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Sample records for geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms

  1. Enhanced uranium immobilization and reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cologgi, Dena L; Speers, Allison M; Bullard, Blair A; Kelly, Shelly D; Reguera, Gemma

    2014-11-01

    Biofilms formed by dissimilatory metal reducers are of interest to develop permeable biobarriers for the immobilization of soluble contaminants such as uranium. Here we show that biofilms of the model uranium-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens immobilized substantially more U(VI) than planktonic cells and did so for longer periods of time, reductively precipitating it to a mononuclear U(IV) phase involving carbon ligands. The biofilms also tolerated high and otherwise toxic concentrations (up to 5 mM) of uranium, consistent with a respiratory strategy that also protected the cells from uranium toxicity. The enhanced ability of the biofilms to immobilize uranium correlated only partially with the biofilm biomass and thickness and depended greatly on the area of the biofilm exposed to the soluble contaminant. In contrast, uranium reduction depended on the expression of Geobacter conductive pili and, to a lesser extent, on the presence of the c cytochrome OmcZ in the biofilm matrix. The results support a model in which the electroactive biofilm matrix immobilizes and reduces the uranium in the top stratum. This mechanism prevents the permeation and mineralization of uranium in the cell envelope, thereby preserving essential cellular functions and enhancing the catalytic capacity of Geobacter cells to reduce uranium. Hence, the biofilms provide cells with a physically and chemically protected environment for the sustained immobilization and reduction of uranium that is of interest for the development of improved strategies for the in situ bioremediation of environments impacted by uranium contamination.

  2. Physiological stratification in electricity-producing biofilms of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrott, Germán David; Ordoñez, María Victoria; Robuschi, Luciana; Busalmen, Juan Pablo

    2014-02-01

    The elucidation of mechanisms and limitations in electrode respiration by electroactive biofilms is significant for the development of rapidly emerging clean energy production and wastewater treatment technologies. In Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms, the controlling steps in current production are thought to be the metabolic activity of cells, but still remain to be determined. By quantifying the DNA, RNA, and protein content during the long-term growth of biofilms on polarized graphite electrodes, we show in this work that current production becomes independent of DNA accumulation immediately after a maximal current is achieved. Indeed, the mean respiratory rate of biofilms rapidly decreases after this point, which indicates the progressive accumulation of cells that do not contribute to current production or contribute to a negligible extent. These results support the occurrence of physiological stratification within biofilms as a consequence of respiratory limitations imposed by limited biofilm conductivity.

  3. Mass transfer studies of Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms on rotating disk electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babauta, Jerome T; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-02-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has received significant attention recently as a method to measure electrochemical parameters of Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms. Here, we use electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to demonstrate the effect of mass transfer processes on electron transfer by G. sulfurreducens biofilms grown in situ on an electrode that was subsequently rotated. By rotating the biofilms up to 530 rpm, we could control the microscale gradients formed inside G. sulfurreducens biofilms. A 24% increase above a baseline of 82 µA could be achieved with a rotation rate of 530 rpm. By comparison, we observed a 340% increase using a soluble redox mediator (ferrocyanide) limited by mass transfer. Control of mass transfer processes was also used to quantify the change in biofilm impedance during the transition from turnover to non-turnover. We found that only one element of the biofilm impedance, the interfacial resistance, changed significantly from 900 to 4,200 Ω under turnover and non-turnover conditions, respectively. We ascribed this change to the electron transfer resistance overcome by the biofilm metabolism and estimate this value as 3,300 Ω. Additionally, under non-turnover, the biofilm impedance developed pseudocapacitive behavior indicative of bound redox mediators. Pseudocapacitance of the biofilm was estimated at 740 µF and was unresponsive to rotation of the electrode. The increase in electron transfer resistance and pseudocapacitive behavior under non-turnover could be used as indicators of acetate limitations inside G. sulfurreducens biofilms.

  4. Use of a small overpotential approximation to analyze Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilm impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babauta, Jerome T.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2017-07-01

    The electrochemical impedance of Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms reflects the extracellular electron transfer mechanisms determining the rate of current output. Binned into two characteristic parameters, conductance and capacitance, biofilm impedance has received significant attention. The goal of this study was to evaluate a small overpotential approximation for extracellular electron transfer in G. sulfurreducens biofilms. Our motivation was to determine whether conductance over biofilm growth behaved linearly with respect to limiting current. Biofilm impedance was tracked during growth using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (eQCM). We showed that normalization of the biofilm impedance is useful for characterizing the changes during growth. When the conductance and capacitance were compared to the biofilm current, we found that: 1) conductance had a linear response and 2) constant phase elements (CPE) had a saturating response that coincided with the limiting current. We provided a framework using a simple iV relationship that predicted the conductance-current slope to be 9.57 V-1. CPEs showed more variability across biofilm replicates than conductance values. Although G. sulfurreducens biofilms were used here, other electrochemically active biofilms exhibiting catalytic waves could be studied using the same methods.

  5. Set potential regulation reveals additional oxidation peaks of Geobacter sulfurreducens anodic biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Xiuping

    2012-08-01

    Higher current densities produced in microbial fuel cells and other bioelectrochemical systems are associated with the presence of various Geobacter species. A number of electron transfer components are involved in extracellular electron transfer by the model exoelectrogen, Geobacter sulfurreducens. It has previously been shown that 5 main oxidation peaks can be identified in cyclic voltammetry scans. It is shown here that 7 separate oxidation peaks emerged over relatively long periods of time when a larger range of set potentials was used to acclimate electroactive biofilms. The potentials of oxidation peaks obtained with G. sulfurreducens biofilms acclimated at 0.60 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) were different from those that developed at - 0.46 V, and both of their peaks were different from those obtained for biofilms incubated at - 0.30 V, 0 V, and 0.30 V. These results expand the known range of potentials for which G. sulfurreducens produces identifiable oxidation peaks that could be important for extracellular electron transfer. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Mechanistic stratification in electroactive biofilms of Geobacter sulfurreducens mediated by pilus nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steidl, Rebecca J.; Lampa-Pastirk, Sanela; Reguera, Gemma

    2016-08-01

    Electricity generation by Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms grown on electrodes involves matrix-associated electron carriers, such as c-type cytochromes. Yet, the contribution of the biofilm's conductive pili remains uncertain, largely because pili-defective mutants also have cytochrome defects. Here we report that a pili-deficient mutant carrying an inactivating mutation in the pilus assembly motor PilB has no measurable defects in cytochrome expression, yet forms anode biofilms with reduced electroactivity and is unable to grow beyond a threshold distance (~10 μm) from the underlying electrode. The defects are similar to those of a Tyr3 mutant, which produces poorly conductive pili. The results support a model in which the conductive pili permeate the biofilms to wire the cells to the conductive biofilm matrix and the underlying electrode, operating coordinately with cytochromes until the biofilm reaches a threshold thickness that limits the efficiency of the cytochrome pathway but not the functioning of the conductive pili network.

  7. Production of gold nanoparticles by electrode-respiring Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanzil, Abid H.; Sultana, Sujala T.; Saunders, Steven R.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Shi, Liang; Davenport, Emily; Ha, Phuc; Beyenal, Haluk

    2016-12-01

    Current chemical syntheses of nanoparticles (NP) has had limited success due to the relatively high environmental cost caused by the use of harsh chemicals requiring necessary purification and size-selective fractionation. Therefore, biological approaches have received recent attention for their potential to overcome these obstacles as a benign synthetic approach. The intrinsic nature of biomolecules present in microorganisms has intrigued researchers to design bottom-up approaches to biosynthesize metal nanoparticles using microorganisms. Most of the literature work has focused on NP synthesis using planktonic cells while the use of biofilms are limited. The goal of this work was to synthesize gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using electrode respiring Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms. We found that most of the AuNPs are generated in the extracellular matrix of Geobacter biofilms with an average particle size of 20 nm. The formation of AuNPs was verified using TEM, FTIR and EDX. We also found that the extracellular substances extracted from electrode respiring G. sulfurreducens biofilms can reduce Au3+ to AuNPs. It appears that reducing sugars were involved in bioreduction and synthesis of AuNPs and amine groups acted as the major biomolecules involved in binding. This is first demonstration of AuNPs formation from the extracellular matrix of electrode respiring biofilms.

  8. Electron donors supporting growth and electroactivity of Geobacter sulfurreducens anode biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speers, Allison M; Reguera, Gemma

    2012-01-01

    Geobacter bacteria efficiently oxidize acetate into electricity in bioelectrochemical systems, yet the range of fermentation products that support the growth of anode biofilms and electricity production has not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we show that Geobacter sulfurreducens oxidized formate and lactate with electrodes and Fe(III) as terminal electron acceptors, though with reduced efficiency compared to acetate. The structure of the formate and lactate biofilms increased in roughness, and the substratum coverage decreased, to alleviate the metabolic constraints derived from the assimilation of carbon from the substrates. Low levels of acetate promoted formate carbon assimilation and biofilm growth and increased the system's performance to levels comparable to those with acetate only. Lactate carbon assimilation also limited biofilm growth and led to the partial oxidization of lactate to acetate. However, lactate was fully oxidized in the presence of fumarate, which redirected carbon fluxes into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and by acetate-grown biofilms. These results expand the known ranges of electron donors for Geobacter-driven fuel cells and identify microbial constraints that can be targeted to develop better-performing strains and increase the performance of bioelectrochemical systems.

  9. pH, redox potential and local biofilm potential microenvironments within Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms and their roles in electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babauta, Jerome T; Nguyen, Hung Duc; Harrington, Timothy D; Renslow, Ryan; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-10-01

    The limitation of pH inside electrode-respiring biofilms is a well-known concept. However, little is known about how pH and redox potential are affected by increasing current inside biofilms respiring on electrodes. Quantifying the variations in pH and redox potential with increasing current is needed to determine how electron transfer is tied to proton transfer within the biofilm. In this research, we quantified pH and redox potential variations in electrode-respiring Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms as a function of respiration rates, measured as current. We also characterized pH and redox potential at the counter electrode. We concluded that (1) pH continued to decrease in the biofilm through different growth phases, showing that the pH is not always a limiting factor in a biofilm and (2) decreasing pH and increasing redox potential at the biofilm electrode were associated only with the biofilm, demonstrating that G. sulfurreducens biofilms respire in a unique internal environment. Redox potential inside the biofilm was also compared to the local biofilm potential measured by a graphite microelectrode, where the tip of the microelectrode was allowed to acclimatize inside the biofilm. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Long-range electron transport in Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms is redox gradient-driven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Rachel M; Strycharz-Glaven, Sarah M; Tsoi, Stanislav D; Erickson, Jeffrey S; Tender, Leonard M

    2012-09-18

    Geobacter spp. can acquire energy by coupling intracellular oxidation of organic matter with extracellular electron transfer to an anode (an electrode poised at a metabolically oxidizing potential), forming a biofilm extending many cell lengths away from the anode surface. It has been proposed that long-range electron transport in such biofilms occurs through a network of bound redox cofactors, thought to involve extracellular matrix c-type cytochromes, as occurs for polymers containing discrete redox moieties. Here, we report measurements of electron transport in actively respiring Geobacter sulfurreducens wild type biofilms using interdigitated microelectrode arrays. Measurements when one electrode is used as an anode and the other electrode is used to monitor redox status of the biofilm 15 μm away indicate the presence of an intrabiofilm redox gradient, in which the concentration of electrons residing within the proposed redox cofactor network is higher farther from the anode surface. The magnitude of the redox gradient seems to correlate with current, which is consistent with electron transport from cells in the biofilm to the anode, where electrons effectively diffuse from areas of high to low concentration, hopping between redox cofactors. Comparison with gate measurements, when one electrode is used as an electron source and the other electrode is used as an electron drain, suggests that there are multiple types of redox cofactors in Geobacter biofilms spanning a range in oxidation potential that can engage in electron transport. The majority of these redox cofactors, however, seem to have oxidation potentials too negative to be involved in electron transport when acetate is the electron source.

  11. Inocula selection in microbial fuel cells based on anodic biofilm abundance of Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guotao Sun; Diogo de Sacadura Rodrigues; Anders Thygesen; Geoffrey Daniel; Dinesh Fernando; Anne S Meyer

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) rely on microbial conversion of organic substrates to electricity. The optimal perfor-mance depends on the establishment of a microbial community rich in electrogenic bacteria. Usual y this micro-bial community is established from inoculation of the MFC anode chamber with naturally occurring mixed inocula. In this study, the electrochemical performance of MFCs and microbial community evolution were eval-uated for three inocula including domestic wastewater (DW), lake sediment (LS) and biogas sludge (BS) with varying substrate loading (Lsub) and external resistance (Rext) on the MFC. The electrogenic bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens was identified in al inocula and its abundance during MFC operation was positively linked to the MFC performance. The LS inoculated MFCs showed highest abundance (18%± 1%) of G. sulfurreducens, maximum current density [Imax=(690 ± 30) mA·m−2] and coulombic efficiency (CE=29%± 1%) with acetate as the substrate. Imax and CE increased to (1780 ± 30) mA·m−2 and 58%± 1%, respectively, after decreasing the Rext from 1000Ωto 200Ω, which also correlated to a higher abundance of G. sulfurreducens (21%± 0.7%) on the MFC anodic biofilm. The data obtained contribute to understanding the microbial community response to Lsub and Rext for optimizing electricity generation in MFCs.

  12. Spatially resolved confocal resonant Raman microscopic analysis of anode-grown Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, Nikolai; Strycharz-Glaven, Sarah M; Tender, Leonard M

    2014-02-03

    When grown on the surface of an anode electrode, Geobacter sulfurreducens forms a multi-cell thick biofilm in which all cells appear to couple the oxidation of acetate with electron transport to the anode, which serves as the terminal metabolic electron acceptor. Just how electrons are transported through such a biofilm from cells to the underlying anode surface over distances that can exceed 20 microns remains unresolved. Current evidence suggests it may occur by electron hopping through a proposed network of redox cofactors composed of immobile outer membrane and/or extracellular multi-heme c-type cytochromes. In the present work, we perform a spatially resolved confocal resonant Raman (CRR) microscopic analysis to investigate anode-grown Geobacter biofilms. The results confirm the presence of an intra-biofilm redox gradient whereby the probability that a heme is in the reduced state increases with increasing distance from the anode surface. Such a gradient is required to drive electron transport toward the anode surface by electron hopping via cytochromes. The results also indicate that at open circuit, when electrons are expected to accumulate in redox cofactors involved in electron transport due to the inability of the anode to accept electrons, nearly all c-type cytochrome hemes detected in the biofilm are oxidized. The same outcome occurs when a comparable potential to that measured at open circuit (-0.30 V vs. SHE) is applied to the anode, whereas nearly all hemes are reduced when an exceedingly negative potential (-0.50 V vs. SHE) is applied to the anode. These results suggest that nearly all c-type cytochrome hemes detected in the biofilm can be electrochemically accessed by the electrode, but most have oxidation potentials too negative to transport electrons originating from acetate metabolism. The results also reveal a lateral heterogeneity (x-y dimensions) in the type of c-type cytochromes within the biofilm that may affect electron transport to the

  13. Carboxydotrophic growth of Geobacter sulfurreducens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geelhoed, J.S.; Henstra, A.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    This study shows that Geobacter sulfurreducens grows on carbon monoxide (CO) as electron donor with fumarate as electron acceptor. Geobacter sulfurreducens was tolerant to high CO levels, with up to 150 kPa in the headspace tested. During growth, hydrogen was detected in very slight amounts (∼5 P

  14. High resolution AFM and single cell resonance Raman spectroscopy of Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms early in growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai eLebedev

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AFM and confocal resonance Raman microscopy (CRRM of single-cells were used to study the transition of anode-grown Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms from lag phase (initial period of low current to exponential phase (subsequent period of rapidly increasing current. Results reveal that lag phase biofilms consist of lone cells and tightly packed single-cell thick clusters crisscrossed with extracellular linear structures that appear to be comprised of nodules approximately 20 nm in diameter aligned end to end. By early exponential phase cell clusters expand laterally and a second layer of closely packed cells begins to form on top of the first. Abundance of c-type cytochromes (c-Cyt is > 3-fold greater in 2-cell thick regions than in 1-cell thick regions. The results indicate that early biofilm growth involves two transformations. The first is from lone cells to 2-dimensionally associated cells during lag phase when current remains low. This is accompanied by formation of extracellular linear structures. The second is from 2- to 3-dimensionally associated cells during early exponential phase when current begins to increases rapidly. This is accompanied by a dramatic increase in c-Cyt abundance.

  15. Anode biofilm transcriptomics reveals outer surface components essential for high density current production in Geobacter sulfurreducens fuel cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly P Nevin

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which Geobacter sulfurreducens transfers electrons through relatively thick (>50 microm biofilms to electrodes acting as a sole electron acceptor were investigated. Biofilms of Geobacter sulfurreducens were grown either in flow-through systems with graphite anodes as the electron acceptor or on the same graphite surface, but with fumarate as the sole electron acceptor. Fumarate-grown biofilms were not immediately capable of significant current production, suggesting substantial physiological differences from current-producing biofilms. Microarray analysis revealed 13 genes in current-harvesting biofilms that had significantly higher transcript levels. The greatest increases were for pilA, the gene immediately downstream of pilA, and the genes for two outer c-type membrane cytochromes, OmcB and OmcZ. Down-regulated genes included the genes for the outer-membrane c-type cytochromes, OmcS and OmcT. Results of quantitative RT-PCR of gene transcript levels during biofilm growth were consistent with microarray results. OmcZ and the outer-surface c-type cytochrome, OmcE, were more abundant and OmcS was less abundant in current-harvesting cells. Strains in which pilA, the gene immediately downstream from pilA, omcB, omcS, omcE, or omcZ was deleted demonstrated that only deletion of pilA or omcZ severely inhibited current production and biofilm formation in current-harvesting mode. In contrast, these gene deletions had no impact on biofilm formation on graphite surfaces when fumarate served as the electron acceptor. These results suggest that biofilms grown harvesting current are specifically poised for electron transfer to electrodes and that, in addition to pili, OmcZ is a key component in electron transfer through differentiated G. sulfurreducens biofilms to electrodes.

  16. Carboxydotrophic growth of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelhoed, Jeanine S; Henstra, Anne M; Stams, Alfons J M

    2016-01-01

    This study shows that Geobacter sulfurreducens grows on carbon monoxide (CO) as electron donor with fumarate as electron acceptor. Geobacter sulfurreducens was tolerant to high CO levels, with up to 150 kPa in the headspace tested. During growth, hydrogen was detected in very slight amounts (∼5 Pa). In assays with cell-free extract of cells grown with CO and fumarate, production of hydrogen from CO was not observed, and hydrogenase activity with benzyl viologen as electron acceptor was very low. Taken together, this suggested that CO is not utilized via hydrogen as intermediate. In the presence of CO, reduction of NADP(+) was observed at a rate comparable to CO oxidation coupled to fumarate reduction in vivo. The G. sulfurreducens genome contains a single putative carbon monoxide dehydrogenase-encoding gene. The gene is part of a predicted operon also comprising a putative Fe-S cluster-binding subunit (CooF) and a FAD-NAD(P) oxidoreductase and is preceded by a putative CO-sensing transcription factor. This cluster may be involved in a novel pathway for CO oxidation, but further studies are necessary to ascertain this. Similar gene clusters are present in several other species belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria and Firmicutes, for which CO utilization is currently not known.

  17. Reduction Kinetics of Manganese Dioxide by Geobacter Sulfurreducens and Associated Biofilm Morphology in a Flow-Through Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, E.; Werth, C. J.; Valocchi, A. J.; Sanford, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Biogeochemical interactions have been investigated extensively to characterize natural nutrient cycling and predict contaminant transport in surface and groundwater. Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria, many of which form biofilms, play an important role in reducing a variety of metals in these systems. It has been shown that biofilm morphology is impacted by flow conditions, but there has been little work that explores how reduction kinetics change as a result of these different morphologies. Different flow rates may affect physical properties of the biofilm that influence the rate of substrate reduction. We introduce an approach to calculate changes in Monod kinetic parameters while simultaneously evaluating biofilm morphologies under different flow rates. A vertical, cylindrical flow cell with removable glass slide sections coated in manganese dioxide (electron acceptor) was used to grow a biofilm of Geobacter sulfurreducens with acetate as the electron donor under both high (50 mL/hr) and low (5 mL/h) flow rates. The removable sections allowed for visualization of the biofilm at different time points with a confocal microscope, and quantification of the biomass on the surface using a combination of a protein assay and image analysis. Data collected from the experiments was used to determine yield and specific growth rate at the different flow rates, and a simple numerical model was used to estimate the half saturation constant of manganese dioxide at both flow rates. A smaller half saturation constant was estimated at the higher flow rate, indicating that the biofilm was more efficient in the high flow system, but a strong correlation between morphology and the faster reduction rate was not observed. Monod kinetic parameters are important for the development of accurate nutrient cycling and contaminant transport models in natural environments, and understanding how they are impacted by flow will be important for the development of new, improved models.

  18. Power output and columbic efficiencies from biofilms of Geobacter sulfurreducens comparable to mixed community microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, K P; Richter, H; Covalla, S F; Johnson, J P; Woodard, T L; Orloff, A L; Jia, H; Zhang, M; Lovley, D R

    2008-10-01

    It has been previously noted that mixed communities typically produce more power in microbial fuel cells than pure cultures. If true, this has important implications for the design of microbial fuel cells and for studying the process of electron transfer on anode biofilms. To further evaluate this, Geobacter sulfurreducens was grown with acetate as fuel in a continuous flow 'ministack' system in which the carbon cloth anode and cathode were positioned in close proximity, and the cation-selective membrane surface area was maximized in order to overcome some of the electrochemical limitations that were inherent in fuel cells previously employed for the study of pure cultures. Reducing the size of the anode in order to eliminate cathode limitation resulted in maximum current and power densities per m(2) of anode surface of 4.56 A m(-2) and 1.88 W m(-2) respectively. Electron recovery as current from acetate oxidation was c. 100% when oxygen diffusion into the system was minimized. This performance is comparable to the highest levels previously reported for mixed communities in similar microbial fuel cells and slightly higher than the power output of an anaerobic sludge inoculum in the same ministack system. Minimizing the volume of the anode chamber yielded a volumetric power density of 2.15 kW m(-3), which is the highest power density per volume yet reported for a microbial fuel cell. Geobacter sulfurreducens formed relatively uniform biofilms 3-18 mum thick on the carbon cloth anodes. When graphite sticks served as the anode, the current density (3.10 A m(-2)) was somewhat less than with the carbon cloth anodes, but the biofilms were thicker (c. 50 mum) with a more complex pillar and channel structure. These results suggest that the previously observed disparity in power production in pure and mixed culture microbial fuel cell systems can be attributed more to differences in the fuel cell designs than to any inherent superior capability of mixed cultures to produce

  19. Abundance of the multiheme c-type cytochrome OmcB increases in outer biofilm layers of electrode-grown Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille S Stephen

    Full Text Available When Geobacter sulfurreducens utilizes an electrode as its electron acceptor, cells embed themselves in a conductive biofilm tens of microns thick. While environmental conditions such as pH or redox potential have been shown to change close to the electrode, less is known about the response of G. sulfurreducens to growth in this biofilm environment. To investigate whether respiratory protein abundance varies with distance from the electrode, antibodies against an outer membrane multiheme cytochrome (OmcB and cytoplasmic acetate kinase (AckA were used to determine protein localization in slices spanning ∼25 µm-thick G. sulfurreducens biofilms growing on polished electrodes poised at +0.24 V (vs. Standard Hydrogen Electrode. Slices were immunogold labeled post-fixing, imaged via transmission electron microscopy, and digitally reassembled to create continuous images allowing subcellular location and abundance per cell to be quantified across an entire biofilm. OmcB was predominantly localized on cell membranes, and 3.6-fold more OmcB was detected on cells 10-20 µm distant from the electrode surface compared to inner layers (0-10 µm. In contrast, acetate kinase remained constant throughout the biofilm, and was always associated with the cell interior. This method for detecting proteins in intact conductive biofilms supports a model where the utilization of redox proteins changes with depth.

  20. Extracellular Palladium Nanoparticle Production using Geobacter sulfurreducens

    KAUST Repository

    Yates, Matthew D.

    2013-09-03

    Sustainable methods are needed to recycle precious metals and synthesize catalytic nanoparticles. Palladium nanoparticles can be produced via microbial reduction of soluble Pd(II) to Pd(0), but in previous tests using dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB), the nanoparticles were closely associated with the cells, occupying potential reductive sites and eliminating the potential for cell reuse. The DMRB Geobacter sulfurreducens was shown here to reduce soluble Pd(II) to Pd(0) nanoparticles primarily outside the cell, reducing the toxicity of metal ions, and allowing nanoparticle recovery without cell destruction that has previously been observed using other microorganisms. Cultures reduced 50 ± 3 mg/L Pd(II) with 1% hydrogen gas (v/v headspace) in 6 h incubation tests [100 mg/L Pd(II) initially], compared to 8 ± 3 mg/L (10 mM acetate) without H2. Acetate was ineffective as an electron donor for palladium removal in the presence or absence of fumarate as an electron acceptor. TEM imaging verified that Pd(0) nanoparticles were predominantly in the EPS surrounding cells in H2-fed cultures, with only a small number of particles visible inside the cell. Separation of the cells and EPS by centrifugation allowed reuse of the cell suspensions and effective nanoparticle recovery. These results demonstrate effective palladium recovery and nanoparticle production using G. sulfurreducens cell suspensions and renewable substrates such as H2 gas. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  1. A Whole Genome Pairwise Comparative and Functional Analysis of Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Geobacter species are involved in electricity production, bioremediations, and various environmental friendly activities. Whole genome comparative analyses of Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA, Geobacter bemidjiensis Bem, Geobacter sp. FRC-32, Geobacter lovleyi SZ, Geobacter sp. M21, Geobacter metallireducens GS-15, Geobacter uraniireducens Rf4 have been made to find out similarities and dissimilarities among them. For whole genome comparison of Geobacter species, an in-house tool, Geobacter Compa...

  2. Acetate oxidation by syntrophic association between Geobacter sulfurreducens and a hydrogen-utilizing exoelectrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Zen-ichiro; Okabe, Satoshi

    2013-08-01

    Anodic microbial communities in acetate-fed microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were analyzed using stable-isotope probing of 16S rRNA genes followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. The results revealed that Geobacter sulfurreducens and Hydrogenophaga sp. predominated in the anodic biofilm. Although the predominance of Geobacter sp. as acetoclastic exoelectrogens in acetate-fed MFC systems has been often reported, the ecophysiological role of Hydrogenophaga sp. is unknown. Therefore, we isolated and characterized a bacterium closely related to Hydrogenophaga sp. (designated strain AR20). The newly isolated strain AR20 could use molecular hydrogen (H2), but not acetate, with carbon electrode as the electron acceptor, indicating that the strain AR20 was a hydrogenotrophic exoelectrogen. This evidence raises a hypothesis that acetate was oxidized by G. sulfurreducens in syntrophic cooperation with the strain AR20 as a hydrogen-consuming partner in the acetate-fed MFC. To prove this hypothesis, G. sulfurreducens strain PCA was cocultivated with the strain AR20 in the acetate-fed MFC without any dissolved electron acceptors. In the coculture MFC of G. sulfurreducens and strain AR20, current generation and acetate degradation were the highest, and the growth of strain AR20 was observed. No current generation, acetate degradation and cell growth occurred in the strain AR20 pure culture MFC. These results show for the first time that G. sulfurreducens can oxidize acetate in syntrophic cooperation with the isolated Hydrogenophaga sp. strain AR20, with electrode as the electron acceptor.

  3. Probing single- to multi-cell level charge transport in Geobacter sulfurreducens DL-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaocheng; Hu, Jinsong; Petersen, Emily R.; Fitzgerald, Lisa A.; Jackan, Charles S.; Lieber, Alexander M.; Ringeisen, Bradley R.; Lieber, Charles M.; Biffinger, Justin C.

    2013-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells, in which living microorganisms convert chemical energy into electricity, represent a potentially sustainable energy technology for the future. Here we report the single-bacterium level current measurements of Geobacter sulfurreducens DL-1 to elucidate the fundamental limits and factors determining maximum power output from a microbial fuel cell. Quantized stepwise current outputs of 92(±33) and 196(±20) fA are generated from microelectrode arrays confined in isolated wells. Simultaneous cell imaging/tracking and current recording reveals that the current steps are directly correlated with the contact of one or two cells with the electrodes. This work establishes the amount of current generated by an individual Geobacter cell in the absence of a biofilm and highlights the potential upper limit of microbial fuel cell performance for Geobacter in thin biofilms.

  4. Scarless Genome Editing and Stable Inducible Expression Vectors for Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chi Ho; Levar, Caleb E; Zacharoff, Lori; Badalamenti, Jonathan P; Bond, Daniel R

    2015-10-01

    Metal reduction by members of the Geobacteraceae is encoded by multiple gene clusters, and the study of extracellular electron transfer often requires biofilm development on surfaces. Genetic tools that utilize polar antibiotic cassette insertions limit mutant construction and complementation. In addition, unstable plasmids create metabolic burdens that slow growth, and the presence of antibiotics such as kanamycin can interfere with the rate and extent of Geobacter biofilm growth. We report here genetic system improvements for the model anaerobic metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. A motile strain of G. sulfurreducens was constructed by precise removal of a transposon interrupting the fgrM flagellar regulator gene using SacB/sucrose counterselection, and Fe(III) citrate reduction was eliminated by deletion of the gene encoding the inner membrane cytochrome imcH. We also show that RK2-based plasmids were maintained in G. sulfurreducens for over 15 generations in the absence of antibiotic selection in contrast to unstable pBBR1 plasmids. Therefore, we engineered a series of new RK2 vectors containing native constitutive Geobacter promoters, and modified one of these promoters for VanR-dependent induction by the small aromatic carboxylic acid vanillate. Inducible plasmids fully complemented ΔimcH mutants for Fe(III) reduction, Mn(IV) oxide reduction, and growth on poised electrodes. A real-time, high-throughput Fe(III) citrate reduction assay is described that can screen numerous G. sulfurreducens strain constructs simultaneously and shows the sensitivity of imcH expression by the vanillate system. These tools will enable more sophisticated genetic studies in G. sulfurreducens without polar insertion effects or need for multiple antibiotics.

  5. Anaerobes unleashed: Aerobic fuel cells of Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, Kelly P.; Zhang, Pei; Franks, Ashley E.; Woodard, Trevor L.; Lovley, Derek R.

    One of the limitations of power generation with microbial fuel cells is that the anode must typically be maintained under anaerobic conditions. When oxygen is present in the anode chamber microorganisms oxidize the fuel with the reduction of oxygen rather than electron transfer to the anode. A system in which fuel is provided from within a graphite anode and diffuses out to the outer surface of the anode was designed to overcome these limitations. A biofilm of Geobacter sulfurreducens strain KN400, pregrown on the surface of a graphite electrode in a traditional two-chambered system with an anaerobic anode chamber and acetate as an external fuel source, produced current just as well under aerobic conditions when acetate was provided via diffusion from an internal concentrated acetate solution. No acetate was detectable in the external medium. In contrast, aerobic systems in which acetate was provided in the external medium completely failed within 48 h. Internally fed anodes colonized by a strain of KN400 adapted to grow at marine salinities produced current in aerobic seawater as well as an anaerobic anode system. The ability to generate current with an anode under aerobic conditions increases the potential applications and design options for microbial fuel cells.

  6. Charge transport in films of Geobacter sulfurreducens on graphite electrodes as a function of film thickness

    KAUST Repository

    Jana, Partha Sarathi

    2014-01-01

    Harnessing, and understanding the mechanisms of growth and activity of, biofilms of electroactive bacteria (EAB) on solid electrodes is of increasing interest, for application to microbial fuel and electrolysis cells. Microbial electrochemical cell technology can be used to generate electricity, or higher value chemicals, from organic waste. The capability of biofilms of electroactive bacteria to transfer electrons to solid anodes is a key feature of this emerging technology, yet the electron transfer mechanism is not fully characterized as yet. Acetate oxidation current generated from biofilms of an EAB, Geobacter sulfurreducens, on graphite electrodes as a function of time does not correlate with film thickness. Values of film thickness, and the number and local concentration of electrically connected redox sites within Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms as well as a charge transport diffusion co-efficient for the biofilm can be estimated from non-turnover voltammetry. The thicker biofilms, of 50 ± 9 μm, display higher charge transport diffusion co-efficient than that in thinner films, as increased film porosity of these films improves ion transport, required to maintain electro-neutrality upon electrolysis. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  7. Expressing the Geobacter metallireducens PilA in Geobacter sulfurreducens Yields Pili with Exceptional Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yang; Adhikari, Ramesh Y.; Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Ward, Joy E.; Woodard, Trevor L.; Nevin, Kelly P.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The electrically conductive pili (e-pili) of Geobacter sulfurreducens serve as a model for a novel strategy for long-range extracellular electron transfer. e-pili are also a new class of bioelectronic materials. However, the only other Geobacter pili previously studied, which were from G. uraniireducens, were poorly conductive. In order to obtain more information on the range of pili conductivities in Geobacter species, the pili of G. metallireducens were investigated. Heterologously expressing the PilA gene of G. metallireducens in G. sulfurreducens yielded a G. sulfurreducens strain, designated strain MP, that produced abundant pili. Strain MP exhibited phenotypes consistent with the presence of e-pili, such as high rates of Fe(III) oxide reduction and high current densities on graphite anodes. Individual pili prepared at physiologically relevant pH 7 had conductivities of 277 ± 18.9 S/cm (mean ± standard deviation), which is 5,000-fold higher than the conductivity of G. sulfurreducens pili at pH 7 and nearly 1 million-fold higher than the conductivity of G. uraniireducens pili at the same pH. A potential explanation for the higher conductivity of the G. metallireducens pili is their greater density of aromatic amino acids, which are known to be important components in electron transport along the length of the pilus. The G. metallireducens pili represent the most highly conductive pili found to date and suggest strategies for designing synthetic pili with even higher conductivities. PMID:28096491

  8. Electricity-Assisted Biological Hydrogen Production from Acetate by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geelhoed, J.S.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens is a well-known current-producing microorganism in microbial fuel cells, and is able to use acetate and hydrogen as electron donor. We studied the functionality of G. sulfurreducens as biocatalyst for hydrogen formation at the cathode of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC).

  9. Lactate Oxidation Coupled to Iron or Electrode Reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA

    KAUST Repository

    Call, D. F.

    2011-10-14

    Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA completely oxidized lactate and reduced iron or an electrode, producing pyruvate and acetate intermediates. Compared to the current produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, G. sulfurreducens PCA produced 10-times-higher current levels in lactate-fed microbial electrolysis cells. The kinetic and comparative analyses reported here suggest a prominent role of G. sulfurreducens strains in metaland electrode-reducing communities supplied with lactate. © 2011, American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Biochemical Mechanisms and Energy Strategies of Geobacter Sulfurreducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tien, Ming; Brantley, Susan L.

    2013-10-28

    To provide the scientific understanding required to allow DOE sites to incorporate relevant biological, chemical, and physical processes into decisions concerning environmental remediation, a fundamental understanding of the controls on micro-organism growth in the subsurface is necessary. Specifically, mobility of metals in the environment, including chromium, technetium and uranium, is greatly affected by the process of dissimilatory metal reduction (DMR), which has been shown to be an important biological activity controlling contaminant mobility in the subsurface at many DOE sites. Long-term maintenance of DMR at constant rates must rely upon steady fluxes of electron donors to provide the maintenance energy needed by organisms such as Geobacter sulfurreducens to maintain steady state populations in the subsurface.

  11. Studies of multi-heme cytochromes from Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokkuluri, P. Raj; Londer, Yuri, Y.; Orshonsky, Valerie; Orshonsky, Lisa; Duke, Norma; Schiffer, Marianne

    2006-04-05

    The Geobacteraceae family predominates in the reduction of uranium in subsurface environments. We are focusing on the model organism, Geobacter sulfurreducens; its genome contains a large number (>100) of cytochromes c that function in metal reduction pathways. Intensive functional genomics and physiological studies are in progress in Prof. Derek Lovley's laboratory, and the complete genome sequence of this organism has been determined by Methe et al. 2003. We are studying cytochromes from the c{sub 7} family that are required for the reduction of Fe(III). Previously, we expressed in E. coli (Londer et al., 2002) and determined the three-dimensional structure at 1.45 {angstrom} resolution (Pokkuluri et al., 2004a) of the three-heme cytochrome c{sub 7} (PpcA, coded by ORF01023) characterized by Lloyd et al., 2003. Further we identified in the G. sulfurreducens genome ORFs for several of its homologs (Pokkuluri et al., 2004a). Four of the ORFs are the same size as PpcA; three other ORFs are polymers of c7-type domains, two of which consist of four domains and one of nine domains, that contain 12 and 27 hemes respectively.

  12. Going wireless: Fe(III) oxide reduction without pili by Geobacter sulfurreducens strain JS-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jessica A; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Snoeyenbos-West, Oona L; Franks, Ashley E; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the conductive pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens are essential for extracellular electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides and for optimal long-range electron transport through current-producing biofilms. The KN400 strain of G. sulfurreducens reduces poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide more rapidly than the more extensively studied DL-1 strain. Deletion of the gene encoding PilA, the structural pilin protein, in strain KN400 inhibited Fe(III) oxide reduction. However, low rates of Fe(III) reduction were detected after extended incubation (>30 days) in the presence of Fe(III) oxide. After seven consecutive transfers, the PilA-deficient strain adapted to reduce Fe(III) oxide as fast as the wild type. Microarray, whole-genome resequencing, proteomic, and gene deletion studies indicated that this adaptation was associated with the production of larger amounts of the c-type cytochrome PgcA, which was released into the culture medium. It is proposed that the extracellular cytochrome acts as an electron shuttle, promoting electron transfer from the outer cell surface to Fe(III) oxides. The adapted PilA-deficient strain competed well with the wild-type strain when both were grown together on Fe(III) oxide. However, when 50% of the culture medium was replaced with fresh medium every 3 days, the wild-type strain outcompeted the adapted strain. A possible explanation for this is that the necessity to produce additional PgcA, to replace the PgcA being continually removed, put the adapted strain at a competitive disadvantage, similar to the apparent selection against electron shuttle-producing Fe(III) reducers in many anaerobic soils and sediments. Despite increased extracellular cytochrome production, the adapted PilA-deficient strain produced low levels of current, consistent with the concept that long-range electron transport through G. sulfurreducens biofilms is more effective via pili.

  13. Crystallographic orientation and electrode nature are key factors for electric current generation by Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestro, Beatriz; Ortiz, Juan M; Schrott, Germán; Busalmen, Juan P; Climent, Víctor; Feliu, Juan M

    2014-08-01

    We have investigated the influence of electrode material and crystallographic structure on electron transfer and biofilm formation of Geobacter sulfurreducens. Single-crystal gold-Au(110), Au(111), Au(210)-and platinum-Pt(100), Pt(110), Pt(111), Pt(210)-electrodes were tested and compared to graphite rods. G. sulfurreducens electrochemically interacts with all these materials with different attachment kinetics and final current production, although redox species involved in the electron transfer to the anode are virtually the same in all cases. Initial bacterial colonization was fastest on graphite up to the monolayer level, whereas gold electrodes led to higher final current densities. Crystal geometry was shown to have an important influence, with Au(210) sustaining a current density of up to 1442±101μAcm(-2) at the steady state, over Au(111) with 961±94μAcm(-2) and Au(110) with 944±89μAcm(-2). On the other hand, the platinum electrodes displayed the lowest performances, including Pt(210). Our results indicate that both crystal geometry and electrode material are key parameters for the efficient interaction of bacteria with the substrate and should be considered for the design of novel materials and microbial devices to optimize energy production.

  14. Structural and Operational Complexity of the Geobacter Sulfurreducens Genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Yu; Cho, Byung-Kwan; Park, Young S.; Lovley, Derek R.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; Zengler, Karsten

    2010-06-30

    Prokaryotic genomes can be annotated based on their structural, operational, and functional properties. These annotations provide the pivotal scaffold for understanding cellular functions on a genome-scale, such as metabolism and transcriptional regulation. Here, we describe a systems approach to simultaneously determine the structural and operational annotation of the Geobacter sulfurreducens genome. Integration of proteomics, transcriptomics, RNA polymerase, and sigma factor-binding information with deep-sequencing-based analysis of primary 59-end transcripts allowed for a most precise annotation. The structural annotation is comprised of numerous previously undetected genes, noncoding RNAs, prevalent leaderless mRNA transcripts, and antisense transcripts. When compared with other prokaryotes, we found that the number of antisense transcripts reversely correlated with genome size. The operational annotation consists of 1453 operons, 22% of which have multiple transcription start sites that use different RNA polymerase holoenzymes. Several operons with multiple transcription start sites encoded genes with essential functions, giving insight into the regulatory complexity of the genome. The experimentally determined structural and operational annotations can be combined with functional annotation, yielding a new three-level annotation that greatly expands our understanding of prokaryotic genomes.

  15. Genetic Identification of a PilT Motor in Geobacter sulfurreducens Reveals a Role for Pilus Retraction in Extracellular Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speers, Allison M.; Schindler, Bryan D.; Hwang, Jihwan; Genc, Aycin; Reguera, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    The metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens requires the expression of conductive pili to reduce iron oxides and to wire electroactive biofilms, but the role of pilus retraction in these functions has remained elusive. Here we show that of the four PilT proteins encoded in the genome of G. sulfurreducens, PilT3 powered pilus retraction in planktonic cells of a PilT-deficient strain of P. aeruginosa and restored the dense mutant biofilms to wild-type levels. Furthermore, PilT3 and PilT4 rescued the twitching motility defect of the PilT-deficient mutant. However, PilT4 was the only paralog whose inactivation in G. sulfurreducens lead to phenotypes associated with the hyperpiliation of non-retractile mutants such as enhanced adhesion and biofilm-forming abilities. In addition, PilT4 was required to reduce iron oxides. Taken together, the results indicate that PilT4 is the motor ATPase of G. sulfurreducens pili and reveal a previously unrecognized role for pilus retraction in extracellular electron transfer, a strategy that confers on Geobacter spp. an adaptive advantage for metal reduction in the natural environment. PMID:27799920

  16. Genetic identification of a PilT motor in Geobacter sulfurreducens reveals a role for pilus retraction in extracellular electron transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Speers

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens requires the expression of conductive pili to reduce iron oxides and to wire electroactive biofilms, but the role of pilus retraction in these functions has remained elusive. Here we show that of the four PilT proteins encoded in the genome of G. sulfurreducens, PilT3 powered pilus retraction in planktonic cells of a PilT-deficient strain of P. aeruginosa and restored the dense mutant biofilms to wild-type levels. Furthermore, PilT3 and PilT4 rescued the twitching motility defect of the PilT-deficient mutant. However, PilT4 was the only paralogue whose inactivation in G. sulfurreducens lead to phenotypes associated with the hyperpiliation of non-retractile mutants such as enhanced adhesion and biofilm-forming abilities. In addition, PilT4 was required to reduce iron oxides. Taken together, the results indicate that PilT4 is the motor ATPase of G. sulfurreducens pili and reveal a previously unrecognized role for pilus retraction in extracellular electron transfer, a strategy that confers on Geobacter spp. an adaptive advantage for metal reduction in the natural environment.

  17. Use of a Coculture To Enable Current Production by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    KAUST Repository

    Qu, Y.

    2012-02-17

    Microbial fuel cells often produce more electrical power with mixed cultures than with pure cultures. Here, we show that a coculture of a nonexoelectrogen (Escherichia coli) and Geobacter sulfurreducens improved system performance relative to that of a pure culture of the exoelectrogen due to the consumption of oxygen leaking into the reactor.

  18. Scanning probe studies of the pilus nanowires in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veazey, Joshua P.

    In microbial organisms like bacteria, pili (singular: pilus) are filament-like appendages that are nanometers in diameter and microns long. The sizes and structures of the different types of pili found in nature are adapted to serve one of many distinct functions for the organism from which they come. The pili expressed by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens act as electrically conductive nanowires that provide conduits for electrons to leave the cell during its respiratory cycle. Biological experiments have suggested that long range electron transfer across micron distances may proceed along the protein matrix, rather than by metal cofactors (metal atoms bound to the protein). Protein conductivity across such distances would require a novel transport mechanism. In an effort to elucidate this mechanism, our lab has used two electronically sensitive scanning probe techniques: Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Conductive Probe Atomic Force Microscopy (CP-AFM). I employed the high resolution imaging and electronic sensitivity of STM to resolve the molecular sub-structure and local electronic density of states (LDOS) at different points above pili from purified preparations, deposited onto a conducting substrate. The significant and stable tunneling currents achieved for biologically relevant voltages, in the absence of metal cofactors, demonstrated conduction between tip and substrate via the protein matrix. We observed periodicity of roughly 10 nm and 2.5 nm in topographs of the pili. In our acquisition of LDOS, we observed gap-like asymmetric energy spectra that were dependent upon the location of the tip above the pilus, suggestive of easier current flow out of one side of the cylindrical pilus and into the opposite side. Voltage-dependent STM imaging, which also contains information about the LDOS at each pixel, was consistent with this interpretation. The asymmetry in spectra observed on one pilus edge had a slightly larger magnitude than the other edge

  19. Recent Origin of the Methacrylate Redox System in Geobacter sulfurreducens AM-1 through Horizontal Gene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipova, Oksana V; Meer, Margarita V; Mikoulinskaia, Galina V; Zakharova, Marina V; Galushko, Alexander S; Akimenko, Vasilii K; Kondrashov, Fyodor A

    2015-01-01

    The origin and evolution of novel biochemical functions remains one of the key questions in molecular evolution. We study recently emerged methacrylate reductase function that is thought to have emerged in the last century and reported in Geobacter sulfurreducens strain AM-1. We report the sequence and study the evolution of the operon coding for the flavin-containing methacrylate reductase (Mrd) and tetraheme cytochrome с (Mcc) in the genome of G. sulfurreducens AM-1. Different types of signal peptides in functionally interlinked proteins Mrd and Mcc suggest a possible complex mechanism of biogenesis for chromoproteids of the methacrylate redox system. The homologs of the Mrd and Mcc sequence found in δ-Proteobacteria and Deferribacteres are also organized into an operon and their phylogenetic distribution suggested that these two genes tend to be horizontally transferred together. Specifically, the mrd and mcc genes from G. sulfurreducens AM-1 are not monophyletic with any of the homologs found in other Geobacter genomes. The acquisition of methacrylate reductase function by G. sulfurreducens AM-1 appears linked to a horizontal gene transfer event. However, the new function of the products of mrd and mcc may have evolved either prior or subsequent to their acquisition by G. sulfurreducens AM-1.

  20. Recent Origin of the Methacrylate Redox System in Geobacter sulfurreducens AM-1 through Horizontal Gene Transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana V Arkhipova

    Full Text Available The origin and evolution of novel biochemical functions remains one of the key questions in molecular evolution. We study recently emerged methacrylate reductase function that is thought to have emerged in the last century and reported in Geobacter sulfurreducens strain AM-1. We report the sequence and study the evolution of the operon coding for the flavin-containing methacrylate reductase (Mrd and tetraheme cytochrome с (Mcc in the genome of G. sulfurreducens AM-1. Different types of signal peptides in functionally interlinked proteins Mrd and Mcc suggest a possible complex mechanism of biogenesis for chromoproteids of the methacrylate redox system. The homologs of the Mrd and Mcc sequence found in δ-Proteobacteria and Deferribacteres are also organized into an operon and their phylogenetic distribution suggested that these two genes tend to be horizontally transferred together. Specifically, the mrd and mcc genes from G. sulfurreducens AM-1 are not monophyletic with any of the homologs found in other Geobacter genomes. The acquisition of methacrylate reductase function by G. sulfurreducens AM-1 appears linked to a horizontal gene transfer event. However, the new function of the products of mrd and mcc may have evolved either prior or subsequent to their acquisition by G. sulfurreducens AM-1.

  1. Reduction of low potential electron acceptors requires the CbcL inner membrane cytochrome of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharoff, Lori; Chan, Chi Ho; Bond, Daniel R

    2016-02-01

    The respiration of metals by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens requires electrons generated by metabolism to pass from the interior of the cell to electron acceptors beyond the cell membranes. The G. sulfurreducens inner membrane multiheme c-type cytochrome ImcH is required for respiration to extracellular electron acceptors with redox potentials greater than -0.1 V vs. SHE, but ImcH is not essential for electron transfer to lower potential acceptors. In contrast, deletion of cbcL, encoding an inner membrane protein consisting of b-type and multiheme c-type cytochrome domains, severely affected reduction of low potential electron acceptors such as Fe(III)-oxides and electrodes poised at -0.1 V vs. SHE. Catalytic cyclic voltammetry of a ΔcbcL strain growing on poised electrodes revealed a 50 mV positive shift in driving force required for electron transfer out of the cell. In non-catalytic conditions, low-potential peaks present in wild type biofilms were absent in ∆cbcL mutants. Expression of cbcL in trans increased growth at low redox potential and restored features to cyclic voltammetry. This evidence supports a model where CbcL is a component of a second electron transfer pathway out of the G. sulfurreducens inner membrane that dominates when redox potential is at or below -0.1 V vs. SHE.

  2. Growth of Geobacter sulfurreducens under nutrient-limiting conditions in continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Núñez, Abraham; Rothermich, Mary; Sharma, Manju; Lovley, Derek

    2005-05-01

    A system for growing Geobacter sulfurreducens under anaerobic conditions in chemostats was developed in order to study the physiology of this organism under conditions that might more closely approximate those found in the subsurface than batch cultures. Geobacter sulfurreducens could be cultured under acetate-limiting conditions with fumarate or Fe(III)-citrate as the electron acceptor at growth rates between 0.04 and 0.09 h(-1). The molar growth yield was threefold higher with fumarate as the electron acceptor than with Fe(III), despite the lower mid-point potential of the fumarate/succinate redox couple. When growth was limited by availability of fumarate, high steady-state concentrations were detected, suggesting that fumarate is unlikely to be an important electron acceptor in sedimentary environments. The half-saturation constant, Ks, for acetate in Fe(III)-grown cultures (10 microM) suggested that the growth of Geobacter species is likely to be acetate limited in most subsurface sediments, but that when millimolar quantities of acetate are added to the subsurface in order to promote the growth of Geobacter for bioremediation applications, this should be enough to overcome any acetate limitations. When the availability of electron acceptors, rather than acetate, limited growth, G. sulfurreducens was less efficient in incorporating acetate into biomass but had higher respiration rates, a desirable physiological characteristic when adding acetate to stimulate the activity of Geobacter species during in situ uranium bioremediation. These results demonstrate that the ability to study the growth of G. sulfurreducens under steady-state conditions can provide insights into its physiological characteristics that have relevance for its activity in a diversity of sedimentary environments.

  3. Rational engineering of Geobacter sulfurreducens electron transfer components: a foundation for building improved Geobacter-based bioelectrochemical technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Joana M; Morgado, Leonor; Aklujkar, Muktak; Bruix, Marta; Londer, Yuri Y; Schiffer, Marianne; Pokkuluri, P Raj; Salgueiro, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    Multiheme cytochromes have been implicated in Geobacter sulfurreducens extracellular electron transfer (EET). These proteins are potential targets to improve EET and enhance bioremediation and electrical current production by G. sulfurreducens. However, the functional characterization of multiheme cytochromes is particularly complex due to the co-existence of several microstates in solution, connecting the fully reduced and fully oxidized states. Over the last decade, new strategies have been developed to characterize multiheme redox proteins functionally and structurally. These strategies were used to reveal the functional mechanism of G. sulfurreducens multiheme cytochromes and also to identify key residues in these proteins for EET. In previous studies, we set the foundations for enhancement of the EET abilities of G. sulfurreducens by characterizing a family of five triheme cytochromes (PpcA-E). These periplasmic cytochromes are implicated in electron transfer between the oxidative reactions of metabolism in the cytoplasm and the reduction of extracellular terminal electron acceptors at the cell's outer surface. The results obtained suggested that PpcA can couple e(-)/H(+) transfer, a property that might contribute to the proton electrochemical gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane for metabolic energy production. The structural and functional properties of PpcA were characterized in detail and used for rational design of a family of 23 single site PpcA mutants. In this review, we summarize the functional characterization of the native and mutant proteins. Mutants that retain the mechanistic features of PpcA and adopt preferential e(-)/H(+) transfer pathways at lower reduction potential values compared to the wild-type protein were selected for in vivo studies as the best candidates to increase the electron transfer rate of G. sulfurreducens. For the first time G. sulfurreducens strains have been manipulated by the introduction of mutant forms of essential

  4. Rational engineering of Geobacter sulfurreducens electron transfer components: a foundation for building improved Geobacter-based bioelectrochemical technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Joana M.; Morgado, Leonor; Aklujkar, Muktak; Bruix, Marta; Londer, Yuri Y.; Schiffer, Marianne; Pokkuluri, P. Raj; Salgueiro, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    Multiheme cytochromes have been implicated in Geobacter sulfurreducens extracellular electron transfer (EET). These proteins are potential targets to improve EET and enhance bioremediation and electrical current production by G. sulfurreducens. However, the functional characterization of multiheme cytochromes is particularly complex due to the co-existence of several microstates in solution, connecting the fully reduced and fully oxidized states. Over the last decade, new strategies have been developed to characterize multiheme redox proteins functionally and structurally. These strategies were used to reveal the functional mechanism of G. sulfurreducens multiheme cytochromes and also to identify key residues in these proteins for EET. In previous studies, we set the foundations for enhancement of the EET abilities of G. sulfurreducens by characterizing a family of five triheme cytochromes (PpcA-E). These periplasmic cytochromes are implicated in electron transfer between the oxidative reactions of metabolism in the cytoplasm and the reduction of extracellular terminal electron acceptors at the cell's outer surface. The results obtained suggested that PpcA can couple e−/H+ transfer, a property that might contribute to the proton electrochemical gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane for metabolic energy production. The structural and functional properties of PpcA were characterized in detail and used for rational design of a family of 23 single site PpcA mutants. In this review, we summarize the functional characterization of the native and mutant proteins. Mutants that retain the mechanistic features of PpcA and adopt preferential e−/H+ transfer pathways at lower reduction potential values compared to the wild-type protein were selected for in vivo studies as the best candidates to increase the electron transfer rate of G. sulfurreducens. For the first time G. sulfurreducens strains have been manipulated by the introduction of mutant forms of essential

  5. A Geobacter sulfurreducens strain expressing pseudomonas aeruginosa type IV pili localizes OmcS on pili but is deficient in Fe(III) oxide reduction and current production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Malvankar, Nikhil S; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R; Vargas, Madeline

    2014-02-01

    The conductive pili of Geobacter species play an important role in electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides, in long-range electron transport through current-producing biofilms, and in direct interspecies electron transfer. Although multiple lines of evidence have indicated that the pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens have a metal-like conductivity, independent of the presence of c-type cytochromes, this claim is still controversial. In order to further investigate this phenomenon, a strain of G. sulfurreducens, designated strain PA, was constructed in which the gene for the native PilA, the structural pilin protein, was replaced with the PilA gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Strain PA expressed and properly assembled P. aeruginosa PilA subunits into pili and exhibited a profile of outer surface c-type cytochromes similar to that of a control strain expressing the G. sulfurreducens PilA. Surprisingly, the strain PA pili were decorated with the c-type cytochrome OmcS in a manner similar to the control strain. However, the strain PA pili were 14-fold less conductive than the pili of the control strain, and strain PA was severely impaired in Fe(III) oxide reduction and current production. These results demonstrate that the presence of OmcS on pili is not sufficient to confer conductivity to pili and suggest that there are unique structural features of the G. sulfurreducens PilA that are necessary for conductivity.

  6. The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens: features of metabolism, physiology and regulation common and dissimilar to Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aklujkar, Muktak [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Krushkal, Julia [University of Texas, Austin; DiBartolo, Genevieve [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lovley, Derek [University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    2009-01-01

    Background. The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens is the second to be completed from the metal-respiring genus Geobacter, and is compared in this report to that of Geobacter sulfurreducens in order to understand their metabolic, physiological and regulatory similarities and differences. Results. The experimentally observed greater metabolic versatility of G. metallireducens versus G. sulfurreducens is borne out by the presence of more numerous genes for metabolism of organic acids including acetate, propionate, and pyruvate. Although G. metallireducens lacks a dicarboxylic acid transporter, it has acquired a second succinate dehydrogenase/fumarate reductase complex, suggesting that respiration of fumarate was important until recently in its evolutionary history. Vestiges of the molybdate (ModE) regulon of G. sulfurreducens can be detected in G. metallireducens, which has lost the global regulatory protein ModE but retained some putative ModE-binding sites and multiplied certain genes of molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis. Several enzymes of amino acid metabolism are of different origin in the two species, but significant patterns of gene organization are conserved. Whereas most Geobacteraceae are predicted to obtain biosynthetic reducing equivalents from electron transfer pathways via a ferredoxin oxidoreductase, G. metallireducens can derive them from the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. In addition to the evidence of greater metabolic versatility, the G. metallireducens genome is also remarkable for the abundance of multicopy nucleotide sequences found in intergenic regions and even within genes. Conclusion. The genomic evidence suggests that metabolism, physiology Background. The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens is the second to be completed from the metal-respiring genus Geobacter, and is compared in this report to that of Geobacter sulfurreducens in order to understand their metabolic, physiological and regulatory similarities and

  7. Localization and Solubilization of the Iron(III) Reductase of Geobacter sulfurreducens

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    The iron(III) reductase activity of Geobacter sulfurreducens was determined with the electron donor NADH and the artificial electron donor horse heart cytochrome c. The highest reduction rates were obtained with Fe(III) complexed by nitrilotriacetic acid as an electron acceptor. Fractionation experiments indicated that no iron(III) reductase activity was present in the cytoplasm, that approximately one-third was found in the periplasmic fraction, and that two-thirds were associated with the m...

  8. The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens: features of metabolism, physiology and regulation common and dissimilar to Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aklujkar Muktak

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens is the second to be completed from the metal-respiring genus Geobacter, and is compared in this report to that of Geobacter sulfurreducens in order to understand their metabolic, physiological and regulatory similarities and differences. Results The experimentally observed greater metabolic versatility of G. metallireducens versus G. sulfurreducens is borne out by the presence of more numerous genes for metabolism of organic acids including acetate, propionate, and pyruvate. Although G. metallireducens lacks a dicarboxylic acid transporter, it has acquired a second putative succinate dehydrogenase/fumarate reductase complex, suggesting that respiration of fumarate was important until recently in its evolutionary history. Vestiges of the molybdate (ModE regulon of G. sulfurreducens can be detected in G. metallireducens, which has lost the global regulatory protein ModE but retained some putative ModE-binding sites and multiplied certain genes of molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis. Several enzymes of amino acid metabolism are of different origin in the two species, but significant patterns of gene organization are conserved. Whereas most Geobacteraceae are predicted to obtain biosynthetic reducing equivalents from electron transfer pathways via a ferredoxin oxidoreductase, G. metallireducens can derive them from the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. In addition to the evidence of greater metabolic versatility, the G. metallireducens genome is also remarkable for the abundance of multicopy nucleotide sequences found in intergenic regions and even within genes. Conclusion The genomic evidence suggests that metabolism, physiology and regulation of gene expression in G. metallireducens may be dramatically different from other Geobacteraceae.

  9. The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens: features of metabolism, physiology and regulation common and dissimilar to Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aklujkar, Muktak; Krushkal, Julia; DiBartolo, Genevieve; Lapidus, Alla; Land, Miriam L.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2008-12-01

    Background: The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens is the second to be completed from the metal-respiring genus Geobacter, and is compared in this report to that of Geobacter sulfurreducens in order to understand their metabolic, physiological and regulatory similarities and differences. Results: The experimentally observed greater metabolic versatility of G. metallireducens versus G. sulfurreducens is borne out by the presence of more numerous genes for metabolism of organic acids including acetate, propionate, and pyruvate. Although G. metallireducens lacks a dicarboxylic acid transporter, it has acquired a second succinate dehydrogenase/fumarate reductase complex, suggesting that respiration of fumarate was important until recently in its evolutionary history. Vestiges of the molybdate (ModE) regulon of G. sulfurreducens can be detected in G. metallireducens, which has lost the global regulatory protein ModE but retained some putative ModE-binding sites and multiplied certain genes of molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis. Several enzymes of amino acid metabolism are of different origin in the two species, but significant patterns of gene organization are conserved. Whereas most Geobacteraceae are predicted to obtain biosynthetic reducing equivalents from electron transfer pathways via a ferredoxin oxidoreductase, G. metallireducens can derive them from the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. In addition to the evidence of greater metabolic versatility, the G. metallireducens genome is also remarkable for the abundance of multicopy nucleotide sequences found in intergenic regions and even within genes. Conclusion: The genomic evidence suggests that metabolism, physiology and regulation of gene expression in G. metallireducens may be dramatically different from other Geobacteraceae.

  10. Cooperative growth of Geobacter sulfurreducens and Clostridium pasteurianum with subsequent metabolic shift in glycerol fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscoviz, Roman; de Fouchécour, Florence; Santa-Catalina, Gaëlle; Bernet, Nicolas; Trably, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Interspecies electron transfer is a common way to couple metabolic energy balances between different species in mixed culture consortia. Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) mechanism has been recently characterised with Geobacter species which couple the electron balance with other species through physical contacts. Using this mechanism could be an efficient and cost-effective way to directly control redox balances in co-culture fermentation. The present study deals with a co-culture of Geobacter sulfurreducens and Clostridium pasteurianum during glycerol fermentation. As a result, it was shown that Geobacter sulfurreducens was able to grow using Clostridium pasteurianum as sole electron acceptor. C. pasteurianum metabolic pattern was significantly altered towards improved 1,3-propanediol and butyrate production (+37% and +38% resp.) at the expense of butanol and ethanol production (−16% and −20% resp.). This metabolic shift was clearly induced by a small electron uptake that represented less than 0.6% of the electrons consumed by C. pasteurianum. A non-linear relationship was found between G. sulfurreducens growth (i.e the electrons transferred between the two species) and the changes in C. pasteurianum metabolite distribution. This study opens up new possibilities for controlling and increasing specificity in mixed culture fermentation. PMID:28287150

  11. Electricity-assisted biological hydrogen production from acetate by Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelhoed, Jeanine S; Stams, Alfons J M

    2011-01-15

    Geobacter sulfurreducens is a well-known current-producing microorganism in microbial fuel cells, and is able to use acetate and hydrogen as electron donor. We studied the functionality of G. sulfurreducens as biocatalyst for hydrogen formation at the cathode of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). Geobacter sulfurreducens was grown in the bioelectrode compartment of a MFC with acetate as the substrate and reduction of complexed Fe(III) at the counter electrode. After depletion of the acetate the electrode potential of the bioelectrode was decreased stepwise to -1.0 V vs Ag/AgCl reference. Production of negative current was observed, which increased in time, indicating that the bioelectrode was now acting as biocathode. Headspace analyses carried out at electrode potentials ranging from -0.8 to -1.0 V showed that hydrogen was produced, with higher rates at more negative cathode potentials. Subsequently, the metabolic properties of G. sulfurreducens for acetate oxidation at the anode and hydrogen production at the cathode were combined in one-compartment membraneless MECs operated at applied voltages of 0.8 and 0.65 V. After two days, current densities were 0.44 A m(-2) at 0.8 V applied voltage and 0.22 A m(-2) at 0.65 V, using flat-surface carbon electrodes for both anode and cathode. The cathodic hydrogen recovery ranged from 23% at 0.5 V applied voltage to 43% at 0.9 V.

  12. Functional characterization of PccH, a key cytochrome for electron transfer from electrodes to the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Joana M; Tomaz, Diogo M; Morgado, Leonor; Salgueiro, Carlos A

    2013-08-19

    The cytochrome PccH from Geobacter sulfurreducens (Gs) plays a crucial role in current-consuming fumarate-reducing biofilms. Deletion of pccH gene inhibited completely electron transfer from electrodes toward Gs cells. The pccH gene was cloned and the protein heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. Complementary biophysical techniques including CD, UV-visible and NMR spectroscopy were used to characterize PccH. This cytochrome contains one low-spin c-type heme with His-Met axial coordination and unusual low-reduction potential. This reduction potential is pH-dependent, within the Gs physiological pH range, and is discussed within the context of the electron transfer mechanisms from electrodes to Gs cells.

  13. Genome-wide analysis of the RpoN regulon in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núñez Cinthia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of the RNA polymerase sigma factor RpoN in regulation of gene expression in Geobacter sulfurreducens was investigated to better understand transcriptional regulatory networks as part of an effort to develop regulatory modules for genome-scale in silico models, which can predict the physiological responses of Geobacter species during groundwater bioremediation or electricity production. Results An rpoN deletion mutant could not be obtained under all conditions tested. In order to investigate the regulon of the G. sulfurreducens RpoN, an RpoN over-expression strain was made in which an extra copy of the rpoN gene was under the control of a taclac promoter. Combining both the microarray transcriptome analysis and the computational prediction revealed that the G. sulfurreducens RpoN controls genes involved in a wide range of cellular functions. Most importantly, RpoN controls the expression of the dcuB gene encoding the fumarate/succinate exchanger, which is essential for cell growth with fumarate as the terminal electron acceptor in G. sulfurreducens. RpoN also controls genes, which encode enzymes for both pathways of ammonia assimilation that is predicted to be essential under all growth conditions in G. sulfurreducens. Other genes that were identified as part of the RpoN regulon using either the computational prediction or the microarray transcriptome analysis included genes involved in flagella biosynthesis, pili biosynthesis and genes involved in central metabolism enzymes and cytochromes involved in extracellular electron transfer to Fe(III, which are known to be important for growth in subsurface environment or electricity production in microbial fuel cells. The consensus sequence for the predicted RpoN-regulated promoter elements is TTGGCACGGTTTTTGCT. Conclusion The G. sulfurreducens RpoN is an essential sigma factor and a global regulator involved in a complex transcriptional network controlling a variety of

  14. Genome Scale Mutational Analysis of Geobacter sulfurreducens Reveals Distinct Molecular Mechanisms for Respiration and Sensing of Poised Electrodes versus Fe(III) Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chi Ho; Levar, Caleb E; Jiménez-Otero, Fernanda; Bond, Daniel R

    2017-10-01

    metals using the same molecular mechanisms used to form biofilms on electrodes and produce electricity. However, by simultaneously comparing thousands of Geobacter sulfurreducens transposon mutants undergoing electrode-dependent respiration, we discovered new cytochromes and chemosensory proteins supporting growth with electrodes that are not required for metal respiration. This supports an emerging model where G. sulfurreducens recognizes surfaces and forms conductive biofilms using mechanisms distinct from those used for growth with metal oxides. These findings provide a possible explanation for studies that correlate electricity generation with syntrophic interspecies electron transfer by Geobacter and reveal many previously unrecognized targets for engineering this useful capability in other organisms. Copyright © 2017 Chan et al.

  15. Interaction studies between periplasmic cytochromes provide insights into extracellular electron transfer pathways of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ana P; Nunes, Tiago C; Paquete, Catarina M; Salgueiro, Carlos A

    2017-02-20

    Geobacter bacteria usually prevail among other microorganisms in soils and sediments where Fe(III) reduction has a central role. This reduction is achieved by extracellular electron transfer (EET), where the electrons are exported from the interior of the cell to the surrounding environment. Periplasmic cytochromes play an important role in establishing an interface between inner and outer membrane electron transfer components. In addition, periplasmic cytochromes, in particular nanowire cytochromes that contain at least 12 haem groups, have been proposed to play a role in electron storage in conditions of an environmental lack of electron acceptors. Up to date, no redox partners have been identified in Geobacter sulfurreducens, and concomitantly, the EET and electron storage mechanisms remain unclear. In this work, NMR chemical shift perturbation measurements were used to probe for an interaction between the most abundant periplasmic cytochrome PpcA and the dodecahaem cytochrome GSU1996, one of the proposed nanowire cytochromes in G. sulfurreducens The perturbations on the haem methyl signals of GSU1996 and PpcA showed that the proteins form a transient redox complex in an interface that involves haem groups from two different domains located at the C-terminal of GSU1996. Overall, the present study provides for the first time a clear evidence for an interaction between periplasmic cytochromes that might be relevant for the EET and electron storage pathways in G. sulfurreducens. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  16. The iron stimulon and fur regulon of Geobacter sulfurreducens and their role in energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embree, Mallory; Qiu, Yu; Shieu, Wendy; Nagarajan, Harish; O'Neil, Regina; Lovley, Derek; Zengler, Karsten

    2014-05-01

    Iron plays a critical role in the physiology of Geobacter species. It serves as both an essential component for proteins and cofactors and an electron acceptor during anaerobic respiration. Here, we investigated the iron stimulon and ferric uptake regulator (Fur) regulon of Geobacter sulfurreducens to examine the coordination between uptake of Fe(II) and the reduction of Fe(III) at the transcriptional level. Gene expression studies across a variety of different iron concentrations in both the wild type and a Δfur mutant strain were used to determine the iron stimulon. The stimulon consists of a broad range of gene products, ranging from iron-utilizing to central metabolism and iron reduction proteins. Integration of gene expression and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data sets assisted in the identification of the Fur transcriptional regulatory network and Fur's role as a regulator of the iron stimulon. Additional physiological and transcriptional analyses of G. sulfurreducens grown with various Fe(II) concentrations revealed the depth of Fur's involvement in energy metabolism and the existence of redundancy within the iron-regulatory network represented by IdeR, an alternative iron transcriptional regulator. These characteristics enable G. sulfurreducens to thrive in environments with fluctuating iron concentrations by providing it with a robust mechanism to maintain tight and deliberate control over intracellular iron homeostasis.

  17. The Proteome of Dissimilatory Metal-reducing Microorganism Geobacter Sulfurreducens under Various Growth Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Y-H R.; Hixson, Kim K.; Giometti, Carol S.; Stanley, A; Esteve-Nunez, A; Khare, Tripti; Tollaksen, Sandra L.; Zhu, Wenhong; Adkins, Joshua N.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Mester, Tunde; Lovley, Derek R.

    2006-05-16

    The global protein analysis of Geobacter sulfurreducens, a model for the Geobacter species that predominate in many Fe(III)-reducing subsurface environments, was characterized with ultra high pressure liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry using accurate mass and time (AMT) tags as well as with more traditional two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE). Cells were grown under eight different growth conditions in order to enhance the potential that genes would be expressed. Over 3,187 gene products, representing about 92% of the total predicted gene products in the genome, were detected. The AMT approach was able to identify a much higher number of proteins than could be detected with the 2-D PAGE approach. A high proportion of predicted proteins in most protein role categories were detected with the highest number of proteins identified in the hypothetical protein role category. Furthermore, 91 c-type cytochromes of 111 predicted genes in the G. sulfurreducens genome were identified. Localization studies indicated that computational predictions of cytochrome location were limited. Differences in the abundance of cytochromes and other proteins under different growth conditions provided information for future functional analysis of these proteins. These results demonstrate that a high percentage of the predicted proteins in the G. sulfurreducens genome are produced and that the AMT approach provides a rapid method for comparing differential expression of proteins under different growth conditions in this organism.

  18. The proteome of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganism Geobacter sulfurreducens under various growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yan-Huai R; Hixson, Kim K; Giometti, Carol S; Stanley, Ann; Esteve-Núñez, Abraham; Khare, Tripti; Tollaksen, Sandra L; Zhu, Wenhong; Adkins, Joshua N; Lipton, Mary S; Smith, Richard D; Mester, Tünde; Lovley, Derek R

    2006-07-01

    The proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens, a model for the Geobacter species that predominate in many Fe(III)-reducing subsurface environments, was characterized with ultra high-pressure liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry using accurate mass and time (AMT) tags as well as with more traditional two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE). Cells were grown under six different growth conditions in order to enhance the potential that a wide range of genes would be expressed. The AMT tag approach was able to identify a much greater number of proteins than could be detected with the 2-D PAGE approach. With the AMT approach over 3,000 gene products were identified, representing about 90% of the total predicted gene products in the genome. A high proportion of predicted proteins in most protein role categories were detected; the highest number of proteins was identified in the hypothetical protein role category. Furthermore, 91 c-type cytochromes of 111 predicted genes in the G. sulfurreducens genome were identified. Differences in the abundance of cytochromes and other proteins under different growth conditions provided information for future functional analysis of these proteins. These results demonstrate that a high percentage of the predicted proteins in the G. sulfurreducens genome are produced and that the AMT tag approach provides a rapid method for comparing differential expression of proteins under different growth conditions in this organism.

  19. Novel regulatory cascades controlling expression of nitrogen-fixation genes in Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Lovley, Derek R

    2010-11-01

    Geobacter species often play an important role in bioremediation of environments contaminated with metals or organics and show promise for harvesting electricity from waste organic matter in microbial fuel cells. The ability of Geobacter species to fix atmospheric nitrogen is an important metabolic feature for these applications. We identified novel regulatory cascades controlling nitrogen-fixation gene expression in Geobacter sulfurreducens. Unlike the regulatory mechanisms known in other nitrogen-fixing microorganisms, nitrogen-fixation gene regulation in G. sulfurreducens is controlled by two two-component His-Asp phosphorelay systems. One of these systems appears to be the master regulatory system that activates transcription of the majority of nitrogen-fixation genes and represses a gene encoding glutamate dehydrogenase during nitrogen fixation. The other system whose expression is directly activated by the master regulatory system appears to control by antitermination the expression of a subset of the nitrogen-fixation genes whose transcription is activated by the master regulatory system and whose promoter contains transcription termination signals. This study provides a new paradigm for nitrogen-fixation gene regulation.

  20. Metabolic response of Geobacter sulfurreducens towards electron donor/acceptor variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovley Derek R

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geobacter sulfurreducens is capable of coupling the complete oxidation of organic compounds to iron reduction. The metabolic response of G. sulfurreducens towards variations in electron donors (acetate, hydrogen and acceptors (Fe(III, fumarate was investigated via 13C-based metabolic flux analysis. We examined the 13C-labeling patterns of proteinogenic amino acids obtained from G. sulfurreducens cultured with 13C-acetate. Results Using 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, we observed that donor and acceptor variations gave rise to differences in gluconeogenetic initiation, tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, and amino acid biosynthesis pathways. Culturing G. sulfurreducens cells with Fe(III as the electron acceptor and acetate as the electron donor resulted in pyruvate as the primary carbon source for gluconeogenesis. When fumarate was provided as the electron acceptor and acetate as the electron donor, the flux analysis suggested that fumarate served as both an electron acceptor and, in conjunction with acetate, a carbon source. Growth on fumarate and acetate resulted in the initiation of gluconeogenesis by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and a slightly elevated flux through the oxidative tricarboxylic acid cycle as compared to growth with Fe(III as the electron acceptor. In addition, the direction of net flux between acetyl-CoA and pyruvate was reversed during growth on fumarate relative to Fe(III, while growth in the presence of Fe(III and acetate which provided hydrogen as an electron donor, resulted in decreased flux through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Conclusions We gained detailed insight into the metabolism of G. sulfurreducens cells under various electron donor/acceptor conditions using 13C-based metabolic flux analysis. Our results can be used for the development of G. sulfurreducens as a chassis for a variety of applications including bioremediation and renewable biofuel production.

  1. Metabolic efficiency of Geobacter sulfurreducens growing on anodes with different redox potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Julian; Lee, Keun-Young; Hong, Siang-Fu; Harnisch, Falk; Schröder, Uwe; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2014-06-01

    Microorganisms respiring Fe(III) in the environment face a range of redox potentials of the prospective terminal ferric electron acceptors, because Fe(III) can be present in different minerals or organic complexes. We investigated the adaptation of Geobacter sulfurreducens to this range by exposing the bacteria to different redox potentials between the electron donor acetate and solid, extracellular anodes in a microbial fuel-cell set-up. Over a range of anode potentials from -0.105 to +0.645 V versus standard hydrogen electrode, G. sulfurreducens produced identical amounts of biomass per electron respired. This indicated that the organism cannot utilize higher available energies for energy conservation to ATP, and confirmed recent studies. Either the high potentials cannot be used due to physiological limitations, or G. sulfurreducens decreased its metabolic efficiency, and less biomass per unit of energy was produced. In this case, G. sulfurreducens "wasted" energy at high-potential differences, most likely as heat to fuel growth kinetics.

  2. NMR studies of the interaction between inner membrane-associated and periplasmic cytochromes from Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Joana M; Brausemann, Anton; Einsle, Oliver; Salgueiro, Carlos A

    2017-06-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens is a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with notable properties and significance in biotechnological applications. Biochemical studies suggest that the inner membrane-associated diheme cytochrome MacA and the periplasmic triheme cytochrome PpcA from G. sulfurreducens can exchange electrons. In this work, NMR chemical shift perturbation measurements were used to map the interface region and to measure the binding affinity between PpcA and MacA. The results show that MacA binds to PpcA in a cleft defined by hemes I and IV, favoring the contact between PpcA heme IV and the MacA high-potential heme. The dissociation constant values indicate the formation of a low-affinity complex between the proteins, which is consistent with the transient interaction observed in electron transfer complexes. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  3. Changes in phosphorylation of adenosine phosphate and redox state of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) in Geobacter sulfurreducens in response to electron acceptor and anode potential variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Nicholas D; Regan, John M

    2015-12-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens is one of the dominant bacterial species found in biofilms growing on anodes in bioelectrochemical systems. The intracellular concentrations of reduced and oxidized forms of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD(+), respectively) and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH and NADP(+), respectively) as well as adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) were measured in G. sulfurreducens using fumarate, Fe(III)-citrate, or anodes poised at different potentials (110, 10, -90, and -190 mV (vs. SHE)) as the electron acceptor. The ratios of CNADH/CNAD+ (0.088±0.022) and CNADPH/CNADP+ (0.268±0.098) were similar under all anode potentials tested and with Fe(III)-citrate (reduced extracellularly). Both ratios significantly increased with fumarate as the electron acceptor (0.331±0.094 for NAD and 1.96±0.37 for NADP). The adenylate energy charge (the fraction of phosphorylation in intracellular adenosine phosphates) was maintained near 0.47 under almost all conditions. Anode-growing biofilms demonstrated a significantly higher molar ratio of ATP/ADP relative to suspended cultures grown on fumarate or Fe(III)-citrate. These results provide evidence that the cellular location of reduction and not the redox potential of the electron acceptor controls the intracellular redox potential in G. sulfurreducens and that biofilm growth alters adenylate phosphorylation.

  4. Changes in phosphorylation of adenosine phosphate and redox state of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) in Geobacter sulfurreducens in response to electron acceptor and anode potential variation

    KAUST Repository

    Rose, Nicholas D.

    2015-12-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. Geobacter sulfurreducens is one of the dominant bacterial species found in biofilms growing on anodes in bioelectrochemical systems. The intracellular concentrations of reduced and oxidized forms of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD+, respectively) and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH and NADP+, respectively) as well as adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) were measured in G. sulfurreducens using fumarate, Fe(III)-citrate, or anodes poised at different potentials (110, 10, -90, and -190mV (vs. SHE)) as the electron acceptor. The ratios of CNADH/CNAD+ (0.088±0.022) and CNADPH/CNADP+ (0.268±0.098) were similar under all anode potentials tested and with Fe(III)-citrate (reduced extracellularly). Both ratios significantly increased with fumarate as the electron acceptor (0.331±0.094 for NAD and 1.96±0.37 for NADP). The adenylate energy charge (the fraction of phosphorylation in intracellular adenosine phosphates) was maintained near 0.47 under almost all conditions. Anode-growing biofilms demonstrated a significantly higher molar ratio of ATP/ADP relative to suspended cultures grown on fumarate or Fe(III)-citrate. These results provide evidence that the cellular location of reduction and not the redox potential of the electron acceptor controls the intracellular redox potential in G. sulfurreducens and that biofilm growth alters adenylate phosphorylation.

  5. Proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens in the presence of U(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Roberto; Hixson, Kim K; Murphy, Sean; Mester, Tünde; Sharma, Manju L; Lipton, Mary S; Lovley, Derek R

    2014-12-01

    Geobacter species often play an important role in the in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater, but little is known about how these microbes avoid uranium toxicity. To evaluate this further, the proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens exposed to 100 µM U(VI) acetate was compared to control cells not exposed to U(VI). Of the 1363 proteins detected from these cultures, 203 proteins had higher abundance during exposure to U(VI) compared with the control cells and 148 proteins had lower abundance. U(VI)-exposed cultures expressed lower levels of proteins involved in growth, protein and amino acid biosynthesis, as well as key central metabolism enzymes as a result of the deleterious effect of U(VI) on the growth of G. sulfurreducens. In contrast, proteins involved in detoxification, such as several efflux pumps belonging to the RND (resistance-nodulation-cell division) family, and membrane protection, and other proteins, such as chaperones and proteins involved in secretion systems, were found in higher abundance in cells exposed to U(VI). Exposing G. sulfurreducens to U(VI) resulted in a higher abundance of many proteins associated with the oxidative stress response, such as superoxide dismutase and superoxide reductase. A strain in which the gene for superoxide dismutase was deleted grew more slowly than the WT strain in the presence of U(VI), but not in its absence. The results suggested that there is no specific mechanism for uranium detoxification. Rather, multiple general stress responses are induced, which presumably enable Geobacter species to tolerate high uranium concentrations.

  6. Conjugated oligoelectrolyte represses hydrogen oxidation by Geobacter sulfurreducens in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jia

    2015-12-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. A conjugated oligoelectrolyte (COE), which spontaneously aligns within cell membranes, was shown to completely inhibit H2 uptake by Geobacter sulfurreducens in microbial electrolysis cells. Coulombic efficiencies that were 490±95%, due to H2 recycling between the cathode and microorganisms on the anode, were reduced to 86±2% with COE addition. The use of the COE resulted in a 67-fold increase in H2 gas recovery, and a 4.4-fold increase in acetate removal. Current generation, H2 recovery and COD removals by Geobacter metallireducens, which cannot use H2, were unaffected by COE addition. These results show that this COE is an effective H2 uptake inhibitor, and that it can enable improved and sustained H2 gas recovery in this bioelectrochemical system.

  7. Conjugated oligoelectrolyte represses hydrogen oxidation by Geobacter sulfurreducens in microbial electrolysis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Hou, Huijie; Chen, Xiaofen; Bazan, Guillermo C; Kashima, Hiroyuki; Logan, Bruce E

    2015-12-01

    A conjugated oligoelectrolyte (COE), which spontaneously aligns within cell membranes, was shown to completely inhibit H2 uptake by Geobacter sulfurreducens in microbial electrolysis cells. Coulombic efficiencies that were 490±95%, due to H2 recycling between the cathode and microorganisms on the anode, were reduced to 86±2% with COE addition. The use of the COE resulted in a 67-fold increase in H2 gas recovery, and a 4.4-fold increase in acetate removal. Current generation, H2 recovery and COD removals by Geobacter metallireducens, which cannot use H2, were unaffected by COE addition. These results show that this COE is an effective H2 uptake inhibitor, and that it can enable improved and sustained H2 gas recovery in this bioelectrochemical system.

  8. Importance of c-Type cytochromes for U(VI reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leang Ching

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to study the mechanism of U(VI reduction, the effect of deleting c-type cytochrome genes on the capacity of Geobacter sulfurreducens to reduce U(VI with acetate serving as the electron donor was investigated. Results The ability of several c-type cytochrome deficient mutants to reduce U(VI was lower than that of the wild type strain. Elimination of two confirmed outer membrane cytochromes and two putative outer membrane cytochromes significantly decreased (ca. 50–60% the ability of G. sulfurreducens to reduce U(VI. Involvement in U(VI reduction did not appear to be a general property of outer membrane cytochromes, as elimination of two other confirmed outer membrane cytochromes, OmcB and OmcC, had very little impact on U(VI reduction. Among the periplasmic cytochromes, only MacA, proposed to transfer electrons from the inner membrane to the periplasm, appeared to play a significant role in U(VI reduction. A subpopulation of both wild type and U(VI reduction-impaired cells, 24–30%, accumulated amorphous uranium in the periplasm. Comparison of uranium-accumulating cells demonstrated a similar amount of periplasmic uranium accumulation in U(VI reduction-impaired and wild type G. sulfurreducens. Assessment of the ability of the various suspensions to reduce Fe(III revealed no correlation between the impact of cytochrome deletion on U(VI reduction and reduction of Fe(III hydroxide and chelated Fe(III. Conclusion This study indicates that c-type cytochromes are involved in U(VI reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens. The data provide new evidence for extracellular uranium reduction by G. sulfurreducens but do not rule out the possibility of periplasmic uranium reduction. Occurrence of U(VI reduction at the cell surface is supported by the significant impact of elimination of outer membrane cytochromes on U(VI reduction and the lack of correlation between periplasmic uranium accumulation and the capacity for uranium

  9. Unraveling the electron transfer processes of a nanowire protein from Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Mónica N; Fernandes, Ana P; Salgueiro, Carlos A; Paquete, Catarina M

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular electron transfer metabolism of Geobacter sulfurreducens is sustained by several multiheme c-type cytochromes. One of these is the dodecaheme cytochrome GSU1996 that belongs to a new sub-class of c-type cytochromes. GSU1996 is composed by four similar triheme domains (A–D). The C-terminal half of the molecule encompasses the domains C and D, which are connected by a small linker and the N-terminal half of the protein contains two domains (A and B) that form one structural unit. It was proposed that this protein works as an electrically conductive device in G. sulfurreducens, transferring electrons within the periplasm or to outer-membrane cytochromes. In this work, a novel strategy was applied to characterize in detail the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the hexaheme fragment CD of GSU1996. This characterization revealed the electron transfer process of GSU1996 for the first time, showing that a heme at the edge of the C-terminal of the protein is thermodynamic and kinetically competent to receive electrons from physiological redox partners. This information contributes towards understanding how this new sub-class of cytochromes functions as nanowires, and also increases the current knowledge of the extracellular electron transfer mechanisms in G. sulfurreducens.

  10. Structure of the type IVa major pilin from the electrically conductive bacterial nanowires of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Patrick N; Mueller, Karl T

    2013-10-11

    Several species of δ proteobacteria are capable of reducing insoluble metal oxides as well as other extracellular electron acceptors. These bacteria play a critical role in the cycling of minerals in subsurface environments, sediments, and groundwater. In some species of bacteria such as Geobacter sulfurreducens, the transport of electrons is proposed to be facilitated by filamentous fibers that are referred to as bacterial nanowires. These nanowires are polymeric assemblies of proteins belonging to the type IVa family of pilin proteins and are mainly comprised of one subunit protein, PilA. Here, we report the high resolution solution NMR structure of the PilA protein from G. sulfurreducens determined in detergent micelles. The protein is >85% α-helical and exhibits similar architecture to the N-terminal regions of other non-conductive type IVa pilins. The detergent micelle interacts with the first 21 amino acids of the protein, indicating that this region likely associates with the bacterial inner membrane prior to fiber formation. A model of the G. sulfurreducens pilus fiber is proposed based on docking of this structure into the fiber model of the type IVa pilin from Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This model provides insight into the organization of aromatic amino acids that are important for electrical conduction.

  11. Structure of the Type IVa Major Pilin from the Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires of Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reardon, Patrick N.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2013-10-11

    Several species of bacteria are capable of reducing insoluble metal oxides as well as other extracellular electron acceptors. These bacteria play a critical role in the cycling of minerals in subsurface environments, sediments, and groundwater. In some species of bacteria, such as Geobacter sulfurreducens, the transport of electrons is facilitated by filamentous fibers that are referred to as bacterial nanowires. These nanowires belong to the type IVa family of pilin proteins and are mainly comprised of one subunit protein, PilA. Here, we report the high resolution solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of the PilA protein from G. sulfurreducens determined in detergent micelles. The protein is over 85% α-helical and exhibits similar architecture to the N-terminal regions of other non-conductive type IVa pilins. The detergent micelle interacts with the first 21 amino acids of the protein, indicating that this region likely associates with the bacterial inner membrane prior to fiber formation. A model of the G. sulfurreducens pilus fiber is proposed based on docking of this structure into the fiber model of the type IVa pilin from Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This model provides insight into the organization of aromatic amino acids that are important for electrical conduction.

  12. Enhancing factors of electricity generation in a microbial fuel cell using Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Sun; Cha, Jaehwan; Kim, Dong-Hoon

    2012-10-01

    In this study, we investigated various cultural and operational factors to enhance electricity generation in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) using Geobacter sulfurreducens. The pure culture of G. sulfurreducens was cultivated using various substrates including acetate, malate, succinate, and butyrate, with fumarate as an electron acceptor. Cell growth was observed only in acetate-fed medium, when the cell concentrations increased 4-fold for 3 days. A high acetate concentration suppressed electricity generation. As the acetate concentration was increased from 5 to 20 mM, the power density dropped from 16 to 13 mW/m2, whereas the coulombic efficiency (CE) declined by about half. The immobilization of G. sulfurreducens on the anode considerably reduced the enrichment period from 15 to 7 days. Using argon gas to create an anaerobic condition in the anode chamber led to increased pH, and electricity generation subsequently dropped. When the plain carbon paper cathode was replaced by Pt-coated carbon paper (0.5 mg Pt/cm2), the CE increased greatly from 39% to 83%.

  13. U(VI) reduction by diverse outer surface c-type cytochromes of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Roberto; Leavitt, Janet J; Comolli, Luis R; Csencsits, Roseann; Janot, Noemie; Flanagan, Kelly A; Gray, Arianna S; Leang, Ching; Izallalen, Mounir; Mester, Tünde; Lovley, Derek R

    2013-10-01

    Early studies with Geobacter sulfurreducens suggested that outer-surface c-type cytochromes might play a role in U(VI) reduction, but it has recently been suggested that there is substantial U(VI) reduction at the surface of the electrically conductive pili known as microbial nanowires. This phenomenon was further investigated. A strain of G. sulfurreducens, known as Aro-5, which produces pili with substantially reduced conductivity reduced U(VI) nearly as well as the wild type, as did a strain in which the gene for PilA, the structural pilin protein, was deleted. In order to reduce rates of U(VI) reduction to levels less than 20% of the wild-type rates, it was necessary to delete the genes for the five most abundant outer surface c-type cytochromes of G. sulfurreducens. X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy demonstrated that whereas 83% ± 10% of the uranium associated with wild-type cells correspond to U(IV) after 4 h of incubation, with the quintuple mutant, 89% ± 10% of uranium was U(VI). Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersion spectroscopy revealed that wild-type cells did not precipitate uranium along pili as previously reported, but U(IV) was precipitated at the outer cell surface. These findings are consistent with those of previous studies, which have suggested that G. sulfurreducens requires outer-surface c-type cytochromes but not pili for the reduction of soluble extracellular electron acceptors.

  14. Interspecies electron transfer via hydrogen and formate rather than direct electrical connections in cocultures of Pelobacter carbinolicus and Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin M; Liu, Fanghua; Ueki, Toshiyuki; Nevin, Kelly; Summers, Zarath M; Lovley, Derek R

    2012-11-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) is an alternative to interspecies H(2)/formate transfer as a mechanism for microbial species to cooperatively exchange electrons during syntrophic metabolism. To understand what specific properties contribute to DIET, studies were conducted with Pelobacter carbinolicus, a close relative of Geobacter metallireducens, which is capable of DIET. P. carbinolicus grew in coculture with Geobacter sulfurreducens with ethanol as the electron donor and fumarate as the electron acceptor, conditions under which G. sulfurreducens formed direct electrical connections with G. metallireducens. In contrast to the cell aggregation associated with DIET, P. carbinolicus and G. sulfurreducens did not aggregate. Attempts to initiate cocultures with a genetically modified strain of G. sulfurreducens incapable of both H(2) and formate utilization were unsuccessful, whereas cocultures readily grew with mutant strains capable of formate but not H(2) uptake or vice versa. The hydrogenase mutant of G. sulfurreducens compensated, in cocultures, with significantly increased formate dehydrogenase gene expression. In contrast, the transcript abundance of a hydrogenase gene was comparable in cocultures with that for the formate dehydrogenase mutant of G. sulfurreducens or the wild type, suggesting that H(2) was the primary electron carrier in the wild-type cocultures. Cocultures were also initiated with strains of G. sulfurreducens that could not produce pili or OmcS, two essential components for DIET. The finding that P. carbinolicus exchanged electrons with G. sulfurreducens via interspecies transfer of H(2)/formate rather than DIET demonstrates that not all microorganisms that can grow syntrophically are capable of DIET and that closely related microorganisms may use significantly different strategies for interspecies electron exchange.

  15. Proteins involved in electron transfer to Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides by Geobacter sulfurreducens and Geobacter uraniireducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aklujkar, M; Coppi, M V; Leang, C; Kim, B C; Chavan, M A; Perpetua, L A; Giloteaux, L; Liu, A; Holmes, D E

    2013-03-01

    Whole-genome microarray analysis of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown on insoluble Fe(III) oxide or Mn(IV) oxide versus soluble Fe(III) citrate revealed significantly different expression patterns. The most upregulated genes, omcS and omcT, encode cell-surface c-type cytochromes, OmcS being required for Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxide reduction. Other electron transport genes upregulated on both metal oxides included genes encoding putative menaquinol : ferricytochrome c oxidoreductase complexes Cbc4 and Cbc5, periplasmic c-type cytochromes Dhc2 and PccF, outer membrane c-type cytochromes OmcC, OmcG and OmcV, multicopper oxidase OmpB, the structural components of electrically conductive pili, PilA-N and PilA-C, and enzymes that detoxify reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. Genes upregulated on Fe(III) oxide encode putative menaquinol : ferricytochrome c oxidoreductase complexes Cbc3 and Cbc6, periplasmic c-type cytochromes, including PccG and PccJ, and outer membrane c-type cytochromes, including OmcA, OmcE, OmcH, OmcL, OmcN, OmcO and OmcP. Electron transport genes upregulated on Mn(IV) oxide encode periplasmic c-type cytochromes PccR, PgcA, PpcA and PpcD, outer membrane c-type cytochromes OmaB/OmaC, OmcB and OmcZ, multicopper oxidase OmpC and menaquinone-reducing enzymes. Genetic studies indicated that MacA, OmcB, OmcF, OmcG, OmcH, OmcI, OmcJ, OmcM, OmcV and PccH, the putative Cbc5 complex subunit CbcC and the putative Cbc3 complex subunit CbcV are important for reduction of Fe(III) oxide but not essential for Mn(IV) oxide reduction. Gene expression patterns for Geobacter uraniireducens were similar. These results demonstrate that the physiology of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria differs significantly during growth on different insoluble and soluble electron acceptors and emphasize the importance of c-type cytochromes for extracellular electron transfer in G. sulfurreducens.

  16. Growth advantage in stationary-phase (GASP) phenotype in long-term survival strains of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmus, Ruth A; Liermann, Laura J; Brantley, Susan L; Tien, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens exists in the subsurface and has been identified in sites contaminated with radioactive metals, consistent with its ability to reduce metals under anaerobic conditions. The natural state of organisms in the environment is one that lacks access to high concentrations of nutrients, namely electron donors and terminal electron acceptors (TEAs). Most studies have investigated G. sulfurreducens under high-nutrient conditions or have enriched for it in environmental systems via acetate amendments. We replicated the starvation state through long-term batch culture of G. sulfurreducens, where both electron donor and TEA were scarce. The growth curve revealed lag, log, stationary, death, and survival phases using acetate as electron donor and either fumarate or iron(III) citrate as TEA. In survival phase, G. sulfurreducens persisted at a constant cell count for as long as 23 months without replenishment of growth medium. Geobacter sulfurreducens demonstrated an ability to acquire a growth advantage in stationary-phase phenotype (GASP), with strains derived from subpopulations from death- or survival phase being able to out-compete mid-log-phase populations when co-cultured. The molecular basis for GASP was not because of any detectable mutation in the rpoS gene (GSU1525) nor because of a mutation in a putative homolog to Escherichia coli lrp, GSU3370.

  17. Biochar as an electron shuttle for reductive dechlorination of pentachlorophenol by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Linpeng; Yuan, Yong; Tang, Jia; Wang, Yueqiang; Zhou, Shungui

    2015-11-01

    The reductive dechlorination of pentachlorophenol (PCP) by Geobacter sulfurreducens in the presence of different biochars was investigated to understand how biochars affect the bioreduction of environmental contaminants. The results indicated that biochars significantly accelerate electron transfer from cells to PCP, thus enhancing reductive dechlorination. The promotion effects of biochar (as high as 24-fold) in this process depend on its electron exchange capacity (EEC) and electrical conductivity (EC). A kinetic model revealed that the surface redox-active moieties (RAMs) and EC of biochar (900 °C) contributed to 56% and 41% of the biodegradation rate, respectively. This work demonstrates that biochars are efficient electron mediators for the dechlorination of PCP and that both the EC and RAMs of biochars play important roles in the electron transfer process.

  18. Biochar as an electron shuttle for reductive dechlorination of pentachlorophenol by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Linpeng; Yuan, Yong; Tang, Jia; Wang, Yueqiang; Zhou, Shungui

    2015-01-01

    The reductive dechlorination of pentachlorophenol (PCP) by Geobacter sulfurreducens in the presence of different biochars was investigated to understand how biochars affect the bioreduction of environmental contaminants. The results indicated that biochars significantly accelerate electron transfer from cells to PCP, thus enhancing reductive dechlorination. The promotion effects of biochar (as high as 24-fold) in this process depend on its electron exchange capacity (EEC) and electrical conductivity (EC). A kinetic model revealed that the surface redox-active moieties (RAMs) and EC of biochar (900 °C) contributed to 56% and 41% of the biodegradation rate, respectively. This work demonstrates that biochars are efficient electron mediators for the dechlorination of PCP and that both the EC and RAMs of biochars play important roles in the electron transfer process. PMID:26592958

  19. Selection of a variant of Geobacter sulfurreducens with enhanced capacity for current production in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hana; Nevin, Kelly P; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Franks, Ashely E; Klimes, Anna; Tender, Leonard M; Lovley, Derek R

    2009-08-15

    Geobacter sulfurreducens produces current densities in microbial fuel cells that are among the highest known for pure cultures. The possibility of adapting this organism to produce even higher current densities was evaluated. A system in which a graphite anode was poised at -400 mV (versus Ag/AgCl) was inoculated with the wild-type strain of G. sulfurreducens, strain DL-1. An isolate, designated strain KN400, was recovered from the biofilm after 5 months of growth on the electrode. KN400 was much more effective in current production than strain DL-1. This was apparent with anodes poised at -400 mV, as well as in systems run in true fuel cell mode. KN400 had current (7.6A/m(2)) and power (3.9 W/m(2)) densities that respectively were substantially higher than those of DL1 (1.4A/m(2) and 0.5 W/m(2)). On a per cell basis KN400 was more effective in current production than DL1, requiring thinner biofilms to make equivalent current. The enhanced capacity for current production in KN400 was associated with a greater abundance of electrically conductive microbial nanowires than DL1 and lower internal resistance (0.015 versus 0.130 Omega/m(2)) and mass transfer limitation in KN400 fuel cells. KN400 produced flagella, whereas DL1 does not. Surprisingly, KN400 had much less outer-surface c-type cytochromes than DL1. KN400 also had a greater propensity to form biofilms on glass or graphite than DL1, even when growing with the soluble electron acceptor, fumarate. These results demonstrate that it is possible to enhance the ability of microorganisms to electrochemically interact with electrodes with the appropriate selective pressure and that improved current production is associated with clear differences in the properties of the outer surface of the cell that may provide insights into the mechanisms for microbe-electrode interactions.

  20. Structural characterization of a β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase from Geobacter sulfurreducens and Geobacter metallireducens with succinic semialdehyde reductase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Zheng, Yi; Qin, Ling; Wang, Shihua; Buchko, Garry W; Garavito, R Michael

    2014-09-01

    Beta-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase (β-HAD) genes have been identified in all sequenced genomes of eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Their gene products catalyze the NAD(+)- or NADP(+)-dependent oxidation of various β-hydroxy acid substrates into their corresponding semialdehyde. In many fungal and bacterial genomes, multiple β-HAD genes are observed leading to the hypothesis that these gene products may have unique, uncharacterized metabolic roles specific to their species. The genomes of Geobacter sulfurreducens and Geobacter metallireducens each contain two potential β-HAD genes. The protein sequences of one pair of these genes, Gs-βHAD (Q74DE4) and Gm-βHAD (Q39R98), have 65% sequence identity and 77% sequence similarity with each other. Both proteins are observed to reduce succinic semialdehyde, a 4-carbon substrate instead of the typical β-HAD 3-carbon substrate, to γ-hydroxybutyric acid. To further explore the structural and functional characteristics of these two β-HADs with a less frequently observed substrate specificity, crystal structures for Gs-βHAD and Gm-βHAD in complex with NADP(+) were determined to a resolution of 1.89 Å and 2.07 Å, respectively. The structures of both proteins are similar, composed of 14 α-helices and nine β-strands organized into two domains. Domain 1 (1-165) adopts a typical Rossmann fold composed of two α/β units: a six-strand parallel β-sheet surrounded by six α-helices (α1-α6) followed by a mixed three-strand β-sheet surrounded by two α-helices (α7 and α8). Domain 2 (166-287) is composed of a bundle of seven α-helices (α9-α14). Four functional regions conserved in all β-HADs are spatially located near each other, with a buried molecule of NADP(+), at the interdomain cleft. Comparison of these Geobacter structures to a closely related β-HAD from Arabidopsis thaliana in the apo-NADP(+) and apo-substrate bound state suggests that NADP(+) binding effects a rigid body rotation between Domains 1 and 2. Bound

  1. Direct and quinone-mediated palladium reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens: mechanisms and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pat-Espadas, Aurora M; Razo-Flores, Elías; Rangel-Mendez, J Rene; Cervantes, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    Palladium(II) reduction to Pd(0) nanoparticles by Geobacter sulfurreducens was explored under conditions of neutral pH, 30 °C and concentrations of 25, 50, and 100 mg of Pd(II)/L aiming to investigate the effect of solid species of palladium on their microbial reduction. The influence of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate was reported to enhance the palladium reaction rate in an average of 1.7-fold and its addition is determining to achieve the reduction of solid species of palladium. Based on the obtained results two mechanisms are proposed: (1) direct, which is fully described considering interactions of amide, sulfur, and phosphoryl groups associated to proteins from bacteria on palladium reduction reaction, and (2) quinone-mediated, which implies multiheme c-type cytochromes participation. Speciation analysis and kinetic results were considered and integrated into a model to fit the experimental data that explain both mechanisms. This work provides elements for a better understanding of direct and quinone-mediated palladium reduction by G. sulfurreducens, which could facilitate metal recovery with concomitant formation of valuable palladium nanoparticles in industrial processes.

  2. Metabolic Profiling of Geobacter sulfurreducens during Industrial Bioprocess Scale-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamadali, Howbeer; Xu, Yun; Ellis, David I; Allwood, J William; Rattray, Nicholas J W; Correa, Elon; Alrabiah, Haitham; Lloyd, Jonathan R; Goodacre, Royston

    2015-05-15

    During the industrial scale-up of bioprocesses it is important to establish that the biological system has not changed significantly when moving from small laboratory-scale shake flasks or culturing bottles to an industrially relevant production level. Therefore, during upscaling of biomass production for a range of metal transformations, including the production of biogenic magnetite nanoparticles by Geobacter sulfurreducens, from 100-ml bench-scale to 5-liter fermentors, we applied Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy as a metabolic fingerprinting approach followed by the analysis of bacterial cell extracts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for metabolic profiling. FTIR results clearly differentiated between the phenotypic changes associated with different growth phases as well as the two culturing conditions. Furthermore, the clustering patterns displayed by multivariate analysis were in agreement with the turbidimetric measurements, which displayed an extended lag phase for cells grown in a 5-liter bioreactor (24 h) compared to those grown in 100-ml serum bottles (6 h). GC-MS analysis of the cell extracts demonstrated an overall accumulation of fumarate during the lag phase under both culturing conditions, coinciding with the detected concentrations of oxaloacetate, pyruvate, nicotinamide, and glycerol-3-phosphate being at their lowest levels compared to other growth phases. These metabolites were overlaid onto a metabolic network of G. sulfurreducens, and taking into account the levels of these metabolites throughout the fermentation process, the limited availability of oxaloacetate and nicotinamide would seem to be the main metabolic bottleneck resulting from this scale-up process. Additional metabolite-feeding experiments were carried out to validate the above hypothesis. Nicotinamide supplementation (1 mM) did not display any significant effects on the lag phase of G. sulfurreducens cells grown in the 100-ml serum bottles. However

  3. Structural insights into the modulation of the redox properties of two Geobacter sulfurreducens homologous triheme cytochromes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgado, L.; Bruix, M.; Orshonsky, V.; Londer, Y. Y.; Duke, N. E. C.; Yang, X.; Pokkuluri, P. R.; Schiffer, M.; Salgueiro, C. A.; Biosciences Division; Univ. Nova de Lisboa; Insti. de Quimica-Fisica

    2008-09-01

    The redox properties of a periplasmic triheme cytochrome, PpcB from Geobacter sulfurreducens, were studied by NMR and visible spectroscopy. The structure of PpcB was determined by X-ray diffraction. PpcB is homologous to PpcA (77% sequence identity), which mediates cytoplasmic electron transfer to extracellular acceptors and is crucial in the bioenergetic metabolism of Geobacter spp. The heme core structure of PpcB in solution, probed by 2D-NMR, was compared to that of PpcA. The results showed that the heme core structures of PpcB and PpcA in solution are similar, in contrast to their crystal structures where the heme cores of the two proteins differ from each other. NMR redox titrations were carried out for both proteins and the order of oxidation of the heme groups was determined. The microscopic properties of PpcB and PpcA redox centers showed important differences: (1) the order in which hemes become oxidized is III-I-IV for PpcB, as opposed to I-IV-III for PpcA; (2) the redox-Bohr effect is also different in the two proteins. The different redox features observed between PpcB and PpcA suggest that each protein uniquely modulates the properties of their co-factors to assure effectiveness in their respective metabolic pathways. The origins of the observed differences are discussed.

  4. Oxidation of acetate through reactions of the citric acid cycle by Geobacter sulfurreducens in pure culture and in syntrophic coculture

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA oxidized acetate to CO2 via citric acid cycle reactions during growth with acetate plus fumarate in pure culture, and with acetate plus nitrate in coculture with Wolinella succinogenes. Acetate was activated by succinyl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase and also via acetate kinase plus phosphotransacetylase. Citrate was formed by citrate synthase. Soluble isocitrate and malate dehydrogenases reduced NADP+ and NAD+, respectively. Oxidation of 2-oxoglutarate was me...

  5. A severe reduction in the cytochrome C content of Geobacter sulfurreducens eliminates its capacity for extracellular electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevez-Canales, Marta; Kuzume, Akiyoshi; Borjas, Zulema; Füeg, Michael; Lovley, Derek; Wandlowski, Thomas; Esteve-Núñez, Abraham

    2015-04-01

    The ability of Geobacter species to transfer electrons outside the cell enables them to play an important role in a number of biogeochemical and bioenergy processes. Gene deletion studies have implicated periplasmic and outer-surface c-type cytochromes in this extracellular electron transfer. However, even when as many as five c-type cytochrome genes have been deleted, some capacity for extracellular electron transfer remains. In order to evaluate the role of c-type cytochromes in extracellular electron transfer, Geobacter sulfurreducens was grown in a low-iron medium that included the iron chelator (2,2'-bipyridine) to further sequester iron. Haem-staining revealed that the cytochrome content of cells grown in this manner was 15-fold lower than in cells exposed to a standard iron-containing medium. The low cytochrome abundance was confirmed by in situ nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (NERS). The cytochrome-depleted cells reduced fumarate to succinate as well as the cytochrome-replete cells do, but were unable to reduce Fe(III) citrate or to exchange electrons with a graphite electrode. These results demonstrate that c-type cytochromes are essential for extracellular electron transfer by G. sulfurreducens. The strategy for growing cytochrome-depleted G. sulfurreducens will also greatly aid future physiological studies of Geobacter species and other microorganisms capable of extracellular electron transfer.

  6. Structural characterization of a β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase from Geobacter sulfurreducens and Geobacter metallireducens with succinic semialdehyde reductase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Zheng, Yi; Qin, Ling; Wang, Shihua; Buchko, Garry W.; Garavito, Michael R.

    2014-07-30

    Beta-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase (β-HAD) genes have been identified in all sequenced genomes of eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Their gene products catalyze the NAD+- or NADP+-dependent oxidation of various β-hydroxy acid substrates into their corresponding semialdehyde. In many fungal and bacterial genomes, multiple β-HAD genes are observed leading to the hypothesis that these gene products may have unique, uncharacterized metabolic roles specific to their species. The genomes of Geobacter sulfurreducens and Geobacter metallireducens each contain two potential β-HAD genes. The protein sequences of one pair of these genes, Gs-βHAD (Q74DE4) and Gm-βHAD (Q39R98), have 65% sequence identity and 77% sequence similarity with each other. Both proteins reduce succinic semialdehyde, a metabolite of the GABA shunt. To further explore the structural and functional characteristics of these two β-HADs with a potentially unique substrate specificity, crystal structures for Gs-βHAD and Gm-βHAD in complex with NADP+ were determined to a resolution of 1.89 Å and 2.07 Å, respectively. The structure of both proteins are similar, composed of 14 α-helices and nine β-strands organized into two domains. Domain One (1-165) adopts a typical Rossmann fold composed of two α/β units: a six-strand parallel β-sheet surrounded by six α-helices (α1 – α6) followed by a mixed three-strand β-sheet surrounded by two α-helices (α7 and α8). Domain Two (166-287) is composed of a bundle of seven α-helices (α9 – α14). Four functional regions conserved in all β-HADs are spatially located near each other at the interdomain cleft in both Gs-βHAD and Gm-βHAD with a buried molecule of NADP+. The structural features of Gs-βHAD and Gm-βHAD are described in relation to the four conserved consensus sequences characteristic of β-HADs and the potential biochemical importance of these enzymes as an alternative pathway for the degradation of succinic semialdehyde.

  7. Rational engineering of Geobacter sulfurreducens electron transfer components: a foundation for building improved Geobacter-based bioelectrochemical technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana M Dantas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiheme cytochromes have been implicated in Geobacter sulfurreducens (Gs extracellular electron transfer (EET. These proteins are potential targets to improve EET and enhance bioremediation and electrical current production by Gs. However, the functional characterization of multiheme cytochromes is particularly complex due to the co-existence of several microstates in solution, connecting the fully reduced and fully oxidized states. Over the last decade, new strategies have been developed to characterize multiheme redox proteins functionally and structurally. These strategies were used to reveal the functional mechanism of Gs multiheme cytochromes and also to identify key residues in these proteins for EET. In previous studies, we set the foundations for enhancement of the EET abilities of Gs by characterizing a family of five triheme cytochromes (PpcA-E. These periplasmic cytochromes are implicated in electron transfer between the oxidative reactions of metabolism in the cytoplasm and the reduction of extracellular terminal electron acceptors at the cell’s outer surface. The results obtained suggested that PpcA can couple e-/H+ transfer, a property that might contribute to the proton electrochemical gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane for metabolic energy production. The structural and functional properties of PpcA were characterized in detail and used for rational design of a family of 23 single site PpcA mutants. In this review, we summarize the functional characterization of the native and mutant proteins. Mutants that retain the mechanistic features of PpcA and adopt preferential e-/H+ transfer pathways at lower reduction potential values compared to the wild-type protein were selected for in vivo studies as the best candidates to increase the electron transfer rate of Gs. For the first time Gs strains have been manipulated by the introduction of mutant forms of essential proteins with the aim to develop and improve

  8. Thermodynamic Characterization of a Triheme Cytochrome Family from Geobacter sulfurreducens Reveals Mechanistic and Functional Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Leonor; Bruix, Marta; Pessanha, Miguel; Londer, Yuri Y.; Salgueiro, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A family of five periplasmic triheme cytochromes (PpcA-E) was identified in Geobacter sulfurreducens, where they play a crucial role by driving electron transfer from the cytoplasm to the cell exterior and assisting the reduction of extracellular acceptors. The thermodynamic characterization of PpcA using NMR and visible spectroscopies was previously achieved under experimental conditions identical to those used for the triheme cytochrome c7 from Desulfuromonas acetoxidans. Under such conditions, attempts to obtain NMR data were complicated by the relatively fast intermolecular electron exchange. This work reports the detailed thermodynamic characterization of PpcB, PpcD, and PpcE under optimal experimental conditions. The thermodynamic characterization of PpcA was redone under these new conditions to allow a proper comparison of the redox properties with those of other members of this family. The heme reduction potentials of the four proteins are negative, differ from each other, and cover different functional ranges. These reduction potentials are strongly modulated by heme-heme interactions and by interactions with protonated groups (the redox-Bohr effect) establishing different cooperative networks for each protein, which indicates that they are designed to perform different functions in the cell. PpcA and PpcD appear to be optimized to interact with specific redox partners involving e−/H+ transfer via different mechanisms. Although no evidence of preferential electron transfer pathway or e−/H+ coupling was found for PpcB and PpcE, the difference in their working potential ranges suggests that they may also have different physiological redox partners. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to characterize homologous cytochromes from the same microorganism and provide evidence of their different mechanistic and functional properties. These findings provide an explanation for the coexistence of five periplasmic triheme cytochromes in G

  9. Redox potential as a master variable controlling pathways of metal reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levar, Caleb E; Hoffman, Colleen L; Dunshee, Aubrey J; Toner, Brandy M; Bond, Daniel R

    2017-01-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens uses at least two different pathways to transport electrons out of the inner membrane quinone pool before reducing acceptors beyond the outer membrane. When growing on electrodes poised at oxidizing potentials, the CbcL-dependent pathway operates at or below redox potentials of –0.10 V vs the standard hydrogen electrode, whereas the ImcH-dependent pathway operates only above this value. Here, we provide evidence that G. sulfurreducens also requires different electron transfer proteins for reduction of a wide range of Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-(oxyhydr)oxides, and must transition from a high- to low-potential pathway during reduction of commonly studied soluble and insoluble metal electron acceptors. Freshly precipitated Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides could not be reduced by mutants lacking the high-potential pathway. Aging these minerals by autoclaving did not change their powder X-ray diffraction pattern, but restored reduction by mutants lacking the high-potential pathway. Mutants lacking the low-potential, CbcL-dependent pathway had higher growth yields with both soluble and insoluble Fe(III). Together, these data suggest that the ImcH-dependent pathway exists to harvest additional energy when conditions permit, and CbcL switches on to allow respiration closer to thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. With evidence of multiple pathways within a single organism, the study of extracellular respiration should consider not only the crystal structure or solubility of a mineral electron acceptor, but rather the redox potential, as this variable determines the energetic reward affecting reduction rates, extents, and final microbial growth yields in the environment. PMID:28045456

  10. Diving into the redox properties of Geobacter sulfurreducens cytochromes: a model for extracellular electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Telma C; Silva, Marta A; Morgado, Leonor; Dantas, Joana M; Salgueiro, Carlos A

    2015-05-28

    Geobacter bacteria have a remarkable respiratory versatility that includes the dissimilatory reduction of insoluble metal oxides in natural habitats and electron transfer to electrode surfaces from which electricity can be harvested. In both cases, electrons need to be exported from the cell interior to the exterior via a mechanism designated as extracellular electron transfer (EET). Several c-type cytochromes from G. sulfurreducens (Gs) were identified as key players in this process. Biochemical and biophysical data have been obtained for ten Gs cytochromes, including inner-membrane associated (MacA), periplasmic (PpcA, PpcB, PpcC, PpcD, PpcE and GSU1996) and outer membrane-associated (OmcF, OmcS and OmcZ). The redox properties of these cytochromes have been determined, except for PpcC and GSU1996. In this perspective, the reduction potentials of these two cytochromes were determined by potentiometric redox titrations followed by visible spectroscopy. The data obtained are taken together with those available for other key cytochromes to present a thorough overview of the current knowledge of Gs EET mechanisms and provide a possible rationalization for the existence of several multiheme cytochromes involved in the same respiratory pathways.

  11. Microbial reduction of Fe(III) in hematite nanoparticles by Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Beizhan; Wrenn, Brian A; Basak, Soubir; Biswas, Pratim; Giammar, Daniel E

    2008-09-01

    The rates of microbial Fe(III) reduction of three sizes of hematite nanoparticles by Geobacter sulfurreducens were measured under two H2 partial pressures (0.01 and 1 atm) and three pH (7.0, 7.5, and 8.0) conditions. Hematite particles with mean primary particle sizes of 10, 30, and 50 nm were synthesized by a novel aerosol method that allows tight control of the particle size distribution. The mass-normalized reduction rates of the 10 and 30 nm particles were comparable to each other and higher than the rate for the 50 nm particles. However, the surface area-normalized rate was highest for the 30 nm particles. Consistent with a previously published model, the reduction rates are likely to be proportional to the bacteria-hematite contact area and not to the total hematite surface area. Surface area-normalized iron reduction rates were higher than those reported in previous studies, which may be due to the sequestration of Fe(II) through formation of vivianite. Similar initial reduction rates were observed under all pH and H2 conditions studied.

  12. Control of nanoparticle size, reactivity and magnetic properties during the bioproduction of magnetite by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, J. M.; Telling, N. D.; Coker, V. S.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Laan, G. van der; Arenholz, E.; Tuna, F.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2011-08-02

    The bioproduction of nano-scale magnetite by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria offers a potentially tunable, environmentally benign route to magnetic nanoparticle synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to control the size of magnetite nanoparticles produced by Geobacter sulfurreducens, by adjusting the total biomass introduced at the start of the process. The particles have a narrow size distribution and can be controlled within the range of 10-50 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that controlled production of a number of different biominerals is possible via this method including goethite, magnetite and siderite, but their formation is strongly dependent upon the rate of Fe(III) reduction and total concentration and rate of Fe(II) produced by the bacteria during the reduction process. Relative cation distributions within the structure of the nanoparticles has been investigated by X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and indicates the presence of a highly reduced surface layer which is not observed when magnetite is produced through abiotic methods. The enhanced Fe(II)-rich surface, combined with small particle size, has important environmental applications such as in the reductive bioremediation of organics, radionuclides and metals. In the case of Cr(VI), as a model high-valence toxic metal, optimised biogenic magnetite is able to reduce and sequester the toxic hexavalent chromium very efficiently in the less harmful trivalent form.

  13. Control of nanoparticle size, reactivity and magnetic properties during the bioproduction of magnetite by Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J M; Telling, N D; Coker, V S; Pattrick, R A D; van der Laan, G; Arenholz, E; Tuna, F; Lloyd, J R

    2011-11-11

    The bioproduction of nanoscale magnetite by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria offers a potentially tunable, environmentally benign route to magnetic nanoparticle synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to control the size of magnetite nanoparticles produced by Geobacter sulfurreducens by adjusting the total biomass introduced at the start of the process. The particles have a narrow size distribution and can be controlled within the range of 10-50 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that controlled production of a number of different biominerals is possible via this method including goethite, magnetite and siderite, but their formation is strongly dependent upon the rate of Fe(III) reduction and total concentration and rate of Fe(II) produced by the bacteria during the reduction process. Relative cation distributions within the structure of the nanoparticles have been investigated by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and indicate the presence of a highly reduced surface layer which is not observed when magnetite is produced through abiotic methods. The enhanced Fe(II)-rich surface, combined with small particle size, has important environmental applications such as in the reductive bioremediation of organics, radionuclides and metals. In the case of Cr(VI), as a model high-valence toxic metal, optimized biogenic magnetite is able to reduce and sequester the toxic hexavalent chromium very efficiently to the less harmful trivalent form.

  14. Control of nanoparticle size, reactivity and magnetic properties during the bioproduction of magnetite by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J. M.; Telling, N. D.; Coker, V. S.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; van der Laan, G.; Arenholz, E.; Tuna, F.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2011-11-01

    The bioproduction of nanoscale magnetite by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria offers a potentially tunable, environmentally benign route to magnetic nanoparticle synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to control the size of magnetite nanoparticles produced by Geobacter sulfurreducens by adjusting the total biomass introduced at the start of the process. The particles have a narrow size distribution and can be controlled within the range of 10-50 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that controlled production of a number of different biominerals is possible via this method including goethite, magnetite and siderite, but their formation is strongly dependent upon the rate of Fe(III) reduction and total concentration and rate of Fe(II) produced by the bacteria during the reduction process. Relative cation distributions within the structure of the nanoparticles have been investigated by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and indicate the presence of a highly reduced surface layer which is not observed when magnetite is produced through abiotic methods. The enhanced Fe(II)-rich surface, combined with small particle size, has important environmental applications such as in the reductive bioremediation of organics, radionuclides and metals. In the case of Cr(VI), as a model high-valence toxic metal, optimized biogenic magnetite is able to reduce and sequester the toxic hexavalent chromium very efficiently to the less harmful trivalent form.

  15. Backbone, side chain and heme resonance assignments of cytochrome OmcF from Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Joana M; Silva E Sousa, Marta; Salgueiro, Carlos A; Bruix, Marta

    2015-10-01

    Gene knockout studies on Geobacter sulfurreducens (Gs) cells showed that the outer membrane cytochrome OmcF is involved in respiratory pathways leading to the extracellular reduction of Fe(III) citrate and U(VI) oxide. In addition, microarray analysis of OmcF-deficient mutant versus the wild-type strain revealed that many of the genes with decreased transcript level were those whose expression is upregulated in cells grown with a graphite electrode as electron acceptor. This suggests that OmcF also regulates the electron transfer to electrode surfaces and the concomitant electrical current production by Gs in microbial fuel cells. Extracellular electron transfer processes (EET) constitute nowadays the foundations to develop biotechnological applications in biofuel production, bioremediation and bioenergy. Therefore, the structural characterization of OmcF is a fundamental step to understand the mechanisms underlying EET. Here, we report the complete assignment of the heme proton signals together with (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone and side chain assignments of the OmcF, excluding the hydrophobic residues of the N-terminal predicted lipid anchor.

  16. Scale-up of the production of highly reactive biogenic magnetite nanoparticles using Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J M; Muhamadali, H; Coker, V S; Cooper, J; Lloyd, J R

    2015-06-06

    Although there are numerous examples of large-scale commercial microbial synthesis routes for organic bioproducts, few studies have addressed the obvious potential for microbial systems to produce inorganic functional biomaterials at scale. Here we address this by focusing on the production of nanoscale biomagnetite particles by the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens, which was scaled up successfully from laboratory- to pilot plant-scale production, while maintaining the surface reactivity and magnetic properties which make this material well suited to commercial exploitation. At the largest scale tested, the bacterium was grown in a 50 l bioreactor, harvested and then inoculated into a buffer solution containing Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide and an electron donor and mediator, which promoted the formation of magnetite in under 24 h. This procedure was capable of producing up to 120 g of biomagnetite. The particle size distribution was maintained between 10 and 15 nm during scale-up of this second step from 10 ml to 10 l, with conserved magnetic properties and surface reactivity; the latter demonstrated by the reduction of Cr(VI). The process presented provides an environmentally benign route to magnetite production and serves as an alternative to harsher synthetic techniques, with the clear potential to be used to produce kilogram to tonne quantities.

  17. High methylation rates of mercury bound to cysteine by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Jeffra K.; Morel, François M. M.

    2009-02-01

    Methylmercury bioaccumulates in aquatic food chains and is able to cross the blood-brain barrier, making this organometallic compound a much more worrisome pollutant than inorganic mercury. We know that methylation of inorganic mercury is carried out by microbes in the anoxic layers of sediments and water columns, but the factors that control the extent of this methylation are poorly known. Mercury methylation is generally thought to be catalysed accidentally by some methylating enzyme, and it has been suggested that cellular mercury uptake results from passive diffusion of neutral mercury complexes. Here, we show that mercury methylation by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is greatly enhanced in the presence of low concentrations of the amino acid cysteine. The formation of a mercury-cysteine complex promotes both the uptake of inorganic mercury by the bacteria and the enzymatic formation of methylmercury, which is subsequently released to the external medium. Our results suggest that mercury uptake and methylation by microbes are controlled more tightly by biological mechanisms than previously thought, and that the formation of specific mercury complexes in anoxic waters modulates the efficiency of the microbial methylation of mercury.

  18. Reduction of palladium and production of nano-catalyst by Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pat-Espadas, Aurora M; Razo-Flores, Elías; Rangel-Mendez, J Rene; Cervantes, Francisco J

    2013-11-01

    The present study is the first report on the ability of Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA to reduce Pd(II) and produce Pd(0) nano-catalyst, using acetate as electron donor at neutral pH (7.0 ± 0.1) and 30 °C. The microbial production of Pd(0) nanoparticles (NPs) was greatly enhanced by the presence of the redox mediator, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) when compared with controls lacking AQDS and cell-free controls. A cell dry weight (CDW) concentration of 800 mg/L provided a larger surface area for Pd(0) NPs deposition than a CDW concentration of 400 mg/L. Sample analysis by transmission electron microscopy revealed the formation of extracellular Pd(0) NPs ranging from 5 to 15 nm and X-ray diffraction confirmed the Pd(0) nature of the nano-catalyst produced. The present findings open the possibility for a new alternative to synthesize Pd(0) nano-catalyst and the potential application for microbial metal recovery from metal-containing waste streams.

  19. Investigating different mechanisms for biogenic selenite transformations: Geobacter sulfurreducens, Shewanella oneidensis and Veillonella atypica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, C.I.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Law, N.; Charnock, J.M.; Coker, V.S.; Fellowes, J.W.; Oremland, R.S.; Lloyd, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The metal-reducing bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens, Shewanella oneidensis and Veillonella atypica, use different mechanisms to transform toxic, bioavailable sodium selenite to less toxic, non-mobile elemental selenium and then to selenide in anaerobic environments, offering the potential for in situ and ex situ bioremediation of contaminated soils, sediments, industrial effluents, and agricultural drainage waters. The products of these reductive transformations depend on both the organism involved and the reduction conditions employed, in terms of electron donor and exogenous extracellular redox mediator. The intermediary phase involves the precipitation of elemental selenium nanospheres and the potential role of proteins in the formation of these structures is discussed. The bionanomineral phases produced during these transformations, including both elemental selenium nanospheres and metal selenide nanoparticles, have catalytic, semiconducting and light-emitting properties, which may have unique applications in the realm of nanophotonics. This research offers the potential to combine remediation of contaminants with the development of environmentally friendly manufacturing pathways for novel bionanominerals. ?? 2009 Taylor & Francis.

  20. Structural and biochemical characterization of DHC2, a novel diheme cytochrome c from Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmann, Daniel; Einsle, Oliver

    2005-09-20

    Multiheme cytochromes c constitute a widespread class of proteins with essential functions in electron transfer and enzymatic catalysis. Their functional properties are in part determined by the relative arrangement of multiple heme cofactors, which in many cases have been found to pack in conserved interaction motifs. Understanding the significance of these motifs is crucial for the elucidation of the highly optimized properties of multiheme cytochromes c, but their spectroscopic investigation is often hindered by the large number and efficient coupling of the individual centers and the limited availability of recombinant protein material. We have identified a diheme cytochrome c, DHC2, from the metal-reducing soil bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens and determined its crystal structure by the method of multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD). The two heme groups of DHC2 pack into one of the typical heme interaction motifs observed in larger multiheme cytochromes, but because of the absence of further, interfering cofactors, the properties of this heme packing motif can be conveniently studied in detail. Spectroscopic properties (UV-vis and EPR) of the protein are typical for cytochromes containing low-spin Fe(III) centers with bis-histidinyl coordination. Midpoint potentials for the two heme groups have been determined to be -135 and -289 mV by potentiometric redox titrations. DHC2 has been produced by recombinant expression in Escherichia coli using the accessory plasmid pEC86 and is therefore accessible for systematic mutational studies in further investigating the properties of heme packing interactions in cytochromes c.

  1. Computational and experimental analysis of redundancy in the central metabolism of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Segura

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous model-based analysis of the metabolic network of Geobacter sulfurreducens suggested the existence of several redundant pathways. Here, we identified eight sets of redundant pathways that included redundancy for the assimilation of acetate, and for the conversion of pyruvate into acetyl-CoA. These equivalent pathways and two other sub-optimal pathways were studied using 5 single-gene deletion mutants in those pathways for the evaluation of the predictive capacity of the model. The growth phenotypes of these mutants were studied under 12 different conditions of electron donor and acceptor availability. The comparison of the model predictions with the resulting experimental phenotypes indicated that pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase is the only activity able to convert pyruvate into acetyl-CoA. However, the results and the modeling showed that the two acetate activation pathways present are not only active, but needed due to the additional role of the acetyl-CoA transferase in the TCA cycle, probably reflecting the adaptation of these bacteria to acetate utilization. In other cases, the data reconciliation suggested additional capacity constraints that were confirmed with biochemical assays. The results demonstrate the need to experimentally verify the activity of key enzymes when developing in silico models of microbial physiology based on sequence-based reconstruction of metabolic networks.

  2. Low Energy Atomic Models Suggesting a Pilus Structure that could Account for Electrical Conductivity of Geobacter sulfurreducens Pili.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ke; Malvankar, Nikhil S; Shu, Chuanjun; Martz, Eric; Lovley, Derek R; Sun, Xiao

    2016-03-22

    The metallic-like electrical conductivity of Geobacter sulfurreducens pili has been documented with multiple lines of experimental evidence, but there is only a rudimentary understanding of the structural features which contribute to this novel mode of biological electron transport. In order to determine if it was feasible for the pilin monomers of G. sulfurreducens to assemble into a conductive filament, theoretical energy-minimized models of Geobacter pili were constructed with a previously described approach, in which pilin monomers are assembled using randomized structural parameters and distance constraints. The lowest energy models from a specific group of predicted structures lacked a central channel, in contrast to previously existing pili models. In half of the no-channel models the three N-terminal aromatic residues of the pilin monomer are arranged in a potentially electrically conductive geometry, sufficiently close to account for the experimentally observed metallic like conductivity of the pili that has been attributed to overlapping pi-pi orbitals of aromatic amino acids. These atomic resolution models capable of explaining the observed conductive properties of Geobacter pili are a valuable tool to guide further investigation of the metallic-like conductivity of the pili, their role in biogeochemical cycling, and applications in bioenergy and bioelectronics.

  3. A defined co-culture of Geobacter sulfurreducens and Escherichia coli in a membrane-less microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdakos, Nicholas; Marsili, Enrico; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

    2014-04-01

    Wastewater-fed microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a promising technology to treat low-organic carbon wastewater and recover part of the chemical energy in wastewater as electrical power. However, the interactions between electrochemically active and fermentative microorganisms cannot be easily studied in wastewater-fed MFCs because of their complex microbial communities. Defined co-culture MFCs provide a detailed understanding of such interactions. In this study, we characterize the extracellular metabolites in laboratory-scale membrane-less MFCs inoculated with Geobacter sulfurreducens and Escherichia coli co-culture and compare them with pure culture MFCs. G. sulfurreducens MFCs are sparged to maintain anaerobic conditions, while co-culture MFCs rely on E. coli for oxygen removal. G. sulfurreducens MFCs have a power output of 128 mW m(-2) , compared to 63 mW m(-2) from the co-culture MFCs. Analysis of metabolites shows that succinate production in co-culture MFCs decreases current production by G. sulfurreducens and that the removal of succinate is responsible for the increased current density in the late co-culture MFCs. Interestingly, pH adjustment is not required for co-culture MFCs but a base addition is necessary for E. coli MFCs and cultures in vials. Our results show that defined co-culture MFCs provide clear insights into metabolic interactions among bacteria while maintaining a low operational complexity.

  4. Geobacter sulfurreducens subsp. ethanolicus, subsp. nov., an ethanol-utilizing dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium from a lotus field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viulu, Samson; Nakamura, Kohei; Kojima, Akihiro; Yoshiyasu, Yuki; Saitou, Sakiko; Takamizawa, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    An ethanol-utilizing Fe(III)-reducing bacterial strain, OSK2A(T), was isolated from a lotus field in Aichi, Japan. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of OSK2A(T) and related strains placed it within Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA(T). Strain OSK2A(T) was shown to be a Gram-negative, motile, rod-shaped bacterium, strictly anaerobic, 0.76-1.65 µm long and 0.28-0.45 μm wide. Its growth occurred at 20-40℃, pH 6.0-8.1, and it tolerated up to 1% NaCl. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 61.2 mol% and DNA-DNA hybridization value with Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA(T) was 60.7%. The major respiratory quinone was MK-8. The major fatty acids were 16:1 ω7c, 16:0, 14:0, 15:0 iso, 16:1 ω5c, and 18:1 ω7c. Strain OSK2A(T) could utilize H2, ethanol, acetate, lactate, pyruvate, and formate as substrates with Fe(III)-citrate as electron acceptor. Amorphous Fe(III) hydroxide, Fe(III)-NTA, fumarate, malate, and elemental sulfur were utilized as electron acceptors with either acetate or ethanol as substrates. Results obtained from physiological, DNA-DNA hybridization, and chemotaxonomic tests support genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strain OSK2A(T) from its closest relative. The isolate is assigned as a novel subspecies with the name Geobacter sulfurreducens subsp. ethanolicus, subsp. nov. (type strain OSK2A(T)=DSMZ 26126(T)=JCM 18752(T)).

  5. OmcB, a c-Type Polyheme Cytochrome, Involved in Fe(III) Reduction in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Microorganisms in the family Geobacteraceae are the predominant Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms in a variety of subsurface environments in which Fe(III) reduction is an important process, but little is known about the mechanisms for electron transport to Fe(III) in these organisms. The Geobacter sulfurreducens genome was found to contain a 10-kb chromosomal duplication consisting of two tandem three-gene clusters. The last genes of the two clusters, designated omcB and omcC, encode putative o...

  6. Role of Geobacter sulfurreducens Outer Surface c-Type Cytochromes in Reduction of Soil Humic Acid and Anthraquinone-2,6-Disulfonate▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voordeckers, James W.; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Izallalen, Mounir; Lovley, Derek R.

    2010-01-01

    Deleting individual genes for outer surface c-type cytochromes in Geobacter sulfurreducens partially inhibited the reduction of humic substances and anthraquinone-2,6,-disulfonate. Complete inhibition was obtained only when five of these genes were simultaneously deleted, suggesting that diverse outer surface cytochromes can contribute to the reduction of humic substances and other extracellular quinones. PMID:20154112

  7. Role of Geobacter sulfurreducens outer surface c-type cytochromes in reduction of soil humic acid and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voordeckers, James W; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Izallalen, Mounir; Lovley, Derek R

    2010-04-01

    Deleting individual genes for outer surface c-type cytochromes in Geobacter sulfurreducens partially inhibited the reduction of humic substances and anthraquinone-2,6,-disulfonate. Complete inhibition was obtained only when five of these genes were simultaneously deleted, suggesting that diverse outer surface cytochromes can contribute to the reduction of humic substances and other extracellular quinones.

  8. Redox- and pH-linked conformational changes in triheme cytochrome PpcA from Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Leonor; Bruix, Marta; Pokkuluri, P Raj; Salgueiro, Carlos A; Turner, David L

    2017-01-15

    The periplasmic triheme cytochrome PpcA from Geobacter sulfurreducens is highly abundant; it is the likely reservoir of electrons to the outer surface to assist the reduction of extracellular terminal acceptors; these include insoluble metal oxides in natural habitats and electrode surfaces from which electricity can be harvested. A detailed thermodynamic characterization of PpcA showed that it has an important redox-Bohr effect that might implicate the protein in e(-)/H(+) coupling mechanisms to sustain cellular growth. This functional mechanism requires control of both the redox state and the protonation state. In the present study, isotope-labeled PpcA was produced and the three-dimensional structure of PpcA in the oxidized form was determined by NMR. This is the first solution structure of a G. sulfurreducens cytochrome in the oxidized state. The comparison of oxidized and reduced structures revealed that the heme I axial ligand geometry changed and there were other significant changes in the segments near heme I. The pH-linked conformational rearrangements observed in the vicinity of the redox-Bohr center, both in the oxidized and reduced structures, constitute the structural basis for the differences observed in the pKa values of the redox-Bohr center, providing insights into the e(-)/H(+) coupling molecular mechanisms driven by PpcA in G. sulfurreducens. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  9. Structural characterization of a family of cytochromes c(7) involved in Fe(III) respiration by Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokkuluri, P R; Londer, Y Y; Yang, X; Duke, N E C; Erickson, J; Orshonsky, V; Johnson, G; Schiffer, M

    2010-02-01

    Periplasmic cytochromes c(7) are important in electron transfer pathway(s) in Fe(III) respiration by Geobacter sulfurreducens. The genome of G. sulfurreducens encodes a family of five 10-kDa, three-heme cytochromes c(7). The sequence identity between the five proteins (designated PpcA, PpcB, PpcC, PpcD, and PpcE) varies between 45% and 77%. Here, we report the high-resolution structures of PpcC, PpcD, and PpcE determined by X-ray diffraction. This new information made it possible to compare the sequences and structures of the entire family. The triheme cores are largely conserved but are not identical. We observed changes, due to different crystal packing, in the relative positions of the hemes between two molecules in the crystal. The overall protein fold of the cytochromes is similar. The structure of PpcD differs most from that of the other homologs, which is not obvious from the sequence comparisons of the family. Interestingly, PpcD is the only cytochrome c(7) within the family that has higher abundance when G. sulfurreducens is grown on insoluble Fe(III) oxide compared to ferric citrate. The structures have the highest degree of conservation around "heme IV"; the protein surface around this heme is positively charged in all of the proteins, and therefore all cytochromes c(7) could interact with similar molecules involving this region. The structures and surface characteristics of the proteins near the other two hemes, "heme I" and "heme III", differ within the family. The above observations suggest that each of the five cytochromes c(7) could interact with its own redox partner via an interface involving the regions of heme I and/or heme III; this provides a possible rationalization for the existence of five similar proteins in G. sulfurreducens. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Enhanced dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride by Geobacter sulfurreducens in the presence of naturally occurring quinones and ferrihydrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doong, Ruey-an; Lee, Chun-chi; Lien, Chia-min

    2014-02-01

    The effect of naturally occurring quinones including lawsone (LQ), ubiquinone (UQ), juglone (JQ), and 1,4-naphthoquinone (NQ) on the biotransformation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) in the presence of Geobacter sulfurreducens and ferrihydrite was investigated. AQDS was used as the model compound for comparison. The reductive dissolution of ferrihydrite by G. sulfurreducens was enhanced by AQDS, NQ, and LQ. However, addition of UQ and JQ had little enhancement effect on Fe(II) production. The bioreduction efficiency and rate of ferrihydrite was highly dependent on the natural property and concentration of quinone compounds and the addition of low concentrations of LQ and NQ significantly accelerated the biotransformation rate of CT. The pseudo-first-order rate constants for CT dechlorination (kobsCT) in AQDS-, LQ- and NQ-amended batches were 5.4-5.8, 4.6-7.4 and 2.4-5.8 times, respectively, higher than those in the absence of quinone. A good relationship between kobsCT for CT dechlorination and bioreduction ratio of ferrihydrite was observed, indicating the important role of biogenic Fe(II) in dechlorination of CT under iron-reducing conditions. Spectroscopic analysis showed that AQDS and NQ could be reduced to semiquinones and hydroquinones, while only hydroquinones were generated in LQ-amended batches.

  11. Electronic properties of conductive pili of the metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens probed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veazey, Joshua P.; Reguera, Gemma; Tessmer, Stuart H.

    2011-12-01

    The metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens produces conductive protein appendages known as “pilus nanowires” to transfer electrons to metal oxides and to other cells. These processes can be harnessed for the bioremediation of toxic metals and the generation of electricity in bioelectrochemical cells. Key to these applications is a detailed understanding of how these nanostructures conduct electrons. However, to the best of our knowledge, their mechanism of electron transport is not known. We used the capability of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to probe conductive materials with higher spatial resolution than other scanning probe methods to gain insights into the transversal electronic behavior of native, cell-anchored pili. Despite the presence of insulating cellular components, the STM topography resolved electronic molecular substructures with periodicities similar to those reported for the pilus shaft. STM spectroscopy revealed electronic states near the Fermi level, consistent with a conducting material, but did not reveal electronic states expected for cytochromes. Furthermore, the transversal conductance was asymmetric, as previously reported for assemblies of helical peptides. Our results thus indicate that the Geobacter pilus shaft has an intrinsic electronic structure that could play a role in charge transport.

  12. Geobacter sulfurreducens对汞的甲基化及其影响因素研究%Research on Mercury Methylation by Geobacter sulfurreducens and Its Influencing Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹嫣; 司友斌; 颜雪; 陈艳

    2012-01-01

    在实验室模拟条件下,研究了铁还原菌Geobacter sulfurreducens对汞的甲基化作用及其影响因素.结果表明,G.sulfurreducens在低浓度汞溶液中能够生长,但生长受到一定程度的抑制,主要表现在菌株生长曲线迟缓期的延长.G.sulfurreducens在生长过程中能同时将溶液中无机汞转化为甲基汞,甲基化过程受多种环境因素的制约.在初始HgCl2浓度为1 mg.L^-1、温度35℃、pH 6.0、0.9%盐度的厌氧环境条件下,G.sulfurreducens对汞的甲基化率可达38%.适当增加HgCl2初始浓度与盐度能提高甲基汞的转化率,但过高汞浓度和盐度会造成微生物的死亡;温度在4~35℃范围内,温度越高甲基汞转化率越高;弱酸性环境比酸性或中碱性环境更利于汞的甲基化.此外,腐殖酸和半胱氨酸等均影响甲基汞的转化效率,其中腐殖酸对汞甲基化有一定的抑制作用,而半胱氨酸有较强的促进作用.该研究为自然水体生态系统中铁还原菌参与汞甲基化的过程提供了直接证据.%Mercury methylation by Geobacter sulfurreducens and the effects of environmental factors were studied under laboratory conditions.The results showed that G.sulfurreducens could grow well in the presence of low concentrations of mercuric chloride,but its growth was inhibited to a certain extent,mainly expressed in the prolonged lag phase.G.sulfurreducens could transform inorganic mercury into methylmercury,and this process was affected by many environmental factors.The efficiency of mercury methylation reached 38% under anaerobic conditions with 1 mg·L^-1 HgCl2 and 0.9% salinity at 35℃,pH 6.0.Increasing the initial HgCl2 concentration or salinity in an appropriate manner improved mercury methylation,but the concentration of methylmercury reduced when the concentrations of HgCl2 and salinity were too high.The efficiency of mercury methylation increased with the increasing temperature in range of 4-35℃.Weakly acidic

  13. A long way to the electrode: how do Geobacter cells transport their electrons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanni, Pablo Sebastián; Schrott, Germán David; Busalmen, Juan Pablo

    2012-12-01

    The mechanism of electron transport in Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms is a topic under intense study and debate. Although some proteins were found to be essential for current production, the specific role that each one plays in electron transport to the electrode remains to be elucidated and a consensus on the mechanism of electron transport has not been reached. In the present paper, to understand the state of the art in the topic, electron transport from inside of the cell to the electrode in Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms is analysed, reviewing genetic studies, biofilm conductivity assays and electrochemical and spectro-electrochemical experiments. Furthermore, crucial data still required to achieve a deeper understanding are highlighted.

  14. Geobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lovley, Derek R; Ueki, Toshiyuki; Zhang, Tian

    2011-01-01

    Geobacter species specialize in making electrical contacts with extracellular electron acceptors and other organisms. This permits Geobacter species to fill important niches in a diversity of anaerobic environments. Geobacter species appear to be the primary agents for coupling the oxidation...... aquifers. The ability of Geobacter species to reductively precipitate uranium and related contaminants has led to the development of bioremediation strategies for contaminated environments. Geobacter species produce higher current densities than any other known organism in microbial fuel cells...... and are common colonizers of electrodes harvesting electricity from organic wastes and aquatic sediments. Direct interspecies electron exchange between Geobacter species and syntrophic partners appears to be an important process in anaerobic wastewater digesters. Functional and comparative genomic studies have...

  15. Unveiling the Structural Basis That Regulates the Energy Transduction Properties within a Family of Triheme Cytochromes from Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Joana M; Simões, Telma; Morgado, Leonor; Caciones, Clara; Fernandes, Ana P; Silva, Marta A; Bruix, Marta; Pokkuluri, P Raj; Salgueiro, Carlos A

    2016-10-06

    A family of triheme cytochromes from Geobacter sulfurreducens plays an important role in extracellular electron transfer. In addition to their role in electron transfer pathways, two members of this family (PpcA and PpcD) were also found to be able to couple e(-)/H(+) transfer through the redox Bohr effect observed in the physiological pH range, a feature not observed for cytochromes PpcB and PpcE. In attempting to understand the molecular control of the redox Bohr effect in this family of cytochromes, which is highly homologous both in amino acid sequence and structures, it was observed that residue 6 is a conserved leucine in PpcA and PpcD, whereas in the other two characterized members (PpcB and PpcE) the equivalent residue is a phenylalanine. To determine the role of this residue located close to the redox Bohr center, we replaced Leu(6) in PpcA with Phe and determined the redox properties of the mutant, as well as its solution structure in the fully reduced state. In contrast with the native form, the mutant PpcAL6F is not able to couple the e(-)/H(+) pathway. We carried out the reverse mutation in PpcB and PpcE (i.e., replacing Phe(6) in these two proteins by leucine) and the mutated proteins showed an increased redox Bohr effect. The results clearly establish the role of residue 6 in the control of the redox Bohr effect in this family of cytochromes, a feature that could enable the rational design of G. sulfurreducens strains that carry mutant cytochromes with an optimal redox Bohr effect that would be suitable for various biotechnological applications.

  16. Analysis of enhanced current-generating mechanism of Geobacter sulfurreducens strain via model-driven metabolism simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jing; Xu, Zixiang; Guo, Jing; Yue, Yunxia; Sun, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a class of ideal technologies that function via anaerobic respiration of electricigens, which bring current generation and environmental restoration together. An in-depth understanding of microbial metabolism is of great importance in engineering microbes to further improve their respiration. We employed flux balance analysis and selected Fe(iii) as a substitute for the electrode to simulate current-generating metabolism of Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA with a fixed acetate uptake rate. Simulation results indicated the fluxes of reactions directing acetate towards dissimilation to generate electrons increased under the suboptimal growth condition, resulting in an increase in the respiration rate and a decrease in the growth rate. The results revealed the competitive relationship between oxidative respiration and cell growth during the metabolism of microbe current generation. The results helped us quantitatively understand why microbes growing slowly have the potential to make good use of fuel in MFCs. At the same time, slow growth does not necessarily result in speedy respiration. Alternative respirations may exist under the same growth state due to redundant pathways in the metabolic network. The big difference between the maximum and minimum respiration mainly results from the total formate secretion. With iterative flux variability analysis, a relatively ideal model of variant of G. sulfurreducens PCA was reconstructed by deleting several enzymes in the wild model, which could reach simultaneous suboptimal growth and maximum respiration. Under this ideal condition, flux towards extracellular electron transfer rather than for biosynthesis is beneficial for the conversion of organic matter to electricity without large accumulations of biomass and electricigens may maximize utilization of limited fuel. Our simulations will provide an insight into the enhanced current-generating mechanism and identify theoretical range of respiration

  17. Analysis of enhanced current-generating mechanism of Geobacter sulfurreducens strain via model-driven metabolism simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Meng

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs are a class of ideal technologies that function via anaerobic respiration of electricigens, which bring current generation and environmental restoration together. An in-depth understanding of microbial metabolism is of great importance in engineering microbes to further improve their respiration. We employed flux balance analysis and selected Fe(iii as a substitute for the electrode to simulate current-generating metabolism of Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA with a fixed acetate uptake rate. Simulation results indicated the fluxes of reactions directing acetate towards dissimilation to generate electrons increased under the suboptimal growth condition, resulting in an increase in the respiration rate and a decrease in the growth rate. The results revealed the competitive relationship between oxidative respiration and cell growth during the metabolism of microbe current generation. The results helped us quantitatively understand why microbes growing slowly have the potential to make good use of fuel in MFCs. At the same time, slow growth does not necessarily result in speedy respiration. Alternative respirations may exist under the same growth state due to redundant pathways in the metabolic network. The big difference between the maximum and minimum respiration mainly results from the total formate secretion. With iterative flux variability analysis, a relatively ideal model of variant of G. sulfurreducens PCA was reconstructed by deleting several enzymes in the wild model, which could reach simultaneous suboptimal growth and maximum respiration. Under this ideal condition, flux towards extracellular electron transfer rather than for biosynthesis is beneficial for the conversion of organic matter to electricity without large accumulations of biomass and electricigens may maximize utilization of limited fuel. Our simulations will provide an insight into the enhanced current-generating mechanism and identify theoretical

  18. The Dnmt2 RNA methyltransferase homolog of Geobacter sulfurreducens specifically methylates tRNA-Glu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Raghuvaran; Aklujkar, Muktak; Schäfer, Matthias; Reinhardt, Richard; Nickel, Olaf; Reuter, Gunter; Lovley, Derek R; Ehrenhofer-Murray, Ann; Nellen, Wolfgang; Ankri, Serge; Helm, Mark; Jurkowski, Tomasz P; Jeltsch, Albert

    2014-06-01

    Dnmt2 enzymes are conserved in eukaryotes, where they methylate C38 of tRNA-Asp with high activity. Here, the activity of one of the very few prokaryotic Dnmt2 homologs from Geobacter species (GsDnmt2) was investigated. GsDnmt2 was observed to methylate tRNA-Asp from flies and mice. Unexpectedly, it had only a weak activity toward its matching Geobacter tRNA-Asp, but methylated Geobacter tRNA-Glu with good activity. In agreement with this result, we show that tRNA-Glu is methylated in Geobacter while the methylation is absent in tRNA-Asp. The activities of Dnmt2 enzymes from Homo sapiens, Drosophila melanogaster, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Dictyostelium discoideum for methylation of the Geobacter tRNA-Asp and tRNA-Glu were determined showing that all these Dnmt2s preferentially methylate tRNA-Asp. Hence, the GsDnmt2 enzyme has a swapped transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) specificity. By comparing the different tRNAs, a characteristic sequence pattern was identified in the variable loop of all preferred tRNA substrates. An exchange of two nucleotides in the variable loop of murine tRNA-Asp converted it to the corresponding variable loop of tRNA-Glu and led to a strong reduction of GsDnmt2 activity. Interestingly, the same loss of activity was observed with human DNMT2, indicating that the variable loop functions as a specificity determinant in tRNA recognition of Dnmt2 enzymes.

  19. Oxidation of acetate through reactions of the citric acid cycle by Geobacter sulfurreducens in pure culture and in syntrophic coculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galushko, A S; Schink, B

    2000-11-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA oxidized acetate to CO2 via citric acid cycle reactions during growth with acetate plus fumarate in pure culture, and with acetate plus nitrate in coculture with Wolinella succinogenes. Acetate was activated by succinyl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase and also via acetate kinase plus phosphotransacetylase. Citrate was formed by citrate synthase. Soluble isocitrate and malate dehydrogenases NADP+ and NAD+, respectively. Oxidation of 2-oxoglutarate was measured as benzyl viologen reduction and strictly CoA-dependent; a low activity was also observed with NADP+. Succinate dehydrogenase and fumarate ductase both were membrane-bound. Succinate oxidation was coupled to NADP+ reduction whereas fumarate reduction was coupled to NADPH and NADH Coupling of succinate oxidation to NADP+ or cytochrome(s) reduction required an ATP-dependent reversed electron transport. Net ATP synthesis proceeded exclusively through electron transport phosphorylation. During fumarate reduction, both NADPH and NADH delivered reducing equivalents into the electron transport chain, which contained a menaquinone. Overall, acetate oxidation with fumarate proceeded through an open loop of citric acid cycle reactions, excluding succinate dehydrogenase, with fumarate reductase as the key reaction for electron delivery, whereas acetate oxidation in the syntrophic coculture required the complete citric acid cycle.

  20. On the road to improve the bioremediation and electricity-harvesting skills of Geobacter sulfurreducens: functional and structural characterization of multihaem cytochromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Leonor; Fernandes, Ana P; Dantas, Joana M; Silva, Marta A; Salgueiro, Carlos A

    2012-12-01

    Extracellular electron transfer is one of the physiological hallmarks of Geobacter sulfurreducens, allowing these bacteria to reduce toxic and/or radioactive metals and grow on electrode surfaces. Aiming to functionally optimize the respiratory electron-transfer chains, such properties can be explored through genetically engineered strains. Geobacter species comprise a large number of different multihaem c-type cytochromes involved in the extracellular electron-transfer pathways. The functional characterization of multihaem proteins is particularly complex because of the coexistence of several microstates in solution, connecting the fully reduced and oxidized states. NMR spectroscopy has been used to monitor the stepwise oxidation of each individual haem and thus to obtain information on each microstate. For the structural study of these proteins, a cost-effective isotopic labelling of the protein polypeptide chains was combined with the comparative analysis of 1H-13C HSQC (heteronuclear single-quantum correlation) NMR spectra obtained for labelled and unlabelled samples. These new methodological approaches allowed us to study G. sulfurreducens haem proteins functionally and structurally, revealing functional mechanisms and key residues involved in their electron-transfer capabilities. Such advances can now be applied to the design of engineered haem proteins to improve the bioremediation and electricity-harvesting skills of G. sulfurreducens.

  1. Probing Single- to Multi-Cell Level Charge Transport in Geobacter sulfurreducens DL-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    experiment for analysis by HPLC (Varian, Inc.) with a refractive index detector. The mobile phase was a 5-mM sulphuric acid solution and the column was PL...thick; VWR) were cleaned in Piranha solution (3:1 concentrated sulphuric acid to 30% hydrogen peroxide) for 30min, rinsed with deionized water (15 s...due to secondary p-stacking of amino acids comprising the pilin itself25. Most conductivity and gene expression experiments with Geobacter sp. are

  2. Coupled mercury-cell sorption, reduction, and oxidation on methylmercury production by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Rao, Balaji; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua

    2014-10-21

    G. sulfurreducens PCA cells have been shown to reduce, sorb, and methylate Hg(II) species, but it is unclear whether this organism can oxidize and methylate dissolved elemental Hg(0) as shown for Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Using Hg(II) and Hg(0) separately as Hg sources in washed cell assays in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4), we report how cell-mediated Hg reduction and oxidation compete or synergize with sorption, thus affecting the production of toxic methylmercury by PCA cells. Methylation is found to be positively correlated to Hg sorption (r = 0.73) but negatively correlated to Hg reduction (r = -0.62). These reactions depend on the Hg and cell concentrations or the ratio of Hg to cellular thiols (-SH). Oxidation and methylation of Hg(0) are favored at relatively low Hg to cell-SH molar ratios (e.g., <1). Increasing Hg to cell ratios from 0.25 × 10(-19) to 25 × 10(-19) moles-Hg/cell (equivalent to Hg/cell-SH of 0.71 to 71) shifts the major reaction from oxidation to reduction. In the absence of five outer membrane c-type cytochromes, mutant ΔomcBESTZ also shows decreases in Hg reduction and increases in methylation. However, the presence of competing thiol-binding ions such as Zn(2+) leads to increased Hg reduction and decreased methylation. These results suggest that the coupled cell-Hg sorption and redox transformations are important in controlling the rates of Hg uptake and methylation by G. sulfurreducens PCA in anoxic environments.

  3. OmcF, a Putative c-Type Monoheme Outer Membrane Cytochrome Required for the Expression of Other Outer Membrane Cytochromes in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Outer membrane cytochromes are often proposed as likely agents for electron transfer to extracellular electron acceptors, such as Fe(III). The omcF gene in the dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganism Geobacter sulfurreducens is predicted to code for a small outer membrane monoheme c-type cytochrome. An OmcF-deficient strain was constructed, and its ability to reduce and grow on Fe(III) citrate was found to be impaired. Following a prolonged lag phase (150 h), the OmcF-deficient strain de...

  4. Maintenance of Geobacter-dominated biofilms in microbial fuel cells treating synthetic wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commault, Audrey S; Lear, Gavin; Weld, Richard J

    2015-12-01

    Geobacter-dominated biofilms can be selected under stringent conditions that limit the growth of competing bacteria. However, in many practical applications, such stringent conditions cannot be maintained and the efficacy and stability of these artificial biofilms may be challenged. In this work, biofilms were selected on low-potential anodes (-0.36 V vs Ag/AgCl, i.e. -0.08 V vs SHE) in minimal acetate or ethanol media. Selection conditions were then relaxed by transferring the biofilms to synthetic wastewater supplemented with soil as a source of competing bacteria. We tracked community succession and functional changes in these biofilms. The Geobacter-dominated biofilms showed stability in their community composition and electrochemical properties, with Geobacter sp. being still electrically active after six weeks in synthetic wastewater with power densities of 100±19 mW·m(-2) (against 74±14 mW·m(-2) at week 0) for all treatments. After six weeks, the ethanol-selected biofilms, despite their high taxon richness and their efficiency at removing the chemical oxygen demand (0.8 g·L(-1) removed against the initial 1.3 g·L(-1) injected), were the least stable in terms of community structure. These findings have important implications for environmental microbial fuel cells based on Geobacter-dominated biofilms and suggest that they could be stable in challenging environments.

  5. Mercury reduction and cell-surface adsorption by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Haiyan [ORNL; Lin, Hui [ORNL; Zheng, Wang [ORNL; Feng, Xinbin [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Both reduction and surface adsorption of mercuric mercury [Hg(II)] are found to occur simultaneously on G. sulfurreducens PCA cells under dark, anaerobic conditions. Reduction of Hg(II) to elemental Hg(0) initially follows a pseudo-first order kinetics with a half-life of < 2 h in the presence of 50 nM Hg(II) and 1011 cells L-1 in a phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). Multiple gene deletions of the outer membrane cytochromes in this organism resulted in decrease in reduction rate from ~ 0.3 to 0.05 h-1, and reduction was nearly absent with heat-killed cells or in the cell filtrate. Adsorption of Hg(II) by cells is found to compete with, and thus inhibit, Hg(II) reduction. Depending on the Hg to cell ratio, maximum Hg(II) reduction was observed at about 5 10-19 mol Hg cell-1, but reduction terminated at a low Hg to cell ratio (< 10-20 mol Hg cell-1). This inhibitory effect is attributed to strong binding between Hg(II) and the thiol ( SH) functional groups on cells and validated by experiments in which the sorbed Hg(II) was readily exchanged by thiols (e.g., glutathione) but not by carboxylic ligands such as ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA). We suggest that coupled Hg(II)-cell interactions, i.e., reduction and surface binding, could be important in controlling Hg species transformation and bioavailability and should therefore be considered in microbial Hg(II) uptake and methylation studies.

  6. Mercury reduction and cell-surface adsorption by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haiyan; Lin, Hui; Zheng, Wang; Rao, Balaji; Feng, Xinbin; Liang, Liyuan; Elias, Dwayne A; Gu, Baohua

    2013-10-01

    Both reduction and surface adsorption of mercuric mercury [Hg(II)] are found to occur simultaneously on G. sulfurreducens PCA cells under dark, anaerobic conditions. Reduction of Hg(II) to elemental Hg(0) initially follows a pseudo-first order kinetics with a half-life of Hg(II) and 10(11) cells L(-1) in a phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). Multiple gene deletions of the outer membrane cytochromes in this organism resulted in a decrease in reduction rate from ∼0.3 to 0.05 h(-1), and reduction was nearly absent with heat-killed cells or in the cell filtrate. Adsorption of Hg(II) by cells is found to compete with, and thus inhibit, Hg(II) reduction. Depending on the Hg to cell ratio, maximum Hg(II) reduction was observed at about 5 × 10(-19) mol Hg cell(-1), but reduction terminated at a low Hg to cell ratio (Hg cell(-1)). This inhibitory effect is attributed to bonding between Hg(II) and the thiol (-SH) functional groups on cells and validated by experiments in which the sorbed Hg(II) was readily exchanged by thiols (e.g., glutathione) but not by carboxylate compounds such as ethylenediamine-tetraacetate (EDTA). We suggest that coupled Hg(II)-cell interactions, i.e., reduction and surface binding, could be important in controlling Hg species transformation and bioavailability and should therefore be considered in microbial Hg(II) uptake and methylation studies.

  7. Two ATP phosphoribosyltransferase isozymes of Geobacter sulfurreducens contribute to growth in the presence or absence of histidine and under nitrogen fixation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aklujkar, Muktak

    2011-07-01

    Bacteria of the Geobacter clade possess two distinct ATP phosphoribosyltransferases encoded by hisG(L) and hisG(S)+hisZ to catalyze the first reaction of histidine biosynthesis. This very unusual redundancy was investigated by mutational analysis. The hisG(L), hisG(S), and hisZ genes of Geobacter sulfurreducens were deleted, effects on growth and histidine biosynthesis gene expression were evaluated, and deficiencies were complemented with plasmid-borne genes. Both hisG(L) and hisG(S)+hisZ encode functional ATP phosphoribosyltransferases. However, deletion of hisG(L) resulted in no growth defect, whereas deletion of hisG(S) delayed growth when histidine was not provided. Both deletions increased hisZ transcript abundance, and both ΔhisG(S) and ΔhisZ mutations increased hisG(L) transcript abundance. Growth with HisG(L) alone (due to deletion of either hisG(S) or hisZ) was better under nitrogen fixation conditions than when ammonium was provided. Deletion of hisZ caused growth defects under all conditions tested, with or without exogenous sources of histidine, with different patterns of histidine biosynthesis gene expression under each condition. Taken together, the data indicate that G. sulfurreducens depends primarily on the HisG(S)Z isozyme as an ATP phosphoribosyltransferase in histidine biosynthesis, and for other functions when histidine is available; however, HisG(L) also functions as ATP phosphoribosyltransferase, particularly during nitrogen fixation.

  8. The structure of PccH from Geobacter sulfurreducens: A novel low reduction potential monoheme cytochrome essential for accepting electrons from an electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantas, Joana M; Campelo, Luisa; Duke, Norma E. C.; Salgueiro, Carlos A; Pokkuluri, P. Raj

    2015-06-01

    The structure of cytochrome-c (GSU3274) designated as PccH from Geobacter sulfurreducens was determined at 2.0 Å resolution. PccH is a small (15 kDa) cytochrome containing one c-type heme, found to be essential for growth of G. sulfurreducens accepting electrons from graphite electrodes poised at -300 mV versus SHE with fumarate as the terminal electron acceptor. The structure of PccH is unique among the monoheme cytochromes described to date. The structural fold of PccH can be described as forming two lobes with the heme sandwiched in a cleft between the two lobes. In addition, PccH has a low reduction potential of -24 mV at pH 7, which is unusual for monoheme cytochromes. Based on difference in structure together with sequence phylogenetic analysis we propose that PccH can be regarded as a first characterized example of a new subclass of class I monoheme cytochromes. The low reduction potential of PccH may enable the protein to be redox active at the typically negative potential ranges encountered by this bacterium. Because PccH is predicted to be located in the periplasm of G. sulfurreducens, it could not be involved in the first step of accepting electrons from the electrode but very likely involved in the downstream electron transport events in the periplasm.

  9. The structure of PccH from Geobacter sulfurreducens - a novel low reduction potential monoheme cytochrome essential for accepting electrons from an electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Joana M; Campelo, Luísa M; Duke, Norma E C; Salgueiro, Carlos A; Pokkuluri, P Raj

    2015-06-01

    The structure of cytochrome c (GSU3274) designated as PccH from Geobacter sulfurreducens was determined at a resolution of 2.0 Å. PccH is a small (15 kDa) cytochrome containing one c-type heme, found to be essential for the growth of G. sulfurreducens with respect to accepting electrons from graphite electrodes poised at -300 mV versus standard hydrogen electrode. with fumarate as the terminal electron acceptor. The structure of PccH is unique among the monoheme cytochromes described to date. The structural fold of PccH can be described as forming two lobes with the heme sandwiched in a cleft between the two lobes. In addition, PccH has a low reduction potential of -24 mV at pH 7, which is unusual for monoheme cytochromes. Based on difference in structure, together with sequence phylogenetic analysis, we propose that PccH can be regarded as a first characterized example of a new subclass of class I monoheme cytochromes. The low reduction potential of PccH may enable the protein to be redox active at the typically negative potential ranges encountered by G. sulfurreducens. Because PccH is predicted to be located in the periplasm of this bacterium, it could not be involved in the first step of accepting electrons from the electrode but is very likely involved in the downstream electron transport events in the periplasm.

  10. A novel Geobacteraceae-specific outer membrane protein J (OmpJ is essential for electron transport to Fe (III and Mn (IV oxides in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiffer Marianne

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metal reduction is thought to take place at or near the bacterial outer membrane and, thus, outer membrane proteins in the model dissimilatory metal-reducing organism Geobacter sulfurreducens are of interest to understand the mechanisms of Fe(III reduction in the Geobacter species that are the predominant Fe(III reducers in many environments. Previous studies have implicated periplasmic and outer membrane cytochromes in electron transfer to metals. Here we show that the most abundant outer membrane protein of G. sulfurreducens, OmpJ, is not a cytochrome yet it is required for metal respiration. Results When outer membrane proteins of G. sulfurreducens were separated via SDS-PAGE, one protein, designated OmpJ (outer membrane protein J, was particularly abundant. The encoding gene, which was identified from mass spectrometry analysis of peptide fragments, is present in other Geobacteraceae, but not in organisms outside this family. The predicted localization and structure of the OmpJ protein suggested that it was a porin. Deletion of the ompJ gene in G. sulfurreducens produced a strain that grew as well as the wild-type strain with fumarate as the electron acceptor but could not grow with metals, such as soluble or insoluble Fe (III and insoluble Mn (IV oxide, as the electron acceptor. The heme c content in the mutant strain was ca. 50% of the wild-type and there was a widespread loss of multiple cytochromes from soluble and membrane fractions. Transmission electron microscopy analyses of mutant cells revealed an unusually enlarged periplasm, which is likely to trigger extracytoplasmic stress response mechanisms leading to the degradation of periplasmic and/or outer membrane proteins, such as cytochromes, required for metal reduction. Thus, the loss of the capacity for extracellular electron transport in the mutant could be due to the missing c-type cytochromes, or some more direct, but as yet unknown, role of OmpJ in metal

  11. A novel Geobacteraceae-specific outer membrane protein J (OmpJ) is essential for electron transport to Fe (III) and Mn (IV) oxides in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afkar, Eman; Reguera, Gemma; Schiffer, Marianne; Lovley, Derek R

    2005-01-01

    Background Metal reduction is thought to take place at or near the bacterial outer membrane and, thus, outer membrane proteins in the model dissimilatory metal-reducing organism Geobacter sulfurreducens are of interest to understand the mechanisms of Fe(III) reduction in the Geobacter species that are the predominant Fe(III) reducers in many environments. Previous studies have implicated periplasmic and outer membrane cytochromes in electron transfer to metals. Here we show that the most abundant outer membrane protein of G. sulfurreducens, OmpJ, is not a cytochrome yet it is required for metal respiration. Results When outer membrane proteins of G. sulfurreducens were separated via SDS-PAGE, one protein, designated OmpJ (outer membrane protein J), was particularly abundant. The encoding gene, which was identified from mass spectrometry analysis of peptide fragments, is present in other Geobacteraceae, but not in organisms outside this family. The predicted localization and structure of the OmpJ protein suggested that it was a porin. Deletion of the ompJ gene in G. sulfurreducens produced a strain that grew as well as the wild-type strain with fumarate as the electron acceptor but could not grow with metals, such as soluble or insoluble Fe (III) and insoluble Mn (IV) oxide, as the electron acceptor. The heme c content in the mutant strain was ca. 50% of the wild-type and there was a widespread loss of multiple cytochromes from soluble and membrane fractions. Transmission electron microscopy analyses of mutant cells revealed an unusually enlarged periplasm, which is likely to trigger extracytoplasmic stress response mechanisms leading to the degradation of periplasmic and/or outer membrane proteins, such as cytochromes, required for metal reduction. Thus, the loss of the capacity for extracellular electron transport in the mutant could be due to the missing c-type cytochromes, or some more direct, but as yet unknown, role of OmpJ in metal reduction. Conclusion Omp

  12. Interspecies electron transfer via hydrogen and formate rather than direct electrical connections in cocultures of Pelobacter carbinolicus and Geobacter sulfurreducens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin M; Liu, Fanghua

    2012-01-01

    was comparable in cocultures with that for the formate dehydrogenase mutant of G. sulfurreducens or the wild type, suggesting that H(2) was the primary electron carrier in the wild-type cocultures. Cocultures were also initiated with strains of G. sulfurreducens that could not produce pili or OmcS, two essential...

  13. Comparative genomic analysis of Geobacter sulfurreducens KN400, a strain with enhanced capacity for extracellular electron transfer and electricity production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butler Jessica E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new strain of Geobacter sulfurreducens, strain KN400, produces more electrical current in microbial fuel cells and reduces insoluble Fe(III oxides much faster than the wildtype strain, PCA. The genome of KN400 was compared to wildtype with the goal of discovering how the network for extracellular electron transfer has changed and how these two strains evolved. Results Both genomes were re-annotated, resulting in 14 fewer genes (net in the PCA genome; 28 fewer (net in the KN400 genome; and ca. 400 gene start and stop sites moved. 96% of genes in KN400 had clear orthologs with conserved synteny in PCA. Most of the remaining genes were in regions of genomic mobility and were strain-specific or conserved in other Geobacteraceae, indicating that the changes occurred post-divergence. There were 27,270 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP between the genomes. There was significant enrichment for SNP locations in non-coding or synonymous amino acid sites, indicating significant selective pressure since the divergence. 25% of orthologs had sequence differences, and this set was enriched in phosphorylation and ATP-dependent enzymes. Substantial sequence differences (at least 12 non-synonymous SNP/kb were found in 3.6% of the orthologs, and this set was enriched in cytochromes and integral membrane proteins. Genes known to be involved in electron transport, those used in the metabolic cell model, and those that exhibit changes in expression during growth in microbial fuel cells were examined in detail. Conclusions The improvement in external electron transfer in the KN400 strain does not appear to be due to novel gene acquisition, but rather to changes in the common metabolic network. The increase in electron transfer rate and yield in KN400 may be due to changes in carbon flux towards oxidation pathways and to changes in ATP metabolism, both of which indicate that the overall energy state of the cell may be different. The

  14. Thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of two methyl-accepting chemotaxis heme sensors from Geobacter sulfurreducens reveals the structural origin of their functional difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marta A; Valente, Raquel C; Pokkuluri, P Raj; Turner, David L; Salgueiro, Carlos A; Catarino, Teresa

    2014-06-01

    The periplasmic sensor domains GSU582 and GSU935 are part of methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins of the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens containing one c-type heme and a PAS-like fold. Their spectroscopic properties were shown previously to share similar spectral features. In both sensors, the heme group is in the high-spin form in the oxidized state and low-spin after reduction and binding of a methionine residue. Therefore, it was proposed that this redox-linked ligand switch might be related to the signal transduction mechanism. We now report the thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of the sensors GSU582 and GSU935 by visible spectroscopy and stopped-flow techniques, at several pH and ionic strength values. Despite their similar spectroscopic features, the midpoint reduction potentials and the rate constants for reduction by dithionite are considerably different in the two sensors. The reduction potentials of both sensors are negative and well framed within the typical anoxic subsurface environments in which Geobacter species predominate. The midpoint reduction potentials of sensor GSU935 are lower than those of GSU582 at all pH and ionic strength values and the same was observed for the reduction rate constants. The origin of the different functional properties of these closely related sensors is rationalized in the terms of the structures. The results suggest that the sensors are designed to function in different working potential ranges, allowing the bacteria to trigger an adequate cellular response in different anoxic subsurface environments. These findings provide an explanation for the co-existence of two similar methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins in G. sulfurreducens.

  15. Outer-membrane cytochrome-c, OmcF, from Geobacter sulfurreducens : high structural similarity to an algal cytochrone c{sub 6}.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Londer, Y. Y.; Wood, S. J.; Duke, N. E. C.; Morgado, L.; Salgueiro, C. A.; Schiffer, M.; Biosciences Division; Univ. Nova de Lisboa, Campus Caparica

    2009-01-01

    Putative outer membrane c-type cytochromes have been implicated in metal ion reducing properties of Geobacter sulfurreducens. OmcF (GSU2432), OmcB (GSU2731), and OmcC are three such proteins that have predicted lipid anchors. MmcF is a monoheme cytochrome, whereas OmcB and OmcC are multiheme cytochromes. Deletion of OmcF was reported to affect the expression of OmcB and OmcC in G. sulfurreducens. The OmcF deficient strain was impaired in its ability to both reduce and grow on Fe(III) citrate probably because the expression fo OmcB, which is crucial for iron reduction, is low in this strain. U(VI) reduction activity of this bacterium is also lower on deletion of OmcB or OmcF. The U(VI) reduction activity is affected more by the deletion of OmcF than by the deletion of OmcB.

  16. Influence of inoculum and anode surface properties on the selection of Geobacter-dominated biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commault, Audrey S; Barrière, Frédéric; Lapinsonnière, Laure; Lear, Gavin; Bouvier, Solène; Weld, Richard J

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated the impact of inoculum source and anode surface modification (carboxylate -COO(-) and sulfonamide -SO2NH2 groups) on the microbial composition of anode-respiring biofilms. These two factors have not previously been considered in detail. Three different inoculum sources were investigated, a dry aerobic soil, brackish estuarine mud and freshwater sediment. The biofilms were selected using a poised anode (-0.36 V vs Ag/AgCl) and acetate as the electron donor in a three-electrode configuration microbial fuel cell (MFC). Population profiling and cloning showed that all biofilms selected were dominated by Geobacter sp., although their electrochemical properties varied depending on the source inoculum and electrode surface modification. These findings suggest that Geobacter sp. are widespread in soils, even those that do not provide a continuously anaerobic environment, and are better at growing in the MFC conditions than other bacteria.

  17. Spectroscopic Studies of Abiotic and Biological Nanomaterials: Silver Nanoparticles, Rhodamine 6G Adsorbed on Graphene, and c-Type Cytochromes and Type IV Pili in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrall, Elizabeth S.

    This thesis describes spectroscopic studies of three different systems: silver nanoparticles, the dye molecule rhodamine 6G adsorbed on graphene, and the type IV pili and c-type cytochromes produced by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. Although these systems are quite different in some ways, they can all be considered examples of nanomaterials. A nanomaterial is generally defined as having at least one dimension below 100 nm in size. Silver nanoparticles, with sub-100 nm size in all dimensions, are examples of zero-dimensional nanomaterials. Graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon atoms, is the paradigmatic two-dimensional nanomaterial. And although bacterial cells are on the order of 1 μm in size, the type IV pili and multiheme c-type cytochromes produced by G. sulfurreducens can be considered to be one- and zero-dimensional nanomaterials respectively. A further connection between these systems is their strong interaction with visible light, allowing us to study them using similar spectroscopic tools. The first chapter of this thesis describes research on the plasmon-mediated photochemistry of silver nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles support coherent electron oscillations, known as localized surface plasmons, at resonance frequencies that depend on the particle size and shape and the local dielectric environment. Nanoparticle absorption and scattering cross-sections are maximized at surface plasmon resonance frequencies, and the electromagnetic field is amplified near the particle surface. Plasmonic effects can enhance the photochemistry of silver particles alone or in conjunction with semiconductors according to several mechanisms. We study the photooxidation of citrate by silver nanoparticles in a photoelectrochemical cell, focusing on the wavelength-dependence of the reaction rate and the role of the semiconductor substrate. We find that the citrate photooxidation rate does not track the plasmon resonance of the silver

  18. Direct Involvement of ombB, omaB and omcB Genes in Extracellular Reduction of Fe(III by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimo eLiu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The tandem gene clusters orfR-ombB-omaB-omcB and orfS-ombC-omaC-omcC of the metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA are responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III-citrate and ferrihydrite [a poorly crystalline Fe(III oxide]. Each gene cluster encodes a putative transcriptional factor (OrfR/OrfS, a porin-like outer-membrane protein (OmbB/OmbC, a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt, OmaB/OmaC and an outer-membrane c-Cyt (OmcB/OmcC. The individual roles of OmbB, OmaB and OmcB in extracellular reduction of Fe(III, however, have remained either uninvestigated or controversial. Here, we showed that replacements of ombB, omaB, omcB and ombB-omaB with an antibiotic gene in the presence of ombC-omaC-omcC had no impact on reduction of Fe(III-citrate by G. sulfurreducens PCA. Disruption of ombB, omaB, omcB and ombB-omaB in the absence of ombC-omaC-omcC, however, severely impaired the bacterial ability to reduce Fe(III-citrate as well as ferrihydrite. These results unequivocally demonstrate an overlapping role of ombB-omaB-omcB and ombC-omaC-omcC in extracellular Fe(III reduction by G. sulfurreducens PCA. Involvement of both ombB-omaB-omcB and ombC-omaC-omcC in extracellular Fe(III reduction reflects the importance of these trans-outer membrane protein complexes in the physiology of this bacterium. Moreover, the kinetics of Fe(III-citrate and ferrihydrite reduction by these mutants in the absence of ombC-omaC-omcC were nearly identical, which suggests that absence of any protein subunit eliminates function of OmaB/OmbB/OmcB protein complex. Finally, orfS was found to have a negative impact on the extracellular reduction of Fe(III-citrate and ferrihydrite in G. sulfurreducens PCA probably by serving as a transcriptional repressor.

  19. From Nanowires to Biofilms: An Exploration of Novel Mechanisms of Uranium Transformation Mediated by Geobacter Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REGUERA, GEMMA [Michigan State University

    2014-01-16

    One promising strategy for the in situ bioremediation of radioactive groundwater contaminants that has been identified by the SBR Program is to stimulate the activity of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms to reductively precipitate uranium and other soluble toxic metals. The reduction of U(VI) and other soluble contaminants by Geobacteraceae is directly dependent on the reduction of Fe(III) oxides, their natural electron acceptor, a process that requires the expression of Geobacter’s conductive pili (pilus nanowires). Expression of conductive pili by Geobacter cells leads to biofilm development on surfaces and to the formation of suspended biogranules, which may be physiological closer to biofilms than to planktonic cells. Biofilm development is often assumed in the subsurface, particularly at the matrix-well screen interface, but evidence of biofilms in the bulk aquifer matrix is scarce. Our preliminary results suggest, however, that biofilms develop in the subsurface and contribute to uranium transformations via sorption and reductive mechanisms. In this project we elucidated the mechanism(s) for uranium immobilization mediated by Geobacter biofilms and identified molecular markers to investigate if biofilm development is happening in the contaminated subsurface. The results provided novel insights needed in order to understand the metabolic potential and physiology of microorganisms with a known role in contaminant transformation in situ, thus having a significant positive impact in the SBR Program and providing novel concept to monitor, model, and predict biological behavior during in situ treatments.

  20. Unveiling the Structural Basis That Regulates the Energy Transduction Properties within a Family of Triheme Cytochromes from Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantas, Joana M.; Simões, Telma; Morgado, Leonor; Caciones, Clara; Fernandes, Ana P.; Silva, Marta A.; Bruix, Marta; Pokkuluri, P. Raj; Salgueiro, Carlos A.

    2016-10-06

    A family of triheme cytochromes from Geobacter sulfurreducens plays an important role in extracellular electron transfer. In addition to their role in electron transfer pathways, two members of this family (PpcA and PpcD) were also found to be able to couple e(-)/H+ transfer through the redox Bohr effect observed in the physiological pH range, a feature not observed for cytochromes PpcB and PpcE. In attempting to understand the molecular control of the redox Bohr effect in this family of cytochromes, which is highly homologous both in amino acid sequence and structures, it was observed that residue 6 is a conserved leucine in PpcA and PpcD, whereas in the other two characterized members (PpcB and PpcE) the equivalent residue is a phenylalanine. To determine the role of this residue located close to the redox Bohr center, we replaced Leu(6) in PpcA with Phe and determined the redox properties of the mutant, as well as its solution structure in the fully reduced state. In contrast with the native form, the mutant PpcAL6F is not able to couple the e(-)/H+ pathway. We carried out the reverse mutation in PpcB and PpcE (i.e., replacing Phe(6) in these two proteins by leucine) and the mutated proteins showed an increased redox Bohr effect. The results clearly establish the role of residue 6 in the control of the redox Bohr effect in this family of cytochromes, a feature that could enable the rational design of G. sulfurreducens strains that carry mutant cytochromes with an optimal redox Bohr effect that would be suitable for various biotechnological applications.

  1. Laboratory evolution of Geobacter sulfurreducens for enhanced growth on lactate via a single-base-pair substitution in a transcriptional regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Zarath M; Ueki, Toshiyuki; Ismail, Wael; Haveman, Shelley A; Lovley, Derek R

    2012-05-01

    The addition of organic compounds to groundwater in order to promote bioremediation may represent a new selective pressure on subsurface microorganisms. The ability of Geobacter sulfurreducens, which serves as a model for the Geobacter species that are important in various types of anaerobic groundwater bioremediation, to adapt for rapid metabolism of lactate, a common bioremediation amendment, was evaluated. Serial transfer of five parallel cultures in a medium with lactate as the sole electron donor yielded five strains that could metabolize lactate faster than the wild-type strain. Genome sequencing revealed that all five strains had non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the same gene, GSU0514, a putative transcriptional regulator. Introducing the single-base-pair mutation from one of the five strains into the wild-type strain conferred rapid growth on lactate. This strain and the five adaptively evolved strains had four to eight-fold higher transcript abundance than wild-type cells for genes for the two subunits of succinyl-CoA synthase, an enzyme required for growth on lactate. DNA-binding assays demonstrated that the protein encoded by GSU0514 bound to the putative promoter of the succinyl-CoA synthase operon. The binding sequence was not apparent elsewhere in the genome. These results demonstrate that a single-base-pair mutation in a transcriptional regulator can have a significant impact on the capacity for substrate utilization and suggest that adaptive evolution should be considered as a potential response of microorganisms to environmental change(s) imposed during bioremediation.

  2. HisE11 and HisF8 provide bis-histidyl heme hexa-coordination in the globin domain of Geobacter sulfurreducens globin-coupled sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Alessandra; Thijs, Liesbet; Nardini, Marco; Desmet, Filip; Sisinni, Lorenza; Gourlay, Louise; Bolli, Alessandro; Coletta, Massimiliano; Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Wan, Xuehua; Alam, Maqsudul; Ascenzi, Paolo; Moens, Luc; Bolognesi, Martino; Dewilde, Sylvia

    2009-02-13

    Among heme-based sensors, recent phylogenomic and sequence analyses have identified 34 globin coupled sensors (GCS), to which an aerotactic or gene-regulating function has been tentatively ascribed. Here, the structural and biochemical characterization of the globin domain of the GCS from Geobacter sulfurreducens (GsGCS(162)) is reported. A combination of X-ray crystallography (crystal structure at 1.5 A resolution), UV-vis and resonance Raman spectroscopy reveals the ferric GsGCS(162) as an example of bis-histidyl hexa-coordinated GCS. In contrast to the known hexa-coordinated globins, the distal heme-coordination in ferric GsGCS(162) is provided by a His residue unexpectedly located at the E11 topological site. Furthermore, UV-vis and resonance Raman spectroscopy indicated that ferrous deoxygenated GsGCS(162) is a penta-/hexa-coordinated mixture, and the heme hexa-to-penta-coordination transition does not represent a rate-limiting step for carbonylation kinetics. Lastly, electron paramagnetic resonance indicates that ferrous nitrosylated GsGCS(162) is a penta-coordinated species, where the proximal HisF8-Fe bond is severed.

  3. Role of Met58 in the regulation of electron/proton transfer in trihaem cytochrome PpcA from Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Leonor; Dantas, Joana M.; Simões, Telma; Londer, Yuri Y.; Pokkuluri, P. Raj; Salgueiro, Carlos A.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterium Gs (Geobacter sulfurreducens) is capable of oxidizing a large variety of compounds relaying electrons out of the cytoplasm and across the membranes in a process designated as extracellular electron transfer. The trihaem cytochrome PpcA is highly abundant in Gs and is most probably the reservoir of electrons destined for the outer surface. In addition to its role in electron transfer pathways, we have previously shown that this protein could perform e−/H+ energy transduction. This mechanism is achieved by selecting the specific redox states that the protein can access during the redox cycle and might be related to the formation of proton electrochemical potential gradient across the periplasmic membrane. The regulatory role of haem III in the functional mechanism of PpcA was probed by replacing Met58, a residue that controls the solvent accessibility of haem III, with serine, aspartic acid, asparagine or lysine. The data obtained from the mutants showed that the preferred e−/H+ transfer pathway observed for PpcA is strongly dependent on the reduction potential of haem III. It is striking to note that one residue can fine tune the redox states that can be accessed by the trihaem cytochrome enough to alter the functional pathways. PMID:23030844

  4. Effect of Dynamic Magnetic Field on Electricity Production of Geobacter sulfurreducens%动态磁场对Geobacter sulfurreducens产电特性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    狄梦洁; 李伟新; 薛诚; 殷瑶; 黄光团

    2015-01-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens为产电菌构建双室微生物燃料电池(MFC).产电茵液分别在0、100、200mT的垂直磁场下动态处理lh,然后接种到MFC1、MFC2和MFC3中,研究动态磁场处理对MFC产电性能的影响.实验结果表明:动态磁场处理使产电茵反应器的启动时间延长、稳定电压降低、表观内阻增大,MFC1、MFC2和MFC3的表观内阻依次为329、507、353 Ω;通过电化学阻抗谱测试可知,相比对照组MFC活化内阻,经磁场处理的产电菌MFC全电池的活化内阻变大,其中MFC1、MFC2和MFC3的活化内阻依次为12.34、28.29、16.87 Ω;循环伏安测试发现经过动态磁场处理的产电菌其电化学活性降低.

  5. Effects of Anode Potential on the Electricity Generation Performance of Geobacter Sulfurreducens%阳极电势对Geobacter sulfurreducens产电性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹效鑫; 范明志; 梁鹏; 黄霞

    2009-01-01

    以产电模式菌Geobacter sulfurreducens为研究对象接种两瓶型微生物燃料电池(MFC)阳极室,利用恒电位仪控制阳极电势,考察了7种电势条件下MFC的启动期、最大功率密度和阳极生物量的变化情况.研究结果表明,当阳极电势为-250,-100和50 mV(vs.SCE)时,MFC启动较快, CV曲线和极化曲线表明,在这3种电势条件下,MFC产电性能增强,其中阳极电势为-100 mV时,MFC最大功率密度为1.67 W/m3,比固定外阻条件下启动的MFC最大功率密度提高了5倍.控制合适的阳极电势可以使阳极生物量提高 2.5~3倍.

  6. Iron-oxide minerals affect extracellular electron-transfer paths of Geobacter spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Souichiro; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2013-01-01

    Some bacteria utilize (semi)conductive iron-oxide minerals as conduits for extracellular electron transfer (EET) to distant, insoluble electron acceptors. A previous study demonstrated that microbe/mineral conductive networks are constructed in soil ecosystems, in which Geobacter spp. share dominant populations. In order to examine how (semi)conductive iron-oxide minerals affect EET paths of Geobacter spp., the present study grew five representative Geobacter strains on electrodes as the sole electron acceptors in the absence or presence of (semi)conductive iron oxides. It was found that iron-oxide minerals enhanced current generation by three Geobacter strains, while no effect was observed in another strain. Geobacter sulfurreducens was the only strain that generated substantial amounts of currents both in the presence and absence of the iron oxides. Microscopic, electrochemical and transcriptomic analyses of G. sulfurreducens disclosed that this strain constructed two distinct types of EET path; in the absence of iron-oxide minerals, bacterial biofilms rich in extracellular polymeric substances were constructed, while composite networks made of mineral particles and microbial cells (without polymeric substances) were developed in the presence of iron oxides. It was also found that uncharacterized c-type cytochromes were up-regulated in the presence of iron oxides that were different from those found in conductive biofilms. These results suggest the possibility that natural (semi)conductive minerals confer energetic and ecological advantages on Geobacter, facilitating their growth and survival in the natural environment.

  7. Outer-membrane cytochrome-c, OmcF from Geobacter sulfurreducens: high structural similarity to an algal cytochrome c6.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Londer, Y. Y.; Wood, S. J.; Duke, N. E. C.; Morgado, L.; Salgueiro, C. A.; Schiffer, M.; Biosciences Division; Univ. Nova de Lisboa

    2009-01-01

    Putative outer membrane c-type cytochromes have been implicated in metal ion reducing properties of Geobacter sulfurreducens. OmcF (GSU2432), OmcB (GSU2731), and OmcC (GSU2737) are three such proteins that have predicted lipid anchors. OmcF is a monoheme cytochrome, whereas OmcB and OmcC are multiheme cytochromes. Deletion of OmcF was reported to affect the expression of OmcB and OmcC in G. sulfurreducens. The OmcF deficient strain was impaired in its ability to both reduce and grow on Fe(III) citrate probably because the expression of OmcB, which is crucial for iron reduction, is low in this strain. U(VI) reduction activity of this bacterium is also lower on deletion of OmcB or OmcF. The U(VI) reduction activity is affected more by the deletion of OmcF than by the deletion of OmcB. The soluble part of OmcF (residues 20-104, referred to as OmcF{sub S} hereafter) has sequence similarity to soluble cytochromes c{sub 6} of photosynthetic algae and cyanobacteria. The cytochrome c{sub 6} proteins in algae and cyanobacteria are electron transport proteins that mediate the transfer of electrons from cytochrome b{sub 6}f to photosystem I and have high reduction potentials of about +350 mV and low pI. The structures of seven cytochromes c{sub 6} have been previously determined. Further, a c{sub 6}-like cytochrome (PetJ2) of unknown function was recently identified in Synechoccus sp. PCC 7002 with a reduction potential of +148 mV and high pI. Here, we report the structure of OmcF{sub S} and its remarkable structural similarity to that of cytochrome c{sub 6} from the green alga, Monoraphidium braunii. To our knowledge, OmcF{sub S} is the first example of a cytochrome c{sub 6}-like structure from a nonphotosynthetic organism.

  8. Survival during long-term starvation: global proteomics analysis of Geobacter sulfurreducens under prolonged electron-acceptor limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Reema; Helmus, Ruth A; Stanley, Bruce A; Zhu, Junjia; Liermann, Laura J; Brantley, Susan L; Tien, Ming

    2013-10-04

    The bioavailability of terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) and other substrates affects the efficiency of subsurface bioremediation. While it is often argued that microorganisms exist under "feast or famine", in the laboratory most organisms are studied under "feast" conditions, whereas they typically encounter "famine" in nature. The work described here aims to understand the survival strategies of the anaerobe Geobacter sulfurreduces under TEA-starvation conditions. Cultures were starved for TEA and at various times sampled to perform global comparative proteomic analysis using iTRAQ to obtain insight into the dynamics of change in proteins/enzymes expression associated with change in nutrient availability/environmental stress. Proteins varying in abundance with a high level of statistical significance (p Geobacter under starvation conditions. The cell shuts down anabolic processes and becomes poised, through changes in its membrane proteins, to sense nutrients in the environment, to transport nutrients into the cell, and to detect or utilize TEAs that are encountered. Under TEA-limiting conditions, the cells turned from translucent white to red in color, indicating higher heme content. The increase in heme content supported proteomics results showing an increase in the number of cytochromes involved in membrane electron transport during the survival phase. The cell is also highly reduced with minimal change in energy charge (ATP to total adenine nucleotide ratio). Nonetheless, these proteomic and biochemical results indicate that even under TEA starvation cells remain poised for bioremediation.

  9. Structures and solution properties of two novel periplasmic sensor domains with c-type heme from chemotaxis proteins of Geobacter sulfurreducens : implications for signal transduction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Pessanha, M.; Londer, Y. Y.; Wood, S. J.; Duke, N. E. C.; Wilton, R.; Catarino, T.; Salgueiro, C. A.; Schiffer, M.; Biosciences Division; Univ.Nova de Lisboa; Insti. de Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica

    2008-04-11

    Periplasmic sensor domains from two methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins from Geobacter sulfurreducens (encoded by genes GSU0935 and GSU0582) were expressed in Escherichia coli. The sensor domains were isolated, purified, characterized in solution, and their crystal structures were determined. In the crystal, both sensor domains form swapped dimers and show a PAS-type fold. The swapped segment consists of two helices of about 45 residues at the N terminus with the hemes located between the two monomers. In the case of the GSU0582 sensor, the dimer contains a crystallographic 2-fold symmetry and the heme is coordinated by an axial His and a water molecule. In the case of the GSU0935 sensor, the crystals contain a non-crystallographic dimer, and surprisingly, the coordination of the heme in each monomer is different; monomer A heme has His-Met ligation and monomer B heme has His-water ligation as found in the GSU0582 sensor. The structures of these sensor domains are the first structures of PAS domains containing covalently bound heme. Optical absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance and NMR spectroscopy have revealed that the heme groups of both sensor domains are high-spin and low-spin in the oxidized and reduced forms, respectively, and that the spin-state interconversion involves a heme axial ligand replacement. Both sensor domains bind NO in their ferric and ferrous forms but bind CO only in the reduced form. The binding of both NO and CO occurs via an axial ligand exchange process, and is fully reversible. The reduction potentials of the sensor domains differ by 95 mV (-156 mV and -251 mV for sensors GSU0582 and GSU0935, respectively). The swapped dimerization of these sensor domains and redox-linked ligand switch might be related to the mechanism of signal transduction by these chemotaxis proteins.

  10. Insights into genes involved in electricity generation in Geobacter sulfurreducens via whole genome microarray analysis of the OmcF-deficient mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byoung-Chan; Postier, Bradley L; Didonato, Raymond J; Chaudhuri, Swades K; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R

    2008-06-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens effectively produces electricity in microbial fuel cells by oxidizing acetate with an electrode serving as the sole electron acceptor. Deletion of the gene encoding OmcF, a monoheme outer membrane c-type cytochrome, substantially decreased current production. Previous studies demonstrated that inhibition of Fe(III) reduction in the OmcF-deficient mutant could be attributed to poor transcription of the gene for OmcB, an outer membrane c-type cytochrome that is required for Fe(III) reduction. However, a mutant in which omcB was deleted produced electricity as well as wild type. Microarray analysis of the OmcF-deficient mutant versus the wild type revealed that many of the genes with the greatest decreases in transcript levels were genes whose expression was previously reported to be upregulated in cells grown with an electrode as the sole electron acceptor. These included genes with putative functions related to metal efflux and/or type I secretion and two hypothetical proteins. The outer membrane cytochromes, OmcS and OmcE, which previous studies have demonstrated are required for optimal current generation, were not detected on the outer surface of the OmcF-deficient mutant even though the omcS and omcE genes were still transcribed, suggesting that the putative secretion system could be involved in the export of outer membrane proteins necessary for electron transfer to the fuel cell anode. These results suggest that the requirement for OmcF for optimal current production is not because OmcF is directly involved in extracellular electron transfer but because OmcF is required for the appropriate transcription of other genes either directly or indirectly involved in electricity production.

  11. Long-range Electron Transport in Geobacter sulfurreducens Biofilms is Redox Gradient-Driven

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    anodes of electrochemical reactors , result- ing in electrical current coupled to metabolic organic matter oxidation (18). When grown using an anode as...cells and microbial electrolysis cells. It may also provide valuable insights into the mechanism of long-range biological electron transport in...from industrial and agricultural waste- water . Trends Biotechnol 22:477–485. 55. Rozendal RA, Hamelers HVM, Rabaey K, Keller J, Buisman CJN (2008

  12. Evidence for interaction between the triheme cytochrome PpcA from Geobacter sulfurreducens and anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate, an analog of the redox active components of humic substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Joana M; Morgado, Leonor; Catarino, Teresa; Kokhan, Oleksandr; Pokkuluri, P Raj; Salgueiro, Carlos A

    2014-06-01

    The bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens displays an extraordinary respiratory versatility underpinning the diversity of electron donors and acceptors that can be used to sustain anaerobic growth. Remarkably, G. sulfurreducens can also use as electron donors the reduced forms of some acceptors, such as the humic substance analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), a feature that confers environmentally competitive advantages to the organism. Using UV-visible and stopped-flow kinetic measurements we demonstrate that there is electron exchange between the triheme cytochrome PpcA from Gs and AQDS. 2D-(1)H-(15)N HSQC NMR spectra were recorded for (15)N-enriched PpcA samples, in the absence and presence of AQDS. Chemical shift perturbation measurements, at increasing concentration of AQDS, were used to probe the interaction region and to measure the binding affinity of the PpcA-AQDS complex. The perturbations on the NMR signals corresponding to the PpcA backbone NH and heme substituents showed that the region around heme IV interacts with AQDS through the formation of a complex with a definite life time in the NMR time scale. The comparison of the NMR data obtained for PpcA in the presence and absence of AQDS showed that the interaction is reversible. Overall, this study provides for the first time a clear illustration of the formation of an electron transfer complex between AQDS and a G. sulfurreducens triheme cytochrome, shedding light on the electron transfer pathways underlying the microbial oxidation of humics.

  13. Bidirectional Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Ruthenium(II)-tris-Bipyridyl Modified PpcA, a Multi-Heme c-type Cytochrome from Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokhan, Oleksandr; Ponomarenko, Nina S.; Pokkuluri, Phani R.; Schiffer, Marianne; Mulfort, Karen L.; Tiede, David M.

    2015-06-18

    PpcA, a tri-heme cytochrome c7 from Geobacter sulfurreducens was investigated as a model for photosensitizer-initiated electron transfer within a multi-heme "molecular wire" protein architecture. E. coli expression of PpcA was found to be tolerant of cysteine site-directed mutagenesis, demonstrated by the successful expression of natively folded proteins bearing cysteine mutations at a series of sites selected to vary characteristically with respect to the three -CXXCH- heme binding domains. A preliminary survey of 5 selected mutants found that the introduced cysteines can be readily covalently linked to a Ru(II)-(2,2'-bpy)2(4-bromomethyl-4’-methyl-2,2'-bpy) photosensitizer (where bpy = bipyridine), and that the linked constructs support both photo-oxidative and photo-reductive quenching of the photosensitizer excited-state, depending upon the initial heme redox state. For photo-oxidative electron transfer, apparent heme reduction risetimes were found to vary from 7 x 10-12 s to 5 x 10-8 s, depending upon the site of photosensitizer linking. The excited-state electron transfers are about 103-fold faster than any previously reported photosensitizer-redox protein covalently linked construct. Preliminary conformational analysis using molecular dynamics simulations shows that rates for electron transfer track both the distance and pathways for electron transfer. Two mutants with the fastest charge transfer rates, A23C and K29C, showed a significant role of specific paths for electron transfer. While K29C labeled mutant was expected to have approximately 0.8Å greater donor-acceptor distance, it showed 20-fold faster charge separation rate. Clear evidence for inter-heme electron transfer within the multi-heme protein is not detected within the lifetimes of the charge separated states. These results demonstrate an opportunity to develop multi-heme c-cytochromes for investigation of electron transfer in protein "molecular wires" and to serve as frameworks for

  14. Geobacter sp. SD-1 with enhanced electrochemical activity in high-salt concentration solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dan; Call, Douglas; Wang, Aijie; Cheng, Shaoan; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-12-01

    An isolate, designated strain SD-1, was obtained from a biofilm dominated by Geobacter sulfurreducens in a microbial fuel cell. The electrochemical activity of strain SD-1 was compared with type strains, G. sulfurreducens PCA and Geobacter metallireducens GS-15, and a mixed culture in microbial electrolysis cells. SD-1 produced a maximum current density of 290 ± 29 A m−3 in a high-concentration phosphate buffer solution (PBS-H, 200 mM). This current density was significantly higher than that produced by the mixed culture (189 ± 44 A m−3) or the type strains (Geobacter strains and mixed cultures in terms of its salt tolerance.

  15. Comparative genomics of Geobacter chemotaxis genes reveals diverse signaling function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antommattei Frances M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geobacter species are δ-Proteobacteria and are often the predominant species in a variety of sedimentary environments where Fe(III reduction is important. Their ability to remediate contaminated environments and produce electricity makes them attractive for further study. Cell motility, biofilm formation, and type IV pili all appear important for the growth of Geobacter in changing environments and for electricity production. Recent studies in other bacteria have demonstrated that signaling pathways homologous to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli chemotaxis can regulate type IV pili-dependent motility, the synthesis of flagella and type IV pili, the production of extracellular matrix material, and biofilm formation. The classification of these pathways by comparative genomics improves the ability to understand how Geobacter thrives in natural environments and better their use in microbial fuel cells. Results The genomes of G. sulfurreducens, G. metallireducens, and G. uraniireducens contain multiple (~70 homologs of chemotaxis genes arranged in several major clusters (six, seven, and seven, respectively. Unlike the single gene cluster of E. coli, the Geobacter clusters are not all located near the flagellar genes. The probable functions of some Geobacter clusters are assignable by homology to known pathways; others appear to be unique to the Geobacter sp. and contain genes of unknown function. We identified large numbers of methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (MCP homologs that have diverse sensing domain architectures and generate a potential for sensing a great variety of environmental signals. We discuss mechanisms for class-specific segregation of the MCPs in the cell membrane, which serve to maintain pathway specificity and diminish crosstalk. Finally, the regulation of gene expression in Geobacter differs from E. coli. The sequences of predicted promoter elements suggest that the alternative sigma factors

  16. Inocula selection in microbial fuel cells based on anodic biofilm abundance of Geobacter sulfurreducens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Guotao; Rodrigues, Diogo De Sacadura; Thygesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) rely on microbial conversion of organic substrates to electricity. The optimal performance depends on the establishment of a microbial community rich in electrogenic bacteria. Usually this microbial community is established from inoculation of the MFC anode chamber....... The data obtained contribute to understanding the microbial community response to Lsub and Rext for optimizing electricity generation in MFCs....

  17. De Novo assembly of the complete genome of an enhanced electricity-producing variant of Geobacter sulfurreducens using only short reads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Nagarajan

    Full Text Available State-of-the-art DNA sequencing technologies are transforming the life sciences due to their ability to generate nucleotide sequence information with a speed and quantity that is unapproachable with traditional Sanger sequencing. Genome sequencing is a principal application of this technology, where the ultimate goal is the full and complete sequence of the organism of interest. Due to the nature of the raw data produced by these technologies, a full genomic sequence attained without the aid of Sanger sequencing has yet to be demonstrated.We have successfully developed a four-phase strategy for using only next-generation sequencing technologies (Illumina and 454 to assemble a complete microbial genome de novo. We applied this approach to completely assemble the 3.7 Mb genome of a rare Geobacter variant (KN400 that is capable of unprecedented current production at an electrode. Two key components of our strategy enabled us to achieve this result. First, we integrated the two data types early in the process to maximally leverage their complementary characteristics. And second, we used the output of different short read assembly programs in such a way so as to leverage the complementary nature of their different underlying algorithms or of their different implementations of the same underlying algorithm.The significance of our result is that it demonstrates a general approach for maximizing the efficiency and success of genome assembly projects as new sequencing technologies and new assembly algorithms are introduced. The general approach is a meta strategy, wherein sequencing data are integrated as early as possible and in particular ways and wherein multiple assembly algorithms are judiciously applied such that the deficiencies in one are complemented by another.

  18. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF EXTRACELLULAR ELECTRON TRANSFER IN BIOFILMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Schenk, Jim; Ivory, Cornelius; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-09-12

    Electrochemically active biofilms have a unique form of respiration in which they utilize solid external materials as terminal electron acceptors for their metabolism. Currently, two primary mechanisms have been identified for long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET): a diffusion- and a conduction-based mechanism. Evidence in the literature suggests that some biofilms, particularly Shewanella oneidensis, produce the requisite components for both mechanisms. In this study, a generic model is presented that incorporates the diffusion- and the conduction-based mechanisms and allows electrochemically active biofilms to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to S. oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found in the literature. Our simulation results show that 1) biofilms having both mechanisms available, especially if they can interact, may have a metabolic advantage over biofilms that can use only a single mechanism; 2) the thickness of G. sulfurreducens biofilms is likely not limited by conductivity; 3) accurate intrabiofilm diffusion coefficient values are critical for current generation predictions; and 4) the local biofilm potential and redox potential are two distinct parameters and cannot be assumed to have identical values. Finally, we determined that simulated cyclic and squarewave voltammetry based on our model are currently not capable of determining the specific percentages of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms in a biofilm. The developed model will be a critical tool for designing experiments to explain EET mechanisms.

  19. Modeling biofilms with dual extracellular electron transfer mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renslow, Ryan; Babauta, Jerome; Kuprat, Andrew; Schenk, Jim; Ivory, Cornelius; Fredrickson, Jim; Beyenal, Haluk

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemically active biofilms have a unique form of respiration in which they utilize solid external materials as terminal electron acceptors for their metabolism. Currently, two primary mechanisms have been identified for long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET): a diffusion- and a conduction-based mechanism. Evidence in the literature suggests that some biofilms, particularly Shewanella oneidensis, produce the requisite components for both mechanisms. In this study, a generic model is presented that incorporates the diffusion- and the conduction-based mechanisms and allows electrochemically active biofilms to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to S. oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found in the literature. Our simulation results show that 1) biofilms having both mechanisms available, especially if they can interact, may have a metabolic advantage over biofilms that can use only a single mechanism; 2) the thickness of G. sulfurreducens biofilms is likely not limited by conductivity; 3) accurate intrabiofilm diffusion coefficient values are critical for current generation predictions; and 4) the local biofilm potential and redox potential are two distinct parameters and cannot be assumed to have identical values. Finally, we determined that simulated cyclic and squarewave voltammetry based on our model are currently not capable of determining the specific percentages of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms in a biofilm. The developed model will be a critical tool for designing experiments to explain EET mechanisms. PMID:24113651

  20. Geobacter anodireducens sp. nov., an exoelectrogenic microbe in bioelectrochemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dan; Wang, Aijie; Cheng, Shaoan; Yates, Matthew; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-10-01

    A previously isolated exoelectrogenic bacterium, strain SD-1(T), was further characterized and identified as a representative of a novel species of the genus Geobacter. Strain SD-1(T) was Gram-negative, aerotolerant, anaerobic, non-spore-forming, non-fermentative and non-motile. Cells were short, curved rods (0.8-1.3 µm long and 0.3 µm in diameter). Growth of strain SD-1(T) was observed at 15-42 °C and pH 6.0-8.5, with optimal growth at 30-35 °C and pH 7. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the isolate was a member of the genus Geobacter, with the closest known relative being Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA(T) (98% similarity). Similar to other members of the genus Geobacter, strain SD-1(T) used soluble or insoluble Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor coupled with the oxidation of acetate. However, SD-1(T) could not reduce fumarate as an electron acceptor with acetate oxidization, which is an important physiological trait for G. sulfurreducens. Moreover, SD-1(T) could grow in media containing as much as 3% NaCl, while G. sulfurreducens PCA(T) can tolerate just half this concentration, and this difference in salt tolerance was even more obvious when cultivated in bioelectrochemical systems. DNA-DNA hybridization analysis of strain SD-1(T) and its closest relative, G. sulfurreducens ATCC 51573(T), showed a relatedness of 61.6%. The DNA G+C content of strain SD-1(T) was 58.9 mol%. Thus, on the basis of these characteristics, strain SD-1(T) was not assigned to G. sulfurreducens, and was instead classified in the genus Geobacter as a representative of a novel species. The name Geobacter anodireducens sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain SD-1(T) ( = CGMCC 1.12536(T) = KCTC 4672(T)).

  1. Geobacter anodireducens sp. nov., an exoelectrogenic microbe in bioelectrochemical systems

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, D.

    2014-07-22

    © 2014 IUMS. A previously isolated exoelectrogenic bacterium, strain SD-1(T), was further characterized and identified as a representative of a novel species of the genus Geobacter. Strain SD-1(T) was Gram-negative, aerotolerant, anaerobic, non-spore-forming, non-fermentative and non-motile. Cells were short, curved rods (0.8-1.3 µm long and 0.3 µm in diameter). Growth of strain SD-1(T) was observed at 15-42 °C and pH 6.0-8.5, with optimal growth at 30-35 °C and pH 7. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the isolate was a member of the genus Geobacter, with the closest known relative being Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA(T) (98% similarity). Similar to other members of the genus Geobacter, strain SD-1(T) used soluble or insoluble Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor coupled with the oxidation of acetate. However, SD-1(T) could not reduce fumarate as an electron acceptor with acetate oxidization, which is an important physiological trait for G. sulfurreducens. Moreover, SD-1(T) could grow in media containing as much as 3% NaCl, while G. sulfurreducens PCA(T) can tolerate just half this concentration, and this difference in salt tolerance was even more obvious when cultivated in bioelectrochemical systems. DNA-DNA hybridization analysis of strain SD-1(T) and its closest relative, G. sulfurreducens ATCC 51573(T), showed a relatedness of 61.6%. The DNA G+C content of strain SD-1(T) was 58.9 mol%. Thus, on the basis of these characteristics, strain SD-1(T) was not assigned to G. sulfurreducens, and was instead classified in the genus Geobacter as a representative of a novel species. The name Geobacter anodireducens sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain SD-1(T) ( = CGMCC 1.12536(T) = KCTC 4672(T)).

  2. A biofilm microreactor system for simultaneous electrochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Ewing, R James; Ewing, Thomas; Mueller, Karl T.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-03-01

    In order to fully understand electrochemically active biofilms and the limitations to their scale-up in industrial biofilm reactors, a complete picture of the microenvironments inside the biofilm is needed. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are ideally suited for the study of biofilms and for probing their microenvironments because these techniques allow for non-invasive interrogation and in situ monitoring with high resolution. By combining NMR with simultaneous electrochemical techniques, it is possible to sustain and study live electrochemically active biofilms. Here, we introduce a novel biofilm microreactor system that allows for simultaneous electrochemical and NMR techniques (EC-NMR) at the microscale. Microreactors were designed with custom radiofrequency resonator coils, which allowed for NMR measurements of biofilms growing on polarized gold electrodes. For an example application of this system, we grew Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms. NMR was used to investigate growth media flow velocities, which were compared to simulated laminar flow, and electron donor concentrations inside the biofilms. We use Monte Carlo error analysis to estimate standard deviations of the electron donor concentration measurements within the biofilm. The EC-NMR biofilm microreactor system can ultimately be used to correlate extracellular electron transfer rates with metabolic reactions and explore extracellular electron transfer mechanisms.

  3. Exoelectrogenic biofilm as a template for sustainable formation of a catalytic mesoporous structure

    KAUST Repository

    Yates, Matthew D.

    2014-06-04

    © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Actively respiring biofilms of Geobacter sulfurreducens were used as a biotemplate to form a palladium mesoporous layer directly on an electrode surface. Cells and proteins within the biofilm acted as the reductant and stabilizer to facilitate the reduction, dispersion, and attachment of palladium nanoparticles to the electrode surface without using synthetic chemicals. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mesoporous structures can increase catalytic activity by maximizing the ratio of surface area to volume, but current synthesis techniques utilize expensive polymers and toxic chemicals. A Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilm was used as a sustainable template to form mesoporous Pd structures while eliminating the need for synthetic chemicals. The bulk of the biofilm material was removed by thermal treatments after nanoparticle formation, producing a catalytic Pd mesoporous (pore size 9.7±0.1nm) structure attached to the graphite electrode with a 1.5-2μm thick backbone composed of nanoparticles (~200nm). A control electrode electrochemically plated with Pd in the absence of a biofilm exhibited a variable planar Pd base (~0.5-3μm thick) with sporadic Pd extrusions (~2μm across, 1-5μm tall) from the surface. The biotemplated mesoporous structure produced 15-20% higher stable current densities during H2 oxidation tests than the electrochemically plated control electrode, even though 30% less Pd was present in the biotemplated catalyst. These results indicate that electroactive biofilms can be used as a sustainable base material to produce nanoporous structures without the need for synthetic polymers. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 2349-2354.

  4. Electrochemically assisted methane production in a biofilm reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villano, Marianna; Monaco, Gianluca; Aulenta, Federico; Majone, Mauro

    Microbial electrolysis is a new technology for the production of value-added products, such as gaseous biofuels, from waste organic substrates. This study describes the performance of a methane-producing microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) operated at ambient temperature with a Geobacter sulfurreducens microbial bioanode and a methanogenic microbial biocathode. The cell was initially operated at a controlled cathode potential of -850 mV (vs. standard hydrogen electrode, SHE) in order to develop a methanogenic biofilm capable of reducing carbon dioxide to methane gas using abiotically produced hydrogen gas or directly the polarized electrode as electron donors. Subsequently, G. sulfurreducens was inoculated at the anode and the MEC was operated at a controlled anode potential of +500 mV, with acetate serving as electron donor. The rate of methane production at the cathode was found to be primarily limited by the acetate oxidation kinetics and in turn by G. sulfurreducens concentration at the anode of the MEC. Temperature had also a main impact on acetate oxidation kinetics, with an apparent activation energy of 58.1 kJ mol -1.

  5. Identification of multicomponent histidine-aspartate phosphorelay system controlling flagellar and motility gene expression in Geobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Leang, Ching; Inoue, Kengo; Lovley, Derek R

    2012-03-30

    Geobacter species play an important role in the natural biogeochemical cycles of aquatic sediments and subsurface environments as well as in subsurface bioremediation by oxidizing organic compounds with the reduction of insoluble Fe(III) oxides. Flagellum-based motility is considered to be critical for Geobacter species to locate fresh sources of Fe(III) oxides. Functional and comparative genomic approaches, coupled with genetic and biochemical methods, identified key regulators for flagellar gene expression in Geobacter species. A master transcriptional regulator, designated FgrM, is a member of the enhancer-binding protein family. The fgrM gene in the most studied strain of Geobacter species, Geobacter sulfurreducens strain DL-1, is truncated by a transposase gene, preventing flagellar biosynthesis. Integrating a functional FgrM homolog restored flagellar biosynthesis and motility in G. sulfurreducens DL-1 and enhanced the ability to reduce insoluble Fe(III) oxide. Interrupting the fgrM gene in G. sulfurreducens strain KN400, which is motile, removed the capacity for flagellar production and inhibited Fe(III) oxide reduction. FgrM, which is also a response regulator of the two-component His-Asp phosphorelay system, was phosphorylated by histidine kinase GHK4, which was essential for flagellar production and motility. GHK4, which is a hybrid kinase with a receiver domain at the N terminus, was phosphorylated by another histidine kinase, GHK3. Therefore, the multicomponent His-Asp phosphorelay system appears to control flagellar gene expression in Geobacter species.

  6. Real-time measurements of the redox states of c-type cytochromes in electroactive biofilms: a confocal resonance Raman Microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virdis, Bernardino; Millo, Diego; Donose, Bogdan C; Batstone, Damien J

    2014-01-01

    Confocal Resonance Raman Microscopy (CRRM) was used to probe variations of redox state of c-type cytochromes embedded in living mixed-culture electroactive biofilms exposed to different electrode polarizations, under potentiostatic and potentiodynamic conditions. In the absence of the metabolic substrate acetate, the redox state of cytochromes followed the application of reducing and oxidizing electrode potentials. Real-time monitoring of the redox state of cytochromes during cyclic voltammetry (CV) in a potential window where cytochromes reduction occurs, evidenced a measurable time delay between the oxidation of redox cofactors probed by CV at the electrode interface, and oxidation of distal cytochromes probed by CRRM. This delay was used to tentatively estimate the diffusivity of electrons through the biofilm. In the presence of acetate, the resonance Raman spectra of young (10 days, j = 208 ± 49 µA cm(-2)) and mature (57 days, j = 267 ± 73 µA cm(-2)) biofilms show that cytochromes remained oxidized homogeneously even at layers as far as 70 µm from the electrode, implying the existence of slow metabolic kinetics that do not result in the formation of a redox gradient inside the biofilm during anode respiration. However, old biofilms (80 days, j = 190 ± 37 µA cm(-2)) with thickness above 100 µm were characterized by reduced catalytic activity compared to the previous developing stages. The cytochromes in these biofilm were mainly in the reduced redox state, showing that only aged mixed-culture biofilms accumulate electrons during anode respiration. These results differ substantially from recent observations in pure Geobacter sulfurreducens electroactive biofilms, in which accumulation of reduced cytochromes is already observed in thinner biofilms, thus suggesting different bottlenecks in current production for mixed-culture and G. sulfurreducens biofilms.

  7. Real-time measurements of the redox states of c-type cytochromes in electroactive biofilms: a confocal resonance Raman Microscopy study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardino Virdis

    Full Text Available Confocal Resonance Raman Microscopy (CRRM was used to probe variations of redox state of c-type cytochromes embedded in living mixed-culture electroactive biofilms exposed to different electrode polarizations, under potentiostatic and potentiodynamic conditions. In the absence of the metabolic substrate acetate, the redox state of cytochromes followed the application of reducing and oxidizing electrode potentials. Real-time monitoring of the redox state of cytochromes during cyclic voltammetry (CV in a potential window where cytochromes reduction occurs, evidenced a measurable time delay between the oxidation of redox cofactors probed by CV at the electrode interface, and oxidation of distal cytochromes probed by CRRM. This delay was used to tentatively estimate the diffusivity of electrons through the biofilm. In the presence of acetate, the resonance Raman spectra of young (10 days, j = 208 ± 49 µA cm(-2 and mature (57 days, j = 267 ± 73 µA cm(-2 biofilms show that cytochromes remained oxidized homogeneously even at layers as far as 70 µm from the electrode, implying the existence of slow metabolic kinetics that do not result in the formation of a redox gradient inside the biofilm during anode respiration. However, old biofilms (80 days, j = 190 ± 37 µA cm(-2 with thickness above 100 µm were characterized by reduced catalytic activity compared to the previous developing stages. The cytochromes in these biofilm were mainly in the reduced redox state, showing that only aged mixed-culture biofilms accumulate electrons during anode respiration. These results differ substantially from recent observations in pure Geobacter sulfurreducens electroactive biofilms, in which accumulation of reduced cytochromes is already observed in thinner biofilms, thus suggesting different bottlenecks in current production for mixed-culture and G. sulfurreducens biofilms.

  8. A biofilm microreactor system for simultaneous electrochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renslow, R S; Babauta, J T; Majors, P D; Mehta, H S; Ewing, R J; Ewing, T W; Mueller, K T; Beyenal, H

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are ideally suited for the study of biofilms and for probing their microenvironments because these techniques allow for noninvasive interrogation and in situ monitoring with high resolution. By combining NMR with simultaneous electrochemical techniques, it is possible to sustain and study live biofilms respiring on electrodes. Here, we describe a biofilm microreactor system, including a reusable and a disposable reactor, that allows for simultaneous electrochemical and NMR techniques (EC-NMR) at the microscale. Microreactors were designed with custom radio frequency resonator coils, which allowed for NMR measurements of biofilms growing on polarized gold electrodes. For an example application of this system we grew Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms on electrodes. EC-NMR was used to investigate growth medium flow velocities and depth-resolved acetate concentration inside the biofilm. As a novel contribution we used Monte Carlo error analysis to estimate the standard deviations of the acetate concentration measurements. Overall, we found that the disposable EC-NMR microreactor provided a 9.7 times better signal-to-noise ratio over the reusable reactor. The EC-NMR biofilm microreactor system can ultimately be used to correlate extracellular electron transfer rates with metabolic reactions and explore extracellular electron transfer mechanisms.

  9. The impact of shearing flows on electroactive biofilm formation, structure, and current generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A.-Andrew; Buie, Cullen

    2016-11-01

    A special class of bacteria exist that directly produce electricity. First explored in 1911, these electroactive bacteria catalyze hydrocarbons and transport electrons directly to a metallic electron acceptor forming thicker biofilms than other species. Electroactive bacteria biofilms are thicker because they are not limited by transport of oxygen or other terminal electron acceptors. Electroactive bacteria can produce power in fuel cells. Power production is limited in fuel cells by the bacteria's inability to eliminate protons near the insoluble electron acceptor not utilized in the wild. To date, they have not been successfully evolved or engineered to overcome this limit. This limitation may be overcome by enhancing convective mass transport while maintaining substantial biomass within the biofilm. Increasing convective mass transport increases shear stress. A biofilm may respond to increased shear by changing biomass, matrix, or current production. In this study, a rotating disk electrode is used to separate nutrient from physical stress. This phenomenon is investigated using the model electroactive bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens at nutrient loads comparable to flow-through microbial fuel cells. We determine biofilm structure experimentally by measuring the porosity and calculating the tortuosity from confocal microscope images. Biofilm adaptation for electron transport is quantified using electrical impedance spectroscopy. Our ultimate objective is a framework relating biofilm thickness, porosity, shear stress and current generation for the optimization of bioelectrochemical systems The Alfred P Sloan Foundation MPHD Program.

  10. Geobacter: the microbe electric's physiology, ecology, and practical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, Derek R; Ueki, Toshiyuki; Zhang, Tian; Malvankar, Nikhil S; Shrestha, Pravin M; Flanagan, Kelly A; Aklujkar, Muktak; Butler, Jessica E; Giloteaux, Ludovic; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Holmes, Dawn E; Franks, Ashley E; Orellana, Roberto; Risso, Carla; Nevin, Kelly P

    2011-01-01

    that conduct electrons along their length with metallic-like conductivity. Surprisingly, the abundant c-type cytochromes of Geobacter species do not contribute to this long-range electron transport, but cytochromes are important for making the terminal electrical connections with Fe(III) oxides and electrodes and also function as capacitors, storing charge to permit continued respiration when extracellular electron acceptors are temporarily unavailable. The high conductivity of Geobacter pili and biofilms and the ability of biofilms to function as supercapacitors are novel properties that might contribute to the field of bioelectronics. The study of Geobacter species has revealed a remarkable number of microbial physiological properties that had not previously been described in any microorganism. Further investigation of these environmentally relevant and physiologically unique organisms is warranted.

  11. Anaerobic benzene oxidation via phenol in Geobacter metallireducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Chaurasia, Akhilesh Kumar; Smith, Jessica A; Bain, Timothy S; Lovley, Derek R

    2013-12-01

    Anaerobic activation of benzene is expected to represent a novel biochemistry of environmental significance. Therefore, benzene metabolism was investigated in Geobacter metallireducens, the only genetically tractable organism known to anaerobically degrade benzene. Trace amounts (Geobacter metallireducens anaerobically oxidizing benzene to carbon dioxide with the reduction of Fe(III). Phenol was not detected in cell-free controls or in Fe(II)- and benzene-containing cultures of Geobacter sulfurreducens, a Geobacter species that cannot metabolize benzene. The phenol produced in G. metallireducens cultures was labeled with (18)O during growth in H2(18)O, as expected for anaerobic conversion of benzene to phenol. Analysis of whole-genome gene expression patterns indicated that genes for phenol metabolism were upregulated during growth on benzene but that genes for benzoate or toluene metabolism were not, further suggesting that phenol was an intermediate in benzene metabolism. Deletion of the genes for PpsA or PpcB, subunits of two enzymes specifically required for the metabolism of phenol, removed the capacity for benzene metabolism. These results demonstrate that benzene hydroxylation to phenol is an alternative to carboxylation for anaerobic benzene activation and suggest that this may be an important metabolic route for benzene removal in petroleum-contaminated groundwaters, in which Geobacter species are considered to play an important role in anaerobic benzene degradation.

  12. Hydrogen production by geobacter species and a mixed consortium in a microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Douglas F; Wagner, Rachel C; Logan, Bruce E

    2009-12-01

    A hydrogen utilizing exoelectrogenic bacterium (Geobacter sulfurreducens) was compared to both a nonhydrogen oxidizer (Geobacter metallireducens) and a mixed consortium in order to compare the hydrogen production rates and hydrogen recoveries of pure and mixed cultures in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). At an applied voltage of 0.7 V, both G. sulfurreducens and the mixed culture generated similar current densities (ca. 160 A/m3), resulting in hydrogen production rates of ca. 1.9 m(3) H2/m3/day, whereas G. metallireducens exhibited lower current densities and production rates of 110 +/- 7 A/m3 and 1.3 +/- 0.1 m3 H2/m3/day, respectively. Before methane was detected in the mixed-culture MEC, the mixed consortium achieved the highest overall energy recovery (relative to both electricity and substrate energy inputs) of 82% +/- 8% compared to G. sulfurreducens (77% +/- 2%) and G. metallireducens (78% +/- 5%), due to the higher coulombic efficiency of the mixed consortium. At an applied voltage of 0.4 V, methane production increased in the mixed-culture MEC and, as a result, the hydrogen recovery decreased and the overall energy recovery dropped to 38% +/- 16% compared to 80% +/- 5% for G. sulfurreducens and 76% +/- 0% for G. metallireducens. Internal hydrogen recycling was confirmed since the mixed culture generated a stable current density of 31 +/- 0 A/m3 when fed hydrogen gas, whereas G. sulfurreducens exhibited a steady decrease in current production. Community analysis suggested that G. sulfurreducens was predominant in the mixed-culture MEC (72% of clones) despite its relative absence in the mixed-culture inoculum obtained from a microbial fuel cell reactor (2% of clones). These results demonstrate that Geobacter species are capable of obtaining similar hydrogen production rates and energy recoveries as mixed cultures in an MEC and that high coulombic efficiencies in mixed culture MECs can be attributed in part to the recycling of hydrogen into current.

  13. Outer cell surface components essential for Fe(III) oxide reduction by Geobacter metallireducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jessica A; Lovley, Derek R; Tremblay, Pier-Luc

    2013-02-01

    Geobacter species are important Fe(III) reducers in a diversity of soils and sediments. Mechanisms for Fe(III) oxide reduction have been studied in detail in Geobacter sulfurreducens, but a number of the most thoroughly studied outer surface components of G. sulfurreducens, particularly c-type cytochromes, are not well conserved among Geobacter species. In order to identify cellular components potentially important for Fe(III) oxide reduction in Geobacter metallireducens, gene transcript abundance was compared in cells grown on Fe(III) oxide or soluble Fe(III) citrate with whole-genome microarrays. Outer-surface cytochromes were also identified. Deletion of genes for c-type cytochromes that had higher transcript abundance during growth on Fe(III) oxides and/or were detected in the outer-surface protein fraction identified six c-type cytochrome genes, that when deleted removed the capacity for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Several of the c-type cytochromes which were essential for Fe(III) oxide reduction in G. metallireducens have homologs in G. sulfurreducens that are not important for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Other genes essential for Fe(III) oxide reduction included a gene predicted to encode an NHL (Ncl-1-HT2A-Lin-41) repeat-containing protein and a gene potentially involved in pili glycosylation. Genes associated with flagellum-based motility, chemotaxis, and pili had higher transcript abundance during growth on Fe(III) oxide, consistent with the previously proposed importance of these components in Fe(III) oxide reduction. These results demonstrate that there are similarities in extracellular electron transfer between G. metallireducens and G. sulfurreducens but the outer-surface c-type cytochromes involved in Fe(III) oxide reduction are different.

  14. Purification and Characterization of OmcZ, an Outer-Surface, Octaheme c-Type Cytochrome Essential for Optimal Current Production by Geobacter sulfurreducens▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kengo; Qian, Xinlei; Morgado, Leonor; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Mester, Tünde; Izallalen, Mounir; Salgueiro, Carlos A.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Geobacter sulfurreducens requires the c-type cytochrome OmcZ, which is present in large (OmcZL; 50-kDa) and small (OmcZS; 30-kDa) forms, for optimal current production in microbial fuel cells. This protein was further characterized to aid in understanding its role in current production. Subcellular-localization studies suggested that OmcZS was the predominant extracellular form of OmcZ. N- and C-terminal amino acid sequence analysis of purified OmcZS and molecular weight measurements indicated that OmcZS is a cleaved product of OmcZL retaining all 8 hemes, including 1 heme with the unusual c-type heme-binding motif CX14CH. The purified OmcZS was remarkably thermally stable (thermal-denaturing temperature, 94.2°C). Redox titration analysis revealed that the midpoint reduction potential of OmcZS is approximately −220 mV (versus the standard hydrogen electrode [SHE]) with nonequivalent heme groups that cover a large reduction potential range (−420 to −60 mV). OmcZS transferred electrons in vitro to a diversity of potential extracellular electron acceptors, such as Fe(III) citrate, U(VI), Cr(VI), Au(III), Mn(IV) oxide, and the humic substance analogue anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate, but not Fe(III) oxide. The biochemical properties and extracellular localization of OmcZ suggest that it is well suited for promoting electron transfer in current-producing biofilms of G. sulfurreducens. PMID:20400562

  15. Unexpected specificity of interspecies cobamide transfer from Geobacter spp. to organohalide-respiring Dehalococcoides mccartyi strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jun; Ritalahti, Kirsti M; Wagner, Darlene D; Löffler, Frank E

    2012-09-01

    Dehalococcoides mccartyi strains conserve energy from reductive dechlorination reactions catalyzed by corrinoid-dependent reductive dehalogenase enzyme systems. Dehalococcoides lacks the ability for de novo corrinoid synthesis, and pure cultures require the addition of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B(12)) for growth. In contrast, Geobacter lovleyi, which dechlorinates tetrachloroethene to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), and the nondechlorinating species Geobacter sulfurreducens have complete sets of cobamide biosynthesis genes and produced 12.9 ± 2.4 and 24.2 ± 5.8 ng of extracellular cobamide per liter of culture suspension, respectively, during growth with acetate and fumarate in a completely synthetic medium. G. lovleyi-D. mccartyi strain BAV1 or strain FL2 cocultures provided evidence for interspecies corrinoid transfer, and cis-DCE was dechlorinated to vinyl chloride and ethene concomitant with Dehalococcoides growth. In contrast, negligible increase in Dehalococcoides 16S rRNA gene copies and insignificant dechlorination occurred in G. sulfurreducens-D. mccartyi strain BAV1 or strain FL2 cocultures. Apparently, G. lovleyi produces a cobamide that complements Dehalococcoides' nutritional requirements, whereas G. sulfurreducens does not. Interestingly, Dehalococcoides dechlorination activity and growth could be restored in G. sulfurreducens-Dehalococcoides cocultures by adding 10 μM 5',6'-dimethylbenzimidazole. Observations made with the G. sulfurreducens-Dehalococcoides cocultures suggest that the exchange of the lower ligand generated a cobalamin, which supported Dehalococcoides activity. These findings have implications for in situ bioremediation and suggest that the corrinoid metabolism of Dehalococcoides must be understood to faithfully predict, and possibly enhance, reductive dechlorination activities.

  16. Genome-scale dynamic modeling of the competition between Rhodoferax and Geobacter in anoxic subsurface environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Kai; Izallalen, Mounir; Mouser, Paula; Richter, Hanno; Risso, Carla; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Lovley, Derek R

    2011-02-01

    The advent of rapid complete genome sequencing, and the potential to capture this information in genome-scale metabolic models, provide the possibility of comprehensively modeling microbial community interactions. For example, Rhodoferax and Geobacter species are acetate-oxidizing Fe(III)-reducers that compete in anoxic subsurface environments and this competition may have an influence on the in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater. Therefore, genome-scale models of Geobacter sulfurreducens and Rhodoferax ferrireducens were used to evaluate how Geobacter and Rhodoferax species might compete under diverse conditions found in a uranium-contaminated aquifer in Rifle, CO. The model predicted that at the low rates of acetate flux expected under natural conditions at the site, Rhodoferax will outcompete Geobacter as long as sufficient ammonium is available. The model also predicted that when high concentrations of acetate are added during in situ bioremediation, Geobacter species would predominate, consistent with field-scale observations. This can be attributed to the higher expected growth yields of Rhodoferax and the ability of Geobacter to fix nitrogen. The modeling predicted relative proportions of Geobacter and Rhodoferax in geochemically distinct zones of the Rifle site that were comparable to those that were previously documented with molecular techniques. The model also predicted that under nitrogen fixation, higher carbon and electron fluxes would be diverted toward respiration rather than biomass formation in Geobacter, providing a potential explanation for enhanced in situ U(VI) reduction in low-ammonium zones. These results show that genome-scale modeling can be a useful tool for predicting microbial interactions in subsurface environments and shows promise for designing bioremediation strategies.

  17. Hydrogen Production by Geobacter Species and a Mixed Consortium in a Microbial Electrolysis Cell▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Douglas F.; Wagner, Rachel C.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2009-01-01

    A hydrogen utilizing exoelectrogenic bacterium (Geobacter sulfurreducens) was compared to both a nonhydrogen oxidizer (Geobacter metallireducens) and a mixed consortium in order to compare the hydrogen production rates and hydrogen recoveries of pure and mixed cultures in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). At an applied voltage of 0.7 V, both G. sulfurreducens and the mixed culture generated similar current densities (ca. 160 A/m3), resulting in hydrogen production rates of ca. 1.9 m3 H2/m3/day, whereas G. metallireducens exhibited lower current densities and production rates of 110 ± 7 A/m3 and 1.3 ± 0.1 m3 H2/m3/day, respectively. Before methane was detected in the mixed-culture MEC, the mixed consortium achieved the highest overall energy recovery (relative to both electricity and substrate energy inputs) of 82% ± 8% compared to G. sulfurreducens (77% ± 2%) and G. metallireducens (78% ± 5%), due to the higher coulombic efficiency of the mixed consortium. At an applied voltage of 0.4 V, methane production increased in the mixed-culture MEC and, as a result, the hydrogen recovery decreased and the overall energy recovery dropped to 38% ± 16% compared to 80% ± 5% for G. sulfurreducens and 76% ± 0% for G. metallireducens. Internal hydrogen recycling was confirmed since the mixed culture generated a stable current density of 31 ± 0 A/m3 when fed hydrogen gas, whereas G. sulfurreducens exhibited a steady decrease in current production. Community analysis suggested that G. sulfurreducens was predominant in the mixed-culture MEC (72% of clones) despite its relative absence in the mixed-culture inoculum obtained from a microbial fuel cell reactor (2% of clones). These results demonstrate that Geobacter species are capable of obtaining similar hydrogen production rates and energy recoveries as mixed cultures in an MEC and that high coulombic efficiencies in mixed culture MECs can be attributed in part to the recycling of hydrogen into current. PMID:19820150

  18. Hydrogen Production by Geobacter Species and a Mixed Consortium in a Microbial Electrolysis Cell

    KAUST Repository

    Call, D. F.

    2009-10-09

    A hydrogen utilizing exoelectrogenic bacterium (Geobacter sulfurreducens) was compared to both a nonhydrogen oxidizer (Geobacter metallireducens) and a mixed consortium in order to compare the hydrogen production rates and hydrogen recoveries of pure and mixed cultures in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). At an applied voltage of 0.7 V, both G. sulfurreducens and the mixed culture generated similar current densities (ca. 160 A/m3), resulting in hydrogen production rates of ca. 1.9 m3 H2/m 3/day, whereas G. metallireducens exhibited lower current densities and production rates of 110 ± 7 A/m3 and 1.3 ± 0.1 m3 H2/m3/day, respectively. Before methane was detected in the mixed-culture MEC, the mixed consortium achieved the highest overall energy recovery (relative to both electricity and substrate energy inputs) of 82% ± 8% compared to G. sulfurreducens (77% ± 2%) and G. metallireducens (78% ± 5%), due to the higher coulombic efficiency of the mixed consortium. At an applied voltage of 0.4 V, methane production increased in the mixed-culture MEC and, as a result, the hydrogen recovery decreased and the overall energy recovery dropped to 38% ± 16% compared to 80% ± 5% for G. sulfurreducens and 76% ± 0% for G. metallireducens. Internal hydrogen recycling was confirmed since the mixed culture generated a stable current density of 31 ± 0 A/m3 when fed hydrogen gas, whereas G. sulfurreducens exhibited a steady decrease in current production. Community analysis suggested that G. sulfurreducens was predominant in the mixed-culture MEC (72% of clones) despite its relative absence in the mixed-culture inoculum obtained from a microbial fuel cell reactor (2% of clones). These results demonstrate that Geobacter species are capable of obtaining similar hydrogen production rates and energy recoveries as mixed cultures in an MEC and that high coulombic efficiencies in mixed culture MECs can be attributed in part to the recycling of hydrogen into current. Copyright

  19. Genome-scale constraint-based modeling of Geobacter metallireducens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Famili Iman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geobacter metallireducens was the first organism that can be grown in pure culture to completely oxidize organic compounds with Fe(III oxide serving as electron acceptor. Geobacter species, including G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens, are used for bioremediation and electricity generation from waste organic matter and renewable biomass. The constraint-based modeling approach enables the development of genome-scale in silico models that can predict the behavior of complex biological systems and their responses to the environments. Such a modeling approach was applied to provide physiological and ecological insights on the metabolism of G. metallireducens. Results The genome-scale metabolic model of G. metallireducens was constructed to include 747 genes and 697 reactions. Compared to the G. sulfurreducens model, the G. metallireducens metabolic model contains 118 unique reactions that reflect many of G. metallireducens' specific metabolic capabilities. Detailed examination of the G. metallireducens model suggests that its central metabolism contains several energy-inefficient reactions that are not present in the G. sulfurreducens model. Experimental biomass yield of G. metallireducens growing on pyruvate was lower than the predicted optimal biomass yield. Microarray data of G. metallireducens growing with benzoate and acetate indicated that genes encoding these energy-inefficient reactions were up-regulated by benzoate. These results suggested that the energy-inefficient reactions were likely turned off during G. metallireducens growth with acetate for optimal biomass yield, but were up-regulated during growth with complex electron donors such as benzoate for rapid energy generation. Furthermore, several computational modeling approaches were applied to accelerate G. metallireducens research. For example, growth of G. metallireducens with different electron donors and electron acceptors were studied using the genome

  20. Influence of Anode Potentials on Current Generation and Extracellular Electron Transfer Paths of Geobacter Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souichiro Kato

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Geobacter species are capable of utilizing solid-state compounds, including anodic electrodes, as electron acceptors of respiration via extracellular electron transfer (EET and have attracted considerable attention for their crucial role as biocatalysts of bioelectrochemical systems (BES’s. Recent studies disclosed that anode potentials affect power output and anodic microbial communities, including selection of dominant Geobacter species, in various BES’s. However, the details in current-generating properties and responses to anode potentials have been investigated only for a model species, namely Geobacter sulfurreducens. In this study, the effects of anode potentials on the current generation and the EET paths were investigated by cultivating six Geobacter species with different anode potentials, followed by electrochemical analyses. The electrochemical cultivation demonstrated that the G. metallireducens clade species (G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens constantly generate high current densities at a wide range of anode potentials (≥−0.3 or −0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl, while the subsurface clades species (G. daltonii, G. bemidjensis, G. chapellei, and G. pelophilus generate a relatively large current only at limited potential regions (−0.1 to −0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The linear sweep voltammetry analyses indicated that the G. metallireducens clade species utilize only one EET path irrespective of the anode potentials, while the subsurface clades species utilize multiple EET paths, which can be optimized depending on the anode potentials. These results clearly demonstrate that the response features to anode potentials are divergent among species (or clades of Geobacter.

  1. Harvesting electricity with Geobacter bremensis isolated from compost.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Nercessian

    Full Text Available Electrochemically active (EA biofilms were formed on metallic dimensionally stable anode-type electrode (DSA, embedded in garden compost and polarized at +0.50 V/SCE. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene libraries revealed that biofilms were heavily enriched in Deltaproteobacteria in comparison to control biofilms formed on non-polarized electrodes, which were preferentially composed of Gammaproteobacteria and Firmicutes. Among Deltaproteobacteria, sequences affiliated with Pelobacter and Geobacter genera were identified. A bacterial consortium was cultivated, in which 25 isolates were identified as Geobacter bremensis. Pure cultures of 4 different G. bremensis isolates gave higher current densities (1400 mA/m(2 on DSA, 2490 mA/m(2 on graphite than the original multi-species biofilms (in average 300 mA/m(2 on DSA and the G. bremensis DSM type strain (100-300 A/m(2 on DSA; 2485 mA/m(2 on graphite. FISH analysis confirmed that G. bremensis represented a minor fraction in the original EA biofilm, in which species related to Pelobacter genus were predominant. The Pelobacter type strain did not show EA capacity, which can explain the lower performance of the multi-species biofilms. These results stressed the great interest of extracting and culturing pure EA strains from wild EA biofilms to improve the current density provided by microbial anodes.

  2. Harvesting electricity with Geobacter bremensis isolated from compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nercessian, Olivier; Parot, Sandrine; Délia, Marie-Line; Bergel, Alain; Achouak, Wafa

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemically active (EA) biofilms were formed on metallic dimensionally stable anode-type electrode (DSA), embedded in garden compost and polarized at +0.50 V/SCE. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene libraries revealed that biofilms were heavily enriched in Deltaproteobacteria in comparison to control biofilms formed on non-polarized electrodes, which were preferentially composed of Gammaproteobacteria and Firmicutes. Among Deltaproteobacteria, sequences affiliated with Pelobacter and Geobacter genera were identified. A bacterial consortium was cultivated, in which 25 isolates were identified as Geobacter bremensis. Pure cultures of 4 different G. bremensis isolates gave higher current densities (1400 mA/m(2) on DSA, 2490 mA/m(2) on graphite) than the original multi-species biofilms (in average 300 mA/m(2) on DSA) and the G. bremensis DSM type strain (100-300 A/m(2) on DSA; 2485 mA/m(2) on graphite). FISH analysis confirmed that G. bremensis represented a minor fraction in the original EA biofilm, in which species related to Pelobacter genus were predominant. The Pelobacter type strain did not show EA capacity, which can explain the lower performance of the multi-species biofilms. These results stressed the great interest of extracting and culturing pure EA strains from wild EA biofilms to improve the current density provided by microbial anodes.

  3. Genome-wide gene regulation of biosynthesis and energy generation by a novel transcriptional repressor in Geobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Lovley, Derek R

    2010-01-01

    Geobacter species play important roles in bioremediation of contaminated environments and in electricity production from waste organic matter in microbial fuel cells. To better understand physiology of Geobacter species, expression and function of citrate synthase, a key enzyme in the TCA cycle that is important for organic acid oxidation in Geobacter species, was investigated. Geobacter sulfurreducens did not require citrate synthase for growth with hydrogen as the electron donor and fumarate as the electron acceptor. Expression of the citrate synthase gene, gltA, was repressed by a transcription factor under this growth condition. Functional and comparative genomics approaches, coupled with genetic and biochemical assays, identified a novel transcription factor termed HgtR that acts as a repressor for gltA. Further analysis revealed that HgtR is a global regulator for genes involved in biosynthesis and energy generation in Geobacter species. The hgtR gene was essential for growth with hydrogen, during which hgtR expression was induced. These findings provide important new insights into the mechanisms by which Geobacter species regulate their central metabolism under different environmental conditions.

  4. Link Between Capacity for Current Production and Syntrophic Growth in Geobacter species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia-Elena eRotaru

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Electrodes are unnatural electron acceptors, and it is yet unknown how some Geobacter species evolved to use electrodes as terminal electron acceptors. Analysis of different Geobacter species revealed that they varied in their capacity for current production. G. metallireducens and G. hydrogenophilus generated high current densities (ca. 0.05 mA/cm2, comparable to G. sulfurreducens. G. bremensis, G. chapellei, G. humireducens, and G. uranireducens, produced much lower currents (ca. 0.05 mA/cm2 and G. bemidjiensis was previously found to not produce current. There was no correspondence between the effectiveness of current generation and Fe(III oxide reduction rates. Some high-current-density strains (G. metallireducens and G. hydrogenophilus reduced Fe(III-oxides as fast as some low-current-density strains (G. bremensis, G. humireducens, and G. uranireducens whereas other low-current-density strains (G. bemidjiensis and G. chapellei reduced Fe(III oxide as slowly as G. sulfurreducens, a high-current-density strain. However, there was a correspondence between the ability to produce higher currents and the ability to grow syntrophically. G. hydrogenophilius was found to grow in co-culture with Methanosarcina barkeri, which is capable of direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET, but not with Methanospirillium hungatei capable only of H2 or formate transfer. Conductive granular activated carbon (GAC stimulated metabolism of the G. hydrogenophilus - M. barkeri co-culture, consistent with electron exchange via DIET. These findings, coupled with the previous finding that G. metallireducens and G. sulfurreducens are also capable of DIET, suggest that evolution to optimize DIET has fortuitiously conferred the capability for high-density current production to some Geobacter species.

  5. Link between capacity for current production and syntrophic growth in Geobacter species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Woodard, Trevor; Nevin, Kelly;

    2015-01-01

    -culture with Methanosarcina barkeri, which is capable of direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET), but not with Methanospirillium hungatei capable only of H2 or formate transfer. Conductive granular activated carbon (GAC) stimulated metabolism of the G. hydrogenophilus - M. barkeri co-culture, consistent with electron......Electrodes are unnatural electron acceptors, and it is yet unknown how some Geobacter species evolved to use electrodes as terminal electron acceptors. Analysis of different Geobacter species revealed that they varied in their capacity for current production. G. metallireducens and G....... hydrogenophilus generated high current densities (ca. 0.05 mA/cm2), comparable to G. sulfurreducens. G. bremensis, G. chapellei, G. humireducens, and G. uranireducens, produced much lower currents (ca. 0.05 mA/cm2) and G. bemidjiensis was previously found to not produce current. There was no correspondence...

  6. Time-course correlation of biofilm properties and electrochemical performance in single-chamber microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Zhiyong

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between anode microbial characteristics and electrochemical parameters in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was analyzed by time-course sampling of parallel single-bottle MFCs operated under identical conditions. While voltage stabilized within 4. days, anode biofilms continued growing during the six-week operation. Viable cell density increased asymptotically, but membrane-compromised cells accumulated steadily from only 9% of total cells on day 3 to 52% at 6. weeks. Electrochemical performance followed the viable cell trend, with a positive correlation for power density and an inverse correlation for anode charge transfer resistance. The biofilm architecture shifted from rod-shaped, dispersed cells to more filamentous structures, with the continuous detection of Geobacter sulfurreducens-like 16S rRNA fragments throughout operation and the emergence of a community member related to a known phenazine-producing Pseudomonas species. A drop in cathode open circuit potential between weeks two and three suggested that uncontrolled biofilm growth on the cathode deleteriously affects system performance. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Geobacter soli sp. nov., a dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium isolated from forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shungui; Yang, Guiqin; Lu, Qin; Wu, Min

    2014-11-01

    A novel Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, designated GSS01(T), was isolated from a forest soil sample using a liquid medium containing acetate and ferrihydrite as electron donor and electron acceptor, respectively. Cells of strain GSS01(T) were strictly anaerobic, Gram-stain-negative, motile, non-spore-forming and slightly curved rod-shaped. Growth occurred at 16-40 °C and optimally at 30 °C. The DNA G+C content was 60.9 mol%. The major respiratory quinone was MK-8. The major fatty acids were C(16:0), C(18:0) and C(16:1)ω7c/C(16:1)ω6c. Strain GSS01(T) was able to grow with ferrihydrite, Fe(III) citrate, Mn(IV), sulfur, nitrate or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate, but not with fumarate, as sole electron acceptor when acetate was the sole electron donor. The isolate was able to utilize acetate, ethanol, glucose, lactate, butyrate, pyruvate, benzoate, benzaldehyde, m-cresol and phenol but not toluene, p-cresol, propionate, malate or succinate as sole electron donor when ferrihydrite was the sole electron acceptor. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain GSS01(T) was most closely related to Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA(T) (98.3% sequence similarity) and exhibited low similarities (94.9-91.8%) to the type strains of other species of the genus Geobacter. The DNA-DNA relatedness between strain GSS01(T) and G. sulfurreducens PCA(T) was 41.4 ± 1.1%. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, phenotypic characterization and physiological tests, strain GSS01(T) is believed to represent a novel species of the genus Geobacter, and the name Geobacter soli sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GSS01(T) ( =KCTC 4545(T) =MCCC 1K00269(T)).

  8. Changes in protein expression across laboratory and field experiments in Geobacter bemidjiensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkley, Eric D.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Castelle, Cindy; Anderson, Brian J.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Shah, Vega; Arbour, Tyler; Brown, Joseph N.; Singer, Steven W.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2015-03-06

    Bacterial extracellular metal respiration, as carried out by members of the genus Geobacter, is of interest for applications including microbial fuel cells and bioremediation. Geobacter bemidjiensis is the major species whose growth is stimulated during groundwater amendment with acetate. We have carried out label-free proteomics studies of Geobacter bemidjiensis grown with acetate as the electron donor and either fumarate, ferric citrate, or one of two hydrous ferric oxide mineral types as electron acceptor. The major class of proteins whose expression changes across these conditions is c-type cytochromes, many of which are known to be involved in extracellular metal reduction in other, better-characterized Geobacter species. Some proteins with multiple homologues in G. bemidjiensis (OmcS, OmcB) had different expression patterns than observed for their G. sulfurreducens homologues under similar growth conditions. We also compared the proteome from our study to a prior proteomics study of biomass recovered from an aquifer in Colorado, where the microbial community was dominated by strains closely-related to G. bemidjiensis. We detected an increased number of proteins with functions related to motility and chemotaxis in the Colorado field samples compared to the laboratory samples, suggesting the importance of motility for in situ extracellular metal respiration.

  9. Influence of anode potentials on selection of Geobacter strains in microbial electrolysis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commault, Audrey S; Lear, Gavin; Packer, Michael A; Weld, Richard J

    2013-07-01

    Through their ability to directly transfer electrons to electrodes, Geobacter sp. are key organisms for microbial fuel cell technology. This study presents a simple method to reproducibly select Geobacter-dominated anode biofilms from a mixed inoculum of bacteria using graphite electrodes initially poised at -0.25, -0.36 and -0.42 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The biofilms all produced maximum power density of approximately 270 m Wm(-2) (projected anode surface area). Analysis of 16S rRNA genes and intergenic spacer (ITS) sequences found that the biofilm communities were all dominated by bacteria closely related to Geobacter psychrophilus. Anodes initially poised at -0.25 V reproducibly selected biofilms that were dominated by a strain of G. psychrophilus that was genetically distinct from the strain that dominated the -0.36 and -0.42 V biofilms. This work demonstrates for the first time that closely related strains of Geobacter can have very different competitive advantages at different anode potentials.

  10. The effect of pH and buffer concentration on anode biofilms of Thermincola ferriacetica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, Bradley G; Parameswaran, Prathap; Popat, Sudeep C; Rittmann, Bruce E; Torres, Cesar I

    2016-12-01

    We assessed the effects of pH and buffer concentration on current production and growth of biofilms of Thermincola ferriacetica - a thermophilic, Gram-positive, anode-respiring bacterium (ARB) - grown on anodes poised at a potential of -0.06V vs. SHE in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) at 60°C. T. ferriacetica generated current in the pH range of 5.2 to 8.3 with acetate as the electron donor and 50mM bicarbonate buffer. Maximum current density was reduced by ~80% at pH5.2 and ~14% at 7.0 compared to pH8.3. Increasing bicarbonate buffer concentrations from 10mM to 100mM resulted in an increase in the current density by 40±6%, from 6.8±1.1 to 11.2±2.7Am(-2), supporting that more buffer alleviated pH depression within T. ferriacetica biofilms. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) images indicated that higher bicarbonate buffer concentrations resulted in larger live biofilm thicknesses: from 68±20μm at 10mM bicarbonate to >150μm at 100mM, supporting that buffer availability was a strong influence on biofilm thickness. In comparison to mesophilic Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms, the faster transport rates at higher temperature and the ability to grow at relatively lower pH allowed T. ferriacetica to produce higher current densities with lower buffer concentrations. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Relevance of Aromatic Amino Acids for Electron Conduction along Geobacter Pili Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Ramesh; Malvankar, Nikhil; Tuominen, Mark; Lovley, Derek

    It has been proposed that the charge transport though Geobacter sulfurreducens pili protein occurs through the aromatic amino acids forming helical conducting chain within pili. X-ray studies of pili show that the aromatic amino acids are packed close enough (3-4 Å) for pi-stacking to occur. Conductivity of the pili network increases with lowering temperature indicating metallic-like transport mechanism. However due to the complexity of charge percolation path in 3D network, the intrinsic conductivity of an individual pili was not known. Here, we report transport measurements of individual pili of G. sulfurreducens. The conductivity, similar to that of organic polymers, shows that the pili may have implications in materials research. In addition, the conductivity value is sufficient to explain the respiration rate of the G. sulfurreducens. Further studies of pili from different natural and genetically modified species with varying amount of aromatic amino acid density demonstrate that it can play a decisive role on the magnitude of the conductivity. This research was supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and National Science Foundation (NSF) Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing (CHM). Nikhil S. Malvankar holds a Career Award from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund.

  12. Respiration of metal (hydr)oxides by Shewanella and Geobacter: a key role for multihaem c-type cytochromes

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Liang; Squier, Thomas C.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2007-01-01

    Dissimilatory reduction of metal (e.g. Fe, Mn) (hydr)oxides represents a challenge for microorganisms, as their cell envelopes are impermeable to metal (hydr)oxides that are poorly soluble in water. To overcome this physical barrier, the Gram-negative bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Geobacter sulfurreducens have developed electron transfer (ET) strategies that require multihaem c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts). In S. oneidensis MR-1, multihaem c-Cyts CymA and MtrA are believed to transfer ...

  13. Changes in protein expression across laboratory and field experiments in Geobacter bemidjiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkley, Eric D; Wrighton, Kelly C; Castelle, Cindy J; Anderson, Brian J; Wilkins, Michael J; Shah, Vega; Arbour, Tyler; Brown, Joseph N; Singer, Steven W; Smith, Richard D; Lipton, Mary S

    2015-03-06

    Bacterial extracellular metal respiration, as carried out by members of the genus Geobacter, is of interest for applications including microbial fuel cells and bioremediation. Geobacter bemidjiensis is the major species whose growth is stimulated during groundwater amendment with acetate. We have carried out label-free proteomics studies of G. bemidjiensis grown with acetate as the electron donor and either fumarate, ferric citrate, or one of two hydrous ferric oxide mineral types as electron acceptor. The major class of proteins whose expression changes across these conditions is c-type cytochromes, many of which are known to be involved in extracellular metal reduction in other, better-characterized Geobacter species. Some proteins with multiple homologues in G. bemidjiensis (OmcS, OmcB) had different expression patterns than observed for their G. sulfurreducens homologues under similar growth conditions. We also compared the proteome from our study to a prior proteomics study of biomass recovered from an aquifer in Colorado, where the microbial community was dominated by strains closely related to G. bemidjiensis. We detected an increased number of proteins with functions related to motility and chemotaxis in the Colorado field samples compared to the laboratory samples, suggesting the importance of motility for in situ extracellular metal respiration.

  14. Evolution of electron transfer out of the cell: comparative genomics of six Geobacter genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Nelson D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geobacter species grow by transferring electrons out of the cell - either to Fe(III-oxides or to man-made substances like energy-harvesting electrodes. Study of Geobacter sulfurreducens has shown that TCA cycle enzymes, inner-membrane respiratory enzymes, and periplasmic and outer-membrane cytochromes are required. Here we present comparative analysis of six Geobacter genomes, including species from the clade that predominates in the subsurface. Conservation of proteins across the genomes was determined to better understand the evolution of Geobacter species and to create a metabolic model applicable to subsurface environments. Results The results showed that enzymes for acetate transport and oxidation, and for proton transport across the inner membrane were well conserved. An NADH dehydrogenase, the ATP synthase, and several TCA cycle enzymes were among the best conserved in the genomes. However, most of the cytochromes required for Fe(III-reduction were not, including many of the outer-membrane cytochromes. While conservation of cytochromes was poor, an abundance and diversity of cytochromes were found in every genome, with duplications apparent in several species. Conclusions These results indicate there is a common pathway for acetate oxidation and energy generation across the family and in the last common ancestor. They also suggest that while cytochromes are important for extracellular electron transport, the path of electrons across the periplasm and outer membrane is variable. This combination of abundant cytochromes with weak sequence conservation suggests they may not be specific terminal reductases, but rather may be important in their heme-bearing capacity, as sinks for electrons between the inner-membrane electron transport chain and the extracellular acceptor.

  15. Extracellular reduction of uranium via Geobacter conductive pili as a protective cellular mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cologgi, Dena L; Lampa-Pastirk, Sanela; Speers, Allison M; Kelly, Shelly D; Reguera, Gemma

    2011-09-13

    The in situ stimulation of Fe(III) oxide reduction by Geobacter bacteria leads to the concomitant precipitation of hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater. Despite its promise for the bioremediation of uranium contaminants, the biological mechanism behind this reaction remains elusive. Because Fe(III) oxide reduction requires the expression of Geobacter's conductive pili, we evaluated their contribution to uranium reduction in Geobacter sulfurreducens grown under pili-inducing or noninducing conditions. A pilin-deficient mutant and a genetically complemented strain with reduced outer membrane c-cytochrome content were used as controls. Pili expression significantly enhanced the rate and extent of uranium immobilization per cell and prevented periplasmic mineralization. As a result, pili expression also preserved the vital respiratory activities of the cell envelope and the cell's viability. Uranium preferentially precipitated along the pili and, to a lesser extent, on outer membrane redox-active foci. In contrast, the pilus-defective strains had different degrees of periplasmic mineralization matching well with their outer membrane c-cytochrome content. X-ray absorption spectroscopy analyses demonstrated the extracellular reduction of U(VI) by the pili to mononuclear tetravalent uranium U(IV) complexed by carbon-containing ligands, consistent with a biological reduction. In contrast, the U(IV) in the pilin-deficient mutant cells also required an additional phosphorous ligand, in agreement with the predominantly periplasmic mineralization of uranium observed in this strain. These findings demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for Geobacter conductive pili in the extracellular reduction of uranium, and highlight its essential function as a catalytic and protective cellular mechanism that is of interest for the bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater.

  16. Enhanced methane production in an anaerobic digestion and microbial electrolysis cell coupled system with co-cultivation of Geobacter and Methanosarcina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qi; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Zhan, Guoqiang; Bo, Tao; Yang, Yanfei; Tao, Yong; He, Xiaohong; Li, Daping; Yan, Zhiying

    2016-04-01

    The anaerobic digestion (AD) and microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) coupled system has been proved to be a promising process for biomethane production. In this paper, it was found that by co-cultivating Geobacter with Methanosarcina in an AD-MEC coupled system, methane yield was further increased by 24.1%, achieving to 360.2 mL/g-COD, which was comparable to the theoretical methane yield of an anaerobic digester. With the presence of Geobacter, the maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate (216.8 mg COD/(L·hr)) and current density (304.3A/m(3)) were both increased by 1.3 and 1.8 fold compared to the previous study without Geobacter, resulting in overall energy efficiency reaching up to 74.6%. Community analysis demonstrated that Geobacter and Methanosarcina could coexist together in the biofilm, and the electrochemical activities of both were confirmed by cyclic voltammetry. Our study observed that the carbon dioxide content in total gas generated from the AD reactor with Geobacter was only half of that generated from the same reactor without Geobacter, suggesting that Methanosarcina may obtain the electron transferred from Geobacter for the reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. Taken together, Geobacter not only can improve the performance of the MEC system, but also can enhance methane production.

  17. The Complex Conductivity Signature of Geobacter Species in Geological Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I.; Atekwana, E. A.; Sarkisova, S.; Achang, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Complex Conductivity (CC) technique is a promising biogeophysical approach for sensing microbially-induced changes in geological media because of its low-invasive character and sufficient sensitivity to enhanced microbial activity in the near subsurface. Geobacter species have been shown to play important roles in the bioremediation of groundwater contaminated with petroleum and landfill leachate. This capability is based on the ability of Geobacter species to reduce Fe(III) by transferring of electrons from the reduced equivalents to Fe(III) rich minerals through respiration chain and special metallic-like conductors - pili. Only the cultivation of Geobacter species on Fe(III) oxides specifically express pili biosynthesis. Moreover, mutants that cannot produce pili are unable to reduce Fe(III) oxides. However, little is known about the contribution of these molecular conductors (nanowires) to the generation of complex conductivity signatures in geological media. Here, we present the results about the modulation of CC signatures in geological media by Geobacter sulfurreducens (G.s.). Cultures of wild strain G.s. and its pilA(-) mutant were anaerobically cultivated in the presence of the pair of such donors and acceptors of electrons: acetate - fumarate, and acetate - magnetite under anaerobic conditions. Each culture was injected in CC sample holders filled either with N2-CO2 mix (planktonic variant) or with this gases mix and glass beads, d=1 mm, (porous medium variant). Both strains of G.s. proliferated well in a medium supplemented with acetate-fumarate. However, pilA(-) mutant did not multiply in a medium supplemented with ox-red pair yeast extract - magnetite. This observation confirmed that only wild pilA(+) strain is capable of the dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) within magnetite molecule. The measurement of CC responses from planktonic culture of G.s. wild strain grown with acetate-fumarate did not show linear correlation with their magnitudes but

  18. Respiration of metal (hydr)oxides by Shewanella and Geobacter: a key role for multihaem c-type cytochromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liang; Squier, Thomas C; Zachara, John M; Fredrickson, James K

    2007-07-01

    Dissimilatory reduction of metal (e.g. Fe, Mn) (hydr)oxides represents a challenge for microorganisms, as their cell envelopes are impermeable to metal (hydr)oxides that are poorly soluble in water. To overcome this physical barrier, the Gram-negative bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Geobacter sulfurreducens have developed electron transfer (ET) strategies that require multihaem c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts). In S. oneidensis MR-1, multihaem c-Cyts CymA and MtrA are believed to transfer electrons from the inner membrane quinone/quinol pool through the periplasm to the outer membrane. The type II secretion system of S. oneidensis MR-1 has been implicated in the reduction of metal (hydr)oxides, most likely by translocating decahaem c-Cyts MtrC and OmcA across outer membrane to the surface of bacterial cells where they form a protein complex. The extracellular MtrC and OmcA can directly reduce solid metal (hydr)oxides. Likewise, outer membrane multihaem c-Cyts OmcE and OmcS of G. sulfurreducens are suggested to transfer electrons from outer membrane to type IV pili that are hypothesized to relay the electrons to solid metal (hydr)oxides. Thus, multihaem c-Cyts play critical roles in S. oneidensis MR-1- and G. sulfurreducens-mediated dissimilatory reduction of solid metal (hydr)oxides by facilitating ET across the bacterial cell envelope.

  19. Selective enrichment of Geobacter sulfurreducens from anaerobic granular sludge with quinones as terminal electron acceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cervantes-Carillo, F.J.; Duong Dac, T.; Ivanova, A.E.; Roest, de K.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Lettinga, G.; Field, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    A quinone-respiring, enrichment culture derived from methanogenic granular sludge was phylogenetically characterized by using a combined cloning-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method, which revealed that the consortium developed was dominated by a single microorganism: 97% related, i

  20. Stimulation of electro-fermentation in single-chamber microbial electrolysis cells driven by genetically engineered anode biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awate, Bhushan; Steidl, Rebecca J.; Hamlischer, Thilo; Reguera, Gemma

    2017-07-01

    Unwanted metabolites produced during fermentations reduce titers and productivity and increase the cost of downstream purification of the targeted product. As a result, the economic feasibility of otherwise attractive fermentations is low. Using ethanol fermentation by the consolidated bioprocessing cellulolytic bacterium Cellulomonas uda, we demonstrate the effectiveness of anodic electro-fermentations at maximizing titers and productivity in a single-chamber microbial electrolysis cell (SCMEC) without the need for metabolic engineering of the fermentative microbe. The performance of the SCMEC platform relied on the genetic improvements of anode biofilms of the exoelectrogen Geobacter sulfurreducens that prevented the oxidation of cathodic hydrogen and improved lactate oxidation. Furthermore, a hybrid bioanode was designed that maximized the removal of organic acids in the fermentation broth. The targeted approach increased cellobiose consumption rates and ethanol titers, yields, and productivity three-fold or more, prevented pH imbalances and reduced batch-to-batch variability. In addition, the sugar substrate was fully consumed and ethanol was enriched in the broth during the electro-fermentation, simplifying its downstream purification. Such improvements and the possibility of scaling up SCMEC configurations highlight the potential of anodic electro-fermentations to stimulate fermentative bacteria beyond their natural capacity and to levels required for industrial implementation.

  1. Light/electricity conversion by defined cocultures of Chlamydomonas and Geobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Koichi; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2013-04-01

    Biological energy-conversion systems are attractive in terms of their self-organizing and self-sustaining properties and are expected to be applied towards environmentally friendly bioenergy processes. Recent studies have demonstrated that sustainable light/electricity-conversion systems, termed microbial solar cells (MSCs), can be constructed using naturally occurring microbial communities. To better understand the energy-conversion mechanisms in microbial communities, the present study attempted to construct model MSCs comprised of defined cocultures of a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and an iron-reducing bacterium, Geobacter sulfurreducens, and examined their metabolism and interactions in MSCs. When MSC bioreactors were inoculated with these microbes and irradiated on a 12-h light/dark cycle, periodic current was generated in the dark with energy-conversion efficiencies of 0.1%. Metabolite analyses revealed that G. sulfurreducens generated current by oxidizing formate that was produced by C. reinhardtii in the dark. These results demonstrate that the light/electricity conversion occurs via syntrophic interactions between phototrophs and electricity-generating bacteria. Based on the results and data in literatures, it is estimated that the excretion of organics by the phototroph was the bottleneck step in the syntrophic light/electricity conversion. We also discuss differences between natural-community and defined-coculture MSCs.

  2. Mechanisms for Electron Transfer Through Pili to Fe(III) Oxide in Geobacter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovley, Derek R. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2015-03-09

    The purpose of these studies was to aid the Department of Energy in its goal of understanding how microorganisms involved in the bioremediation of metals and radionuclides sustain their activity in the subsurface. This information is required in order to incorporate biological processes into decision making for environmental remediation and long-term stewardship of contaminated sites. The proposed research was designed to elucidate the mechanisms for electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides in Geobacter species because Geobacter species are abundant dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms in a diversity of sites in which uranium is undergoing natural attenuation via the reduction of soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) or when this process is artificially stimulated with the addition of organic electron donors. This study investigated the novel, but highly controversial, concept that the final conduit for electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides are electrically conductive pili. The specific objectives were to: 1) further evaluate the conductivity along the pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens and related organisms; 2) determine the mechanisms for pili conductivity; and 3) investigate the role of pili in Fe(III) oxide reduction. The studies demonstrated that the pili of G. sulfurreducens are conductive along their length. Surprisingly, the pili possess a metallic-like conductivity similar to that observed in synthetic organic conducting polymers such as polyaniline. Detailed physical analysis of the pili, as well as studies in which the structure of the pili was genetically modified, demonstrated that the metallic-like conductivity of the pili could be attributed to overlapping pi-pi orbitals of aromatic amino acids. Other potential mechanisms for conductivity, such as electron hopping between cytochromes associated with the pili were definitively ruled out. Pili were also found to be essential for Fe(III) oxide reduction in G. metallireducens. Ecological studies demonstrated

  3. A trans-outer membrane porin-cytochrome protein complex for extracellular electron transfer by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yimo; Wang, Zheming; Liu, Juan; Levar, Caleb; Edwards, Marcus J; Babauta, Jerome T; Kennedy, David W; Shi, Zhi; Beyenal, Haluk; Bond, Daniel R; Clarke, Thomas A; Butt, Julea N; Richardson, David J; Rosso, Kevin M; Zachara, John M; Fredrickson, James K; Shi, Liang

    2014-12-01

    The multi-heme, outer membrane c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) OmcB of Geobacter sulfurreducens was previously proposed to mediate electron transfer across the outer membrane. However, the underlying mechanism has remained uncharacterized. In G. sulfurreducens, the omcB gene is part of two tandem four-gene clusters, each is predicted to encode a transcriptional factor (OrfR/OrfS), a porin-like outer membrane protein (OmbB/OmbC), a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (OmaB/OmaC) and an outer membrane c-Cyt (OmcB/OmcC) respectively. Here, we showed that OmbB/OmbC, OmaB/OmaC and OmcB/OmcC of G. sulfurreducens PCA formed the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complexes, which were involved in transferring electrons across the outer membrane. The isolated Pcc protein complexes reconstituted in proteoliposomes transferred electrons from reduced methyl viologen across the lipid bilayer of liposomes to Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite. The pcc clusters were found in all eight sequenced Geobacter and 11 other bacterial genomes from six different phyla, demonstrating a widespread distribution of Pcc protein complexes in phylogenetically diverse bacteria. Deletion of ombB-omaB-omcB-orfS-ombC-omaC-omcC gene clusters had no impact on the growth of G. sulfurreducens PCA with fumarate but diminished the ability of G. sulfurreducens PCA to reduce Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite. Complementation with the ombB-omaB-omcB gene cluster restored the ability of G. sulfurreducens PCA to reduce Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite.

  4. Identification of succinic semialdehyde reductases from Geobacter: expression,purification, crystallization, preliminary functional, and crystallographic analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanfeng Zhang; Xiaoli Gao; Yi Zheng; R. Michae; Garavito

    2011-01-01

    Succinic semialdehyde reductase (SSAR) is an important enzyme involved in γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) metabolism.By converting succinic semialdehyde (SSA) to γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB),the SSAR facilitates an alternative pathway for GABA degradation.In this study,we identified SSARs from Geobacter sulfurreducens and Geobacter metallireducens (GsSSAR and GmSSAR,respectively).The enzymes were over-expressed in Escherichia coil and purified to near homogeneity.Both GsSSAR and GmSSAR showed the activity of reducing SSA using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate as a co-factor.The oligomeric sizes of GsSSAR and GmSSAR,as determined by analytical size exclusion chromatography,suggest that the enzymes presumably exist as tetramers in solution.The recombinant GsSSAR and GmSSAR crystallized in the presence of NADP+,and the resulting crystals diffracted to 1.89 (A) (GsSSAR) and 2.25 (A)(GmSSAR) resolution.The GsSSAR and GmSSAR crystals belong to the space groups P21221 (a =99.61 (A),b =147.49 (A),c =182.47 A) and P1 (a =75.97 (A) b =79.14 (A) c =95.47 (A),α =82.15°,β =88.80°,γ=87.66°),respectively.Preliminary crystallographic data analysis suggests the presence of eight protein monomers in the asymmetric units for both GsSSAR and GmSSAR.

  5. Identification of succinic semialdehyde reductases from Geobacter: expression, purification, crystallization, preliminary functional, and crystallographic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gao, Xiaoli; Zheng, Yi; Garavito, R. Michael (MSU)

    2012-04-30

    Succinic semialdehyde reductase (SSAR) is an important enzyme involved in {gamma}-aminobutyrate (GABA) metabolism. By converting succinic semialdehyde (SSA) to {gamma}-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), the SSAR facilitates an alternative pathway for GABA degradation. In this study, we identified SSARs from Geobacter sulfurreducens and Geobacter metallireducens (GsSSAR and GmSSAR, respectively). The enzymes were over-expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to near homogeneity. Both GsSSAR and GmSSAR showed the activity of reducing SSA using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate as a co-factor. The oligomeric sizes of GsSSAR and GmSSAR, as determined by analytical size exclusion chromatography, suggest that the enzymes presumably exist as tetramers in solution. The recombinant GsSSAR and GmSSAR crystallized in the presence of NADP{sup +}, and the resulting crystals diffracted to 1.89 {angstrom} (GsSSAR) and 2.25 {angstrom} (GmSSAR) resolution. The GsSSAR and GmSSAR crystals belong to the space groups P2{sub 1}22{sub 1} (a = 99.61 {angstrom}, b = 147.49 {angstrom}, c = 182.47 {angstrom}) and P1 (a = 75.97 {angstrom}, b = 79.14 {angstrom}, c = 95.47 {angstrom}, {alpha} = 82.15{sup o}, {beta} = 88.80{sup o}, {gamma} = 87.66{sup o}), respectively. Preliminary crystallographic data analysis suggests the presence of eight protein monomers in the asymmetric units for both GsSSAR and GmSSAR.

  6. GEMM-I riboswitches from Geobacter sense the bacterial second messenger cyclic AMP-GMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellenberger, Colleen A; Wilson, Stephen C; Hickey, Scott F; Gonzalez, Tania L; Su, Yichi; Hallberg, Zachary F; Brewer, Thomas F; Iavarone, Anthony T; Carlson, Hans K; Hsieh, Yu-Fang; Hammond, Ming C

    2015-04-28

    Cyclic dinucleotides are an expanding class of signaling molecules that control many aspects of bacterial physiology. A synthase for cyclic AMP-GMP (cAG, also referenced as 3'-5', 3'-5' cGAMP) called DncV is associated with hyperinfectivity of Vibrio cholerae but has not been found in many bacteria, raising questions about the prevalence and function of cAG signaling. We have discovered that the environmental bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens produces cAG and uses a subset of GEMM-I class riboswitches (GEMM-Ib, Genes for the Environment, Membranes, and Motility) as specific receptors for cAG. GEMM-Ib riboswitches regulate genes associated with extracellular electron transfer; thus cAG signaling may control aspects of bacterial electrophysiology. These findings expand the role of cAG beyond organisms that harbor DncV and beyond pathogenesis to microbial geochemistry, which is important to environmental remediation and microbial fuel cell development. Finally, we have developed an RNA-based fluorescent biosensor for live-cell imaging of cAG. This selective, genetically encodable biosensor will be useful to probe the biochemistry and cell biology of cAG signaling in diverse bacteria.

  7. Anaerobic benzene oxidation by Geobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian; Bain, Timothy S; Nevin, Kelly P; Barlett, Melissa A; Lovley, Derek R

    2012-12-01

    The abundance of Geobacter species in contaminated aquifers in which benzene is anaerobically degraded has led to the suggestion that some Geobacter species might be capable of anaerobic benzene degradation, but this has never been documented. A strain of Geobacter, designated strain Ben, was isolated from sediments from the Fe(III)-reducing zone of a petroleum-contaminated aquifer in which there was significant capacity for anaerobic benzene oxidation. Strain Ben grew in a medium with benzene as the sole electron donor and Fe(III) oxide as the sole electron acceptor. Furthermore, additional evaluation of Geobacter metallireducens demonstrated that it could also grow in benzene-Fe(III) medium. In both strain Ben and G. metallireducens the stoichiometry of benzene metabolism and Fe(III) reduction was consistent with the oxidation of benzene to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) serving as the sole electron acceptor. With benzene as the electron donor, and Fe(III) oxide (strain Ben) or Fe(III) citrate (G. metallireducens) as the electron acceptor, the cell yields of strain Ben and G. metallireducens were 3.2 × 10(9) and 8.4 × 10(9) cells/mmol of Fe(III) reduced, respectively. Strain Ben also oxidized benzene with anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) as the sole electron acceptor with cell yields of 5.9 × 10(9) cells/mmol of AQDS reduced. Strain Ben serves as model organism for the study of anaerobic benzene metabolism in petroleum-contaminated aquifers, and G. metallireducens is the first anaerobic benzene-degrading organism that can be genetically manipulated.

  8. Decolorization of azo dyes by Geobacter metallireducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Chen, Congcong; Wang, Jing; Jin, Ruofei; Lv, Hong

    2013-09-01

    Geobacter metallireducens was found to be capable of decolorizing several azo dyes with different structures to various extents. Pyruvate, ethanol, acetate, propionate, and benzoate could support 66.3 ± 2.6-93.7 ± 2.1 % decolorization of 0.1 mM acid red 27 (AR27) in 40 h. The dependence of the specific decolorization rate on AR27 concentration (25 to 800 μM) followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (K m = 186.9 ± 1.4 μΜ, V max = 0.65 ± 0.02 μmol mg protein(-1) h(-1)). Enhanced AR27 decolorization was observed with the increase of cell concentrations ranging from 7.5 to 45 mgL(-1). AR27 decolorization by G. metallireducens was retarded by the presence of goethite, which competed electrons with AR27 and was reduced to Fe(II). The addition of low concentrations of humic acid (1-100 mgL(-1)) or 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (0.5-50 μM) could improve the decolorization performance of G. metallireducens. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis suggested reductive pathway to be responsible for decolorization. This was the first study on azo dye decolorization by Geobacter strain and might improve our understanding of natural attenuation and bioremediation of environments polluted by azo dyes.

  9. Proteogenomic monitoring of Geobacter physiology during stimulated uranium bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Michael J; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Williams, Kenneth H; Callister, Stephen J; Mouser, Paula J; Elifantz, Hila; N'guessan, A Lucie; Thomas, Brian C; Nicora, Carrie D; Shah, Manesh B; Abraham, Paul; Lipton, Mary S; Lovley, Derek R; Hettich, Robert L; Long, Philip E; Banfield, Jillian F

    2009-10-01

    Implementation of uranium bioremediation requires methods for monitoring the membership and activities of the subsurface microbial communities that are responsible for reduction of soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). Here, we report a proteomics-based approach for simultaneously documenting the strain membership and microbial physiology of the dominant Geobacter community members during in situ acetate amendment of the U-contaminated Rifle, CO, aquifer. Three planktonic Geobacter-dominated samples were obtained from two wells down-gradient of acetate addition. Over 2,500 proteins from each of these samples were identified by matching liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry spectra to peptides predicted from seven isolate Geobacter genomes. Genome-specific peptides indicate early proliferation of multiple M21 and Geobacter bemidjiensis-like strains and later possible emergence of M21 and G. bemidjiensis-like strains more closely related to Geobacter lovleyi. Throughout biostimulation, the proteome is dominated by enzymes that convert acetate to acetyl-coenzyme A and pyruvate for central metabolism, while abundant peptides matching tricarboxylic acid cycle proteins and ATP synthase subunits were also detected, indicating the importance of energy generation during the period of rapid growth following the start of biostimulation. Evolving Geobacter strain composition may be linked to changes in protein abundance over the course of biostimulation and may reflect changes in metabolic functioning. Thus, metagenomics-independent community proteogenomics can be used to diagnose the status of the subsurface consortia upon which remediation biotechnology relies.

  10. Proteogenomic monitoring of Geobacter physiology during stimulated uranium bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkins, M.J.; VerBerkmoes, N.C.; Williams, K.H.; Callister, S.J.; Mouser, P.J.; Elifantz, H.; N' Guessan, A.L.; Thomas, B.C.; Nicora, C.D.; Shah, M.B.; Lipton, M.S.; Lovley, D.R.; Hettich, R.L.; Long, P.E.; Banfield, J.F.; Abraham, P.

    2009-08-01

    Implementation of uranium bioremediation requires methods for monitoring the membership and activities of the subsurface microbial communities that are responsible for reduction of soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). Here, we report a proteomics-based approach for simultaneously documenting the strain membership and microbial physiology of the dominant Geobacter community members during in situ acetate amendment of the U-contaminated Rifle, CO, aquifer. Three planktonic Geobacter-dominated samples were obtained from two wells down-gradient of acetate addition. Over 2,500 proteins from each of these samples were identified by matching liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry spectra to peptides predicted from seven isolate Geobacter genomes. Genome-specific peptides indicate early proliferation of multiple M21 and Geobacter bemidjiensis-like strains and later possible emergence of M21 and G. bemidjiensis-like strains more closely related to Geobacter lovleyi. Throughout biostimulation, the proteome is dominated by enzymes that convert acetate to acetyl-coenzyme A and pyruvate for central metabolism, while abundant peptides matching tricarboxylic acid cycle proteins and ATP synthase subunits were also detected, indicating the importance of energy generation during the period of rapid growth following the start of biostimulation. Evolving Geobacter strain composition may be linked to changes in protein abundance over the course of biostimulation and may reflect changes in metabolic functioning. Thus, metagenomics-independent community proteogenomics can be used to diagnose the status of the subsurface consortia upon which remediation biotechnology relies.

  11. Biofilm Risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirtanen, Gun Linnea; Salo, Satu

    2016-01-01

    This chapter on biofilm risks deals with biofilm formation of pathogenic microbes, sampling and detection methods, biofilm removal, and prevention of biofilm formation. Several common pathogens produce sticky and/or slimy structures in which the cells are embedded, that is, biofilms, on various s...

  12. Alternating Current Influences Anaerobic Electroactive Biofilm Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Zhou, Lean; Lu, Lu; Lobo, Fernanda Leite; Li, Nan; Wang, Heming; Park, Jaedo; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2016-09-06

    Alternating current (AC) is known to inactivate microbial growth in suspension, but how AC influences anaerobic biofilm activities has not been systematically investigated. Using a Geobacter dominated anaerobic biofilm growing on the electrodes of microbial electrochemical reactors, we found that high frequency AC ranging from 1 MHz to 1 kHz (amplitude of 5 V, 30 min) showed only temporary inhibition to the biofilm activity. However, lower frequency (100 Hz, 1.2 or 5 V) treatment led to 47 ± 19% permanent decrease in limiting current on the same biofilm, which is attributed to the action of electrohydrodynamic force that caused biofilm damage and loss of intercellular electron transfer network. Confocal microscopy images show such inactivation mainly occurred at the interface between the biofilm and the electrode. Reducing the frequency further to 1 Hz led to water electrolysis, which generated gas bubbles that flushed all attached cells out of the electrode. These findings provide new references on understanding and regulating biofilm growth, which has broader implications in biofouling control, anaerobic waste treatment, energy and product recovery, and general understanding of microbial ecology and physiology.

  13. Evidence of Geobacter-associated phage in a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Geobacter species may be important agents in the bioremediation of organic and metal contaminants in the subsurface, but as yet unknown factors limit the in situ growth of subsurface Geobacter well below rates predicted by analysis of gene expression or in silico metabolic modeling. Analysis of the genomes of five different Geobacter species recovered from contaminated subsurface sites indicated that each of the isolates had been infected with phage. Geobacter-associated phage sequences were ...

  14. Combating biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Hong;

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are complex microbial communities consisting of microcolonies embedded in a matrix of self-produced polymer substances. Biofilm cells show much greater resistance to environmental challenges including antimicrobial agents than their free-living counterparts. The biofilm mode of life...... is believed to significantly contribute to successful microbial survival in hostile environments. Conventional treatment, disinfection and cleaning strategies do not proficiently deal with biofilm-related problems, such as persistent infections and contamination of food production facilities. In this review......, strategies to control biofilms are discussed, including those of inhibition of microbial attachment, interference of biofilm structure development and differentiation, killing of biofilm cells and induction of biofilm dispersion....

  15. Evidence of Geobacter-associated phage in a uranium-contaminated aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Dawn E; Giloteaux, Ludovic; Chaurasia, Akhilesh K; Williams, Kenneth H; Luef, Birgit; Wilkins, Michael J; Wrighton, Kelly C; Thompson, Courtney A; Comolli, Luis R; Lovley, Derek R

    2015-02-01

    Geobacter species may be important agents in the bioremediation of organic and metal contaminants in the subsurface, but as yet unknown factors limit the in situ growth of subsurface Geobacter well below rates predicted by analysis of gene expression or in silico metabolic modeling. Analysis of the genomes of five different Geobacter species recovered from contaminated subsurface sites indicated that each of the isolates had been infected with phage. Geobacter-associated phage sequences were also detected by metagenomic and proteomic analysis of samples from a uranium-contaminated aquifer undergoing in situ bioremediation, and phage particles were detected by microscopic analysis in groundwater collected from sediment enrichment cultures. Transcript abundance for genes from the Geobacter-associated phage structural proteins, tail tube Gp19 and baseplate J, increased in the groundwater in response to the growth of Geobacter species when acetate was added, and then declined as the number of Geobacter decreased. Western blot analysis of a Geobacter-associated tail tube protein Gp19 in the groundwater demonstrated that its abundance tracked with the abundance of Geobacter species. These results suggest that the enhanced growth of Geobacter species in the subsurface associated with in situ uranium bioremediation increased the abundance and activity of Geobacter-associated phage and show that future studies should focus on how these phages might be influencing the ecology of this site.

  16. Proteogenomic monitoring of Geobacter physiology during stimulated uranium bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkins, Mike [University of California, Berkeley; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Williams, Ken [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Callister, Stephen J [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Mouser, Paula J [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Elifantz, Hila [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; N' Guessan, A. Lucie [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Thomas, Brian [University of California, Berkeley; Nicora, Carrie D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Abraham, Paul E [ORNL; Lipton, Mary S [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Lovley, Derek [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Long, Phil [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Banfield, Jillian F. [University of California, Berkeley

    2009-01-01

    Implementation of uranium bioremediation requires methods to monitor the membership and activities of the subsurface microbial communities that are responsible for reduction of soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). Here we report a proteomics-based approach to simultaneously document strain membership and microbial physiology of the dominant Geobacter community members during in situ acetate amendment of the U-contaminated Rifle, CO aquifer. Three planktonic Geobacter-dominated samples were obtained from two wells down-gradient of acetate addition. Over 2,500 proteins from each of these samples were identified by matching LC MS/MS spectra to peptides predicted from 7 isolate Geobacter genomes. Genome-specific peptides indicate early proliferation of multiple M21 and G. bemidjiensis like strains and later possible emergence of M21 and G. bemidjiensis like strains more closely related to G. lovleyi. Throughout biostimulation, the proteome is dominated by enzymes that convert acetate to acetyl-CoA and pyruvate for central metabolism while abundant peptides matching TCA cycle proteins and ATP synthase subunits were also detected, indicating the importance of energy generation during the period of rapid growth following the start of biostimulation. Evolving Geobacter strain composition may be linked to changes in protein abundance over the course of biostimulation and may reflect changes in metabolic functioning. Thus, metagenomics independent community proteogenomics can be used to diagnose the status of the subsurface consortia upon which remediation biotechnology relies.

  17. Proteogenomic monitoring of Geobacter physiology during stimulated uranium bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkins, Michael J.; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Callister, Stephen J.; Mouser, Paula; Elifantz, H.; N' Guessan, A. Lucie; Thomas, Brian C.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Shah, Manesh B.; Abraham, Paul; Lipton, Mary S.; Lovely, Derek R.; Hettich, Robert L.; Long, Philip E.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2009-10-01

    Implementation of uranium bioremediation requires methods to monitor the membership and activities of the subsurface microbial communities that are responsible for reduction of soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). Here we report a proteomics-based approach to simultaneously document strain membership and microbial physiology of the dominant Geobacter community members during in situ acetate amendment of the U-contaminated Rifle, CO aquifer. Three planktonic Geobacter-dominated samples were obtained from two wells down-gradient of acetate addition. Over 2,500 proteins from each of these samples were identified by matching LC MS/MS spectra to peptides predicted from 7 isolate Geobacter genomes. Genome-specific peptides indicate early proliferation of multiple M21 and G. bemidjiensis–like strains and later possible emergence of M21 and G. bemidjiensis–like strains more closely related to G. lovleyi. Throughout biostimulation, the proteome is dominated by enzymes that convert acetate to acetyl-CoA and pyruvate for central metabolism while abundant peptides matching TCA cycle proteins and ATP synthase subunits were also detected, indicating the importance of energy generation during the period of rapid growth following the start of biostimulation. Evolving Geobacter strain composition may be linked to changes in protein abundance over the course of biostimulation and may reflect changes in metabolic functioning. Thus, metagenomics independent community proteogenomics can be used to diagnose the status of the subsurface consortia upon which remediation biotechnology relies.

  18. Direct interspecies electron transfer between Geobacter metallireducens and Methanosarcina barkeri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Liu, Fanghua;

    2014-01-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) is potentially an effective form of syntrophy in methanogenic communities, but little is known about the diversity of methanogens capable of DIET. The ability of Methanosarcina barkeri, to participate in DIET was evaluated in co-culture with Geobacter...

  19. Monitoring the metabolic status of geobacter species in contaminated groundwater by quantifying key metabolic proteins with Geobacter-specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jiae; Ueki, Toshiyuki; Miletto, Marzia; Lovley, Derek R

    2011-07-01

    Simple and inexpensive methods for assessing the metabolic status and bioremediation activities of subsurface microorganisms are required before bioremediation practitioners will adopt molecular diagnosis of the bioremediation community as a routine practice for guiding the development of bioremediation strategies. Quantifying gene transcripts can diagnose important aspects of microbial physiology during bioremediation but is technically challenging and does not account for the impact of translational modifications on protein abundance. An alternative strategy is to directly quantify the abundance of key proteins that might be diagnostic of physiological state. To evaluate this strategy, an antibody-based quantification approach was developed to investigate subsurface Geobacter communities. The abundance of citrate synthase corresponded with rates of metabolism of Geobacter bemidjiensis in chemostat cultures. During in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater the quantity of Geobacter citrate synthase increased with the addition of acetate to the groundwater and decreased when acetate amendments stopped. The abundance of the nitrogen-fixation protein, NifD, increased as ammonium became less available in the groundwater and then declined when ammonium concentrations increased. In a petroleum-contaminated aquifer, the abundance of BamB, an enzyme subunit involved in the anaerobic degradation of mono-aromatic compounds by Geobacter species, increased in zones in which Geobacter were expected to play an important role in aromatic hydrocarbon degradation. These results suggest that antibody-based detection of key metabolic proteins, which should be readily adaptable to standardized kits, may be a feasible method for diagnosing the metabolic state of microbial communities responsible for bioremediation, aiding in the rational design of bioremediation strategies.

  20. Permeabilizing biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukos, Nikolaos S.; Lee, Shun; Doukas,; Apostolos G.

    2008-02-19

    Methods for permeabilizing biofilms using stress waves are described. The methods involve applying one or more stress waves to a biofilm, e.g., on a surface of a device or food item, or on a tissue surface in a patient, and then inducing stress waves to create transient increases in the permeability of the biofilm. The increased permeability facilitates delivery of compounds, such as antimicrobial or therapeutic agents into and through the biofilm.

  1. Electrochemically active biofilms: formation, characterization and application%电活性生物膜:形成、表征及应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐家桓; 刘毅; 周顺桂; 袁勇

    2014-01-01

    电活性生物膜(Electrochemically active biofilms,EABs)是一类能够直接与胞外固态载体(铁氧化物、腐殖质及电极等)进行电子交换的生物膜.EABs的电子传递特性,赋予了它在环境、能源和化工等领域的广泛应用前景,已成为当前国际研究热点.本文以革兰氏染色法为依据,分别介绍了腐败希瓦氏菌(Shewanella putrefaciens)、硫还原地杆菌(Geobacter sulfurreducens)和丁酸梭菌(Clostridium butyricum EG3)为代表的阴性和阳性电活性微生物;在普通生物膜的形成基础上,讨论了EABs的两种主要培养方法;分别从EABs输出电子与接受电子的角度,详细论述了电活性微生物与胞外载体的电子传递机制;重点阐述了利用电化学、光谱学、电子显微镜、分子生态学等多技术手段表征单个电活性微生物和整个EABs的形态、结构,以及所揭示的胞外电子传递机制和相关影响因子;对EABs在电能输出、污染物治理、有价品合成等方面应用作了详细介绍.最后,建议对EABs的研究建立一个统一、标准的表征方法,同时应重点研究EABs接受电子的传递机制.对这些机理的深入了解,可使得EABs在污染物治理以及有机物的电合成等方面应用早日实现规模化、产业化生产.

  2. Beneficial biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara R Robertson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Surface-adherent biofilm growth is a common trait of bacteria and other microorganisms in nature. Within biofilms, organisms are present in high density and are enmeshed in an organic matrix containing polysaccharides and other molecules. The close proximity of organisms within biofilms facilitates microbial interactions and signaling, including many metabolic processes in which consortia rather than individual organisms participate. Biofilm growth also enables microorganisms to withstand chemical and biological stresses. Here, we review some current literature and document representative beneficial aspects of biofilms using examples from wastewater treatment, microbial fuel cells, biological repair (biocementation of stonework, and biofilm protection against Candida albicans infections. Finally, we address a chemical ecology strategy whereby desired microbial succession and beneficial biofilm formation can be encouraged via manipulation of culture conditions and bacterial signaling.

  3. Isolation of Geobacter species from diverse sedimentary environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coaxes, J.D.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Lonergan, D.J.; Jenter, H.; Lovley, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    In an attempt to better understand the microorganisms responsible for Fe(III) reduction in sedimentary environments, Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms were enriched for and isolated from freshwater aquatic sediments, a pristine deep aquifer, and a petroleum-contaminated shallow aquifer. Enrichments were initiated with acetate or toluene as the electron donor and Fe(III) as the electron acceptor. Isolations were made with acetate or benzoate. Five new strains which could obtain energy for growth by dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction were isolated. All five isolates are gram- negative strict anaerobes which grow with acetate as the electron donor and Fe(III) as the electron acceptor. Analysis of the 16S rRNA sequence of the isolated organisms demonstrated that they all belonged to the genus Geobacter in the delta subdivision of the Proteobacteria. Unlike the type strain, Geobacter metallireducens, three of the five isolates could use H2 as an electron donor fur Fe(III) reduction. The deep subsurface isolate is the first Fe(III) reducer shown to completely oxidize lactate to carbon dioxide, while one of the freshwater sediment isolates is only the second Fe(III) reducer known that can oxidize toluene. The isolation of these organisms demonstrates that Geobacter species are widely distributed in a diversity of sedimentary environments in which Fe(III) reduction is an important process.

  4. Dissecting the functional role of key residues in triheme cytochrome PpcA: a path to rational design of G. sulfurreducens strains with enhanced electron transfer capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Leonor; Lourenço, Sílvia; Londer, Yuri Y; Schiffer, Marianne; Pokkuluri, P Raj; Salgueiro, Carlos A

    2014-01-01

    PpcA is the most abundant member of a family of five triheme cytochromes c7 in the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens (Gs) and is the most likely carrier of electrons destined for outer surface during respiration on solid metal oxides, a process that requires extracellular electron transfer. This cytochrome has the highest content of lysine residues (24%) among the family, and it was suggested to be involved in e-/H(+) energy transduction processes. In the present work, we investigated the functional role of lysine residues strategically located in the vicinity of each heme group. Each lysine was replaced by glutamine or glutamic acid to evaluate the effects of a neutral or negatively charged residue in each position. The results showed that replacing Lys9 (located near heme IV), Lys18 (near heme I) or Lys22 (between hemes I and III) has essentially no effect on the redox properties of the heme groups and are probably involved in redox partner recognition. On the other hand, Lys43 (near heme IV), Lys52 (between hemes III and IV) and Lys60 (near heme III) are crucial in the regulation of the functional mechanism of PpcA, namely in the selection of microstates that allow the protein to establish preferential e-/H(+) transfer pathways. The results showed that the preferred e-/H(+) transfer pathways are only established when heme III is the last heme to oxidize, a feature reinforced by a higher difference between its reduction potential and that of its predecessor in the order of oxidation. We also showed that K43 and K52 mutants keep the mechanistic features of PpcA by establishing preferential e-/H+ transfer pathways at lower reduction potential values than the wild-type protein, a property that can enable rational design of Gs strains with optimized extracellular electron transfer capabilities.

  5. Dissecting the Functional Role of Key Residues in Triheme Cytochrome PpcA: A Path to Rational Design of G. sulfurreducens Strains with Enhanced Electron Transfer Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Leonor; Lourenço, Sílvia; Londer, Yuri Y.; Schiffer, Marianne; Pokkuluri, P. Raj; Salgueiro, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    PpcA is the most abundant member of a family of five triheme cytochromes c7 in the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens (Gs) and is the most likely carrier of electrons destined for outer surface during respiration on solid metal oxides, a process that requires extracellular electron transfer. This cytochrome has the highest content of lysine residues (24%) among the family, and it was suggested to be involved in e−/H+ energy transduction processes. In the present work, we investigated the functional role of lysine residues strategically located in the vicinity of each heme group. Each lysine was replaced by glutamine or glutamic acid to evaluate the effects of a neutral or negatively charged residue in each position. The results showed that replacing Lys9 (located near heme IV), Lys18 (near heme I) or Lys22 (between hemes I and III) has essentially no effect on the redox properties of the heme groups and are probably involved in redox partner recognition. On the other hand, Lys43 (near heme IV), Lys52 (between hemes III and IV) and Lys60 (near heme III) are crucial in the regulation of the functional mechanism of PpcA, namely in the selection of microstates that allow the protein to establish preferential e−/H+ transfer pathways. The results showed that the preferred e−/H+ transfer pathways are only established when heme III is the last heme to oxidize, a feature reinforced by a higher difference between its reduction potential and that of its predecessor in the order of oxidation. We also showed that K43 and K52 mutants keep the mechanistic features of PpcA by establishing preferential e−/H+ transfer pathways at lower reduction potential values than the wild-type protein, a property that can enable rational design of Gs strains with optimized extracellular electron transfer capabilities. PMID:25153891

  6. Dissecting the functional role of key residues in triheme cytochrome PpcA: a path to rational design of G. sulfurreducens strains with enhanced electron transfer capabilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Morgado

    Full Text Available PpcA is the most abundant member of a family of five triheme cytochromes c7 in the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens (Gs and is the most likely carrier of electrons destined for outer surface during respiration on solid metal oxides, a process that requires extracellular electron transfer. This cytochrome has the highest content of lysine residues (24% among the family, and it was suggested to be involved in e-/H(+ energy transduction processes. In the present work, we investigated the functional role of lysine residues strategically located in the vicinity of each heme group. Each lysine was replaced by glutamine or glutamic acid to evaluate the effects of a neutral or negatively charged residue in each position. The results showed that replacing Lys9 (located near heme IV, Lys18 (near heme I or Lys22 (between hemes I and III has essentially no effect on the redox properties of the heme groups and are probably involved in redox partner recognition. On the other hand, Lys43 (near heme IV, Lys52 (between hemes III and IV and Lys60 (near heme III are crucial in the regulation of the functional mechanism of PpcA, namely in the selection of microstates that allow the protein to establish preferential e-/H(+ transfer pathways. The results showed that the preferred e-/H(+ transfer pathways are only established when heme III is the last heme to oxidize, a feature reinforced by a higher difference between its reduction potential and that of its predecessor in the order of oxidation. We also showed that K43 and K52 mutants keep the mechanistic features of PpcA by establishing preferential e-/H+ transfer pathways at lower reduction potential values than the wild-type protein, a property that can enable rational design of Gs strains with optimized extracellular electron transfer capabilities.

  7. Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Moser, Claus Ernst

    A still increasing interest and emphasis on the sessile bacterial lifestyle biofilms has been seen since it was realized that the vast majority of the total microbial biomass exists as biofilms. Aggregation of bacteria was first described by Leeuwenhoek in 1677, but only recently recognized...... as being important in chronic infection. In 1993 the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) recognized that the biofilm mode of growth was relevant to microbiology. This book covers both the evidence for biofilms in many chronic bacterial infections as well as the problems facing these infections...... such as diagnostics, pathogenesis, treatment regimes and in vitro and in vivo models for studying biofilms. This is the first scientific book on biofilm infections, chapters written by the world leading scientist and clinicians. The intended audience of this book is scientists, teachers at university level as well...

  8. Identification of a Transcriptional Repressor Involved in Benzoate Metabolism in Geobacter bemidjiensis ▿

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Subsurface environments contaminated with aromatic compounds can be remediated in situ by Geobacter species. A transcription factor that represses expression of bamA, a benzoate-inducible gene, in Geobacter bemidjiensis during growth with acetate was identified. It is likely that this repressor also regulates other genes involved in aromatic compound metabolism.

  9. A C-Type Cytochrome and a Transcriptional Regulator Responsible for Enhanced Extracellular Electron Transfer in Geobacter Sulfurreducens Revealed by Adaptive Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ducens fuel cells. Appl Environ Microbiol 72: 7345–7348. Sambrook, J., Fritsch, E.F., and Maniatis , T. (1989) Molecular Cloning : A Laboratory Manual... Molecular Science and Engineering, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC, USA. 3Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, La...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Research Laboratory,Center for Bio/ Molecular Science and Engineering,Washington,DC,20375 8. PERFORMING

  10. Salmonella biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castelijn, G.A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Salmonellaspp. is a problem in the food industry, since biofilms may act as a persistent source of product contamination. Therefore the aim of this study was to obtain more insight in the processes involved and the factors contributing to Salmonellabiofilm formation. A collectio

  11. The Roles of Biofilm Conductivity and Donor Substrate Kinetics in a Mixed-Culture Biofilm Anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyung-Sool; Dhar, Bipro Ranjan; An, Junyeong; Rittmann, Bruce E; Ryu, Hodon; Santo Domingo, Jorge W; Ren, Hao; Chae, Junseok

    2016-12-06

    We experimentally assessed the kinetics and thermodynamics of electron transfer (ET) from the donor substrate (acetate) to the anode for a mixed-culture biofilm anode. We interpreted the results with a modified biofilm-conduction model consisting of three ET steps in series: (1) intracellular ET, (2) non-Ohmic extracellular ET (EET) from an outer membrane protein to an extracellular cofactor (EC), and (3) ET from the EC to the anode by Ohmic-conduction in the biofilm matrix. The steady-state current density was 0.82 ± 0.03 A/m(2) in a miniature microbial electrochemical cell operated at fixed anode potential of -0.15 V versus the standard hydrogen electrode. Illumina 16S-rDNA and -rRNA sequences showed that the Geobacter genus was less than 30% of the community of the biofilm anode. Biofilm conductivity was high at 2.44 ± 0.42 mS/cm, indicating that the maximum current density could be as high as 270 A/m(2) if only Ohmic-conduction EET was limiting. Due to the high biofilm conductivity, the maximum energy loss for Ohmic-conduction EET was negligible, 0.085 mV. The energy loss in the second ET step also was small, only 20 mV, and the potential for the EC involved in the second ET was -0.15 V, a value documenting that >99% of the EC was in the oxidized state. Monod kinetics for utilization of acetate were relatively slow, and at least 87% of the energy loss was in the intracellular step. Thus, intracellular ET was the main kinetic and thermodynamic bottleneck to ET from donor substrate to the anode for a highly conductive biofilm.

  12. Biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade we have gained much knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that are involved in initiation and termination of biofilm formation. In many bacteria, these processes appear to occur in response to specific environmental cues and result in, respectively, induction or terminat......During the past decade we have gained much knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that are involved in initiation and termination of biofilm formation. In many bacteria, these processes appear to occur in response to specific environmental cues and result in, respectively, induction...... or termination of biofilm matrix production via the second messenger molecule c-di-GMP. In between initiation and termination of biofilm formation we have defined specific biofilm stages, but the currently available evidence suggests that these transitions are mainly governed by adaptive responses......, and not by specific genetic programs. It appears that biofilm formation can occur through multiple pathways and that the spatial structure of the biofilms is species dependent as well as dependent on environmental conditions. Bacterial subpopulations, e.g., motile and nonmotile subpopulations, can develop...

  13. Phenol-degrading anode biofilm with high coulombic efficiency in graphite electrodes microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongdong; Li, Zhiling; Zhang, Chunfang; Zhou, Xue; Xiao, Zhixing; Awata, Takanori; Katayama, Arata

    2017-03-01

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC), with graphite electrodes as both the anode and cathode, was operated with a soil-free anaerobic consortium for phenol degradation. This phenol-degrading MFC showed high efficiency with a current density of 120 mA/m(2) and a coulombic efficiency of 22.7%, despite the lack of a platinum catalyst cathode and inoculation of sediment/soil. Removal of planktonic bacteria by renewing the anaerobic medium did not decrease the performance, suggesting that the phenol-degrading MFC was not maintained by the planktonic bacteria but by the microorganisms in the anode biofilm. Cyclic voltammetry analysis of the anode biofilm showed distinct oxidation and reduction peaks. Analysis of the microbial community structure of the anode biofilm and the planktonic bacteria based on 16S rRNA gene sequences suggested that Geobacter sp. was the phenol degrader in the anode biofilm and was responsible for current generation.

  14. Identification of genes specifically required for the anaerobic metabolism of benzene in Geobacter metallireducens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Tian; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Chaurasia, Akhilesh Kumar;

    2014-01-01

    Although the biochemical pathways for the anaerobic degradation of many of the hydrocarbon constituents in petroleum reservoirs have been elucidated, the mechanisms for anaerobic activation of benzene, a very stable molecule, are not known. Previous studies have demonstrated that Geobacter...

  15. Impact of Ferrous Iron on Microbial Community of the Biofilm in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Liu, Bingfeng; Li, Wei; Zhao, Xin; Zuo, Wenjing; Xing, Defeng

    2017-01-01

    The performance of microbial electrochemical cells depends upon microbial community structure and metabolic activity of the electrode biofilms. Iron as a signal affects biofilm development and enrichment of exoelectrogenic bacteria. In this study, the effect of ferrous iron on microbial communities of the electrode biofilms in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was investigated. Voltage production showed that ferrous iron of 100 μM facilitated MFC start-up compared to 150 μM, 200 μM, and without supplement of ferrous iron. However, higher concentration of ferrous iron had an inhibitive influence on current generation after 30 days of operation. Illumina Hiseq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons indicated that ferrous iron substantially changed microbial community structures of both anode and cathode biofilms. Principal component analysis showed that the response of microbial communities of the anode biofilms to higher concentration of ferrous iron was more sensitive. The majority of predominant populations of the anode biofilms in MFCs belonged to Geobacter, which was different from the populations of the cathode biofilms. An obvious shift of community structures of the cathode biofilms occurred after ferrous iron addition. This study implied that ferrous iron influenced the power output and microbial community of MFCs.

  16. Wound biofilms: lessons learned from oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancl, Kimberly A; Kirsner, Robert S; Ajdic, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many chronic infections. Oral biofilms, more commonly known as dental plaque, are a primary cause of oral diseases including caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis. Oral biofilms are commonly studied as model biofilm systems as they are easily accessible; thus, biofilm research in oral diseases is advanced with details of biofilm formation and bacterial interactions being well elucidated. In contrast, wound research has relatively recently directed attention to the role biofilms have in chronic wounds. This review discusses the biofilms in periodontal disease and chronic wounds with comparisons focusing on biofilm detection, biofilm formation, the immune response to biofilms, bacterial interaction, and quorum sensing. Current treatment modalities used by both fields and future therapies are also discussed.

  17. Direct interspecies electron transfer between Geobacter metallireducens and Methanosarcina barkeri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Liu, Fanghua

    2014-01-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) is potentially an effective form of syntrophy in methanogenic communities, but little is known about the diversity of methanogens capable of DIET. The ability of Methanosarcina barkeri, to participate in DIET was evaluated in co-culture with Geobacter...... metallireducens. Co-cultures formed aggregates that shared electrons via DIET during the stoichiometric conversion of ethanol to methane. Co-cultures could not be initiated with a pilin-deficient G. metallireducens, suggesting that long-range electron transfer along pili was important for DIET. Amendments...... physical contact was not necessary for interspecies H2 transfer. M. barkeri is the second methanogen found to accept electrons via DIET and the first methanogen known to be capable of using either H2 or electrons derived from DIET for CO2 reduction. Furthermore, M. barkeri is genetically tractable, making...

  18. The genome of Geobacter bemidjiensis, exemplar for the subsurface clade of Geobacter species that predominate in Fe(III-reducing subsurface environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aklujkar Muktak

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geobacter species in a phylogenetic cluster known as subsurface clade 1 are often the predominant microorganisms in subsurface environments in which Fe(III reduction is the primary electron-accepting process. Geobacter bemidjiensis, a member of this clade, was isolated from hydrocarbon-contaminated subsurface sediments in Bemidji, Minnesota, and is closely related to Geobacter species found to be abundant at other subsurface sites. This study examines whether there are significant differences in the metabolism and physiology of G. bemidjiensis compared to non-subsurface Geobacter species. Results Annotation of the genome sequence of G. bemidjiensis indicates several differences in metabolism compared to previously sequenced non-subsurface Geobacteraceae, which will be useful for in silico metabolic modeling of subsurface bioremediation processes involving Geobacter species. Pathways can now be predicted for the use of various carbon sources such as propionate by G. bemidjiensis. Additional metabolic capabilities such as carbon dioxide fixation and growth on glucose were predicted from the genome annotation. The presence of different dicarboxylic acid transporters and two oxaloacetate decarboxylases in G. bemidjiensis may explain its ability to grow by disproportionation of fumarate. Although benzoate is the only aromatic compound that G. bemidjiensis is known or predicted to utilize as an electron donor and carbon source, the genome suggests that this species may be able to detoxify other aromatic pollutants without degrading them. Furthermore, G. bemidjiensis is auxotrophic for 4-aminobenzoate, which makes it the first Geobacter species identified as having a vitamin requirement. Several features of the genome indicated that G. bemidjiensis has enhanced abilities to respire, detoxify and avoid oxygen. Conclusion Overall, the genome sequence of G. bemidjiensis offers surprising insights into the metabolism and physiology of

  19. Integrative analysis of the interactions between Geobacter spp. and sulfate-reducing bacteria during uranium bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Lovley

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing microbial U(VI reduction with the addition of organic electron donors is a promising strategy for immobilizing uranium in contaminated groundwaters, but has yet to be optimized because of a poor understanding of the factors controlling the growth of various microbial communities during bioremediation. In previous field trials in which acetate was added to the subsurface, there were two distinct phases: an initial phase in which acetate-oxidizing, U(VI-reducing Geobacter predominated and U(VI was effectively reduced and a second phase in which acetate-oxidizing sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB predominated and U(VI reduction was poor. The interaction of Geobacter and SRB was investigated both in sediment incubations that mimicked in situ bioremediation and with in silico metabolic modeling. In sediment incubations, Geobacter grew quickly but then declined in numbers as the microbially reducible Fe(III was depleted whereas the SRB grow more slowly and reached dominance after 30–40 days. Modeling predicted a similar outcome. Additional modeling in which the relative initial percentages of the Geobacter and SRB were varied indicated that there was little to no competitive interaction between Geobacter and SRB when acetate was abundant. Further simulations suggested that the addition of Fe(III would revive the Geobacter, but have little to no effect on the SRB. This result was confirmed experimentally. The results demonstrate that it is possible to predict the impact of amendments on important components of the subsurface microbial community during groundwater bioremediation. The finding that Fe(III availability, rather than competition with SRB, is the key factor limiting the activity of Geobacter during in situ uranium bioremediation will aid in the design of improved uranium bioremediation strategies.

  20. Integrative analysis of Geobacter spp. and sulfate-reducing bacteria during uranium bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlett, M.; Zhuang, K.; Mahadevan, R.; Lovley, D.

    2012-03-01

    Enhancing microbial U(VI) reduction with the addition of organic electron donors is a promising strategy for immobilizing uranium in contaminated groundwaters, but has yet to be optimized because of a poor understanding of the factors controlling the growth of various microbial communities during bioremediation. In previous field trials in which acetate was added to the subsurface, there were two distinct phases: an initial phase in which acetate-oxidizing, U(VI)-reducing Geobacter predominated and U(VI) was effectively reduced and a second phase in which acetate-oxidizing sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) predominated and U(VI) reduction was poor. The interaction of Geobacter and SRB was investigated both in sediment incubations that mimicked in situ bioremediation and with in silico metabolic modeling. In sediment incubations, Geobacter grew quickly but then declined in numbers as the microbially reducible Fe(III) was depleted whereas the SRB grow more slowly and reached dominance after 30-40 days. Modeling predicted a similar outcome. Additional modeling in which the relative initial percentages of the Geobacter and SRB were varied indicated that there was little to no competitive interaction between Geobacter and SRB when acetate was abundant. Further simulations suggested that the addition of Fe(III) would revive the Geobacter, but have little to no effect on the SRB. This result was confirmed experimentally. The results demonstrate that it is possible to predict the impact of amendments on important components of the subsurface microbial community during groundwater bioremediation. The finding that Fe(III) availability, rather than competition with SRB, is the key factor limiting the activity of Geobacter during in situ uranium bioremediation will aid in the design of improved uranium bioremediation strategies.

  1. Integrative analysis of the interactions between Geobacter spp. and sulfate-reducing bacteria during uranium bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlett, M.; Zhuang, K.; Mahadevan, R.; Lovley, D. R.

    2011-11-01

    Enhancing microbial U(VI) reduction with the addition of organic electron donors is a promising strategy for immobilizing uranium in contaminated groundwaters, but has yet to be optimized because of a poor understanding of the factors controlling the growth of various microbial communities during bioremediation. In previous field trials in which acetate was added to the subsurface, there were two distinct phases: an initial phase in which acetate-oxidizing, U(VI)-reducing Geobacter predominated and U(VI) was effectively reduced and a second phase in which acetate-oxidizing sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) predominated and U(VI) reduction was poor. The interaction of Geobacter and SRB was investigated both in sediment incubations that mimicked in situ bioremediation and with in silico metabolic modeling. In sediment incubations, Geobacter grew quickly but then declined in numbers as the microbially reducible Fe(III) was depleted whereas the SRB grow more slowly and reached dominance after 30-40 days. Modeling predicted a similar outcome. Additional modeling in which the relative initial percentages of the Geobacter and SRB were varied indicated that there was little to no competitive interaction between Geobacter and SRB when acetate was abundant. Further simulations suggested that the addition of Fe(III) would revive the Geobacter, but have little to no effect on the SRB. This result was confirmed experimentally. The results demonstrate that it is possible to predict the impact of amendments on important components of the subsurface microbial community during groundwater bioremediation. The finding that Fe(III) availability, rather than competition with SRB, is the key factor limiting the activity of Geobacter during in situ uranium bioremediation will aid in the design of improved uranium bioremediation strategies.

  2. Molecular analysis of the in situ growth rates of subsurface Geobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Dawn E; Giloteaux, Ludovic; Barlett, Melissa; Chavan, Milind A; Smith, Jessica A; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael; Long, Philip; Lovley, Derek R

    2013-03-01

    Molecular tools that can provide an estimate of the in situ growth rate of Geobacter species could improve understanding of dissimilatory metal reduction in a diversity of environments. Whole-genome microarray analyses of a subsurface isolate of Geobacter uraniireducens, grown under a variety of conditions, identified a number of genes that are differentially expressed at different specific growth rates. Expression of two genes encoding ribosomal proteins, rpsC and rplL, was further evaluated with quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) in cells with doubling times ranging from 6.56 h to 89.28 h. Transcript abundance of rpsC correlated best (r(2) = 0.90) with specific growth rates. Therefore, expression patterns of rpsC were used to estimate specific growth rates of Geobacter species during an in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment in which acetate was added to the groundwater to promote dissimilatory metal reduction. Initially, increased availability of acetate in the groundwater resulted in higher expression of Geobacter rpsC, and the increase in the number of Geobacter cells estimated with fluorescent in situ hybridization compared well with specific growth rates estimated from levels of in situ rpsC expression. However, in later phases, cell number increases were substantially lower than predicted from rpsC transcript abundance. This change coincided with a bloom of protozoa and increased attachment of Geobacter species to solid phases. These results suggest that monitoring rpsC expression may better reflect the actual rate that Geobacter species are metabolizing and growing during in situ uranium bioremediation than changes in cell abundance.

  3. Integrative analysis of Geobacter spp. and sulfate-reducing bacteria during uranium bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lovley

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing microbial U(VI reduction with the addition of organic electron donors is a promising strategy for immobilizing uranium in contaminated groundwaters, but has yet to be optimized because of a poor understanding of the factors controlling the growth of various microbial communities during bioremediation. In previous field trials in which acetate was added to the subsurface, there were two distinct phases: an initial phase in which acetate-oxidizing, U(VI-reducing Geobacter predominated and U(VI was effectively reduced and a second phase in which acetate-oxidizing sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB predominated and U(VI reduction was poor. The interaction of Geobacter and SRB was investigated both in sediment incubations that mimicked in situ bioremediation and with in silico metabolic modeling. In sediment incubations, Geobacter grew quickly but then declined in numbers as the microbially reducible Fe(III was depleted whereas the SRB grow more slowly and reached dominance after 30–40 days. Modeling predicted a similar outcome. Additional modeling in which the relative initial percentages of the Geobacter and SRB were varied indicated that there was little to no competitive interaction between Geobacter and SRB when acetate was abundant. Further simulations suggested that the addition of Fe(III would revive the Geobacter, but have little to no effect on the SRB. This result was confirmed experimentally. The results demonstrate that it is possible to predict the impact of amendments on important components of the subsurface microbial community during groundwater bioremediation. The finding that Fe(III availability, rather than competition with SRB, is the key factor limiting the activity of Geobacter during in situ uranium bioremediation will aid in the design of improved uranium bioremediation strategies.

  4. Anaerobic Mercury Methylation and Demethylation by Geobacter bemidjiensis Bem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xia; Liu, Yurong; Johs, Alexander; Zhao, Linduo; Wang, Tieshan; Yang, Ziming; Lin, Hui; Elias, Dwayne A; Pierce, Eric M; Liang, Liyuan; Barkay, Tamar; Gu, Baohua

    2016-04-19

    Microbial methylation and demethylation are two competing processes controlling the net production and bioaccumulation of neurotoxic methylmercury (MeHg) in natural ecosystems. Although mercury (Hg) methylation by anaerobic microorganisms and demethylation by aerobic Hg-resistant bacteria have both been extensively studied, little attention has been given to MeHg degradation by anaerobic bacteria, particularly the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter bemidjiensis Bem. Here we report, for the first time, that the strain G. bemidjiensis Bem can mediate a suite of Hg transformations, including Hg(II) reduction, Hg(0) oxidation, MeHg production and degradation under anoxic conditions. Results suggest that G. bemidjiensis utilizes a reductive demethylation pathway to degrade MeHg, with elemental Hg(0) as the major reaction product, possibly due to the presence of genes encoding homologues of an organomercurial lyase (MerB) and a mercuric reductase (MerA). In addition, the cells can strongly sorb Hg(II) and MeHg, reduce or oxidize Hg, resulting in both time and concentration-dependent Hg species transformations. Moderate concentrations (10-500 μM) of Hg-binding ligands such as cysteine enhance Hg(II) methylation but inhibit MeHg degradation. These findings indicate a cycle of Hg methylation and demethylation among anaerobic bacteria, thereby influencing net MeHg production in anoxic water and sediments.

  5. Direct interspecies electron transfer between Geobacter metallireducens and Methanosarcina barkeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Liu, Fanghua; Markovaite, Beatrice; Chen, Shanshan; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R

    2014-08-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) is potentially an effective form of syntrophy in methanogenic communities, but little is known about the diversity of methanogens capable of DIET. The ability of Methanosarcina barkeri to participate in DIET was evaluated in coculture with Geobacter metallireducens. Cocultures formed aggregates that shared electrons via DIET during the stoichiometric conversion of ethanol to methane. Cocultures could not be initiated with a pilin-deficient G. metallireducens strain, suggesting that long-range electron transfer along pili was important for DIET. Amendments of granular activated carbon permitted the pilin-deficient G. metallireducens isolates to share electrons with M. barkeri, demonstrating that this conductive material could substitute for pili in promoting DIET. When M. barkeri was grown in coculture with the H2-producing Pelobacter carbinolicus, incapable of DIET, M. barkeri utilized H2 as an electron donor but metabolized little of the acetate that P.carbinolicus produced. This suggested that H2, but not electrons derived from DIET, inhibited acetate metabolism. P. carbinolicus-M. barkeri cocultures did not aggregate, demonstrating that, unlike DIET, close physical contact was not necessary for interspecies H2 transfer. M. barkeri is the second methanogen found to accept electrons via DIET and the first methanogen known to be capable of using either H2 or electrons derived from DIET for CO2 reduction. Furthermore, M. barkeri is genetically tractable,making it a model organism for elucidating mechanisms by which methanogens make biological electrical connections with other cells.

  6. Molecular Basis for Electron Flow Within Metal-and Electrode-Reducing Biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Daniel R. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Electrochemical, spectral, genetic, and biochemical techniques were developed to reveal that a diverse suite of redox proteins and structural macromolecules outside the cell work together to move electrons long distances between Geobacter cells to metals and electrodes. In this project, we greatly expanded the known participants in the electron transfer pathway of Geobacter. For example, in addition to well-studied pili, polysaccharides contribute to anchoring, different cytochromes are required under different conditions, strategies change with redox potential, and the localization of these components can change depending on where cells are located in a biofilm. By inventing new electrodes compatible with real-time spectral measurements, we were able to visualize the redox status of biofilms in action, leading to a hypothesis that long-distance electron transfer is ultimately limiting in these systems and redox potentials change within biofilms. The goals of this project were met, as we were able to 1) identify new elements crucial to the expression, assembly and function of the extracellular electron transfer phenotype 2) expand spectral and electrochemical techniques to define the mechanism and route of electron transfer through the matrix, and 3) combine this knowledge to build the next generation of genetic tools for study of this complex process.

  7. Protozoan grazing reduces the current output of microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Dawn E; Nevin, Kelly P; Snoeyenbos-West, Oona L; Woodard, Trevor L; Strickland, Justin N; Lovley, Derek R

    2015-10-01

    Several experiments were conducted to determine whether protozoan grazing can reduce current output from sediment microbial fuel cells. When marine sediments were amended with eukaryotic inhibitors, the power output from the fuel cells increased 2-5-fold. Quantitative PCR showed that Geobacteraceae sequences were 120 times more abundant on anodes from treated fuel cells compared to untreated fuel cells, and that Spirotrichea sequences in untreated fuel cells were 200 times more abundant on anode surfaces than in the surrounding sediments. Defined studies with current-producing biofilms of Geobacter sulfurreducens and pure cultures of protozoa demonstrated that protozoa that were effective in consuming G. sulfurreducens reduced current production up to 91% when added to G. sulfurreducens fuel cells. These results suggest that anode biofilms are an attractive food source for protozoa and that protozoan grazing can be an important factor limiting the current output of sediment microbial fuel cells.

  8. The Biofilm Challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Maria; Alhede, Morten

    2014-01-01

    in wounds. However, the impact of biofilms is often debated, because infected wounds were also treated before the concept of biofilms was coined. In this short review, we will address the significance of biofilms and their role in wounds, and discuss the future tasks of the biofilm challenge....

  9. Bidirectional microbial electron transfer: Switching an acetate oxidizing biofilm to nitrate reducing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pous, Narcís; Carmona-Martínez, Alessandro A; Vilajeliu-Pons, Anna; Fiset, Erika; Bañeras, Lluis; Trably, Eric; Balaguer, M Dolors; Colprim, Jesús; Bernet, Nicolas; Puig, Sebastià

    2016-01-15

    Up to date a few electroactive bacteria embedded in biofilms are described to catalyze both anodic and cathodic reactions in bioelectrochemical systems (i.e. bidirectional electron transfer). How these bacteria transfer electrons to or from the electrode is still uncertain. In this study the extracellular electron transfer mechanism of bacteria within an electroactive biofilm was investigated by using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). First, a mature anodic electroactive biofilm was developed from an activated sludge sample (inoculum), acetate as electron donor and a poised electrode (+397mV vs. SHE). Later, this biofilm was "switched" to biocathodic conditions by feeding it with a medium containing nitrates and poising the electrode at -303mV vs. SHE. The electrochemical characterization indicated that both, acetate oxidation and nitrate reduction took place at a similar formal potential of -175±05 and -175±34mV vs. SHE, respectively. The biofilm was predominantly composed by Geobacter sp. at both experimental conditions. Taken together, the results indicated that both processes could be catalyzed by using the same electron conduit, and most likely by the same bacterial consortium. Hence, this study suggests that electroactive bacteria within biofilms could use the same electron transfer conduit for catalyzing anodic and cathodic reactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The in vivo biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, Maria; Alhede, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria can grow and proliferate either as single, independent cells or organized in aggregates commonly referred to as biofilms. When bacteria succeed in forming a biofilm within the human host, the infection often becomes very resistant to treatment and can develop into a chronic state. Biofilms...... have been studied for decades using various in vitro models, but it remains debatable whether such in vitro biofilms actually resemble in vivo biofilms in chronic infections. In vivo biofilms share several structural characteristics that differ from most in vitro biofilms. Additionally, the in vivo...... experimental time span and presence of host defenses differ from chronic infections and the chemical microenvironment of both in vivo and in vitro biofilms is seldom taken into account. In this review, we discuss why the current in vitro models of biofilms might be limited for describing infectious biofilms...

  11. The Biofilm Challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Maria; Alhede, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The concept of biofilms has emerged in the clinical setting during the last decade. Infections involving biofilms have been documented in all parts of the human body, and it is currently believed that the presence of biofilm-forming bacteria is equivalent to chronic infection. A quick Pubmed search...... reveals the significance of biofilms, as evidenced by a dramatic increase in scientific publications on the topic, as well as in publications concerning wounds with biofilms, which reached 600 publications in 2013. Judged from the number of publications, it appears that biofilms play a significant role...... in wounds. However, the impact of biofilms is often debated, because infected wounds were also treated before the concept of biofilms was coined. In this short review, we will address the significance of biofilms and their role in wounds, and discuss the future tasks of the biofilm challenge....

  12. Polyphasic analysis of an Azoarcus-Leptothrix-dominated bacterial biofilm developed on stainless steel surface in a gasoline-contaminated hypoxic groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, Tibor; Táncsics, András; Szabó, István; Farkas, Milán; Szoboszlay, Sándor; Fábián, Krisztina; Maróti, Gergely; Kriszt, Balázs

    2016-05-01

    Pump and treat systems are widely used for hydrocarbon-contaminated groundwater remediation. Although biofouling (formation of clogging biofilms on pump surfaces) is a common problem in these systems, scarce information is available regarding the phylogenetic and functional complexity of such biofilms. Extensive information about the taxa and species as well as metabolic potential of a bacterial biofilm developed on the stainless steel surface of a pump submerged in a gasoline-contaminated hypoxic groundwater is presented. Results shed light on a complex network of interconnected hydrocarbon-degrading chemoorganotrophic and chemolitotrophic bacteria. It was found that besides the well-known hydrocarbon-degrading aerobic/facultative anaerobic biofilm-forming organisms (e.g., Azoarcus, Leptothrix, Acidovorax, Thauera, Pseudomonas, etc.), representatives of Fe(2+)-and Mn(2+)-oxidizing (Thiobacillus, Sideroxydans, Gallionella, Rhodopseudomonas, etc.) as well as of Fe(3+)- and Mn(4+)-respiring (Rhodoferax, Geobacter, Magnetospirillum, Sulfurimonas, etc.) bacteria were present in the biofilm. The predominance of β-Proteobacteria within the biofilm bacterial community in phylogenetic and functional point of view was revealed. Investigation of meta-cleavage dioxygenase and benzylsuccinate synthase (bssA) genes indicated that within the biofilm, Azoarcus, Leptothrix, Zoogloea, and Thauera species are most probably involved in intrinsic biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons. Polyphasic analysis of the biofilm shed light on the fact that subsurface microbial accretions might be reservoirs of novel putatively hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial species. Moreover, clogging biofilms besides their detrimental effects might supplement the efficiency of pump and treat systems.

  13. Proteogenomic Analysis of Geobacter Populations in a low Nutrient Contaminated Aquifer Under Stimulated Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, M. J.; Williams, K. H.; Verberkmoes, N. C.; Hettich, R. L.; Lipton, M. S.; Callister, S. J.; Long, P. E.; Banfield, J. F.

    2008-12-01

    Proteogenomic samples were obtained from a U(VI)-contaminated aquifer undergoing acetate-stimulated bioreduction at the U.S. Department of Energy Integrated Field Challenge (IFC) site in Western Colorado. Analysis of these samples using ICP-MS/MS indicated that they were dominated by Geobacter species, with over 2,500 proteins identified per sample. The detected proteins revealed a wealth of information about how Geobacter species are able to dominate subsurface environments under nutrient-poor conditions such as those at Rifle. The presence of nitrogenase proteins indicates that the Geobacter populations are fixing nitrogen, although the absence of other proteins indicative of nitrogen stress, such as the uridylylated version of the P-II regulatory protein and NtrB, suggests that low-level N2 fixation occurs without the community undergoing extreme nitrogen stress. The detection of a large number of proteins involved in two- component sensor and chemotaxis systems, along with flagella subunits, indicates that Geobacter species are able to rapidly detect and respond to chemical gradients in the environment. Pathways for the efficient utilization of the elevated acetate concentrations in the subsurface have also been elucidated, with an important role suggested for acetyl-CoA transferase in controlling flux between succinyl-CoA and succinate. Other proteins detected that are clearly important for growth in the subsurface include those involved in phosphate acquisition and heavy-metal efflux.

  14. Annual progress Report on research related to our research project “Stabilization of Plutonium in Subsurface Environments via Microbial Reduction and Biofilm Formation” funded by the Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    New, Mary

    2006-06-01

    The overarching goal of this research project is to investigate and optimize the mechanisms for in situ immobilization of Pu species by naturally-occurring bacteria. Specific research objectives are: (a) investigate the mechanism of bacterial accumulation and immobilization of plutonium species by biofilm formation under aerobic conditions and (b) to demonstrate the direct and indirect stabilization of Pu via dissimilatory reduction by Geobacter metallireducens.

  15. Modeling and sensitivity analysis of electron capacitance for Geobacter in sedimentary environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiao; Fang, Yilin; Scheibe, Timothy D; Lovley, Derek R; Mahadevan, R

    2010-03-01

    In situ stimulation of the metabolic activity of Geobacter species through acetate amendment has been shown to be a promising bioremediation strategy to reduce and immobilize hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] as insoluble U(IV). Although Geobacter species are reducing U(VI), they primarily grow via Fe(III) reduction. Unfortunately, the biogeochemistry and the physiology of simultaneous reduction of multiple metals are still poorly understood. A detailed model is therefore required to better understand the pathways leading to U(VI) and Fe(III) reduction by Geobacter species. Based on recent experimental evidence of temporary electron capacitors in Geobacter we propose a novel kinetic model that physically distinguishes planktonic cells into electron-loaded and -unloaded states. Incorporation of an electron load-unload cycle into the model provides insight into U(VI) reduction efficiency, and elucidates the relationship between U(VI)- and Fe(III)-reducing activity and further explains the correlation of high U(VI) removal with high fractions of planktonic cells in subsurface environments. Global sensitivity analysis was used to determine the level of importance of geochemical and microbial processes controlling Geobacter growth and U(VI) reduction, suggesting that the electron load-unload cycle and the resulting repartition of the microbes between aqueous and attached phases are critical for U(VI) reduction. As compared with conventional Monod modeling approaches without inclusion of the electron capacitance, the new model attempts to incorporate a novel cellular mechanism that has a significant impact on the outcome of in situ bioremediation.

  16. Biofilm Fixed Film Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipesh Das

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The work reviewed here was published between 2008 and 2010 and describes research that involved aerobic and anoxic biofilm treatment of water pollutants. Biofilm denitrification systems are covered when appropriate. References catalogued here are divided on the basis of fundamental research area or reactor types. Fundamental research into biofilms is presented in two sections, Biofilm Measurement and Characterization and Growth and Modeling. The reactor types covered are: trickling filters, rotating biological contactors, fluidized bed bioreactors, submerged bed biofilm reactors, biological granular activated carbon, membrane bioreactors, and immobilized cell reactors. Innovative reactors, not easily classified, are then presented, followed by a section on biofilms on sand, soil and sediment.

  17. Development of Electroactive and Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing (Anammox Biofilms from Digestate in Microbial Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enea Gino Di Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial Fuel cells (MFCs have been proposed for nutrient removal and energy recovery from different wastes. In this study the anaerobic digestate was used to feed H-type MFC reactors, one with a graphite anode preconditioned with Geobacter sulfurreducens and the other with an unconditioned graphite anode. The data demonstrate that the digestate acts as a carbon source, and even in the absence of anode preconditioning, electroactive bacteria colonise the anodic chamber, producing a maximum power density of 172.2 mW/m2. The carbon content was also reduced by up to 60%, while anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox bacteria, which were found in the anodic compartment of the reactors, contributed to nitrogen removal from the digestate. Overall, these results demonstrate that MFCs can be used to recover anammox bacteria from natural sources, and it may represent a promising bioremediation unit in anaerobic digestor plants for the simultaneous nitrogen removal and electricity generation using digestate as substrate.

  18. Endodontic Biofilm: Quo Vadis?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tatiana Ramírez Mora

    2016-01-01

    .... However, the evidence of biofilm along the root canal system and the inability of current instruments and irrigants to eliminate bacterial biofilm have built a barrier toward a higher favorable...

  19. Biofilms of Clostridium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaléon, Véronique; Bouttier, Sylvie; Soavelomandroso, Anna Philibertine; Janoir, Claire; Candela, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The biofilm is a microbial community embedded in a synthesized matrix and is the main bacterial way of life. A biofilm adheres on surfaces or is found on interfaces. It protects bacteria from the environment, toxic molecules and may have a role in virulence. Clostridium species are spread throughout both environments and hosts, but their biofilms have not been extensively described in comparison with other bacterial species. In this review we describe all biofilms formed by Clostridium species during both industrial processes and in mammals where biofilms may be formed either during infections or associated to microbiota in the gut. We have specifically focussed on Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens biofilms, which have been studied in vitro. Regulatory processes including sporulation and germination highlight how these Clostridium species live in biofilms. Furthermore, biofilms may have a role in the survival and spreading of Clostridium species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten; Hultqvist, Louise Dahl; Givskov, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Studies of biopsies from infectious sites, explanted tissue and medical devises have provided evidence that biofilms are the underlying cause of a variety of tissue-associated and implant-associated recalcitrant human infections. With a need for novel anti-biofilm treatment strategies, research...... in biofilm infection microbiology, biofilm formation mechanisms and biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance has become an important area in microbiology. Substantial knowledge about biofilm formation mechanisms, biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance and immune evasion mechanisms has been obtained...... through work with biofilms grown in in vitro experimental setups, and the relevance of this information in the context of chronic infections is being investigated by the use of animal models of infection. Because our current in vitro experimental setups and animal models have limitations, new advanced...

  1. Arsenic dissolution from Japanese paddy soil by a dissimilatory arsenate-reducing bacterium Geobacter sp. OR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Toshihiko; Yamaguchi, Noriko; Makino, Tomoyuki; Sakurai, Kazuhiro; Kimura, Kenta; Kudo, Keitaro; Homma, Eri; Dong, Dian Tao; Amachi, Seigo

    2013-06-18

    Dissimilatory As(V) (arsenate)-reducing bacteria may play an important role in arsenic release from anoxic sediments in the form of As(III) (arsenite). Although respiratory arsenate reductase genes (arrA) closely related to Geobacter species have been frequently detected in arsenic-rich sediments, it is still unclear whether they directly participate in arsenic release, mainly due to lack of pure cultures capable of arsenate reduction. In this study, we isolated a novel dissimilatory arsenate-reducing bacterium, strain OR-1, from Japanese paddy soil, and found that it was phylogenetically closely related to Geobacter pelophilus. OR-1 also utilized soluble Fe(III), ferrihydrite, nitrate, and fumarate as electron acceptors. OR-1 catalyzed dissolution of arsenic from arsenate-adsorbed ferrihydrite, while Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 did not. Furthermore, inoculation of washed cells of OR-1 into sterilized paddy soil successfully restored arsenic release. Arsenic K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis revealed that strain OR-1 reduced arsenate directly on the soil solid phase. Analysis of putative ArrA sequences from paddy soils suggested that Geobacter-related bacteria, including those closely related to OR-1, play an important role in arsenic release from paddy soils. Our results provide direct evidence for arsenic dissolution by Geobacter species and support the hypothesis that Geobacter species play a significant role in reduction and mobilization of arsenic in flooded soils and anoxic sediments.

  2. Biofilms: A microbial home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandki, Rita; Banthia, Priyank; Banthia, Ruchi

    2011-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are mainly implicated in etiopathogenesis of caries and periodontal disease. Owing to its properties, these pose great challenges. Continuous and regular disruption of these biofilms is imperative for prevention and management of oral diseases. This essay provides a detailed insight into properties, mechanisms of etiopathogenesis, detection and removal of these microbial biofilms. PMID:21976832

  3. Biofilms: A microbial home

    OpenAIRE

    Chandki, Rita; Banthia, Priyank; Banthia, Ruchi

    2011-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are mainly implicated in etiopathogenesis of caries and periodontal disease. Owing to its properties, these pose great challenges. Continuous and regular disruption of these biofilms is imperative for prevention and management of oral diseases. This essay provides a detailed insight into properties, mechanisms of etiopathogenesis, detection and removal of these microbial biofilms.

  4. Constraint-Based Modeling of Carbon Fixation and the Energetics of Electron Transfer in Geobacter metallireducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feist, AM; Nagarajan, H; Rotaru, AE; Tremblay, PL; Zhang, T; Nevin, KP; Lovley, DR; Zengler, K

    2014-04-24

    Geobacter species are of great interest for environmental and biotechnology applications as they can carry out direct electron transfer to insoluble metals or other microorganisms and have the ability to assimilate inorganic carbon. Here, we report on the capability and key enabling metabolic machinery of Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 to carry out CO2 fixation and direct electron transfer to iron. An updated metabolic reconstruction was generated, growth screens on targeted conditions of interest were performed, and constraint-based analysis was utilized to characterize and evaluate critical pathways and reactions in G. metallireducens. The novel capability of G. metallireducens to grow autotrophically with formate and Fe(III) was predicted and subsequently validated in vivo. Additionally, the energetic cost of transferring electrons to an external electron acceptor was determined through analysis of growth experiments carried out using three different electron acceptors (Fe(III), nitrate, and fumarate) by systematically isolating and examining different parts of the electron transport chain. The updated reconstruction will serve as a knowledgebase for understanding and engineering Geobacter and similar species. Author Summary The ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons directly with their environment has large implications for our knowledge of industrial and environmental processes. For decades, it has been known that microbes can use electrodes as electron acceptors in microbial fuel cell settings. Geobacter metallireducens has been one of the model organisms for characterizing microbe-electrode interactions as well as environmental processes such as bioremediation. Here, we significantly expand the knowledge of metabolism and energetics of this model organism by employing constraint-based metabolic modeling. Through this analysis, we build the metabolic pathways necessary for carbon fixation, a desirable property for industrial chemical production. We

  5. Geobacter luticola sp. nov., an Fe(III)-reducing bacterium isolated from lotus field mud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viulu, Samson; Nakamura, Kohei; Okada, Yurina; Saitou, Sakiko; Takamizawa, Kazuhiro

    2013-02-01

    A novel species of Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, designated strain OSK6(T), belonging to the genus Geobacter, was isolated from lotus field mud in Japan. Strain OSK6(T) was isolated using a solid medium containing acetate, Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetate (NTA) and gellan gum. The isolate is a strictly anaerobic, gram-negative, motile, straight rod-shaped bacterium, 0.6-1.9 µm long and 0.2-0.4 µm wide. The growth of the isolate occurred at 20-40 °C with optima of 30-37 °C and pH 6.5-7.5 in the presence of up to 0.5 g NaCl l(-1). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was determined by HPLC to be 59.7 mol%. The major respiratory quinone was MK-8. The major fatty acids were 16 : 1ω7c and 16 : 0. Strain OSK6(T) was able to grow with Fe(III)-NTA, ferric citrate, amorphous iron (III) hydroxide and nitrate, but not with fumarate, malate or sulfate as electron acceptors. Among examined substrates grown with Fe(III)-NTA, the isolate grew on acetate, lactate, pyruvate and succinate. Analysis of the near full-length 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain OSK6(T) is closely related to Geobacter daltonii and Geobacter toluenoxydans with 95.6 % similarity to the type strains of these species. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis and physiological tests, strain OSK6(T) is described as a representative of a novel species, Geobacter luticola sp. nov.; the type strain is OSK6(T) ( = DSM 24905(T) = JCM 17780(T)).

  6. Constraint-based modeling of carbon fixation and the energetics of electron transfer in Geobacter metallireducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, Adam M; Nagarajan, Harish; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Zhang, Tian; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R; Zengler, Karsten

    2014-04-01

    Geobacter species are of great interest for environmental and biotechnology applications as they can carry out direct electron transfer to insoluble metals or other microorganisms and have the ability to assimilate inorganic carbon. Here, we report on the capability and key enabling metabolic machinery of Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 to carry out CO2 fixation and direct electron transfer to iron. An updated metabolic reconstruction was generated, growth screens on targeted conditions of interest were performed, and constraint-based analysis was utilized to characterize and evaluate critical pathways and reactions in G. metallireducens. The novel capability of G. metallireducens to grow autotrophically with formate and Fe(III) was predicted and subsequently validated in vivo. Additionally, the energetic cost of transferring electrons to an external electron acceptor was determined through analysis of growth experiments carried out using three different electron acceptors (Fe(III), nitrate, and fumarate) by systematically isolating and examining different parts of the electron transport chain. The updated reconstruction will serve as a knowledgebase for understanding and engineering Geobacter and similar species.

  7. Constraint-based modeling of carbon fixation and the energetics of electron transfer in Geobacter metallireducens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M Feist

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Geobacter species are of great interest for environmental and biotechnology applications as they can carry out direct electron transfer to insoluble metals or other microorganisms and have the ability to assimilate inorganic carbon. Here, we report on the capability and key enabling metabolic machinery of Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 to carry out CO2 fixation and direct electron transfer to iron. An updated metabolic reconstruction was generated, growth screens on targeted conditions of interest were performed, and constraint-based analysis was utilized to characterize and evaluate critical pathways and reactions in G. metallireducens. The novel capability of G. metallireducens to grow autotrophically with formate and Fe(III was predicted and subsequently validated in vivo. Additionally, the energetic cost of transferring electrons to an external electron acceptor was determined through analysis of growth experiments carried out using three different electron acceptors (Fe(III, nitrate, and fumarate by systematically isolating and examining different parts of the electron transport chain. The updated reconstruction will serve as a knowledgebase for understanding and engineering Geobacter and similar species.

  8. Electron transfer at the cell-uranium interface in Geobacter spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reguera, Gemma

    2012-12-01

    The in situ stimulation of Fe(III) oxide reduction in the subsurface stimulates the growth of Geobacter spp. and the precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater. As with Fe(III) oxide reduction, the reduction of uranium by Geobacter spp. requires the expression of their conductive pili. The pili bind the soluble uranium and catalyse its extracellular reductive precipitation along the pili filaments as a mononuclear U(IV) complexed by carbon-containing ligands. Although most of the uranium is immobilized by the pili, some uranium deposits are also observed in discreet regions of the outer membrane, consistent with the participation of redox-active foci, presumably c-type cytochromes, in the extracellular reduction of uranium. It is unlikely that cytochromes released from the outer membrane could associate with the pili and contribute to the catalysis, because scanning tunnelling microscopy spectroscopy did not reveal any haem-specific electronic features in the pili, but, rather, showed topographic and electronic features intrinsic to the pilus shaft. Pili not only enhance the rate and extent of uranium reduction per cell, but also prevent the uranium from traversing the outer membrane and mineralizing the cell envelope. As a result, pili expression preserves the essential respiratory activities of the cell envelope and the cell's viability. Hence the results support a model in which the conductive pili function as the primary mechanism for the reduction of uranium and cellular protection in Geobacter spp.

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria in natural, industrial and clinical settings predominantly live in biofilms, i.e., sessile structured microbial communities encased in self-produced extracellular matrix material. One of the most important characteristics of microbial biofilms is that the resident bacteria display...... a remarkable increased tolerance toward antimicrobial attack. Biofilms formed by opportunistic pathogenic bacteria are involved in devastating persistent medical device-associated infections, and chronic infections in individuals who are immune-compromised or otherwise impaired in the host defense. Because...... the use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  10. Studying bacterial multispecies biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Henriette Lyng; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Burmølle, Mette

    2016-01-01

    and drawbacks of varying the degree of complexity. This review aims to facilitate multispecies biofilm research in order to expand the current limited knowledge on interspecies interactions. Recent technological advances have enabled total diversity analysis of highly complex and diverse microbial communities...... at the microscale of complex communities, including biofilms.Studies of multispecies biofilms and the interactions shaping these are conducted in traditional approaches used for single-species biofilms with some adjustments; but a crucial point for consideration is which strains to combine and where these should...

  11. Hydraulic resistance of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Dreszer, C.

    2013-02-01

    Biofilms may interfere with membrane performance in at least three ways: (i) increase of the transmembrane pressure drop, (ii) increase of feed channel (feed-concentrate) pressure drop, and (iii) increase of transmembrane passage. Given the relevance of biofouling, it is surprising how few data exist about the hydraulic resistance of biofilms that may affect the transmembrane pressure drop and membrane passage. In this study, biofilms were generated in a lab scale cross flow microfiltration system at two fluxes (20 and 100Lm-2h-1) and constant cross flow (0.1ms-1). As a nutrient source, acetate was added (1.0mgL-1 acetate C) besides a control without nutrient supply. A microfiltration (MF) membrane was chosen because the MF membrane resistance is very low compared to the expected biofilm resistance and, thus, biofilm resistance can be determined accurately. Transmembrane pressure drop was monitored. As biofilm parameters, thickness, total cell number, TOC, and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were determined, it was demonstrated that no internal membrane fouling occurred and that the fouling layer actually consisted of a grown biofilm and was not a filter cake of accumulated bacterial cells. At 20Lm-2h-1 flux with a nutrient dosage of 1mgL-1 acetate C, the resistance after 4 days reached a value of 6×1012m-1. At 100Lm-2h-1 flux under the same conditions, the resistance was 5×1013m-1. No correlation of biofilm resistance to biofilm thickness was found; Biofilms with similar thickness could have different resistance depending on the applied flux. The cell number in biofilms was between 4×107 and 5×108 cellscm-2. At this number, bacterial cells make up less than a half percent of the overall biofilm volume and therefore did not hamper the water flow through the biofilm significantly. A flux of 100Lm-2h-1 with nutrient supply caused higher cell numbers, more biomass, and higher biofilm resistance than a flux of 20Lm-2h-1. However, the biofilm thickness

  12. Meningococcal biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappann, M.; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Claus, H.

    2006-01-01

    We show that in a standardized in vitro flow system unencapsulated variants of genetically diverse lineages of Neisseria meningitidis formed biofilms, that could be maintained for more than 96 h. Biofilm cells were resistant to penicillin, but not to rifampin or ciprofloxacin. For some strains......, microcolony formation within biofilms was observed. Microcolony formation in strain MC58 depended on a functional copy of the pilE gene encoding the pilus subunit pilin, and was associated with twitching of cells. Nevertheless, unpiliated pilE mutants formed biofilms showing that attachment and accumulation......X alleles was identified among genetically diverse meningococcal strains. PilX alleles differed in their propensity to support autoaggregation of cells in suspension, but not in their ability to support microcolony formation within biofilms in the continuous flow system....

  13. Meningococcal biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappann, M.; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Claus, H.

    2006-01-01

    We show that in a standardized in vitro flow system unencapsulated variants of genetically diverse lineages of Neisseria meningitidis formed biofilms, that could be maintained for more than 96 h. Biofilm cells were resistant to penicillin, but not to rifampin or ciprofloxacin. For some strains......, microcolony formation within biofilms was observed. Microcolony formation in strain MC58 depended on a functional copy of the pilE gene encoding the pilus subunit pilin, and was associated with twitching of cells. Nevertheless, unpiliated pilE mutants formed biofilms showing that attachment and accumulation......X alleles was identified among genetically diverse meningococcal strains. PilX alleles differed in their propensity to support autoaggregation of cells in suspension, but not in their ability to support microcolony formation within biofilms in the continuous flow system....

  14. Biofilm Cohesive Strength as a Basis for Biofilm Recalcitrance: Are Bacterial Biofilms Overdesigned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Srijan; Stewart, Philip S; Hozalski, Raymond M

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are highly resistant to common antibacterial treatments, and several physiological explanations have been offered to explain the recalcitrant nature of bacterial biofilms. Herein, a biophysical aspect of biofilm recalcitrance is being reported on. While engineering structures are often overdesigned with a factor of safety (FOS) usually under 10, experimental measurements of biofilm cohesive strength suggest that the FOS is on the order of thousands. In other words, bacterial biofilms appear to be designed to withstand extreme forces rather than typical or average loads. In scenarios requiring the removal or control of unwanted biofilms, this emphasizes the importance of considering strategies for structurally weakening the biofilms in conjunction with bacterial inactivation.

  15. Genomic determinants of organohalide-respiration in Geobacter lovleyi, an unusual member of the Geobacteraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Darlene D

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geobacter lovleyi is a unique member of the Geobacteraceae because strains of this species share the ability to couple tetrachloroethene (PCE reductive dechlorination to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE with energy conservation and growth (i.e., organohalide respiration. Strain SZ also reduces U(VI to U(IV and contributes to uranium immobilization, making G. lovleyi relevant for bioremediation at sites impacted with chlorinated ethenes and radionuclides. G. lovleyi is the only fully sequenced representative of this distinct Geobacter clade, and comparative genome analyses identified genetic elements associated with organohalide respiration and elucidated genome features that distinguish strain SZ from other members of the Geobacteraceae. Results Sequencing the G. lovleyi strain SZ genome revealed a 3.9 Mbp chromosome with 54.7% GC content (i.e., the percent of the total guanines (Gs and cytosines (Cs among the four bases within the genome, and average amino acid identities of 53–56% compared to other sequenced Geobacter spp. Sequencing also revealed the presence of a 77 kbp plasmid, pSZ77 (53.0% GC, with nearly half of its encoded genes corresponding to chromosomal homologs in other Geobacteraceae genomes. Among these chromosome-derived features, pSZ77 encodes 15 out of the 24 genes required for de novo cobalamin biosynthesis, a required cofactor for organohalide respiration. A plasmid with 99% sequence identity to pSZ77 was subsequently detected in the PCE-dechlorinating G. lovleyi strain KB-1 present in the PCE-to-ethene-dechlorinating consortium KB-1. Additional PCE-to-cis-DCE-dechlorinating G. lovleyi strains obtained from the PCE-contaminated Fort Lewis, WA, site did not carry a plasmid indicating that pSZ77 is not a requirement (marker for PCE respiration within this species. Chromosomal genomic islands found within the G. lovleyi strain SZ genome encode two reductive dehalogenase (RDase homologs and a putative

  16. N2-dependent growth and nitrogenase activity in the metal-metabolizing bacteria, Geobacter and Magnetospirillum species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazylinski, D.A.; Dean, A.J.; Schuler, D.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Lovley, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    Cells of Geobacter metallireducens, Magnetospirillum strain AMB-1, Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum and Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense showed N2-dependent growth, the first anaerobically with Fe(lll) as the electron acceptor, and the latter three species micro-aerobically in semi-solid oxygen gradient cultures. Cells of the Magnetospirillum species grown with N2 under microaerobic conditions were magnetotactic and therefore produced magnetosomes. Cells of Geobacter metallireducens reduced acetylene to ethylene (11.5 ?? 5.9nmol C2H4 produced min-1 mg-1 cell protein) while growing with Fe(lll) as the electron acceptor in anaerobic growth medium lacking a fixed nitrogen source. Cells of the Magnetospirillum species, grown in a semi-solid oxygen gradient medium, also reduced acetylene at comparable rates. Uncut chromosomal and fragments from endonuclease-digested chromosomal DNA from these species, as well as Geobacter sulphurreducens organisms, hybridized with a nifHDK probe from Rhodospirillum rubrum, indicating the presence of these nitrogenase structural genes in these organisms. The evidence presented here shows that members of the metal-metabolizing genera, Geobacter and Magnetospirillum, fix atmospheric dinitrogen.

  17. Pyrosequencing reveals a core community of anodic bacterial biofilms in bioelectrochemical systems from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong eXiao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs are promising technologies for energy and product recovery coupled with wastewater treatment, and the core microbial community in electrochemically active biofilm in BESs remains controversy. In the present study, 7 anodic communities from 6 bioelectrochemical systems in 4 labs in southeast, north and south-central of China are explored by 454 pyrosequencing. A total of 251,225 effective sequences are obtained for 7 electrochemically active biofilm samples at 3% cutoff level. While Alpha-, Beta- and Gamma-proteobacteria are the most abundant classes (averaging 16.0-17.7%, Bacteroidia and Clostridia are the two sub-dominant and commonly shared classes. Six commonly shared genera i.e. Azospira, Azospirillum, Acinetobacter, Bacteroides, Geobacter, Pseudomonas and Rhodopseudomonas dominate the electrochemically active communities and are defined as core genera. A total of 25 OTUs with average relative abundance >0.5% were selected and designated as core OTUs, and some species relating to these OTUs have been reported electrochemically active. Furthermore, cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry tests show that two strains from Acinetobacter guillouiae and Stappia indica, bacteria relate to two core OTUs, are electrochemically active. Using randomly selected bioelectrochemical systems, the study presented extremely diverse bacterial communities in anodic biofilms, though, we still can suggest some potential microbes for investigating the electrochemical mechanisms in bioelectrochemical systems.

  18. Genomic and microarray analysis of aromatics degradation in Geobacter metallireducens and comparison to a Geobacter isolate from a contaminated field site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jizhong

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Groundwater and subsurface environments contaminated with aromatic compounds can be remediated in situ by Geobacter species that couple oxidation of these compounds to reduction of Fe(III-oxides. Geobacter metallireducens metabolizes many aromatic compounds, but the enzymes involved are not well known. Results The complete G. metallireducens genome contained a 300 kb island predicted to encode enzymes for the degradation of phenol, p-cresol, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 4-hydroxybenzoate, benzyl alcohol, benzaldehyde, and benzoate. Toluene degradation genes were encoded in a separate region. None of these genes was found in closely related species that cannot degrade aromatic compounds. Abundant transposons and phage-like genes in the island suggest mobility, but nucleotide composition and lack of synteny with other species do not suggest a recent transfer. The inferred degradation pathways are similar to those in species that anaerobically oxidize aromatic compounds with nitrate as an electron acceptor. In these pathways the aromatic compounds are converted to benzoyl-CoA and then to 3-hydroxypimelyl-CoA. However, in G. metallireducens there were no genes for the energetically-expensive dearomatizing enzyme. Whole-genome changes in transcript levels were identified in cells oxidizing benzoate. These supported the predicted pathway, identified induced fatty-acid oxidation genes, and identified an apparent shift in the TCA cycle to a putative ATP-yielding succinyl-CoA synthase. Paralogs to several genes in the pathway were also induced, as were several putative molybdo-proteins. Comparison of the aromatics degradation pathway genes to the genome of an isolate from a contaminated field site showed very similar content, and suggested this strain degrades many of the same compounds. This strain also lacked a classical dearomatizing enzyme, but contained two copies of an eight-gene cluster encoding redox proteins that was 30-fold

  19. Compaction and relaxation of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, R.

    2015-06-18

    Operation of membrane systems for water treatment can be seriously hampered by biofouling. A better characterization of biofilms in membrane systems and their impact on membrane performance may help to develop effective biofouling control strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence, extent and timescale of biofilm compaction and relaxation (decompaction), caused by permeate flux variations. The impact of permeate flux changes on biofilm thickness, structure and stiffness was investigated in situ and non-destructively with optical coherence tomography using membrane fouling monitors operated at a constant crossflow velocity of 0.1 m s−1 with permeate production. The permeate flux was varied sequentially from 20 to 60 and back to 20 L m−2 h−1. The study showed that the average biofilm thickness on the membrane decreased after elevating the permeate flux from 20 to 60 L m−2 h−1 while the biofilm thickness increased again after restoring the original flux of 20 L m−2 h−1, indicating the occurrence of biofilm compaction and relaxation. Within a few seconds after the flux change, the biofilm thickness was changed and stabilized, biofilm compaction occurred faster than the relaxation after restoring the original permeate flux. The initial biofilm parameters were not fully reinstated: the biofilm thickness was reduced by 21%, biofilm stiffness had increased and the hydraulic biofilm resistance was elevated by 16%. Biofilm thickness was related to the hydraulic biofilm resistance. Membrane performance losses are related to the biofilm thickness, density and morphology, which are influenced by (variations in) hydraulic conditions. A (temporarily) permeate flux increase caused biofilm compaction, together with membrane performance losses. The impact of biofilms on membrane performance can be influenced (increased and reduced) by operational parameters. The article shows that a (temporary) pressure increase leads to more

  20. Biofilm in wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpaul, Kumal

    2015-03-01

    A biofilm can be described as a microbial colony encased in a polysaccharide matrix which can become attached to a wound surface. This can affect the healing potential of chronic wounds due to the production of destructive enzymes and toxins which can promote a chronic inflammatory state within the wound. Biofilms can be polymicrobial and can result in delayed wound healing and chronic wound infection resistant to antibiotics, leading to prolonged hospitalisation for some patients. There appears to be a correlation between biofilms and non-healing in chronic wounds. It is suggested that biofilms are a major player in the chronicity of wounds. They are a complex concept to diagnose and management needs to be multifactorial.

  1. Interactions in multispecies biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burmølle, Mette; Ren, Dawei; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The recent focus on complex bacterial communities has led to the recognition of interactions across species boundaries. This is particularly pronounced in multispecies biofilms, where synergistic interactions impact the bacterial distribution and overall biomass produced. Importantly, in a number...

  2. Biofilms in chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Garth A; Swogger, Ellen; Wolcott, Randall; Pulcini, Elinor deLancey; Secor, Patrick; Sestrich, Jennifer; Costerton, John W; Stewart, Philip S

    2008-01-01

    Chronic wounds including diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers, and venous leg ulcers are a worldwide health problem. It has been speculated that bacteria colonizing chronic wounds exist as highly persistent biofilm communities. This research examined chronic and acute wounds for biofilms and characterized microorganisms inhabiting these wounds. Chronic wound specimens were obtained from 77 subjects and acute wound specimens were obtained from 16 subjects. Culture data were collected using standard clinical techniques. Light and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to analyze 50 of the chronic wound specimens and the 16 acute wound specimens. Molecular analyses were performed on the remaining 27 chronic wound specimens using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequence analysis. Of the 50 chronic wound specimens evaluated by microscopy, 30 were characterized as containing biofilm (60%), whereas only one of the 16 acute wound specimens was characterized as containing biofilm (6%). This was a statistically significant difference (p<0.001). Molecular analyses of chronic wound specimens revealed diverse polymicrobial communities and the presence of bacteria, including strictly anaerobic bacteria, not revealed by culture. Bacterial biofilm prevalence in specimens from chronic wounds relative to acute wounds observed in this study provides evidence that biofilms may be abundant in chronic wounds.

  3. Bacteriophages and Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, David R.; Parracho, Helena M. R. T.; Walker, James; Sharp, Richard; Hughes, Gavin; Werthén, Maria; Lehman, Susan; Morales, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are an extremely common adaptation, allowing bacteria to colonize hostile environments. They present unique problems for antibiotics and biocides, both due to the nature of the extracellular matrix and to the presence within the biofilm of metabolically inactive persister cells. Such chemicals can be highly effective against planktonic bacterial cells, while being essentially ineffective against biofilms. By contrast, bacteriophages seem to have a greater ability to target this common form of bacterial growth. The high numbers of bacteria present within biofilms actually facilitate the action of bacteriophages by allowing rapid and efficient infection of the host and consequent amplification of the bacteriophage. Bacteriophages also have a number of properties that make biofilms susceptible to their action. They are known to produce (or to be able to induce) enzymes that degrade the extracellular matrix. They are also able to infect persister cells, remaining dormant within them, but re-activating when they become metabolically active. Some cultured biofilms also seem better able to support the replication of bacteriophages than comparable planktonic systems. It is perhaps unsurprising that bacteriophages, as the natural predators of bacteria, have the ability to target this common form of bacterial life.

  4. Bacteriophages and Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Harper

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are an extremely common adaptation, allowing bacteria to colonize hostile environments. They present unique problems for antibiotics and biocides, both due to the nature of the extracellular matrix and to the presence within the biofilm of metabolically inactive persister cells. Such chemicals can be highly effective against planktonic bacterial cells, while being essentially ineffective against biofilms. By contrast, bacteriophages seem to have a greater ability to target this common form of bacterial growth. The high numbers of bacteria present within biofilms actually facilitate the action of bacteriophages by allowing rapid and efficient infection of the host and consequent amplification of the bacteriophage. Bacteriophages also have a number of properties that make biofilms susceptible to their action. They are known to produce (or to be able to induce enzymes that degrade the extracellular matrix. They are also able to infect persister cells, remaining dormant within them, but re-activating when they become metabolically active. Some cultured biofilms also seem better able to support the replication of bacteriophages than comparable planktonic systems. It is perhaps unsurprising that bacteriophages, as the natural predators of bacteria, have the ability to target this common form of bacterial life.

  5. Three paths to reduce ferric oxides taken by Geobacter metallireducens%Geobacter metallireducens异化还原铁氧化物三种方式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯雅丽; 周良; 祝学远; 连静; 李少华

    2006-01-01

    异化金属还原菌通过络和剂、电子传递中间体、直接接触三种方式异化还原金属氧化矿.以Geobacter metallireducens还原铁氧化物为实验体系,利用微生物燃料电池考察了以上三种方式对异化还原铁氧化物的影响.结果表明,微生物异化还原铁氧化矿时,NTA,AQDS在初始阶段显著加速铁氧化物的还原,但也加速磁铁矿的生成,阻碍反应继续进行;直接接触方式起着重要作用,吸附形成的生物膜是一个关键因素,其形成是一个相对较长的过程.生物膜的形成阻碍电子传递中间体发挥作用.

  6. Biofilms and the food industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathanon Trachoo

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available In the past, interest in biofilms was limited to research related to water distribution systems, waste water treatment and dental plaques. Biofilm has become a more popular research topic in many other areas in recent years including food safety. Biofilm formation can compromise the sanitation of food surfaces and environmental surfaces by spreading detached organisms to other areas of processing plants. Unfortunately, these detached organisms are not similar to normal microorganisms suspended in an aquatic environment but are more resistant to several stresses or microbial inactivation including some food preservation methods. Microstructures of biofilms as revealed by different types of microscopic techniques showed that biofilms are highly complex and consist of many symbiotic organisms, some of which are human pathogens. This article reviewed the process of biofilm formation, the significance of biofilms on food or food contact surfaces, their ability to protect foodborne pathogens from environmental stresses and recent methods for the study of biofilms on food contact surfaces.

  7. Geobacter Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derek Lovley; Maddalena Coppi; Stacy Ciufo; Barbara Methe; Pablo, Pomposiello; Steve Sandler; Cinthia Nunez; Daniel Bond; Susan Childers; Carol Giometti; Julia Krushkal; Christophe Shilling; Bernard Palsson

    2004-03-17

    Analysis of the Genetic Potential and Gene Expression of Microbial Communities Involved in the In Situ Bioremediation of Uranium and Harvesting Electrical Energy from Organic Matter The primary goal of this research is to develop conceptual and computational models that can describe the functioning of complex microbial communities involved in microbial processes of interest to the Department of Energy. Microbial Communities to be Investigated: (1) Microbial community associated with the in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater; and (2) Microbial community that is capable of harvesting energy from waste organic matter in the form of electricity.

  8. Biofilms in wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, R A; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, M

    2014-01-01

    Following confirmation of the presence of biofilms in chronic wounds, the term biofilm became a buzzword within the wound healing community. For more than a century pathogens have been successfully isolated and identified from wound specimens using techniques that were devised in the nineteenth...... extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Cells within such aggregations (or biofilms) display varying physiological and metabolic properties that are distinct from those of planktonic cells, and which contribute to their persistence. There are many factors that influence healing in wounds and the discovery...... century by Louis Pasteur and Robert Koch. Although this approach still provides valuable information with which to help diagnose acute infections and to select appropriate antibiotic therapies, it is evident that those organisms isolated from clinical specimens with the conditions normally used...

  9. Manipulation of Biofilm Microbial Ecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.C.; Palmer, R.J., Jr.; Zinn, M.; Smith, C.A.; Burkhalter, R.; Macnaughton, S.J.; Whitaker, K.W.; Kirkegaard, R.D.

    1998-08-15

    The biofilm mode of growth provides such significant advantages to the members of the consortium that most organisms in important habitats are found in biofilms. The study of factors that allow manipulation of biofilm microbes in the biofilm growth state requires that reproducible biofilms be generated. The most effective monitoring of biofilm formation, succession and desaturation is with on-line monitoring of microbial biofilms with flowcell for direct observation. The biofilm growth state incorporates a second important factor, the heterogeneity in distribution in time and space of the component members of the biofilm consortium. This heterogeneity is reflected not only in the cellular distribution but in the metabolic activity within a population of cells. Activity and cellular distribution can be mapped in four dimensions with confocal microscopy, and function can be ascertained by genetically manipulated reporter functions for specific genes or by vital stains. The methodology for understanding the microbial ecology of biofilms is now much more readily available and the capacity to manipulate biofilms is becoming an important feature of biotechnology.

  10. Critical review on biofilm methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeredo, Joana; Azevedo, Nuno F; Briandet, Romain; Cerca, Nuno; Coenye, Tom; Costa, Ana Rita; Desvaux, Mickaël; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni; Hébraud, Michel; Jaglic, Zoran; Kačániová, Miroslava; Knøchel, Susanne; Lourenço, Anália; Mergulhão, Filipe; Meyer, Rikke Louise; Nychas, George; Simões, Manuel; Tresse, Odile; Sternberg, Claus

    2017-05-01

    Biofilms are widespread in nature and constitute an important strategy implemented by microorganisms to survive in sometimes harsh environmental conditions. They can be beneficial or have a negative impact particularly when formed in industrial settings or on medical devices. As such, research into the formation and elimination of biofilms is important for many disciplines. Several new methodologies have been recently developed for, or adapted to, biofilm studies that have contributed to deeper knowledge on biofilm physiology, structure and composition. In this review, traditional and cutting-edge methods to study biofilm biomass, viability, structure, composition and physiology are addressed. Moreover, as there is a lack of consensus among the diversity of techniques used to grow and study biofilms. This review intends to remedy this, by giving a critical perspective, highlighting the advantages and limitations of several methods. Accordingly, this review aims at helping scientists in finding the most appropriate and up-to-date methods to study their biofilms.

  11. Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria can attach to any surface in contact with water and proliferate into complex communities enclosed in an adhesive matrix, these communities are called biofilms. The matrix makes the biofilm difficult to remove by physical means, and bacteria in biofilm can survive treatment with many...... antibiotics, disinfectants and cleaning agents. Biofilms are therefore very difficult to eradicate, and an attractive approach to limit biofilm formation is to reduce bacterial adhesion. In this thesis it was shown that lowering the surface roughness had a greater effect on bacterial retention compared....... The ability to form biofilms, the amount of eDNA produced, and the importance of eDNA for biofilm formation or stability did not correlate and varied from strain to strain. Finally, a method was developed for immobilization of living bacteria for analysis by atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM is used...

  12. Microbial Biofilms and Chronic Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Amin; Wright, J. Barry; Schultz, Gregory; Burrell, Robert; Nadworny, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Background is provided on biofilms, including their formation, tolerance mechanisms, structure, and morphology within the context of chronic wounds. The features of biofilms in chronic wounds are discussed in detail, as is the impact of biofilm on wound chronicity. Difficulties associated with the use of standard susceptibility tests (minimum inhibitory concentrations or MICs) to determine appropriate treatment regimens for, or develop new treatments for use in, chronic wounds are discussed, with alternate test methods specific to biofilms being recommended. Animal models appropriate for evaluating biofilm treatments are also described. Current and potential future therapies for treatment of biofilm-containing chronic wounds, including probiotic therapy, virulence attenuation, biofilm phenotype expression attenuation, immune response suppression, and aggressive debridement combined with antimicrobial dressings, are described. PMID:28272369

  13. Expression of acetate permease-like (apl) genes in subsurface communities of Geobacter species under fluctuating acetate concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elifantz, H.; N' Guessan, L.A.; Mouser, P.J.; Williams, K H.; Wilkins, M J.; Risso, C.; Holmes, D.E.; Long, P.E.; Lovley, D.R.

    2010-03-01

    The addition of acetate to uranium-contaminated aquifers in order to stimulate the growth and activity of Geobacter species that reduce uranium is a promising in situ bioremediation option. Optimizing this bioremediation strategy requires that sufficient acetate be added to promote Geobacter species growth. We hypothesized that under acetate-limiting conditions, subsurface Geobacter species would increase the expression of either putative acetate symporters genes (aplI and aplII). Acetate was added to a uranium-contaminated aquifer (Rifle, CO) in two continuous amendments separated by 5 days of groundwater flush to create changing acetate concentrations. While the expression of aplI in monitoring well D04 (high acetate) weakly correlated with the acetate concentration over time, the transcript levels for this gene were relatively constant in well D08 (low acetate). At the lowest acetate concentrations during the groundwater flush, the transcript levels of aplII were the highest. The expression of aplII decreased 2-10-fold upon acetate reintroduction. However, the overall instability of acetate concentrations throughout the experiment could not support a robust conclusion regarding the role of apl genes in response to acetate limitation under field conditions, in contrast to previous chemostat studies, suggesting that the function of a microbial community cannot be inferred based on lab experiments alone.

  14. Biofilm roughness determines Cryptosporidium parvum retention in environmental biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCesare, E A Wolyniak; Hargreaves, B R; Jellison, K L

    2012-06-01

    The genus Cryptosporidium is a group of waterborne protozoan parasites that have been implicated in significant outbreaks of gastrointestinal infections throughout the world. Biofilms trap these pathogens and can contaminate water supplies through subsequent release. Biofilm microbial assemblages were collected seasonally from three streams in eastern Pennsylvania and used to grow biofilms in laboratory microcosms. Daily oocyst counts in the influx and efflux flow allowed the calculation of daily oocyst retention in the biofilm. Following the removal of oocysts from the influx water, oocyst attachment to the biofilm declined to an equilibrium state within 5 days that was sustained for at least 25 days. Varying the oocyst loading rate for the system showed that biofilm retention could be saturated, suggesting that discrete binding sites determined the maximum number of oocysts retained. Oocyst retention varied seasonally but was consistent across all three sites; however, seasonal oocyst retention was not consistent across years at the same site. No correlation between oocyst attachment and any measured water quality parameter was found. However, oocyst retention was strongly correlated with biofilm surface roughness and roughness varied among seasons and across years. We hypothesize that biofilm roughness and oocyst retention are dependent on environmentally driven changes in the biofilm community rather than directly on water quality conditions. It is important to understand oocyst transport dynamics to reduce risks of human infection. Better understanding of factors controlling biofilm retention of oocysts should improve our understanding of oocyst transport at different scales.

  15. The Root Canal Biofilm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluis, van der L.W.M.; Boutsioukis, C.; Jiang, L.M.; Macedo, R.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; Chávez de Paz, E.; Sedgley, C.M.; Kishen, A.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of root canal irrigation are the chemical dissolution or disruption and the mechanical detachment of pulp tissue, dentin debris and smear layer (instrumentation products), microorganisms (planktonic or biofilm), and their products from the root canal wall, their removal out of the root cana

  16. Strategies for combating bacterial biofilm infections

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong Wu Claus Moser Heng-Zhuang Wang Niels Hoiby Zhi-Jun Song

    2015-01-01

    .... Under the protection of biofilm, microbial cells in biofilm become tolerant and resistant to antibiotics and the immune responses, which increases the difficulties for the clinical treatment of biofilm infections...

  17. Development of a biomarker for Geobacter activity and strain composition; Proteogenomic analysis of the citrate synthase protein during bioremediation of U(VI).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Miletto, Marzia; Williams, Kenneth H.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Lovely, Derek R.; Long, Philip E.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring the activity of target microorganisms during stimulated bioremediation is a key problem for the development of effective remediation strategies. At the U.S. Department of Energy’s Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, CO, the stimulation of Geobacter growth and activity via subsurface acetate addition leads to precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater as U(IV). Citrate synthase (gltA) is a key enzyme in Geobacter central metabolism that controls flux into the TCA cycle. Here, we utilize shotgun proteomic methods to demonstrate that the measurement of gltA peptides can be used to track Geobacter activity and strain evolution during in situ biostimulation. Abundances of conserved gltA peptides tracked Fe(III) reduction and changes in U(VI) concentrations during biostimulation, whereas changing patterns of unique peptide abundances between samples suggested sample-specific strain shifts within the Geobacter population. Abundances of unique peptides indicated potential differences at the strain level between Fe(III)-reducing populations stimulated during in situ biostimulation experiments conducted a year apart at the Rifle IFRC. These results offer a novel technique for the rapid screening of large numbers of proteomic samples for Geobacter species and will aid monitoring of subsurface bioremediation efforts that rely on metal reduction for desired outcomes.

  18. Motile Geobacter dechlorinators migrate into a model source zone of trichloroethene dense non-aqueous phase liquid: Experimental evaluation and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Jo; Miroshnikov, Alexey; Haest, Pieter Jan; Springael, Dirk; Smolders, Erik

    2014-12-01

    Microbial migration towards a trichloroethene (TCE) dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) could facilitate the bioaugmentation of TCE DNAPL source zones. This study characterized the motility of the Geobacter dechlorinators in a TCE to cis-dichloroethene dechlorinating KB-1™ subculture. No chemotaxis towards or away from TCE was found using an agarose in-plug bridge method. A second experiment placed an inoculated aqueous layer on top of a sterile sand layer and showed that Geobacter migrated several centimeters in the sand layer in just 7 days. A random motility coefficient for Geobacter in water of 0.24 ± 0.02 cm2·day- 1 was fitted. A third experiment used a diffusion-cell setup with a 5.5 cm central sand layer separating a DNAPL from an aqueous top layer as a model source zone to examine the effect of random motility on TCE DNAPL dissolution. With top layer inoculation, Geobacter quickly colonized the sand layer, thereby enhancing the initial TCE DNAPL dissolution flux. After 19 days, the DNAPL dissolution enhancement was only 24% lower than with an homogenous inoculation of the sand layer. A diffusion-motility model was developed to describe dechlorination and migration in the diffusion-cells. This model suggested that the fast colonization of the sand layer by Geobacter was due to the combination of random motility and growth on TCE.

  19. Development of a biomarker for Geobacter activity and strain composition; proteogenomic analysis of the citrate synthase protein during bioremediation of U(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Michael J; Callister, Stephen J; Miletto, Marzia; Williams, Kenneth H; Nicora, Carrie D; Lovley, Derek R; Long, Philip E; Lipton, Mary S

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring the activity of target microorganisms during stimulated bioremediation is a key problem for the development of effective remediation strategies. At the US Department of Energy's Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, CO, the stimulation of Geobacter growth and activity via subsurface acetate addition leads to precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater as U(IV). Citrate synthase (gltA) is a key enzyme in Geobacter central metabolism that controls flux into the TCA cycle. Here, we utilize shotgun proteomic methods to demonstrate that the measurement of gltA peptides can be used to track Geobacter activity and strain evolution during in situ biostimulation. Abundances of conserved gltA peptides tracked Fe(III) reduction and changes in U(VI) concentrations during biostimulation, whereas changing patterns of unique peptide abundances between samples suggested sample-specific strain shifts within the Geobacter population. Abundances of unique peptides indicated potential differences at the strain level between Fe(III)-reducing populations stimulated during in situ biostimulation experiments conducted a year apart at the Rifle IFRC. These results offer a novel technique for the rapid screening of large numbers of proteomic samples for Geobacter species and will aid monitoring of subsurface bioremediation efforts that rely on metal reduction for desired outcomes.

  20. Development of a biomarker for Geobacter activity and strain composition: Proteogenomic analysis of the citrate synthase protein during bioremediation of U(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkins, M.J.; Callister, S.J.; Miletto, M.; Williams, K.H.; Nicora, C.D.; Lovley, D.R.; Long, P.E.; Lipton, M.S.

    2010-02-15

    Monitoring the activity of target microorganisms during stimulated bioremediation is a key problem for the development of effective remediation strategies. At the US Department of Energy's Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, CO, the stimulation of Geobacter growth and activity via subsurface acetate addition leads to precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater as U(IV). Citrate synthase (gltA) is a key enzyme in Geobacter central metabolism that controls flux into the TCA cycle. Here, we utilize shotgun proteomic methods to demonstrate that the measurement of gltA peptides can be used to track Geobacter activity and strain evolution during in situ biostimulation. Abundances of conserved gltA peptides tracked Fe(III) reduction and changes in U(VI) concentrations during biostimulation, whereas changing patterns of unique peptide abundances between samples suggested sample-specific strain shifts within the Geobacter population. Abundances of unique peptides indicated potential differences at the strain level between Fe(III)-reducing populations stimulated during in situ biostimulation experiments conducted a year apart at the Rifle IFRC. These results offer a novel technique for the rapid screening of large numbers of proteomic samples for Geobacter species and will aid monitoring of subsurface bioremediation efforts that rely on metal reduction for desired outcomes.

  1. Nanowires, Capacitors, and Other Novel Outer-Surface Components Involved in Electron Transfer to Fe(III) Oxides in Geobacter Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovley, Derek, R.

    2008-12-22

    The overall goal of this project was to better understand the mechanisms by which Geobacter species transfer electrons outside the cell onto Fe(III) oxides. The rationale for this study was that Geobacter species are often the predominant microorganisms involved in in situ uranium bioremediation and the growth and activity of the Geobacter species during bioremediation is primarily supported by electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides. These studies greatly expanded the understanding of electron transfer to Fe(III). Novel concepts developed included the potential role of microbial nanowires for long range electron transfer in Geobacter species and the importance of extracytoplasmic cytochromes functioning as capacitors to permit continued electron transfer during the hunt for Fe(III) oxide. Furthermore, these studies provided target sequences that were then used in other studies to tract the activity of Geobacter species in the subsurface through monitoring the abundance of gene transcripts of the target genes. A brief summary of the major accomplishments of the project is provided.

  2. New Technologies for Studying Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Michael J; Chang, Connie; Akiyama, Tatsuya; Bothner, Brian

    2015-08-01

    Bacteria have traditionally been studied as single-cell organisms. In laboratory settings, aerobic bacteria are usually cultured in aerated flasks, where the cells are considered essentially homogenous. However, in many natural environments, bacteria and other microorganisms grow in mixed communities, often associated with surfaces. Biofilms are comprised of surface-associated microorganisms, their extracellular matrix material, and environmental chemicals that have adsorbed to the bacteria or their matrix material. While this definition of a biofilm is fairly simple, biofilms are complex and dynamic. Our understanding of the activities of individual biofilm cells and whole biofilm systems has developed rapidly, due in part to advances in molecular, analytical, and imaging tools and the miniaturization of tools designed to characterize biofilms at the enzyme level, cellular level, and systems level.

  3. Critical review on biofilm methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azeredo, Joana; F. Azevedo, Nuno; Briandet, Romain;

    2017-01-01

    into the formation and elimination of biofilms is important for many disciplines. Several new methodologies have been recently developed for, or adapted to, biofilm studies that have contributed to deeper knowledge on biofilm physiology, structure and composition. In this review, traditional and cutting-edge methods...... to study biofilm biomass, viability, structure, composition and physiology are addressed. Moreover, as there is a lack of consensus among the diversity of techniques used to grow and study biofilms. This review intends to remedy this, by giving a critical perspective, highlighting the advantages...... and limitations of several methods. Accordingly, this review aims at helping scientists in finding the most appropriate and up-to-date methods to study their biofilms....

  4. Biofilm susceptibility to metal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Joe J; Ceri, Howard; Stremick, Carol A; Turner, Raymond J

    2004-12-01

    This study compared bacterial biofilm and planktonic cell susceptibility to metal toxicity by evaluating the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), the planktonic minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC), and minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) using the MBEC device. In total, 17 metal cations and oxyanions, chosen to represent groups VIB to VIA of the periodic table, were each tested on biofilm and planktonic cultures of Escherichia coli JM109, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853. In contrast to control antibiotic assays, where biofilm cultures were 2 to 64 times less susceptible to killing than logarithmically growing planktonic bacteria, metal compounds killed planktonic and biofilm cultures at the same concentration in the vast majority of combinations. Our data indicate that, under the conditions reported, growth in a biofilm does not provide resistance to bacteria against killing by metal cations or oxyanions.

  5. Biofilms: a developing microscopic community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivera Sandra Patricia

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are microbial communities composed by different microbiota embebbed in a special adaptive environment. These communities show different characteristics such as heterogeneity, diversity in microenvironments, capacity to resist antimicrobial therapy and ability to allow bacterial communication. These characteristics convert them in complex organizations that are difficult to eradicate in their own environment. In the man, biofilms are associated to a great number of slow-development infectious processes which greatly difficulties their eradication. In the industry and environment, biofilms are centered in processes known as biofouling and bioremediation. The former is the contamination of a system due to the microbial activity of a biofilm. The latter uses biofilms to improve the conditions of a contaminated system. The study of biofilms is a new and exciting field which is constantly evolving and whose implications in medicine and industry would have important repercussions for the humankind.

  6. Critical review on biofilm methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azeredo, Joana; F. Azevedo, Nuno; Briandet, Romain;

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms are widespread in nature and constitute an important strategy implemented by microorganisms to survive in sometimes harsh environmental conditions. They can be beneficial or have a negative impact particularly when formed in industrial settings or on medical devices. As such, research...... into the formation and elimination of biofilms is important for many disciplines. Several new methodologies have been recently developed for, or adapted to, biofilm studies that have contributed to deeper knowledge on biofilm physiology, structure and composition. In this review, traditional and cutting-edge methods...... to study biofilm biomass, viability, structure, composition and physiology are addressed. Moreover, as there is a lack of consensus among the diversity of techniques used to grow and study biofilms. This review intends to remedy this, by giving a critical perspective, highlighting the advantages...

  7. Electrochemical biofilm control: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Sujala T; Babauta, Jerome T; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    One of the methods of controlling biofilms that has widely been discussed in the literature is to apply a potential or electrical current to a metal surface on which the biofilm is growing. Although electrochemical biofilm control has been studied for decades, the literature is often conflicting, as is detailed in this review. The goals of this review are: (1) to present the current status of knowledge regarding electrochemical biofilm control; (2) to establish a basis for a fundamental definition of electrochemical biofilm control and requirements for studying it; (3) to discuss current proposed mechanisms; and (4) to introduce future directions in the field. It is expected that the review will provide researchers with guidelines on comparing datasets across the literature and generating comparable datasets. The authors believe that, with the correct design, electrochemical biofilm control has great potential for industrial use.

  8. Geobacter strains that use alternate organic compounds, methods of making, and methods of use thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovley, Derek R.; Summers, Zarath Morgan; Haveman, Shelley Annette; Izallalen, Mounir

    2016-03-01

    In preferred embodiments, the present invention provides new isolated strains of a Geobacter species that are capable of using a carbon source that is selected from C.sub.3 to C.sub.12 organic compounds selected from pyruvate or metabolic precursors of pyruvate as an electron donor in metabolism and in subsequent energy production. The wild type strain of the microorganisms has been shown to be unable to use these C.sub.3 to C.sub.12 organic compounds as electron donors. The inventive strains of microorganisms are useful for improving bioremediation applications, including in situ bioremediation (including uranium bioremediation and halogenated solvent bioremediation), microbial fuel cells, power generation from small and large-scale waste facilities (e.g., biomass waste from dairy, agriculture, food processing, brewery, or vintner industries, etc.) using microbial fuel cells, and other applications of microbial fuel cells, including, but not limited to, improved electrical power supplies for environmental sensors, electronic devices, and electric vehicles.

  9. Geobacter strains that use alternate organic compounds, methods of making, and methods of use thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, Derek R; Summers, Zarath Morgan; Haveman, Shelley Annette; Izallalen, Mounir

    2013-12-03

    In preferred embodiments, the present invention provides new isolated strains of Geobacter species that are capable of using a carbon source that is selected from C.sub.3 to C.sub.12 organic compounds selected from pyruvate or metabolic precursors of pyruvate as an electron donor in metabolism and in subsequent energy production. In other aspects, other preferred embodiments of the present invention include methods of making such strains and methods of using such strains. In general, the wild type strain of the microorganisms has been shown to be unable to use these C.sub.3 to C.sub.12 organic compounds as electron donors in metabolic steps such as the reduction of metallic ions. The inventive strains of microorganisms are useful improving bioremediation applications, including in situ bioremediation (including uranium bioremediation and halogenated solvent bioremediation), microbial fuel cells, power generation from small and large-scale waste facilities (e.g., biomass waste from dairy, agriculture, food processing, brewery, or vintner industries, etc.) using microbial fuel cells, and other applications of microbial fuel cells, including, but not limited to, improved electrical power supplies for environmental sensors, electronic sensors, and electric vehicles.

  10. Understanding Biofilms in Chronic Sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajudeen, Bobby A; Schwartz, Joseph S; Palmer, James N

    2016-02-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a burdensome disease that has substantial individual and societal impact. Although great advances in medical and surgical therapies have been made, some patients continue to have recalcitrant infections. Microbial biofilms have been implicated as a cause of recalcitrant chronic sinusitis, and recent studies have tried to better understand the pathogenesis of chronic sinusitis as it relates to microbial biofilms. Here, we provide an overview of biofilms in chronic sinusitis with emphasis on pathogenesis, treatment, and future directions. In addition, recent evidence is presented, elucidating the role of bitter taste receptors as a possible key factor leading to biofilm formation.

  11. Initial development and structure of biofilms on microbial fuel cell anodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keller Jürg

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial fuel cells (MFCs rely on electrochemically active bacteria to capture the chemical energy contained in organics and convert it to electrical energy. Bacteria develop biofilms on the MFC electrodes, allowing considerable conversion capacity and opportunities for extracellular electron transfer (EET. The present knowledge on EET is centred around two Gram-negative models, i.e. Shewanella and Geobacter species, as it is believed that Gram-positives cannot perform EET by themselves as the Gram-negatives can. To understand how bacteria form biofilms within MFCs and how their development, structure and viability affects electron transfer, we performed pure and co-culture experiments. Results Biofilm viability was maintained highest nearer the anode during closed circuit operation (current flowing, in contrast to when the anode was in open circuit (soluble electron acceptor where viability was highest on top of the biofilm, furthest from the anode. Closed circuit anode Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were considerably thinner compared to the open circuit anode (30 ± 3 μm and 42 ± 3 μm respectively, which is likely due to the higher energetic gain of soluble electron acceptors used. The two Gram-positive bacteria used only provided a fraction of current produced by the Gram-negative organisms. Power output of co-cultures Gram-positive Enterococcus faecium and either Gram-negative organisms, increased by 30-70% relative to the single cultures. Over time the co-culture biofilms segregated, in particular, Pseudomonas aeruginosa creating towers piercing through a thin, uniform layer of Enterococcus faecium. P. aeruginosa and E. faecium together generated a current of 1.8 ± 0.4 mA while alone they produced 0.9 ± 0.01 and 0.2 ± 0.05 mA respectively. Conclusion We postulate that this segregation may be an essential difference in strategy for electron transfer and substrate capture between the Gram-negative and the Gram

  12. Biofilm and Dental Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Øilo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available All treatment involving the use of biomaterials in the body can affect the host in positive or negative ways. The microbiological environment in the oral cavity is affected by the composition and shape of the biomaterials used for oral restorations. This may impair the patients’ oral health and sometimes their general health as well. Many factors determine the composition of the microbiota and the formation of biofilm in relation to biomaterials such as, surface roughness, surface energy and chemical composition, This paper aims to give an overview of the scientific literature regarding the association between the chemical, mechanical and physical properties of dental biomaterials and oral biofilm formation, with emphasis on current research and future perspectives.

  13. G eobacter sp. SD-1 with enhanced electrochemical activity in high-salt concentration solutions

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Dan

    2014-07-16

    © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Summary: An isolate, designated strain SD-1, was obtained from a biofilm dominated by Geobacter sulfurreducens in a microbial fuel cell. The electrochemical activity of strain SD-1 was compared with type strains, G.sulfurreducensPCA and Geobacter metallireducensGS-15, and a mixed culture in microbial electrolysis cells. SD-1 produced a maximum current density of 290±29Am-3 in a high-concentration phosphate buffer solution (PBS-H, 200mM). This current density was significantly higher than that produced by the mixed culture (189±44Am-3) or the type strains (<70Am-3). In a highly saline water (SW; 50mM PBS and 650mM NaCl), current by SD-1 (158±4Am-3) was reduced by 28% compared with 50mM PBS (220±4Am-3), but it was still higher than that of the mixed culture (147±19Am-3), and strains PCA and GS-15 did not produce any current. Electrochemical tests showed that the improved performance of SD-1 was due to its lower charge transfer resistance and more negative potentials produced at higher current densities. These results show that the electrochemical activity of SD-1 was significantly different than other Geobacter strains and mixed cultures in terms of its salt tolerance.

  14. Biofilm architecture in a novel pressurized biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Xia, Siqing; Duan, Liang; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

    2015-01-01

    A novel pure-oxygen pressurized biofilm reactor was operated at different organic loading, mechanical shear and hydrodynamic conditions to understand the relationships between biofilm architecture and its operation. The ultimate goal was to improve the performance of the biofilm reactor. The biofilm was labeled with seven stains and observed with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Unusual biofilm architecture of a ribbon embedded between two surfaces with very few points of attachment was observed. As organic loading increased, the biofilm morphology changed from a moderately rough layer into a locally smoother biomass with significant bulging protuberances, although the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency remained unchanged at about 75%. At higher organic loadings, biofilms contained a larger fraction of active cells distributed uniformly within a proteinaceous matrix with decreasing polysaccharide content. Higher hydrodynamic shear in combination with high organic loading resulted in the collapse of biofilm structure and a substantial decrease in reactor performance (a COD removal of 16%). Moreover, the important role of proteins for the spatial distribution of active cells was demonstrated quantitatively.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms: recent developments in biofilm dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Jessica L; Horswill, Alexander R

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections and represents a significant burden on the healthcare system. S. aureus attachment to medical implants and host tissue, and the establishment of a mature biofilm, play an important role in the persistence of chronic infections. The formation of a biofilm, and encasement of cells in a polymer-based matrix, decreases the susceptibility to antimicrobials and immune defenses, making these infections difficult to eradicate. During infection, dispersal of cells from the biofilm can result in spread to secondary sites and worsening of the infection. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the pathways behind biofilm dispersal in S. aureus, with a focus on enzymatic and newly described broad-spectrum dispersal mechanisms. Additionally, we explore potential applications of dispersal in the treatment of biofilm-mediated infections.

  16. Stimulating the In Situ Activity of Geobacter Species to Remove Uranium from the Groundwater of a Uranium-Contaminated Aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, R. T.; Vrionis, Helen A.; Ortiz-Bernad, Irene; Resch, Charles T.; Long, Philip E.; Dayvault, R. D.; Karp, Ken; Marutzky, Sammy J.; Metzler, Donald R.; Peacock, Aaron D.; White, David C.; Lowe, Mary; Lovley, Derek R.

    2003-10-01

    The potential for removing uranium from contaminated groundwater by stimulating the in situ activity of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms was evaluated in a uranium-contaminated aquifer located in Rifle, Colo. Acetate (1 to 3 mM) was injected into the subsurface over a 3-month period via an injection gallery composed of 20 injection wells, which was installed upgradient from a series of 15 monitoring wells. U(VI) concentrations decreased in as little as 9 days after acetate injection was initiated, and within 50 days uranium had declined below the prescribed treatment level of 0.18 _M in some of the monitoring wells. Analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences and phospholipid fatty acid profiles demonstrated that the initial loss of uranium from the groundwater was associated with an enrichment of Geobacter species in the treatment zone. Fe(II) in the groundwater also increased during this period, suggesting that U(VI) reduction was coincident with Fe(III) reduction. As the acetate injection continued over 50 days there was a loss of sulfate from the groundwater and an accumulation of sulfide and the composition of the microbial community changed. Organisms with 16S rDNA sequences most closely related to those of sulfate reducers became predominant, and Geobacter species became a minor component of the community. This apparent switch from Fe(III) reduction to sulfate reduction as the terminal electron accepting process for the oxidation of the injected acetate was associated with an increase in uranium concentration in the groundwater. These results demonstrate that in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater is feasible but suggest that the strategy should be optimized to better maintain long-term activity of Geobacter species.

  17. Microbial ecology of phototrophic biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeselers, G.

    2007-01-01

    Biofilms are layered structures of microbial cells and an extracellular matrix of polymeric substances, associated with surfaces and interfaces. Biofilms trap nutrients for growth of the enclosed microbial community and help prevent detachment of cells from surfaces in flowing systems. Phototrophic

  18. Interaction of Nanoparticles with Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this work we have studied the interaction and adsorption of engineered nanoparticles such as TiO2, ZnO, CeO2 , and carbon nanotubes with biofilms. Biofilm is an extracellular polymeric substance coating comprised of living material and it is an aggregation of bacteria, algae, ...

  19. Microalgal biofilms for wastewater treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelee, N.C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to explore the possibilities of using microalgal biofilms for the treatment of municipal wastewater, with a focus on the post-treatment of municipal wastewater effluent. The potential of microalgal biofilms for wastewater treatment was first investigated using a scen

  20. Experimental evolution in biofilm populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenackers, Hans P; Parijs, Ilse; Foster, Kevin R; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2016-05-01

    Biofilms are a major form of microbial life in which cells form dense surface associated communities that can persist for many generations. The long-life of biofilm communities means that they can be strongly shaped by evolutionary processes. Here, we review the experimental study of evolution in biofilm communities. We first provide an overview of the different experimental models used to study biofilm evolution and their associated advantages and disadvantages. We then illustrate the vast amount of diversification observed during biofilm evolution, and we discuss (i) potential ecological and evolutionary processes behind the observed diversification, (ii) recent insights into the genetics of adaptive diversification, (iii) the striking degree of parallelism between evolution experiments and real-life biofilms and (iv) potential consequences of diversification. In the second part, we discuss the insights provided by evolution experiments in how biofilm growth and structure can promote cooperative phenotypes. Overall, our analysis points to an important role of biofilm diversification and cooperation in bacterial survival and productivity. Deeper understanding of both processes is of key importance to design improved antimicrobial strategies and diagnostic techniques.

  1. Critical review on biofilm methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azeredo, Joana; F. Azevedo, Nuno; Briandet, Romain

    2017-01-01

    to study biofilm biomass, viability, structure, composition and physiology are addressed. Moreover, as there is a lack of consensus among the diversity of techniques used to grow and study biofilms. This review intends to remedy this, by giving a critical perspective, highlighting the advantages...

  2. Experimental evolution in biofilm populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenackers, Hans P.; Parijs, Ilse; Foster, Kevin R.; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a major form of microbial life in which cells form dense surface associated communities that can persist for many generations. The long-life of biofilm communities means that they can be strongly shaped by evolutionary processes. Here, we review the experimental study of evolution in biofilm communities. We first provide an overview of the different experimental models used to study biofilm evolution and their associated advantages and disadvantages. We then illustrate the vast amount of diversification observed during biofilm evolution, and we discuss (i) potential ecological and evolutionary processes behind the observed diversification, (ii) recent insights into the genetics of adaptive diversification, (iii) the striking degree of parallelism between evolution experiments and real-life biofilms and (iv) potential consequences of diversification. In the second part, we discuss the insights provided by evolution experiments in how biofilm growth and structure can promote cooperative phenotypes. Overall, our analysis points to an important role of biofilm diversification and cooperation in bacterial survival and productivity. Deeper understanding of both processes is of key importance to design improved antimicrobial strategies and diagnostic techniques. PMID:26895713

  3. Microalgal biofilms for wastewater treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelee, N.C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to explore the possibilities of using microalgal biofilms for the treatment of municipal wastewater, with a focus on the post-treatment of municipal wastewater effluent. The potential of microalgal biofilms for wastewater treatment was first investigated using a scen

  4. Microbial ecology of phototrophic biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeselers, G.

    2007-01-01

    Biofilms are layered structures of microbial cells and an extracellular matrix of polymeric substances, associated with surfaces and interfaces. Biofilms trap nutrients for growth of the enclosed microbial community and help prevent detachment of cells from surfaces in flowing systems. Phototrophic

  5. A Description of an Acidophilic, Iron Reducer, Geobacter sp. FeAm09 Isolated from Tropical Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, O.; Souchek, J.; Heithoff, A.; LaMere, B.; Pan, D.; Hollis, G.; Yang, W. H.; Silver, W. L.; Weber, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    Iron (Fe) is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth's crust and plays a significant role controlling the geochemistry in soils, sediments, and aquatic systems. As part of a study to understand microbially-catalysed iron biogeochemical cycling in tropical soils, an iron reducing isolate, strain FeAm09, was obtained. Strain FeAm09 was isolated from acidic, Fe-rich soils collected from a tropical forest (Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico). Strain FeAm09 is a rod-shaped, motile, Gram-negative bacterium. Taxonomic analysis of the near complete 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain FeAm09 is 94.7% similar to Geobacter lovleyi, placing it in the genus Geobacter within the Family Geobacteraceae in the Deltaproteobacteria. Characterization of the optimal growth conditions revealed that strain FeAm09 is a moderate acidophile with an optimal growth pH of 5.0. The optimal growth temperature was 37°C. Growth of FeAm09 was coupled to the reduction of soluble Fe(III), Fe(III)-NTA, with H2, fumarate, ethanol, and various organic acids and sugars serving as the electron donor. Insoluble Fe(III), in the form of synthetic ferrihydrite, was reduced by strain FeAm09 using acetate or H2 as the electron donor. The use of H2 as an electron donor in the presence of CO2 and absence of organic carbon and assimilation of 14C-labelled CO2 into biomass indicate that strain FeAm09 is an autotrophic Fe(III)-reducing bacterium. Together, these data describe the first acidophilic, autotrophic Geobacter species. Iron reducing bacteria were previously shown to be as abundant in tropical soils as in saturated sediments (lake-bottoms) and saturated soils (wetlands) where Fe(III) reduction is more commonly recognized as a dominant mode of microbial respiration. Furthermore, Fe(III) reduction was identified as a primary driver of carbon mineralization in these tropical soils (Dubinsky et al. 2010). In addition to mineralizing organic carbon, Geobacter sp. FeAm09 is likely to also

  6. Adaptation of the Biolog Phenotype MicroArrayTM Technology to Profile the Obligate Anaerobe Geobacter metallireducens

    OpenAIRE

    Joyner, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    The Biolog OmniLog? Phenotype MicroArray (PM) plate technology was successfully adapted to generate a select phenotypic profile of the strict anaerobe Geobacter metallireducens (G.m.). The profile generated for G.m. provides insight into the chemical sensitivity of the organism as well as some of its metabolic capabilities when grown with a basal medium containing acetate and Fe(III). The PM technology was developed for aerobic organisms. The reduction of a tetrazolium dye by the test organis...

  7. Bacterial interactions in dental biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruijie; Li, Mingyun; Gregory, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms are masses of microorganisms that bind to and multiply on a solid surface, typically with a fluid bathing the microbes. The microorganisms that are not attached but are free floating in an aqueous environment are termed planktonic cells. Traditionally, microbiology research has addressed results from planktonic bacterial cells. However, many recent studies have indicated that biofilms are the preferred form of growth of most microbes and particularly those of a pathogenic nature. Biofilms on animal hosts have significantly increased resistance to various antimicrobials compared to planktonic cells. These microbial communities form microcolonies that interact with each other using very sophisticated communication methods (i.e., quorum-sensing). The development of unique microbiological tools to detect and assess the various biofilms around us is a tremendously important focus of research in many laboratories. In the present review, we discuss the major biofilm mechanisms and the interactions among oral bacteria.

  8. Antibiotic tolerance and microbial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Anders

    Increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents is thought to be an important feature of microbes growing in biofilms. We study the dynamics of antibiotic action within hydrodynamic flow chamber biofilms of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa using isogenic mutants and fluorescent gene...... expression reporters and we address the question of how biofilm organization affects antibiotic susceptibility. The dynamics of microbial killing is monitored by viable count determination, and confocal laser microscopy. Our work shows that the apparent increased antibiotic tolerance is due to the formation...... of antibiotic tolerant subpopulations within the biofilm. The formation of these subpopulations is highly variable and dependent on the antibiotic used, the biofilm structural organization and the induction of specific tolerance mechanisms....

  9. Silver against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Kirketerp-Møller, K.; Kristiansen, S.

    2007-01-01

    Silver has been recognized for its antimicrobial properties for centuries. Most studies on the antibacterial efficacy of silver, with particular emphasis on wound healing, have been performed on planktonic bacteria. Our recent studies, however, strongly suggest that colonization of wounds involves...... bacteria in both the planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. The action of silver on mature in vitro biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a primary pathogen of chronic infected wounds, was investigated. The results show that silver is very effective against mature biofilms of P. aeruginosa......, but that the silver concentration is important. A concentration of 5-10 ig/mL silver sulfadiazine eradicated the biofilm whereas a lower concentration (1 ig/mL) had no effect. The bactericidal concentration of silver required to eradicate the bacterial biofilm was 10-100 times higher than that used to eradicate...

  10. Antibiotic tolerance and microbial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Anders

    Increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents is thought to be an important feature of microbes growing in biofilms. We study the dynamics of antibiotic action within hydrodynamic flow chamber biofilms of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa using isogenic mutants and fluorescent gene...... expression reporters and we address the question of how biofilm organization affects antibiotic susceptibility. The dynamics of microbial killing is monitored by viable count determination, and confocal laser microscopy. Our work shows that the apparent increased antibiotic tolerance is due to the formation...... of antibiotic tolerant subpopulations within the biofilm. The formation of these subpopulations is highly variable and dependent on the antibiotic used, the biofilm structural organization and the induction of specific tolerance mechanisms....

  11. Growing and analyzing biofilms in flow chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes the setup of flow chamber systems for the study of microbial biofilms, and methods for the analysis of structural biofilm formation. Use of flow chambers allows direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The biofilms in flow chambers develop under hydrodynamic cond...

  12. Growing and Analyzing Biofilms in Flow Chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes the setup of flow chamber systems for the study of microbial biofilms, and methods for the analysis of structural biofilm formation. Use of flow chambers allows direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The biofilms in flow chambers develop under hydrodynamic cond...

  13. Impact of Hydrodynamics on Oral Biofilm Strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paramonova, E.; Kalmykowa, O. J.; van der Mei, H. C.; Busscher, H. J.; Sharma, P. K.

    2009-01-01

    Mechanical removal of oral biofilms is ubiquitously accepted as the best way to prevent caries and periodontal diseases. Removal effectiveness strongly depends on biofilm strength. To investigate the influence of hydrodynamics on oral biofilm strength, we grew single- and multi-species biofilms of S

  14. Bacterial biofilms: prokaryotic adventures in multicellularity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, J.S.; Givskov, Michael Christian; Kjelleberg, S.

    2003-01-01

    The development of bacterial biofilms includes both the initial social behavior of undifferentiated cells, as well as cell death and differentiation in the mature biofilm, and displays several striking similarities with higher organisms. Recent advances in the field provide new insight...... into differentiation and cell death events in bacterial biofilm development and propose that biofilms have an unexpected level of multicellularity....

  15. Oral biofilm models for mechanical plaque removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, Martinus J.; Busscher, Henk J.; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; Slomp, Anje M.; Abbas, Frank; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2010-01-01

    In vitro plaque removal studies require biofilm models that resemble in vivo dental plaque. Here, we compare contact and non-contact removal of single and dual-species biofilms as well as of biofilms grown from human whole saliva in vitro using different biofilm models. Bacteria were adhered to a sa

  16. Confocal Microscopy Imaging of the Biofilm Matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Meyer, Rikke Louise

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is an integral part of microbial biofilms and an important field of research. Confocal laser scanning microscopy is a valuable tool for the study of biofilms, and in particular of the biofilm matrix, as it allows real-time visualization of fully hydrated, living specimens...... the concentration of solutes and the diffusive properties of the biofilm matrix....

  17. Oral Biofilm Architecture on Natural Teeth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijnge, Vincent; van Leeuwen, M. Barbara M.; Degener, John E.; Abbas, Frank; Thurnheer, Thomas; Gmuer, Rudolf; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Periodontitis and caries are infectious diseases of the oral cavity in which oral biofilms play a causative role. Moreover, oral biofilms are widely studied as model systems for bacterial adhesion, biofilm development, and biofilm resistance to antibiotics, due to their widespread presence and acces

  18. Identification of genes specifically required for the anaerobic metabolism of benzene in Geobacter metallireducens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian eZhang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the biochemical pathways for the anaerobic degradation of many of the hydrocarbon constituents in petroleum reservoirs have been elucidated, the mechanisms for anaerobic activation of benzene, a very stable molecule, are not known. Previous studies have demonstrated that Geobacter metallireducens can anaerobically oxidize benzene to carbon dioxide with Fe(III as the sole electron acceptor and that phenol is an intermediate in benzene oxidation. In an attempt to identify enzymes that might be involved in the conversion of benzene to phenol, whole-genome gene transcript abundance was compared in cells metabolizing benzene and cells metabolizing phenol. Eleven genes had significantly higher transcript abundance in benzene-metabolizing cells. Five of these genes had annotations suggesting that they did not encode proteins that could be involved in benzene metabolism and were not further studied. Strains were constructed in which one of the remaining six genes was deleted. The strain in which the monocistronic gene Gmet 0232 was deleted metabolized phenol, but not benzene. Transcript abundance of the adjacent monocistronic gene, Gmet 0231, predicted to encode a zinc-containing oxidoreductase, was elevated in cells metabolizing benzene, although not at a statistically significant level. However, deleting Gmet 0231 also yielded a strain that could metabolize phenol, but not benzene. Although homologs of Gmet 0231 and Gmet 0232 are found in microorganisms not known to anaerobically metabolize benzene, the adjacent localization of these genes is unique to G. metallireducens. The discovery of genes that are specifically required for the metabolism of benzene, but not phenol in G. metallireducens is an important step in potentially identifying the mechanisms for anaerobic benzene activation.

  19. Structure determination and biochemical characterization of a putative HNH endonuclease from Geobacter metallireducens GS-15.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang-yong Xu

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of a putative HNH endonuclease, Gmet_0936 protein from Geobacter metallireducens GS-15, has been determined at 2.6 Å resolution using single-wavelength anomalous dispersion method. The structure contains a two-stranded anti-parallel β-sheet that are surrounded by two helices on each face, and reveals a Zn ion bound in each monomer, coordinated by residues Cys38, Cys41, Cys73, and Cys76, which likely plays an important structural role in stabilizing the overall conformation. Structural homologs of Gmet_0936 include Hpy99I endonuclease, phage T4 endonuclease VII, and other HNH endonucleases, with these enzymes sharing 15-20% amino acid sequence identity. An overlay of Gmet_0936 and Hpy99I structures shows that most of the secondary structure elements, catalytic residues as well as the zinc binding site (zinc ribbon are conserved. However, Gmet_0936 lacks the N-terminal domain of Hpy99I, which mediates DNA binding as well as dimerization. Purified Gmet_0936 forms dimers in solution and a dimer of the protein is observed in the crystal, but with a different mode of dimerization as compared to Hpy99I. Gmet_0936 and its N77H variant show a weak DNA binding activity in a DNA mobility shift assay and a weak Mn²⁺-dependent nicking activity on supercoiled plasmids in low pH buffers. The preferred substrate appears to be acid and heat-treated DNA with AP sites, suggesting Gmet_0936 may be a DNA repair enzyme.

  20. Spatial Patterns of Carbonate Biomineralization in Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaobao; Chopp, David L.; Russin, William A.; Brannon, Paul T.; Parsek, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Microbially catalyzed precipitation of carbonate minerals is an important process in diverse biological, geological, and engineered systems. However, the processes that regulate carbonate biomineralization and their impacts on biofilms are largely unexplored, mainly because of the inability of current methods to directly observe biomineralization within biofilms. Here, we present a method for in situ, real-time imaging of biomineralization in biofilms and use it to show that Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms produce morphologically distinct carbonate deposits that substantially modify biofilm structures. The patterns of carbonate biomineralization produced in situ were substantially different from those caused by accumulation of particles produced by abiotic precipitation. Contrary to the common expectation that mineral precipitation should occur at the biofilm surface, we found that biomineralization started at the base of the biofilm. The carbonate deposits grew over time, detaching biofilm-resident cells and deforming the biofilm morphology. These findings indicate that biomineralization is a general regulator of biofilm architecture and properties. PMID:26276112

  1. Environmental factors that shape biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyofuku, Masanori; Inaba, Tomohiro; Kiyokawa, Tatsunori; Obana, Nozomu; Yawata, Yutaka; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Cells respond to the environment and alter gene expression. Recent studies have revealed the social aspects of bacterial life, such as biofilm formation. Biofilm formation is largely affected by the environment, and the mechanisms by which the gene expression of individual cells affects biofilm development have attracted interest. Environmental factors determine the cell's decision to form or leave a biofilm. In addition, the biofilm structure largely depends on the environment, implying that biofilms are shaped to adapt to local conditions. Second messengers such as cAMP and c-di-GMP are key factors that link environmental factors with gene regulation. Cell-to-cell communication is also an important factor in shaping the biofilm. In this short review, we will introduce the basics of biofilm formation and further discuss environmental factors that shape biofilm formation. Finally, the state-of-the-art tools that allow us investigate biofilms under various conditions are discussed.

  2. A short history of microbial biofilms and biofilm infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høiby, Niels

    2017-04-01

    The observation of aggregated microbes surrounded by a self-produced matrix adhering to surfaces or located in tissues or secretions is old since both Leeuwenhoek and Pasteur have described the phenomenon. In environmental and technical microbiology, biofilms, 80-90 years ago, were already shown to be important for biofouling on submerged surfaces, for example, ships. The concept of biofilm infections and their importance in medicine was, however, initiated in the early 1970s by the observation of heaps of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells in sputum and lung tissue from chronically infected cystic fibrosis patients. The term biofilm was introduced into medicine in 1985 by J. W. Costerton. During the following decades, the number of published biofilm articles and methods for studying biofilms increased rapidly and it was shown that adhering and nonadhering biofilm infections are widespread in medicine. The medical importance of biofilm infections is now generally accepted and guidelines for prophylaxis, diagnosis, and treatment have been published. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Holographic microrheology of biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiong Cheong, Fook; Duarte, Simone; Grier, David

    2008-03-01

    We present microrheological measurements of polymeric matrices, including the extra-cellular polysaccharide gel synthesized by the dental pathogen S. mutans. As part of this study, we introduce the use of precision three-dimensional particle tracking based on video holographic microscopy. This technique offers nanometer-scale resolution at video rates, thereby providing detailed information on the gels' complex viscoelastic moduli, including insights into their heterogeneity. The particular application to dental biofilms complements previous studies based on macroscopic rheology, and demonstrates the utility of holographic microrheology for soft-matter physics and biomedical research.

  4. Significance of biofilms in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróblewska, Marta; Strużycka, Izabela; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    In the past decades significant scientific progress has taken place in the knowledge about biofilms. They constitute multilayer conglomerates of bacteria and fungi, surrounded by carbohydrates which they produce, as well as substances derived from saliva and gingival fluid. Modern techniques showed significant diversity of the biofilm environment and a system of microbial communication (quorum sensing), enhancing their survival. At present it is believed that the majority of infections, particularly chronic with exacerbations, are a result of biofilm formation, particularly in the presence of biomaterials. It should be emphasised that penetration of antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents into deeper layers of a biofilm is poor, causing therapeutic problems and necessitating sometimes removal of the implant or prosthesis. Biofilms play an increasing role in dentistry as a result of more and more broad use in dental practice of plastic and implantable materials. Biofilms are produced on the surfaces of teeth as dental plaque, in the para-nasal sinuses, on prostheses, dental implants, as well as in waterlines of a dental unit, constituting a particular risk for severely immunocompromised patients. New methods of therapy and prevention of infections linked to biofilms are under development.

  5. Biofilm models for the practitioner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgenroth, Eberhard Friedrich; van Loosdrecht, M. C. M.; Wanner, O.

    2000-01-01

    Even though mathematical biofilm models are extensively used in biofilm research, there has been very little application of these models in the engineering practice so far. However, practitioners would be interested in models that can be used as tools to control plant operation under dynamic...... conditions or to help them handle complex interactions between particle removal, carbon oxidation, nitrification, denitrification and biological phosphorus removal. But even though there is a whole range of biofilm models available, it is difficult for the practitioner to select the appropriate modeling...

  6. Antibiotic resistance of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoiby, N.; Bjarnsholt, T.; Givskov, M.

    2010-01-01

    and other components of the body's defence system. The persistence of, for example, staphylococcal infections related to foreign bodies is due to biofilm formation. Likewise, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis patients is caused by biofilm-growing mucoid strains...... to antibiotics. Biofilm growth is associated with an increased level of mutations as well as with quorum-sensing-regulated mechanisms. Conventional resistance mechanisms such as chromosomal beta-lactamase, upregulated efflux pumps and mutations in antibiotic target molecules in bacteria also contribute...

  7. Metabolism links bacterial biofilms and colon carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Caroline H; Dejea, Christine M; Edler, David; Hoang, Linh T; Santidrian, Antonio F; Felding, Brunhilde H; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Cho, Kevin; Wick, Elizabeth C; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; Uritboonthai, Winnie; Goetz, Laura; Casero, Robert A; Pardoll, Drew M; White, James R; Patti, Gary J; Sears, Cynthia L; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-06-02

    Bacterial biofilms in the colon alter the host tissue microenvironment. A role for biofilms in colon cancer metabolism has been suggested but to date has not been evaluated. Using metabolomics, we investigated the metabolic influence that microbial biofilms have on colon tissues and the related occurrence of cancer. Patient-matched colon cancers and histologically normal tissues, with or without biofilms, were examined. We show the upregulation of polyamine metabolites in tissues from cancer hosts with significant enhancement of N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine in both biofilm-positive cancer and normal tissues. Antibiotic treatment, which cleared biofilms, decreased N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine levels to those seen in biofilm-negative tissues, indicating that host cancer and bacterial biofilm structures contribute to the polyamine metabolite pool. These results show that colonic mucosal biofilms alter the cancer metabolome to produce a regulator of cellular proliferation and colon cancer growth potentially affecting cancer development and progression.

  8. Metabolism links bacterial biofilms and colon carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Caroline H.; Dejea, Christine M.; Edler, David; Hoang, Linh T.; Santidrian, Antonio F.; Felding, Brunhilde H.; Cho, Kevin; Wick, Elizabeth C.; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M.; Uritboonthai, Winnie; Goetz, Laura; Casero, Robert A.; Pardoll, Drew M.; White, James R.; Patti, Gary J.; Sears, Cynthia L.; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial biofilms in the colon alter the host tissue microenvironment. A role for biofilms in colon cancer metabolism has been suggested but to date has not been evaluated. Using metabolomics, we investigated the metabolic influence that microbial biofilms have on colon tissues and the related occurrence of cancer. Patient-matched colon cancers and histologically normal tissues, with or without biofilms, were examined. We show the upregulation of polyamine metabolites in tissues from cancer hosts with significant enhancement of N1, N12-diacetylspermine in both biofilm positive cancer and normal tissues. Antibiotic treatment, which cleared biofilms, decreased N1, N12-diacetylspermine levels to those seen in biofilm negative tissues, indicating that host cancer and bacterial biofilm structures contribute to the polyamine metabolite pool. These results show that colonic mucosal biofilms alter the cancer metabolome, to produce a regulator of cellular proliferation and colon cancer growth potentially affecting cancer development and progression. PMID:25959674

  9. The ``Swiss cheese'' instability of bacterial biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hongchul; Rusconi, Roberto; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    Bacteria often adhere to surfaces, where they develop polymer-encased communities (biofilms) that display dramatic resistance to antibiotic treatment. A better understanding of cell detachment from biofilms may lead to novel strategies for biofilm disruption. Here we describe a new detachment mode, whereby a biofilm develops a nearly regular array of ~50-100 μm holes. Using surface-treated microfluidic devices, we create biofilms of controlled shape and size. After the passage of an air plug, the break-up of the residual thin liquid film scrapes and rearranges bacteria on the surface, such that a ``Swiss cheese'' pattern is left in the residual biofilm. Fluorescent staining of the polymeric matrix (EPS) reveals that resistance to cell dislodgement correlates with local biofilm age, early settlers having had more time to hunker down. Because few survivors suffice to regrow a biofilm, these results point at the importance of considering microscale heterogeneity in assessing the effectiveness of biofilm removal strategies.

  10. Effect of calcium on moving-bed biofilm reactor biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, C; Allen, D G

    2011-03-01

    The effect of calcium concentration on the biofilm structure, microbiology, and treatment performance was evaluated in a moving-bed biofilm reactor. Three experiments were conducted in replicate laboratory-scale reactors to determine if wastewater calcium is an important variable for the design and optimization of these reactors. Biofilm structural properties, such as thickness, oxygen microprofiles, and the composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were affected by increasing calcium concentrations. Above a threshold concentration of calcium between 1 and 50 mg/L, biofilms became thicker and denser, with a shift toward increasingly proteinaceous EPS at higher calcium concentrations up to 200 mgCa2+/L. At 300 mgCa2+/L, biofilms were found to become primarily composed of inorganic calcium precipitates. Microbiology was assessed through microscopy, denaturing grade gel electrophoresis, and enumeration of higher organisms. Higher calcium concentrations were found to change the bacterial community and promote the abundant growth of filamentous organisms and various protazoa and metazoan populations. The chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency was improved for reactors at calcium concentrations of 50 mg/L and above. Reactor effluents for the lowest calcium concentration (1 mgCa2+/L) were found to be turbid (>50 NTU), as a result of the detachment of small and poorly settling planktonic biomass, whereas higher concentrations promoted settling of the suspended phase. In general, calcium was found to be an important variable causing significant changes in biofilm structure and reactor function.

  11. Synergistic Interactions in Multispecies Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Dawei

    between plasmid host range and composition of the recipient community was investigated in Manuscript 5 by comparing plasmid permissiveness in single populations and in a microbial community composed of 15 soil strains. By use of flow cytometry (FCM) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing, the IncP1 plasmid, pKJK10...... bacterial species, the study to elucidate the impact of interaction networks on the multispecies biofilms in natural ecosystems, especially in soil, is still at an early stage. The diverse patterns of interactions within the mixed communities as well as the predatorprey relationship between protozoa...... interactions in this four-species biofilm model community. Manuscript 2 presents the further application of this developed approach on evaluating the synergistic/antagonistic interactions in multispecies biofilms composed of seven soil isolates. 63% of the four-species biofilms were found to interact...

  12. Differential growth of wrinkled biofilms

    CERN Document Server

    Espeso, D R; Einarsson, B

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are antibiotic-resistant bacterial aggregates that grow on moist surfaces and can trigger hospital-acquired infections. They provide a classical example in biology where the dynamics of cellular communities may be observed and studied. Gene expression regulates cell division and differentiation, which affect the biofilm architecture. Mechanical and chemical processes shape the resulting structure. We gain insight into the interplay between cellular and mechanical processes during biofilm development on air-agar interfaces by means of a hybrid model. Cellular behavior is governed by stochastic rules informed by a cascade of concentration fields for nutrients, waste and autoinducers. Cellular differentiation and death alter the structure and the mechanical properties of the biofilm, which is deformed according to Foppl-Von Karman equations informed by cellular processes and the interaction with the substratum. Stiffness gradients due to growth and swelling produce wrinkle branching. We are able to repr...

  13. Nanotechnology: Role in dental biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhardwaj Sonia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are surface- adherent populations of microorganisms consisting of cells, water and extracellular matrix material Nanotechnology is promising field of science which can guide our understanding of the role of interspecies interaction in the development of biofilm. Streptococcus mutans with other species of bacteria has been known to form dental biofilm. The correlation between genetically modified bacteria Streptococcus mutans and nanoscale morphology has been assessed using AFMi.e atomic force microscopy. Nanotechnology application includes 16 O/ 18 O reverse proteolytic labeling,use of quantum dots for labeling of bacterial cells, selective removal of cariogenic bacteria while preserving the normal oral flora and silver antimicrobial nanotechnology against pathogens associated with biofilms. The future comprises a mouthwash full of smart nanomachines which can allow the harmless flora of mouth to flourish in a healthy ecosystem

  14. Biogenesis of Enterococcis faecium biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paganelli, F.L.

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial infections caused by Enterococcus faecium have rapidly increased worldwide and treatment options become more limited. The presence of antibiotic resistance genes and virulence factors in pathogenic E. faecium contribute to difficult-to-treat infections, frequently biofilm mediated, such

  15. Critical review on biofilm methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azeredo, Joana; F. Azevedo, Nuno; Briandet, Romain

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms are widespread in nature and constitute an important strategy implemented by microorganisms to survive in sometimes harsh environmental conditions. They can be beneficial or have a negative impact particularly when formed in industrial settings or on medical devices. As such, research in...... and limitations of several methods. Accordingly, this review aims at helping scientists in finding the most appropriate and up-to-date methods to study their biofilms....

  16. Hydrodynamics of catheter biofilm formation

    CERN Document Server

    Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar; Rodriguez-Perez, Daniel; Martinez-Escobar, Sergio; Fernandez-Barbero, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model is proposed to describe one of the most critical problems in intensive medical care units: the formation of biofilms inside central venous catheters. The incorporation of approximate solutions for the flow-limited diffusion equation leads to the conclusion that biofilms grow on the internal catheter wall due to the counter-stream diffusion of blood through a very thin layer close to the wall. This biological deposition is the first necessary step for the subsequent bacteria colonization.

  17. Biofilm-specific antibiotic tolerance and resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, I

    2015-05-01

    Biofilms are heterogeneous structures composed of bacterial cells surrounded by a matrix and attached to solid surfaces. The bacteria here are 100 to 1,000 times more tolerant to antimicrobials than corresponding planktonic cells. Biofilms can be difficult to eradicate when they cause biofilm-related diseases, e.g., implant infections, cystic fibrosis, urinary tract infections, and periodontal diseases. A number of phenotypic features of the biofilm can be involved in biofilm-specific tolerance and resistance. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved. The current review deals with both phenotypic and molecular mechanisms of biofilm-specific antibiotic tolerance and resistance.

  18. Strategies for combating bacterial biofilm infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Wu; Claus Moser; Heng-Zhuang Wang; Niels Hiby; Zhi-Jun Song

    2015-01-01

    Formation of biofilm is a survival strategy for bacteria and fungi to adapt to their living environment, especially in the hostile environment. Under the protection of biofilm, microbial cells in biofilm become tolerant and resistant to antibiotics and the immune responses, which increases the difficulties for the clinical treatment of biofilm infections. Clinical and laboratory investigations demonstrated a perspicuous correlation between biofilm infection and medical foreign bodies or indwelling devices. Clinical observations and experimental studies indicated clearly that antibiotic treatment alone is in most cases insufficient to eradicate biofilm infections. Therefore, to effectively treat biofilm infections with currently available antibiotics and evaluate the outcomes become important and urgent for clinicians. The review summarizes the latest progress in treatment of clinical biofilm infections and scientific investigations, discusses the diagnosis and treatment of different biofilm infections and introduces the promising laboratory progress, which may contribute to prevention or cure of biofilm infections. We conclude that, an efficient treatment of biofilm infections needs a well-established multidisciplinary collaboration, which includes removal of the infected foreign bodies, selection of biofilm-active, sensitive and well-penetrating antibiotics, systemic or topical antibiotic administration in high dosage and combinations, and administration of anti-quorum sensing or biofilm dispersal agents.

  19. Enzymatic removal and disinfection of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Charlotte; Falholt, Per; Gram, Lone

    1997-01-01

    Model biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were made on steel and polypropylene substrata. Plaque-resembling biofilms of Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces, viscosus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum were made on saliva-coate...

  20. Enzymatic removal and disinfection of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Charlotte; Falholt, Per; Gram, Lone

    1997-01-01

    Model biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were made on steel and polypropylene substrata. Plaque-resembling biofilms of Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces, viscosus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum were made on saliva...

  1. Candida Biofilms: Development, Architecture, and Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Jyotsna; Mukherjee, Pranab K

    2015-08-01

    Intravascular device-related infections are often associated with biofilms (microbial communities encased within a polysaccharide-rich extracellular matrix) formed by pathogens on the surfaces of these devices. Candida species are the most common fungi isolated from catheter-, denture-, and voice prosthesis-associated infections and also are commonly isolated from contact lens-related infections (e.g., fungal keratitis). These biofilms exhibit decreased susceptibility to most antimicrobial agents, which contributes to the persistence of infection. Recent technological advances have facilitated the development of novel approaches to investigate the formation of biofilms and identify specific markers for biofilms. These studies have provided extensive knowledge of the effect of different variables, including growth time, nutrients, and physiological conditions, on biofilm formation, morphology, and architecture. In this article, we will focus on fungal biofilms (mainly Candida biofilms) and provide an update on the development, architecture, and resistance mechanisms of biofilms.

  2. Candida Biofilms: Development, Architecture, and Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHANDRA, JYOTSNA; MUKHERJEE, PRANAB K.

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular device–related infections are often associated with biofilms (microbial communities encased within a polysaccharide-rich extracellular matrix) formed by pathogens on the surfaces of these devices. Candida species are the most common fungi isolated from catheter-, denture-, and voice prosthesis–associated infections and also are commonly isolated from contact lens–related infections (e.g., fungal keratitis). These biofilms exhibit decreased susceptibility to most antimicrobial agents, which contributes to the persistence of infection. Recent technological advances have facilitated the development of novel approaches to investigate the formation of biofilms and identify specific markers for biofilms. These studies have provided extensive knowledge of the effect of different variables, including growth time, nutrients, and physiological conditions, on biofilm formation, morphology, and architecture. In this article, we will focus on fungal biofilms (mainly Candida biofilms) and provide an update on the development, architecture, and resistance mechanisms of biofilms. PMID:26350306

  3. Ciliates as engineers of phototrophic biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerman, Ellen J.; van der Geest, Harm G.; van der Meulen, Myra D.; Manders, Erik M. M.; van de Koppel, Johan; Herman, Peter M. J.; Admiraal, Wim

    2011-01-01

    1. Phototrophic biofilms consist of a matrix of phototrophs, non-photosynthetic bacteria and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which is spatially structured. Despite widespread exploitation of algae and bacteria within phototrophic biofilms, for example by protozoans, the 'engineering' effect

  4. New Dimensions of Moving Bed Biofilm Carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Piculell, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) is a biological wastewater treatment process in which microorganisms grow as biofilms on suspended carriers. Conventionally, MBBRs are mainly designed and optimized based on the carrier surface area, neglecting the dynamic relationship between carrier design, reactor operation and biofilm characteristics, such as biofilm thickness and the composition of the microbial community. The purpose of this research project was to learn more about the roles of the ...

  5. Molecular Analysis of Shower Curtain Biofilm Microbes

    OpenAIRE

    Kelley, Scott T.; Theisen, Ulrike; Angenent, Largus T.; Amand, Allison St.; Pace, Norman R.

    2004-01-01

    Households provide environments that encourage the formation of microbial communities, often as biofilms. Such biofilms constitute potential reservoirs for pathogens, particularly for immune-compromised individuals. One household environment that potentially accumulates microbial biofilms is that provided by vinyl shower curtains. Over time, vinyl shower curtains accumulate films, commonly referred to as “soap scum,” which microscopy reveals are constituted of lush microbial biofilms. To dete...

  6. Geobacter daltonii sp. nov., an Fe(III)- and uranium(VI)-reducing bacterium isolated from a shallow subsurface exposed to mixed heavy metal and hydrocarbon contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Om; Gihring, Thomas M; Dalton, Dava D; Chin, Kuk-Jeong; Green, Stefan J; Akob, Denise M; Wanger, Greg; Kostka, Joel E

    2010-03-01

    An Fe(III)- and uranium(VI)-reducing bacterium, designated strain FRC-32(T), was isolated from a contaminated subsurface of the USA Department of Energy Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where the sediments are exposed to mixed waste contamination of radionuclides and hydrocarbons. Analyses of both 16S rRNA gene and the Geobacteraceae-specific citrate synthase (gltA) mRNA gene sequences retrieved from ORFRC sediments indicated that this strain was abundant and active in ORFRC subsurface sediments undergoing uranium(VI) bioremediation. The organism belonged to the subsurface clade of the genus Geobacter and shared 92-98 % 16S rRNA gene and 75-81 % rpoB gene sequence similarities with other recognized species of the genus. In comparison to its closest relative, Geobacter uraniireducens Rf4(T), according to 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain FRC-32(T) showed a DNA-DNA relatedness value of 21 %. Cells of strain FRC-32(T) were Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, curved rods, 1.0-1.5 microm long and 0.3-0.5 microm in diameter; the cells formed pink colonies in a semisolid cultivation medium, a characteristic feature of the genus Geobacter. The isolate was an obligate anaerobe, had temperature and pH optima for growth at 30 degrees C and pH 6.7-7.3, respectively, and could tolerate up to 0.7 % NaCl although growth was better in the absence of NaCl. Similar to other members of the Geobacter group, strain FRC-32(T) conserved energy for growth from the respiration of Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide coupled with the oxidation of acetate. Strain FRC-32(T) was metabolically versatile and, unlike its closest relative, G. uraniireducens, was capable of utilizing formate, butyrate and butanol as electron donors and soluble ferric iron (as ferric citrate) and elemental sulfur as electron acceptors. Growth on aromatic compounds including benzoate and toluene was predicted from preliminary genomic analyses and was confirmed through successive transfer with

  7. Novel method for quantitative estimation of biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syal, Kirtimaan

    2017-01-01

    Biofilm protects bacteria from stress and hostile environment. Crystal violet (CV) assay is the most popular method for biofilm determination adopted by different laboratories so far. However, biofilm layer formed at the liquid-air interphase known as pellicle is extremely sensitive to its washin...

  8. Microbiële biofilms in tandheelkunde

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krom, B.P.

    2015-01-01

    Aangehechte gemeenschappen van micro-organismen, ook wel biofilms genoemd, zijn altijd en overal aanwezig. Hoewel biofilms een slechte naam hebben, zijn ze meestal natuurlijk, gezond en zelfs gewenst. In de mondzorgpraktijk komen zowel gezonde (orale biofilms) als ongezonde (bijv. in de waterleiding

  9. Microbiële biofilms in tandheelkunde

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krom, B.P.

    2015-01-01

    Aangehechte gemeenschappen van micro-organismen, ook wel biofilms genoemd, zijn altijd en overal aanwezig. Hoewel biofilms een slechte naam hebben, zijn ze meestal natuurlijk, gezond en zelfs gewenst. In de tandartspraktijk komen zowel gezonde (orale biofilms) als ongezonde (bijv. in de waterleiding

  10. Current understanding of multi-species biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Direct observation of a wide range of natural microorganisms has revealed the fact that the majority of microbes persist as surface-attached communities surrounded by matrix materials, called biofilms. Biofilms can be formed by a single bacterial strain. However, most natural biofilms are actuall...

  11. Extracellular DNA in oral microbial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubovics, Nicholas S; Burgess, J Grant

    2015-07-01

    The extracellular matrix of microbial biofilms is critical for surface adhesion and nutrient homeostasis. Evidence is accumulating that extracellular DNA plays a number of important roles in biofilm integrity and formation on hard and soft tissues in the oral cavity. Here, we summarise recent developments in the field and consider the potential of targeting DNA for oral biofilm control.

  12. Current understanding of multi-species biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Direct observation of a wide range of natural microorganisms has revealed the fact that the majority of microbes persist as surface-attached communities surrounded by matrix materials, called biofilms. Biofilms can be formed by a single bacterial strain. However, most natural biofilms are actuall...

  13. Presence of extracellular DNA in the Candida albicans biofilm matrix and its contribution to biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Margarida; Uppuluri, Priya; Thomas, Derek P; Cleary, Ian A; Henriques, Mariana; Lopez-Ribot, José L; Oliveira, Rosário

    2010-05-01

    DNA has been described as a structural component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in bacterial biofilms. In Candida albicans, there is a scarce knowledge concerning the contribution of extracellular DNA (eDNA) to biofilm matrix and overall structure. This work examined the presence and quantified the amount of eDNA in C. albicans biofilm ECM and the effect of DNase treatment and the addition of exogenous DNA on C. albicans biofilm development as indicators of a role for eDNA in biofilm development. We were able to detect the accumulation of eDNA in biofilm ECM extracted from C. albicans biofilms formed under conditions of flow, although the quantity of eDNA detected differed according to growth conditions, in particular with regards to the medium used to grow the biofilms. Experiments with C. albicans biofilms formed statically using a microtiter plate model indicated that the addition of exogenous DNA (>160 ng/ml) increases biofilm biomass and, conversely, DNase treatment (>0.03 mg/ml) decreases biofilm biomass at later time points of biofilm development. We present evidence for the role of eDNA in C. albicans biofilm structure and formation, consistent with eDNA being a key element of the ECM in mature C. albicans biofilms and playing a predominant role in biofilm structural integrity and maintenance.

  14. Microbial pathogenesis and biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, A.; Høiby, N.; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2004-01-01

    cycles of different microorganisms will eventually lead to improved treatments. Several bacteria have evolved specific strategies for virulent colonization of humans in addition to their otherwise harmless establishment as environmental inhabitants. In many such cases biofilm development seems to play...... permit bacterial growth to occur. In laboratory model systems the growth of the surface-associated bacteria is supported by the nutrient supply in the moving or standing liquid. A benchmark of biofilm formation by several organisms in vitro is the development of three-dimensional structures that have...... been termed 'maturation', which is thought to be mediated by a differentiation process. Maturation into late stages of biofilm development resulting in stable and robust structures may require the formation of a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which are most often assumed to consist...

  15. Biofilm Induced Tolerance Towards Antimicrobial Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Anders; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Zampaloni, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    to the presence of IncF plasmids expressing altered forms of the transfer pili in two different biofilm model systems. The mature biofilms were subsequently treated with two antibiotics with different molecular targets, the peptide antibiotic colistin and the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin. The dynamics...... regulated tolerant subpopulation formation and not caused by a general biofilm property. No significant difference in survival was detected when the strains were challenged with ciprofloxacin. Our data show that biofilm formation confers increased colistin tolerance to cells within the biofilm structure...

  16. Pattern formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parsek, Matthew R.; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria are capable of forming elaborate multicellular communities called biofilms. Pattern formation in biofilms depends on cell proliferation and cellular migration in response to the available nutrients and other external cues, as well as on self-generated intercellular signal molecules...... and the production of an extracellular matrix that serves as a structural 'scaffolding' for the biofilm cells. Pattern formation in biofilms allows cells to position themselves favorably within nutrient gradients and enables buildup and maintenance of physiologically distinct subpopulations, which facilitates...... survival of one or more subpopulations upon environmental insult, and therefore plays an important role in the innate tolerance displayed by biofilms toward adverse conditions....

  17. Combining Biofilm-Controlling Compounds and Antibiotics as a Promising New Way to Control Biofilm Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Bergamo Estrela

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria grow on surfaces forming biofilms. In this structure, they are well protected and often high dosages of antibiotics cannot clear infectious biofilms. The formation and stabilization of biofilms are mediated by diffusible autoinducers (e.g. N-acyl homoserine lactones, small peptides, furanosyl borate diester. Metabolites interfering with this process have been identified in plants, animals and microbes, and synthetic analogues are known. Additionally, this seems to be not the only way to control biofilms. Enzymes capable of cleaving essential components of the biofilm matrix, e.g. polysaccharides or extracellular DNA, and thus weakening the biofilm architecture have been identified. Bacteria also have mechanisms to dissolve their biofilms and return to planktonic lifestyle. Only a few compounds responsible for the signalling of these processes are known, but they may open a completely novel line of biofilm control. All these approaches lead to the destruction of the biofilm but not the killing of the pathogens. Therefore, a combination of biofilm-destroying compounds and antibiotics to handle biofilm infections is proposed. In this article, different approaches to combine biofilm-controlling compounds and antibiotics to fight biofilm infections are discussed, as well as the balance between biofilm formation and virulence.

  18. Biofilm induced tolerance towards antimicrobial peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Folkesson

    Full Text Available Increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents is thought to be an important feature of microbes growing in biofilms. We address the question of how biofilm organization affects antibiotic susceptibility. We established Escherichia coli biofilms with differential structural organization due to the presence of IncF plasmids expressing altered forms of the transfer pili in two different biofilm model systems. The mature biofilms were subsequently treated with two antibiotics with different molecular targets, the peptide antibiotic colistin and the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin. The dynamics of microbial killing were monitored by viable count determination, and confocal laser microscopy. Strains forming structurally organized biofilms show an increased bacterial survival when challenged with colistin, compared to strains forming unstructured biofilms. The increased survival is due to genetically regulated tolerant subpopulation formation and not caused by a general biofilm property. No significant difference in survival was detected when the strains were challenged with ciprofloxacin. Our data show that biofilm formation confers increased colistin tolerance to cells within the biofilm structure, but the protection is conditional being dependent on the structural organization of the biofilm, and the induction of specific tolerance mechanisms.

  19. Vibrio cholerae Biofilms and Cholera Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Anisia J.; Benitez, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae can switch between motile and biofilm lifestyles. The last decades have been marked by a remarkable increase in our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function of biofilms formed under laboratory conditions. Evidence has grown suggesting that V. cholerae can form biofilm-like aggregates during infection that could play a critical role in pathogenesis and disease transmission. However, the structure and regulation of biofilms formed during infection, as well as their role in intestinal colonization and virulence, remains poorly understood. Here, we review (i) the evidence for biofilm formation during infection, (ii) the coordinate regulation of biofilm and virulence gene expression, and (iii) the host signals that favor V. cholerae transitions between alternative lifestyles during intestinal colonization, and (iv) we discuss a model for the role of V. cholerae biofilms in pathogenicity. PMID:26845681

  20. Vibrio cholerae Biofilms and Cholera Pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisia J Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae can switch between motile and biofilm lifestyles. The last decades have been marked by a remarkable increase in our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function of biofilms formed under laboratory conditions. Evidence has grown suggesting that V. cholerae can form biofilm-like aggregates during infection that could play a critical role in pathogenesis and disease transmission. However, the structure and regulation of biofilms formed during infection, as well as their role in intestinal colonization and virulence, remains poorly understood. Here, we review (i the evidence for biofilm formation during infection, (ii the coordinate regulation of biofilm and virulence gene expression, and (iii the host signals that favor V. cholerae transitions between alternative lifestyles during intestinal colonization, and (iv we discuss a model for the role of V. cholerae biofilms in pathogenicity.

  1. The immune system vs. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Østrup; Givskov, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    revealed both innate as well as adaptive immune responses to biofilms. On the other hand, measures launched by biofilm bacteria to achieve protection against the various immune responses have also been demonstrated. Whether particular immune responses to biofilm infections exist remains to be firmly...... established. However, because biofilm infections are often persistent (or chronic), an odd situation appears with the simultaneous activation of both arms of the host immune response, neither of which can eliminate the biofilm pathogen, but instead, in synergy, causes collateral tissue damage. Although...... the present review on the immune system vs. biofilm bacteria is focused on Pseudomonas aeruginosa (mainly because this is the most thoroughly studied), many of the same mechanisms are also seen with biofilm infections generated by other microorganisms....

  2. Role of multicellular aggregates in biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Kasper N.; Hutchison, Jaime B.; Melaugh, Gavin;

    2016-01-01

    response, may add to this ecological benefit. Our findings suggest that current models of biofilm formation should be reconsidered to incorporate the role of aggregates in biofilm initiation.IMPORTANCE During the past decades, there has been a consensus around the model of development of a biofilm......In traditional models of in vitro biofilm development, individual bacterial cells seed a surface, multiply, and mature into multicellular, three-dimensional structures. Much research has been devoted to elucidating the mechanisms governing the initial attachment of single cells to surfaces. However......, in natural environments and during infection, bacterial cells tend to clump as multicellular aggregates, and biofilms can also slough off aggregates as a part of the dispersal process. This makes it likely that biofilms are often seeded by aggregates and single cells, yet how these aggregates impact biofilm...

  3. Vibrio cholerae Biofilms and Cholera Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Anisia J; Benitez, Jorge A

    2016-02-01

    Vibrio cholerae can switch between motile and biofilm lifestyles. The last decades have been marked by a remarkable increase in our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function of biofilms formed under laboratory conditions. Evidence has grown suggesting that V. cholerae can form biofilm-like aggregates during infection that could play a critical role in pathogenesis and disease transmission. However, the structure and regulation of biofilms formed during infection, as well as their role in intestinal colonization and virulence, remains poorly understood. Here, we review (i) the evidence for biofilm formation during infection, (ii) the coordinate regulation of biofilm and virulence gene expression, and (iii) the host signals that favor V. cholerae transitions between alternative lifestyles during intestinal colonization, and (iv) we discuss a model for the role of V. cholerae biofilms in pathogenicity.

  4. Molecular Basis for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Biofilm Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kaj Scherz

    In this study, I sought to identify genes regulating the global molecular program for development of sessile multicellular communities, also known as biofilm, of the eukaryotic microorganism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast). Yeast biofilm has a clinical interest, as biofilms can cause chronic...... infections in humans. Biofilm is also interesting from an evolutionary standpoint, as an example of primitive multicellularity. By using a genome-wide screen of yeast deletion mutants, I show that 71 genes are essential for biofilm formation. Two-thirds of these genes are required for transcription of FLO11......, but only a small subset is previously described as regulators of FLO11. These results reveal that the regulation of biofilm formation and FLO11 is even more complex than what has previously been described. I find that the molecular program for biofilm formation shares many essential components with two...

  5. Molecular Basis for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Biofilm Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kaj Scherz

    of translation of FLO11. In conclusion, I have conducted the first global study of the genetic program for yeast biofilm formation on polystyrene. This work provide several target genes as good basis for further research of biofilm, that I believe can contribute to fields such as cell biology, genetics, system......In this study, I sought to identify genes regulating the global molecular program for development of sessile multicellular communities, also known as biofilm, of the eukaryotic microorganism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast). Yeast biofilm has a clinical interest, as biofilms can cause chronic......, but only a small subset is previously described as regulators of FLO11. These results reveal that the regulation of biofilm formation and FLO11 is even more complex than what has previously been described. I find that the molecular program for biofilm formation shares many essential components with two...

  6. Current and future trends for biofilm reactors for fermentation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, Duygu; Demirci, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Biofilms in the environment can both cause detrimental and beneficial effects. However, their use in bioreactors provides many advantages including lesser tendencies to develop membrane fouling and lower required capital costs, their higher biomass density and operation stability, contribution to resistance of microorganisms, etc. Biofilm formation occurs naturally by the attachment of microbial cells to the support without use of any chemicals agent in biofilm reactors. Biofilm reactors have been studied and commercially used for waste water treatment and bench and pilot-scale production of value-added products in the past decades. It is important to understand the fundamentals of biofilm formation, physical and chemical properties of a biofilm matrix to run the biofilm reactor at optimum conditions. This review includes the principles of biofilm formation; properties of a biofilm matrix and their roles in the biofilm formation; factors that improve the biofilm formation, such as support materials; advantages and disadvantages of biofilm reactors; and industrial applications of biofilm reactors.

  7. Inhibition of Geobacter dechlorinators at elevated trichloroethene concentrations is explained by a reduced activity rather than by an enhanced cell decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Jo; Haest, Pieter Jan; Springael, Dirk; Smolders, Erik

    2013-02-05

    Microbial dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) is inhibited at elevated TCE concentrations. A batch experiment and modeling analysis were performed to examine whether this self-inhibition is related to an enhanced cell decay or a reduced dechlorination activity at increasing TCE concentrations. The batch experiment combined four different initial TCE concentrations (1.4-3.0 mM) and three different inoculation densities (4.0 × 10(5) to 4.0 × 10(7)Geobacter cells·mL(-1)). Chlorinated ethene concentrations and Geobacter 16S rRNA gene copy numbers were measured. The time required for complete conversion of TCE to cis-DCE increased with increasing initial TCE concentration and decreasing inoculation density. Both an enhanced decay and a reduced activity model fitted the experimental results well, although the reduced activity model better described the lag phase and microbial decay in some treatments. In addition, the reduced activity model succeeded in predicting the reactivation of the dechlorination reaction in treatments in which the inhibiting TCE concentration was lowered after 80 days. In contrast, the enhanced decay model predicted a Geobacter cell density that was too low to allow recovery for these treatments. Conclusively, our results suggest that TCE self-inhibition is related to a reduced dechlorination activity rather than to an enhanced cell decay at elevated TCE concentrations.

  8. Biofilm monitoring using complex permittivity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altman, Susan Jeanne; McGrath, Lucas K.; Dolan, Patricia L.; Yelton, William Graham

    2008-10-01

    There is strong interest in the detection and monitoring of bio-fouling. Bio-fouling problems are common in numerous water treatments systems, medical and dental apparatus and food processing equipment. Current bio-fouling control protocols are time consuming and costly. New early detection techniques to monitor bio-forming contaminates are means to enhanced efficiency. Understanding the unique dielectric properties of biofilm development, colony forming bacteria and nutrient background will provide a basis to the effectiveness of controlling or preventing biofilm growth. Dielectric spectroscopy measurements provide values of complex permittivity, {var_epsilon}*, of biofilm formation by applying a weak alternating electric field at various frequencies. The dielectric characteristic of the biofilm, {var_epsilon}{prime}, is the real component of {var_epsilon}* and measures the biofilm's unique ability to store energy. Graphically observed dependencies of {var_epsilon}{prime} to frequency indicate dielectric relaxation or dielectric dispersion behaviors that mark the particular stage of progression during the development of biofilms. In contrast, any frequency dependency of the imaginary component, {var_epsilon}{double_prime} the loss factor, is expressed as dielectric losses from the biofilm due to dipole relaxation. The tangent angle of these two component vectors is the ratio of the imaginary component to the real component, {var_epsilon}{double_prime}/{var_epsilon}{prime} and is referred to as the loss angle tangent (tan {delta}) or dielectric loss. Changes in tan {delta} are characteristic of changes in dielectric losses during various developmental stages of the films. Permittivity scans in the above figure are of biofilm growth from P. Fluorescens (10e7 CFU's at the start). Three trends are apparent from these scans, the first being a small drop in the imaginary permittivity over a 7 hours period, best seen in the Cole-Cole plot (a). The second trend

  9. Biofilms in chronic infections - a matter of opportunity - monospecies biofilms in multispecies infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burmølle, Mette; Thomsen, Trine Rolighed; Fazli, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    to permanent tissue fillers and chronic wounds) both as to distribution (such as where in the wound bed) and organization (monospecies or multispecies microcolonies). We correlate these biofilm observations to observations of commensal biofilms (dental and intestine) and biofilms in natural ecosystems (soil......). The observations of the chronic biofilm infections point toward a trend of low bacterial diversity and sovereign monospecies biofilm aggregates even though the infection in which they reside are multispecies. In contrast to this, commensal and natural biofilm aggregates contain multiple species that are believed...

  10. Rapid identification of bacterial biofilms and biofilm wound models using a multichannel nanosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoning; Kong, Hao; Mout, Rubul; Saha, Krishnendu; Moyano, Daniel F; Robinson, Sandra M; Rana, Subinoy; Zhang, Xinrong; Riley, Margaret A; Rotello, Vincent M

    2014-12-23

    Identification of infectious bacteria responsible for biofilm-associated infections is challenging due to the complex and heterogeneous biofilm matrix. To address this issue and minimize the impact of heterogeneity on biofilm identification, we developed a gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based multichannel sensor to detect and identify biofilms based on their physicochemical properties. Our results showed that the sensor can discriminate six bacterial biofilms including two composed of uropathogenic bacteria. The capability of the sensor was further demonstrated through discrimination of biofilms in a mixed bacteria/mammalian cell in vitro wound model.

  11. Biogenesis of Enterococcis faecium biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paganelli, F.L.

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial infections caused by Enterococcus faecium have rapidly increased worldwide and treatment options become more limited. The presence of antibiotic resistance genes and virulence factors in pathogenic E. faecium contribute to difficult-to-treat infections, frequently biofilm mediated, such a

  12. Biofilm models for the practitioner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgenroth, Eberhard Friedrich; van Loosdrecht, M. C. M.; Wanner, O.

    2000-01-01

    conditions or to help them handle complex interactions between particle removal, carbon oxidation, nitrification, denitrification and biological phosphorus removal. But even though there is a whole range of biofilm models available, it is difficult for the practitioner to select the appropriate modeling...

  13. Exploiting social evolution in biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyle, Kerry E; Heilmann, Silja; van Ditmarsch, Dave

    2013-01-01

    and thus, regrettably, select for resistance against their own action. A possible solution lies in targeting the mechanisms by which bacteria interact with each other within biofilms. The emerging field of microbial social evolution combines molecular microbiology with evolutionary theory to dissect...

  14. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial activity that leads to the formation of biofilms on process equipment can accelerate corrosion, reduce heat transfer rates, and generally decrease process efficiencies. Additional concerns arise in the food and pharma industries where product quality and safety are a high priority. Pharmac...

  15. Hydrodynamic dispersion within porous biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Davit, Y.

    2013-01-23

    Many microorganisms live within surface-associated consortia, termed biofilms, that can form intricate porous structures interspersed with a network of fluid channels. In such systems, transport phenomena, including flow and advection, regulate various aspects of cell behavior by controlling nutrient supply, evacuation of waste products, and permeation of antimicrobial agents. This study presents multiscale analysis of solute transport in these porous biofilms. We start our analysis with a channel-scale description of mass transport and use the method of volume averaging to derive a set of homogenized equations at the biofilm-scale in the case where the width of the channels is significantly smaller than the thickness of the biofilm. We show that solute transport may be described via two coupled partial differential equations or telegrapher\\'s equations for the averaged concentrations. These models are particularly relevant for chemicals, such as some antimicrobial agents, that penetrate cell clusters very slowly. In most cases, especially for nutrients, solute penetration is faster, and transport can be described via an advection-dispersion equation. In this simpler case, the effective diffusion is characterized by a second-order tensor whose components depend on (1) the topology of the channels\\' network; (2) the solute\\'s diffusion coefficients in the fluid and the cell clusters; (3) hydrodynamic dispersion effects; and (4) an additional dispersion term intrinsic to the two-phase configuration. Although solute transport in biofilms is commonly thought to be diffusion dominated, this analysis shows that hydrodynamic dispersion effects may significantly contribute to transport. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  16. Chemical Biology Strategies for Biofilm Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liang; Givskov, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Microbes live as densely populated multicellular surface-attached biofilm communities embedded in self-generated, extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs). EPSs serve as a scaffold for cross-linking biofilm cells and support development of biofilm architecture and functions. Biofilms can have a clear negative impact on humans, where biofilms are a common denominator in many chronic diseases in which they prime development of destructive inflammatory conditions and the failure of our immune system to efficiently cope with them. Our current assortment of antimicrobial agents cannot efficiently eradicate biofilms. For industrial applications, the removal of biofilms within production machinery in the paper and hygienic food packaging industry, cooling water circuits, and drinking water manufacturing systems can be critical for the safety and efficacy of those processes. Biofilm formation is a dynamic process that involves microbial cell migration, cell-to-cell signaling and interactions, EPS synthesis, and cell-EPS interactions. Recent progress of fundamental biofilm research has shed light on novel chemical biology strategies for biofilm control. In this article, chemical biology strategies targeting the bacterial intercellular and intracellular signaling pathways will be discussed.

  17. Adaptation of the Biolog Phenotype MicroArrayTM Technology to Profile the Obligate Anaerobe Geobacter metallireducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joyner, Dominique; Fortney, Julian; Chakraborty, Romy; Hazen, Terry

    2010-05-17

    The Biolog OmniLog? Phenotype MicroArray (PM) plate technology was successfully adapted to generate a select phenotypic profile of the strict anaerobe Geobacter metallireducens (G.m.). The profile generated for G.m. provides insight into the chemical sensitivity of the organism as well as some of its metabolic capabilities when grown with a basal medium containing acetate and Fe(III). The PM technology was developed for aerobic organisms. The reduction of a tetrazolium dye by the test organism represents metabolic activity on the array which is detected and measured by the OmniLog(R) system. We have previously adapted the technology for the anaerobic sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris. In this work, we have taken the technology a step further by adapting it for the iron reducing obligate anaerobe Geobacter metallireducens. In an osmotic stress microarray it was determined that the organism has higher sensitivity to impermeable solutes 3-6percent KCl and 2-5percent NaNO3 that result in osmotic stress by osmosis to the cell than to permeable non-ionic solutes represented by 5-20percent ethylene glycol and 2-3percent urea. The osmotic stress microarray also includes an array of osmoprotectants and precursor molecules that were screened to identify substrates that would provide osmotic protection to NaCl stress. None of the substrates tested conferred resistance to elevated concentrations of salt. Verification studies in which G.m. was grown in defined medium amended with 100mM NaCl (MIC) and the common osmoprotectants betaine, glycine and proline supported the PM findings. Further verification was done by analysis of transcriptomic profiles of G.m. grown under 100mM NaCl stress that revealed up-regulation of genes related to degradation rather than accumulation of the above-mentioned osmoprotectants. The phenotypic profile, supported by additional analysis indicates that the accumulation of these osmoprotectants as a response to salt stress does not

  18. Dynamic interactions of neutrophils and biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefine Hirschfeld

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The majority of microbial infections in humans are biofilm-associated and difficult to treat, as biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and protect themselves from external threats in various ways. Biofilms are tenaciously attached to surfaces and impede the ability of host defense molecules and cells to penetrate them. On the other hand, some biofilms are beneficial for the host and contain protective microorganisms. Microbes in biofilms express pathogen-associated molecular patterns and epitopes that can be recognized by innate immune cells and opsonins, leading to activation of neutrophils and other leukocytes. Neutrophils are part of the first line of defense and have multiple antimicrobial strategies allowing them to attack pathogenic biofilms. Objective/design: In this paper, interaction modes of neutrophils with biofilms are reviewed. Antimicrobial strategies of neutrophils and the counteractions of the biofilm communities, with special attention to oral biofilms, are presented. Moreover, possible adverse effects of neutrophil activity and their biofilm-promoting side effects are discussed. Results/conclusion: Biofilms are partially, but not entirely, protected against neutrophil assault, which include the processes of phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. However, virulence factors of microorganisms, microbial composition, and properties of the extracellular matrix determine whether a biofilm and subsequent microbial spread can be controlled by neutrophils and other host defense factors. Besides, neutrophils may inadvertently contribute to the physical and ecological stability of biofilms by promoting selection of more resistant strains. Moreover, neutrophil enzymes can degrade collagen and other proteins and, as a result, cause harm to the host tissues. These parameters could be crucial factors in the onset of periodontal inflammation and the subsequent tissue breakdown.

  19. Mycobacterium biofilms: factors involved in development, dispersal, and therapeutic strategies against biofilm-relevant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xiaohong; Deng, Wanyan; Liu, Minqiang; Xie, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria can develop biofilm (BF), a multicellular structure largely combining bacteria and their extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The formation of biofilm results in an alternative existence in which microbes ensure their survival in adverse environments. Biofilm-relevant infections are more persistent, resistant to most antibiotics, and more recalcitrant to host immunity. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, can develop biofilm, though whether M. tuberculosis can form biofilm within tuberculosis patients has yet to be determined. Here, we summarize the factors involved in the development and dispersal of mycobacterial biofilms, as well as underlying regulatory factors and inhibitors against biofilm to deepen our understanding of their development and to elucidate potential novel modes of action for future antibiotics. Key factors in biofilm formation identified as drug targets represent a novel and promising avenue for developing better antibiotics.

  20. Novel metabolic activity indicator in Streptococcus mutans biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, D.M.; Hoogenkamp, M.A.; ten Cate, J.M.; Crielaard, W.

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of micro-organisms in biofilms requires novel strategies to evaluate the efficacy of caries preventive agents in actual biofilms. Hence we investigated fluorescence intensity (FI) in Streptococcus mutans biofilms constitutively expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP). Upo

  1. Inhibition of Biofilm Formation Using Novel Nanostructured Surfaces Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Biofilms are ubiquitous in the environment. Few surfaces resist biofilm formation, most promote it. Biofilm formation poses problems in water systems as they can...

  2. Influence of biofilm thickness on micropollutants removal in nitrifying MBBRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torresi, Elena; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus; Smets, Barth F.;

    The removal of pharmaceuticals was investigated in nitrifying Moving Bed Biofilm Reactors (MBBRs) containing carriers with different biofilm thicknesses. The biofilm with the thinnest thickness was found to have the highest nitrification and biotransformation rate for some key pharmaceuticals...

  3. Microbial Biofilms in Endodontic Infections: An Update Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahed Mohammadi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms and microbial aggregates are the common mechanisms for the survival of bacteria in nature. In other words, the ability to form biofilms has been regarded as a virulence factor. Microbial biofilms play an essential role in several infectious diseases such as pulp and periradicular pathosis. The aim of this article was to review the adaptation mechanisms of biofilms, their roles in pulpal and periapical pathosis, factors influencing biofilm formation, mechanisms of their antimicrobial resistance, models developed to create biofilms, observation techniques of endodontic biofilms, and the effects of root canal irrigants and medicaments as well as lasers on endodontic biofilms. The search was performed from 1982 to December 2010, and was limited to papers in English language. The keywords searched on Medline were "biofilms and endodontics," "biofilms and root canal irrigation," "biofilms and intra-canal medicament," and "biofilms and lasers." The reference section of each article was manually searched to find other suitable sources of information.

  4. Electromicrobiology of Dissimilatory Sulfur Reducing Bacterium Desulfuromonas acetexigens

    KAUST Repository

    Bin Bandar, Khaled

    2014-12-01

    Bioelectrochmical systems (BES) are engineered electrochemical devices that harness hidden chemical energy of the wastewater in to the form of electricity or hydrogen. Unique microbial communities enrich in these systems for oxidation of organic matter as well as transfer of resulted electron to anode, known them as “electricigens” communities. Exploring novel electricigenesis microbial communities in the nature and understanding their electromicrobiology is one the important aspect for BES systems scale up. Herein, we report first time the electricigenesis property of an anaerobic, fresh water sediment, sulfur reducing bacterium Desulfuromona acetexigens. The electrochemical behavior of D. acetexigens biofilms grown on graphite-rod electrodes in batch-fed mode under an applied potential was investigated with traditional electroanalytical tools, and correlate the electron transfer from biofilms to electrode with a model electricigen Geobacter sulfurreducens electrochemical behavior. Research findings suggest that D. acetexigens has the ability to use electrode as electron acceptor in BES systems through establishing the direct contact with anode by expressing the membrane bound redox proteins, but not due to the secretion of soluble redox mediators. Preliminary results revealed that D. acetexigens express three distinct redox proteins in their membranes for turnover of the electrons from biofilm to electrode, and the 4 whole electricigenesis process observed to be unique in the D. acetexigens compared to that of well-studied model organism G. sulfurreducens.

  5. The composition and compression of biofilms developed on ultrafiltration membranes determine hydraulic biofilm resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derlon, Nicolas; Grütter, Alexander; Brandenberger, Fabienne; Sutter, Anja; Kuhlicke, Ute; Neu, Thomas R; Morgenroth, Eberhard

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed at identifying how to improve the level of permeate flux stabilisation during gravity-driven membrane filtration without control of biofilm formation. The focus was therefore on understanding (i) how the different fractions of the biofilms (inorganics particles, bacterial cells, EPS matrix) influence its hydraulic resistance and (ii) how the compression of biofilms impacts its hydraulic resistance, i.e., can water head be increased to increase the level of permeate flux stabilisation. Biofilms were developed on ultrafiltration membranes at 88 and 284 cm water heads with dead-end filtration for around 50 days. A larger water head resulted in a smaller biofilm permeability (150 and 50 L m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1) for biofilms grown at 88 cm and 284 cm water head, respectively). Biofilms were mainly composed of EPS (>90% in volume). The comparison of the hydraulic resistances of biofilms to model fouling layers indicated that most of the hydraulic resistance is due to the EPS matrix. The compressibility of the biofilm was also evaluated by subjecting the biofilms to short-term (few minutes) and long-term variations of transmembrane pressures (TMP). A sudden change of TMP resulted in an instantaneous and reversible change of biofilm hydraulic resistance. A long-term change of TMP induced a slow change in the biofilm hydraulic resistance. Our results demonstrate that the response of biofilms to a TMP change has two components: an immediate variation of resistance (due to compression/relaxation) and a long-term response (linked to biofilm adaptation/growth). Our results provide relevant information about the relationship between the operating conditions in terms of TMP, the biofilm structure and composition and the resulting biofilm hydraulic resistance. These findings have practical implications for a broad range of membrane systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Anthranilate deteriorates the structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and antagonizes the biofilm-enhancing indole effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Park, Ha-Young; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2015-04-01

    Anthranilate and indole are alternative degradation products of tryptophan, depending on the bacterial species. While indole enhances the biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we found that anthranilate, the tryptophan degradation product of P. aeruginosa, had an opposite effect on P. aeruginosa biofilm formation, in which anthranilate deteriorated the mushroom structure of biofilm. The anthranilate effect on biofilm formation was differentially exerted depending on the developmental stage and the presence of shear force. Anthranilate slightly accelerated the initial attachment of P. aeruginosa at the early stage of biofilm development and appeared to build more biofilm without shear force. But anthranilate weakened the biofilm structure in the late stage, deteriorating the mushroom structure of biofilms with shear force to make a flat biofilm. To investigate the interplay of anthranilate with indole in biofilm formation, biofilms were cotreated with anthranilate and indole, and the results showed that anthranilate antagonized the biofilm-enhancing effect of indole. Anthranilate was able to deteriorate the preformed biofilm. The effect of anthranilate and indole on biofilm formation was quorum sensing independent. AntR, a regulator of anthranilate-degrading metabolism was synergistically activated by cotreatment with anthranilate and indole, suggesting that indole might enhance biofilm formation by facilitating the degradation of anthranilate. Anthranilate slightly but significantly affected the cyclic diguaniylate (c-di-GMP) level and transcription of major extracellular polysaccharide (Psl, Pel, and alginate) operons. These results suggest that anthranilate may be a promising antibiofilm agent and antagonize the effect of indole on P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. How Staphylococcus aureus biofilms develop their characteristic structure

    OpenAIRE

    Periasamy, Saravanan; Joo, Hwang-Soo; Anthony C. Duong; Bach, Thanh-Huy L.; Tan, Vee Y.; Chatterjee, Som S; Cheung, Gordon Y. C.; Otto, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms cause significant problems in the environment and during the treatment of infections. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying biofilm formation are poorly understood. There is a particular lack of knowledge about biofilm maturation processes, such as biofilm structuring and detachment, which are deemed crucial for the maintenance of biofilm viability and the dissemination of cells from a biofilm. Here, we identify the phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) surfactant peptides as key biofi...

  8. [Biofilms and their significance in medical microbiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernohorská, L; Votava, M

    2002-11-01

    Microorganisms are able to adhere to various surfaces and to form there a three-dimensional structure known as biofilm. In biofilms, microbial cells show characteristics and behaviours different from those of plankton cells. Intercellular signalizations of the quorum-sensing type regulate interaction between members of the biofilm. Bacteria embedded in the biofilm can escape and form well known planktonic forms, that are obviously only a part of the bacterial life cycle. Bacteria adhere also to medically important surfaces such as catheters, either urinary or intravenous ones, artificial heart valves, orthopedic implants and so on and contribute to device-related infections like cystitis, catheter-related sepsis, endocarditis etc. Once a biofilm has been established on a surface, the bacteria harboured inside are less exposed to the host's immune response and less susceptible to antibiotics. As an important cause of nosocomial infections the biofilm must remain in the centre of the microbiologist's attention.

  9. Innovative Strategies to Overcome Biofilm Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Taraszkiewicz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the recent literature concerning the efficiency of antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation toward various microbial species in planktonic and biofilm cultures. The review is mainly focused on biofilm-growing microrganisms because this form of growth poses a threat to chronically infected or immunocompromised patients and is difficult to eradicate from medical devices. We discuss the biofilm formation process and mechanisms of its increased resistance to various antimicrobials. We present, based on data in the literature, strategies for overcoming the problem of biofilm resistance. Factors that have potential for use in increasing the efficiency of the killing of biofilm-forming bacteria include plant extracts, enzymes that disturb the biofilm structure, and other nonenzymatic molecules. We propose combining antimicrobial photodynamic therapy with various antimicrobial and antibiofilm approaches to obtain a synergistic effect to permit efficient microbial growth control at low photosensitizer doses.

  10. Silver-Palladium Surfaces Inhibit Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Schroll, Casper; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2009-01-01

    Undesired biofilm formation is a major concern in many areas. In the present study, we investigated biofilm-inhibiting properties of a silver-palladium surface that kills bacteria by generating microelectric fields and electrochemical redox processes. For evaluation of the biofilm inhibition...... efficacy and study of the biofilm inhibition mechanism, the silver-sensitive Escherichia coli J53 and the silver-resistant E. coli J53[pMG101] strains were used as model organisms, and batch and flow chamber setups were used as model systems. In the case of the silver-sensitive strain, the silver......-palladium surfaces killed the bacteria and prevented biofilm formation under conditions of low or high bacterial load. In the case of the silver-resistant strain, the silver-palladium surfaces killed surface-associated bacteria and prevented biofilm formation under conditions of low bacterial load, whereas under...

  11. Development of a simplified biofilm model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sushovan; Mazumder, Debabrata

    2017-07-01

    A simplified approach for analyzing the biofilm process in deriving an easy model has been presented. This simplified biofilm model formulated correlations between substrate concentration in the influent/effluent and at biofilm-liquid interface along with substrate flux and biofilm thickness. The model essentially considered the external mass transport according to Fick's Law, steady state substrate as well as biomass balance for attached growth microorganisms. In substrate utilization, Monod growth kinetics has been followed incorporating relevant boundary conditions at the liquid-biofilm interface and at the attachment surface. The numerical solution of equations was accomplished using Runge-Kutta method and accordingly an integrated computer program was developed. The model has been successfully applied in a distinct set of trials with varying range of representative input variables. The model performance was compared with available existing methods and it was found an easy, accurate method that can be used for process design of biofilm reactor.

  12. Microbial biofilms: biosurfactants as antibiofilm agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banat, Ibrahim M; De Rienzo, Mayri A Díaz; Quinn, Gerry A

    2014-12-01

    Current microbial inhibition strategies based on planktonic bacterial physiology have been known to have limited efficacy on the growth of biofilm communities. This problem can be exacerbated by the emergence of increasingly resistant clinical strains. All aspects of biofilm measurement, monitoring, dispersal, control, and inhibition are becoming issues of increasing importance. Biosurfactants have merited renewed interest in both clinical and hygienic sectors due to their potential to disperse microbial biofilms in addition to many other advantages. The dispersal properties of biosurfactants have been shown to rival those of conventional inhibitory agents against bacterial and yeast biofilms. This makes them suitable candidates for use in new generations of microbial dispersal agents and for use as adjuvants for existing microbial suppression or eradication strategies. In this review, we explore aspects of biofilm characteristics and examine the contribution of biologically derived surface-active agents (biosurfactants) to the disruption or inhibition of microbial biofilms.

  13. The clinical impact of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2011-01-01

    . Bacterial biofilms are resistant to antibiotics, disinfectant chemicals and to phagocytosis and other components of the innate and adaptive inflammatory defense system of the body. It is known, for example, that persistence of staphylococcal infections related to foreign bodies is due to biofilm formation....... Likewise, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients are caused by biofilm growing mucoid strains. Gradients of nutrients and oxygen exist from the top to the bottom of biofilms and the bacterial cells located in nutrient poor areas have decreased metabolic activity...... and increased doubling times. These more or less dormant cells are therefore responsible for some of the tolerance to antibiotics. Biofilm growth is associated with an increased level of mutations. Bacteria in biofilms communicate by means of molecules, which activates certain genes responsible for production...

  14. Artificial biofilms establish the role of matrix interactions in staphylococcal biofilm assembly and disassembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Elizabeth J; Ganesan, Mahesh; Younger, John G; Solomon, Michael J

    2015-08-14

    We demonstrate that the microstructural and mechanical properties of bacterial biofilms can be created through colloidal self-assembly of cells and polymers, and thereby link the complex material properties of biofilms to well understood colloidal and polymeric behaviors. This finding is applied to soften and disassemble staphylococcal biofilms through pH changes. Bacterial biofilms are viscoelastic, structured communities of cells encapsulated in an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) comprised of polysaccharides, proteins, and DNA. Although the identity and abundance of EPS macromolecules are known, how these matrix materials interact with themselves and bacterial cells to generate biofilm morphology and mechanics is not understood. Here, we find that the colloidal self-assembly of Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A cells and polysaccharides into viscoelastic biofilms is driven by thermodynamic phase instability of EPS. pH conditions that induce phase instability of chitosan produce artificial S. epidermidis biofilms whose mechanics match natural S. epidermidis biofilms. Furthermore, pH-induced solubilization of the matrix triggers disassembly in both artificial and natural S. epidermidis biofilms. This pH-induced disassembly occurs in biofilms formed by five additional staphylococcal strains, including three clinical isolates. Our findings suggest that colloidal self-assembly of cells and matrix polymers produces biofilm viscoelasticity and that biofilm control strategies can exploit this mechanism.

  15. Physiology of Geobacter metallireducens under excess and limitation of electron donors. Part II. Mimicking environmental conditions during cultivation in retentostats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marozava, Sviatlana; Röling, Wilfred F M; Seifert, Jana; Küffner, Robert; von Bergen, Martin; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2014-06-01

    The strict anaerobe Geobacter metallireducens was cultivated in retentostats under acetate and acetate plus benzoate limitation in the presence of Fe(III) citrate in order to investigate its physiology under close to natural conditions. Growth rates below 0.003h(-1) were achieved in the course of cultivation. A nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach (nano-LC-MS/MS) with subsequent label-free quantification was performed on proteins extracted from cells sampled at different time points during retentostat cultivation. Proteins detected at low (0.002h(-1)) and high (0.06h(-1)) growth rates were compared between corresponding growth conditions (acetate or acetate plus benzoate). Carbon limitation significantly increased the abundances of several catabolic proteins involved in the degradation of substrates not present in the medium (ethanol, butyrate, fatty acids, and aromatic compounds). Growth rate-specific physiology was reflected in the changed abundances of energy-, chemotaxis-, oxidative stress-, and transport-related proteins. Mimicking natural conditions by extremely slow bacterial growth allowed to show how G. metallireducens optimized its physiology in order to survive in its natural habitats, since it was prepared to consume several carbon sources simultaneously and to withstand various environmental stresses.

  16. Fate of Cd during microbial Fe(III) mineral reduction by a novel and Cd-tolerant Geobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehe, E Marie; Obst, Martin; Hitchcock, Adam; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Behrens, Sebastian; Schröder, Christian; Byrne, James M; Michel, F Marc; Krämer, Ute; Kappler, Andreas

    2013-12-17

    Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides affect the mobility of contaminants in the environment by providing reactive surfaces for sorption. This includes the toxic metal cadmium (Cd), which prevails in agricultural soils and is taken up by crops. Fe(III)-reducing bacteria can mobilize such contaminants by Fe(III) mineral dissolution or immobilize them by sorption to or coprecipitation with secondary Fe minerals. To date, not much is known about the fate of Fe(III) mineral-associated Cd during microbial Fe(III) reduction. Here, we describe the isolation of a new Geobacter sp. strain Cd1 from a Cd-contaminated field site, where the strain accounts for 10(4) cells g(-1) dry soil. Strain Cd1 reduces the poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxyhydroxide ferrihydrite in the presence of at least up to 112 mg Cd L(-1). During initial microbial reduction of Cd-loaded ferrihydrite, sorbed Cd was mobilized. However, during continuous microbial Fe(III) reduction, Cd was immobilized by sorption to and/or coprecipitation within newly formed secondary minerals that contained Ca, Fe, and carbonate, implying the formation of an otavite-siderite-calcite (CdCO3-FeCO3-CaCO3) mixed mineral phase. Our data shows that microbially mediated turnover of Fe minerals affects the mobility of Cd in soils, potentially altering the dynamics of Cd uptake into food or phyto-remediating plants.

  17. Physiology of Geobacter metallireducens under excess and limitation of electron donors. Part I. Batch cultivation with excess of carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marozava, Sviatlana; Röling, Wilfred F M; Seifert, Jana; Küffner, Robert; von Bergen, Martin; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2014-06-01

    For microorganisms that play an important role in bioremediation, the adaptation to swift changes in the availability of various substrates is a key for survival. The iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter metallireducens was hypothesized to repress utilization of less preferred substrates in the presence of high concentrations of easily degradable compounds. In our experiments, acetate and ethanol were preferred over benzoate, but benzoate was co-consumed with toluene and butyrate. To reveal overall physiological changes caused by different single substrates and a mixture of acetate plus benzoate, a nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach (nano-LC-MS/MS) was performed using label-free quantification. Significant differential expression during growth on different substrates was observed for 155 out of 1477 proteins. The benzoyl-CoA pathway was found to be subjected to incomplete repression during exponential growth on acetate in the presence of benzoate and on butyrate as a single substrate. Peripheral pathways of toluene, ethanol, and butyrate degradation were highly expressed only during growth on the corresponding substrates. However, low expression of these pathways was detected in all other tested conditions. Therefore, G. metallireducens seems to lack strong carbon catabolite repression under high substrate concentrations, which might be advantageous for survival in habitats rich in fatty acids and aromatic hydrocarbons.

  18. Flux analysis of central metabolic pathways in the Fe(III)-reducing organism Geobacter metallireducens via 13C isotopiclabeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Chakraborty, Romy; Martin, Hector Garcia; Chu,Jeannie; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-08-13

    We analyzed the carbon fluxes in the central metabolism ofGeobacter metallireducens strain GS-15 using 13C isotopomer modeling.Acetate labeled in the 1st or 2nd position was the sole carbon source,and Fe-NTA was the sole terminal electron acceptor. The measured labeledacetate uptake rate was 21 mmol/gdw/h in the exponential growth phase.The resulting isotope labeling pattern of amino acids allowed an accuratedetermination of the in vivo global metabolic reaction rates (fluxes)through the central metabolic pathways using a computational isotopomermodel. The model indicated that over 90 percent of the acetate wascompletely oxidized to CO2 via a complete tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cyclewhile reducing iron. Pyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvatecarboxykinase were present under these conditions, but enzymes in theglyoxylate shunt and malic enzyme were absent. Gluconeogenesis and thepentose phosphate pathway were mainly employed for biosynthesis andaccounted for less than 3 percent of total carbon consumption. The modelalso indicated surprisingly high reversibility in the reaction betweenoxoglutarate and succinate. This step operates close to the thermodynamicequilibrium possibly because succinate is synthesized via a transferasereaction, and its product, acetyl-CoA, inhibits the conversion ofoxoglutarate to succinate. These findings enable a better understandingof the relationship between genome annotation and extant metabolicpathways in G. metallireducens.

  19. Penetration of erythromycin through Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Mao-hu; HE Lei; GAO Jie; LIU Yun-xi; SUO Ji-jiang; XING Yu-bin; JIA Ning

    2013-01-01

    Background The catheter related infection caused by Staphylococcus epiderrnidis biofilm is increasing and difficult to treat by antimicrobial chemotherapy.The properties of biofilms that give rise to antibiotic resistance are only partially understood.This study aimed to elucidate the penetration of erythromycin through Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm.Methods The penetration ratio of erythromycin through Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms of 1457,1457-msrA,and wild isolate S68 was detected by biofilm penetration model at different time points according to the standard regression curve.The RNNDNA ratio and the cell density within the biofilms were observed by confocal laser microscope and transmission electromicroscope,respectively.Results The penetration ratios of erythromycin through the biofilms of 1457,1457-msrA,and S68 after cultivation for 36 hours were 0.93,0.55 and 0.4,respectively.The erythromycin penetration ratio through 1457 biofilm (0.58 after 8 hours)was higher than that through the other two (0.499 and 0.31 after 24 hours).Lower growth rate of the cells in biofilm was shown,with reduction of RNA/DNA proportion observed by confocal laser microscope through acridine orange stain.Compared with the control group observed by transmission electrmicroscope,the cell density of biofilm air face was lower than that of agar face,with more cell debris.Conclusions Erythromycin could penetrate to the Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm,but could not kill the cells thoroughly.The lower growth rate of the cells within biofilm could help decreasing the erythromycin susceptibility.

  20. Polymicrobial biofilms by diabetic foot clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottola, Carla; Mendes, João J; Cristino, José Melo; Cavaco-Silva, Patrícia; Tavares, Luís; Oliveira, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major chronic disease that continues to increase significantly. One of the most important and costly complications of diabetes is foot ulceration that may be colonized by pathogenic and antimicrobial resistant bacteria, which may express several virulence factors that could impair treatment success. These bacterial communities can be organized in polymicrobial biofilms, which may be responsible for diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) chronicity. We evaluated the influence of polymicrobial communities in the ability of DFU isolates to produce biofilm, using a microtiter plate assay and a multiplex fluorescent in situ hybridization, at three time points (24, 48, 72 h), after evaluating biofilm formation by 95 DFU isolates belonging to several bacterial genera (Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium, Enterococcus, Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter). All isolates were biofilm-positive at 24 h, and the amount of biofilm produced increased with incubation time. Pseudomonas presented the higher biofilm production, followed by Corynebacterium, Acinetobacter, Staphylococcus and Enterococcus. Significant differences were found in biofilm formation between the three time points. Polymicrobial communities produced higher biofilm values than individual species. Pseudomonas + Enterococcus, Acinetobacter + Staphylococcus and Corynebacterium + Staphylococcus produced higher biofilm than the ones formed by E. faecalis + Staphylococcus and E. faecalis + Corynebacterium. Synergy between bacteria present in dual or multispecies biofilms has been described, and this work represents the first report on time course of biofilm formation by polymicrobial communities from DFUs including several species. The biological behavior of different bacterial species in polymicrobial biofilms has important clinical implications for the successful treatment of these infections.

  1. Strategies for combating bacterial biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hong; Moser, Claus Ernst; Wang, Heng-Zhuang

    2015-01-01

    Formation of biofilm is a survival strategy for bacteria and fungi to adapt to their living environment, especially in the hostile environment. Under the protection of biofilm, microbial cells in biofilm become tolerant and resistant to antibiotics and the immune responses, which increases the di.......International Journal of Oral Science advance online publication, 12 December 2014; doi:10.1038/ijos.2014.65....

  2. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenkamp, Michel A.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Janus, Marleen M.; ten Cate, Jacob M.; de Soet, Johannes J.; Crielaard, Wim; van der Veen, Monique H.

    2016-01-01

    Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation) as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation). Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red) were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries. PMID:27997567

  3. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgenant, Catherine M C; Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Krom, Bastiaan P; Janus, Marleen M; Ten Cate, Jacob M; de Soet, Johannes J; Crielaard, Wim; van der Veen, Monique H

    2016-01-01

    Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation) as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation). Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red) were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries.

  4. Antibiotic tolerance and resistance in biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important features of microbial biofilms is their tolerance to antimicrobial agents and components of the host immune system. The difficulty of treating biofilm infections with antibiotics is a major clinical problem. Although antibiotics may decrease the number of bacteria...... in biofilms, they will not completely eradicate the bacteria in vivo which may have important clinical consequences in form of relapses of the infection....

  5. In situ rheology of yeast biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnoni, Lorena I; Tarifa, María C; Lozano, Jorge E; Genovese, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the in situ rheological behavior of yeast biofilms growing on stainless steel under static and turbulent flow. The species used (Rhodototula mucilaginosa, Candida krusei, Candida kefyr and Candida tropicalis) were isolated from a clarified apple juice industry. The flow conditions impacted biofilm composition over time, with a predominance of C. krusei under static and turbulent flow. Likewise, structural variations occurred, with a tighter appearance under dynamic flow. Under turbulent flow there was an increase of 112 μm in biofilm thickness at 11 weeks (p rheology and contribute to a thin body of knowledge about fungal biofilm formation.

  6. Biofilm responses to marine fish farm wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz-Lazaro, Carlos, E-mail: carsanz@um.es [Departamento de Ecologia e Hidrologia, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad de Murcia, 30100 Murcia (Spain); Navarrete-Mier, Francisco; Marin, Arnaldo [Departamento de Ecologia e Hidrologia, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad de Murcia, 30100 Murcia (Spain)

    2011-03-15

    The changes in the biofilm community due to organic matter enrichment, eutrophication and metal contamination derived from fish farming were studied. The biofilm biomass, polysaccharide content, trophic niche and element accumulation were quantified along an environmental gradient of fish farm wastes in two seasons. Biofilm structure and trophic diversity was influenced by seasonality as well as by the fish farm waste load. Fish farming enhanced the accumulation of organic carbon, nutrients, selenium and metals by the biofilm community. The accumulation pattern of these elements was similar regardless of the structure and trophic niche of the community. This suggests that the biofilm communities can be considered a reliable tool for assessing dissolved aquaculture wastes. Due to the ubiquity of biofilms and its wide range of consumers, its role as a sink of dissolved wastes may have important implications for the transfer of aquaculture wastes to higher trophic levels in coastal systems. - Research highlights: > Biofilms can act as a trophic pathway of fish farm dissolved wastes. > Biofilms are reliable tools for monitoring fish farm dissolved wastes. > The influence of the fish farm dissolved wastes can be detected 120-350 m from farm. - Under the influence of fish farming biofilm accumulates organic carbon, nutrients, selenium and metals, regardless of the structure and trophic niche of the community.

  7. Microbial biofilms: from ecology to molecular genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, M E; O'toole, G A

    2000-12-01

    Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms attached to surfaces or associated with interfaces. Despite the focus of modern microbiology research on pure culture, planktonic (free-swimming) bacteria, it is now widely recognized that most bacteria found in natural, clinical, and industrial settings persist in association with surfaces. Furthermore, these microbial communities are often composed of multiple species that interact with each other and their environment. The determination of biofilm architecture, particularly the spatial arrangement of microcolonies (clusters of cells) relative to one another, has profound implications for the function of these complex communities. Numerous new experimental approaches and methodologies have been developed in order to explore metabolic interactions, phylogenetic groupings, and competition among members of the biofilm. To complement this broad view of biofilm ecology, individual organisms have been studied using molecular genetics in order to identify the genes required for biofilm development and to dissect the regulatory pathways that control the plankton-to-biofilm transition. These molecular genetic studies have led to the emergence of the concept of biofilm formation as a novel system for the study of bacterial development. The recent explosion in the field of biofilm research has led to exciting progress in the development of new technologies for studying these communities, advanced our understanding of the ecological significance of surface-attached bacteria, and provided new insights into the molecular genetic basis of biofilm development.

  8. Growing and Analyzing Biofilms in Flow Chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes the setup of flow chamber systems for the study of microbial biofilms, and methods for the analysis of structural biofilm formation. Use of flow chambers allows direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The biofilms in flow chambers develop under hydrodynamic...... conditions, and the environment can be carefully controlled and easily changed. The protocols in this unit include construction of the flow chamber and the bubble trap, assembly and sterilization of the flow chamber system, inoculation of the flow chambers, running of the system, image capture and analysis...

  9. Aspartate inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hang; Wang, Mengyue; Yu, Junping; Wei, Hongping

    2015-04-01

    Biofilm formation renders Staphylococcus aureus highly resistant to conventional antibiotics and host defenses. Four D-amino acids (D-Leu, D-Met, D-Trp and D-Tyr) have been reported to be able to inhibit biofilm formation and disassemble established S. aureus biofilms. We report here for the first time that both D- and L-isoforms of aspartate (Asp) inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation on tissue culture plates. Similar biofilm inhibition effects were also observed against other staphylococcal strains, including S. saprophyticus, S. equorum, S. chromogenes and S. haemolyticus. It was found that Asp at high concentrations (>10 mM) inhibited the growth of planktonic N315 cells, but at subinhibitory concentrations decreased the cellular metabolic activity without influencing cell growth. The decreased cellular metabolic activity might be the reason for the production of less protein and DNA in the matrix of the biofilms formed in the presence of Asp. However, varied inhibition efficacies of Asp were observed for biofilms formed by clinical staphylococcal isolates. There might be mechanisms other than decreasing the metabolic activity, e.g. the biofilm phenotypes, affecting biofilm formation in the presence of Asp.

  10. Mechanisms of Candida biofilm drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taff, Heather T; Mitchell, Kaitlin F; Edward, Jessica A; Andes, David R

    2013-01-01

    Candida commonly adheres to implanted medical devices, growing as a resilient biofilm capable of withstanding extraordinarily high antifungal concentrations. As currently available antifungals have minimal activity against biofilms, new drugs to treat these recalcitrant infections are urgently needed. Recent investigations have begun to shed light on the mechanisms behind the profound resistance associated with the biofilm mode of growth. This resistance appears to be multifactorial, involving both mechanisms similar to conventional, planktonic antifungal resistance, such as increased efflux pump activity, as well as mechanisms specific to the biofilm lifestyle. A unique biofilm property is the production of an extracellular matrix. Two components of this material, β-glucan and extracellular DNA, promote biofilm resistance to multiple antifungals. Biofilm formation also engages several stress response pathways that impair the activity of azole drugs. Resistance within a biofilm is often heterogeneous, with the development of a subpopulation of resistant persister cells. In this article we review the molecular mechanisms underlying Candida biofilm antifungal resistance and their relative contributions during various growth phases. PMID:24059922

  11. Phototrophic biofilms and their potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeselers, G; Loosdrecht, M C M van; Muyzer, G

    2008-06-01

    Phototrophic biofilms occur on surfaces exposed to light in a range of terrestrial and aquatic environments. Oxygenic phototrophs like diatoms, green algae, and cyanobacteria are the major primary producers that generate energy and reduce carbon dioxide, providing the system with organic substrates and oxygen. Photosynthesis fuels processes and conversions in the total biofilm community, including the metabolism of heterotrophic organisms. A matrix of polymeric substances secreted by phototrophs and heterotrophs enhances the attachment of the biofilm community. This review discusses the actual and potential applications of phototrophic biofilms in wastewater treatment, bioremediation, fish-feed production, biohydrogen production, and soil improvement.

  12. Focus on the physics of biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecuyer, Sigolene; Stocker, Roman; Rusconi, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria are the smallest and most abundant form of life. They have traditionally been considered as primarily planktonic organisms, swimming or floating in a liquid medium, and this view has shaped many of the approaches to microbial processes, including for example the design of most antibiotics. However, over the last few decades it has become clear that many bacteria often adopt a sessile, surface-associated lifestyle, forming complex multicellular communities called biofilms. Bacterial biofilms are found in a vast range of environments and have major consequences on human health and industrial processes, from biofouling of surfaces to the spread of diseases. Although the study of biofilms has been biologists’ territory for a long time, a multitude of phenomena in the formation and development of biofilms hinges on physical processes. We are pleased to present a collection of research papers that discuss some of the latest developments in many of the areas to which physicists can contribute a deeper understanding of biofilms, both experimentally and theoretically. The topics covered range from the influence of physical environmental parameters on cell attachment and subsequent biofilm growth, to the use of local probes and imaging techniques to investigate biofilm structure, to the development of biofilms in complex environments and the modeling of colony morphogenesis. The results presented contribute to addressing some of the major challenges in microbiology today, including the prevention of surface contamination, the optimization of biofilm disruption methods and the effectiveness of antibiotic treatments.

  13. Microbial Biofilms: from Ecology to Molecular Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Mary Ellen; O'toole, George A.

    2000-01-01

    Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms attached to surfaces or associated with interfaces. Despite the focus of modern microbiology research on pure culture, planktonic (free-swimming) bacteria, it is now widely recognized that most bacteria found in natural, clinical, and industrial settings persist in association with surfaces. Furthermore, these microbial communities are often composed of multiple species that interact with each other and their environment. The determination of biofilm architecture, particularly the spatial arrangement of microcolonies (clusters of cells) relative to one another, has profound implications for the function of these complex communities. Numerous new experimental approaches and methodologies have been developed in order to explore metabolic interactions, phylogenetic groupings, and competition among members of the biofilm. To complement this broad view of biofilm ecology, individual organisms have been studied using molecular genetics in order to identify the genes required for biofilm development and to dissect the regulatory pathways that control the plankton-to-biofilm transition. These molecular genetic studies have led to the emergence of the concept of biofilm formation as a novel system for the study of bacterial development. The recent explosion in the field of biofilm research has led to exciting progress in the development of new technologies for studying these communities, advanced our understanding of the ecological significance of surface-attached bacteria, and provided new insights into the molecular genetic basis of biofilm development. PMID:11104821

  14. AFM Structural Characterization of Drinking Water Biofilm ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air and aqueous solution. Operating parameters were optimized to improve imaging of structural details for a mature biofilm in liquid. By using a soft cantilever (0.03 N/m) and slow scan rate (0.5 Hz), biofilm and individual bacterial cell’s structural topography were resolved and continuously imaged in liquid without loss of spatial resolution or sample damage. The developed methodology will allow future in situ investigations to temporally monitor mixed culture drinking water biofilm structural changes during disinfection treatments. Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air and aqueous solution. Operating parameters were optimized to improve imaging of structural details for a mature biofilm in liquid. By using a soft cantilever (0.03 N/m) and slow scan rate (0.5 Hz), biofilm and individual bacterial cell’s structural topography were resolved and continuously imaged in liquid without loss of spatial resolution or sample damage. The developed methodo

  15. Electroactive biofilms of sulphate reducing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordas, Cristina M.; Guerra, L. Tiago; Xavier, Catarina [Requimte-CQFB, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Moura, Jose J.G. [Requimte-CQFB, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)], E-mail: jose.moura@dq.fct.unl.pt

    2008-12-01

    Biofilms formed from a pure strain of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans 27774 on stainless steel and graphite polarised surfaces were studied. The polarisation conditions applied were -0.4 V vs. SCE for different times. A cathodic current related with the biofilms growth was observed with a maximum intensity of -270 mA m{sup -2} that remained stable for several days using graphite electrodes. These sulphate reducing bacteria biofilms present electrocatalytic activity towards hydrogen and oxygen reduction reactions. Electrode polarisation has a selective effect on the catalytic activity. The biofilms were also observed by scanning electronic microscopy revealing the formation of homogeneous films on the surfaces.

  16. Biofilm formation in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Francesca; Vuotto, Claudia; Donelli, Gianfranco

    2014-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has received much attention in recent years because of its increasing involvement in a number of severe infections and outbreaks occurring in clinical settings, and presumably related to its ability to survive and persist in hospital environments. The treatment of infections caused by A. baumannii nosocomial strains has become increasingly problematic, due to their intrinsic and/or acquired resistance to multiple classes of antibiotics. Furthermore, the demonstrated ability of nosocomial strains to grow as biofilm is believed to play a significant role in their persistence and antibiotic resistance. This review summarises current knowledge on A. baumannii biofilm formation and its clinical significance, as well as the related genetic determinants and the regulation of this process.

  17. Antimicrobial and biofilm inhibiting diketopiperazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, M P; Abraham, W-R

    2012-01-01

    Diketopiperazines are the smallest cyclic peptides known. 90% of Gram-negative bacteria produce diketopiperazines and they have also been isolated from Gram-positive bacteria, fungi and higher organisms. Biosynthesis of cyclodipeptides can be achieved by dedicated nonribosomal peptide synthetases or by a novel type of synthetases named cyclopeptide synthases. Since the first report in 1924 a large number of bioactive diketopiperazines was discovered spanning activities as antitumor, antiviral, antifungal, antibacterial, antiprion, antihyperglycemic or glycosidase inhibitor agents. As infections are of increasing concern for human health and resistances against existing antibiotics are growing this review focuses on the antimicrobial activities of diketopiperazines. The antibiotic bicyclomycin is a diketopiperazine and structure activity studies revealed the unique nature of this compound which was finally developed for clinical applications. The antimicrobial activities of a number of other diketopiperazines along with structure activity relationships are discussed. Here a special focus is on the activity-toxicity problem of many compounds setting tight limitations to their application as drugs. Not only these classical antimicrobial activities but also proposed action in modulating bacterial communication as a new target to control biofilms will be evaluated. Pathogens organized in biofilms are difficult to eradicate because of the increase of their tolerance for antibiotics for several orders. Diketopiperazines were reported to modulate LuxR-mediated quorum-sensing systems of bacteria, and they are considered to influence cell-cell signaling offering alternative ways of biofilm control by interfering with microbial communication. Concluding the review we will finally discuss the potential of diketopiperazines in the clinic to erase biofilm infections.

  18. Alginate production affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development and architecture, but is not essential for biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stapper, A.P.; Narasimhan, G.; Oman, D.E.

    2004-01-01

    -overproducing (mucA22) and alginate-defective (algD) variants in order to discern the role of alginate in biofilm formation. These strains, PAO1, Alg(+) PAOmucA22 and Alg(-) PAOalgD, tagged with green fluorescent protein, were grown in a continuous flow cell system to characterize the developmental cycles...... of their biofilm formation using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Biofilm Image Processing (BIP) and Community Statistics (COMSTAT) software programs were used to provide quantitative measurements of the two-dimensional biofilm images. All three strains formed distinguishable biofilm architectures, indicating...

  19. Magnetic fields suppress Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and enhance ciprofloxacin activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, H M H N; Nguyen, D; Mogarala, S; Osiñski, M; Smyth, H D C

    2015-01-01

    Due to the refractory nature of pathogenic microbial biofilms, innovative biofilm eradication strategies are constantly being sought. Thus, this study addresses a novel approach to eradicate Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNP), ciprofloxacin (Cipro), and magnetic fields were systematically evaluated in vitro for their relative anti-biofilm contributions. Twenty-four-hour biofilms exposed to aerosolized MNPs, Cipro, or a combination of both, were assessed in the presence or absence of magnetic fields (Static one-sided, Static switched, Oscillating, Static + oscillating) using changes in bacterial metabolism, biofilm biomass, and biofilm imaging. The biofilms exposed to magnetic fields alone exhibited significant metabolic and biomass reductions (p biofilms were treated with a MNP/Cipro combination, the most significant metabolic and biomass reductions were observed when exposed to static switched magnetic fields (p biofilms to a static switched magnetic field alone, or co-administration with MNP/Cipro/MNP + Cipro appears to be a promising approach to eradicate biofilms of this bacterium.

  20. Protein-based biofilm matrices in Staphylococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro eSpeziale

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis are the most important etiological agents of biofilm associated-infections on indwelling medical devices. Biofilm infections may also develop independently of indwelling devices, e.g. in native valve endocarditis, bone tissue and open wounds. After attachment to tissue or indwelling medical devices that have been conditioned with host plasma proteins, staphylococcal biofilms grow and produce a specific environment which provides the conditions for cell-cell interaction and formation of multicellular communities. Bacteria living in biofilms express a variety of macromolecules, including exopolysaccharides, proteins, extracellular eDNA and other polymers. The S. aureus surface protein C and G (SasC and SasG, clumping factor B (ClfB, serine aspartate repeat protein (SdrC, the biofilm-associated protein (Bap and the fibronectin/fibrinogen-binding proteins (FnBPA and FnBPB are individually implicated in biofilm matrix formation. In S. epidermidis, a protein named accumulation-associated protein (Aap contributes to both the primary attachment phase and the establishment of intercellular connections by forming fibrils on the cell surface. In S. epidermidis proteinaceous biofilm formation can also be mediated by the extracellular matrix binding protein (Embp and S. epidermidis surface protein C (SesC. Additionally, multifunctional proteins such as extracellular adherence protein (Eap and extracellular matrix protein binding protein (Emp of S. aureus and the iron-regulated surface determinant protein C (IsdC of S. lugdunensis can promote biofilm formation in iron-depleted conditions. This multitude of proteins intervene at different stages of biofilm formation with certain proteins contributing to biofilm accumulation and others mediating primary attachment to surfaces. This review examines the contribution of proteins to biofilm formation in staphylococci. The potential to develop vaccines to prevent

  1. Reliability of Haemophilus influenzae biofilm measurement via static method, and determinants of in vitro biofilm production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaid, Najla A; Tristram, Stephen; Narkowicz, Christian K; Jacobson, Glenn A

    2016-12-01

    Information is lacking regarding the precision of microtitre plate (MTP) assays used to measure biofilm. This study investigated the precision of an MTP assay to measure biofilm production by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and the effects of frozen storage and inoculation technique on biofilm production. The density of bacterial final growth was determined by absorbance after 18-20 h incubation, and biofilm production was then measured by absorbance after crystal violet staining. Biofilm formation was categorised as high and low for each strain. For the high biofilm producing strains of NTHi, interday reproducibility of NTHi biofilm formation measured using the MTP assay was excellent and met the acceptance criteria, but higher variability was observed in low biofilm producers. Method of inoculum preparation was a determinant of biofilm formation with inoculum prepared directly from solid media showing increased biofilm production for at least one of the high producing strains. In general, storage of NTHi cultures at -80 °C for up to 48 weeks did not have any major effect on their ability to produce biofilm.

  2. Subinhibitory concentrations of azithromycin decrease nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilm formation and Diminish established biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starner, Timothy D; Shrout, Joshua D; Parsek, Matthew R; Appelbaum, Peter C; Kim, GunHee

    2008-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) commonly causes otitis media, chronic bronchitis in emphysema, and early airway infections in cystic fibrosis. Long-term, low-dose azithromycin has been shown to improve clinical outcomes in chronic lung diseases, although the mechanism of action remains unclear. The inhibition of bacterial biofilms by azithromycin has been postulated to be one mechanism mediating these effects. We hypothesized that subinhibitory concentrations of azithromycin would affect NTHi biofilm formation. Laboratory strains of NTHi expressing green fluorescent protein and azithromycin-resistant clinical isolates were grown in flow-cell and static-culture biofilm models. Using a range of concentrations of azithromycin and gentamicin, we measured the degree to which these antibiotics inhibited biofilm formation and persistence. Large biofilms formed over 2 to 4 days in a flow cell, displaying complex structures, including towers and channels. Subinhibitory concentrations of azithromycin significantly decreased biomass and maximal thickness in both forming and established NTHi biofilms. In contrast, subinhibitory concentrations of gentamicin had no effect on biofilm formation. Furthermore, established NTHi biofilms became resistant to gentamicin at concentrations far above the MIC. Biofilm formation of highly resistant clinical NTHi isolates (azithromycin MIC of > 64 microg/ml) was similarly decreased at subinhibitory azithromycin concentrations. Clinically obtainable azithromycin concentrations inhibited biofilms in all but the most highly resistant isolates. These data show that subinhibitory concentrations of azithromycin have antibiofilm properties, provide mechanistic insights, and supply an additional rationale for the use of azithromycin in chronic biofilm infections involving H. influenzae.

  3. Resistance of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilms is independent of biofilm size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimche, Jennifer L; Kirse, Daniel J; Whigham, Amy S; Swords, W Edward

    2017-02-01

    The inflammatory middle ear disease known as otitis media can become chronic or recurrent in some cases due to failure of the antibiotic treatment to clear the bacterial etiological agent. Biofilms are known culprits of antibiotic-resistant infections; however, the mechanisms of resistance for non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilms have not been completely elucidated. In this study, we utilized in vitro static biofilm assays to characterize clinical strain biofilms and addressed the hypothesis that biofilms with greater biomass and/or thickness would be more resistant to antimicrobial-mediated eradication than thinner and/or lower biomass biofilms. Consistent with previous studies, antibiotic concentrations required to eliminate biofilm bacteria tended to be drastically higher than concentrations required to kill planktonic bacteria. The size characterizations of the biofilms formed by the clinical isolates were compared to their minimum biofilm eradication concentrations for four antibiotics. This revealed no correlation between biofilm thickness or biomass and the ability to resist eradication by antibiotics. Therefore, we concluded that biofilm size does not play a role in antibiotic resistance, suggesting that reduction of antibiotic penetration may not be a significant mechanism for antibiotic resistance for this bacterial opportunist. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Estimation of spatial distribution of quorum sensing signaling in sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinfeng; Ding, Lili; Li, Kan; Huang, Hui; Hu, Haidong; Geng, Jinju; Xu, Ke; Ren, Hongqiang

    2017-08-28

    Quorum sensing (QS) signaling, plays a significant role in regulating formation of biofilms in the nature; however, little information about the occurrence and distribution of quorum sensing molecular in the biofilm of carriers has been reported. In this study, distribution of QS signaling molecules (the acylated homoserine lactones-AHLs, and AI-2), extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and the mechanical properties in sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) biofilms have been investigated. Using increased centrifugal force, the biofilms were detached into different fractions. The AHLs ranged from 5.2ng/g to 98.3ng/g in different fractions of biofilms, and N-decanoyl-dl-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL) and N-dodecanoyl-dl-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL) in the biofilms obtained at various centrifugal forces displayed significant differences (pbiofilms ranged from 79.2ng/g to 98.3ng/g. Soluble EPS and loosely bound EPS content in the different fractions of biofilms displayed significant positive relationship with the distribution of C12-HSL (r=0.86, pbiofilms were positively related with AHLs with 22.76% was significantly positively (pBiofilm adhesion and compliance was the strongest in the tightly-bound biofilm, the weakest in the supernatant/surface biofilm, which was in accordance with the distribution of C12 HSL(r=0.77, pbiofilm application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Physics of biofilms: the initial stages of biofilm formation and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Guillaume; Bergman, Andrew; Zhang, Qiucen; Bortz, David; Austin, Robert

    2014-04-01

    One of the physiological responses of bacteria to external stress is to assemble into a biofilm. The formation of a biofilm greatly increases a bacterial population's resistance to a hostile environment by shielding cells, for example, from antibiotics. In this paper, we describe the conditions necessary for the emergence of biofilms in natural environments and relate them to the emergence of biofilm formation inside microfluidic devices. We show that competing species of Escherichia coli bacteria form biofilms to spatially segregate themselves in response to starvation stress, and use in situ methods to characterize the physical properties of the biofilms. Finally, we develop a microfluidic platform to study the inter-species interactions and show how biofilm-mediated genetic interactions can improve a species’ resistance to external stress.

  6. Alginate production affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development and architecture, but is not essential for biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stapper, A.P.; Narasimhan, G.; Oman, D.E.

    2004-01-01

    Extracellular polymers can facilitate the non-specific attachment of bacteria to surfaces and hold together developing biofilms. This study was undertaken to qualitatively and quantitatively compare the architecture of biofilms produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1 and its alginate......-overproducing (mucA22) and alginate-defective (algD) variants in order to discern the role of alginate in biofilm formation. These strains, PAO1, Alg(+) PAOmucA22 and Alg(-) PAOalgD, tagged with green fluorescent protein, were grown in a continuous flow cell system to characterize the developmental cycles...... of their biofilm formation using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Biofilm Image Processing (BIP) and Community Statistics (COMSTAT) software programs were used to provide quantitative measurements of the two-dimensional biofilm images. All three strains formed distinguishable biofilm architectures, indicating...

  7. Carboxydotrophic growth of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geelhoed, J.; Henstra, A.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    This study shows that Geobacter sulfurreducensgrows on carbon monoxide (CO) as electron donor with fumarateas electron acceptor. Geobacter sulfurreducens wastolerant to high CO levels, with up to 150 kPa in the headspacetested. During growth, hydrogen was detected in very slightamounts (~5 Pa). In a

  8. Promoting interspecies electron transfer with biochar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Shanshan; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla;

    2014-01-01

    to that previously reported for granular activated carbon (GAC). Although the biochars investigated were 1000 times less conductive than GAC, they stimulated DIET in co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens with Geobacter sulfurreducens or Methanosarcina barkeri in which ethanol was the electron donor. Cells were...

  9. Quantifying Temporal Autocorrelations for the Expression of Geobacter species mRNA Gene Transcripts at Variable Ammonium Levels during in situ U(VI) Bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouser, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    In order to develop decision-making tools for the prediction and optimization of subsurface bioremediation strategies, we must be able to link the molecular-scale activity of microorganisms involved in remediation processes with biogeochemical processes observed at the field-scale. This requires the ability to quantify changes in the in situ metabolic condition of dominant microbes and associate these changes to fluctuations in nutrient levels throughout the bioremediation process. It also necessitates a need to understand the spatiotemporal variability of the molecular-scale information to develop meaningful parameters and constraint ranges in complex bio-physio-chemical models. The expression of three Geobacter species genes (ammonium transporter (amtB), nitrogen fixation (nifD), and a housekeeping gene (recA)) were tracked at two monitoring locations that differed significantly in ammonium (NH4+) concentrations during a field-scale experiment where acetate was injected into the subsurface to simulate Geobacteraceae in a uranium-contaminated aquifer. Analysis of amtB and nifD mRNA transcript levels indicated that NH4+ was the primary form of fixed nitrogen during bioremediation. Overall expression levels of amtB were on average 8-fold higher at NH4+ concentrations of 300 μM or more than at lower NH4+ levels (average 60 μM). The degree of temporal correlation in Geobacter species mRNA expression levels was calculated at both locations using autocorrelation methods that describe the relationship between sample semi-variance and time lag. At the monitoring location with lower NH4+, a temporal correlation lag of 8 days was observed for both amtB and nifD transcript patterns. At the location where higher NH4+ levels were observed, no discernable temporal correlation lag above the sampling frequency (approximately every 2 days) was observed for amtB or nifD transcript fluctuations. Autocorrelation trends in recA expression levels at both locations indicated that

  10. Biofilm ved kronisk rhinosinuitis og cystisk fibrose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Jacob; Buchwald, Christian von; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2011-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are known to cause persistent foreign-body infections and have recently been acknowledged as involved in more than 65% of all human infections. Microbial biofilms have been detected in chronic rhinosinusitis, and chronic rhinosinusitis is mandatory in patients with cystic...

  11. Modelling the growth of a methanotrophic biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcangeli, J.-P.; Arvin, E.

    1999-01-01

    that heterotrophs and nitrifiers co-existed with methanotrophs in the biofilm. Heterotrophic biomass grew on soluble polymers formed by the hydrolysis of dead biomass entrapped in the biofilm. Nitrifier populations developed because of the presence of ammonia in the mineral medium. Based on these experimental...

  12. Screening of Compounds against Gardnerella vaginalis Biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Gottschick

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis (BV is a common infection in reproductive age woman and is characterized by dysbiosis of the healthy vaginal flora which is dominated by Lactobacilli, followed by growth of bacteria like Gardnerella vaginalis. The ability of G. vaginalis to form biofilms contributes to the high rates of recurrence that are typical for BV and which unfortunately make repeated antibiotic therapy inevitable. Here we developed a biofilm model for G. vaginalis and screened a large spectrum of compounds for their ability to prevent biofilm formation and to resolve an existing G. vaginalis biofilm. The antibiotics metronidazole and tobramycin were highly effective in preventing biofilm formation, but had no effect on an established biofilm. The application of the amphoteric tenside sodium cocoamphoacetate (SCAA led to disintegration of existing biofilms, reducing biomass by 51% and viability by 61% and it was able to increase the effect of metronidazole by 40% (biomass and 61% (viability. Our data show that attacking the biofilm and the bacterial cells by the combination of an amphoteric tenside with the antibiotic metronidazole might be a useful strategy against BV.

  13. Synergistic effects in mixed Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, A.; Holler, B.M.; Molin, Søren

    2006-01-01

    the pathways governing development of more complex heterogeneous communities. In this study, we established a laboratory model where biofilm-stimulating effects due to interactions between genetically diverse strains of Escherichia coli were monitored. Synergistic induction of biofilm formation resulting from...

  14. Introduction to Biofilms Thematic Minireview Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allewell, Norma M

    2016-06-10

    The biofilms that many bacteria and fungi produce enable them to form communities, adhere tightly to surfaces, evade host immunity, and resist antibiotics. Pathogenic microorganisms that form biofilms are very difficult to eradicate and thus are a frequent source of life-threatening, hospital-acquired infections. This series of five minireviews from the Journal of Biological Chemistry provides a broad overview of our current understanding of biofilms and the challenges that remain. The structure, biosynthesis, and biological function of the biofilms produced by pathogenic fungi are the subject of the first article, by Sheppard and Howell. Gunn, Bakaletz, and Wozniak focus on the biochemistry and structure of bacterial biofilms, how these structures enable bacteria to evade host immunity, and current and developing strategies for overcoming this resistance. The third and fourth articles present two of the best understood cell signaling pathways involved in biofilm formation. Valentini and Filloux focus on cyclic di-GMP, while Kavanaugh and Horswill discuss the quorum-sensing (agr) system and the relationship between quorum sensing and biofilm formation. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance, particularly the role of efflux pumps and the development of persister cells, are the topics of the final article by Van Acker and Coenye. The advances described in this series guarantee that ongoing interdisciplinary and international efforts will lead to new insights into the basic biology of biofilm formation, as well as new strategies for therapeutic interventions.

  15. Mucosal biofilm detection in chronic otitis media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessman, Marcus; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Eickhardt-Sørensen, Steffen Robert

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine middle ear biopsies from Greenlandic patients with chronic otitis media (COM) for the presence of mucosal biofilms and the bacteria within the biofilms. Thirty-five middle ear biopsies were obtained from 32 Greenlandic COM patients admitted to ear...

  16. Spaceflight promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wooseong Kim

    Full Text Available Understanding the effects of spaceflight on microbial communities is crucial for the success of long-term, manned space missions. Surface-associated bacterial communities, known as biofilms, were abundant on the Mir space station and continue to be a challenge on the International Space Station. The health and safety hazards linked to the development of biofilms are of particular concern due to the suppression of immune function observed during spaceflight. While planktonic cultures of microbes have indicated that spaceflight can lead to increases in growth and virulence, the effects of spaceflight on biofilm development and physiology remain unclear. To address this issue, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cultured during two Space Shuttle Atlantis missions: STS-132 and STS-135, and the biofilms formed during spaceflight were characterized. Spaceflight was observed to increase the number of viable cells, biofilm biomass, and thickness relative to normal gravity controls. Moreover, the biofilms formed during spaceflight exhibited a column-and-canopy structure that has not been observed on Earth. The increase in the amount of biofilms and the formation of the novel architecture during spaceflight were observed to be independent of carbon source and phosphate concentrations in the media. However, flagella-driven motility was shown to be essential for the formation of this biofilm architecture during spaceflight. These findings represent the first evidence that spaceflight affects community-level behaviors of bacteria and highlight the importance of understanding how both harmful and beneficial human-microbe interactions may be altered during spaceflight.

  17. Ciliates as engineers of phototrophic biofilms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerman, E.J.; Geest, H.G.; Meulen, M.D.; Manders, E.M.M.; Van de Koppel, J.; Herman, P.M.J.; Admiraal, W.

    2011-01-01

    1.Phototrophic biofilms consist of a matrix of phototrophs, non-photosynthetic bacteria and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which is spatially structured. Despite widespread exploitation of algae and bacteria within phototrophic biofilms, for example by protozoans, the ‘engineering’ effects

  18. Ciliates as engineers of phototrophic biofilms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerman, E.J.; van der Geest, H.G.; van der Meulen, M.D; Manders, E.M.M.; van de Koppel, J.; Herman, P.M.J.; Admiraal, W.

    2011-01-01

    1. Phototrophic biofilms consist of a matrix of phototrophs, non-photosynthetic bacteria and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which is spatially structured. Despite widespread exploitation of algae and bacteria within phototrophic biofilms, for example by protozoans, the ‘engineering’ effect

  19. Biofilms: The Stronghold of Legionella pneumophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mena Abdel-Nour

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Legionellosis is mostly caused by Legionella pneumophila and is defined as a severe respiratory illness with a case fatality rate ranging from 5% to 80%. L. pneumophila is ubiquitous in natural and anthropogenic water systems. L. pneumophila is transmitted by inhalation of contaminated aerosols produced by a variety of devices. While L. pneumophila replicates within environmental protozoa, colonization and persistence in its natural environment are also mediated by biofilm formation and colonization within multispecies microbial communities. There is now evidence that some legionellosis outbreaks are correlated with the presence of biofilms. Thus, preventing biofilm formation appears as one of the strategies to reduce water system contamination. However, we lack information about the chemical and biophysical conditions, as well as the molecular mechanisms that allow the production of biofilms by L. pneumophila. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of biofilm formation by L. pneumophila and the roles of other microbial species in L. pneumophila biofilm colonization. In addition, we discuss the protective roles of biofilms against current L. pneumophila sanitation strategies along with the initial data available on the regulation of L. pneumophila biofilm formation.

  20. Dental diagnostics: molecular analysis of oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiyari, Sarah; Bennett, Katie M

    2011-01-01

    Dental biofilms are complex, multi-species bacterial communities that colonize the mouth in the form of plaque and are known to cause dental caries and periodontal disease. Biofilms are unique from planktonic bacteria in that they are mutualistic communities with a 3-dimensional structure and complex nutritional and communication pathways. The homeostasis within the biofilm colony can be disrupted, causing a shift in the bacterial composition of the colony and resulting in proliferation of pathogenic species. Because of this dynamic lifestyle, traditional microbiological techniques are inadequate for the study of biofilms. Many of the bacteria present in the oral cavity are viable but not culturable, which severely limits laboratory analysis. However, with the advent of new molecular techniques, the microbial makeup of oral biofilms can be better identified. Some of these techniques include DNA-DNA hybridization, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and pyrosequencing. This review provides an overview of biofilm formation and examines the major molecular techniques currently used in oral biofilm analysis. Future applications of the molecular analysis of oral biofilms in the diagnosis and treatment of caries and periodontal disease are also discussed.

  1. Biofilm ved kronisk rhinosinuitis og cystisk fibrose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Jacob; Buchwald, Christian von; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2011-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are known to cause persistent foreign-body infections and have recently been acknowledged as involved in more than 65% of all human infections. Microbial biofilms have been detected in chronic rhinosinusitis, and chronic rhinosinusitis is mandatory in patients with cystic...

  2. The 'Swiss cheese' instability of bacterial biofilms

    CERN Document Server

    Jang, Hongchul; Stocker, Roman

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel pattern that results in bacterial biofilms as a result of the competition between hydrodynamic forces and adhesion forces. After the passage of an air plug, the break up of the residual thin liquid film scrapes and rearranges bacteria on the surface, such that a Swiss cheese pattern of holes is left in the residual biofilm.

  3. Pseudomonas biofilms: possibilities of their control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masák, Jan; Čejková, Alena; Schreiberová, Olga; Rezanka, Tomáš

    2014-07-01

    Genus Pseudomonas includes a large number of species that can be encountered in biotechnological processes as well as in the role of serious human or plant pathogens. Pseudomonads easily form biofilms on various types of surfaces. The biofilm phenotype is characterized by an increased resistance to environmental influences including resistance to antibiotics and other disinfectants, causing a number of problems in health care, food industry, and other areas. Considerable attention is therefore paid to the possibilities of eradication/destruction of pseudomonads biofilms both in terms of understanding the mechanisms of biofilm formation and at the level of finding suitable antibiofilm tools applicable in practice. The first part of this review is devoted to an overview of the regulatory mechanisms that are directly or indirectly involved in the formation of biofilm. The most effective approaches to suppressing the formation of biofilm that do not cause the development of resistance are based on the application of substances that interfere with the regulatory molecules or block the appropriate regulatory mechanisms involved in biofilm development by the cells. Pseudomonads biofilm formation is, similar to other microorganisms, a sophisticated process with many regulatory elements. The suppression of this process therefore also requires multiple antibiofilm tools.

  4. Transferrin Impacts Bacillus thuringiensis Biofilm Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Garner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the impact of transferrin on Bacillus thuringiensis biofilms. Three commercial strains, an environmental strain (33679, the type strain (10792, and an isolate from a diseased insect (700872, were cultured in iron restricted minimal medium. All strains produced biofilm when grown in vinyl plates at 30°C. B. thuringiensis 33679 had a biofilm biomass more than twice the concentration exhibited by the other strains. The addition of transferrin resulted in slightly increased growth yields for 2 of the 3 strains tested, including 33679. In contrast, the addition of 50 μg/mL of transferrin resulted in an 80% decrease in biofilm levels for strain 33679. When the growth temperature was increased to 37°C, the addition of 50 μg/mL of transferrin increased culture turbidity for only strain 33679. Biofilm levels were again decreased in strain 33679 at 37°C. Growth of B. thuringiensis cultures in polystyrene resulted in a decrease in overall growth yields at 30°C, with biofilm levels significantly decreased for 33679 in the presence of transferrin. These findings demonstrate that transferrin impacts biofilm formation in select strains of B. thuringiensis. Identification of these differences in biofilm regulation may be beneficial in elucidating potential virulence mechanisms among the differing strains.

  5. The ecology and biogeochemistry of stream biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battin, Tom J; Besemer, Katharina; Bengtsson, Mia M; Romani, Anna M; Packmann, Aaron I

    2016-04-01

    Streams and rivers form dense networks, shape the Earth's surface and, in their sediments, provide an immensely large surface area for microbial growth. Biofilms dominate microbial life in streams and rivers, drive crucial ecosystem processes and contribute substantially to global biogeochemical fluxes. In turn, water flow and related deliveries of nutrients and organic matter to biofilms constitute major constraints on microbial life. In this Review, we describe the ecology and biogeochemistry of stream biofilms and highlight the influence of physical and ecological processes on their structure and function. Recent advances in the study of biofilm ecology may pave the way towards a mechanistic understanding of the effects of climate and environmental change on stream biofilms and the biogeochemistry of stream ecosystems.

  6. Cellular chain formation in Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Klemm, Per

    2009-01-01

    In this study we report on a novel structural phenotype in Escherichia coli biofilms: cellular chain formation. Biofilm chaining in E. coli K-12 was found to occur primarily by clonal expansion, but was not due to filamentous growth. Rather, chain formation was the result of intercellular......; type I fimbriae expression significantly reduced cellular chain formation, presumably by steric hindrance. Cellular chain formation did not appear to be specific to E coli K-12. Although many urinary tract infection (UTI) isolates were found to form rather homogeneous, flat biofilms, three isolates......, including the prototypic asymptomatic bacteriuria strain, 83972, formed highly elaborate cellular chains during biofilm growth in human urine. Combined, these results illustrate the diversity of biofilm architectures that can be observed even within a single microbial species....

  7. Role of multicellular aggregates in biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Kasper N.; Hutchison, Jaime B.; Melaugh, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    In traditional models of in vitro biofilm development, individual bacterial cells seed a surface, multiply, and mature into multicellular, three-dimensional structures. Much research has been devoted to elucidating the mechanisms governing the initial attachment of single cells to surfaces. However......, in natural environments and during infection, bacterial cells tend to clump as multicellular aggregates, and biofilms can also slough off aggregates as a part of the dispersal process. This makes it likely that biofilms are often seeded by aggregates and single cells, yet how these aggregates impact biofilm...... initiation and development is not known. Here we use a combination of experimental and computational approaches to determine the relative fitness of single cells and preformed aggregates during early development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We find that the relative fitness of aggregates depends...

  8. Stratified growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, E.; Roe, F.; Bugnicourt, A.;

    2004-01-01

    In this study, stratified patterns of protein synthesis and growth were demonstrated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Spatial patterns of protein synthetic activity inside biofilms were characterized by the use of two green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene constructs. One construct...... carried an isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-inducible gfpmut2 gene encoding a stable GFP. The second construct carried a GFP derivative, gfp-AGA, encoding an unstable GFP under the control of the growth-rate-dependent rrnBp(1) promoter. Both GFP reporters indicated that active protein...... of oxygen limitation in the biofilm. Oxygen microelectrode measurements showed that oxygen only penetrated approximately 50 mum into the biofilm. P. aeruginosa was incapable of anaerobic growth in the medium used for this investigation. These results show that while mature P. aeruginosa biofilms contain...

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The persistence of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is due to biofilm-growing mucoid (alginate-producing) strains. A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria, embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein...... and DNA. In CF lungs, the polysaccharide alginate is the major part of the P. aeruginosa biofilm matrix. Bacterial biofilms cause chronic infections because they show increased tolerance to antibiotics and resist phagocytosis, as well as other components of the innate and the adaptive immune system....... As a consequence, a pronounced antibody response develops, leading to immune complex-mediated chronic inflammation, dominated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The chronic inflammation is the major cause of the lung tissue damage in CF. Biofilm growth in CF lungs is associated with an increased frequency...

  10. Mesoscale Elucidation of Biofilm Shear Behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Barai, Pallab; Mukherjee, Partha P

    2015-01-01

    Formation of bacterial colonies as biofilm on the surface/interface of various objects has the potential to impact not only human health and disease but also energy and environmental considerations. Biofilms can be regarded as soft materials, and comprehension of their shear response to external forces is a key element to the fundamental understanding. A mesoscale model has been presented in this article based on digitization of a biofilm microstructure. Its response under externally applied shear load is analyzed. Strain stiffening type behavior is readily observed under high strain loads due to the unfolding of chains within soft polymeric substrate. Sustained shear loading of the biofilm network results in strain localization along the diagonal direction. Rupture of the soft polymeric matrix can potentially reduce the intercellular interaction between the bacterial cells. Evolution of stiffness within the biofilm network under shear reveals two regions: a) initial increase in stiffness due to strain stiffe...

  11. The Physics of Biofilms -- An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Mazza, Marco G

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are complex, self-organized consortia of microorganisms that produce a functional, protective matrix of biomolecules. Physically, the structure of a biofilm can be described as an entangled polymer network which grows and changes under the effect of gradients of nutrients, cell differentiation, quorum sensing, bacterial motion, and interaction with the environment. Its development is complex, and constantly adapting to environmental stimuli. Here, we review the fundamental physical processes the govern the inception, growth and development of a biofilm. Two important mechanisms guide the initial phase in a biofilm life cycle: (\\emph{i}) the cell motility near or at a solid interface, and (\\emph{ii}) the cellular adhesion. Both processes are crucial for initiating the colony and for ensuring its stability. A mature biofilm behaves as a viscoelastic fluid with a complex, history-dependent dynamics. We discuss progress and challenges in the determination of its physical properties. Experimental and theo...

  12. Biofilm-based algal cultivation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Martin; Jarboe, Darren; Wen, Zhiyou

    2015-07-01

    Biofilm-based algal cultivation has received increased attention as a potential platform for algal production and other applications such as wastewater treatment. Algal biofilm cultivation systems represent an alternative to the suspension-based systems that have yet to become economically viable. One major advantage of algal biofilm systems is that algae can be simply harvested through scraping and thus avoid the expensive harvesting procedures used in suspension-based harvesting such as flocculation and centrifugation. In recent years, an assortment of algal biofilm systems have been developed with various design configurations and biomass production capacities. This review summarizes the state of the art of different algal biofilm systems in terms of their design and operation. Perspectives for future research needs are also discussed to provide guidance for further development of these unique cultivation systems.

  13. Oral biofilms: emerging concepts in microbial ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filoche, S; Wong, L; Sissons, C H

    2010-01-01

    Oral biofilms develop under a range of different conditions and different environments. This review will discuss emerging concepts in microbial ecology and how they relate to oral biofilm development and the treatment of oral diseases. Clues to how oral biofilms develop may lie in other complex systems, such as interactions between host and gut microbiota, and even in factors that affect biofilm development on leaf surfaces. Most of the conditions under which oral biofilms develop are tightly linked to the overall health and biology of the host. Advances in molecular techniques have led to a greater appreciation of the diversity of human microbiota, the extent of interactions with the human host, and how that relates to inter-individual variation. As a consequence, plaque development may no longer be thought of as a generic process, but rather as a highly individualized process, which has ramifications for the treatment of the diseases it causes.

  14. Modulating the ecology and phenotype of in vitro oral biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janus, M.M.

    2017-01-01

    Chapter 2 describes the development of a complex healthy biofilm model compared to a cariogenic biofilm model and a biofilm model for periodontal disease. The addition of different nutrients and different incubation times were used to create phenotypically different biofilms. These in vitro models

  15. A Subinhibitory Concentration of Clarithromycin Inhibits Mycobacterium avium Biofilm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium causes disseminated infection in immunosuppressed individuals and lung infection in patients with chronic lung diseases. M. avium forms biofilm in the environment and possibly in human airways. Antibiotics with activity against the bacterium could inhibit biofilm formation. Clarithromycin inhibits biofilm formation but has no activity against established biofilm.

  16. Discovering Biofilms: Inquiry-Based Activities for the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redelman, Carly V.; Marrs, Kathleen; Anderson, Gregory G.

    2012-01-01

    In nature, bacteria exist in and adapt to different environments by forming microbial communities called "biofilms." We propose simple, inquiry-based laboratory exercises utilizing a biofilm formation assay, which allows controlled biofilm growth. Students will be able to qualitatively assess biofilm growth via staining. Recently, we developed a…

  17. In vitro phenotypic differentiation towards commensal and pathogenic oral biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janus, M.M.; Keijser, B.J.F.; Bikker, F.J.; Exterkate, R.A.M.; Crielaard, W.; Krom, B.P.

    2015-01-01

    Commensal oral biofilms, defined by the absence of pathology-related phenotypes, are ubiquitously present. In contrast to pathological biofilms commensal biofilms are rarely studied. Here, the effect of the initial inoculum and subsequent growth conditions on in vitro oral biofilms was studied. Biof

  18. Biofilms On Orbit and On Earth: Current Methods, Future Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Leticia

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms have played a significant role on the effectiveness of life support hardware on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS). This presentation will discuss how biofilms impact flight hardware, how on orbit biofilms are analyzed from an engineering and research perspective, and future needs to analyze and utilize biofilms for long duration, deep space missions.

  19. Maltodextrin enhances biofilm elimination by electrochemical scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Sujala T; Call, Douglas R; Beyenal, Haluk

    2016-10-26

    Electrochemical scaffolds (e-scaffolds) continuously generate low concentrations of H2O2 suitable for damaging wound biofilms without damaging host tissue. Nevertheless, retarded diffusion combined with H2O2 degradation can limit the efficacy of this potentially important clinical tool. H2O2 diffusion into biofilms and bacterial cells can be increased by damaging the biofilm structure or by activating membrane transportation channels by exposure to hyperosmotic agents. We hypothesized that e-scaffolds would be more effective against Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in the presence of a hyperosmotic agent. E-scaffolds polarized at -600 mVAg/AgCl were overlaid onto preformed biofilms in media containing various maltodextrin concentrations. E-scaffold alone decreased A. baumannii and S. aureus biofilm cell densities by (3.92 ± 0.15) log and (2.31 ± 0.12) log, respectively. Compared to untreated biofilms, the efficacy of the e-scaffold increased to a maximum (8.27 ± 0.05) log reduction in A. baumannii and (4.71 ± 0.12) log reduction in S. aureus biofilm cell densities upon 10 mM and 30 mM maltodextrin addition, respectively. Overall ~55% decrease in relative biofilm surface coverage was achieved for both species. We conclude that combined treatment with electrochemically generated H2O2 from an e-scaffold and maltodextrin is more effective in decreasing viable biofilm cell density.

  20. Maltodextrin enhances biofilm elimination by electrochemical scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Sujala T.; Call, Douglas R.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical scaffolds (e-scaffolds) continuously generate low concentrations of H2O2 suitable for damaging wound biofilms without damaging host tissue. Nevertheless, retarded diffusion combined with H2O2 degradation can limit the efficacy of this potentially important clinical tool. H2O2 diffusion into biofilms and bacterial cells can be increased by damaging the biofilm structure or by activating membrane transportation channels by exposure to hyperosmotic agents. We hypothesized that e-scaffolds would be more effective against Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in the presence of a hyperosmotic agent. E-scaffolds polarized at −600 mVAg/AgCl were overlaid onto preformed biofilms in media containing various maltodextrin concentrations. E-scaffold alone decreased A. baumannii and S. aureus biofilm cell densities by (3.92 ± 0.15) log and (2.31 ± 0.12) log, respectively. Compared to untreated biofilms, the efficacy of the e-scaffold increased to a maximum (8.27 ± 0.05) log reduction in A. baumannii and (4.71 ± 0.12) log reduction in S. aureus biofilm cell densities upon 10 mM and 30 mM maltodextrin addition, respectively. Overall ~55% decrease in relative biofilm surface coverage was achieved for both species. We conclude that combined treatment with electrochemically generated H2O2 from an e-scaffold and maltodextrin is more effective in decreasing viable biofilm cell density. PMID:27782161

  1. Combined Reactor and Microelectrode Measurements in Laboratory Grown Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tove; Harremoës, Poul

    1994-01-01

    A combined biofilm reactor-/microelectrode experimental set-up has been constructed, allowing for simultaneous reactor mass balances and measurements of concentration profiles within the biofilm. The system consists of an annular biofilm reactor equipped with an oxygen microelectrode. Experiments...... were carried out with aerobic glucose and starch degrading biofilms. The well described aerobic glucose degradation biofilm system was used to test the combined reactor set-up. Results predicted from known biofilm kinetics were obtained. In the starch degrading biofilm, basic assumptions were tested...

  2. Bacteriophage inspired antibiotics discovery against infection involved biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiangyu; Li, Wu; Zheng, Fei; Xie, Jianping

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm profoundly influences the fate of bacteria within and the outcome of related infection, and is closely associated with antibiotics resistance and bacterial persistence. Bacteriophages represent a new promising alternative to combat biofilm-related infection. The interplay between phages and biofilms is complex. Some phages or their components can inhibit the host bacteria biofilm via diverse mechanisms, while other phages can facilitate the host biofilm formation through phage-mediated lysis and extracellular DNA release. In this paper, we summarize the role of bacteriophages in the biofilm formation, and the application of phages to the control of bacterial persisters and infectious biofilms, in particular, the phage-inspired antibiotics discovery.

  3. A mucosal model to study microbial biofilm development and anti-biofilm therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Michele J.; Parks, Patrick J.; Peterson, Marnie L.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are a sessile colony of bacteria which adhere to and persist on surfaces. The ability of bacteria to form biofilms is considered a virulence factor, and in fact is central to the pathogenesis of some organisms. Biofilms are inherently resistant to chemotherapy and host immune responses. Clinically, biofilms are considered a primary cause of a majority of infections, such as otitis media, pneumonia in cystic fibrosis patients and endocarditis. However, the vast majority of the data on biofilm formation comes from traditional microtiter-based or flow displacement assays with no consideration given to host factors. These assays, which have been a valuable tool in high-throughput screening for biofilm-related factors, do not mimic a host-pathogen interaction and may contribute to an inappropriate estimation of the role of some factors in clinical biofilm formation. We describe the development of a novel ex vivo model of biofilm formation on a mucosal surface by an important mucosal pathogen, methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA). This model is being used for the identification of microbial virulence factors important in mucosal biofilm formation and novel anti-biofilm therapies. PMID:23246911

  4. Plaque biofilms: the effect of chemical environment on natural human plaque biofilm architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, C; Strafford, S; Rees, G; Brookes, S J; Kirkham, J; Shore, R C; Watson, P S; Wood, S

    2006-11-01

    The architecture of microbial biofilms especially the outer regions have an important influence on the interaction between biofilm and local environment particularly on the flux of materials into and out of biofilm compartments and as a consequence, biofilm metabolic behaviour. In the case of dental plaque biofilms, architecture will determine access of nutrients including acidogenic substrates and therapeutic materials to the microbial biomass and to the underlying tooth surface. Manipulation of this architecture may offer a means of altering mass transfer into the whole biofilm and biomass and raises the possibility of improving access of therapeutics. Plaque biofilms formed in vivo on human enamel were subjected to a number of different chemical conditions while under observation by confocal laser scanning microscopy in reflection mode. In this way the outer 50-100 microm or so of the biofilms was examined. Density and distribution of biomass were recorded as degree of reflectance. The amount and density of biofilm biomass increased from the plaque saliva interface towards the interior. Plaque biofilms were robust and little affected by mechanical manipulation, high ionic strength or low pH (2.5). Detergent (SLS), however, often appeared to either remove biomass and/or dramatically reduce its density.

  5. Efficacy of NVC-422 against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in a sheep biofilm model of sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Deepti; Jekle, Andreas; Debabov, Dmitri; Wang, Lu; Khosrovi, Bez; Anderson, Mark; Foreman, Andrew; Wormald, Peter-John

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a major obstacle in management of recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis. NVC-422 is a potent, fast-acting, broad-spectrum, nonantibiotic, antimicrobial with a new mechanism of action effective against biofilm bacteria in in vitro conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and efficacy of NVC-422 as local antibiofilm treatment in a sheep model of rhinosinusitis. After accessing and occluding frontal sinus ostia in 24 merino sheep via staged endoscopic procedures, S. aureus clinical isolate was instilled in frontal sinuses. Following biofilm formation, ostial obstruction was removed and sinuses irrigated with 0.1% and 0.5% NVC-422 in 5 mM acetate isotonic saline at pH 4.0. Sheep were monitored for adverse effects and euthanized 24 hours after treatment. Frontal sinuses were assessed for infection and changes in mucosa after the treatment. S. aureus biofilms were identified with Baclight-confocal scanning microscopy protocol and the biofilm biomass assayed by applying the COMSTAT2 program to recorded image stacks. After 2 irrigations with 0.1% NVC-422, S. aureus biofilm biomass was reduced when compared to control sinuses (p = 0.0001), though this effect was variable in samples. NVC-422 0.5% solution irrigations reduced biofilm even more significantly and consistently over all samples (p biofilm biomass (p biofilms, with dose-dependent efficacy in this animal model of biofilm-associated sinusitis. Copyright © 2012 American Rhinologic Society-American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy, LLC.

  6. Antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms: towards the development of novel anti-biofilm therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Patrick K; Yeung, Amy T Y; Hancock, Robert E W

    2014-12-10

    The growth of bacteria as structured aggregates termed biofilms leads to their protection from harsh environmental conditions such as physical and chemical stresses, shearing forces, and limited nutrient availability. Because of this highly adapted ability to survive adverse environmental conditions, bacterial biofilms are recalcitrant to antibiotic therapies and immune clearance. This is particularly problematic in hospital settings where biofilms are a frequent cause of chronic and device-related infections and constitute a significant burden on the health-care system. The major therapeutic strategy against infections is the use of antibiotics, which, due to adaptive resistance, are often insufficient to clear biofilm infections. Thus, novel biofilm-specific therapies are required. Specific features of biofilm development, such as surface adherence, extracellular matrix formation, quorum sensing, and highly regulated biofilm maturation and dispersal are currently being studied as targets to be exploited in the development of novel biofilm-specific treatments. Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa for illustrative purposes, this review highlights the antibiotic resistance mechanisms of biofilms, and discusses current research into novel biofilm-specific therapies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Inactivation of Efflux Pumps Abolishes Bacterial Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Malin; Hancock, Viktoria; Klemm, Per

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms cause numerous problems in health care and industry; notably, biofilms are associated with a large number of infections. Biofilm-dwelling bacteria are particularly resistant to antibiotics, making it hard to eradicate biofilm-associated infections. Bacteria rely on efflux pumps...... to get rid of toxic substances. We discovered that efflux pumps are highly active in bacterial biofilms, thus making efflux pumps attractive targets for antibiofilm measures. A number of efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) are known. EPIs were shown to reduce biofilm formation, and in combination they could...... abolish biofilm formation completely. Also, EPIs were able to block the antibiotic tolerance of biofilms. The results of this feasibility study might pave the way for new treatments for biofilm-related infections and may be exploited for prevention of biofilms in general....

  8. A biofilm model for prediction of pollutant transformation in sewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Feng; Leung, Derek Hoi-Wai; Li, Shiyu; Chen, Guang-Hao; Okabe, Satoshi; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2009-07-01

    This study developed a new sewer biofilm model to simulate the pollutant transformation and biofilm variation in sewers under aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic conditions. The biofilm model can describe the activities of heterotrophic, autotrophic, and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the biofilm as well as the variations in biofilm thickness, the spatial profiles of SRB population and biofilm density. The model can describe dynamic biofilm growth, multiple biomass evolution and competitions among organic oxidation, denitrification, nitrification, sulfate reduction and sulfide oxidation in a heterogeneous biofilm growing in a sewer. The model has been extensively verified by three different approaches, including direct verification by measurement of the spatial concentration profiles of dissolved oxygen, nitrate, ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide in sewer biofilm. The spatial distribution profile of SRB in sewer biofilm was determined from the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) images taken by a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and were predicted well by the model.

  9. Intrigues of biofilm: A perspective in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullahi, Umar Faruk; Igwenagu, Ephraim; Mu'azu, Anas; Aliyu, Sani; Umar, Maryam Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm has a tremendous impact in the field of veterinary medicine, especially the livestock industry, leading to a serious economic loss. Over the years, little attention has been given to biofilm in animals with most of the research geared toward human biofilm diseases. The greatest challenge posed by biofilm is in its incredible ability to resist most of the currently existing antibiotics. This mystery can best be demystified through understanding the mechanism of the quorum sensing which regulate the pathophysiology of biofilm. Ability of biofilm formation in a variety of inanimate surfaces such as animal food contact surfaces is responsible for a host of biofilm diseases affecting animals and humans. In this review, we highlighted some of the challenges of biofilm in livestock and food industries. Also highlighted are; mechanisms of biofilm development, best diagnostic approach and possible novel therapeutic measures needed to combat the menace of biofilm in veterinary medicine.

  10. From biofilm ecology to reactors: a focused review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, Joshua P; Smets, Barth F; Rittmann, Bruce E; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Daigger, Glen T

    2017-04-01

    Biofilms are complex biostructures that appear on all surfaces that are regularly in contact with water. They are structurally complex, dynamic systems with attributes of primordial multicellular organisms and multifaceted ecosystems. The presence of biofilms may have a negative impact on the performance of various systems, but they can also be used beneficially for the treatment of water (defined herein as potable water, municipal and industrial wastewater, fresh/brackish/salt water bodies, groundwater) as well as in water stream-based biological resource recovery systems. This review addresses the following three topics: (1) biofilm ecology, (2) biofilm reactor technology and design, and (3) biofilm modeling. In so doing, it addresses the processes occurring in the biofilm, and how these affect and are affected by the broader biofilm system. The symphonic application of a suite of biological methods has led to significant advances in the understanding of biofilm ecology. New metabolic pathways, such as anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) or complete ammonium oxidation (comammox) were first observed in biofilm reactors. The functions, properties, and constituents of the biofilm extracellular polymeric substance matrix are somewhat known, but their exact composition and role in the microbial conversion kinetics and biochemical transformations are still to be resolved. Biofilm grown microorganisms may contribute to increased metabolism of micro-pollutants. Several types of biofilm reactors have been used for water treatment, with current focus on moving bed biofilm reactors, integrated fixed-film activated sludge, membrane-supported biofilm reactors, and granular sludge processes. The control and/or beneficial use of biofilms in membrane processes is advancing. Biofilm models have become essential tools for fundamental biofilm research and biofilm reactor engineering and design. At the same time, the divergence between biofilm modeling and biofilm reactor

  11. Effect of Escherichia coli Morphogene bolA on Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira, Helena L. A.; Freire, Patrick; Arraiano, Cecília M.

    2004-01-01

    Biofilm physiology is established under a low growth rate. The morphogene bolA is mostly expressed under stress conditions or in stationary phase, suggesting that bolA could be implicated in biofilm development. In order to verify this hypothesis, we tested the effect of bolA on biofilm formation. Overexpression of bolA induces biofilm development, while bolA deletion decreases biofilms.

  12. Biofilm-specific extracellular matrix proteins of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)