City, MI), Michigan Technological University (Houghton, MI) and Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, MI) proposed to develop and execute an economical and environmentally sensitive plan for recovery of hydrocarbons from an abandoned shallow-shelf carbonate field that is typical of many fields in the U.S. Midwest. This is a 5-year project that will use surface geochemistry as a tool to reduce risk in locating and producing hydrocarbons in Class II fields. The project will develop new techniques for measuring hydrocarbon gases in the soil horizon to locate new and bypassed oil in the shallow-shelf carbonate environments typified by the Dundee and Trenton Formations of the Michigan Basin (Fisher et. al., 1988). In Phase I of the project, the consortium proposes to re-develop the Vernon Oil field located in Vernon Twp, Isabella County, Michigan and produce both bypassed hydrocarbons from the original field and to locate and produce extensions of the original field

  14. Sc, Y, La-Lu. Rare earth elements. Vol. A 6a. Y, La, and the lanthanoids. Geochemistry: Sedimentary cycle. Metamorphic cycle. 8. rev. ed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditz, R; Sarbas, B; Schubert, P; Toepper, W

    1988-01-01

    The present volume 'Rare Earth Elements' A 6a describes origin, mode of occurrence, and behavior of Y and RE elements in the sedimentary and metamorphic cycles, and completes the series of volumes describing cosmo- and geochemistry of these elements. In the chapter 'Sedimentary Cycle', the behavior of Y and RE during the weathering process is first outlined under both marine and terrestrial conditions, including a short compilation for migration and precipitation in surficial weathering and oxidation zones. The main part of the chapter treats, in addition to the mode of occurrence, predominantly the distribution of Y and RE in the different types of sedimentary rocks in relation to genetic processes (comprising physical and/or spatial factors such as geological age of the deposition). A concluding part gives a description of mobilization, migration, and precipitation of Y and RE during the diagenetic transformation of sediments, especially in relation to the various types of ferromanganese concretions. In the chapter 'Metamorphic Cycle', the first, extensive part gives examples of mode of occurrence and behavior of Y and RE during both the contact-metamorphic and prograde and retrograde regional-metamorphic processes affecting sedimentary and igeneous source rocks. The second part briefly describes behaviour of Y and RE during ultrametamorphism of metamorphic rocks, and during metamorphic processes in connection with special types of geologic events (as, e.g., subduction of crustal material into the earth's mantle and impact of extraterrestrial material). (orig.) With 4 figs.

  15. The Paleozoic-Mesozoic recycling of the Rakaia Terrane, South Island, New Zealand : sandstone clast and sandstone petrology, geochemistry, and geochronology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wandres, A.M.; Bradshaw, J.D.; Ireland, T.

    2005-01-01

    The Torlesse terranes - part of the New Zealand Eastern Province - are accretionary complexes that comprise an enormous volume of quartzofeldspathic sandstones and mudstones with subsidiary conglomerates plus minor oceanic assemblages. Two terranes are recognised in the South Island - the Permian to Late Triassic Rakaia Terrane and the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous Pahau Terrane. Sandstone clasts from two Rakaia Terrane and two Pahau Terrane conglomerates were collected. We present the first combined detailed information on petrography and geochemistry of Torlesse conglomerate sandstone clasts and use our own and published U-Pb SHRIMP detrital zircon age data to demonstrate the recycling of the Rakaia Terrane into Rakaia strata itself and into Pahau Terrane strata. Sandstone clast major and trace element chemical data largely support petrographic observations derived from thin-section analysis. The similarities of petrographic and geochemical data between sandstone clasts from the Rakaia Terrane and Rakaia sandstones suggest that clasts in the Permian Te Moana and Late Triassic Lake Hill Conglomerates were derived by autocannibalistic reworking of older, consolidated, Rakaia sediments. Data from sandstone clasts from the Pahau Terrane suggest that uplift of the Rakaia Terrane continued into the Cretaceous. These Pahau Terrane clasts indicate that at the time of the Pahau sedimentation Permian to early Late Triassic Rakaia rocks were exposed and recycled into the Pahau Basin. (author). 57 refs., 8 figs., 3 tables

  16. Geology, mineralization, Rb-Sr & Sm-Nd geochemistry, and U–Pb zircon geochronology of Kalateh Ahani Cretaceous intrusive rocks, southeast Gonabad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hassan Karimpour

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Kalateh Ahani is located 27 km southeast of Gonabad within the Khorasan Razavi province. The area is part of Lut Block. Sub-volcanic monzonitic rocks intruded regional metamorphosed Shemshak Formation (Jurassic age. Magnetic susceptibility of less altered monzonitic rocks is 0.6%., As, Pb and Zn > 1%, Au up to 150 ppb and Sn = 133 ppm. The Sn content of vein in the northern part of Kalateh Ahani (Rud Gaz is > 1%. Based on mineralization, alteration and geochemistry, it seems that Sn mineralization is associated with the Cretaceous monzonitic rocks. Zircon U–Pb dating indicates that the age of the monzonitic rocks associated with mineralization is 109 Ma (Lower Cretaceous. Based on (87Sr/86Sri = 0.71089-0.710647 and (143Nd/144Ndi = 0.512113-0.51227 of the monzonitic rocks, the magma for these rocks were originated from the continental crust. This research has opened new window with respect to Sn-Cu mineralization and exploration within the Lut Block which is associated with Cretaceous granitoid rocks (reduced type, ilmenite series originated from the continental crust.

  17. A conceptual hydrogeologic model for the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in the Pecos County region, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jonathan V.; Stanton, Gregory P.; Bumgarner, Johnathan R.; Pearson, Daniel K.; Teeple, Andrew; Houston, Natalie A.; Payne, Jason; Musgrove, MaryLynn

    2013-01-01

    The Edwards-Trinity aquifer is a vital groundwater resource for agricultural, industrial, and municipal uses in the Trans-Pecos region of west Texas. A conceptual model of the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system in the 4,700 square-mile study area was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Middle Pecos Groundwater Conservation District, Pecos County, City of Fort Stockton, Brewster County, and Pecos County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1. The model was developed to gain a better understanding of the groundwater system and to establish a scientific foundation for resource-management decisions. Data and information were collected or obtained from various sources to develop the model. Lithologic information obtained from well reports and geophysical data were used to describe the hydrostratigraphy and structural features of the groundwater system, and aquifer-test data were used to estimate aquifer hydraulic properties. Groundwater-quality data were used to evaluate groundwater-flow paths, water and rock interaction, aquifer interaction, and the mixing of water from different sources. Groundwater-level data also were used to evaluate aquifer interaction as well as to develop a potentiometric-surface map, delineate regional groundwater divides, and describe regional groundwater-flow paths.

  18. Assessment of arsenic in Australian grown and imported rice varieties on sale in Australia and potential links with irrigation practises and soil geochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransisca, Yunnita; Small, Darryl M; Morrison, Paul D; Spencer, Michelle J S; Ball, Andrew S; Jones, Oliver A H

    2015-11-01

    Chronic dietary exposure to arsenic, particularly the inorganic forms (defined as elemental arsenic, predominantly As(3+) and As(5+), and all its inorganic compounds except arsine), is a matter of concern for human health. Ingestion of arsenic usually occurs via contaminated water but recent studies show there is also a risk of exposure from food, particularly Asian rice (Oryza sativa). Australia is a rice growing country, contributing around 2% of the world rice trade, and a large proportion of the population consumes rice regularly. In the present study we investigated concentrations of arsenic in both Australian grown and imported rice on sale in Australia and examined the potential links with irrigation practises and soil geochemistry. The results indicated a wide spread of arsenic levels of 0.09-0.33 mg kg(-1), with Australian grown Arborio and sushi varieties of O. sativa containing the highest mean value of ∼0.22 mg kg(-1). Arsenic levels in all samples were below the 1 mg kg(-1) limit set by Food Standards Australia New Zealand. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Geochemistry of the volcanic dome in the Municipality of Iza, Boyaca Department, geodynamic interpretation and comparison with Neogene volcanism of the Eastern Cordillera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesga, Ana Maria; Jaramillo, Jose

    2009-01-01

    This work has as purpose to offer new analytic data, supplemented the available ones until the present regarding the volcanic rocks of the region of Iza, (Boyaca); in the same way, the development of a new approach, as for determining if exists a direct connection with other volcanic deposits geographically near to the study area, using descriptive statistical methods. It was realized a characterization geochemistry for 12 samples gathered in the area, where were analyzed big elements, smaller and traces and using diagrams of characterization for effusive rocks, it is corroborated that these possess an alkaline likeness of riolitic composition. Besides the use of normalized diagrams whose abundances of elements of strong electrostatic field (HFSE) as the Nb and Zr, and elements of big ionic radio (LILE) in this case the Rb, they allowed to this rocks characteristic of ambient coalitional. On the other hand, with the obtained results of the statistical analyses, the existent relationship settled down between two geographically places near, as are it volcanic bodies of Los Naranjos and those of Paipa. As for of Iza, it was found that relationship doesn't exist some with another volcanic body among the studied sectors, probably due the alteration hydrothermal that presents the dome of Iza.

  20. 230Th-238U radioactive disequilibria in tholeiites from the FAMOUS zone (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 36050'N): Th and Sr isotopic geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condomines, M.; Morand, P.; Allegre, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    We analyzed, U, Th and 230 Th/ 232 Th activity ratios for a few tholeiites from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge FAMOUS zone at 36 0 50'N. The results show a fairly wider scatter for both Th/U and ( 230 Th/ 232 Th) ratios. Seawater contamination appears to be responsible for this scatter and, for the uranium, produces an increase in content yielding a ( 234 U/ 238 U) ratio greater than 1 and, for the Th, an increase of the ( 230 Th/ 232 Th) ratio which is a very sensitive indicator for contamination. Also, the latter often is selective: U, Th and Sr are not affected in the same manner. When discarding all data for contaminated samples, the FAMOUS zone appears to be very homogeneous with a Th/U ratio value of 3.05 and a ( 230 Th/ 232 Th) ratio value of 1.24. Comparison with other active volcanic areas reveals a negative correlation between ( 230 Th/ 232 Th) and 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios for present lavas which is indicative of a consistency in Th-U and Rb-Sr fractionation in the source regions of these magmas. The Th isotopic geochemistry can thus provide useful information for the study of present volcanism, information as valuable as that from Sr, Pb or Nd isotopes. (orig.)

  1. Major-element geochemistry of the Silent Canyon--Black Mountain peralkaline volcanic centers, northwestern Nevada Test Site: applications to an assessment of renewed volcanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, B.M.; Sargent, K.A.

    1979-01-01

    The Silent Canyon and Black Mountain volcanic centers are located in the northern part of the Nevada Test Site. The Silent Canyon volcanic center is a buried cauldron complex of Miocene age (13 to 15 m.y.). Black Mountain volcanic center is an elliptical-shaped cauldron complex of late Miocene age. The lavas and tuffs of the two centers comprise a subalkaline-peralkaline association. Rock types range from quartz normative subalkaline trachyte and rhyolite to peralkaline commendite. The Gold Flat Member of the Thirsty Canyon Tuff (Black Mountain) is a pantellerite. The major-element geochemistry of the Black Mountain--Silent Canyon volcanic centers differ in the total range and distribution of SiO 2 , contents, the degree of peralkalinity (molecular Na 2 O + K 2 O > Al 2 O 3 ) and in the values of total iron and alumina through the range of rock types. These differences indicate that the suites were unrelated and evolved from differing magma bodies. The Black Mountain volcanic cycle represents a renewed phase of volcanism following cessation of the Timber Mountain--Silent Canyon volcanic cycles. Consequently, there is a small but numerically incalculable probability of recurrence of Black Mountain-type volcanism within the Nevada Test Site region. This represents a potential risk with respect to deep geologic storage of high-level radioactive waste at the Nevada Test Site

  2. Petrography and geochemistry characteristics of the lower Cretaceous Muling Formation from the Laoheishan Basin, Northeast China: implications for provenance and tectonic setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yu; Liu, Zhaojun; Meng, Qingtao; Wang, Yimeng; Zheng, Guodong; Xu, Yinbo

    2017-06-01

    The petrography, mineralogy and geochemistry of sedimentary rocks from the lower Cretaceous Muling Formation (K1ml) in the Laoheishan basin, northeast (NE) China are studied to determine the weathering intensity, provenance and tectonic setting of the source region. Petrographic data indicate the average quartz-feldspar-lithic fragments (QFL) of the sandstone is Q = 63 %, F = 22 %, and L = 15 %. Lithic fragments mainly contain volcanic clasts that derived from surrounding basement. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data reveal abundant clay and detrital minerals (e.g. quartz), as well as minor calcite in the fine-grained sediments. The Hf contents and element concentration ratios such as Al2O3/TiO2, Co/Th, La/Sc, and La/Th are comparable to sediments derived from felsic and intermediate igneous rocks. The strong genetic relationship with the igneous rocks from the northwest and northeast areas provides evidence that the sediments of the Muling Formation (K1ml) in the Laoheishan basin have been derived from this area. The chemical index of alteration (CIA) and index of chemical variability (ICV) reveal an intensive weathering in the source region of the sediments. The multidimensional tectonic discrimination diagrams indicate that the source rocks of K1ml are mainly derived from the collision system. However, they may also comprise sediments derived from the continental rift system. The results are consistent with the geology of the study area.

  3. Sedimentology, geochemistry, pollution status and ecological risk assessment of some heavy metals in surficial sediments of an Egyptian lagoon connecting to the Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Said, Ghada F; Draz, Suzanne E O; El-Sadaawy, Manal M; Moneer, Abeer A

    2014-01-01

    Spatial distribution of heavy metals (Co, Cu, Ni, Cr, Mn, Zn and Fe) was studied on Lake Edku's surface sediments in relation to sedimentology and geochemistry characteristics and their contamination status on the ecological system. Lake Edku's sediments were dominated by sandy silt and silty sand textures and were enriched with carbonate content (9.83-58.46%). Iron and manganese were the most abundant heavy metals with ranges of 1.69 to 8.06 mg g(-1) and 0.88 to 3.27 mg g(-1), respectively. Cobalt and nickel showed a harmonic distribution along the studied sediments. The results were interpreted by the statistical means. The heavy metal pollution status and their ecological risk in Lake Edku was evaluated using the sediment quality guidelines and the contamination assessment methods (geoaccumulation, pollution load and potential ecological risk indices, enrichment factor, contamination degree as well as effect range median (ERM) and probable effect level (PEL) quotients). Amongst the determined heavy metals, zinc had the most ecological risk. Overall, the heavy metals in surface sediments showed ecological effect range from moderate to considerable risk, specially, in the stations in front of the seawater and in drain sources that had the highest toxic priority.

  4. Rare earth element geochemistry of feldspars: examples from Fe-oxide Cu-Au systems in the Olympic Cu-Au Province, South Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontonikas-Charos, Alkis; Ciobanu, Cristiana L.; Cook, Nigel J.; Ehrig, Kathy; Krneta, Sasha; Kamenetsky, Vadim S.

    2018-04-01

    Rare earth element (REE) fractionation trends in feldspars are reported from Olympic Dam (including Wirrda Well and Phillip's Ridge) and Cape Donington (Port Lincoln), for comparison with two other igneous-hydrothermal terranes within the eastern Gawler Craton: Moonta-Wallaroo and Hillside. The case studies were selected as they represent 1590 Ma Hiltaba Suite and/or 1845 - 1810 Ma Donington Suite granites, and, aside from Cape Donington, are associated with Mesoproterozoic iron-oxide copper gold (IOCG)-type mineralization. Both plagioclase and alkali feldspar were analyzed within selected samples with the purpose of constraining and linking changes in REE concentrations and fractionation trends in feldspars to local and whole-rock textures and geochemistry. Two unique, reproducible fractionation trends were obtained for igneous plagioclase and alkali feldspars, distinguished from one another by light rare earth element enrichment, Eu-anomalies and degrees of fractionation (e.g. La/Lu slopes). Results for hydrothermal albite and K-feldspar indicate that REE concentrations and fractionation trends are generally inherited from igneous predecessors, however in some instances, significant amounts of REE appear to have been lost to the fluid. These results may have critical implications for the formation of world-class IOCG systems, in which widespread alkali metasomatism plays a key role by altering the physical and chemical properties of the host rocks during early stages of IOCG formation, as well as trapping trace elements (including REE).

  5. Climatic Constraints on Growth Rate and Geochemistry (Sr/Ca and U/Ca) of the Coral Siderastrea stellata in the Southwest Equatorial Atlantic (Rocas Atoll, Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, H.; Sifeddine, A.; Corrège, T.; Servain, J.; Dassié, E. P.; Logato, R.; Cordeiro, R. C.; Shen, C.-C.; Le Cornec, F.; Nogueira, J.; Segal, B.; Castagna, A.; Turcq, B.

    2018-03-01

    Although relatively rare compared to similar latitudes in the Pacific or Indian Oceans, massive coral colonies are present in the Tropical/Equatorial Southwestern Atlantic Ocean. However, detailed geochemical compositions of these corals are still largely unknown. In this work, we present growth rates, Sr/Ca, and U/Ca ratios of the coral colony (Siderastrea stellata) sampled at Rocas Atoll, off the Brazilian coast. These variables are primarily affected by sea surface temperature (SST) at seasonal scale, and by wind stress at interannual scale, these results represent a broad new finding. A lower significance at the interannual time scale between Sr/Ca and U/Ca with respect to SST is attributed to the low SST amplitude closed to Equator. An investigation on the dependence of coral growth rates with respect to the "cloud shading effect" promoted by the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) does not show significant influence. Additionally, rain seems to act on local geochemistry of Sr/Ca ratios and growth rate at the decadal scale.

  6. Petrography, mineral chemistry and geochemistry of post-ophiolitic volcanic rocks in the Ratouk area (south of Gazik, east of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Vahedi Tabas

    2017-11-01

    basic (Quaternary compositions outcropped above ophiolitic units. Electron probe micro analyzer (EMPA data indicated that clinopyroxene in basalt is diopside and olivine from chrysolite type with Mg# around 81-82 percent. The whole rocks geochemical data prove calc-alkaline and alkaline nature for andesites and basalts, respectively. Trace element patterns, especially for andesites show enrichment in Ba, K, Cs, Sr and Th, depletion in P, Nb, Ti and enrichment in LREE relative to HREE. Electron probe micro analyses of clinopyroxene in olivine basalt support alkaline nature and within plate tectonic setting for this rock. Thermobarometry of clinopyroxene in olivine basalt record crystallization conditions about 1200 oC and 6-10kbars. Discussion The origin of intraplate volcanism is diverse and not always well understood. Most intraplate volcanos have been attributed to (i mantle plumes and hot spots, (ii continental rift, (iii back-arc extension and (iv lithosphere delamination and thinning (Chen et al., 2007. Although volcanism at intraplate settings is less common than along mid-ocean ridges and subduction zones, it is of significant importance for both preventing geological hazards and understanding mantle geochemistry. It is believed that alkaline oceanic island basalts (OIB are only derived from the asthenospheric mantle (Alici et al., 2002. However, the intracontinental alkaline magmas can be produced by partial melting of metasomatized mantle enriched in LREE and LILE (Upadhyay et al., 2006. On the basis of trace element diagrams, Ratouk basaltic rocks placed within plate volcanic zone (WPVZ and andesitic samples have been located within the active continental margin (ACM. The studies that took place about young basaltic volcanism (Alishahi, 2012; Mollashahi et al., 2011; Ghasempour et al., 2011; Pang et al., 2012; Walker et al., 2009 have shown that the mechanisms of their occurrence are similar such that all of them have been formed in intraplate extensional

  7. Geochemistry and composition of the Middle Devonian Srbsko Formation in Barrandian Area, Bohemian Massif: A trench or fore-arc strike-slip basin fill with material from volcanic arc of continental margin?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strnad, L.; Hladil, Jindřich

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 13, - (2001), s. 111-114 ISSN 1210-9606. [Meeting of the Czech Tectonic Studies Group /6./. Donovaly - Nízké Tatry, 03.05.2001-06.05.2001] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK3012103 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3013912 Keywords : Geochemistry * tectonic setting * Srbsko Formation of the Barrandian area Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy http://geolines.gli.cas.cz/fileadmin/volumes/volume13/G13-111.pdf

  8. Characteristics of hydrothermal alteration mineralogy and geochemistry of igneous rocks from the epithermal Co-O mine and district, Eastern Mindanao (Philippines)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Iris; Hagemann, Steffen

    2010-05-01

    Detailed petrographic as well as hyperspectral analyses using PIMA (Portable Infrared Mineral Analyser) and geochemical (major, trace and rare earth elements) studies were conducted on samples of the epithermal, low sulfidation Co-O mine (47,869 ounces gold produced in 2009 with an average grade of 13.3 g/t gold) and district in Eastern Mindanao (Philippines). The aims of the study were to unravel the petrogenetic origin of the various volcanic (host rocks) and intrusive rocks (potential fluid driver) as well as their relationship and influence on the hydrothermal alteration zoning and fluid chemistry. The auriferous veins at the Co-O mine were formed during two hydrothermal stages associated with the district wide D1 and D2 deformation events. Gold in stage 1 quartz veins is in equilibrium with galena and sphalerite, whereas in stage 2 it is associated with pyrite. Auriferous quartz veins of stage 1 reflect temperatures below 250° C or strong variations in pH and fO2 at higher temperatures, due to potential involvement of acidic gas or meteoric water. Cathodoluminescense studies revealed strong zonation of quartz associated with Au, presumably related to changes in the Al content, which is influenced by the pH. Plumose textures indicate times of rapid deposition, whereas saccharoidal quartz grains are related to potential calcite replacement. The geology of the Co-O mine and district is dominated by Miocene volcanic rocks (basic to intermediate flows and pyroclastics units), which are partly covered by Pliocene volcanic rocks and late Oligocene to Miocene limestones. The Miocene units are intruded by diorite (presumably Miocene in age). The epithermal mineralization event may be related to diorite intrusions. The geochemistry of all igneous rocks in the district is defined by a sub-alkaline affinity and is low to medium K in composition. Most units are related to a Miocene subduction zone with westward subduction, whereas the younger Pliocene rocks are related to

  9. High-resolution C and O stable isotope geochemistry of the early Aptian OAE1a at Cau (Prebetic Zone, Spain): Preliminary results from sediment core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejandro Ruiz-Ortiz, Pedro; Aguado, Roque; Castro, José Manuel; Gallego, David; de Gea, Ginés Alfonso; Jarvis, Ian; Molina, José Miguel; Nieto, Luis Miguel; Pancost, Richard; Quijano, María Luisa; Reolid, Matías; Rodriguez, Rafael; Skelton, Peter; Weisser, Helmut

    2017-04-01

    The occurrence of time intervals of enhanced deposition of organic matter (OM) during the Cretaceous, defined as Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAE), reflect abrupt changes in global carbon cycling. The Aptian OAE1a (120 Ma), represents an excellent example, recorded in all the main ocean basins, associated to massive burial of organic matter in marine sediments [1]. Much research has been done on the OAE1a from different sections in the world over the last decades, including the definition of the C-isotope stratigraphy of the event [2]. Notwithstanding, higher-resolution studies across the entire event will be crucial to shed light into the precise timing and rates of the different environmental and biotic changes that occurred. The Cau section is located in the easternmost part of the Prebetic Zone (Betic Cordillera), which represents the platform deposits of the Southern Iberian palaeomargin. The Lower Aptian of the Cau section is represented by a hemipelagic unit (Almadich Formation, ca. 200 m thick), deposited in a highly subsiding sector of a tilted block, located in the distal parts of the Prebetic Platform. Previous studies of the Lower Aptian of the Cau section have focused on the stratigraphy, bioevents, C-isotope stratigraphy, and organic and elemental geochemistry [3], [4], and in the reconstruction of pCO2 from organic geochemistry proxies [5]. All these studies reveal that the Cau section represents an excellent site to investigate the OAE 1a, based on its unusual high thickness and stratigraphic continuity, the quality and preservation of fossils and the geochemical signatures. Here we present the first results of a high-resolution carbonate C-isotope study based on the the analysis of three new research cores drilled at Cau in autumn 2015 [6]. These new data represent an important advance in the knowledge of the C-isotope record of the OAE 1a, presenting a more continuous record at a higher resolution than previous studies. This leads to the refining of the

  10. Effects of climate and geochemistry on soil organic matter stabilization and greenhouse gas emissions along altitudinal transects in different mountain regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griepentrog, Marco; Bodé, Samuel; Boudin, Mathieu; Dercon, Gerd; Doetterl, Sebastian; Matulanya, Machibya; Msigwa, Anna; Vermeir, Pieter; Boeckx, Pascal

    2017-04-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems are strongly influenced by climate change and soils are key compartments of the global carbon (C) cycle in terms of their potential to store or release significant amounts of C. This study is part of the interregional IAEA Technical Cooperation Project ``Assessing the Impact of Climate Change and its Effects on Soil and Water Resources in Polar and Mountainous Regions (INT5153)'' aiming to improve the understanding of climate change impacts on soil organic carbon (SOC) in fragile polar and high mountainous ecosystems at local and global scale for their better management and conservation. The project includes 13 benchmark sites situated around the world. Here we present novel data from altitudinal transects of three different mountain regions (Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania; Mount Gongga, China; Cordillera Blanca, Peru). All altitudinal transects cover a wide range of natural ecosystems under different climates and soil geochemistry. Bulk soil samples (four field replicates per ecosystem) were subjected to a combination of aggregate and particle-size fractionation followed by organic C, total nitrogen, stable isotope (13C, 15N) and radiocarbon (14C) analyses of all fractions. Bulk soils were further characterized for their geochemistry (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, Mn, Si, P) and incubated for 63 days to assess greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, CH4, NO, N2O). Further, stable C isotopic signature of CO2 was measured to determine the isotopic signature of soil respiration (using Keeling plots) and to estimate potential respiration sources. The following four ecosystems were sampled at an altitudinal transect on the (wet) southern slopes of Mount Kilimanjaro: savannah (920m), lower montane rain forests with angiosperm trees (2020m), upper montane cloud forest with gymnosperm trees (2680m), subalpine heathlands (3660m). Both forests showed highest C contents followed by subalpine and savannah. The largest part of SOC was found in particulate organic matter

  11. Iron geochemistry and organic carbon preservation by iron (oxyhydr)oxides in surface sediments of the East China Sea and the south Yellow Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei-Wei; Zhu, Mao-Xu; Yang, Gui-Peng; Li, Tie

    2018-02-01

    In marine sediments factors that influence iron (Fe) geochemistry and its interactions with other elements are diverse and remain poorly understood. Here we comparatively study Fe speciation and reactive Fe-bound organic carbon (Fe-OC) in surface sediments of the East China Sea (ECS) and the south Yellow Sea (SYS). The objectives are to better understand the potential impacts of geochemically distinct sediment sources and depositional/diagenetic settings on Fe geochemistry and OC preservation by Fe (hydr)oxides in sediments of the two extensive shelf seas around the world. Contents of carbonate- and acid-volatile-sulfide (AVS)-associated Fe(II) (FeAVS + carb) and magnetite (Femag) in the ECS sediments are about 5 and 9 times higher, respectively, than in the SYS. This could be ascribed to the ferruginous conditions of the ECS sediments that favor the formation/accumulation of Fecarb and Femag, a unique feature of marine unsteady depositional regimes. Much lower total Fe(II) contents in the SYS than in the ECS suggest that lower availability of highly reactive Fe (FeHR) and/or weak Fe reduction is a factor limiting Fe(II) formation and accumulation in the SYS sediments. The ratio of FeHR to total Fe is, on average, markedly higher (2.4 times) in the ECS sediments than in the SYS, which may be a combined result of several factors relevant to different sediment sources and depositional/diagenetic settings. In comparison with many other marine sediments, the percent fractions (fFe-OC) of Fe-OC to total organic carbon (TOC) in the ECS and the SYS are low, which can be ascribed to surface adsorption of OC rather than coprecipitation or organic complexation as the dominant binding mechanisms. Based on the fFe-OC in this study, total Fe-OC estimated for global continental shelves is equivalent to 38% of the atmospheric CO2 pool, which indicates the important role of sorptive stabilization of Fe-OC in continental shelf sediments for buffering CO2 release to the atmosphere

  12. Integration of inorganic and isotopic geochemistry with endocrine disruption activity assays to assess risks to water resources near unconventional oil and gas development in Garfield County, CO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, J.; Kassotis, C.; Cornelius, J.; Nagel, S.; Vengosh, A.

    2016-12-01

    The rise of hydraulic fracturing in the United States has sparked a debate about the impact of oil and gas development on the quality of water resources. Wastewater associated with hydraulic fracturing includes injection fluid that is a mixture of sand, freshwater and synthetic organic chemicals, flowback water that is a mixture of injection fluid and formation brine, and produced water that is primarily brine. The fluids range in salinity and chemical composition that can have different environmental impacts. We analyzed the inorganic and isotope geochemistry of 58 surface and groundwater samples near and away from unconventional oil and gas operations (UOG), along with hormonal profiles via bioassays. Cl (0.12 to 198 mg/L), Na (1.2 to 518 mg/L) and Sr (1.4 to 2410 ug/L) were higher in both groundwater and surface water near UOG wells. Four surface waters and one groundwater had Br/Cl indicative of brine contamination (>1.5x10-3). Three of the SW samples also had 87Sr/86Sr ratios similar to values found in produced or flowback water (0.7118 and 0.7158, respectively) from the Williams-Fork formation and elevated compared to background ratios (0.71062 to 0.7115). Increased progestogenic activity was observed in groundwater near UOG operations and inncreased estrogenic, androgenic, progestogenic, anti-androgenic, anti-progestogenic, and anti-glucocorticoid activities in surface water near UOG operations. The association of increased EDCs with inorganic and isotopic indicators of UOG wastewater provides evidence for possible environmental and health impacts from drilling activity.

  13. Organic geochemistry of deep ground waters from the Palo Duro Basin, Texas: implications for radionuclide complexation, ground-water origin, and petroleum exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Means, J.L.; Hubbard, N.J.

    1985-05-01

    This report describes the organic geochemistry of 11 ground-water samples from the Palo Duro Basin, Texas and discusses the implications of their organic geochemical compositions in terms of radionuclide complexation, ground-water origin, and the petroleum potential of two candidate repository sites in Deaf Smith and Swisher Counties. Short-chain aliphatic acid anions are the principal organic constituents present. Stability constant data and simple chemical equilibria calculations suggest that short-chain aliphatic acids are relatively weak complexing agents. The extent of complexation of a typical actinide by selected inorganic ligands present in these brines is expected to far outweigh actinide complexation by the aliphatic acid anions. Various lines of evidence suggest that some portion of the bromide concentrations in the brines is derived from the same source as the short-chain aliphatic acid anions. When the postulated organic components are subtracted from total bromide concentrations, the origins of the Palo Duro brines, based on chloride versus bromide relationships, appear largely consistent with origins based on isotopic evidence. The short-chain aliphatic acid anion content of the Palo Duro brines is postulated to have been much greater in the geologic past. Aliphatic acid anions are but one of numerous petroleum proximity indicators, which consistently suggest a greater petroleum exploration potential for the area surrounding the Swisher County site than the region encompassing the candidate site in Deaf Smith County. Short-chain aliphatic acid anions appear to provide a useful petroleum exploration tool as long as the complex reactions that may dimish their concentrations in ground water are recognized. 71 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs

  14. Geochemistry of Hydrothermal Alteration Associated with Cenozoic Intrusion-Hosted Cu-Pb-Zn Mineralization at Tavşanlı Area, Kütahya, NW Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Kumral

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Miocene magmatic intrusion in the Tavşanlı zone of the Kütahya-Bolkardağ Belt (KBB in the northwestern region of Turkey is represented by the Eğrigöz granitoids. This paper studies the petrology and geochemistry of hydrothermal alterations associated with the vein-type Cu-Pb-Zn mineralization hosted by this pluton, focusing on the determination of the mass gains and losses of chemical components, which reflect the chemical exchanges between the host rocks and hydrothermal fluids. Vein-type Cu-Pb-Zn mineralization is closely associated with intense hydrothermal alterations within the brecciation, quartz stockwork veining, and brittle fracture zones that are controlled by NW-SE trending faults cutting through the Eğrigöz granitoids. Paragenetic relationships reveal three stages of mineralization: pre-ore, ore, and supergene. The ore mineralogy typically includes hypogene chalcopyrite, sphalerite, galena, and pyrite, with locally supergene covellite, malachite, and azurite. Wall-rock hypogene hydrothermal alterations include pervasive silicification, sulfidation, sericitization, and selective carbonatization and albitization. These are distributed in three main alteration zones (zone 1: silicified/iron carbonatized alterations ± albite, zone 2: argillic-silicic alterations, and zone 3: phyllic alterations. Based on the gains and losses of mass and volume (calculated by the GEOISO-Windows™ program, zone 1 has a higher mass and volume gain than zones 2 and 3. Non-systematic zonal distributions of alterations are observed in which the silicic-carbonate alterations +/− albitization appeared in zone 1 in the center and the phyllic-argillic alterations appeared in zones 2 and 3, with an increase in base metals (Cu-Pb-Zn in the zone from Cu, Cu-Pb, to Cu-Pb-Zn moving outwards.

  15. Mineralogy, geochemistry, and palynology of modern and late Tertiary mangrove deposits in the Barreiras Formation of Mosqueiro Island, northeastern Pará state, eastern Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behling, Hermann; da Costa, Marcondes Lima

    2004-12-01

    A coastal environment has been interpreted from 110 cm thick mudstone deposits found at the base of a 10 m immature laterite profile, which forms the modern coastal cliff on Mosqueiro Island in northeastern Pará state, northern Brazil. The late Tertiary sediment deposits of the Barreiras Formation are studied by multi-element geochemistry and pollen analyses. The mineralogical and geochemical results show that the gray, organic-rich deposits are composed of kaolinite, quartz, and illite/muscovite, as well as pyrite and anatase. They are rich in SiO 2, Al 2O 3, and some FeO. The composition is homogenous, indicating that the detritus source area is formed of lateritic soils derived from acid rock composition. Their chemical composition, including trace elements, is somewhat comparable to continental shale, and the values are below the upper continental Earth crust composition. The pollen analytical data document that the mudstone deposits were formed by an ancient mangrove ecosystem. Mineralogical, geochemical, and pollen analytical data obtained from late Tertiary mangrove deposits are compared with modern mangrove deposits from the Bragança Peninsula of the northeastern coast of Pará state. Although the pollen composition of the deposits is very similar to the modern one, the geochemical and mineralogical composition is different. Smectite was only found in the modern deposit; illite/mica occurs in the ancient deposit, along with Mg, K, and Na. The pollen signature and detrital minerals (kaolinite, quartz and anatase) found in both mangrove deposits show that during the Miocene, a humid tropical climate condition prevailed, similar to modern conditions.

  16. Iron and sulfur geochemistry in semi-arid mangrove soils (Ceará, Brazil) in relation to seasonal changes and shrimp farming effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóbrega, G N; Ferreira, T O; Romero, R E; Marques, A G B; Otero, X L

    2013-09-01

    Iron and sulfur are key elements in the biogeochemistry of estuarine soils, in which Fe and sulfate reduction (SR) pathways are important for organic matter decomposition. In the semi-arid coast of NE Brazil, mangroves are characterized by large seasonal variations in weather and the presence of numerous shrimp farms. The objective was to determine the impacts of shrimp farm effluents on iron and sulfur geochemistry in mangrove soils under the semi-arid climate of NE Brazil. A seasonal study was made of two mangrove forest soils (SF, a mangrove forest that directly receives wastewater from shrimp ponds and CS, a control site). Pyrite Fe, oxyhydroxides Fe, acid volatile sulfide, degree of pyritization (DOP), pH, Eh, total organic carbon (TOC) and total S were determined. There was a clear decrease in pyritic Fe and DOP in the SF soils, which may be related to the anaerobic oxidation of pyrite coupled with nitrate reduction, or to the dominance of denitrification over SR. Lower TOC contents in the SF site suggest that below ground decomposition increased in response to eutrophication. The seasonal variations led to important changes in the semi-arid mangrove soils. During the dry period, both soils experienced oxidizing conditions with remarkable loss of reduced and oxidized forms of Fe, which may have important environmental implications as Fe is biolimiting for marine primary production. The data show that both factors (seasonal weather variations and shrimp effluents) play important roles in the geochemical processes that occur in these soils and, thus, may affect their functioning and maintenance.

  17. Reply to 'Comment on kinetic modeling of microbially-driven redox chemistry of subsurface environments: coupling transport, microbial metabolism and geochemistry' by J. Griffioen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, K. S.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2000-01-01

    Our paper, 'Kinetic modeling of microbially-driven redox chemistry of subsurface environments: coupling transport, microbial metabolism and geochemistry' (Hunter et al., 1998), presents a theoretical exploration of biogeochemical reaction networks and their importance to the biogeochemistry of groundwater systems. As with any other model, the kinetic reaction-transport model developed in our paper includes only a subset of all physically, biologically and chemically relevant processes in subsurface environments. It considers aquifer systems where the primary energy source driving microbial activity is the degradation of organic matter. In addition to the primary biodegradation pathways of organic matter (i.e. respiration and fermentation), the redox chemistry of groundwaters is also affected by reactions not directly involving organic matter oxidation. We refer to the latter as secondary reactions. By including secondary redox reactions which consume reduced reaction products (e.g., Mn2+, FeS, H2S), and in the process compete with microbial heterotrophic populations for available oxidants (i.e. O2, NO3-, Mn(IV), Fe(III), SO42-), we predict spatio-temporal distributions of microbial activity which differ significantly from those of models which consider only the biodegradation reactions. That is, the secondary reactions have a significant impact on the distributions of the rates of heterotrophic and chemolithotrophic metabolic pathways. We further show that secondary redox reactions, as well as non-redox reactions, significantly influence the acid-base chemistry of groundwaters. The distributions of dissolved inorganic redox species along flowpaths, however, are similar in simulations with and without secondary reactions (see Figs. 3(b) and 7(b) in Hunter et al., 1998), indicating that very different biogeochemical reaction dynamics may lead to essentially the same chemical redox zonation of a groundwater system.

  18. Geochemistry of formation waters from the Wolfcamp and “Cline” shales: Insights into brine origin, reservoir connectivity, and fluid flow in the Permian Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Mark A.; Reyes, Francisco R.; Varonka, Matthew S.; Orem, William H.; Lin, Ma; Ianno, Adam J.; Westphal, Tiffani M.; Xu, Pei; Carroll, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    Despite being one of the most important oil producing provinces in the United States, information on basinal hydrogeology and fluid flow in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico is lacking. The source and geochemistry of brines from the basin were investigated (Ordovician- to Guadalupian-age reservoirs) by combining previously published data from conventional reservoirs with geochemical results for 39 new produced water samples, with a focus on those from shales. Salinity of the Ca–Cl-type brines in the basin generally increases with depth reaching a maximum in Devonian (median = 154 g/L) reservoirs, followed by decreases in salinity in the Silurian (median = 77 g/L) and Ordovician (median = 70 g/L) reservoirs. Isotopic data for B, O, H, and Sr and ion chemistry indicate three major types of water. Lower salinity fluids (100 g/L), isotopically heavy (O and H) water in Leonardian [Permian] to Pennsylvanian reservoirs (2–3.2 km depth) is evaporated, Late Permian seawater. Water from the Permian Wolfcamp and Pennsylvanian “Cline” shales, which are isotopically similar but lower in salinity and enriched in alkalis, appear to have developed their composition due to post-illitization diffusion into the shales. Samples from the “Cline” shale are further enriched with NH4, Br, I and isotopically light B, sourced from the breakdown of marine kerogen in the unit. Lower salinity waters (3 km depth), which plot near the modern local meteoric water line, are distinct from the water in overlying reservoirs. We propose that these deep meteoric waters are part of a newly identified hydrogeologic unit: the Deep Basin Meteoric Aquifer System. Chemical, isotopic, and pressure data suggest that despite over-pressuring in the Wolfcamp shale, there is little potential for vertical fluid migration to the surface environment via natural conduits.

  19. Petrology, geochemistry and zirconology of impure calcite marbles from the Precambrian metamorphic basement at the southeastern margin of the North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Can; Zhang, Pin-Gang; Wang, Cheng-Cheng; Groppo, Chiara; Rolfo, Franco; Yang, Yang; Li, Yuan; Deng, Liang-Peng; Song, Biao

    2017-10-01

    Impure calcite marbles from the Precambrian metamorphic basement of the Wuhe Complex, southeastern margin of the North China Craton, provide an exceptional opportunity to understand the depositional processes during the Late Archean and the subsequent Palaeoproterozoic metamorphic evolution of one of the oldest cratons in the world. The studied marbles are characterized by the assemblage calcite + clinopyroxene + plagioclase + K-feldspar + quartz + rutile ± biotite ± white mica. Based on petrography and geochemistry, the marbles can be broadly divided into two main types. The first type (type 1) is rich in REE with a negative Eu anomaly, whereas the second type (type 2) is relatively poor in REE with a positive Eu anomaly. Notably, all marbles exhibit remarkably uniform REE patterns with moderate LREE/HREE fractionation, suggesting a close genetic relationship. Cathodoluminescence imaging, trace elements and mineral inclusions reveal that most zircons from two dated samples display distinct core-rim structures. Zircon cores show typical igneous features with oscillatory growth zoning and high Th/U ratios (mostly in the range 0.3-0.7) and give ages of 2.53 - 2.48 Ga, thus dating the maximum age of deposition of the protolith. Zircon rims overgrew during granulite-facies metamorphism, as evidenced by calcite + clinopyroxene + rutile + plagioclase + quartz inclusions, by Ti-in-zircon temperatures in the range 660-743 °C and by the low Th/U (mostly marbles are ascribed to syn-depositional felsic hydrothermal activity which occurred at 2.53 - 2.48 Ga. Our results, together with other published data and the inferred tectonic setting, suggest that the marbles' protolith is an impure limestone, rich in detrital silicates of igneous origin, deposited in a back-arc basin within an active continental margin during the late Archean and affected by synchronous high-T hydrothermalism at the southeastern margin of the North China Craton.

  20. Quaternary stratigraphy, sediment characteristics and geochemistry of arsenic-contaminated alluvial aquifers in the Ganges-Brahmaputra floodplain in central Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsudduha, M; Uddin, A; Saunders, J A; Lee, M-K

    2008-07-29

    This study focuses on the Quaternary stratigraphy, sediment composition, mineralogy, and geochemistry of arsenic (As)-contaminated alluvial aquifers in the Ganges-Brahmaputra floodplain in the central Bangladesh. Arsenic concentrations in 85 tubewells in Manikganj area, 70 km northwest of Dhaka City, range from 0.25 microg/L to 191 microg/L with a mean concentration of 33 microg/L. Groundwater is mainly Ca-HCO(3) type with high concentrations of dissolved As, Fe, and Mn, but low level of SO(4). The uppermost aquifer occurs between 10 m and 80 m below the surface that has a mean arsenic concentration of 35 microg/L. Deeper aquifer (>100 m depth) has a mean arsenic concentration of 18 microg/L. Sediments in the upper aquifer are mostly gray to dark-gray, whereas sediments in the deep aquifer are mostly yellowing-gray to brown. Quartz, feldspar, mica, hornblende, garnet, kyanite, tourmaline, magnetite, ilmenite are the major minerals in sediments from both aquifers. Biotite and potassium feldspar are dominant in shallow aquifer, although plagioclase feldspar and garnet are abundant in deep aquifer sediments. Sediment composition suggests a mixed provenance with sediment supplies from both orogenic belts and cratons. High arsenic concentrations in sediments are found within the upper 50 m in drilled core samples. Statistical analysis shows that As, Fe, Mn, Ca, and P are strongly correlated in sediments. Concentrations of Cd, Cu, Ni, Zn, and Bi also show strong correlations with arsenic in the Manikganj sediment cores. Authigenic goethite concretions, possibly formed by bacteria, are found in the shallow sediments, which contain arsenic of a concentration as high as 8.8 mg/kg. High arsenic concentrations in aquifers are associated with fine-grained sediments that were derived mostly from the recycled orogens and relatively rapidly deposited mainly by meandering channels during the Early to Middle Holocene rising sea-level conditions.

  1. Sulfur geochemistry of hydrothermal waters in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. III. An anion-exchange resin technique for sampling and preservation of sulfoxyanions in natural waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druschel, G.K.; Schoonen, M.A.A.; Nordstorm, D.K.; Ball, J.W.; Xu, Y.; Cohn, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    A sampling protocol for the retention, extraction, and analysis of sulfoxyanions in hydrothermal waters has been developed in the laboratory and tested at Yellowstone National Park and Green Lake, NY. Initial laboratory testing of the anion-exchange resin Bio-Rad??? AG1-X8 indicated that the resin was well suited for the sampling, preservation, and extraction of sulfate and thiosulfate. Synthetic solutions containing sulfate and thiosulfate were passed through AG1-X8 resin columns and eluted with 1 and 3 M KCl, respectively. Recovery ranged from 89 to 100%. Comparison of results for water samples collected from five pools in Yellowstone National Park between on-site IC analysis (U.S. Geological Survey mobile lab) and IC analysis of resin-stored sample at SUNY-Stony Brook indicates 96 to 100% agreement for three pools (Cinder, Cistern, and an unnamed pool near Cistern) and 76 and 63% agreement for two pools (Sulfur Dust and Frying Pan). Attempts to extract polythionates from the AG1-X8 resin were made using HCl solutions, but were unsuccessful. Bio-Rad??? AG2-X8, an anion-exchange resin with weaker binding sites than the AG1-X8 resin, is better suited for polythionate extraction. Sulfate and thiosulfate extraction with this resin has been accomplished with KCl solutions of 0.1 and 0.5 M, respectively. Trithionate and tetrathionate can be extracted with 4 M KCl. Higher polythionates can be extracted with 9 M hydrochloric acid. Polythionate concentrations can then be determined directly using ion chromatographic methods, and laboratory results indicate recovery of up to 90% for synthetic polythionate solutions using AG2-X8 resin columns. ?? The Royal Society of Chemistry and the Division of Geochemistry of the American Chemical Society 2003.

  2. Geochronology and geochemistry of the Badaguan porphyry Cu-Mo deposit in Derbugan metallogenic belt of the NE China, and their geological significances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bingyu; Zhang, Lianchang; Jin, Xindi; Li, Wenjun; Chen, Zhiguang; Zhu, Mingtian

    2016-03-01

    The Badaguan porphyry Cu-Mo deposit belongs to the Derbugan metallogenic belt, which is located in the Ergun block, NE China. In the mining area, the Cu-Mo mineralization mainly occurs in quartz diorite porphyry and is hosted within silicified-sericitized and sericite alteration zone. Geochemical results of the host porphyry is characterized by high SiO2, high Al2O3, low MgO, weak positive Eu anomalies and clearly HREE depletion, high Sr, low Y and low Yb, similar to those of adakite. The Sr-Nd isotopic composition of the host porphyry displays an initial (87Sr/86Sr)i ratio of 0.7036-0.7055 and positive Nd( t) values of +0.1 to +0.6, which are similar to the OIB, reflecting the source of the host porphyry may derive from subducted ocean slab, and the new lower crust also had some contribution to the magma sources. The SIMS zircon U-Pb age from the host porphyry is 229 ± 2 Ma. The Re-Os isochron age for the molybdenite in the deposit is 225 ± 2 Ma closed to zircon U-Pb age of the host porphyry, indicating that Cu-Mo mineralization event occurred in Triassic. Combining the geology-geochemistry of the host porphyry and the regional tectonic evolution, we infer that the subduction processes of Mongol-Okhotsk oceanic slab under the Ergun block led to the formation of the Badaguan porphyry Cu-Mo deposit during the Triassic.

  3. Geochemistry and hydrology of perched groundwater springs: assessing elevated uranium concentrations at Pigeon Spring relative to nearby Pigeon Mine, Arizona (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisner, Kimberly R.; Paretti, Nicholas; Tillman, Fred; Naftz, David L.; Bills, Donald; Walton-Day, Katie; Gallegos, Tanya J.

    2017-01-01

    The processes that affect water chemistry as the water flows from recharge areas through breccia-pipe uranium deposits in the Grand Canyon region of the southwestern United States are not well understood. Pigeon Spring had elevated uranium in 1982 (44 μg/L), compared to other perched springs (2.7–18 μg/L), prior to mining operations at the nearby Pigeon Mine. Perched groundwater springs in an area around the Pigeon Mine were sampled between 2009 and 2015 and compared with material from the Pigeon Mine to better understand the geochemistry and hydrology of the area. Two general groups of perched groundwater springs were identified from this study; one group is characterized by calcium sulfate type water, low uranium activity ratio 234U/238U (UAR) values, and a mixture of water with some component of modern water, and the other group by calcium-magnesium sulfate type water, higher UAR values, and radiocarbon ages indicating recharge on the order of several thousand years ago. Multivariate statistical principal components analysis of Pigeon Mine and spring samples indicate Cu, Pb, As, Mn, and Cd concentrations distinguished mining-related leachates from perched groundwater springs. The groundwater potentiometric surface indicates that perched groundwater at Pigeon Mine would likely flow toward the northwest away from Pigeon Spring. The geochemical analysis of the water, sediment and rock samples collected from the Snake Gulch area indicate that the elevated uranium at Pigeon Spring is likely related to a natural source of uranium upgradient from the spring and not likely related to the Pigeon Mine.

  4. Geochemistry and origin of metamorphosed mafic rocks from the Lower Paleozoic Moretown and Cram Hill Formations of North-Central Vermont: Delamination magmatism in the western New England appalachians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coish, Raymond; Kim, Jonathan; Twelker, Evan; Zolkos, Scott P.; Walsh, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    The Moretown Formation, exposed as a north-trending unit that extends from northern Vermont to Connecticut, is located along a critical Appalachian litho-tectonic zone between the paleomargin of Laurentia and accreted oceanic terranes. Remnants of magmatic activity, in part preserved as metamorphosed mafic rocks in the Moretown Formation and the overlying Cram Hill Formation, are a key to further understanding the tectonic history of the northern Appalachians. Field relationships suggest that the metamorphosed mafic rocks might have formed during and after Taconian deformation, which occurred at ca. 470 to 460 Ma. Geochemistry indicates that the sampled metamorphosed mafic rocks were mostly basalts or basaltic andesites. The rocks have moderate TiO2 contents (1–2.5 wt %), are slightly enriched in the light-rare earth elements relative to the heavy rare earths, and have negative Nb-Ta anomalies in MORB-normalized extended rare earth element diagrams. Their chemistry is similar to compositions of basalts from western Pacific extensional basins near volcanic arcs. The metamorphosed mafic rocks of this study are similar in chemistry to both the pre-Silurian Mount Norris Intrusive Suite of northern Vermont, and also to some of Late Silurian rocks within the Lake Memphremagog Intrusive Suite, particularly the Comerford Intrusive Complex of Vermont and New Hampshire. Both suites may be represented among the samples of this study. The geochemistry of all samples indicates that parental magmas were generated in supra-subduction extensional environments during lithospheric delamination.

  5. Mineralization, geochemistry, fluid inclusion and sulfur stable isotope studies in the carbonate hosted Baqoroq Cu-Zn-As deposit (NE Anarak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Jazi

    2015-10-01

    bacterial sulfate reduction or by nonbacterial sulfate reduction through a reaction with organic materialin the sedimentary rocks (thermochemical sulfate reduction. However, the narrow range of δ34S and positive values indicates that they were not produced by bacterial sulfate reduction.Partial thermochemical reduction of sulfates has apparently produced light sulfurvalues (~ 21‰ lighter and it has been effective inthe deposition of ore minerals. Organic matter occurs as graphite in the Baqoroq formation in proximity of Baqoroq deposit (Cherepovsky et al., 1982. Discussion Epigenetic, stratabound and discordant Cu-Zn-As mineralization in the Baqoroq deposit occurs as open space filling of upper Cretaceous rocks. Host rock is partially dolomitized by ascending warm, saline fluids. Seawater sulfates were the source of the sulfidesulfur and the sulfate in the barite. The reduced sulfur was generated by partial thermochemical reduction and it was effective inthe deposition ofthe ore minerals. Based onthe evidence of carbonate host rocks, the absence of igneous activity, the open space filling texture, mineralogy, dolomite alteration, ore geochemistry (As and Sb high content and absence of Bi, microthermometric data of ore bearing fluid and sulfur isotope values, the Baqoroq deposit is very similar to the carbonate hosted copper deposits in Africa and in particular the Tsumeb deposit in Namibia. The Baqoroqdepositmay have been produced bymetamorphicfluids during orogenyrelated to theclosureof the Neo-Tethys ocean. References Cherepovsky, N., Plyaskin, V., Zhitinev, N., Kokorin, Y., Susov, M., Melnikov, B. and Aistov, L., 1982. Report on detailed geological prospecting in Anarak area (Central Iran Nakhlak locality. Geological Survey of Iran and Technoexport Company, Tehran. Report 14, 196 pp. Jazi, M.A., Karimpour, M.H., Malekzadeh, A. and Rahimi, B., 2015. Stratigraphic, lithological and structural controls in placement of Nakhlak deposit (northeast of Esfahan. Advanced

  6. Os, Nd and Sr isotope and trace element geochemistry of the Muli picrites: Insights into the mantle source of the Emeishan Large Igneous Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Xu, Ji-Feng; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; He, Bin; Xu, Yi-Gang; Ren, Zhong-Yuan

    2010-09-01

    A suite of picrites and basalts from the Muli area, in the northwestern part of the Emeishan continental flood basalt province, provides new and valuable information on the geochemistry of the Emeishan Large Igneous Province (LIP) and its source. The Muli picrites can be classified as type-1 or type-2. The former shows ocean-island basalt-like trace element characteristics, with γ Os (260 Ma) values and ɛ Nd (260 Ma) values ranging from + 7.5 to + 11.5 and from + 6.0 to + 7.8, respectively. This is the first time that picrites with highly radiogenic Os and high Os contents (up to 3.3 ppb) have been recognized in the Emeishan LIP. These characteristics probably reflect a relatively enriched component in the Emeishan LIP source. The type-2 picrites are characterized by non-radiogenic γ Os (260 Ma) values ranging from - 4.2 to - 0.3, and they may be further subdivided into type-2A and type-2B picrites. Type-2A picrites contain moderate amounts of the light rare earth elements (LREEs), have low Ce N/Yb N values (1.1-2.0), and a relatively high initial ɛ Nd (+ 5.0 to + 6.6). In terms of Os and Nd isotopes, the Muli type-2A picrites are similar to the Song Da komatiites of Vietnam and the Gorgona Island picrites, revealing the existence of a depleted mantle component in the Emeishan LIP source. In contrast with the type-2A picrites, type-2B lavas exhibit a negative Nb anomaly and relatively lower initial ɛ Nd and γ Os values (Nb/La > 1.8; ɛ Nd (260 Ma) = - 5.5 to + 6.4; γ Os (260 Ma) = - 4.2 to - 1.9), suggesting that the type-2B lavas have a depleted mantle source, similar to type-2A, but that the type-2B lavas are also influenced by various degrees of mixing of depleted plume-derived melt, sub-continental lithospheric mantle, and/or continental crust. Given that the basalts in the Muli area show similar geochemical features to those of the type-2B picrites, their origins are inferred to be similar.

  7. Field geology, geochronology and geochemistry of mafic-ultramafic rocks from Alxa, China: Implications for Late Permian accretionary tectonics in the southern Altaids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jianyun; Xiao, Wenjiao; Windley, Brian; Han, Chunming; Wan, Bo; Zhang, Ji'en; Ao, Songjian; Zhang, Zhiyong; Lin, Lina

    2013-12-01

    The time of termination of orogenesis for the southern Altaids has been controversial. Systematic investigations of field geology, geochronology and geochemistry on newly discriminated mafic-ultramafic rocks from northern Alxa in the southern Altaids were conducted to address the termination problem. The mafic-ultramafic rocks are located in the Bijiertai, Honggueryulin, and Qinggele areas, stretching from west to east for about 100 km. All rocks occur high-grade gneisses as tectonic lenses that are composed of peridotite, pyroxenite, gabbro, and serpentinite, most of which have undergone pronounced alteration, i.e., serpentinization and chloritization. Geochemically, the rocks are characterized by uniform compositional trends, i.e., with low SiO2-contents (42.51-52.21 wt.%) and alkalinity (Na2O + K2O) (0.01-5.45 wt.%, mostly less than 0.8 wt.%), and enrichments in MgO (7.37-43.36 wt.%), with Mg# = 52.75-91.87. As the rocks have been strongly altered and have a wide range of loss-on-ignition (LOI: 0.44-14.07 wt.%) values, they may have been subjected to considerable alteration by either seawater or metamorphic fluids. The REE and trace element patterns show a relatively fractionated trend with LILE enrichment and HFSE depletion, similar to that of T-MORB between N-MORB and E-MORB, indicating that the parental melt resulted from the partial melting of oceanic lithospheric mantle overprinted by fluid alteration of island-arc origin. The ultramafic rocks are relics derived from the magma after a large degree of partial melting of oceanic lithospheric mantle with superposed island arc processes under the influence of mid-ocean-ridge magmatism. LA-ICP MS U-Pb zircon ages of gabbros from three spots are 274 ± 3 Ma (MSWD = 0.35), 306 ± 3 Ma (MSWD = 0.49), 262 ± 5 Ma (MSWD = 1.2), respectively, representing the formation ages of the mafic-ultramafic rocks. Therefore, considering other previously published data, we suggest that the mafic-ultramafic rocks were products of

  8. Experimental Partitioning of Chalcophile Elements between Mantle Silicate Minerals and Basaltic Melt at High Pressures and Temperatures - Implications for Sulfur Geochemistry of Mantle and Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, R.; Jego, S.; Ding, S.; Li, Y.; Lee, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    crystallization. The model results are compared with the chalcophile element abundance in oceanic basalts. We will discuss the implications of our new partitioning data and model results on sulfur and chalcophile element geochemistry of mantle source regions of ocean floor basalts and the fate of sulfides during mantle melting.

  9. Geochemistry and metamorphic evolution of a Ti-metagabbro in the Asnawa Group of the Shalair terrain (Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone), Kurdistan region, Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yara, Irfan; Schulz, Bernhard; Tichomirowa, Marion; Mohammad, Yousif; Matschullat, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    Geochemistry and metamorphic evolution of a Ti-metagabbro in the Asnawa Group of the Shalair terrain (Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone), Kurdistan region, Iraq. We present geochemical data, mineral chemistry, petrography, and theP-T conditions of a Ti-metagabbro from the Asnawa Group in the Shalair Terrain (Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone).Geochemical data indicate that this Ti-metagabbro has tholeiitic characteristics with low-K contents. Factor analyses of the elements indicate fractionation of common mineral phases such as clinopyroxene, hornblende, plagioclase, Ti-bearing phases (rutile, ilmenite, titanite), and apatite. The normal mid-oceanic ridge basalt (N-MORB)-normalized incompatible trace element diagram shows close similarity with typical N-MORB pattern. Tectonomagmatic discrimination diagrams suggest a dominating MORB environment. The rock/chondrite-normalized REE diagram of the amphibolites also shows their N-MORB-type signature, with relative enrichment in LREE. The rock derived from mixed primitive and depleted mantel. The formation and preservation of the various metamorphic mineral assemblages and their mineral chemical characteristicsare strongly affected by the original magmatic whole-rock composition. This can be demonstrated by different microdomains, which contain different amphiboles and plagioclases. The metamorphic history can be subdivided into the stages M1-M2-M3. The first stage of metamorphism was recorded by crystallisation of actinolite replacing clinopyroxene and igneous amphibole (M1 stage, 410< T < 490°C; 1.8 < P <2.2 kbar). Increase of temperature resulted in the formation of hornblende pseudomorphism and hornblende and sphene coronae growing on previous amphibole or clinopyroxene and ilmenite, respectively (M2 stage, 540 < T <580°C; 4.5 < P < 5.5 kbar). The third stage (M3 stage, 730 < T °C < 780°C; 6.5 < P < 7.5 kbar) led to the formation of a ferro-tschermakite corona, around the M2 amphibole, and rutile that developed on the sphene and ilmenite

  10. Geochronology and Geochemistry of Zircons from the IODP Site U1437 in the Rear of the Izu-Bonin Volcanic Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, G. D.; Schmitt, A. K.; Busby, C. J.; Brown, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Zircons recovered from International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 350 Site U1437 (31°47.390'N, 139°01.580'E) in the Izu-Bonin arc were analyzed by SIMS to constrain their age (U/Pb geochronology) and geochemistry (trace elements, δ18O); LA-ICP-MS ɛHf analyses are pending. Seven intervals were dated successfully: six tuffs and lapilli-tuffs between 680.99 and 1722.46 m below sea floor (mbsf) and a single peperitic rhyolitic intrusion at 1388.86 - 1390.07 mbsf. Thirty-two intervals which underwent mineral separation lacked zircon, or yielded zircon much older than age expectations for U1437. Geochronology results from separated zircons confirm and extend the shipboard age model to 1360.77 mbsf where Late Miocene (Tortonian) submarine volcanic rocks (11.3 ±0.7 Ma; n = 17) were sampled. In-situ measurement of zircons associated with magnetite crystals in the rhyolite intrusion yield an age of 13.6 ±1.7 Ma (n = 9). Zircon U contents are low (typically <300 ppm), with trace element ratios characteristic of oceanic lithosphere and near-mantle δ18O values (4-6 ‰). Individual Miocene zircon crystals are difficult to distinguish by age alone from those in the drilling mud (sepiolite) used during Expedition 350; the sepiolite is quarried by IMV Nevada in the Amargosa Valley. Our analysis of thirty-three zircons from the sepiolite finds that they have a broad and varied age distribution (2 - 2033 Ma) with a prominent peak at 12-14 Ma, bimodal δ18O values (peaks at 5-5.5 and 6.5-7.5 ‰), and dominantly continental trace element signatures. Three zircons from U1437 are tentatively identified as sepiolite-derived, but a single Eocene grain (51.7 ±2.4 Ma) recovered from 1722.46 mbsf has an age unlike those in the sepiolite, and potentially is genuinely xenocrystic. The majority of U1437 zircons thus crystallized from evolved melts lacking continental characteristics, although thermal and compositional conditions conducive for zircon crystallization appear to have

  11. Geochronology and geochemistry of early Paleozoic intrusive rocks from the Khanka Massif in the Russian Far East: Petrogenesis and tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Xu, Wen-Liang; Wang, Feng; Ge, Wen-Chun; Sorokin, A. A.

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents new geochronological and geochemical data for early Paleozoic intrusive rocks from the Khanka Massif in the Russian Far East, with the aim of elucidating the Paleozoic evolution and tectonic attributes of the Khanka Massif. New U-Pb zircon data indicate that early Paleozoic magmatism within the Khanka Massif can be subdivided into at least four stages: 502, 492, 462-445, and 430 Ma. The 502 Ma pyroxene diorites contain 58.28-59.64 wt% SiO2, 2.84-3.69 wt% MgO, and relatively high Cr and Ni contents. Negative εHf(t) values (- 1.8 to - 0.4), along with other geochemical data, indicate that the primary magma was derived from partial melting of mafic lower crust with the addition of mantle material. The 492 Ma syenogranites have high SiO2 and K2O contents, and show positive Eu anomalies, indicating the primary magma was generated by partial melting of lower crust at relatively low pressure. The 445 Ma Na-rich trondhjemites display high Sr/Y ratios and positive εHf(t) values (+ 1.8 to + 3.9), indicating the primary magma was generated by partial melting of thickened hydrous mafic crust. The 430 Ma granitoids have high SiO2 and K2O contents, zircon εHf(t) values of - 5.4 to + 5.8, and two-stage model ages of 1757-1045 Ma, suggesting the primary magma was produced by partial melting of heterogeneous Proterozoic lower crustal material. The geochemistry of these early Paleozoic intrusive assemblages indicates their formation in an active continental margin setting associated with the subduction of a paleo-oceanic plate beneath the Khanka Massif. The εHf(t) values show an increasingly negative trend with increasing latitude, revealing a lateral heterogeneity of the lower crust beneath the Khanka Massif. Regional comparisons of the magmatic events indicate that the Khanka Massif in the Russian Far East has a tectonic affinity to the Songnen-Zhangguangcai Range Massif rather than the adjacent Jiamusi Massif.

  12. The chemical conditions of the late Archean Hamersley basin inferred from whole rock and pyrite geochemistry with Δ33S and δ34S isotope analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Daniel D.; Large, Ross R.; Halpin, Jacqueline A.; Steadman, Jeffery A.; Hickman, Arthur H.; Ireland, Trevor R.; Holden, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The well-preserved late Archean sedimentary rocks of the Fortescue and Hamersley Basins in Western Australia offer fascinating insights into early earth ocean chemistry prior to the Great Oxidation Event (GOE). In this study, we use a combination of whole rock geochemistry, LA-ICPMS trace element analysis of sedimentary pyrite and pyrrhotite and SHRIMP-SI sulfur isotope analyses to elucidate the chemical changes in these sedimentary rocks. These proxies are used to examine chemical conditions of the ocean during the late Archean. Two to three periods of oxygen enrichment prior to the deposition of banded iron formations (BIF) can be identified. One minor stage of general increase in whole rock enrichment factors and trace element content of pyrite is observed up stratigraphy in the Jeerinah Formation, Fortescue Basin and a more substantial stage is present in the Paraburdoo and Bee Gorge Members of the Wittenoom Formation, Hamersley Basin. Some of the trace element enrichments indicate organic matter burial flux (Ni, Cr, Zn, Co and Cu) which suggests an increase in biological productivity. If the increased biological activity reflects an increase in cyanobacteria activity then an associated increase in oxygen is likely to have occurred during the deposition of the Bee Gorge Member. An increase in atmospheric oxygen would result in continental weathering of sulfide and other minerals, increasing the trace element content of the water column via erosion and avoiding excessive depletion of trace elements due to drawdown in seawater. Since some of these trace elements may also be limiting nutrients (such as Mo and Se) for the cyanobacteria, the degree of biological productivity may have further increased due to the increasing amount of trace elements introduced by oxygenation in a positive feedback loop. These periods of increased productivity and oxygen rise stopped prior to the onset of BIF deposition in the Hamersley Basin. This may be due to the ocean reaching an

  13. Origin and Processes Highlighted By Noble Gases Geochemistry of Submarine Gas Emissions from Seeps at the Aquitaine Shelf (Bay of Biscay):

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battani, A.; Ruffine, L.; Donval, J. P.; Bignon, L.; Pujol, M.; Levaché, D.

    2014-12-01

    . M.V., Ballentine C. J. Holland G. a, Blagburn D.Sherwood Lollar B., Stevens S., Schoell, M., Cassidy, M. (2008) The noble gas geochemistry of natural CO2 gas reservoirs from the Colorado Plateau and Rocky Mountain provinces, USA

  14. Evidence of magma recharge at Colli Albani (Italy), the volcanic district at the gates of Rome, from geodesy and gas geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trasatti, E.; Marra, F.; Polcari, M.; Etiope, G.; Ciotoli, G.; Darrah, T.; Tedesco, D.; Stramondo, S.; Florindo, F.; Ventura, G.

    2017-12-01

    Colli Albani (Italy) is an alkali-potassic volcanic district located about 20 km SE of Rome (3 M inhabitants) and lastly erupted 36 ka ago. Since the modern volcanic activity at Colli Albani seems not particularly intense, scientists have interpreted this volcano to be quiescent. Therefore, unlike other Italian volcanoes, the area has not undergone extensive monitoring. However, a seismic swarm during 1989-1990 has been related to a local uplift of ca. 30 cm since the 1950's along a line crossing the western side of the volcano, giving rise to a debate about its possible interpretation in terms of unrest. Furthermore, recent geological investigations indicate a coupling of eruption history, uplift history, and changes in the regional stress field, pointing to the conclusion that Colli Albani is in unrest. Here, we investigate the deformation processes and the gas geochemistry (He, CO2 and their isotopic ratios). Fro